WorldWideScience

Sample records for residents living close

  1. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings.

  2. Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

  3. Resident Transitions to Assisted Living: A Role for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Noelle LeCrone; Koenig, Terry; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This study explored key aspects of resident transitions to assisted living (AL), including the frequency and importance of preadmission resident education and the potential role of social workers in this setting. To examine the factors that may help or hinder resident transitions to AL, a written survey was administered to a statewide,…

  4. Sleep Practices of University Students Living in Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Pei; Brown, Cary A.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in both students' academic and personal life. Despite widespread sleep problems among young adults, few studies focus on higher education students living in campus residence. This study investigated residence-living students' sleep patterns, sleep promoting practices, sources of help seeking, and preferred ways to…

  5. Surveillance on University Students' Living Behaviors in the Private Residence, Prathumthani, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckanavanich, Suwannee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among lifestyles, personal relationship (friendship and romantic relationship), and living behaviors shared with closed friends and romantic friends. The study undertook a quantitative research of university students' living behaviors in the private residence. A survey questionnaire was…

  6. Judicious Leadership for Residence Hall Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercoal, Forrest

    This book presents a theory of judicious leadership for residence hall management that advocates the creation of an ethical and educational perspective based on the U.S. Bill of Rights. It argues that by recognizing college students' citizenship rights, providing them an opportunity to experience individual liberties, and helping them to…

  7. Survey of awareness about hazardous chemicals of residents living near chemical plants in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Don-Hee; Park, Min Soo

    2018-02-10

    With economic growth, the use of chemicals has continually increased, resulting in an increase of chemical accidents. Chemical accidents pose a life threat and can lead to many health problems among the residents living in close proximity to chemical plants. This study aimed to investigate the awareness of the residents living near chemical plants about hazardous chemicals, as well as to survey the awareness of workers who do not directly handle chemicals at chemical plants (WNHCs). To this end, a questionnaire survey was conducted among a total of 600 residents and 160 WNHCs. The questionnaire was composed of three items: awareness of chemical risk, awareness of countermeasures in chemical accidents, and imperious necessity of PPE (personal protective equipment). Statistical analysis of the data was performed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. The results show that the government needs to complement the notification system of chemical risk for residents who live close to chemical plants. The highest priority of PPE which residents want to prepare for chemical accidents was respiratory protective equipment (RPE). They responded that, if necessary to purchase PPE, they could bear a portion of the expenses (up to US $30). This study provides basic data for the development of programs and policies on chemical safety relevant for the residents living in close proximity to chemical plants in South Korea.

  8. Resident-to-resident relational aggression and subjective well-being in assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompetter, Hester; Scholte, Ron; Westerhof, Gerben

    2011-01-01

    Research in settings similar to assisted living facilities suggests that relational aggression, an indirect and mature form of aggression, might occur in assisted living facilities. This empirical study investigates the existence of relational aggression in a sample of residents and the relationship between relational aggression and resident's subjective well-being. 121 residents from six assisted living facilities completed questionnaires assessing personal experiences as victims of relational aggression and subjective well-being. Also nurses reported on victimization of relational aggression for every participant. Linear regression models were used to examine the association between both reports of relational aggression and subjective well-being. Relational aggression was shown to exist in assisted living facilities according to both residents (prevalence: 19%) and nurses (prevalence: 41%). Chi-square testing revealed no association between ratings by nurses and residents. Self-reports of victimization of relational aggression were related to depression, anxiety, satisfaction with life and social loneliness, but not to emotional loneliness. Nurse-reports of victimization of relational aggression were not related to subjective well-being. Self-reports of relational aggression seem to be better predictors of resident's well-being than nurse-reports of relational aggression. Awareness of these findings and the discrepancy between nurse-reports and self-reports are important for practice and for future research regarding social dynamics and living arrangements in elderly care settings.

  9. Resident-to-resident relational aggression and subjective well-being in assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trompetter, H.R.; Trompetter, Hester; Scholte, Ron; Westerhof, Gerben Johan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Research in settings similar to assisted living facilities suggests that relational aggression, an indirect and mature form of aggression, might occur in assisted living facilities. This empirical study investigates the existence of relational aggression in a sample of residents and the

  10. Factors that Influence Physical Activity among Residents in Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Sarah D; Galik, Elizabeth; Resnick, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence physical activity among residents in assisted living. This was a secondary data analysis using baseline data from a function-focused care intervention study including 171 residents from 4 assisted living facilities. Using structural equation modeling, we found that mood, satisfaction with staff and activities, and social support for exercise were directly associated with time spent in physical activity. Gender, cognition, depression, and comorbidities were indirectly associated with physical activity and accounted for 13% of the total variance in physical activity. Implications for future research and social work practice are presented.

  11. Vision Impairment Among Older Adults Residing in Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amanda F.; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine rates of visual impairment of older adults in assisted living facilities (ALFs). METHODS Vision screening events were held at 12 ALFs in Jefferson County, Alabama for residents ≥60 years of age. Visual acuity, cognitive status, and presence of eye conditions were assessed. RESULTS 144 residents were screened. 67.8% failed distance screening, 70.9% failed near screening, and 89.3% failed contrast sensitivity screening. 40.4% of residents had cognitive impairment and 89% had a least one diagnosed eye condition. Visual acuities did not differ significantly between cognitive status groups or with greater numbers of eye conditions. DISCUSSION This study is the first to provide information about vision impairment in the assisted living population. Of those screened, 70% had visual acuity worse than 20/40 for distance or near vision, and 90% had impaired contrast sensitivity. Cognitive impairment accounted for a small percentage of the variance in near vision and contrast sensitivity. PMID:23338786

  12. Bringing Assisted Living Services into Congregate Housing: Residents' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Nancy W.; Oakes, Claudia E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Bringing state-subsidized assisted living services (ALS) into congregate housing (CH) is a strategy for reducing rates of nursing home placement. This article discusses CH residents' reactions as a new ALS program was introduced in their housing, and it provides recommendations for others who are considering the implementation of similar…

  13. Depressive Symptoms among Older Residents in Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yuri; Bergman, Elizabeth; Schonfeld, Lawrence; Molinari, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Responding to the dramatic growth in Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs), the present study focused on mental health among older residents in ALFs. We assessed the effects of physical health constraints (chronic conditions, functional disability, and self-rated health) and psychosocial resources (social network, sense of mastery, religiosity, and…

  14. Social Support and Successful Aging in Assisted Living Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Laura Odell; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Newman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging has been associated with adequate social support. However, impaired functionality, increased dependence, multiple comorbidities, and reduced social interactions place older assisted living community (ALC) residents at risk for poorer social support and less successful aging. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the revised…

  15. Vision impairment and nutritional status among older assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muurinen, Seija M; Soini, Helena H; Suominen, Merja H; Saarela, Riitta K T; Savikko, Niina M; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2014-01-01

    Vision impairment is common among older persons. It is a risk factor for disability, and it may be associated with nutritional status via decline in functional status. However, only few studies have examined the relationship between vision impairment and nutritional status, which was investigated in this cross-sectional study. The study included all residents living in the assisted living facilities in Helsinki and Espoo in 2007. Residents in temporary respite care were excluded (5%). Of permanent residents (N=2214), 70% (N=1475) consented. Trained nurses performed a personal interview and assessment of each resident including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), functional and health status. Patient records were used to confirm demographic data and medical history. Mortality in 2010 was retrieved from central registers. Of the residents, 17.5% (N=245) had vision impairment and they were not able to read regular print. Those with vision impairment were older, more often females, and malnourished according to MNA. They had lower BMI, and suffered more often from dementia and chewing problems than those without vision impairment. In logistic regression analysis controlling for age, gender, chewing problems and dementia, vision impairment was independently associated with resident's malnutrition (OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.80-3.51). According to our results older residents in assisted living with vision impairment are at high risk for malnutrition. Therefore it is important to assess nutritional status of persons with vision impairment. It would be beneficial to repeat this kind of a study also in elderly community population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Vision impairment among older adults residing in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amanda F; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-03-01

    To examine rates of visual impairment of older adults in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Vision screening events were held at 12 ALFs in Jefferson County, Alabama, for residents above 60 years of age. Visual acuity, cognitive status, and presence of eye conditions were assessed. A total of 144 residents were screened. Of these 67.8% failed distance screening, 70.9% failed near screening, and 89.3% failed contrast sensitivity screening. A total of 40.4% of residents had cognitive impairment and 89% had a least one diagnosed eye condition. Visual acuities did not differ significantly between cognitive status groups or with greater numbers of eye conditions. This study is the first to provide information about vision impairment in the assisted living population. Of those screened, 70% had visual acuity worse than 20/40 for distance or near vision, and 90% had impaired contrast sensitivity. Cognitive impairment accounted for a small percentage of the variance in near vision and contrast sensitivity.

  17. Strangers and friends: residents' social careers in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Candace L; Ball, Mary M; Hollingsworth, Carole; Perkins, Molly M

    2012-07-01

    This study examines coresident relationships in assisted living (AL) and identifies factors influencing relationships. We draw on qualitative data collected from 2008 to 2009 from three AL communities varying in size, location, and resident characteristics. Data collection methods included participant observation, and informal and formal, in-depth interviews with residents, administrators, and AL staff. Data analysis was guided by principles of grounded theory method, an iterative approach that seeks to discover core categories, processes, and patterns and link these together to construct theory. The dynamic, evolutionary nature of relationships and the individual patterns that comprise residents' overall experiences with coresidents are captured by our core category, "negotiating social careers in AL." Across facilities, relationships ranged from stranger to friend. Neighboring was a common way of relating and often involved social support, but was not universal. We offer a conceptual model explaining the multilevel factors influencing residents' relationships and social careers. Our explanatory framework reveals the dynamic and variable nature of coresident relationships and raises additional questions about social career variability, trajectories, and transitions. We discuss implications for practice including the need for useable spaces, thoughtful activity programming, and the promotion of neighboring through staff and family involvement.

  18. Operationalizing frailty among older residents of assisted living facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty in later life is viewed as a state of heightened vulnerability to poor outcomes. The utility of frailty as a measure of vulnerability in the assisted living (AL population remains unexplored. We examined the feasibility and predictive accuracy of two different interpretations of the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS frailty criteria in a population-based sample of AL residents. Methods CHS frailty criteria were operationalized using two different approaches in 928 AL residents from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES. Risks of one-year mortality and hospitalization were estimated for those categorized as frail or pre-frail (compared with non-frail. The prognostic significance of individual criteria was explored, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated for select models to assess the utility of frailty in predicting one-year outcomes. Results Regarding feasibility, complete CHS criteria could not be assessed for 40% of the initial 1,067 residents. Consideration of supplementary items for select criteria reduced this to 12%. Using absolute (CHS-specified cut-points, 48% of residents were categorized as frail and were at greater risk for death (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 1.75, 95% CI 1.08-2.83 and hospitalization (adjusted RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.20-1.96. Pre-frail residents defined by absolute cut-points (48.6% showed no increased risk for mortality or hospitalization compared with non-frail residents. Using relative cut-points (derived from AL sample, 19% were defined as frail and 55% as pre-frail and the associated risks for mortality and hospitalization varied by sex. Frail (but not pre-frail women were more likely to die (RR 1.58 95% CI 1.02-2.44 and be hospitalized (RR 1.53 95% CI 1.25-1.87. Frail and pre-frail men showed an increased mortality risk (RR 3.21 95% CI 1.71-6.00 and RR 2.61 95% CI 1.40-4.85, respectively while only pre-frail men had an increased risk of hospitalization (RR 1

  19. Operationalizing frailty among older residents of assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiheit, Elizabeth A; Hogan, David B; Strain, Laurel A; Schmaltz, Heidi N; Patten, Scott B; Eliasziw, Misha; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2011-05-13

    Frailty in later life is viewed as a state of heightened vulnerability to poor outcomes. The utility of frailty as a measure of vulnerability in the assisted living (AL) population remains unexplored. We examined the feasibility and predictive accuracy of two different interpretations of the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) frailty criteria in a population-based sample of AL residents. CHS frailty criteria were operationalized using two different approaches in 928 AL residents from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Risks of one-year mortality and hospitalization were estimated for those categorized as frail or pre-frail (compared with non-frail). The prognostic significance of individual criteria was explored, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated for select models to assess the utility of frailty in predicting one-year outcomes. Regarding feasibility, complete CHS criteria could not be assessed for 40% of the initial 1,067 residents. Consideration of supplementary items for select criteria reduced this to 12%. Using absolute (CHS-specified) cut-points, 48% of residents were categorized as frail and were at greater risk for death (adjusted risk ratio [RR] 1.75, 95% CI 1.08-2.83) and hospitalization (adjusted RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.20-1.96). Pre-frail residents defined by absolute cut-points (48.6%) showed no increased risk for mortality or hospitalization compared with non-frail residents. Using relative cut-points (derived from AL sample), 19% were defined as frail and 55% as pre-frail and the associated risks for mortality and hospitalization varied by sex. Frail (but not pre-frail) women were more likely to die (RR 1.58 95% CI 1.02-2.44) and be hospitalized (RR 1.53 95% CI 1.25-1.87). Frail and pre-frail men showed an increased mortality risk (RR 3.21 95% CI 1.71-6.00 and RR 2.61 95% CI 1.40-4.85, respectively) while only pre-frail men had an increased risk of hospitalization (RR 1.58 95% CI 1.15-2.17). Although

  20. Social engagement in older residents of assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yuri; Park, Nan Sook; Dominguez, Delilah Dylan; Molinari, Victor

    2014-07-01

    As a core component of successful aging, social engagement is widely known to play an important role in promoting the health and well-being of older populations. Given the unique nature of assisted living facility (ALF) settings, the present study made a distinction between social engagement within and outside the facility and explored how these two types of social engagement would interact with functional disability in predicting depressive symptoms of older residents in ALFs. We hypothesized that the positive impact of social engagement within the facility would be greater among residents with higher levels of functional disability. Using data from 150 ALF residents in Florida (Mage = 82.8, SD = 9.41), the direct and moderating effects of functional disability and the two types of social engagement on depressive symptoms were assessed. Supporting the hypothesis, the interaction between functional disability and social engagement within the facility was found to be significant. The finding demonstrates the particular importance of social engagement within the facility for those with reduced physical function. For them, the limited but available opportunities for social activities and interpersonal contacts within the facility seem to bring substantial psychological benefits. The findings call attention to efforts to promote social activities and interpersonal contacts within ALFs.

  1. Increased deaths from gastric cancer in communities living close to waste landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciaula, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Municipal waste landfills (MWLs) have been linked with some malignancies, but data about gastric cancer (GC) are still uncertain. Number of deaths from GC, death rates, and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated considering all residents in the 258 towns in the Apulia Region (4,099,547 subjects, years 2006-2009), living within 3 km from each of the 16 regional MWLs (n = 716,404) or in control areas (n = 3,383,143). Males living close to MWLs showed a higher death rate for GC, a twofold higher mean number of GC deaths and higher adjusted ORs of GC, compared with controls areas. In a large population and over a wide time period, an increased risk of death from GC has been shown in males living in communities close to MWLs. Primary prevention policies acting through more sustainable waste management might probably partially reduce deaths from GC in areas with MWLs.

  2. Star: A Dementia-Specific Training Program for Staff in Assisted Living Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teri, Linda; Huda, Piruz; Gibbons, Laura; Young, Heather; van Leynseele, June

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes, and provides data on, an innovative, comprehensive, dementia-specific training program designed to teach direct care staff in assisted living residences to improve care and reduce problems in residents with dementia. Design and Methods: STAR--which stands for Staff Training in Assisted living Residences- provides…

  3. Experiences of people living with HIV and people living close to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heleen French

    2014-07-14

    Jul 14, 2014 ... To cite this article: Heleen French, Minrie Greeff & Martha J. Watson (2014) Experiences of people living with. HIV and people living close to them of a comprehensive HIV stigma reduction community intervention in an urban and a rural ..... school-aged children in the care and support of PLWH. The find-.

  4. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in children living in city and rural residences in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The present study aims to assess the biological uptake in children of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured as 1-hydroxypyrene in urine from children living in city and rural residences. METHODS: 103 children living in Copenhagen and 101 children living in rural residences of Denmark......, the children excreted on average 0.07 [95% CI: 0.01-0.41] micromol urinary 1-hydroxypyrene per mol creatinine. Children living in urban residences excreted 0.02 [95% CI: 0.01-0.05] micromol more 1-hydroxypyrene than children living in rural residences. This was confirmed in the multiple regression analysis...... living in urban residences are more exposed to PAH than children living in rural residences. Time spent outdoors increased the excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene, which was most evident among urban children. Higher concentrations of ambient air pollution in urban areas may explain this finding. No influence...

  5. Life satisfaction of people with intellectual disability living in community residences: perceptions of the residents, their parents and staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Rabinovitz, S

    2003-02-01

    Within the literature on quality of life (QoL), life satisfaction (LS) has emerged as a key variable by which to measure perceived well-being, which is referred to as subjective QoL. The LS self-reports of 93 residents with intellectual disability (ID) living in community-based residences were compared with reports about their LS completed by their staff and parents. The residents were interviewed on their LS by social workers who did not belong to the staff of the interviewee's residence. The instrument used was the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). Staff and parents completed the short version of the LSS. Residents and staff's LS reports were positively correlated. However, significant differences were found between these two groups of informants when the residents were characterized as high functioning, had a low score in challenging behaviour, worked in an integrative employment setting and lived in an apartment. As opposed to staff/resident discrepancies, no differences were found between parents' and residents' LS reports. If residents cannot to be interviewed about their LS, then the parent is the preferred person to respond on behalf of the resident. The current study highlights the importance of including both objective measures (e.g. functional assessment characteristics) and subjective measures (e.g. LS) in order to get a better understanding of the QoL of people with ID.

  6. Characteristics of residents and providers in the assisted living pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Susan; Guihan, Marylou; Chapko, Michael; Manheim, Larry; Sullivan, Jean; Thomas, Mark; Barry, Sarah; Zhou, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    The number of residents in assisted living has rapidly increased, although these facilities still primarily serve people who can pay out of pocket. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was authorized to provide this level of care for the first time in the Assisted Living Pilot Program (ALPP). We describe the residents and providers, comparing them across three facility types and other populations, to assess the characteristics and feasibility of this new approach. We assessed ALPP residents and providers across seven Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. We obtained information from medical records, assessment tools, and a provider survey. We report here on 743 residents placed from 2002 to 2004. The Department of Veterans Affairs contracted with 58 adult family homes, 56 assisted living facilities, and 46 residential care facilities. The average ALPP resident was a 70-year-old unmarried White man referred from an inpatient hospital and living in a private residence prior to placement. Adult family homes enrolled residents requiring greater levels of assistance with activities of daily living than other facility types. Assisted living facilities were less likely than adult family homes to admit residents with functional disabilities and less likely than either adult family homes or adult residential care facilities to admit residents with certain care needs. ALPP placed residents with a wide range of characteristics in community facilities that varied widely in size and services. This information can help determine the role of this type of care in and outside of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  7. Reflections of a Professor on Nine Years of Living in the Dorms ... I Mean Residence Halls!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs aim to strengthen the intellectual climate in residential facilities. This article presents the author's reflections on nine years of living in a residence hall as a Faculty-In-Residence (FIR) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The author shares an insider's observations on the role he played as a…

  8. Measuring Resident and Family Member Determinants of Satisfaction with Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Perry; Guihan, Marylou; Bryant, Fred B.; Munroe, Donna J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study developed measures of satisfaction with assisted living from residents' and family members' perspectives. Design and Methods: We collected survey data from 204 residents and 232 family members associated with 11 assisted living facilities. We used confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the goodness of fit of a priori…

  9. Five Residents Speak: The Meaning of Living with Dying in a Long-Term Care Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djivre, Sandra E.; Levin, Elizabeth; Schinke, Robert J.; Porter, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Personal meanings given to the experience of living with nursing home death were shared by 5 nursing home residents. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Using M. van Manen's (1990) hermeneutic phenomenology, the lived experience of residents emerged as a compilation of 5 dynamically occurring themes, including (a) mapping…

  10. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in children living in city and rural residences in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Knudsen, Lisbeth Ehlert; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to assess the biological uptake in children of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured as 1-hydroxypyrene in urine from children living in city and rural residences.......The present study aims to assess the biological uptake in children of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured as 1-hydroxypyrene in urine from children living in city and rural residences....

  11. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urban Institute. 2006. Polzer K. Assisted living state regulatory review 2011. Washington, DC: National Center for Assisted Living. 2011. MetLife Mature Market Institute. Market Survey of Long-Term Care Costs. ...

  12. Depression is associated with poor functioning in activities of daily living among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Eide, Geir E; Ranhoff, Anette H

    2011-11-01

    To explore depressive symptoms among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment and the relationship between their depressive symptoms and dependence on activities of daily living, comorbidity and sociodemographic variables. Depression has become a major health care concern among older people, but depression and its association with functioning in activities of daily living among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment has previously not been studied in Norway. A cross-sectional comparative design. The sample comprised older residents (age 65-102 years; n = 227) from 30 nursing homes with at least six months of residence. All nursing home residents had a Clinical Dementia Rating scale score ≤0·5 and were capable of conversation. Scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale (15 items) and demographic variables were collected during face-to-face interviews. The activities of daily living were assessed using the Katz Index based on nurses' observation, and medical diagnoses were obtained from the patient records. Pearson's chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression were used to identify possible associations between activities of daily living and depression. After adjustment for age, sex, marital status, length of stay per year and education, more dependence on activities of daily living was associated with depression [odds ratio (OR): 1·18; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1·04-1·37; p = 0·02]. Higher age was associated with less depression (OR: 0·64; 95% CI: 0·43-0·94; p = 0·02), that is, the odds of depression declined by 36% for each 10-year increase in age. Our results suggest that depression symptoms are a major health problem among nursing home residents without cognitive impairment and that younger residents are more prone to having depressive symptoms. Nursing home staff should communicate with and observe residents closely for signs of depression, especially younger residents with high dependence on activities of daily living

  13. The physical environment influences neuropsychiatric symptoms and other outcomes in assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C; Samus, Quincy M; McNabney, Mathew; Onyike, Chiadi U; Mayer, Lawrence S; Brandt, Jason; Rabins, Peter; Lyketsos, Constantine; Rosenblatt, Adam

    2010-10-01

    Although the number of elderly residents living in assisted living (AL) facilities is rising, few studies have examined the AL physical environment and its impact on resident well-being. We sought to quantify the relationship of AL physical environment with resident outcomes including neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), quality of life (QOL), and fall risk, and to compare the effects for demented and non-demented residents. Prospective cohort study of a stratified random sample of 326 AL residents living in 21 AL facilities. Measures included the Therapeutic Environmental Screening Scale for Nursing Homes and Residential Care (TESS-NH/RC) to rate facilities and in-person assessment of residents for diagnosis (and assessment of treatment) of dementia, ratings on standardized clinical, cognitive, and QOL measures. Regression models compared environmental measures with outcomes. TESS-NH/RC is modified into a scale for rating the AL physical environment AL-EQS. The AL Environmental Quality Score (AL-EQS) was strongly negatively associated with Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) total score (p environment of AL facilities likely affects NPS and QOL in AL residents, and the effect may be stronger for residents without dementia than for residents with dementia. Environmental manipulations that increase resident privacy, as well as implementing call buttons and telephones, may improve resident well-being. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Enabling at-homeness for residents living in a nursing home: Reflected experience of nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarnio, Lotta; Boström, Anne-Marie; Hedman, Ragnhild; Gustavsson, Petter; Öhlén, Joakim

    2017-12-01

    Older people are often living the last period of their lives in institutions such as nursing homes. Knowledge of this period, specifically related to at-homeness which can be described as wellbeing in spite of illness and has been regarded as one of the goals in palliative care, has been very little researched in the context of nursing homes and the experience of nursing home staff. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nursing home staff of how to enable at-homeness for residents. Qualitative interpretive description methodology guided the design. The data generation was conducted in winter 2014-2015, when seven repetitive reflective group discussions with staff in a nursing home were held. The results show five patterns for how healthcare staff enabled at-homeness for the residents: Striving to know the resident, Showing respect for the resident's integrity, Creating and working in family-like relationships, Helping to find a new ordinariness and Preparing and making plans to ensure continuity. Nursing home staff seem to have collegial knowledge of how to enable at-homeness for the residents in a nursing home. Close relationships with respect for the resident's integrity stand out as enabling at-homeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Telemonitoring for assisted living residences : the medical specialists’ view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh, S.; Bakkes, S.C.J.; Kanis, M.; Rijken, M.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Telemonitoring is regarded as a means to maintain a relatively high quality of life for independently living elderly. This paper discusses a requirements study of a system to, foremost, telemonitor activities of daily living (ADL) of the elderly. The study utilizes literature and in-depth interviews

  16. Telemonitoring for assisted living residences: the medical specialists' view.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh, S.; Bakkes, S.C.J.; Kanis, M.; Rijken, M.; Kröse, B.J.A.; Jordanova, M.; Lievens, F.

    2011-01-01

    Telemonitoring is regarded as a means to maintain a relatively high quality of life for independently living elderly. This paper discusses a requirements study of a system to, foremost, telemonitor activities of daily living (ADL) of the elderly. The study utilizes literature and in-depth interviews

  17. Negotiating the Lack of Intimacy in Assisted Living: Resident Desires, Barriers, and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Alexis A; Burgess, Elisabeth O; Barmon, Christina

    2017-12-01

    Despite continuity in the desire for sex and partnership, many older adults experience a lack of intimacy in late life. The use of assisted living is a complicating factor for understanding issues of partnership, sex, and intimacy for older adults. Using in-depth interviews with 23 assisted living residents and grounded theory methods, we examined how residents negotiate a lack of intimacy in assisted living. The process of negotiation entailed three factors: desire, barriers, and strategies. Although some residents continued to desire intimacy, there was a marked absence of dating or intimacy in our study sites. Findings highlight unique barriers to acting on desire and the strategies residents used as aligning actions between desire and barriers. This research expands previous studies of sexuality and older adults by examining the complex ways in which they balanced desire and barriers through the use of strategies within the assisted living environment.

  18. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in children living in city and rural residences in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2006-01-01

    living in urban residences are more exposed to PAH than children living in rural residences. Time spent outdoors increased the excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene, which was most evident among urban children. Higher concentrations of ambient air pollution in urban areas may explain this finding. No influence......, the children excreted on average 0.07 [95% CI: 0.01-0.41] micromol urinary 1-hydroxypyrene per mol creatinine. Children living in urban residences excreted 0.02 [95% CI: 0.01-0.05] micromol more 1-hydroxypyrene than children living in rural residences. This was confirmed in the multiple regression analysis...... showing a 29% (95% CI: 2-64%) higher excretion among urban children than rural children. Moreover, the regression analysis showed that for each hour per day spent outside the children excreted 58% (1.58 [1.22-2.03]) more 1-hydroxypyrene in urine. CONCLUSION: The present study indicates that children...

  19. Characteristics of residents living in residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Christine; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren; Rome, Vincent; Sengupta, Manisha

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, there was a higher percentage of older, female residents in communities with more than 25 beds compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Residents in communities with 4–25 beds were more racially diverse than residents in larger communities. The percentage of Medicaid beneficiaries was higher in communities with 4–25 beds than it was in communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. A higher percentage of residents living in communities with 4–25 beds had a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with residents in larger communities. Need for assistance with each of the activities of daily living (ADLs) examined (except walking or locomotion) was substantially higher among residents in communities with 4–25 beds, compared with residents in larger communities. Emergency department visits and discharges from an overnight hospital stay in a 90-day period did not vary across residents by community bed size. This report presents national estimates of residents living in residential care, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care residents provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residents across the different sizes of residential care communities. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website, available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  20. Predictors of Psychological Well-Being among Assisted-Living Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Sherry M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the psychological well-being of elderly assisted-living residents and factors associated with well-being. Depression, life satisfaction, and demographic, health, and social support variables were measured through interviews. A sizeable minority of the residents reported high levels of depressive symptoms and low life satisfaction.…

  1. Hope, Laughter, and Humor in Residents and Staff at an Assisted Living Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westburg, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Assesses and compares hope levels and laughter and humor experiences of 24 elderly residents and 21 staff at an assisted living facility. Residents and staff reported numerous benefits from humor and laughing, but differences arose between the two groups about the source and frequency of humor and laughter. Implications for mental health…

  2. Physical Performance Characteristics of Assisted Living Residents and Risk for Adverse Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Carol A.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Park, Nan S.; Schrodt, Lori A.; Rokoske, Franzi; Sloane, Philip D.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers know little about the physical performance ability of residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) residents and its relationship to adverse outcomes such as fracture, nursing home placement, functional decline, and death. The purposes of this article are to (a) describe the functional characteristics of RC/AL residents, (b)…

  3. Patterns in Functioning among Residents of an Affordable Assisted Living Housing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, Stephanie J.; Clipp, Elizabeth C.; Maddox, George L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This is the second article reporting a project that (a) characterized the longitudinal functional patterns of residents in an affordable, assisted living housing (ALH) milieu for low-income people and (b) compared the ALH residents' functional patterns with those for similarly low-income, community-dwelling people. Design and Methods:…

  4. The salience of social relationships for resident well-being in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Debra; Burge, Stephanie; Quadagno, Jill; Barrett, Anne

    2007-03-01

    We examined how organizational characteristics, transition experiences, and social relationships impact three subjective measures of well-being among assisted living residents: life satisfaction, quality of life, and perception that assisted living feels like home. Data were from 384 assisted living residents interviewed for the Florida Study of Assisted Living. Using ordinary least squares and logistic regression we estimated associations between resident well-being and organizational characteristics, transition experiences, and social relationships, controlling for gender, age, education, and physical functioning. To varying degrees depending on the measure used, higher resident well-being was associated with facility size, facility acceptance of payment from Florida's low income program, and resident perceptions of adequate privacy. Non-kin room sharing reduced life satisfaction, whereas food quality positively affected all measures of well-being. The most consistent findings concerned internal social relationships. Residents with high scores on internal social relationship measures reported more positive well-being across all measures than residents with low scores on the same measures. Individuals have the capacity to form new support networks following a move to assisted living, and relationships formed become more salient to their well-being than the continuation of past relationships or the physical characteristics of the immediate surroundings.

  5. Exposure assessment of residents living near a wood treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, James; Warshaw, Raphael; Horsak, Randy D.; Parker, Frank M. III; Takhar, Harpreet

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of environmental sampling and modeling in a neighborhood adjacent to a wood processing plant. This plant used creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) to treat wood for over 70 years. Between 1999 and 2001, environmental samples were obtained to quantify the level of environmental contamination from the wood processing plant. Blood from 10 residents was measured for chlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans. Soil sediment samples from drainage ditches and attic/dust samples from nearby residents' homes were tested for polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The dioxin congeners analysis of the 10 residents revealed elevated valued for octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin compatible with PCP as the source. The levels of carcinogenic PAHs were higher than background levels and were similar to soil contamination on wood preserving sites. Wipe sampling in the kitchens of 11 homes revealed that 20 of the 33 samples were positive for octachlorinated dioxins with a mean value of 10.27 ng/m 2 . The soil, ditch samples, and positive wipe samples from the homes indicate a possible ongoing route of exposure to the contaminants in the homes of these residents. Modeled air exposure estimated for the wood processing waste chemicals indicate some air exposure to combustion products. The estimated air levels for benzo(a)pyrene and tetrachlorodibenzodiozin in this neighborhood exceeded the recommended levels for these compounds in some states. The quantitative data presented suggest a significant contamination of a neighborhood by wood processing waste chemicals. These findings suggest the need for more stringent regulations on waste discharges from wood treatment plants

  6. Determinants of resident autonomy in assisted living facilities: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta; Wright, James D

    2007-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) stresses the importance of resident autonomy in the provision of good quality care. Resident autonomy has been linked to better resident well-being, less reliance on supportive services, and greater participation in social activities. Little is known, however, about factors that foster resident autonomy in AL. This article reviews what is currently known about organizational determinants of resident autonomy in AL. The open-natural systems approach to organizational effectiveness, which views organizations in relation to their environment, provides a broad conceptual framework for this analysis. Factors that influence resident autonomy in AL are classified into two categories: (a) external environmental conditions (e.g., ownership status, chain membership, regulatory environment) and (b) internal organizational structures and processes (e.g., facility size, residents' functional ability, resident social resources, and staff work environment). Environmental conditions represent the most antecedent set of factors that influence resident autonomy, indirectly through their effects on internal organizational structures and processes. Internal organizational factors influence resident autonomy through their impact on policies that enable resident choice and control in the facility. More research is needed to better understand the complex mechanism(s) through which organizational factors influence resident autonomy.

  7. Dysphonia in nursing home and assisted living residents: prevalence and association with frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Nichols, Brent; Varadarajan, Varun; Bock, Jonathan M; Blumin, Joel H

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of geriatric dysphonia prevalence have been limited to ambulatory outpatient and senior communities. Our goal was to identify prevalence of dysphonia in nursing home residents and assisted living residents and search for correlations between indices of dysphonia and indices of frailty. Prospective epidemiological survey. Residents of a vertically integrated senior care organization who were 65 or older and able to understand and complete the questionnaire were recruited to complete the voice handicap index 10 (VHI-10) to assess for dysphonia (VHI-10 > 10 = dysphonia) and Vulnerable Elders Survey 13 (VES-13), a validated instrument to assess for frailty (VES > 3 = frailty). A total of 119 residents were surveyed. Thirty-three percent of nursing home residents, and 25% of assisted living residents reported dysphonia with 29% of all respondents reporting dysphonia. The mean VHI-10 was 7.4, the median was 5, and the interquartile range was 2-12.5. There was a significant relationship between VHI-10 and VES-13 score (P = 0.029). There were no statistically significant relationships between frailty, age, or type of living and dysphonia or VHI-10. There is a high prevalence of voice dysfunction in assisted living and nursing home residents. The correlation between VHI-10 and VES-13 suggests that voice declines as frailty increases. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  8. The physical environment influences neuropsychiatric symptoms and other outcomes in assisted living residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C.; Samus, Quincy M.; McNabney, Mathew; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Mayer, Lawrence S.; Brandt, Jason; Rabins, Peter; Lyketsos, Constantine; Rosenblatt, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although the number of elderly residents living in assisted living (AL) facilities is rising, few studies have examined the AL physical environment and its impact on resident well-being. We sought to quantify the relationship of AL physical environment with resident outcomes including neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), quality of life (QOL), and fall risk, and to compare the effects for demented and non-demented residents. Methods Prospective cohort study of a stratified random sample of 326 AL residents living in 21 AL facilities. Measures included the Therapeutic Environmental Screening Scale for Nursing Homes and Residential Care (TESS-NH/RC) to rate facilities and in-person assessment of residents for diagnosis (and assessment of treatment) of dementia, ratings on standardized clinical, cognitive, and QOL measures. Regression models compared environmental measures with outcomes. TESS-NH/RC is modified into a scale for rating the AL physical environment AL-EQS. Results The AL Environmental Quality Score (AL-EQS) was strongly negatively associated with Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) total score (p <0.001), positively associated with Alzheimer Disease Related Quality of Life (ADRQL) score (p = 0.010), and negatively correlated with fall risk (p = 0.042). Factor analysis revealed an excellent two-factor solution, Dignity and Sensory. Both were strongly associated with NPI and associated with ADRQL. Conclusion The physical environment of AL facilities likely affects NPS and QOL in AL residents, and the effect may be stronger for residents without dementia than for residents with dementia. Environmental manipulations that increase resident privacy, as well as implementing call buttons and telephones, may improve resident well-being. PMID:20077498

  9. Comparison of behaviors regarding live poultry exposure among rural residents in Vietnam and Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qiuyan; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Bich, Tran Huu; Dang, Vu Trung; Fielding, Richard

    2014-04-15

    Live poultry exposure and risk behaviors are more prevalent in rural communities, increasing the risk of influenza A/H5N1 infection. We examined the economic and socio-cultural influences on poultry-related practices by comparing the poultry-related practices among Vietnamese and Thai rural residents by family income and consumption preference. Stratified cluster sampling was performed to select households. Within each household, one adult was randomly selected for a face-to-face interview in five Vietnamese and five Thai rural districts. Using a standardized questionnaire to assess domestic poultry husbandry, live poultry purchase, and demographics, logistic regression enabled comparisons of behaviors related to live poultry exposure and examination of associated factors. Among 994 Vietnamese and 907 Thai rural residents, live poultry exposure (prevalence of raising poultry, improper handling of sick or dead poultry, touching live poultry before buying, and slaughtering poultry at home) was more prevalent among Vietnamese than Thai respondents. After adjusting for other demographics, respondents with higher family incomes were less likely to rear backyard poultry in both Vietnam and Thailand, and with more likely to buy live poultry in Vietnam, but not in Thailand. Consumption preference for live poultry was associated with being more likely to rear backyard poultry in Vietnam and Thailand, and with being more likely to buy live poultry in Thailand, but not in Vietnam. The findings suggest important roles of economic imperatives and cultural preference for live poultry for consumption in supporting poultry rearing and live poultry purchase among rural residents.

  10. Migratory New World blackbirds (icterids are more neophobic than closely related resident icterids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mettke-Hofmann

    Full Text Available Environments undergo short-term and long-term changes due to natural or human-induced events. Animals differ in their ability to cope with such changes which can be related to their ecology. Changes in the environment often elicit avoidance reactions (neophobia which protect animals from dangerous situations but can also inhibit exploration and familiarization with novel situations and thus, learning about new resources. Studies investigating the relationship between a species' ecology and its neophobia have so far been restricted to comparing only a few species and mainly in captivity. The current study investigated neophobia reactions to experimentally-induced changes in the natural environment of six closely-related blackbird species (Icteridae, including two species represented by two distinct populations. For analyses, neophobic reactions (difference in number of birds feeding and time spent feeding with and without novel objects were related to several measures of ecological plasticity and the migratory strategy (resident or migratory of the population. Phylogenetic relationships were incorporated into the analysis. The degree of neophobia was related to migratory strategy with migrants expressing much higher neophobia (fewer birds feeding and for a shorter time with objects present than residents. Furthermore, neophobia showed a relationship to diet breadth with fewer individuals of diet generalists than specialists returning when objects were present supporting the dangerous niche hypothesis. Residents may have evolved lower neophobia as costs of missing out on opportunities may be higher for residents than migrants as the former are restricted to a smaller area. Lower neophobia allows them approaching changes in the environment (e.g. novel objects quickly, thereby securing access to resources. Additionally, residents have a greater familiarity with similar situations in the area than migrants and the latter may, therefore, initially

  11. Infection prevention and control standards in assisted living facilities: are residents' needs being met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossover, Rachel A; Chi, Carolyn J; Wise, Matthew E; Tran, Alvin H; Chande, Neha D; Perz, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    Assisted living facilities (ALFs) provide housing and care to persons unable to live independently, and who often have increasing medical needs. Disease outbreaks illustrate challenges of maintaining adequate resident protections in these facilities. Describe current state laws on assisted living admissions criteria, medical oversight, medication administration, vaccination requirements, and standards for infection control training. We abstracted laws and regulations governing assisted living facilities for the 50 states using a structured abstraction tool. Selected characteristics were compared according to the time period in which the regulation took effect. Selected state health departments were queried regarding outbreaks identified in assisted living facilities. Of the 50 states, 84% specify health-based admissions criteria to assisted living facilities; 60% require licensed health care professionals to oversee medical care; 88% specifically allow subcontracting with outside entities to provide routine medical services onsite; 64% address medication administration by assisted living facility staff; 54% specify requirements for some form of initial infection control training for all staff; 50% require reporting of disease outbreaks to the health department; 18% specify requirements to offer or require vaccines to staff; 30% specify requirements to offer or require vaccines to residents. Twelve states identified approximately 1600 outbreaks from 2010 to 2013, with influenza or norovirus infections predominating. There is wide variation in how assisted living facilities are regulated in the United States. States may wish to consider regulatory changes that ensure safe health care delivery, and minimize risks of infections, outbreaks of disease, and other forms of harm among assisted living residents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Infection Prevention and Control Standards in Assisted Living Facilities: Are Residents Needs Being Met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossover, Rachel; Chi, Carolyn; Wise, Matthew; Tran, Alvin; Chande, Neha; Perz, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) provide housing and care to persons unable to live independently, and who often have increasing medical needs. Disease outbreaks illustrate challenges of maintaining adequate resident protections in these facilities. Objectives Describe current state laws on assisted living admissions criteria, medical oversight, medication administration, vaccination requirements, and standards for infection control training. Methods We abstracted laws and regulations governing assisted living facilities for the 50 states using a structured abstraction tool. Selected characteristics were compared according to the time period in which the regulation took effect. Selected state health departments were queried regarding outbreaks identified in assisted living facilities. Results Of the 50 states, 84% specify health-based admissions criteria to assisted living facilities. 60% require licensed healthcare professionals to oversee medical care. 88% specifically allow subcontracting with outside entities to provide routine medical services onsite, and 64% address medication administration by assisted living facility staff. 54% specify requirements for some form of initial infection control training for all staff; 50% require reporting of disease outbreaks to the health department. 30% offered or required vaccines to staff; 15% of states offered or required vaccines to residents. Eleven states identified approximately 1500 outbreaks from 2010–2013, with influenza or norovirus infections predominating. Conclusions There is wide variation in how assisted living facilities are regulated in the United States. States may wish to consider regulatory changes that assure safe healthcare delivery, and minimize risks of infections, outbreaks of disease, and other forms of harm among assisted living residents. PMID:24239014

  13. Commentary: watching closely at a distance: key tensions in supervising resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbott, Stewart

    2010-09-01

    Graded responsibility and autonomy are integral features of medical education. High-quality patient care is paramount and is the ultimate responsibility of the attending physician. In the training setting, the teaching attending holds quality of care constant while balancing the amount of supervision and autonomy he or she gives the learner. Sterkenburg and colleagues focus on how faculty members make their decisions to entrust patient care to learners. Both this critical decision and the process of deciding, performed many times a day by teaching faculty, are at the heart of the confluence of providing quality patient care and developing the next generation of physicians. Sterkenburg and colleagues innovatively use a system of rating (with six sequentially more complex entrustable professional activities [EPAs]) and structured interviews to better understand the current practice of entrusting care. They defined gaps between when attending faculty feel residents are ready to perform a particular EPA, when the residents feel ready, and when the residents actually perform it. The tension between the imperative to ensure quality care and the competing imperative to grant graded autonomy can be described as "watching closely at a distance." The details of who should watch whom, when and what to watch, and how and how much to watch are all key issues for faculty and residents. Sterkenburg and colleagues provide a framework for further investigation (e.g., discerning the ideal level of supervision, developing a gold standard for assessing EPAs) into these critical medical education challenges.

  14. Correlates of attitudes toward personal aging in older assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nan Sook; Jang, Yuri; Lee, Beom S; Chiriboga, David A; Molinari, Victor

    2015-01-01

    This study explored factors contributing to older adults' self-perceptions about their own aging in assisted living (AL) communities. Data analysis was completed based on interviews with 150 older residents from 17 AL communities. Multiple regression analyses found that functional disability and hearing impairment negatively affected attitudes toward personal aging among AL residents, and satisfaction with social support positively influenced attitudes. Health perception mediated attitudes toward personal aging. Findings suggest the importance of social workers helping older AL residents recognize social support as a means of promoting their positive self-regard.

  15. Medicare expenditures for residents in assisted living: data from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Charles D; Holan, Scott; Sherman, Michael; Spector, William; Hawes, Catherine

    2005-04-01

    To provide preliminary data on Medicare expenditures for assisted living facility (ALF) residents and to investigate whether ALF characteristics were related to Medicare expenditures for ALF residents. Data from the National Study of Assisted Living for the Frail Elderly conducted in 1998-1999. This analysis was restricted to the 40 percent of ALFs in that sample that adhered to the assisted living (AL) philosophy by offering more than minimal levels of services and privacy. This study involved the approximately 1,200 residents who remained in an ALF from baseline to follow-up data collection. Six months of postbaseline Medicare claims were acquired for 545 of these residents, who did not differ significantly from the larger sample. Baseline individual and facility data were collected in personal interviews with residents and a combination of personal and telephone interviews with facility staff. Medicare claims data were acquired from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Cross-sectional analyses using logistic and ordinary least squares regression techniques were used to determine the relationships among individual and facility characteristics and Medicare utilization and expenditures. On an annualized basis, AL residents incurred Medicare costs of approximately US dollars 4,800. Just less than 15 percent of AL residents accounted for over 75 percent of total Medicare costs. Both the likelihood of utilizing Medicare-covered services and the intensity of service use were largely unaffected by the characteristics of the ALF in which residents lived. Utilization was largely a function of individual characteristics. The only exception to this general finding was that those individuals who utilized services and resided in smaller ALFs had significantly lower average expenditures than did individuals in larger ALFs. These preliminary data imply that both the level and distribution of Medicare expenditures among ALF residents were similar to those among the

  16. Person-Centered Dementia Care and Sleep in Assisted Living Residents With Dementia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxin; Grandner, Michael A; Chang, Yu-Ping; Jungquist, Carla; Porock, Davina

    2017-01-01

    The sleep of people with dementia living in long-term care is known to be disturbed. This pre-post controlled pilot study examined the effects of a person-centered dementia care intervention on sleep in assisted living residents with dementia. The three-month intervention included in-class staff training plus supervision and support in practice. The sleep-wake patterns were measured using actigraphy for three consecutive days at baseline and postintervention. Sixteen residents from the intervention and six from the control groups completed the study. The intervention group had significantly more nighttime sleep at posttest. After adjusting for baseline, the intervention group exhibited significantly less daytime sleep and more nighttime sleep. Person-centered dementia care may be effective for improving sleep of residents with dementia.

  17. Residents' Interaction with Their College Living-Learning Peer Mentor: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Jonathan Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This study used Strauss and Corbin's (1998) grounded theory model to describe and explain the stories of residents' interactions with their peer mentor, in a health, education, and human development living-learning community (LLC). The question answered in this study was: What is the impact of the interaction between a peer mentor and…

  18. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbens, R.J.J.; Krans, A.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Methods Between June 2013 and May 2014

  19. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; Krans, Anita; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Methods: Between June 2013 and May 2014

  20. Oral hygiene and associated factors among frail older assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Riitta K T; Soini, Helena; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the associations of older assisted living residents' tooth brushing habits with health and nutritional status. We assessed the tooth brushing habits, nutritional status, oral health, use of dental services, and morbidity of 1,447 assisted living residents in the Helsinki metropolitan area of Finland. Of the residents, 17% did not clean or had not cleaned their teeth and/or dentures daily. Those not cleaning their teeth and/or dentures daily were more often male, less educated and had a mean length of stay in assisted living longer than those who cleaned their teeth and/or dentures daily. They were more often malnourished and dependent in ADLs. In addition they more often had poorer oral health and used fewer dental services. Poor tooth brushing habits indicate poor oral and subjective health. More attention should focus on the oral hygiene of frail older assisted living residents. ©2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Social Relations and Resident Health in Assisted Living: An Application of the Convoy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Molly M.; Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article, based on analysis of data from a mixed methods study, builds on a growing body of assisted living (AL) research focusing on the link between residents' social relationships and health. A key aim of this analysis, which uses the social convoy model as a conceptual and methodological framework, was to examine the relative…

  2. The Provision of Informal Support By Elderly People Residing in Assisted Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Howard

    1998-01-01

    Examines factors facilitating support giving to members of the social network by elderly Jewish persons residing in assisted-living facilities in Israel. Results reveal that it is principally the perceived support measure along with two personal characteristics that explains the variance in support provision scores. (Author/MKA)

  3. Maneuvering Together, Apart, and at Odds: Residents' Care Convoys in Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Candace L; Ball, Mary M; Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Doyle, Patrick J; Burgess, Elisabeth O; Perkins, Molly M

    2018-02-01

    Frail and disabled individuals such as assisted living residents are embedded in "care convoys" comprised of paid and unpaid caregivers. We sought to learn how care convoys are configured and function in assisted living and understand how and why they vary and with what resident and caregiver outcomes. We analyzed data from a qualitative study involving formal in-depth interviews, participant observation and informal interviewing, and record review. We prospectively studied 28 residents and 114 care convoy members drawn from four diverse assisted living communities over 2 years. Care convoys involved family and friends who operated individually or shared responsibility, assisted living staff, and multiple external care workers. Residents and convoy members engaged in processes of "maneuvering together, apart, and at odds" as they negotiated the care landscape routinely and during health crises. Based on consensus levels, and the quality of collaboration and communication, we identified three main convoy types: cohesive, fragmented, and discordant. Care convoys clearly shape care experiences and outcomes. Identifying strategies for establishing effective communication and collaboration practices and promoting convoy member consensus, particularly over time, is essential to the creation and maintenance of successful and supportive care partnerships. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Linking Resident Satisfaction to Staff Perceptions of the Work Environment in Assisted Living: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between resident satisfaction and staff perceptions of the work environment in assisted living. Staff perceptions were assessed at the facility level, using aggregate measures of staff job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and views of organizational culture. Design and Methods: The sample…

  5. Students' Perceptions of the Residence Hall Living Environment at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kandari, Nabila

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' perceptions of the residence hall living environment at Kuwait University. The researcher developed a questionnaire for this purpose that included 36 items. The sample of the study consisted of 191 residential students, of whom 98 were male and 93 were female. The research findings indicated that:…

  6. Residence Hall Room Type and Alcohol Use among College Students Living on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jennifer E.; Zimmerman, Don; O'Grady, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives were to explore the relation between the built environment of residence halls and the alcohol use of college students living on campus from the perspective of the theory of routine activity. This exploratory study examined data from two samples on one college campus. Online surveys assessed alcohol use, attitudes toward alcohol use,…

  7. Are residents living in eco-districts environmentally conscious? A case study of environmental attitudes of residents living in the European Green Capital of Stockholm, Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Choi Kan

    2017-01-01

    With rapid urbanization, climate change and population growth in the 21st century, the development of eco-cities, especially in those fast-growing populated countries such as China and India, is important to minimize human impact on the planet. Nevertheless,  despite that there is a very well-designed eco-city, if residents living in an eco-city are not environmentally conscious, the eco-city is sustainable only in its tangible part – technologies and infrastructure, but not in its intangible...

  8. Use of health services by residents at a seniors-only living facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Ferraz Teston

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the use of medical and dental services by seniors residing at a seniors-only living facility and in the general community. It was a quantitative study, among 50 residents of the living facility and 173 in the general community. The data were collected between November 2011 and February 2012 through a questionnaire, and subjected to statistical analysis. Performance of clinical exams and satisfaction with health services was greater among seniors living in the general community; however, physical therapy treatment was more common among those living in the facility. The use of medical and dental services showed a statistically significant difference. The seniors in both groups need oral health monitoring and those living in the facility also require coverage by the Family Health Strategy. The presence of professionals with the right profile to adequately serve residents and the network of available services are determining factors for the success of this new housing policy.

  9. Southern Nevada assisted living residents' perception of their oral health status and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounis, Georgia; Ditmyer, Marcia M; McCants, Robert; Lee, Yoonah; Mobley, Connie

    2012-06-01

    Oral health is an integral component of general health, and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of oral health status and acces\\s to dental care by Southern Nevada Assisted Living Facilities Residents. A cross-sectional questionnaire study design was used to survey residents between 34 and 99 years old residing in Assisted Living Facilities. Seventy respondents (42 males and 28 females) completed a survey that included personal oral hygiene, access to care, and demographic information. Data analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square. Mean age was 75.78 years, and the majority had a college education (n = 41). Four currently smoked cigarettes. Twenty-nine (males = 14; females = 15) reported having dental insurance. Eleven respondents had seen a dentist twice a year, while 33 reported a visit less than 6 months. Forty-one reported the facility did not provide oral health care with majority (n = 64) indicating that accessing oral health care was difficult. Self-rated response to oral hygiene, a majority (n = 64) reported their oral hygiene as fair and five reported their oral hygiene as poor. Assisted living residents in Southern Nevada reported difficulty accessing dental services within and outside of the facility. Oral care models to address this unique population should be explored. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. A phenomenological understanding of residents' emotional distress of living in an environmental justice community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dory, Gabriela; Qiu, Zeyuan; Qiu, Christina M; Fu, Mei R; Ryan, Caitlin E

    2017-12-01

    Deteriorative environmental conditions in environmental justice (EJ) communities not only post direct health risks such as chronic illnesses, but also cause emotional distress such as anxiety, fear, and anger among residents, which may further exacerbate health risks. This study applies a descriptive phenomenological method to explore and describe the emotional experience of residents living in Ironbound, a known EJ community located in Newark, New Jersey. Twenty-three residents participated in the study. Four essential themes regarding the residents' emotional experiences were elicited from 43 interviews: (1) being worried about the harmful effects of the surrounding pollution; (2) being distressed by the known historical pollution sources; (3) being frustrated by the unheard voices and/or lack of responses; and (4) being angered by the ongoing pollution sources. Participants not only expressed their emotions of worry, distress, frustration, and anger in detail but also described reasons or situations that provoked such negative emotions. Such detailed depictions provide insights into potential meaningful strategies to improve residents' psychological wellbeing by alleviating negative emotions and meaningfully engaging residents in developing, implementing, and enforcing environmental laws, regulations, and policies to achieve EJ goals.

  11. Minimal Internal Radiation Exposure in Residents Living South of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Junichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Hayano, Ryugo; Tokiwa, Michio; Shimmura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Following the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, assessment of internal radiation exposure was indispensable to predict radiation-related health threats to residents of neighboring areas. Although many evaluations of internal radiation in residents living north and west of the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant are available, there is little information on residents living in areas south of the plant, which were similarly affected by radio-contamination from the disaster. To assess the internal radio-contamination in residents living in affected areas to the south of the plant or who were evacuated into Iwaki city, a whole body counter (WBC) screening program of internal radio-contamination was performed on visitors to the Jyoban hospital in Iwaki city, which experienced less contamination than southern areas adjacent to the nuclear plant. The study included 9,206 volunteer subjects, of whom 6,446 were schoolchildren aged 4-15 years. Measurements began one year after the incident and were carried out over the course of two years. Early in the screening period only two schoolchildren showed Cs-137 levels that were over the detection limit (250 Bq/body), although their Cs-134 levels were below the detection limit (220 Bq/body). Among the 2,760 adults tested, 35 (1.3%) had detectable internal radio-contamination, but only for Cs-137 (range: 250 Bq/body to 859 Bq/body), and not Cs-134. Of these 35 subjects, nearly all (34/35) showed elevated Cs-137 levels only during the first year of the screening. With the exception of potassium 40, no other radionuclides were detected during the screening period. The maximum annual effective dose calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels was 0.029 and 0.028 mSv/year for the schoolchildren and adults, respectively, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Although the data for radiation exposure during the most critical first year after the incident are unavailable due to a lack of systemic

  12. Increasing social activity attendance in assisted living residents using personalized prompts and positive social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polenick, Courtney Allyn; Flora, Stephen Ray

    2013-08-01

    Low levels of social activity involvement may have negative implications on overall quality of life for older adults living in residential care settings. Despite the recent growth of assisted living (AL) facilities, few studies have examined social activity participation in this environment. The present study assessed the effects of two prompt procedures that included different amounts of positive social attention (personalized prompts alone and combined with brief conversation) on the social activity attendance of 8 AL residents. Personalized prompts were designed to appeal to each participant on the basis of preference assessments regarding activity interests and preferred types of activity participation. During treatment conditions, increases in attendance occurred not only following treatment prompts but also during activities that were not preceded by treatment prompts. Similar effects were observed for both treatment prompts. Results suggest that personalized prompts and positive social attention can increase weekly social activity attendance in AL residents.

  13. Dietary intake of homeless women residing at a transitional living center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lisa R; Weller, Nancy F; Jadhav, Monika; Holleman, Warren L

    2008-08-01

    Women who are homeless experience health problems due to many factors, including poor nutrition. This paper describes a nutritional assessment of women who are homeless living at a transitional living center in an urban setting. A rapid food screener was used to assess fat, fruit and vegetable, and fiber intake, and focus group analysis was used to assess nutritional attitudes and dietary behaviors. We found that the dietary intake of shelter residents does not meet the USDA recommendations in several key areas. We also found that shelter residents considered shelter cafeteria food to be inadequate in terms of taste, nutritional quality, and choices, and they believed the shelter diet contributed to chronic diseases and their symptoms. We conclude that addressing these barriers to good nutrition may help people who are homeless prevent and manage chronic illness.

  14. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; Krans, Anita; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Between June 2013 and May 2014 seven assisted living facilities were contacted. A total of 221 persons completed the questionnaire on life-course determinants, frailty (using the Tilburg Frailty Indicator), self-reported chronic diseases, and adverse outcomes disability, quality of life, health care utilization, and falls. Adverse outcomes were analyzed with sequential (logistic) regression analyses. The integral model is partially validated. Life-course determinants and disease(s) affected only physical frailty. All three frailty domains (physical, psychological, social) together affected disability, quality of life, visits to a general practitioner, and falls. Contrary to the model, disease(s) had no effect on adverse outcomes after controlling for frailty. Life-course determinants affected adverse outcomes, with unhealthy lifestyle having consistent negative effects, and women had more disability, scored lower on physical health, and received more personal and informal care after controlling for all other predictors. The integral model of frailty is less useful for predicting adverse outcomes of residents of assisted living facilities than for community-dwelling older persons, because these residents are much frailer and already have access to healthcare facilities. The present study showed that a multidimensional assessment of frailty, distinguishing three domains of frailty (physical, psychological, social), is beneficial with respect to predicting adverse outcomes in residents of assisted living facilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. The impact of complex chronic diseases on care utilization among assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabney, Matthew K; Onyike, Chiadi; Johnston, Deirdre; Mayer, Lawrence; Lyketsos, Constantine; Brandt, Jason; Rosenblatt, Adam; Samus, Quincy

    2014-01-01

    Many residents of assisted living (AL) have chronic diseases that are difficult to manage, including congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). We estimated the amount and intensity of care delivered by the staff for residents with these conditions. We performed a secondary data analysis from the Maryland Assisted Living (MDAL) Study (399 residents, 29 facilities). In-person assessments included measures of cognition, function, depression, and general medical health. Diagnosis of CHF, COPD, and DM, as well as current medications was abstracted from AL medical charts. Measures of care utilization were operationalized at the resident level as: 1) minutes per day of direct care (caregiver activity scale [CAS]), 2) subjective staff ratings of care burden, and 3) assigned AL "level of care" (based on state regulatory criteria). In best fit regression models, CHF and DM were not significant predictors of the evaluated care utilization measures; however, COPD was independently associated with increased minutes per day of direct care - 34% of the variance in the caregiver activity scale was explained by degree of functional dependency, cognitive impairment, age, and presence of COPD. Functional dependency, depressive symptoms, and age explained almost a quarter (23%) of the variance of staff care burden rating. For the AL level of care intensity rating, degree of functional dependency, level of cognition, and age were significant correlates, together explaining about 28% of the variance. The presence of COPD was a significant predictor of time per day of direct care. However, CHF and DM were not correlates of care utilization measures. Functional and cognitive impairment was associated with measures of care utilization, reiterating the importance of these characteristics in the utilization and intensity of care consumed by AL residents. Further study of this population could reveal other forms and amounts of

  16. Restorative Care's Effect on Activities of Daily Living Dependency in Long-stay Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Kristine M C; Wyman, Jean F; Savik, Kay; Kane, Robert L; Mueller, Christine; Zhao, Hong

    2015-06-01

    (a) Identify the prevalence of nursing homes providing Medicare supported restorative care programs and of long stay participants, (b) compare characteristics between restorative care participants and nonparticipants, and (c) assess restorative care's effect on change in activities of daily living (ADL) dependency. Longitudinal analysis of Minimum Data Set assessments linked to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey using a sample of 7,735 residents, age ≥ 65 years living in 1,097 nursing homes for at least 6 months. Receipt of any restorative care was used as a time varying predictor to estimate change in ADL dependency over 18 months using linear mixed models. The sample was 75% female, 89% non-Hispanic White, with a mean age of 85±8, and average length of stay of 3.2±3.4 years. Most nursing homes had restorative care programs (67%), but less than one-third of long-stay residents participated. After controlling for resident and nursing home characteristics, the predicted mean ADL dependency score (range 0-28) at baseline was 18 for restorative care participants and 14 for nonparticipants. Over 18 months, ADL dependency increased 1 point for both participants and nonparticipants (p = .12). A minority of long-stay residents participated in Medicare supported restorative care programs despite their availability and potential benefits. Even though participants had greater vulnerability for deterioration in physical, mental, and functional health than nonparticipants, both groups had similar rates of ADL decline. Future research is needed to determine if providing restorative care to less dependent long-stay residents is effective. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Variation Across U.S. Assisted Living Facilities: Admissions, Resident Care Needs, and Staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihye; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy; Yang, Bo Kyum

    2017-01-01

    Though more people in the United States currently reside in assisted living facilities (ALFs) than nursing homes, little is known about ALF admission policies, resident care needs, and staffing characteristics. We therefore conducted this study using a nationwide sample of ALFs to examine these factors, along with comparison of ALFs by size. Cross-sectional secondary data analysis using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. Measures included nine admission policy items, seven items on the proportion of residents with selected conditions or care needs, and six items on staffing characteristics (e.g., access to licensed nurse, aide training). Facilities (n = 2,301) were divided into three categories by size: small, 4 to 10 beds; medium, 11 to 25 beds; and large, 26 or more beds. Analyses took complex sampling design effects into account to project national U.S. estimates. More than half of ALFs admitted residents with considerable healthcare needs and served populations that required nursing care, such as for transfers, medications, and eating or dressing. Staffing was largely composed of patient care aides, and fewer than half of ALFs had licensed care provider (registered nurse, licensed practical nurse) hours. Smaller facilities tended to have more inclusive admission policies and residents with more complex care needs (more mobility, eating and medication assistance required, short-term memory issues, p < .01) and less access to licensed nurses than larger ALFs (p < .01). This study suggests ALFs are caring for and admitting residents with considerable care needs, indicating potential overlap with nursing home populations. Despite this finding, ALF regulations lag far behind those in effect for nursing homes. In addition, measurement of care outcomes is critically needed to ensure appropriate ALF care quality. As more people choose ALFs, outcome measures for ALFs, which are now unavailable, should be developed to allow for oversight

  18. Assessing Independence of Residents Suffering from Dementia in Meeting Basic Living Needs in Ljubljana Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojka Trkulja Kobentar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Obviously a very high proportion of nursing home residents exhibit the clinical signs of dementia, which affect the independence of the impaired individual. The purpose of the study is to determine the level of independence of the residents in performing basic life activities.Methods:The research examines 233 residents of both sexes, with a clinical diagnosis of dementia that are aged 65 years and over that have resided in one of the four Ljubljana municipality nursing homes for at least one year prior to the begin of the study. The autonomy in carrying out 11 basic live activities was measured on a three-level scale and their cognitive skills with a quick test of cognitive abilities (KPSS. The data was processed with SPSS, ver. 13.0 through methods of descriptive statistics, t-test for two independent samples and the variance analysis (ANOVA.Results:The examined population sample shows a high cognitive decline measured on the KPSS scale, as 50.2% of subjects in mid-stage reached ≤ 24-11 points and 43.4% of those in the late-stage reached ≤ 10-0 points in the scale (out of 30 in total. Those in the early stage reached ≤ 29-25 points in only 6.4 % of the examined population. The significant findings may thus indicate a high overall average depending on the implementation of all 11 life activities (x = 2.57 on the three-level scale (1 being self-sufficient, 2 and 3 standing for partially dependent and entirely dependent, respectively.Conclusions:The examined nursing home residents in the sample, suffering from dementia, show a high degree of dependency in performing basic life activities. The survey results so far present a starting point for the planning of programmes for increasing involvement of residents in psychosocial activities, through practical exercises in self-sufficiency through implementation of fundamental life activities. 

  19. Population monitoring: three generation study of residents living in the vicinity of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersimbaev, R.I.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this work are as follows: to establish a Blood Bio-sample Database of three generations families living close to the Semipalatinsk test site (STS) and control families in three generation from clean areas; to determine the mini-satellite mutations rates in the three generation of radiation exposed people and control families of the same ethnic origin; to definition the chromosomal translocation frequencies by FISH chromosome painting in the lymphocytes of the exposed and control people in order to determine the radiation exposure. The following criteria for select to examined groups were used: the people from control group should be permanently living at clean area (far from STS or any places where the nuclear tests occur and far from any chemical industrial plants), e.g. they should not been exposed to radiation during their life (including a radiotherapy and cytostatics); the people of both examined groups should be matched regard to structure of families, age, ethnic background, parental age of P 0 and F 1 to the moment children birth, smoking habit, lifestyle and occupation. The maximum of available families by appropriate criteria in villages were chosen. As exposed inhabitation serves residents of following villages: Dolon, Mostik, Bodene, Cheremushki, Kanonerka, Karamyrza (all these villages are situated in Beskargai district). The inhabitants of Dzerzhinsk, Zhanatalap and Ushtobe villages of former Taldy-Kurgan oblast were included for study as a control group. The Bio-sample Bank consists of the frozen EDTA blood (at - 20 deg C), and isolated whole blood DNA (at - 70 deg C), the fixated erythrocytes (at - 70 deg C), isolated lymphocytes (in liquid nitrogen container) and lymphocyte cultures (at - 20 deg C). The Bio-sample Bank is supplement with a computerized database identifying the samples and number of vial stored, and information on individuals studied (all questionnaire data) and family tree. Results from the translocation FISH

  20. Experiences of frequent visits to the emergency department by residents with dementia in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpp, Tara J; Young, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) is a growing option for housing for older adults with dementia in the United States. Typically, nurses are not employed in AL in California. The purpose of this paper is to describe the health care incidents and experiences of residents and their family members who are transferred from AL to an (emergency department) ED. Data were collected from two dementia-only AL communities in California over a period of six months. In this study, only 32% of ED visits resulted in admission to acute care. Of the 71 residents, eight (11%) were responsible for 47% of the ED visits. Qualitative interviews with 3 employees and 9 family members and focus groups with 11 employee caregivers were conducted to augment the quantitative data. The qualitative theme of frustration and helplessness by family and staff to prevent repeated falling and ED transfers was identified, which complemented the quantitative findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dignity in Older Adults With Schizophrenia Residing in Assisted Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Darlene; McInnis-Perry, Gloria; Weeks, Lori E; Foley, Vicki

    2018-02-01

    There is a lack of nursing literature on older adults' perceptions of dignity, specifically those of older adults with schizophrenia. With the aging population, mental health services and support for older adults with schizophrenia will become a greater priority. The purpose of the current descriptive phenomenological study was to describe the meaning of the lived experience of dignity for older adults with schizophrenia residing in assisted living facilities. A purposive sample of eight older adults with schizophrenia residing in assisted living facilities participated in semi-structured interviews following the descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Five intertwined constituents were identified: (1) dignity is an intrinsic or self-regarding experience; (2) dignity is an experience that is reciprocal, extrinsic, and regards others, and is embedded in social relationships; (3) dignity can be eroded by ageism, stigma, discrimination, and alienation; (4) dignity can be interrupted when positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia are present and misunderstood by others; and (5) dignity can be enhanced when oneself and others embrace a recovery-focused relationship. Implications for mental health nursing are provided. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(2), 20-28.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Evaluation of a pet-assisted living intervention for improving functional status in assisted living residents with mild to moderate cognitive impairment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Erika; Galik, Elizabeth; Thomas, Sue A; Hall, P Sue; Chung, Seon Yoon; McCune, Sandra

    2015-05-01

    In older adults with cognitive impairment (CI), decreased functional status and increased behavioral symptoms require relocation from assisted living (AL) to nursing homes. Studies support positive effects of pets on health/function. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Pet AL (PAL) intervention to support physical, behavioral, and emotional function in AL residents with CI. Cognitively impaired AL residents randomized to 60-90 minute sessions [PAL (n = 22) or reminiscing (n = 18)] twice/week for 12 weeks. PAL interventionist encourages residents to perform skills with the visiting dog; reminiscing interventionist encourages residents to reminisce. Monthly assessment of physical (energy expenditure, activities of daily living), emotional (depression, apathy), and behavioral (agitation) function. In linear mixed models, physical activity depressive symptoms improved more with PAL. Evidence supports that the PAL program helps preserve/enhance function of AL residents with CI. Additional study is required to evaluate the duration and predictors of effectiveness of the PAL intervention. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Physical and psychosocial effects of Wii Fit exergames use in assisted living residents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ying-Yu; Scherer, Yvonne K; Montgomery, Carolyn A; Wu, Yow-Wu; Lucke, Kathleen T

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical and psychosocial effects of the Wii Fit exergames incorporating self-efficacy theory on assisted living residents. The study was a quasi-experimental pre/post-test design. Thirty-two participants were recruited from two assisted living facilities. Sixteen participants received the Wii Fit exergames incorporating self-efficacy theory twice a week for 4 weeks. The other participants received a health education program. Physical function, fear of falling, depression, and quality of life were evaluated. T tests were used for data analysis. After the 4-week intervention, the Wii Fit group showed significant improvements in balance (p < .01), mobility (p < .01), and depression (p < .05). The education group showed no significant improvement in any of the outcomes. Integrating concepts of self-efficacy theory with the exergames show promise as a potential tool to improve and maintain physical and psychosocial health for older adults. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. The Physical and Cognitive Performance Test for Residents in Assisted Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Mary Elizabeth; Rowe, Meredeth; Ersek, Mary; Ibrahim, Said; Shea, Judy A

    2017-07-01

    To develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a new performance-based instrument (Physical and Cognitive Performance Test for Assisted Living Facilities (PCPT ALF)) designed to assess the physical and cognitive skills associated with performance of activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). There were three stages in this study: development of instrument items and validity testing, a feasibility pilot study, and a cross-sectional trial to establish construct and criterion validity and reliability. One 116-bed assisted living facility (ALF). After a pilot test with 10 residents, a cross-sectional trial was conducted with 55 additional residents. The Barthel Index and Functional Independence Measure were used to estimate criterion validity. Construct validity was examined using exploratory factor analyses (EFAs). Disattenuated correlations between the PCPT ALF and other tools were all greater than 0.72, supporting criterion validity. Internal consistency (physical ability, α = 0.95; cognitive support, α = 0.92) and 1-week test-retest reliability (PCPT ALF, P = .93) were high, as was interrater reliability (IRR) (physical ability, 0.99; cognitive support, 1.00). In two EFAs, a one-factor solution accounted for 64.1% of the variance for the physical ability subscale and 63.5% of the variance for the cognitive support subscale. The findings provide early evidence of the PCPT ALF's validity and reliability. If confirmed, this study's findings may be used in future work to assess the success of interventions to prevent or slow decline in the skills associated with ADL and IADL performance in ALFs. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. A Reason to Live: The Protective Influence of Close Friendships on College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Keely J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among college age student's experiences in close friendship, emotional autonomy and reasons to live. This study was grounded in Attachment Theory and College Student Development. A sample of undergraduate students was drawn from one Southeastern U.S. university. A total of 441 participants…

  6. "Learning about Your Residents": How Assisted Living Residence Medication Aides Decide to Administer Pro Re Nata Medications to Persons with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Paula C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study identified how unlicensed staff members decide to administer medications prescribed pro re nata (PRN) to residents of assisted living (AL) settings designated for persons with dementia. Theories of knowledge, including explicit and implicit knowledge, discretion, and judgment, guided the analysis. Design and Methods: Data were…

  7. The Effect of Licensure Type on the Policies, Practices, and Resident Composition of Florida Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Debra; Burge, Stephanie; Quadagno, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Most assisted living facility (ALF) residents are White widows in their mid- to late 80s who need assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) because of frailty or cognitive decline. Yet, ALFs also serve younger individuals with physical disabilities, traumatic brain injury, or serious mental illness. We compare Florida ALFs with…

  8. Patterns of serum PCDD/Fs affected by vegetarian regime, consumption of locally produced food, and resident places of residents living near incinerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Hsiu-Ling; Lee Chang-Ching; Su Hue-Jen; Liao Pao-Chi [Inst. of Basic Medical Science, Medical Coll., National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Previous reports have been estimated that more than 90% of serum PCDD/Fs can be accounted for by the consumption of various food groups. Nouwen et al. suggested residents living near incinerators with the elevated dioxin exposure while they ate locally produced food compared to the general population from other areas. PCDD/Fs usually abound in fatty meats and marine foods, and consumption of which is the major pathway of human expose to PCDD/Fs. However, no distinct association was shown between vegetarian regime of human and their corresponding serum PCDD/Fs concentration. In addition, the resident region is associated to their corresponding dietary consumption and ambient exposure of PCDD/Fs, especially for subjects consumed the local foods with special dioxin-like contamination. The current study, therefore, was set to examine how dietary habits, including vegetarian regime and consumption of local food original for residents living near the incinerators are associated to serum PCDD/F concentrations. In addition, the further aim is to assess the influence on the serum PCDD/Fs levels resulting from subjects living in the alternative resident regions, even all of them exposed to PCDD/Fs emission from incinerators.

  9. How close do we live to water? A global analysis of population distance to freshwater bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Kummu

    Full Text Available Traditionally, people have inhabited places with ready access to fresh water. Today, over 50% of the global population lives in urban areas, and water can be directed via tens of kilometres of pipelines. Still, however, a large part of the world's population is directly dependent on access to natural freshwater sources. So how are inhabited places related to the location of freshwater bodies today? We present a high-resolution global analysis of how close present-day populations live to surface freshwater. We aim to increase the understanding of the relationship between inhabited places, distance to surface freshwater bodies, and climatic characteristics in different climate zones and administrative regions. Our results show that over 50% of the world's population lives closer than 3 km to a surface freshwater body, and only 10% of the population lives further than 10 km away. There are, however, remarkable differences between administrative regions and climatic zones. Populations in Australia, Asia, and Europe live closest to water. Although populations in arid zones live furthest away from freshwater bodies in absolute terms, relatively speaking they live closest to water considering the limited number of freshwater bodies in those areas. Population distributions in arid zones show statistically significant relationships with a combination of climatic factors and distance to water, whilst in other zones there is no statistically significant relationship with distance to water. Global studies on development and climate adaptation can benefit from an improved understanding of these relationships between human populations and the distance to fresh water.

  10. How Close Do We Live to Water? A Global Analysis of Population Distance to Freshwater Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummu, Matti; de Moel, Hans; Ward, Philip J.; Varis, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, people have inhabited places with ready access to fresh water. Today, over 50% of the global population lives in urban areas, and water can be directed via tens of kilometres of pipelines. Still, however, a large part of the world's population is directly dependent on access to natural freshwater sources. So how are inhabited places related to the location of freshwater bodies today? We present a high-resolution global analysis of how close present-day populations live to surface freshwater. We aim to increase the understanding of the relationship between inhabited places, distance to surface freshwater bodies, and climatic characteristics in different climate zones and administrative regions. Our results show that over 50% of the world's population lives closer than 3 km to a surface freshwater body, and only 10% of the population lives further than 10 km away. There are, however, remarkable differences between administrative regions and climatic zones. Populations in Australia, Asia, and Europe live closest to water. Although populations in arid zones live furthest away from freshwater bodies in absolute terms, relatively speaking they live closest to water considering the limited number of freshwater bodies in those areas. Population distributions in arid zones show statistically significant relationships with a combination of climatic factors and distance to water, whilst in other zones there is no statistically significant relationship with distance to water. Global studies on development and climate adaptation can benefit from an improved understanding of these relationships between human populations and the distance to fresh water. PMID:21687675

  11. A Comparison Between the Level of Happiness Among the Elderly Living at Home and That of Senior Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to compare the level of happiness among the elderly population living at home with that of senior home residents. Methods & Materials: This was a causative-comparative study. The statistical population consisted of all 60 plus men and women residing at home and senior homes in the city of Tabriz, from whom 100 samples were selected in two groups of 50 individuals (25 females and 25 males using an availability non-random sampling method. The oxford happiness questionnaire was used in order to collect data, which were then analyzed using an independent t-test. Results: Results showed that the level of happiness among the elderly living at home was significantly higher than that of senior home residents. Furthermore, among indicators of happiness, life satisfaction levels, psychological health, positive mood, and efficiency were significantly higher among the elderly living at home. However, there was no significant difference between the two in terms of self-esteem. Conclusion: Findings indicate that, due to better social and family support, the level of happiness among the elderly living at home is significantly higher than that of senior home residents. Conversely, residing at senior homes consequent to financial and family conditions, for those who would otherwise live with family, leads to depressed mood, dissatisfaction with life, and ultimately lack of happiness.

  12. LIVED EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH PROBLEMS OF ELDERLY RESIDING IN URBAN AREAS, KATHMANDU: PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bista Archana, Joshi Sarala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Globally, number of old age population is increasing with advancement of biomedical technology. Old age is the time associated with biological, psychological and social changes which situate elderly to acquire different health related problems. Objectives: To find out lived experiences of elderly regarding their health problems residing in homes of Kathmandu city. Methods: Qualitative hermeneutic phenomenology approach was adopted. Researcher selected purposively four elderly residing in an urban area of Kathmandu Valley as the study participants. In-depth interview was conducted by using in-depth interview guideline, as well as medical records, field notes and observation clues were recorded. Interview was conducted in Nepali Language and was audio taped. The recording was transcribed by the researcher herself, and the data were analyzed thematically. Finally, different sources of data were triangulated. Results: The four main themes identified were physical health problems, impaired functional abilities, psychological and social problems. Experienced physical health problems were joint pain, hearing and vision deficit, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, gastritis and fall injury. Impaired Functional abilities in performing activities of daily living was commonly experienced problems. Loneliness and decreased recent memory power were the psychological problems. Being neglected by family members, financial constraints for treatment and improper care during illness were the discerned social problems. Conclusion: Elderly are suffering from different physical health problems, impaired functional abilities, as well as various psycho-social problems. Thus, health promotional activities need to be promoted for decreasing morbidity of elderly. Family members need to be focused in the care of elderly through national policy.

  13. High rates of hospital admission among older residents in assisted living facilities: opportunities for intervention and impact on acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David B; Amuah, Joseph E; Strain, Laurel A; Wodchis, Walter P; Soo, Andrea; Eliasziw, Misha; Gruneir, Andrea; Hagen, Brad; Teare, Gary; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about health or service use outcomes for residents of Canadian assisted living facilities. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of admission to hospital over 1 year for residents of designated (i.e., publicly funded) assisted living (DAL) facilities in Alberta, to compare this rate with the rate among residents of long-term care facilities, and to identify individual and facility predictors of hospital admission for DAL residents. Participants were 1066 DAL residents (mean age ± standard deviation 84.9 ± 7.3 years) and 976 longterm care residents (85.4 ± 7.6 years) from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Research nurses completed a standardized comprehensive assessment for each resident and interviewed family caregivers at baseline (2006 to 2008) and 1 year later. We used standardized interviews with administrators to generate facility- level data. We determined hospital admissions through linkage with the Alberta Inpatient Discharge Abstract Database. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of hospital admission. The cumulative annual incidence of hospital admission was 38.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.9%- 41.9%) for DAL residents and 13.7% (95% CI 11.5%-15.8%) for long-term care residents. The risk of hospital admission was significantly greater for DAL residents with greater health instability, fatigue, medication use (11 or more medications), and 2 or more hospital admissions in the preceding year. The risk of hospital admission was also significantly higher for residents from DAL facilities with a smaller number of spaces, no licensed practical and/ or registered nurses on site (or on site less than 24 hours a day, 7 days a week), no chain affiliation, and from select health regions. The incidence of hospital admission was about 3 times higher among DAL residents than among long-term care residents, and the risk of hospital admission was associated with a number of

  14. Peripheral blood cells among community residents living near nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yuan-Teh; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Yang, Chi-Yu; Chen, Wen Jone [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, No. 7 Chungshan South Road, 10020 Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Sung, Fung C. [Institute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lin, Ruey S. [Institute of Epidemiology, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    2001-12-03

    Information about hematopoieses as a result of exposure to very low levels of radiation is scarce. To investigate the human hematopoietic effect of very low level radiation exposure, measurements of peripheral blood components were performed among 3602 men and women, aged 35 and above, living in a community near two nuclear power installations in Chinshan, Taiwan. The radiation level that each individual was exposed to was represented by a surrogate level, '+', a transformed distance from each individual's residence to the two power plants D{sub 1} and D{sub 2}. In addition to comparing average hematology measurements, multiple regression analyses were done to include age, gender, smoking, drinking status and the surrogate radiation exposure level as independent variables. Univariate and bivariate analyses showed that the hematology measurements had significant associations with age, gender, smoking or drinking. The multiple regression analyses revealed that significant positive associations with '+' were found for hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet, white blood cell and red blood cell. The platelet count might increase for 208.7x10{sup 3}/{mu}l if the exposure from the nuclear plants increased by one exposure unit. This type of association implies that those who lived closer to the nuclear power installation had a higher blood cell count; we suspect that this could be a type of radiation hormesis.

  15. Assisted living facility administrator and direct care staff views of resident mental health concerns and staff training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Emily; Quijano, Louise M; McAlister, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This community needs assessment surveyed 21 administrators and 75 direct care staff at 9 larger and 12 smaller assisted living facilities (ALFs) regarding perceptions of resident mental health concerns, direct care staff capacity to work with residents with mental illness, and direct care staff training needs. Group differences in these perceptions were also examined. Both administrators and directcare staff indicated that direct care staff would benefit from mental health-related training, and direct care staff perceived themselves as being more comfortable working with residents with mental illness than administrators perceived them to be. Implications for gerontological social work are discussed.

  16. The Impact of the Physical Environment on Depressive Symptoms of Older Residents Living in Care Homes: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Rachel; Sheehan, Bart; Cain, Rebecca; Griffin, James; Jennings, Paul A

    2017-05-23

    Forty percent of residents living in care homes in the United Kingdom have significant depressive symptoms. Care homes can appear to be depressing places, but whether the physical environment of homes directly affects depression in care home residents is unknown. This study explores the relationship between the physical environment and depressive symptoms of older people living in care homes. In a prospective cohort study the physical environment of 50 care homes were measured using the Sheffield Care Environment Assessment Matrix (SCEAM) and depressive symptoms of 510 residents measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). The study was supplemented with semi-structured interviews with residents living in the care homes. Quantitative data were analyzed using multi-level modeling, and qualitative data analyzed using a thematic framework approach. The overall physical environment of care homes (overall SCEAM score) did not predict depressive symptoms. Controlling for dependency, social engagement, and home type, having access to outdoor space was the only environmental variable to significantly predict depressive symptoms. Residents interviewed reported that access to outdoor space was restricted in many ways: locked doors, uneven foot paths, steep steps, and needing permission or assistance to go outside. We provide new evidence to suggest that access to outdoor space predicts depressive symptoms in older people living in care home. Interventions aimed at increasing access to outdoor spaces could positively affect depressive symptoms in older people. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  17. Diabetes prevalence and treatment adherence in residents living in a colonia located on the West Texas, USA/Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Robert L; Olson, Thomas; Wiebe, John; Bean, Nathaniel H; DiGregorio, Rena; Guillermina, Mina; Ortiz, Melchor

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about how diabetes affects the health status of Hispanic people living in colonias located along the USA/Mexico border. The purpose of this report is to describe the demographic factors, prevalence of diabetes, and the health status of the residents living in a colonia on the border between El Paso, Texas, USA, and Juarez, Mexico, and to report the residents' adherence to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) protocols for the management of type 2 diabetes. This study included 188 participants. The instruments used included a demographic questionnaire, the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics, "Cutting Down, Annoyance by Criticism, Guilty Feelings, and Eye-openers", BRFSS, and the Short Form-36 (v2). The prevalence of diabetes was 15.4% and 41.3% of the residents had a Body Mass Index score > 30. The rate of hypertension, elevated cholesterol, and depression for those reporting diabetes was significant. The SF-36 v2 physical score for the diabetic residents was 42.9 and it was 52.4 for the non-diabetic residents. The average resident of the colonia who reports diabetes has many health disadvantages when compared to those in other parts of Texas and the USA generally.

  18. "I Get Along with Most of Them": Direct Care Workers' Relationships with Residents' Families in Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Candace L.; Ball, Mary M.; Perkins, Molly M.; Hollingsworth, Carole; Lepore, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to explore staff-family relationships in assisted living facilities (ALFs) as they are experienced by care staff and perceived by administrators. We identify factors that influence relationships and explore how interactions with residents' families affect care staff's caregiving experiences. Design and…

  19. Ambivalence in Place Attachment : The Lived Experiences of Residents in Declining Neighbourhoods Facing Demolition in Shenyang, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kleinhans, R.J.; van Ham, M.

    This paper investigates the place attachment of residents in declining neighbourhoods that are facing demolition in Shenyang, China. Through in-depth interviews with homeowners living in danwei communities, or urban villages, at the pre-demolition phase, this paper reveals the strong connection

  20. Morbidity and mortality of people who live close to municipal waste landfills: a multisite cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataloni, Francesca; Badaloni, Chiara; Golini, Martina Nicole; Bolignano, Andrea; Bucci, Simone; Sozzi, Roberto; Forastiere, Francesco; Davoli, Marina; Ancona, Carla

    2016-06-01

    The evidence on the health effects related to residing close to landfills is controversial. Nine landfills for municipal waste have been operating in the Lazio region (Central Italy) for several decades. We evaluated the potential health effects associated with contamination from landfills using the estimated concentration of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) as exposure. A cohort of residents within 5 km of landfills was enrolled (subjects resident on 1 January 1996 and those who subsequently moved into the areas until 2008) and followed for mortality and hospitalizations until 31 December 2012. Assessment of exposure to the landfill (H2S as a tracer) was performed for each subject at enrolment, using a Lagrangian dispersion model. Information on several confounders was available (gender, age, socioeconomic position, outdoor PM10 concentration, and distance from busy roads and industries). Cox regression analysis was performed [Hazard Ratios (HRs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs)]. The cohort included 242 409 individuals. H2S exposure was associated with mortality from lung cancer and respiratory diseases (e.g. HR for increment of 1 ng/m(3) H2S: 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19; HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.19, respectively). There were also associations between H2S and hospitalization for respiratory diseases (HR = 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.03), especially acute respiratory infections among children (0-14 years) (HR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.11). Exposure to H2S, a tracer of airborne contamination from landfills, was associated with lung cancer mortality as well as with mortality and morbidity for respiratory diseases. The link with respiratory disease is plausible and coherent with previous studies, whereas the association with lung cancer deserves confirmation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  1. A critical assessment of geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Olga A; Oyana, Tonny J

    2009-01-01

    To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the floodplains.

  2. A Critical Assessment of Geographic Clusters of Breast and Lung Cancer Incidences among Residents Living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guajardo, O.A.; Oyana, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Materials and Methods. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. Results and Conclusion. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P=.001) clusters of cancer incidences were observed among residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the flood plains.

  3. A Critical Assessment of Geographic Clusters of Breast and Lung Cancer Incidences among Residents Living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Guajardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess previously determined geographic clusters of breast and lung cancer incidences among residents living near the Tittabawassee and Saginaw Rivers, Michigan, using a new set of environmental factors. Materials and Methods. Breast and lung cancer data were acquired from the Michigan Department of Community Health, along with point source pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The datasets were used to determine whether there is a spatial association between disease risk and environmental contamination. GIS and spatial techniques were combined with statistical analysis to investigate local risk of breast and lung cancer. Results and Conclusion. The study suggests that neighborhoods in close proximity to the river were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, while increased risk of lung cancer was detected among neighborhoods in close proximity to point source pollution and major highways. Statistically significant (P≤.001 clusters of cancer incidences were observed among residents living near the rivers. These findings are useful to researchers and governmental agencies for risk assessment, regulation, and control of environmental contamination in the floodplains.

  4. Coming together and pulling apart: Exploring the influence of functional status on co-resident relationships in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Navtej K; Kemp, Candace L; Ball, Mary M; Burgess, Elisabeth O; Perkins, Molly M

    2013-12-01

    Social relationships can have considerable influence on physical and mental well-being in later life, particularly for those in long-term care settings such as assisted living (AL). Research set in AL suggests that other residents are among the most available social contacts and that co-resident relationships can affect life satisfaction, quality of life, and well-being. Functional status is a major factor influencing relationships, yet AL research has not studied in-depth or systematically considered the role it plays in residents' relationships. This study examines the influences of physical and mental function on co-resident relationships in AL and identifies the factors shaping the influence of functional status. We present an analysis of qualitative data collected over a one-year period in two distinct AL settings. Data collection included: participant observation, informal interviews, and formal in-depth interviews with staff, residents, administrators and visitors, as well as surveys with residents. Grounded theory methods guided our data collection and analysis. Our analysis identified the core category, "coming together and pulling apart", which signifies that functional status is multi-directional, fluid, and operates in different ways in various situations and across time. Key facility- (e.g., admission and retention practices, staff intervention) and resident-level (e.g., personal and situational characteristics) factors shape the influence of functional status on co-resident relationships. Based on our findings, we suggest strategies for promoting positive relationships among residents in AL, including the need to educate staff, families, and residents. © 2013.

  5. Modeling Usersr Data Traces in Multi-Resident Ambient Assisted Living Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ghasemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling usersr data traces is of crucial importance for human behavior analysis and context-aware applications in ambient assisted living (AAL environments. However, learning the parameters of the underlying model is a challenging task in multi-occupant environments; because, the anonymous usersr data traces are aggregated temporally. This paper proposes a novel method for modeling usersr data traces in multi-resident sensor-based AAL environments. A Markov chain was considered as the underlying model. We aimed at estimating the parameters of the Markov chain directly out of usersr aggregate data. For this purpose, we hired the idea of conditional least squares (CLS estimation. However, the CLS estimations can be inconsistent in the circumstances of AAL environments. To tackle this problem, we proposed to regularize the CLS estimations using spatial information of sensors. This information was extracted using an accessibility graph, made out of the deployed sensor network. To evaluate the proposed method, a well-known and publicly available dataset was used. The proposed method was compared with the standard CLS, using Kullback-Leibler (KL divergence, and mean squared error (MSE criteria. The results conveyed that the proposed method results in estimations with lower KL divergences from ground truth, compared to CLS. Also, the proposed method outperformed CLS with a MSE of 2.7atimes;10lsupgaminus;3l/supg.

  6. Measuring change in activities of daily living in nursing home residents with moderate to severe cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fries Brant E

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the responsiveness of the Minimum Data Set Activities of Daily Living (MDS-ADL Scale to change over time by examining the change in physical function in adults with moderate to severe dementia with no comorbid illness who had been resident in a nursing home for over 90 days. Methods Longitudinal data were collected on nursing home residents with moderate (n = 7001 or severe (n = 4616 dementia in one US state from the US national Minimum Data Set (MDS. Severity of dementia was determined by the MDS Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS. Physical function was assessed by summing the seven items (bed mobility, transfer, locomotion, dressing, eating, toilet use, personal hygiene on the MDS activities of daily living (ADL Long Form scale. Mean change over time of MDS-ADL scores were estimated at three and six months for residents with moderate (CPS score of 3 and severe (CPS score of 4 or 5 dementia. Results Physical function in residents with moderate cognitive impairment deteriorated over six months by an average of 1.78 points on the MDS-ADL Long Form scale, while those with severe cognitive impairment declined by an average of 1.70 points. Approximately one quarter of residents in both groups showed some improvement in physical function over the six month period. Residents with moderate cognitive impairment experienced the greatest deterioration in early-loss and mid-loss ADL items (personal hygiene, dressing, toilet use and residents with severe cognitive impairment showed the greatest deterioration in activities related to eating, a late loss ADL. Conclusion The MDS-ADL Long Form scale detected clinically meaningful change in physical function in a large cohort of long-stay nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia, supporting its use as a research tool in future studies.

  7. Measuring change in activities of daily living in nursing home residents with moderate to severe cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, G Iain; Hastie, Charlotte L; Morris, John N; Fries, Brant E; Ankri, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the responsiveness of the Minimum Data Set Activities of Daily Living (MDS-ADL) Scale to change over time by examining the change in physical function in adults with moderate to severe dementia with no comorbid illness who had been resident in a nursing home for over 90 days. Methods Longitudinal data were collected on nursing home residents with moderate (n = 7001) or severe (n = 4616) dementia in one US state from the US national Minimum Data Set (MDS). Severity of dementia was determined by the MDS Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS). Physical function was assessed by summing the seven items (bed mobility, transfer, locomotion, dressing, eating, toilet use, personal hygiene) on the MDS activities of daily living (ADL) Long Form scale. Mean change over time of MDS-ADL scores were estimated at three and six months for residents with moderate (CPS score of 3) and severe (CPS score of 4 or 5) dementia. Results Physical function in residents with moderate cognitive impairment deteriorated over six months by an average of 1.78 points on the MDS-ADL Long Form scale, while those with severe cognitive impairment declined by an average of 1.70 points. Approximately one quarter of residents in both groups showed some improvement in physical function over the six month period. Residents with moderate cognitive impairment experienced the greatest deterioration in early-loss and mid-loss ADL items (personal hygiene, dressing, toilet use) and residents with severe cognitive impairment showed the greatest deterioration in activities related to eating, a late loss ADL. Conclusion The MDS-ADL Long Form scale detected clinically meaningful change in physical function in a large cohort of long-stay nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia, supporting its use as a research tool in future studies. PMID:16584565

  8. Analysis and interpretation of residence time distribution experimental curves in FM01-LC reactor using axial dispersion and plug dispersion exchange models with closed-closed boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, Fernando F. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Diaz, Martin R., E-mail: mcruz@tese.edu.m [Division de Quimica y Bioquimica, Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Av. Tecnologico S/N Esq. Av. Hank Gonzalez, Valle de Anahuac, C.P. 55120, Ecatepec, Edo. de Mex (Mexico); Rivero, Eligio P. [Departamento de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlan, Av. Primero de Mayo, Cuautitlan Izcalli, C.P. 54740, Edo. de Mex (Mexico); Gonzalez, Ignacio [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    The liquid phase mixing flow pattern at low (20 < Re < 120) and intermediate liquid flow rate (120 < Re < 400) was studied by means of residence time distribution (RTD) experimental curve in an up-flow Filter Press electrochemical reactor (FM01-LC) bench scale. For this purpose, a plastic turbulence promoter was used with stainless-steel and platinised titanium structural meshes as electrodes in channel configuration. To visualize and determine the mixing flow pattern in the liquid phase, the stimulus-response technique was employed using dextran blue (D{sub M} = 1.058 x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} s{sup -1}, 25 {sup o}C, in water) as model tracer. A theoretical analysis and approximation RTD experimental curves with axial dispersion model (ADM) and plug dispersion exchange model (PDE), with 'closed-closed vessel' boundary conditions were used in order to establish a better approximation of the axial dispersion, stagnant zones, channelling and by-pass (preference flow) effects present at low and intermediate Re. RTD curves show that the liquid flow pattern in the FM01-LC deviates considerably from axial dispersion model at low Re, where the FM01-LC exhibits large channelling, stagnant zones, and dead zone. The PDE model represents fairly this deviation from ideal flow (less dead zone).

  9. Determination of total tritium in urine from residents living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Qinshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bao-Ming; Ji, Yan-Qin; Tian, Qing; Shao, Xiang-Zhang; Yin, Liang-Liang; Su, Xu

    2015-01-16

    To estimate the tritium doses of the residents living in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant, urine samples of 34 adults were collected from residents living near the Qinshan nuclear power plant. The tritium-in-urine (HTO plus OBT) was measured by liquid scintillation counting. The doses of tritium-in-urine from participants living at 2, 10 and 22 km were in a range of 1.26-6.73 Bq/L, 1.31-3.09 Bq/L and 2.21-3.81 Bq/L, respectively, while the average activity concentrations of participants from the three groups were 3.53 ± 1.62, 2.09 ± 0.62 and 2.97 ± 0.78 Bq/L, respectively. The personal committed effective doses for males were 2.5 ± 1.7 nSv and for females they were 2.9 ± 1.3 nSv. These results indicate that tritium concentrations in urine samples from residents living at 2 km from a nuclear power plant are significantly higher than those at 10 km. It may be the downwind direction that caused a higher dose in participants living at 22 km. All the measured doses of tritium-in-urine are in a background level range.

  10. [Heat vulnerability assessment in Jinan city: a comparison between residents living in urban centers and urban-fringe areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fangjun; Xin, Zheng; Zhou, Lin; Bai, Li; Wang, Yongming; Gu, Shaohua; Liu, Shouqin; Li, Mengmeng; Sang, Shaowei; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Qiyong

    2014-06-01

    To find out the differences in regional characteristics of heat vulnerability between people living in urban centers and urban-fringe areas of Jinan city so as to provide basis for the development of adaptation measures to heat. A cross-sectional survey on heat vulnerability was conducted in urban center and urban-fringe areas of Jinan city, using a self-designed questionnaire among 801 residents at the age of 16 years or older in August 2013. Data of 23 indicators related to heat vulnerability were collected and aggregated to 7 dimensions:health and medical insurance, social networks, heat perception and adaptive behavior, economic status, resources, living environment and working environment. An index score was calculated using a balanced weighted average approach for each dimension, ranging from 0 to 1, with the closer to 1 as greater vulnerability. The scores on heat perception and adaptive behavior, economic status, resources and working environment dimensions for urban-fringe areas were 0.42,0.63,0.55 and 0.62, statistically significantly higher than the urban center area of 0.41,0.51,0.26 and 0.41. Scores of living environment, social networks and health/medical insurance dimensions for urban center area were 0.57,0.49 and 0.31, which were all higher than the urban-fringe areas of 0.50,0.46 and 0.25, with differences statistically significant. Residents living in the urban center might be more vulnerable to heat in terms of living environment, health/medical insurance and social networks while residents living in the urban-fringe areas might more be vulnerable in terms of heat perception and adaptive behavior, economic status, life resources and working environment. These facts indicated that heat vulnerability among residents could be quite different, even at a fine geographic sale. We would thus suggest that intervention strategies on protecting people from heat, should be more targeted.

  11. Comparing frailty measures in their ability to predict adverse outcome among older residents of assisted living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan David B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have directly compared the competing approaches to identifying frailty in more vulnerable older populations. We examined the ability of two versions of a frailty index (43 vs. 83 items, the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS frailty criteria, and the CHESS scale to accurately predict the occurrence of three outcomes among Assisted Living (AL residents followed over one year. Methods The three frailty measures and the CHESS scale were derived from assessment items completed among 1,066 AL residents (aged 65+ participating in the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES. Adjusted risks of one-year mortality, hospitalization and long-term care placement were estimated for those categorized as frail or pre-frail compared with non-frail (or at high/intermediate vs. low risk on CHESS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated for select models to assess the predictive accuracy of the different frailty measures and CHESS scale in relation to the three outcomes examined. Results Frail subjects defined by the three approaches and those at high risk for decline on CHESS showed a statistically significant increased risk for death and long-term care placement compared with those categorized as either not frail or at low risk for decline. The risk estimates for hospitalization associated with the frailty measures and CHESS were generally weaker with one of the frailty indices (43 items showing no significant association. For death and long-term care placement, the addition of frailty (however derived or CHESS significantly improved on the AUC obtained with a model including only age, sex and co-morbidity, though the magnitude of improvement was sometimes small. The different frailty/risk models did not differ significantly from each other in predicting mortality or hospitalization; however, one of the frailty indices (83 items showed significantly better performance over the other measures in predicting long

  12. Comparing frailty measures in their ability to predict adverse outcome among older residents of assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David B; Freiheit, Elizabeth A; Strain, Laurel A; Patten, Scott B; Schmaltz, Heidi N; Rolfson, Darryl; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2012-09-14

    Few studies have directly compared the competing approaches to identifying frailty in more vulnerable older populations. We examined the ability of two versions of a frailty index (43 vs. 83 items), the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) frailty criteria, and the CHESS scale to accurately predict the occurrence of three outcomes among Assisted Living (AL) residents followed over one year. The three frailty measures and the CHESS scale were derived from assessment items completed among 1,066 AL residents (aged 65+) participating in the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Adjusted risks of one-year mortality, hospitalization and long-term care placement were estimated for those categorized as frail or pre-frail compared with non-frail (or at high/intermediate vs. low risk on CHESS). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated for select models to assess the predictive accuracy of the different frailty measures and CHESS scale in relation to the three outcomes examined. Frail subjects defined by the three approaches and those at high risk for decline on CHESS showed a statistically significant increased risk for death and long-term care placement compared with those categorized as either not frail or at low risk for decline. The risk estimates for hospitalization associated with the frailty measures and CHESS were generally weaker with one of the frailty indices (43 items) showing no significant association. For death and long-term care placement, the addition of frailty (however derived) or CHESS significantly improved on the AUC obtained with a model including only age, sex and co-morbidity, though the magnitude of improvement was sometimes small. The different frailty/risk models did not differ significantly from each other in predicting mortality or hospitalization; however, one of the frailty indices (83 items) showed significantly better performance over the other measures in predicting long-term care placement. Using different

  13. Larger eggs in resident brown trout living in sympatry with anadromous brown trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, H.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    ) or migratory populations (44.5-121.9 mg), after accounting for differences in body size. In Jorlandaan, some resident females even had a larger absolute mean egg weight than any of the migratory females found in the stream Resident trout had low absolute fecundity, and our data suggest that resident females...... in Jorlandan produce large eggs at the expense of their fecundity The extremely large relative egg size in resident Jorlandaan females suggests that the production of large offspring enhances fitness, possibly through increased fry survival....

  14. Discordance Between Resident and Active Bacterioplankton in Free-Living and Particle-Associated Communities in Estuary Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Ling; Salam, Nimaichand; Wang, Pan-Deng; Chen, Lin-Xing; Jiao, Jian-Yu; Li, Xin; Xian, Wen-Dong; Han, Ming-Xian; Fang, Bao-Zhu; Mou, Xiao-Zhen; Li, Wen-Jun

    2018-03-16

    Bacterioplankton are the major driving force for biogeochemical cycles in estuarine ecosystems, but the communities that mediate these processes are largely unexplored. We sampled in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) to examine potential differences in the taxonomic composition of resident (DNA-based) and active (RNA-based) bacterioplankton communities in free-living and particle-associated fractions. MiSeq sequencing data showed that the overall bacterial diversity in particle-associated fractions was higher than in free-living communities. Further in-depth analyses of the sequences revealed a positive correlation between resident and active bacterioplankton communities for the particle-associated fraction but not in the free-living fraction. However, a large overlapping of OTUs between free-living and particle-associated communities in PRE suggested that the two fractions may be actively exchanged. We also observed that the positive correlation between resident and active communities is more prominent among the abundant OTUs (relative abundance > 0.2%). Further, the results from the present study indicated that low-abundance bacterioplankton make an important contribution towards the metabolic activity in PRE.

  15. Examining the Impact Parental Educational Attainment Has on Students' Perceptions of Residence Hall Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the impact parental educational attainment had on how students perceived their residence hall environment. This multi-campus study utilized the University Residence Environment Scale, along with a demographic form to gather data. The study occurred on three campuses during the Spring 2012 semester and had 347…

  16. Urology residents experience comparable workload profiles when performing live porcine nephrectomies and robotic surgery virtual reality training modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Klein, Martina; Schommer, Eric; Thiel, David D; Samavedi, Srinivas; Kumar, Anup; Leveillee, Raymond J; Thomas, Raju; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Su, Li-Ming; Mui, Engy; Smith, Roger; Patel, Vipul

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of improving the quality of residents' education, the Southeastern Section of the American Urological Association (SES AUA) hosts an annual robotic training course for its residents. The workshop involves performing a robotic live porcine nephrectomy as well as virtual reality robotic training modules. The aim of this study was to evaluate workload levels of urology residents when performing a live porcine nephrectomy and the virtual reality robotic surgery training modules employed during this workshop. Twenty-one residents from 14 SES AUA programs participated in 2015. On the first-day residents were taught with didactic lectures by faculty. On the second day, trainees were divided into two groups. Half were asked to perform training modules of the Mimic da Vinci-Trainer (MdVT, Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA) for 4 h, while the other half performed nephrectomy procedures on a live porcine model using the da Vinci Si robot (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). After the first 4 h the groups changed places for another 4-h session. All trainees were asked to complete the NASA-TLX 1-page questionnaire following both the MdVT simulation and live animal model sessions. A significant interface and TLX interaction was observed. The interface by TLX interaction was further analyzed to determine whether the scores of each of the six TLX scales varied across the two interfaces. The means of the TLX scores observed at the two interfaces were similar. The only significant difference was observed for frustration, which was significantly higher at the simulation than the animal model, t (20) = 4.12, p = 0.001. This could be due to trainees' familiarity with live anatomical structures over skill set simulations which remain a real challenge to novice surgeons. Another reason might be that the simulator provides performance metrics for specific performance traits as well as composite scores for entire exercises. Novice trainees experienced

  17. Global trade, local impacts: lessons from California on health impacts and environmental justice concerns for residents living near freight rail yards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricko, Andrea; Rowland, Glovioell; Eckel, Sandrah; Logan, Angelo; Taher, Maryam; Wilson, John

    2014-02-10

    Global trade has increased nearly 100-fold since 1950, according to the World Trade Organization. Today, major changes in trade are occurring with the advent of mega-ships that can transport thousands more containers than cargo ships now in use. Because global trade is expected to increase dramatically, the railroad industry-in the U.S. alone-has invested more than $5 billion a year over the past decade to expand rail yards and enhance rail routes to transport goods from ports to retail destinations. This article describes cancer risks for residents living in close proximity to rail yards with emissions of diesel particulate matter pollution from locomotives, trucks and yard equipment. The article examines the demographics (income, race/ethnicity) of populations living in the highest estimated cancer risk zones near 18 major rail yards in California, concluding that the majority are over-represented by either lower-income or minority residents (or both). The authors also describe a review of the news media and environmental impact reports to determine if rail yards are still being constructed or expanded in close proximity to homes and schools or in working class/working poor communities of color. The paper suggests policy efforts that might provide more public health protection and result in more "environmentally just" siting of rail yards. The authors conclude that diesel pollution from rail yards, which creates significant diesel cancer risks for those living near the facilities, is an often overlooked public health, health disparities and environmental justice issue in the U.S. The conclusions are relevant to other countries where international trade is increasing and large new intermodal rail facilities are being considered.

  18. Global Trade, Local Impacts: Lessons from California on Health Impacts and Environmental Justice Concerns for Residents Living near Freight Rail Yards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricko, Andrea; Rowland, Glovioell; Eckel, Sandrah; Logan, Angelo; Taher, Maryam; Wilson, John

    2014-01-01

    Global trade has increased nearly 100-fold since 1950, according to the World Trade Organization. Today, major changes in trade are occurring with the advent of mega-ships that can transport thousands more containers than cargo ships now in use. Because global trade is expected to increase dramatically, the railroad industry—in the U.S. alone—has invested more than $5 billion a year over the past decade to expand rail yards and enhance rail routes to transport goods from ports to retail destinations. This article describes cancer risks for residents living in close proximity to rail yards with emissions of diesel particulate matter pollution from locomotives, trucks and yard equipment. The article examines the demographics (income, race/ethnicity) of populations living in the highest estimated cancer risk zones near 18 major rail yards in California, concluding that the majority are over-represented by either lower-income or minority residents (or both). The authors also describe a review of the news media and environmental impact reports to determine if rail yards are still being constructed or expanded in close proximity to homes and schools or in working class/working poor communities of color. The paper suggests policy efforts that might provide more public health protection and result in more “environmentally just” siting of rail yards. The authors conclude that diesel pollution from rail yards, which creates significant diesel cancer risks for those living near the facilities, is an often overlooked public health, health disparities and environmental justice issue in the U.S. The conclusions are relevant to other countries where international trade is increasing and large new intermodal rail facilities are being considered. PMID:24518649

  19. Health status of radiation exposed residents living near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site based on health assessment by interview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Kyoko; Kawano, Noriyuki; Ohtaki, Megu; Harada, Yuka; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hadara, Hironori; Muldagaliyev, Talgat; Apsalikov, Kazbek

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to examine the aftereffects of radiation exposure on residents of villages near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) in Kazakhstan. Our Hiroshima University (Japan) research team began field research in 2002 by means of health assessments conducted via interviews. We focus on persons who responded to questions concerning their medical conditions and symptoms. In this paper, we summarize and analyze, using multiple linear logistic regression analysis, the answers obtained by questionnaire survey. The results show: 31% of the residents reported that they felt bad or were in very poor health. Residents living in villages having higher radiation levels were more likely to report having poor or very poor health, minor complaints such as loss of sleep, headaches, nighttime sweating and swollen arms or legs, and the need for nursing care in performing activities of daily living. Symptoms reported by over 40% of the respondents included high blood pressure, heart disease and arthralgia/lower back pain/arthritis. Our results suggest that radiation exposure in the Semipalatinsk area is one of the causes of poor health in general among residents. There is also a possibility that radiation exposure has influenced the incidence of some specific medical conditions. (author)

  20. Sleep quality and some factors affecting sleep quality in the students living in the residence hall of a university

    OpenAIRE

    Ozge Yavuz Sari; Sarp Uner; Berkem Buyukakkus; Emine Ozlem Bostanci; Aytek Huseyin Celiksoz; Mehmet Budak

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Sleep disorders are remarkable public health problems as they adversely affect physical, mental and social health and may cause accidents and decline in academic performance and labor productivity. Aim of the study is assessing sleep quality and determining some factors affecting sleep quality in the students living in the residence hall of a university. METHOD: It is a cross sectional study conducted with 277 students, 180 of whom are female. Data were collected via a questionnaire ...

  1. Minisatellite mutations and retrospective biodosimetry of population living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, C.; Bersimbacv, R. I.; Dubrova, Y. E.; Hulten, M.; Bigbee, W. I.; Murphy, B. P.; Koivistoinen, A.; Tankimonova, M.; Mamyrbaeva, Z.; Djansugarova, L.; Mustonen, R.; Salomaa, S.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine minisatellite mutation rates in families in three generations and to perform retrospective biodosimetry of individuals in these families living close to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. The oldes generation (Po) lived in the area at the time of the first Soviet nuclear test in 1949 whereas the younger generations (F1,F2) were exposed to smaller doses from the residual fallout and later tests. Matched control families in three generations living in non-contamianted areas were analysed in parallel. The retrospective biodosimetry comprehended two endpoints; chromosomal translocations determined by FISH chromosome painting and the glycophorin A (GPA) somatic mutation assay. The minisatellite mutation rate in the cohort of P0 parents was 1-8-fold higher than in the control non-exposed population. Moreover, the minisatellite mutatin rate in the cohort of f1 parents from the exposed area showed a significant negative correlation with with the year of birth, fully consistent with the decay of radioisotopes after the cessation of surface and atmospheric nuclear tests. The results from the FISH painting analysis showed similar translocation frequencies in the Semipalatinsk cohort and the control group. Based on the FISH results it can be concluded that the P0 generation has received a cumulative mean dose of less than 0.5 Gy. The GPA assay did not reveal significant diffrences in the variant cell frequencies for all subjects from the Semipalatinsk area compared with the matched controls. However, a significant increase (P<0.05) of the mean allele-loss φN variant frequency was observed among the exposed P0 generation in comparison to controls. Considering the sensitivity of the GPA assay, the results suggest that the mean dose to the P0 generation of the affected villages was relatively low and in accordance to the results obtained using FISH. (Author) 17 refs

  2. Non-verbal communication of the residents living in homes for the older people in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Marija; Kovacev, Asja Nina; Sustersic, Olga; Kragelj, Lijana Zaletel

    2010-09-01

    Aging of the population is a growing problem in all developed societies. The older people need more health and social services, and their life quality in there is getting more and more important. The study aimed at determining the characteristics of non-verbal communication of the older people living in old people's homes (OPH). The sample consisted of 267 residents of the OPH, aged 65-96 years, and 267 caregivers from randomly selected twenty-seven OPH. Three types of non-verbal communication were observed and analysed using univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In face expressions and head movements about 75% older people looked at the eyes of their caregivers, and about 60% were looking around, while laughing or pressing the lips together was rarely noticed. The differences between genders were not statistically significant while statistically significant differences among different age groups was observed in dropping the eyes (p = 0.004) and smiling (0.008). In hand gestures and trunk movements, majority of older people most often moved forwards and clenched fingers, while most rarely they stroked and caressed their caregivers. The differences between genders were statistically significant in leaning on the table (p = 0.001), and changing the position on the chair (0.013). Statistically significant differences among age groups were registered in leaning forwards (p = 0.006) and pointing to the others (p = 0.036). In different modes of speaking and paralinguistic signs almost 75% older people spoke normally, about 70% kept silent, while they rarely quarrelled. The differences between genders were not statistically significant while statistically significant differences among age groups was observed in persuasive speaking (p = 0.007). The present study showed that older people in OPH in Slovenia communicated significantly less frequently with hand gestures and trunk movements than with face expressions and head movements or different modes of speaking

  3. Short-lived Isotopes from a Close-by AGB Star Triggering the Protosolar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, R.; Busso, M.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Straniero, O.

    The presence of short-lived isotopes in the early solar system, in particular 26Al, 41Ca, 60Fe, and 107Pd, point to a close-by and fresh nucleosynthesis source, possibly triggering the collapse of the protosolar nebula. We present the results of nucleosynthesis calculations based on an AGB polluting hypothesis. A general concordance of the predicted yields of the above radioactivities relative to 26Al can be obtained in the case of an intermediate mass AGB star with hot bottom burning in the envelope (thus producing 26Al), and mixing through a series of third dredge-up episodes a fraction of the C-rich and s-processed material from the He intershell with the extended envelope. Polution of the protosolar nebula with freshly synthesized material may derive from the efficient winds of the AGB star. In AGB stars, the s-process nucleosynthesis occurs both during the maximum phase of every thermal runaway, driven by the partial activation of the 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg reaction, and in the interpulse phase, where the 13C nuclei are fully consumed in radiative conditions by the activation of the 13C(alpha,n)16O reaction. We have used different prescriptions for the amount of the 13C nuclei present in the intershell. A minimum amount of 13C is naturally expected in the ashes of H-shell burning. Possible formation of an extra "13C-pocket" derives from the injection of a small amount of protons from the envelope into the 12C-rich intershell during any third dredge-up episode, when the H-shell is inactivated. Prediction for other short-lived, 36Cl, 135Cs, and 205Pb, are given. General consequences for the pollution of the protosolar nebula with newly synthesized stable isotopes from the AGB winds are outlined. The origin of other detected short-lived nuclei, in particular 53Mn, 129I, and 182Hf, which cannot come from an AGB source, is analysed. The alternative trigger hypothesis by a close-by Supernova is discussed.

  4. Self-Regulation and Experience of Loneliness of Elderly People Who Live in Social Care Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitov, Ildar R.; Gorodetskaya, Inna M.

    2016-01-01

    The research addresses the peculiarities of self-regulation of loneliness experience of elderly people living in care homes. The population of the study consisted of 60 elderly people (65-80 years old). 30 of them live in families with spouses and children and 30 persons live in the State residential social service institution. It was found that…

  5. Overcoming Recruitment Barriers in Urban Older Adults Residing in Congregate Living Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Simning

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Participation of minority older adults in mental health research has been limited by mistrust, transportation difficulties, lack of knowledge, and insufficient community partnership. We describe strategies utilized to overcome these recruitment barriers. Methods. Our target population included 553 public housing residents of older adult high-rise buildings in Rochester, NY. We had a two-stage cross-sectional study: Stage 1 was a health survey for all residents and Stage 2 was a psychiatric interview of English-speaking residents aged 60 years and older. Recruitment occurred through mailings, onsite activities, and resident referrals. Results. Stage 1 had 358 participants (64.7% response and Stage 2 had 190 (61.6% target population response, with higher participation among African Americans. We found some strategies effective for overcoming recruitment barriers. First, we partnered with a community agency and organized onsite educational activities to improve residents’ trust. Second, the study occurred entirely onsite, which facilitated participation of functionally impaired residents. Third, onsite activities allowed the residents to learn about the study and complete surveys in person. Fourth, we provided immediate incentives that resulted in many study referrals. Conclusions. Although recruitment of minority older adults presents unique challenges, a multifaceted community-tailored approach mitigated several recruitment barriers in this mental health study.

  6. Association between Continuous Wearable Activity Monitoring and Self-Reported Functioning in Assisted Living Facility and Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilahti, J; Korhonen, I

    2016-01-01

    Physical functioning is a key factor in independent living, and its preclinical state assessment and monitoring during the subject's normal life would be beneficial. The aim of the study is to analyse associations between ambulatory measured physical activity behaviour and sleep patterns (wrist actigraphy) and self-reported difficulties in performing activities of daily living. Participants, setting and design: 36 residents in assisted living facilities and nursing homes (average age=80.4±9.0 years) without dementia in free living conditions participated. Actigraphic monitoring is integrated with the facilities' social alarm system. Indices on activity level, activity rhythm, sleep pattern and external stimuli response of sleep-wake behaviours were extracted from the actigraph data and correlated (Spearman rank-order correlation) with activities of daily living measures. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Activity level (ρ=-0.49, pliving scores. The similarity of subject-wise activity pattern to facility common activities had a trend with activities of daily living (ρ=-0.44, passisted living facility settings. However, variance between individuals was large in this dataset which decreases the reliability of the results. Furthermore, external stimuli such as weather and facility-related activities can affect subjects' activity and sleep behaviour and should be considered in the related studies as well.

  7. Restorative Care’s Effect on Activities of Daily Living Dependency in Long-stay Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Kristine M. C.; Wyman, Jean F.; Savik, Kay; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: (a) Identify the prevalence of nursing homes providing Medicare supported restorative care programs and of long stay participants, (b) compare characteristics between restorative care participants and nonparticipants, and (c) assess restorative care’s effect on change in activities of daily living (ADL) dependency. Design and Methods: Longitudinal analysis of Minimum Data Set assessments linked to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey using a sample of 7,735 residents, age ≥ 65 years living in 1,097 nursing homes for at least 6 months. Receipt of any restorative care was used as a time varying predictor to estimate change in ADL dependency over 18 months using linear mixed models. Results: The sample was 75% female, 89% non-Hispanic White, with a mean age of 85±8, and average length of stay of 3.2±3.4 years. Most nursing homes had restorative care programs (67%), but less than one-third of long-stay residents participated. After controlling for resident and nursing home characteristics, the predicted mean ADL dependency score (range 0–28) at baseline was 18 for restorative care participants and 14 for nonparticipants. Over 18 months, ADL dependency increased 1 point for both participants and nonparticipants (p = .12). Implications: A minority of long-stay residents participated in Medicare supported restorative care programs despite their availability and potential benefits. Even though participants had greater vulnerability for deterioration in physical, mental, and functional health than nonparticipants, both groups had similar rates of ADL decline. Future research is needed to determine if providing restorative care to less dependent long-stay residents is effective. PMID:26055785

  8. Job-induced Commuting between Two Residences – Characteristics of a Multilocational Living Arrangement in the Late Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Reuschke

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of the ongoing flexibilisation of labour markets and a rising labour force participation of (highly qualified women, job-related commuting between a main and secondary residence has become more important in Western capitalist countries as is the case in contemporary Germany. The limited number of recent empirical studies on this kind of multilocational living arrangement almost entirely focuses on commuters in couple/family households. The main objective of this article is, firstly, to provide data about the characteristics and formation contexts of job-related multilocational household organisations as a whole, in order to make a contribution to the discussion of the forms and causes of this currently important phenomenon. Secondly, by means of comparison analyses, the multilocational form of living is compared to the group of long-distance movers, in order to provide insights into who prefers commuting to migration with the complete household under which circumstances. The article draws on data of a field research study, which have been obtained from an individual based random sample from official registers of inhabitants of four metropolises in Germany. The sample was restricted to individuals with specific characteristics (in-movers, age 25 to 59. The fully structured postal interviews were complemented by qualitative telephone interviews with selected commuters. The results show that commuters are a heterogeneous group. Living in a partnership and the social connections established thereby play a prominent role for multilocational household organisations. Among male commuters, one can distinguish between those who are young, never married and predominantly childless, on the one hand, and a group of older married commuters with children in the household, on the other. The vast majority of female commuters, however, live childless. As men commute between two residences even if they live with a family, they significantly

  9. Assessment of a closed wash system developed for processing living donor femoral heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, M J; Man, J; Rooney, P; McQuillan, T A; Galea, G; Kearney, J N

    2017-12-01

    NHS Blood and Transplant Tissue and Eye Services (TES) and Scottish National Blood Transfusion Services Tissues and Cells Directorate (TCD) currently bank whole, frozen femoral head bone from living donors who are undergoing primary hip replacement surgery. When required, the bone is issued to a surgeon still frozen on dry ice (- 79 °C). Consequently, the femoral head bone is not processed, is not sterilised and at the time of issue, it contains donor blood, bone marrow and associated cells. We have previously shown that, cut, shaped and washed bone from deceased donors can be processed to remove up to 99.9% of blood, bone marrow and associated cells (Eagle et al. 2015). However, cut and shaped bone is not suitable for some orthopaedic procedures and some orthopaedic surgeons do not wish to use irradiated bone; therefore in this report, a method has been developed in which whole femoral heads can be washed to remove donor blood and bone marrow components. Processing results in excess of 99% bone marrow component removal-soluble protein, haemoglobin and DNA; the procedure is performed inside a closed system, thereby eliminating the need for terminal sterilisation by irradiation. In addition, uniaxial testing demonstrated no difference in compressive strength between washed and unwashed bone. We suggest that this washed bone may be capable of improving incorporation after grafting without disturbing biomechanical properties of the graft.

  10. Living environment matters: relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putrik, Polina; de Vries, Nanne K.; Mujakovic, Suhreta; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic; Kant, Ijmert; Kunst, Anton E.; van Oers, Hans; Jansen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited.

  11. Living environment matters : Relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putrik, P.; de Vries, N.K.; Mujakovic, S.; van Amelsvoort, L.; Kant, IJ.; Kunst, A.E.; van Oers, J.A.M.; Jansen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited.

  12. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Jiao

    Full Text Available Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  13. Living environment matters: relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrik, Polina; de Vries, Nanne K; Mujakovic, Suhreta; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic; Kant, Ijmert; Kunst, Anton E; van Oers, Hans; Jansen, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited. The main objective of this study was to explore associations between certain features of neighborhood environment and self-rated health and depressive symptoms in Maastricht (The Netherlands). A large amount of routinely collected neighborhood data were aggregated by means of factor analysis to 18 characteristics of neighborhood social and physical environment. Associations between these characteristics and self-rated health and presence of depressive symptoms were further explored in multilevel logistic regression models adjusted for individual demographic and socio-economic factors. The study sample consisted of 9,879 residents (mean age 55 years, 48 % male). Residents of unsafe communities were less likely to report good health (OR 0.88 95 % CI 0.80-0.97) and depressive symptoms (OR 0.81 95 % CI 0.69-0.97), and less cohesive environment was related to worse self-rated health (OR 0.81 95 % CI 0.72-0.92). Residents of neighborhoods with more car traffic nuisance and more disturbance from railway noise reported worse mental health (OR 0.79 95 % CI 0.68-0.92 and 0.85 95 % CI 0.73-0.99, respectively). We did not observe any association between health and quality of parking and shopping facilities, facilities for public or private transport, neighborhood aesthetics, green space, industrial nuisance, sewerage, neighbor nuisance or satisfaction with police performance. Our findings can be used to support development of integrated health policies targeting broader determinants of health. Improving safety, social cohesion and decreasing traffic nuisance in disadvantaged neighborhoods might be a promising way to improve the health of residents and reduce health inequalities.

  14. Effects of living near an urban motorway on the wellbeing of local residents in deprived areas: Natural experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Foley

    Full Text Available Health and wellbeing are partly shaped by the neighbourhood environment. In 2011, an eight kilometre (five mile extension to the M74 motorway was opened in Glasgow, Scotland, constructed through a predominantly urban, deprived area. We evaluated the effects of the new motorway on wellbeing in local residents.This natural experimental study involved a longitudinal cohort (n = 365 and two cross-sectional samples (baseline n = 980; follow-up n = 978 recruited in 2005 and 2013. Adults from one of three study areas-surrounding the new motorway, another existing motorway, or no motorway-completed a postal survey. Within areas, individual measures of motorway proximity were calculated. Wellbeing was assessed with the mental (MCS-8 and physical (PCS-8 components of the SF-8 scale at both time points, and the short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (SWEMWBS at follow-up only.In multivariable linear regression analyses, cohort participants living nearer to the new M74 motorway experienced significantly reduced mental wellbeing over time (MCS-8: -3.6, 95% CI -6.6 to -0.7 compared to those living further away. In cross-sectional and repeat cross-sectional analyses, an interaction was found whereby participants with a chronic condition living nearer to the established M8 motorway experienced reduced (MCS-8: -3.7, 95% CI -8.3 to 0.9 or poorer (SWEMWBS: -1.1, 95% CI -2.0 to -0.3 mental wellbeing compared to those living further away.We found some evidence that living near to a new motorway worsened local residents' wellbeing. In an area with an existing motorway, negative impacts appeared to be concentrated in those with chronic conditions, which may exacerbate existing health inequalities and contribute to poorer health outcomes. Health impacts of this type of urban regeneration intervention should be more fully taken into account in future policy and planning.

  15. Effects of living near an urban motorway on the wellbeing of local residents in deprived areas: Natural experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Louise; Prins, Richard; Crawford, Fiona; Humphreys, David; Mitchell, Richard; Sahlqvist, Shannon; Thomson, Hilary; Ogilvie, David

    2017-01-01

    Health and wellbeing are partly shaped by the neighbourhood environment. In 2011, an eight kilometre (five mile) extension to the M74 motorway was opened in Glasgow, Scotland, constructed through a predominantly urban, deprived area. We evaluated the effects of the new motorway on wellbeing in local residents. This natural experimental study involved a longitudinal cohort (n = 365) and two cross-sectional samples (baseline n = 980; follow-up n = 978) recruited in 2005 and 2013. Adults from one of three study areas-surrounding the new motorway, another existing motorway, or no motorway-completed a postal survey. Within areas, individual measures of motorway proximity were calculated. Wellbeing was assessed with the mental (MCS-8) and physical (PCS-8) components of the SF-8 scale at both time points, and the short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (SWEMWBS) at follow-up only. In multivariable linear regression analyses, cohort participants living nearer to the new M74 motorway experienced significantly reduced mental wellbeing over time (MCS-8: -3.6, 95% CI -6.6 to -0.7) compared to those living further away. In cross-sectional and repeat cross-sectional analyses, an interaction was found whereby participants with a chronic condition living nearer to the established M8 motorway experienced reduced (MCS-8: -3.7, 95% CI -8.3 to 0.9) or poorer (SWEMWBS: -1.1, 95% CI -2.0 to -0.3) mental wellbeing compared to those living further away. We found some evidence that living near to a new motorway worsened local residents' wellbeing. In an area with an existing motorway, negative impacts appeared to be concentrated in those with chronic conditions, which may exacerbate existing health inequalities and contribute to poorer health outcomes. Health impacts of this type of urban regeneration intervention should be more fully taken into account in future policy and planning.

  16. Sleep quality in residents of assisted living facilities: effect on quality of life, functional status, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Jouldjian, Stella; Josephson, Karen R; Alessi, Cathy A

    2010-05-01

    To describe sleep patterns in older adults living in assisted living facilities (ALFs) and to explore the relationship between sleep disturbance and quality of life, functional status, and depression over 6 months of follow-up. Prospective, observational cohort study. Eighteen ALFs in the Los Angeles area. One hundred twenty-one ALF residents aged 65 and older (mean age 85.3, 86% female, 88% non-Hispanic white). Data were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 months after enrollment. Data collected were demographics, physical and cognitive functioning, depression, quality of life, comorbidities, medications, and subjective (i.e., questionnaires) and objective (i.e., 3 days and nights of wrist actigraphy) measures of sleep. Sixty-five percent of participants reported clinically significant sleep disturbance on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and objective wrist actigraphy confirmed poor sleep quality. In regression analyses including sleep variables and other predictors, more self-reported sleep disturbance at baseline was associated with worse health-related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short Form Survey Mental Component Summary score) and worse depressive symptoms five-item Geriatric Depression Scale at follow-up. Worse nighttime sleep (according to actigraphy) at baseline was associated with worse activities of daily living functioning and more depressive symptoms at follow-up. Sleep disturbance is common in older ALF residents, and poor sleep is associated with declining functional status and quality of life and greater depression over 6 months of follow-up. Studies are needed to determine whether improving sleep in ALF residents will result in improvements in these outcomes. Well-established treatments should be adapted for use in ALFs and systematically evaluated in future research.

  17. The association of neuropsychiatric symptoms and environment with quality of life in assisted living residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samus, Quincy M; Rosenblatt, Adam; Steele, Cynthia; Baker, Alva; Harper, Michael; Brandt, Jason; Mayer, Lawrence; Rabins, Peter V; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2005-10-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether neuropsychiatric symptoms and environmental characteristics are associated with quality of life in assisted living residents with dementia. We used a cross-sectional study of 134 residents from 22 facilities and employed the Alzheimer's Disease-Related Quality of Life Scale and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. A scale was developed to capture the homelike climate of each facility. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the relationship of neuropsychiatric symptoms and homelike climate with quality of life, controlling for sociodemographics, cognition, functional dependence, and physical health. Exploratory analyses and graphical techniques were employed to test for environmental-level moderating effects. Agitation, depression, apathy, and irritability were significant predictors of quality of life, explaining 29% of the variance. Neither facility size nor homelike environment was significantly associated with quality of life in univariate analyses. Size of facility moderated the relationship between agitation and quality of life. Neuropsychiatric symptoms impair quality of life in residents with dementia. Further research should investigate the role of other environmental aspects.

  18. Hospice use and public expenditures at the end of life in assisted living residents in a Florida Medicaid waiver program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hongdao; Dobbs, Debra; Wang, Su; Hyer, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    To examine the association between hospice use and public expenditures in a sample of dually eligible assisted living (AL) residents at the end of life. A retrospective cohort study. Florida AL facilities. Newly enrolled dually eligible older AL residents under Florida's Medicaid Assisted Living for the Elderly waiver program who died between January 2003 and December 2004 (N = 382). Individual sociodemographic characteristics were obtained from Florida's Medicaid comprehensive assessment data. Medicaid eligibility status, enrollment in the AL waiver programs, International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes and Medicaid claims data were obtained from Florida's Medicaid payment agency. Individual characteristics and Medicare and Medicaid claims data were merged with vital statistics to determine diagnoses, date of death, hospice enrollment, and public expenditures. The mean age of the study sample was 84.8 (range 65-102); 71.5% were female, and 63.4% were white. During the average 9.6 months of follow-up, 35.6% of the sample enrolled in hospice, and the average hospice length of stay was 47.9 d; 73.3% of the sample had been admitted to a hospital, and 38.0% had been admitted to a nursing home. The generalized linear model showed that hospice use was not significantly associated with lower public expenditures (average marginal effect = -$1,127, 95% confidence interval = -$8,377, $6,122). Hospice use at the end of life may not be associated with lower public expenditures in older dually eligible AL residents. Future research should examine the association between hospice enrollment and the quality of end-of-life care. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Living and Learning: "Does Residence Hall Roommate Placement of Traditional Freshman Students at MSOE Effect Their Satisfaction with the Residence Halls?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breese, William Ellis, II

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine if residence hall roommate placement of traditional freshman students at MSOE affects their satisfaction with the residence halls. The idea behind this study is that if residence hall roommate placement is done purposefully, with the participation of incoming freshmen through appropriate placement…

  20. Radiation doses among residents living 37 km northwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Nanao; Saito, Osamu; Endo, Satoru; Kimura, Akirou; Shizuma, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    External and internal radiation doses were estimated for 15 residents who lived approximately 37 km northwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, which released radioactive plumes on March 11, 2011 as the result of the Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami damage. Residents were interviewed on where they stayed and what they ate after the incident. To estimate external dose, the air dose rate around each person's home was measured, and cumulative effective doses up to 54 d after the deposition were calculated. To estimate committed effective dose, urinary bioassays were performed using a low-background Ge spectrometer on 54 d and 78–85 d after the deposition. The average cumulative effective dose was 8.4 mSv for adults and 5.1 mSv for children. The average committed effective dose from 134 Cs and 137 Cs was 0.055 mSv for adults and 0.029 mSv for children. Iodine-131 was observed from urinary samples of five residents, the equivalent doses for thyroid gland were 27–66 mSv at maximum. We discuss the necessity of reducing the risk of further exposure. - Highlights: ► We estimated external and internal effective doses for 15 residents in Fukushima. ► The external dose up to 54 d was 8.4 mSv for adults and 5.1 mSv for children. ► The committed effective dose was 0.055 mSv for adults and 0.029 mSv for children. ► The effective doses for thyroid gland was 27–66 mSv at maximum.

  1. Advance care planning discussions among residents of long term care and designated assisted living: experience from Calgary, Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyason, Claire; Simon, Jessica; Martin, Tracy Lynn Wityk

    2015-03-01

    Patients, physicians and the healthcare system are faced with the challenge of determining, and respecting, the medical wishes of an aging population. Our study sought to describe who participates in advance care planning (ACP) and decision-making for patients in long-term care and designated assisted living. In 2008, Alberta Health Services initiated its 'Advance Care Planning: Goals of Care Designation' (Adult) policy in the Calgary zone. This policy encouraged discussions about goals of care and used a tracking form to capture these conversations. A postpolicy implementation chart review was performed at 3 time points: at baseline, at 6 months and at 18 months post implementation in long term care (LTC) and designated assisted living sites. 166 charts were reviewed and 90% had a documented goals of care order. Less than half of residents (47%) were documented as participating in conversations and they were less likely to participate if they had cognitive impairment and were living in LTC. Documented family participation was more prevalent in LTC (51% vs 11%). Nurses participated in 67% of documented conversations with only 34% of discussions documenting physician involvement. This study identifies the lack of documented resident participation in ACP in LTC. While this finding may be explained by the high prevalence of cognitive impairment in our population, it raises questions about the optimal approach to ACP in LTC. In this setting, ACP appears to be more about relational autonomy than it is about patient autonomy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha

    2015-01-01

    cough. Elderly subjects aged ≥80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were......Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven...... European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards...

  3. Impact of the Educational Boost Your Brain and Memory Program Among Senior Living Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Roscoe; O'Brien, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    This random assignment waitlist control intervention study examined an implementation of the educational Boost Your Brain and Memory cognitive fitness intervention in 12 senior living organizations. Older adult participants ( n = 166) completed measures of brain health knowledge, use of memory techniques, physical and intellectual activity, and mindfulness, at baseline and after the intervention group's completion of the course. Changes in knowledge scores and in self-reported physical and intellectual activity increased significantly more for intervention participants than for waitlist controls at the conclusion of the course. There were no significant changes between the groups in mindfulness or use of memory techniques. This suggests that in senior living settings Boost Your Brain and Memory is effective in educating participants about brain healthy behaviors and in motivating behavioral change in the areas of physical and intellectual activity.

  4. Quality of Life in Rural Communities: Residents Living Near to Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers, Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairuddin Idris

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to identify the quality of life (QoL among communities residing near the Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers in Malaysia. This quantitative study used a constructed questionnaire as main tool to collect data on the QoL of river communities. A total of 240 villagers were selected as respondents. The results indicated that the dimensions of settlement, safety, involvement and social relationships, as well as education scored highest, while dimensions of physical environment, financial and job security yielded moderate scores. Dimensions of infrastructure facilities yielded a low mean score. Recommendations are provided, in the hope that our results may be useful for strategies that could enhance QoL of these river communities.

  5. Quality of Life in Rural Communities: Residents Living Near to Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Samah, Asnarulkhadi; Hamzah, Azimi; Abu Samah, Bahaman

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to identify the quality of life (QoL) among communities residing near the Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers in Malaysia. This quantitative study used a constructed questionnaire as main tool to collect data on the QoL of river communities. A total of 240 villagers were selected as respondents. The results indicated that the dimensions of settlement, safety, involvement and social relationships, as well as education scored highest, while dimensions of physical environment, financial and job security yielded moderate scores. Dimensions of infrastructure facilities yielded a low mean score. Recommendations are provided, in the hope that our results may be useful for strategies that could enhance QoL of these river communities. PMID:26974837

  6. Activities of Daily Living Assessment among Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia: Psychometric Reevaluation of the Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Paula August; Wilks, Scott E; Geiger, Jennifer R

    2018-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to conduct psychometric reevaluation of the Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADL) among a population logistically difficult to observe beyond cross-sectional analysis: nursing home residents with advanced dementia (AD). Data from observation-based measures were collected by nursing home staff at two intervals within a three-month time frame among 43 residents identified with AD via medical records and nursing home staff. Three broad properties of BADL were examined: factor structure, reliability, and validity. Principal components analysis determined underlying components. BADL internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's and Guttman coefficients; test-retest reliability was also observed. Convergent validity was assessed by correlating BADL with theoretically linked measures of quality of life (QOL) and social engagement. Compared with the original evaluation, BADL showed inconsistent factor structure at interval 1 but comparable at interval 2. Reliability coefficients at both intervals were robust and comparable to the original evaluation. BADL demonstrated significant convergence with QOL and social engagement. Psychometric potency of BADL was confirmed, suggesting practice applicability with this AD population. Future research calls for further examination of tools to guide effective interventions with this vulnerable population.

  7. Reconstruction of long-lived radionuclide intakes for Techa riverside residents: strontium-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstykh, E I; Degteva, M O; Peremyslova, L M; Shagina, N B; Shishkina, E A; Krivoshchapov, V A; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2011-07-01

    Releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak Production Association in 1949-1956 resulted in contamination of the Techa River; a nuclide of major interest was 90Sr, which downstream residents consumed with water from the river and with milk contaminated by cows' consumption of river water and contaminated pasture. Over the years, several reconstructions of dose have been performed for the approximately 30,000 persons who make up the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of the study described here was to derive a revised reference-90Sr-intake function for the members of this cohort. The revision was necessary because recently discovered data have provided a more accurate description of the time course of the releases, and more is now known about the importance of the pasture grass-cow-milk pathway for the members of this cohort. The fundamental basis for the derivation of the reference-90Sr-intake function remains the same: thousands of measurements of 90Sr content in bone with a special whole-body counter, thousands of measurements of beta-activity of front teeth with a special tooth-beta counter, and a variety of other measurements, including post mortem measurements of 90Sr in bone, measurements of 90Sr in cow's milk, and measurements of beta activity in human excreta. Results of the new analyses are that the major intake started in September 1950 and peaked somewhat later than originally postulated. However, the total intake for adult residents has not changed significantly. For children of some birth years, the intake and incorporation of Sr in bone tissue have changed substantially.

  8. Being a close family member of a person with dementia living in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Norberg, Astrid

    2017-11-01

    To illuminate how family members of persons with dementia describe their own experiences, before and after placing their relative in a nursing home. In the Western world and with a growing population of older people, the number of persons with dementia increases. Family members often become carers in their own homes creating stressful and exhausting situation that eventually leads to relocating the person to a nursing home. This may lead to troubled conscience among family members. This is a qualitative study with descriptive design based on interviews with ten family members to residents with dementia at one small nursing home ward. Data were analysed using content analysis. Five categories were derived from data: relocating a person with dementia - a responsibility; visiting the resident - a relief or a burden; the participants taking part in and monitoring the residents' care needs; participants meeting their own needs; and thoughts about the future and resident's death. The result shows both positive and negative aspects of being a family member to persons with dementia. Family members described feeling relief as well as having a troubled conscience when placing a relative in a nursing home. They held themselves responsible for monitoring and evaluating the quality of the care. Family members expressed fearing a slow death for the person with dementia as well as for their own sake. Most felt well treated by the staff. Family members were responsible for relocating the residents to the nursing home. This in itself was found to cause feelings of moral concerns and generating troubled conscience. Staff at nursing homes needs to exercise family-centred care to benefit the persons with dementia, their family members and the staff themselves. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Probing the closed-loop model of mRNA translation in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Hallwirth, Claus V; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA closed-loop, formed through interactions between the cap structure, poly(A) tail, eIF4E, eIF4G and PAB, features centrally in models of eukaryotic translation initiation, although direct support for its existence in vivo is not well established. Here, we investigated the closed-loop using a combination of mRNP isolation from rapidly cross-linked cells and high-throughput qPCR. Using the interaction between these factors and the opposing ends of mRNAs as a proxy for the closed-loop, w...

  10. Dentition, nutritional status and adequacy of dietary intake among older residents in assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Riitta K T; Lindroos, Eeva; Soini, Helena; Hiltunen, Kaija; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2016-06-01

    We examined the relationships between dentition, nutritional status and dietary intakes of energy, protein and micronutrients among older people in assisted living facilities in Helsinki. Poor dentition is associated with malnutrition. Less is known about how dentition is associated with detailed nutrient intakes in institutionalised older people. This cross-sectional study assessed 343 participants (mean age 83 years). Dentition was assessed by trained ward nurses and divided into edentulous participants without dentures (group 1), edentulous participants with removable dentures (group 2) and those with any natural teeth (group 3). Nutritional status was assessed by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The energy, protein and nutrient intakes were calculated from detailed 1-day food diaries and compared with the recommendations of the Finnish National Nutrition Council as a measure of dietary adequacy. Assessment included also participants' cognitive and functional status. Of the participants, 8.2, 39.1 and 52.8% were in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Altogether 22% were malnourished according to MNA. Group 1 had the poorest nutritional status. A large proportion of participants consumed less than the recommended amounts of energy, protein or micronutrients. Half of the participants consumed assisted living facilities. Assessment of dental status should be part of good nutritional care in long-term care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Attitudes and experiences with secondhand smoke and smoke-free policies among subsidised and market-rate multiunit housing residents living in six diverse communities in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzke, Andrea S; Hyland, Andrew; Kiviniemi, Marc; Travers, Mark J

    2018-03-01

    Given that higher smoking rates persist among lower socioeconomic populations, multiunit housing (MUH) environments may result in higher secondhand smoke (SHS) exposures among subsidised MUH residents. This cross-sectional assessment compares experiences with SHS and smoke-free policies among subsidised and market-rate MUH residents living in six US communities. MUH residents (n=1565) were surveyed regarding their smoke-free rules (home and building), SHS exposures and preferences towards smoke-free policies. Binary logistic regression identified predictors of each outcome, focusing on differences by subsidised housing status (subsidised vs market rate). Among residents enforcing smoke-free home rules (76%, overall), 50% reported SHS incursions into their unit. Only 23% reported living in a smoke-free building; 56% of those living in smoking-allowable buildings reported preferences towards smoke-free building policies. Among market-rate housing residents, smoke-free home (OR=4.18) and building (OR=2.26) rules were significantly higher when children were present. Smoke-free building rules reduced the odds of SHS incursions among market-rate housing residents (OR=0.50), but no association was observed among subsidised housing residents. Non-smoking subsidised housing residents exhibited stronger preferences for smoke-free policies compared with those in market-rate housing. Smoke-free home rules may not protect MUH residents from SHS exposures, particularly in subsidised MUH. Although strong preferences towards smoke-free policies were present overall, subsidised MUH residents may have fewer alternative smoke-free housing options available. Therefore, all publicly funded housing should be smoke free to protect these vulnerable populations. However, continued efforts to encourage privately owned MUH operators to adopt smoke-free policies are also necessary. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights

  12. The association between racial and gender discrimination and body mass index among residents living in lower-income housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C; Puleo, Elaine; Bennett, Gary G; McNeill, Lorna H; Sorensen, Glorian; Emmons, Karen M

    2009-01-01

    Research on the association between self-reported racial or gender discrimination and body mass index (BMI) has been limited and inconclusive to date, particularly among lower-income populations. The aim of the current study was to examine the association between self-reported racial and gender discrimination and BMI among a sample of adult residents living in 12 urban lower-income housing sites in Boston, Masschusetts (USA). Baseline survey data were collected among 1,307 (weighted N = 1907) study participants. For analyses, linear regression models with a cluster design were conducted using SUDAAN and SAS statistical software. Our sample was predominately Black (weighted n = 956) and Hispanic (weighted n = 857), and female (weighted n = 1420), with a mean age of 49.3 (SE: .40) and mean BMI of 30.2 kg m(-2) (SE: .19). Nearly 47% of participants reported ever experiencing racial discrimination, and 24.8% reported ever experiencing gender discrimination. In bivariate and multivariable linear regression models, no main effect association was found between either racial or gender discrimination and BMI. While our findings suggest that self-reported discrimination is not a key determinant of BMI among lower-income housing residents, these results should be considered in light of study limitations. Future researchers may want to investigate this association among other relevant samples, and other social contextual and cultural factors should be explored to understand how they contribute to disparities.

  13. Sleep quality and some factors affecting sleep quality in the students living in the residence hall of a university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Yavuz Sari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Sleep disorders are remarkable public health problems as they adversely affect physical, mental and social health and may cause accidents and decline in academic performance and labor productivity. Aim of the study is assessing sleep quality and determining some factors affecting sleep quality in the students living in the residence hall of a university. METHOD: It is a cross sectional study conducted with 277 students, 180 of whom are female. Data were collected via a questionnaire including Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and socio-demographic characteristics query. RESULTS: According to PSQI, 41.1% of students have bad sleep quality. Sleep quality of male students and students who are overweight/obese or living in more crowded rooms in the hall of residence is worse than other students and #8217;. Prevalence of bad sleep quality is higher in medication users, participants thinking that they have problems in sleeping or falling asleep and had stressful experience in the last month. The differences between groups were statistically significant. In logistic regression analyzes, using medication (OR=2.54, having problems in sleep (OR=12.75, having problems in falling asleep (OR=8.83 and bad experiences in the last month (OR=2.66 have effects on sleep quality. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions about sleep disorders are important due to their preventable characteristics. Developing healthy life habits, improving physical conditions and coping with stress will be effective on preventing and treating sleep disorders. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(2.000: 93-100

  14. Education to reduce potentially harmful medication use among residents of assisted living facilities: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Juola, Anna-Liisa; Kautiainen, Hannu; Soini, Helena; Finne-Soveri, U Harriet; Bell, J Simon; Björkman, Mikko

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effect of nurse training on the use of potentially harmful medications; and (2) to explore the effect of nurse training on residents' health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health service utilization, and mortality. A randomized controlled trial. In total, 227 residents in 20 wards of assisted living facilities in Helsinki were recruited. The 20 wards were randomized into those in which (1) staff received two 4-hour training sessions on appropriate medication treatment (intervention group), and (2) staff received no additional training and continued to provide routine care (control group). Two 4-hour interactive training sessions for nursing staff based on constructive learning theory to recognize potentially harmful medications and corresponding adverse drug events. Use of potentially harmful medications, HRQoL assessed using the 15 dimensional instrument of health-related quality of life, health service utilization, and mortality assessed at baseline, and 6 and 12 months. During the 12-month follow-up, the mean number of potentially harmful medications decreased in the intervention wards [-0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.71 to -0.15] but remained constant in the control wards (+0.11, 95% CI -0.09 to +0.31) (P = .004, adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities). HRQoL declined more slowly in the intervention wards (-0.038 (95% CI -0.054 to -0.022) than in the control wards (-0.072 (95% CI -0.089 to -0.055) (P = .005, adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities). Residents of the intervention wards had significantly less hospital days (1.4 days/person/year, 95% CI 1.2-1.6) than in the control wards (2.3 days/person/year; 95% CI 2.1-2.7) (relative risk 0.60, 95% CI 0.49-0.75, P assisted living facilities. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in malnutrition and quality of nutritional care among aged residents in all nursing homes and assisted living facilities in Helsinki 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Riitta K T; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Savikko, Niina N; Soini, Helena; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2017-09-01

    While nutritional problems have been recognized as common in institutional settings for several decades, less is known about how nutritional care and nutrition has changed in these settings over time. To describe and compare the nutritional problems and nutritional care of residents in all nursing homes (NH) in 2003 and 2011 and residents in all assisted living facilities (ALF) in 2007 and 2011, in Helsinki, Finland. We combined four cross-sectional datasets of (1) residents from all NHs in 2003 (N=1987), (2) residents from all ALFs in 2007 (N=1377), (3) residents from all NHs in 2011 (N=1576) and (4) residents from all ALFs in 2011 (N=1585). All participants at each time point were assessed using identical methods, including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The mean age of both samples from 2011 was higher and a larger proportion suffered from dementia, compared to earlier collected samples. A larger proportion of the residents in 2011 were assessed either malnourished or at-risk for malnutrition, according to the MNA, than in 2003 (NH: 93.5% vs. 88.9%, psnacks between meals was significantly more common in the 2011 residents, compared to the respective earlier samples. In 2011, institutionalized residents were more disabled and more prone to malnourishment than in 2003 or 2007. Institutions do seem to be more aware of good nutritional care for vulnerable older people, although there is still room for improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Care homes may close due to cost of national living wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinks, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    In April this year, a compulsory national living wage (NLW) for people over the age of 25 was introduced across the UK. The NLW increases minimum hourly pay from £6.70 to £7.20, a figure that is due to rise to £9 by 2020.

  17. [Daily living activities and oral condition among care facility residents with severe intellectual disabilities. Comparative analyses between residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance and those not receiving tooth-brushing assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiwata, Kaoru; Takeda, Fumi

    2007-06-01

    To clarify 1) differences in daily living activities and oral condition among care facility residents with severe intellectual disabilities and 2) chronological changes in daily living activities and oral condition for residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance and those never receiving tooth-brushing assistance. Subjects were 44 residents at a care facility for individuals with severe intellectual disabilities, who underwent dental screening in July 1994 and October 2003. At each time point, daily living activities, behavior during oral health guidance, behavior during dental health screening and oral condition were compared between residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance (assistance group) and those not receiving tooth-brushing assistance (independent group). Furthermore, chronological changes were analyzed for residents requiring assistance at both screenings, those requiring assistance only at the second screening, and those not requiring assistance at either screening. 1) In the assistance group, 100% and 36.4% of residents were unable to brush their teeth independently in 1994 and 2003, respectively. Significant differences between the assistance and independent groups were observed in all items of behavior during dental health screening in 1994, but not in 2003. No significant intergroup differences in oral condition were observed in 1994, but differences were seen in 2003; when compared to the assistance group, the number of lost teeth was significantly higher in the independent group, while the number of remaining teeth was lower. 2) Regarding changes over the nine-year period, a significantly greater proportion of residents not requiring assistance at either screening and those requiring assistance only at the second screening finally required assistance in bathing. As for oral condition, no significant changes in healthy teeth were observed in residents requiring assistance at both screening time points, while significant increases in dental

  18. Probing the closed-loop model of mRNA translation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Hallwirth, Claus V; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA closed-loop, formed through interactions between the cap structure, poly(A) tail, eIF4E, eIF4G and PAB, features centrally in models of eukaryotic translation initiation, although direct support for its existence in vivo is not well established. Here, we investigated the closed-loop using a combination of mRNP isolation from rapidly cross-linked cells and high-throughput qPCR. Using the interaction between these factors and the opposing ends of mRNAs as a proxy for the closed-loop, we provide evidence that it is prevalent for eIF4E/4G-bound but unexpectedly sparse for PAB1-bound mRNAs, suggesting it primarily occurs during a distinct phase of polysome assembly. We observed mRNA-specific variation in the extent of closed-loop formation, consistent with a role for polysome topology in the control of gene expression. PMID:25826658

  19. Nasopharyngeal Carriage of Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Serotypes Indentified among Nursing Home Residents in Comparison to the Elderly and Patients Younger than 65 Years Living in Domestic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolšek-Šušteršič, Maja; Beg Krasnič, Andreja; Mioč, Verica; Paragi, Metka; Rifel, Janez

    2017-09-01

    In Slovenia, there is little data available on pneumococcal vaccination rates and no data on asymptomatic NPCR and serotypes in the population of nursing home residents in comparison to the elderly living in domestic environment, therefore the goal was to gain these data. A cross sectional epidemiological study was performed. Nasopharyngeal swabs from 151 nursing home residents, 150 elderly living in domestic environment, and 38 adults less than 65 years old were collected twice (in two consecutive years). The swabs were analysed for pneumococcal identification and serotyping. Patient data were collected from medical files and medical history. No statistically significant differences in NPCR were seen between compared groups in two consecutive years. An average NPCR in two consecutive years in nursing home residents was 1.45%, in the elderly living in domestic environment 0.85%, and in adults less than 65 years old 7.05%. Serotypes identified among nursing home residents were 6B and 9N, among the group of elderly living in domestic environment, 6A and among adults less than 65 years old, 35F, 18C and 3. Pneumococcal vaccination rates were low (3.3% in nursing home residents, 6% in the elderly from domestic environment and 0% in the group of adults less than 65 years old). Our data suggests that NPCR and the proportion of people vaccinated with pneumococcal vaccine among the elderly are low. We identified different serotypes in all groups, only one person was a chronic carrier (serotype 35F).

  20. Analysis and interpretation of residence time distribution experimental curves in FM01-LC reactor using axial dispersion and plug dispersion exchange models with closed-closed boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Fernando F.; Cruz-Diaz, Martin R.; Rivero, Eligio P.; Gonzalez, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    The liquid phase mixing flow pattern at low (20 M = 1.058 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 , 25 o C, in water) as model tracer. A theoretical analysis and approximation RTD experimental curves with axial dispersion model (ADM) and plug dispersion exchange model (PDE), with 'closed-closed vessel' boundary conditions were used in order to establish a better approximation of the axial dispersion, stagnant zones, channelling and by-pass (preference flow) effects present at low and intermediate Re. RTD curves show that the liquid flow pattern in the FM01-LC deviates considerably from axial dispersion model at low Re, where the FM01-LC exhibits large channelling, stagnant zones, and dead zone. The PDE model represents fairly this deviation from ideal flow (less dead zone).

  1. Maintaining social cohesion is a more important determinant of patch residence time than maximizing food intake rate in a group-living primate, Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazahari, Nobuko

    2014-04-01

    Animals have been assumed to employ an optimal foraging strategy (e.g., rate-maximizing strategy). In patchy food environments, intake rate within patches is positively correlated with patch quality, and declines as patches are depleted through consumption. This causes patch-leaving and determines patch residence time. In group-foraging situations, patch residence times are also affected by patch sharing. Optimal patch models for groups predict that patch residence times decrease as the number of co-feeding animals increases because of accelerated patch depletion. However, group members often depart patches without patch depletion, and their patch residence time deviates from patch models. It has been pointed out that patch residence time is also influenced by maintaining social proximity with others among group-living animals. In this study, the effects of maintaining social cohesion and that of rate-maximizing strategy on patch residence time were examined in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). I hypothesized that foragers give up patches to remain in the proximity of their troop members. On the other hand, foragers may stay for a relatively long period when they do not have to abandon patches to follow the troop. In this study, intake rate and foraging effort (i.e., movement) did not change during patch residency. Macaques maintained their intake rate with only a little foraging effort. Therefore, the patches were assumed to be undepleted during patch residency. Further, patch residence time was affected by patch-leaving to maintain social proximity, but not by the intake rate. Macaques tended to stay in patches for short periods when they needed to give up patches for social proximity, and remained for long periods when they did not need to leave to keep social proximity. Patch-leaving and patch residence time that prioritize the maintenance of social cohesion may be a behavioral pattern in group-living primates.

  2. A survey of habits of people living close to the Sellafield nuclear processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, T.H.; Fulker, M.J.; Jones, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    A survey has been carried out of the habits of people living within 3 km of the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant. The survey included estimates of consumption rates of foodstuffs for a range of ages and of time spent indoors, outdoors and away from home. A high proportion of those interviewed were farmers and they provided additional data on time spent in the various farming activities. A comparison is made of the food consumption rates and generalised values recommended for critical groups by the NRPB and MAFF. (author)

  3. Air pollution and urinary n-acetyl-B-glucosaminidase levels in residents living near a cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min Soo; Kim, Jae Yoon; Lee, Hyun Seung; Lee, Chul Gab; Song, Han Soo

    2016-01-01

    To identify adverse renal effects due to air pollution derived from a cement plant in Korea. Urinary n-acetyl-B-glucosaminidase (U-NAG) levels in residents living near a cement plant were compared to those in a group who lived farther away from the plant. From June to August 2013 and from August to November 2014, laboratory tests for U-NAG and heavy metal were conducted on 547 study participants. Based on the level of air pollution exposure, subjects were divided into the "less exposed group," (LEG) which consisted of 66 persons who lived more than 5 km away from the cement plant, the "more exposed group from the rural area" (MEG-R), which consisted of 272 persons, and the "more exposed group from downtown area" (MEG-D), which consisted of 209 persons who lived within a 1 km radius of the cement plant. U-NAG levels >5.67 U/L were defined as "higher U-NAG" levels. We compared the prevalence of higher U-NAG levels and estimated the adjusted odds ratio (OR) by air pollution exposure using a chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis. Further, we estimated the interaction between air pollution exposure and heavy metal exposure in renal toxicity. The OR of higher U-NAG levels by MEG-D and MEG-R compared to LEG was 2.13 (95 % CI 0.86-4.96) and 4.79 (95 CI 1.65-10.01), respectively. Urinary cadmium (U-Cd), urinary mercury (U-Hg), age, occupation, hypertension, and diabetes had a significant association with higher U-NAG levels. However, blood lead (B-Pb), sex, and smoking were not associated with higher U-NAG. Especially, concurrent exposure to heavy metals (U-Hg or/and U-Cd) and air pollution had an additive adverse effect. In the group with both 4 th quartile heavy metal exposure (U-Cd or/and U-Hg) and air pollution exposure, the OR in MEG-R and MEG-D was 6.49 (95 % 1.42-29.65) and 8.12 (95 % CI 1.74-37.92), respectively, after adjustment for age, occupation, hypertension, diabetes. U-NAG levels seem to be affected by air pollution exposure as well

  4. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: influence of contaminated fish consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Ching-Chang; Lin Wu-Ting; Liao Po-Chi; Su Huey-Jen [Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health/Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic substances, Medical Coll., National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan); Chen Hsiu-Lin [Inst. of Basic Medical Sciences, Medical Coll., National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Many reports have suggested that PCDD/Fs (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans) contribute to immune deficiency, liver damage, human carcinogenesis, and neuromotor maturation in children. Therefore, beginning in 1999, the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a survey to determine serum levels of PCDD/Fs in the general populations living around 19 incinerators in Taiwan. Relatively high average serum PCDD/F levels were unexpectedly found in Tainan city, a less industrialized area in southwestern Taiwan, than in other urban areas. We therefore reviewed the usage history of the land and found that a factory situated between Hsien-Gong Li and Lu-Erh Li, two administrative units of Tainan city, had been manufacturing pentachlorophenol (PCP) between 1967 and 1982. PCDD/Fs are formed as byproducts in the PCP manufacturing process. Exposure to PCP and its derivatives via the food chain is the most significant intake route of PCDD/Fs in consumers in the European Union (EU). In Japan, in addition to combustion processes, PCP and chlornitrofen (CNP) have also been identified as the major sources of PCDD/Fs in Tokyo Bay7. A preliminary investigation showed that the soil in the PCP factory and sediments in the sea reservoir (13 hectares) near the deserted factory were seriously contaminated with PCDD/Fs (260-184,000 and 20-6220 pg I-TEQ/g, respectively), levels higher than those in other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the PCDD/F levels of fish meat in the sea reservoir and the serum in inhabitants living in the vicinity of the closed PCP plant and other nearby areas. The data from human and other biota samples might clarify the transmission pathway of the PCDD/F contaminants from the PCP factory to local residents, provide information about the exposure status of those living in the vicinity of the deserted PCP factory, and also lead to useful suggestions for controlling PCDD/F accumulation in those living near such

  5. Living Close to Natural Outdoor Environments in Four European Cities: Adults’ Contact with the Environments and Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Triguero-Mas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether residential availability of natural outdoor environments (NOE was associated with contact with NOE, overall physical activity and physical activity in NOE, in four different European cities using objective measures. A nested cross-sectional study was conducted in Barcelona (Spain; Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom; Doetinchem (The Netherlands; and Kaunas (Lithuania. Smartphones were used to collect information on the location and physical activity (overall and NOE of around 100 residents of each city over seven days. We used Geographic Information Systems (GIS to determine residential NOE availability (presence/absence of NOE within 300 m buffer from residence, contact with NOE (time spent in NOE, overall PA (total physical activity, NOE PA (total physical activity in NOE. Potential effect modifiers were investigated. Participants spent around 40 min in NOE and 80 min doing overall PA daily, of which 11% was in NOE. Having residential NOE availability was consistently linked with higher NOE contact during weekdays, but not to overall PA. Having residential NOE availability was related to NOE PA, especially for our Barcelona participants, people that lived in a city with low NOE availability.

  6. Living Close to Natural Outdoor Environments in Four European Cities: Adults’ Contact with the Environments and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Seto, Edmund; Valentín, Antònia; Smith, Graham; Martínez, David; Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Masterson, Daniel; van den Berg, Magdalena; Ambròs, Albert; Dedele, Audrius; Hurst, Gemma; Ellis, Naomi; Grazulevicius, Tomas; Voorsmit, Martin; Cirach, Marta; Cirac-Claveras, Judith; Swart, Wim; Clasquin, Eddy; Maas, Jolanda; Wendel-Vos, Wanda; Jerrett, Michael; Kruize, Hanneke; Gidlow, Christopher J.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether residential availability of natural outdoor environments (NOE) was associated with contact with NOE, overall physical activity and physical activity in NOE, in four different European cities using objective measures. A nested cross-sectional study was conducted in Barcelona (Spain); Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Doetinchem (The Netherlands); and Kaunas (Lithuania). Smartphones were used to collect information on the location and physical activity (overall and NOE) of around 100 residents of each city over seven days. We used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to determine residential NOE availability (presence/absence of NOE within 300 m buffer from residence), contact with NOE (time spent in NOE), overall PA (total physical activity), NOE PA (total physical activity in NOE). Potential effect modifiers were investigated. Participants spent around 40 min in NOE and 80 min doing overall PA daily, of which 11% was in NOE. Having residential NOE availability was consistently linked with higher NOE contact during weekdays, but not to overall PA. Having residential NOE availability was related to NOE PA, especially for our Barcelona participants, people that lived in a city with low NOE availability. PMID:28974010

  7. Effects of closing and reopening live poultry markets on the epidemic of human infection with avian influenza A virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jian; Liu, Wendong; Xia, Rui; Dai, Qigang; Bao, Changjun; Tang, Fenyang; Zhu, yefei; Wang, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Live poultry markets (LPMs) are crucial places for human infection of influenza A (H7N9 virus). In Yangtze River Delta, LPMs were closed after the outbreak of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and then reopened when no case was found. Our purpose was to quantify the effect of LPMs? operations in this region on the transmission of influenza A (H7N9) virus. We obtained information about dates of symptom onset and locations for all human influenza A (H7N9) cases repor...

  8. Healthy Active Living: A Residence Community-Based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity and Healthy Eating during the Transition to First-Year University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denver M. Y.; Bray, Steve R.; Beatty, Kevin R.; Kwan, Matthew Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of a Healthy Active Living (HAL) community intervention on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC), and psychosocial mediators of physical activity among students transitioning into university. Methods: Sixty undergraduate students were assigned to reside in either the…

  9. Studies of short-lived nuclei in the proximity of closed shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omtvedt, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    In this work the structure of {sup 84,85}Se at the closed N=50 neutron shell, and the {sup 132}Sb, {sup 132}Sn, and {sup 134}Te nuclei, at the doubly closed N=82,Z=50 shells, was studied. The experiments were performed at the OSIRIS fission product mass separator at Studsvik, Sweden. The excited levels of the studied nuclei were populated in {beta} decay. The sources were produced in fission of {sup 235}U in the OSIRIS combined target and ion source. The nuclei were studied by standard nuclear spectroscopy measuring techniques: Singles {gamma} spectra and {gamma}{gamma}-coincidence data were obtained. In addition {gamma}{gamma}({theta}) angular correlation and {beta}{gamma}{gamma}(t) triple coincidence ``fast-timing`` ,measurements were performed on the nuclei in the {sup 132}Sn (N=82,Z=50) region. Detailed level schemes for the {sup 84,85}Se, {sup 132}Sb,{sup 132}Sn, {sup 132}Te nuclei were built, greatly improvi our knowledge of the structure of these nuclei. The experimentally deduced transition rates and multipole mixing ratios of the studied {sup 132}Sn region nuclei were compared to theoretical calculations within the random phase approximation framework and related models. Particular attention was paid to the collective properties of nuclei in the {sup 132}Sn region, parametrized by the electrical octupole effective charge. A range of general software spectroscopic tools were developed for the purpose of analysing the experimental data. This included a program, Yggdrasil, which for the first time allowed a complete two-dimensional {gamma}{gamma}-coincidence matrix to be analysed on ordinary ``small`` personal computers (PCs). 49 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. "Fit and fabulous": mixed-methods research on processes, perceptions, and outcomes of a yearlong gym program with assisted-living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Mary Ann; LeCompte, Michelle; Ramel, Lisa

    2014-04-01

    This study's mixed-methods design sought to understand how to encourage assisted-living (AL) residents to initiate and continue exercise in a gym setting. Ten residents participated in this yearlong program. Processes developed and perceived benefits were understood through interviews and observations. Changes in active time, lower body strength, and workload were evaluated using direct measures. Findings indicated that AL residents regularly used exercise machines (mean participation = 53.8%) and increased active time and lower body strength (p = .02) when adequately prepared and supported. Participants prioritized gym time and developed pride and ownership in the program. They described themselves as exercisers and developed a sense of belonging to their new home. Friendships with one another, staff, and university partners were nurtured in the gym setting. When provided space, equipment, trained staff, and additional resource support, AL residents' quality of life and life satisfaction were enhanced in several domains.

  11. The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program: Providing meaningful volunteer activity to residents in assisted living with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Resnick, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program was developed to provide individualized meaningful volunteer activities matched to interests and capabilities for older adults with MCI in assisted living. The purposes of this single-site pre-test/post-test pilot study were to (1) establish feasibility of the VIP Program based on treatment fidelity (design, treatment, delivery, enactment); and (2) evaluate preliminary efficacy via improvement in psychological health (depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience, and life satisfaction) and decreased sedentary activity (survey and Fitbit) at 3 and 6 months. Ten residents participated. The majority was white, female and educated, and on average 88 years old. The VIP Program was feasible and most participants continued to volunteer at 6 months. There were non-significant improvements in depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience and recreational physical activity. The results of this study provide support for the feasibility of the VIP Program. Further study is necessary to examine efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metals Exposures of Residents Living Near the Akaki River in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Yard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Akaki River in Ethiopia has been found to contain elevated levels of several metals. Our objectives were to characterize metals exposures of residents living near the Akaki River and to assess metal levels in their drinking water. Methods. In 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 101 households in Akaki-Kality subcity (near the Akaki River and 50 households in Yeka subcity (distant to the Akaki River. One willing adult in each household provided urine, blood, and drinking water sample. Results. Urinary molybdenum (p<0.001, tungsten (p<0.001, lead (p<0.001, uranium (p<0.001, and mercury (p=0.049 were higher in Akaki-Kality participants compared to Yeka participants. Participants in both subcities had low urinary iodine; 45% met the World Health Organization (WHO classification for being at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. In Yeka, 47% of households exceeded the WHO aesthetic-based reference value for manganese; in Akaki-Kality, only 2% of households exceeded this value (p<0.001. There was no correlation between metals levels in water samples and clinical specimens. Conclusions. Most of the exposures found during this investigation seem unlikely to cause acute health effects based on known toxic thresholds. However, toxicity data for many of these metals are very limited.

  13. Endosymbiosis In Statu Nascendi: Close Phylogenetic RelationshipBetween Obligately Endosymbiotic and Obligately Free-LivingPolynucleobacter Strains (Betaproteobacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannini, Claudia; Pockl, Matthias; Petroni, Giulio; Wu, Qinglong; Lang, Elke; Stackebrandt, Erko; Schrallhammer, Martina; Richardson, PaulM.; Hahn, Martin W.

    2006-07-21

    Bacterial strains affiliated to the phylogenetically shallowsubcluster C (PnecC) of the 28 Polynucleobacter cluster, which ischaracterized by a minimal 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of approx.98.5 percent, have been reported to occur as obligate endosymbionts of 30ciliates (Euplotes spp.), as well as to occur as free-living cells in thepelagic zone of freshwater habitats. We investigated if these two groupsof closely related bacteria represent 32 strains fundamentally differingin lifestyle, or if they simply represent different stages of afacultative endosymbiotic lifestyle. The phylogenetic analysis of 16SrRNA gene and 16S34 23S ITS sequences of five endosymbiont strains fromtwo different Euplotes species and 40 pure culture strains demonstratedhost-species-specific clustering of the endosymbiont 36 sequences withinthe PnecC subcluster. The sequences of the endosymbionts showedcharacteristics indicating an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle.Cultivation experiments 38 revealed fundamental differences inphysiological adaptations, and determination of the genome sizesindicated a slight size reduction in endosymbiotic strains. We concludethat the 40 two groups of PnecC bacteria represent obligately free-livingand obligately endosymbiotic strains, respectively, and do not representdifferent stages of the same complex lifecycle. 42 These closely relatedstrains occupy completely separated ecological niches. To our bestknowledge, this is the closest phylogenetic relationship between obligateendosymbionts and 44 obligately free-living bacteria everrevealed.

  14. Promoting a healthy diet and physical activity in adults with intellectual disabilities living in community residences: Design and evaluation of a cluster-randomized intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wihlman Ulla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adults with intellectual disabilities have poor dietary habits, low physical activity and weight disturbances. This study protocol describes the design and evaluation of a health intervention aiming to improve diet and physical activity in this target group. In Sweden, adults with intellectual disabilities often live in community residences where the staff has insufficient education regarding the special health needs of residents. No published lifestyle interventions have simultaneously targeted both residents and staff. Methods/Design The intervention is designed to suit the ordinary work routines of community residences. It is based on social cognitive theory and takes 12-15 months to complete. The intervention includes three components: 1 Ten health education sessions for residents in their homes; 2 the appointment of a health ambassador among the staff in each residence and formation of a network; and 3 a study circle for staff in each residence. The intervention is implemented by consultation with managers, training of health educators, and coaching of health ambassadors. Fidelity is assessed based on the participation of residents and staff in the intervention activities. The study design is a cluster-randomised trial with physical activity as primary outcome objectively assessed by pedometry. Secondary outcomes are dietary quality assessed by digital photography, measured weight, height and waist circumference, and quality of life assessed by a quality of life scale. Intermediate outcomes are changes in work routines in the residences assessed by a questionnaire to managers. Adults with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities living in community residences in Stockholm County are eligible for inclusion. Multilevel analysis is used to evaluate effects on primary and secondary outcomes. The impact of the intervention on work routines in community residences is analysed by ordinal regression analysis. Barriers and

  15. Comparison of Psychological Problem Areas in Diabetes between Diabetic Elderly Residents of Kahrizak Nursing Home With Living in Homes, In Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Nasseh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Due to increased growth rates of diabetes and aging in the country subject of this research was a comparison of problem areas in diabetes among diabetic elderly residents of the Nursing Home with living in the home. Methods & Materials: This study is a descriptive-analytical research and among diabetic elderly nursing home residents and elderly living at home in Tehran Who 93 persons from each group were randomly selected. PAID questionnaire used for this study (α=0.94, (validity=0.88 and statistical analysis T test, Kolmograph and Anova was performed with SPSS 16 software. Results: The testing shows a significant difference in Psychological distress in relation to diabetes management and depression-related domains. Nursing home residents in these two areas show better results (P<0.01. Both groups show better scores in men. Conclusion: Increasing the quality of life in diabetic elder people, need to indicate medical aspects and other aspects that associated with the disease. For example improving the emotional status in nursing home residents and caring in home residents, is important.

  16. Different profiles of anthropogenic and naturally produced organohalogen compounds in serum from residents living near a coastal area and e-waste recycling workers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Bulbule, Kesav A; Parthasarathy, Peethambaram; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-10-15

    We determined the contamination status and accumulation profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated PCB congeners (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs) in serum from e-waste recycling workers and residents near a coastal area in India. Residue levels of penta- to octa-chlorinated PCBs, penta- to octa-chlorinated OH-PCBs, 6MeO-BDE47, 6OH-BDE47, and 2,4,6-tri-BPh in serum from residents living near the coastal area were significantly higher than those in serum from e-waste recycling workers. Residue levels of tri- to tetra-chlorinated PCBs, tri- to tetra-chlorinated OH-PCBs, PBDEs, octa-brominated OH-PBDEs, and tetra-BPhs in serum from e-waste recycling workers were higher than those in serum from residents living near the coastal area. Principal component analysis revealed that residents living near the coastal area and e-waste recycling workers had different serum profiles of chlorinated and brominated compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of traditional knowledge for wild edible mushrooms consumed by residents living in Jirisan National Park (Korea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Song, Mi-Jang

    2014-04-11

    This study aims to record and analyze the traditional knowledge of wild edible mushrooms utilized by residents living in Jirisan National Park (Korea). Data was collected through participant observations and in-depth interviews with semi-structured questionnaires. Quantitative comparative analyses were accomplished through informant consensus factor (ICF), fidelity level (FL), and inter-network analysis (INA). The amounts of traditional knowledge recorded from the communities were 158 practices classified within 22 families, 33 genera, and 38 species. The representative families were Tricholomataceae (23.20%) followed by Pleurotaceae (13.10%), Polyporaceae (8.21%), and Hymenochaetaceae (6.33%). The results revealed 24 modes of preparation for the mushrooms, with the most common methods being for preparing them as, seasoned cooked mushrooms (40.75%), soups (13.84%), teas (12.18%), simmered (9.19%), and roasted (6.20%). The informant consensus factor (ICF) values in the ailment categories were birth-related disorders (1.00), genitourinary system disorders (1.00), other conditions (0.91), circulatory system disorders (0.76), and diabetes (0.33). In terms of fidelity levels, five mushroom species showed 100% of fidelities. Regarding the inter-network analysis (INA) of mushrooms and ailments, the positions of medicinal mushrooms is distributed into three main groups. Also, regarding the network of mushrooms and foods, the location of edible mushrooms is distributed into two main food groups. The utilization of the inter-network analysis has been used typically within the social sciences for the analysis of social trends and phenomena through the interrelationship of specific social components, from this study it is being applied for the interpretation of traditional knowledge utilizing mushrooms in the local communities. Through this study, we are confident that the useful application of the inter-network analysis has been successfully proven. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  18. Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charice S. Chan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQL for nursing home residents is important, however, the concept of quality of life is broad, encompasses many domains and is difficult to assess in people with dementia. Basic activities of daily living (ADL are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS and Functional Independence Measure (FIM instrument. We examined the relationship between HRQL and ADL to assess the future possibility of ADL dependency level serving as a surrogate measure of HRQL in residents with dementia. To assess ADL, measures derived from the RAI-MDS and FIM data were gathered for 111 residents at the beginning of our study and at 6-month follow-up. Higher scores for independence in ADL were correlated with higher scores for a disease-specific HRQL measure, the Quality of Life—Alzheimer’s Disease Scale. Preliminary evidence suggests that FIM-assessed ADL is associated with HRQL for these residents. The associations of the dressing and toileting items with HRQL were particularly strong. This finding suggests the importance of ADL function in HRQL. The RAI-MDS ADL scales should be used with caution to evaluate HRQL.

  19. Prevalence of and associations with agitation in residents with dementia living in care homes: MARQUE cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Julie; Marston, Louise; Rapaport, Penny; Livingston, Deborah; Cousins, Sian; Robertson, Sarah; La Frenais, Francesca; Cooper, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Background Agitation is reportedly the most common neuropsychiatric symptom in care home residents with dementia. Aims To report, in a large care home survey, prevalence and determinants of agitation in residents with dementia. Method We interviewed staff from 86 care homes between 13 January 2014 and 12 November 2015 about residents with dementia with respect to agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI)), quality of life (DEMQOL-proxy) and dementia severity (Clinical Dementia Rating). We also interviewed residents and their relatives. We used random effects models adjusted for resident age, gender, dementia severity and care home type with CMAI as a continuous score. Results Out of 3053 (86.2%) residents who had dementia, 1489 (52.7%) eligible residents participated. Fifteen per cent of residents with very mild dementia had clinically significant agitation compared with 33% with mild (odds ratios (ORs)=4.49 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.30) and 45% with moderate or severe dementia (OR=6.95 95% CI=3.63, 13.31 and OR=6.23 95% CI=3.25, 11.94, respectively). More agitation was associated with lower quality of life (regression coefficient (rc)=−0.53; 95% CI=−0.61, −0.46) but not with staffing or resident ratio (rc=0.03; 95% CI=−0.04, 0.11), level of residents’ engagement in home activities (rc=3.21; 95% CI=−0.82, 7.21) or family visit numbers (rc=−0.03; 95% CI=−0.15, 0.08). It was correlated with antipsychotic use (rc=6.45; 95% CI=3.98, 8.91). Conclusions Care home residents with dementia and agitation have lower quality of life. More staffing time and activities as currently provided are not associated with lower agitation levels. New approaches to develop staff skills in understanding and responding to the underlying reasons for individual resident’s agitation require development and testing. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the

  20. [Well-Being in old age – content validity of the Ryff Scale for residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsteiner, Mariella; Boggatz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Well-being is an important but rarely assessed outcome of care. The Ryff Scale of Psychological Well-Being measures this concept, but was not designed specifically for residents of assisted living facilities and nursing homes. To create a variant of this scale for the elderly in nursing homes and assisted living facilities in German speaking regions and to determine its content validity. A study was conducted in Salzburg using the Delphi method, which consisted of two rounds containing 56 experts working in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Suggestions for improvements were obtained by means of open-end questions. Acceptance of the items was rated on a 4-point Likert-scale. Items were accepted if a minimum of 80 % of the experts agreed at least partially. During the qualitative analysis the statements of the experts were compared and summarised into codes and categories. In the first round (response rate: 34.6 %) 38 items out of 54 items were modified. The revised questionnaire received approval (≥ 80 %) for all items in the second round (response rate: 64.7 %). The experts criticised the phrasing of some items and also aspects of well-being, which in their opinion, are not relevant for the elderly in need of care anymore (e. g. performance of obligations). A modified scale was developed which was deemed appropriate by the experts for residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. This scale now requires psychometric testing.

  1. Ovarian cancer survival population differences: a "high resolution study" comparing Philippine residents, and Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaniel, Maria Theresa M; Laudico, Adriano; Mirasol-Lumague, Maria Rica; Gondos, Adam; Uy, Gemma Leonora; Toral, Jean Ann; Benavides, Doris; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-09-24

    In contrast to most other forms of cancer, data from some developing and developed countries show surprisingly similar survival rates for ovarian cancer. We aimed to compare ovarian cancer survival in Philippine residents, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US, using a high resolution approach, taking potential differences in prognostic factors into account. Using databases from the SEER 13 and from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries, age-adjusted five-year absolute and relative survival estimates were computed using the period analysis method and compared between Filipino-American ovarian cancer patients with cancer patients from the Philippines and Caucasians in the US. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Despite more favorable distribution of age and cancer morphology and similar stage distribution, 5-year absolute and relative survival were lower in Philippine residents (Absolute survival, AS, 44%, Standard Error, SE, 2.9 and Relative survival, RS, 49.7%, SE, 3.7) than in Filipino-Americans (AS, 51.3%, SE, 3.1 and RS, 54.1%, SE, 3.4). After adjustment for these and additional covariates, strong excess risk of death for Philippine residents was found (Relative Risk, RR, 2.45, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.99-3.01). In contrast, no significant differences were found between Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US. Multivariate analyses disclosed strong survival disadvantages of Philippine residents compared to Filipino-American patients, for which differences in access to health care might have played an important role. Survival is no worse among Filipino-Americans than among Caucasians living in the US.

  2. Ovarian cancer survival population differences: a "high resolution study" comparing Philippine residents, and Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uy Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to most other forms of cancer, data from some developing and developed countries show surprisingly similar survival rates for ovarian cancer. We aimed to compare ovarian cancer survival in Philippine residents, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US, using a high resolution approach, taking potential differences in prognostic factors into account. Methods Using databases from the SEER 13 and from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries, age-adjusted five-year absolute and relative survival estimates were computed using the period analysis method and compared between Filipino-American ovarian cancer patients with cancer patients from the Philippines and Caucasians in the US. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Results Despite more favorable distribution of age and cancer morphology and similar stage distribution, 5-year absolute and relative survival were lower in Philippine residents (Absolute survival, AS, 44%, Standard Error, SE, 2.9 and Relative survival, RS, 49.7%, SE, 3.7 than in Filipino-Americans (AS, 51.3%, SE, 3.1 and RS, 54.1%, SE, 3.4. After adjustment for these and additional covariates, strong excess risk of death for Philippine residents was found (Relative Risk, RR, 2.45, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.99-3.01. In contrast, no significant differences were found between Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US. Conclusion Multivariate analyses disclosed strong survival disadvantages of Philippine residents compared to Filipino-American patients, for which differences in access to health care might have played an important role. Survival is no worse among Filipino-Americans than among Caucasians living in the US.

  3. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: influence of contaminated fish consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C C; Lin, W T; Liao, P C; Su, H J; Chen, H L

    2006-05-01

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (Pfarm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory.

  4. [Does living nearby a garbage dumping site degrade the quality of life? A case study based on Shin-dong Myeon residents, Chun-cheon Si].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Choi, Jun Yeol; Kim, In Kyoung; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Kim, Young-Shin; Jung, Hye Jin; Kim, Li Na; Lee, Young Kyu; Cho, Youngtae

    2006-07-01

    This study aims to examine if a garbage dumping site has real and negative influence on the quality of life (QOL) for the nearby residents. The net effects of the residential distance from the garbage dumping site and from the garbage truck route were investigated for five domains of the QOL. Two hundred fifty seven Shin-dong Myeon residents, Chun-cheon Si, participated in a self-administrated survey. The Shin-dong Myeon garbage dumping site began operating in 1996. ANCOVA with generalized linear models and multiple regression analysis were performed. Descriptive analyses show that a residence nearby a garbage dumping site is negatively associated with the physical and environmental domains of the QOL. The residential distance from the garbage truck route does not exert any significant effect on various domains of QOL, except for the environmental domain. On the multivariate analysis, the residents living near the garbage dumping site tended to have a significantly negative QOL in the physical and environmental domains. However, the distance from the garbage truck route did not show a significant nor substantial effect on the QOL. The demographic and socioeconomic control variables are associated with a number of the QOL domains, and their patterns are consistent with the general expectations. The results indicated that a garbage dumping site is considered to be an environmental hazard among the nearby residents according to the lower scores on the physical and environmental domains of the QOL. The findings from this study provide comprehensive\\ understanding on the residents' QOL, and they may help politicians and policy makers make decisions for appropriate interventions.

  5. Radionuclide characterization and associated dose from long-lived radionuclides in close-in fallout delivered to the marine environment at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    Between June 1946 and October 1958, Enewetak and Bikini Atolls were used by the US as testing grounds for 66 nuclear devices. The combined explosive yield from these tests was 107 million t (million t TNT equivalents). This testing produced close-in fallout debris that was contaminated with quantities of radioactive fission and particle activated products, and unspent radioactive nuclear fuel that entered the aquatic environment of the atolls. Today, the sediments in the lagoons are reservoirs for tens of TBq of the transuranics and some long-lived fission and activation products. The larger amounts of contamination are associated with fine and coarse sediment material adjacent to the locations of the high yield explosions. Radionuclides are also distributed vertically in the sediment column to various depths in all regions of the lagoons. Concentrations greater than fallout background levels are found in filtered water sampled over several decades from all locations and depths in the lagoons. This is a direct indication that the radionuclides are continuously mobilized to solution from the solid phases. Of particular importance is the fact that the long-lived radionuclides are accumulated to different levels by indigenous aquatic plants and organisms that are used as food by resident people. One might anticipate finding continuous high contamination levels in many of the edible marine organisms from the lagoons, since the radionuclides associated with the sediments are not contained and are available to the different organisms in a relatively shallow water environment. This is not the case. We estimate that the radiological dose from consumption of the edible parts of marine foods at Enewetak and Bikini is presently approximately 0.05% of the total 50-year integral effective dose from all other exposure pathways that include ingestion of terrestrial foods and drinking water, external exposure and inhalation. The total radiological dose from the marine pathway is

  6. Effects of the Staff Training for Assisted Living Residences protocol for caregivers of older adults with dementia: A pilot study in the Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Serelli, Larissa; Reis, Ramon Castro; Laks, Jerson; de Pádua, Analuiza Camozzato; Bottino, Cássio Mc; Caramelli, Paulo

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of the Staff Training for Assisted Living Residences administered to formal caregivers of older adults with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in the institutional environment. The project was developed in two long-term care institutions in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, with 25 formal caregivers and 46 older adults with dementia. The training was carried out over 6 weeks. Evaluations were carried out with the caregivers and the elderly residents, using specific instruments to evaluate different domains (demographic data, etiological diagnoses of dementia, severity of dementia, global cognition, functional performance, quality of life, behavior, burden of caregiver, depression and anxiety). The total time for data collection was 6 months. A significant improvement in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, as assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, was observed (P Assisted Living Residences protocol was effective in reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia patients, and might be a feasible and positive strategy to train formal caregivers in long-term care institutions in Brazil. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 449-455. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Differences in Health Symptoms among Residents Living Near Illegal Dump Sites in Los Laureles Canyon, Tijuana, Mexico: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael K. Al-Delaimy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Living near landfills is a known health hazard prompting recognition of environmental injustice. The study aim was to compare self-reported symptoms of ill health among residents of four neighborhoods, living in haphazardly constructed settlements surrounded by illegal dumpsites in Tijuana, Mexico. One adult from each of 388 households located in Los Laureles Canyon were interviewed about demographics, health status, and symptoms. Distance from each residence to both the nearest dumpsite and the canyon bottom was assessed. The neighborhoods were selected from locations within the canyon, and varied with respect to proximity to dump sites. Residents of San Bernardo reported significantly higher frequencies of ill-health symptoms than the other neighborhoods, including extreme fatigue (OR 3.01 (95% CI 1.6–5.5, skin problems/irritations (OR 2.73 (95% CI 1.3–5.9, stomach discomfort (OR 2.47 (1.3–4.8, eye irritation/tears (OR 2.02 (1.2–3.6, and confusion/difficulty concentrating (OR 2.39 (1.2–4.8. Proximity to dumpsites did not explain these results, that varied only slightly when adjusted for distance to nearest dumpsite or distance to the canyon bottom. Because San Bernardo has no paved roads, we hypothesize that dust and the toxicants it carries is a possible explanation for this difference. Studies are needed to further document this association and sources of toxicants.

  8. HIV-infected women have high numbers of CD103-CD8+ T cells residing close to the basal membrane of the ectocervical epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Anna; Buggert, Marcus; Edfeldt, Gabriella; Ranefall, Petter; Introini, Andrea; Cheuk, Stanley; Martini, Elisa; Eidsmo, Liv; Ball, Terry B; Kimani, Joshua; Kaul, Rupert; Karlsson, Annika C; Wählby, Carolina; Broliden, Kristina; Tjernlund, Annelie

    2017-12-20

    Genital mucosa is the main portal of entry for various incoming pathogens, including HIV, hence an important site for host immune defenses. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells defend tissue barriers against infections and are characterized by expression of CD103 and CD69. Here we describe the composition of CD8+ TRM cells in the ectocervix of healthy and HIV-infected women. Study samples were collected from healthy Swedish and Kenyan HIV-infected and uninfected women. Customized computerized image-based in situ analysis was developed to assess the ectocervical biopsies. Genital mucosa and blood samples were assessed by flow cytometry. While ectocervical epithelium of healthy women was populated with bona fide CD8+ TRM cells (CD103+CD69+), HIV-infected women displayed high frequency of CD103-CD8+ cells residing close to their epithelial basal membrane. Accumulation of CD103-CD8+ cells was associated with chemokine expression in the ectocervix and HIV viral load. CD103+CD8+ and CD103-CD8+ T cells expressed cytotoxic effector molecules in the ectocervical epithelium of healthy and HIV-infected women. Additionally, HIV-infected women had decreased frequencies of circulating CD103+CD8+ T cells. Our data provide insight into the distribution of CD8+ TRM cells in human genital mucosa, a critically important location for immune defense against pathogens, including HIV. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  10. A cluster randomised controlled trial of an occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke living in UK care homes (OTCH: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sackley Cath M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occupational therapy (OT in care homes study (OTCH aims to investigate the effect of a targeted course of individual OT (with task training, provision of adaptive equipment, minor environmental adaptations and staff education for stroke survivors living in care homes, compared to usual care. Methods/Design A cluster randomised controlled trial of United Kingdom (UK care homes (n = 90 with residents (n = 900 who have suffered a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA, and who are not receiving end-of-life care. Homes will be stratified by centre and by type of care provided and randomised (50:50 using computer generated blocked randomisation within strata to receive either the OT intervention (3 months intervention from an occupational therapist or control (usual care. Staff training on facilitating independence and mobility and the use of adaptive equipment, will be delivered to every home, with control homes receiving this after the 12 month follow-up. Allocation will be concealed from the independent assessors, but the treating therapists, and residents will not be masked to the intervention. Measurements are taken at baseline prior to randomisation and at 3, 6 and 12 months post randomisation. The primary outcome measure is independence in self-care activities of daily living (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index. Secondary outcome measures are mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index, mood (Geriatric Depression Scale, preference based quality of life measured from EQ-5D and costs associated with each intervention group. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs will be derived based on the EQ-5D scores. Cost effectiveness analysis will be estimated and measured by incremental cost effectiveness ratio. Adverse events will be recorded. Discussion This study will be the largest cluster randomised controlled trial of OT in care homes to date and will clarify the currently inconclusive literature on the efficacy of OT for

  11. Care-Delivery Interventions to Manage Agitation and Aggression in Dementia Nursing Home and Assisted Living Residents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Brasure, Michelle; Fuchs, Erika; Shippee, Tetyana; Kane, Rosalie A; Fink, Howard A; Butler, Mary; Sylvanus, Tonye; Kane, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of nonpharmacological care-delivery interventions (staff training, care-delivery models, changes to the environment) to reduce and manage agitation and aggression in nursing home and assisted living residents. Three bibliographic databases, references of systematic reviews, ClincalTrials.gov, and the International Controlled Trials Registry Platform were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials reporting behavioral outcomes for nonpharmacological care-delivery interventions in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Five investigators independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data, rated risk of bias, and graded strength of evidence. Inclusion was limited to studies with low to moderate risk of bias. Nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Facility caregiving staff. Agitation, aggression, antipsychotic and other psychotropic use, general behavior. Nineteen unique studies met entry criteria, addressing several categories of facility caregiver training interventions: dementia care mapping (DCM; n = 3), person-centered care (PCC; n = 3), clinical protocols to reduce the use of antipsychotic and other psychotropic drugs (n = 3), and emotion-oriented care (n = 2). Eleven additional studies evaluated other unique interventions. Results were pooled for the effect of each type of intervention on agitation and aggression: DCM (standardized mean difference -0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.66 to 0.42), PCC (standardized mean difference -0.15, 95% CI = -0.67 to 0.38), and protocols to reduce antipsychotic and other psychotropic use (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory mean difference -4.5, 95% C = -38.84 to 29.93). Strength of evidence was generally insufficient to draw conclusions regarding efficacy or comparative effectiveness. Evidence was insufficient regarding the efficacy of nonpharmacological care-delivery interventions to reduce agitation or aggression in nursing home and assisted

  12. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: Influence of contaminated fish consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Lin, W.T.; Liao, P.C.; Su, H.J.; Chen, H.L.

    2006-01-01

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (P < 0.05). In biota samples, average PCDD/F of milkfish in sea reservoir (28.3 pg WHO-TEQ/g) was higher than those in the nearby fish farm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory. - Inhabitants living near a deserted PCP factory are exposed to high PCDD/F levels

  13. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: Influence of contaminated fish consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.C. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic Substances, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, W.T. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liao, P.C. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic Substances, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Su, H.J. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic Substances, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.L. [Department of Industrial Safety and Health, Hung Kuang University, Taichung, 34 Chung Chie Rd. Sha Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: hsiulin@sunrise.hk.edu.tw

    2006-05-15

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (P < 0.05). In biota samples, average PCDD/F of milkfish in sea reservoir (28.3 pg WHO-TEQ/g) was higher than those in the nearby fish farm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory. - Inhabitants living near a deserted PCP factory are exposed to high PCDD/F levels.

  14. Evaluating the Feasibility and Intercorrelation of Measurements on the Functioning of Residents Living in Scandinavian Nursing Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of measurements of muscle strength, balance, cognitive function, mobility, activities of daily living (ADL), and physical activity for use in a Scandinavian nursing home population and to examine intercorrelations between the......, functional independence measure, physiotherapy clinical outcome variables, and the Nursing Home Life Space...

  15. Increased risk of pneumonia in residents living near poultry farms : does the upper respiratory tract microbiota play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Lidwien A. M.; Boender, Gert Jan; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Hagenaars, Thomas J; Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Rossen, John W A; Koopmans, Marion; Nodelijk, Gonnie; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Yzermans, Joris; Bogaert, Debby; Heederik, Dick

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution has been shown to increase the susceptibility to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Previously, we observed an increased incidence of CAP in adults living within 1 km from poultry farms, potentially related to particulate matter and endotoxin emissions. We aim to confirm

  16. Need fulfillment, need importance, and depressive symptoms of residents over the first eight months of living in a nursing home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, A.F.J.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Westerhof, G.J.; Kuin, Y.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Based on self-determination theory and adaptation theories, the study aim was to investigate the relationship between need fulfillment (of autonomy, relatedness, and competence), need importance, and depressive symptoms during the first months of living in a nursing home. Methods:

  17. “I Get Along With Most of Them”: Direct Care Workers' Relationships With Residents' Families in Assisted Living

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Candace L.; Ball, Mary M.; Perkins, Molly M.; Hollingsworth, Carole; Lepore, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to explore staff–family relationships in assisted living facilities (ALFs) as they are experienced by care staff and perceived by administrators. We identify factors that influence relationships and explore how interactions with residents’ families affect care staff’s caregiving experiences. Design and Methods: The data are drawn from a statewide study involving 45 ALFs in Georgia. Using grounded theory methods, we analyze qualitative data from in-dept...

  18. Assessment of the living and workplace health and safety conditions of site-resident construction workers in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Peyman Hossein; Farshad, Ali Asghar; Mirkazemi, Roksana; Orak, Rouhangiz Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess living and workplace safety conditions of construction workers in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 410 construction sites in a municipal area of Tehran whose municipal building permits were issued in 2011. Data on ventilation, workplace safety and hygiene were collected by direct observation and interviews with site foremen. Noise levels were estimated from 10 sound-level-meter stations in the municipality area. Lack of ventilation in the workers' rooms was abundant. Bathrooms were unhygienic and minimum requirements such as lighting and ventilation did not exist in 80% of the cases. In nearly 50% of large construction sites, sewage and garbage disposal were inappropriate. Elevator safety was poor at all sites and no measures for fall prevention were present in over 88% of active construction sites. This study showed that the mean 24-h equivalent continuous sound level Leq was over 70 dB in 80% of the sites during weekdays. The results of this study revealed poor health and safety living and working conditions of construction workers in Tehran.

  19. Challenges and opportunities from a combined research study and community groundwater testing program for residents living near hydraulic fracturing sites in Appalachian Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.

    2017-12-01

    People living in rural areas of the United States often depend on groundwater as the only domestic and agricultural water resource. Hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") has led to widespread fears of groundwater contamination, and many people lack resources for monitoring their water. To help in this effort, I led a three-year free groundwater monitoring program for residents of parts of the Utica Shale drilling region of Ohio from early 2012 to early 2015. Our team took samples and made laboratory measurements of species meant to act as indicators of the presence of natural gas or fracking fluid in groundwater. All data were made available to participants, and all participation was voluntary. The project team also made several presentations about our findings at community meetings. In this presentation, I will discuss challenges associated with obtaining funding and communicating results with the media, the oil and gas industry, Congress, and my university. However, opportunities have arisen from this work as well, beyond the obvious opportunity for public service, including recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students to the project team; generation of scientific data in an emerging area of research; and a better understanding of policy needs for rural residents in Appalachia.

  20. Daily variation of radon gas and its short-lived progeny concentration near ground level and estimation of aerosol residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Mohery; A, M. Abdallah; A, Ali; S, S. Baz

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of radon (222Rn) gas and its short-lived progenies 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Po were continuously monitored every four hours at the ground level in Jeddah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The measurements were performed three times every week, starting from November 2014 to October 2015. A method of electrostatic precipitation of positively charged 218Po and 214Po by a positive voltage was applied for determining 222Rn gas concentration. The short-lived 222Rn progeny concentration was determined by using a filter holder connected with the alpha-spectrometric technique. The meteorological parameters (relative air humidity, air temperature, and wind speed) were determined during the measurements of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. 222Rn gas as well as its short-lived progeny concentration display a daily and seasonal variation with high values in the night and early morning hours as compared to low values at noon and in the afternoon. The observed monthly atmospheric concentrations showed a seasonal trend with the highest values in the autumn/winter season and the lowest values in the spring/summer season. Moreover, and in parallel with alpha-spectrometric measurements, a single filter-holder was used to collect air samples. The deposited activities of 214Pb and the long-lived 222Rn daughter 210Pb on the filter were measured with the gamma spectrometric technique. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb by both techniques were found to be relatively equal largely. The highest mean seasonally activity concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn/winter season while the lowest mean were observed in the spring/summer season. The mean residence time (MRT) of aerosol particles in the atmospheric air could be estimated from the activity ratios of 210Pb/214Pb. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Grant No. 291/965/1434).

  1. Metropolitan social environments and pre-HAART/HAART era changes in mortality rates (per 10,000 adult residents among injection drug users living with AIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel R Friedman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the largest US metropolitan areas, trends in mortality rates for injection drug users (IDUs with AIDS vary substantially. Ecosocial, risk environment and dialectical theories suggest many metropolitan areas characteristics that might drive this variation. We assess metropolitan area characteristics associated with decline in mortality rates among IDUs living with AIDS (per 10,000 adult MSA residents after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was developed. METHODS: This is an ecological cohort study of 86 large US metropolitan areas from 1993-2006. The proportional rate of decline in mortality among IDUs diagnosed with AIDS (as a proportion of adult residents from 1993-1995 to 2004-2006 was the outcome of interest. This rate of decline was modeled as a function of MSA-level variables suggested by ecosocial, risk environment and dialectical theories. In multiple regression analyses, we used 1993-1995 mortality rates to (partially control for pre-HAART epidemic history and study how other independent variables affected the outcomes. RESULTS: In multivariable models, pre-HAART to HAART era increases in 'hard drug' arrest rates and higher pre-HAART income inequality were associated with lower relative declines in mortality rates. Pre-HAART per capita health expenditure and drug abuse treatment rates, and pre- to HAART-era increases in HIV counseling and testing rates, were weakly associated with greater decline in AIDS mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality among IDUs living with AIDS might be decreased by reducing metropolitan income inequality, increasing public health expenditures, and perhaps increasing drug abuse treatment and HIV testing services. Given prior evidence that drug-related arrest rates are associated with higher HIV prevalence rates among IDUs and do not seem to decrease IDU population prevalence, changes in laws and policing practices to reduce such arrests while still protecting public order should be

  2. The occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among residents living within the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekosse, Georges; de Jager, Linda; van den Heever, Dawid J

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at establishing occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among different classes of residents within Selebi Phikwe, Botswana where there are on going nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) mining and smelting activities. Through the administration of questionnaires and structured questions to 600 individuals, 7 health service providers, 200 business enterprises, and 30 educational institutions, attempts were made to establish and verify the existing human health status at Selebi Phikwe by focusing on chest pains and frequent coughing which are considered to be some of the respiratory tract related symptoms of sicknesses and diseases. With the aid of statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), interpreted results from respondents indicated that 33 % of the individuals complained of persistent chest pains; and 27 % of educational institutions, 45 % business enterprises, and all health service providers had learners, workers, and patients who complained of chest pains. Furthermore, 49 % of the individuals complained of persistent frequent coughing; and 70 % of educational institutions, 45 % business enterprises, and all health service providers had learners, workers, and patients who complained of frequent coughing. According to study sites, respondents living in sites closest to the mine and smelter / concentrator plant reported a higher incidence of chest pains and frequent coughing, compared to those living in other parts of the study area. Residents associate fumes and dust from mining activities to the frequent coughing and persistent chest pains, which could be symptoms of respiratory tract diseases. This baseline investigation calls for further studies to establish relations of mining activities to human health at Selebi Phikwe.

  3. Health symptoms in residents living near shale gas activity: A retrospective record review from the Environmental Health Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Weinberger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between health symptoms and exposure to unconventional natural gas development (UNGD. The purpose of this study is to describe the health of adults in communities with intense UNGD who presented for evaluation of symptoms. Records of 135 structured health assessments conducted between February 2012 and October 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Publicly available data were used to determine proximity to gas wells. Analysis was restricted to records of adults who lived within 1km of a well in Pennsylvania and denied employment in the gas industry (n=51. Symptoms in each record were reviewed by a physician. Symptoms that could be explained by pre-existing or concurrent conditions or social history and those that began or worsened prior to exposure were excluded. Exposure was calculated using date of well drilling within 1km. The number of symptoms/participant ranged from 0 to 19 (mean=6.2; SD=5.1. Symptoms most commonly reported were: sleep disruption, headache, throat irritation, stress or anxiety, cough, shortness of breath, sinus problems, fatigue, nausea, and wheezing. These results are consistent with findings of prior studies using self-report without physician review. In comparison, our results are strengthened by the collection of health data by a health care provider, critical review of symptoms for possible alternative causes, and confirmation of timing of exposure to unconventional natural gas well relative to symptom onset or exacerbation. Our findings confirm earlier studies and add to the growing body of evidence of the association between symptoms and exposure to UNGD. Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing, Health, Fracking, Shale gas, Unconventional gas

  4. Local acceptance by people with unvoiced opinions living close to a wind farm: A case study from Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motosu, Memi; Maruyama, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The local acceptance of wind energy projects has received significant attention because local opposition is a barrier to implementing a wind energy project. To decrease objections from local residents, previous studies identified factors that evoke negative attitudes. However, little research has focused on the acceptance of people who remain silent. Therefore, the situation in which there is no marked opposition has been regarded as a success for the project. This research focused on the acceptance of people who are not objecting to a wind farm in their backyard and clarifies the implications of the silent situation. One of the principal findings is that while most of the respondents accept the existing local wind farm, they have negative attitudes towards a new wind farm. This result means that the silent situation does not support further wind development. We conclude that the purpose of consensus building needs to be set to encouraging local residents to express their opinions instead of simply aiming for the absence of opposing opinions. Finally, we discuss a council model through a budgetary provision, eliciting opinions from people who remain silent, and adaptable management as the policy implications for sustainable wind development. - Highlights: •We examined the acceptance of people with unvoiced opinions toward a wind project. •The silent situation does not support further wind farm construction. •Two factors were identified to maintain a receptive attitude. •A council model and eliciting opinions from people who remain silent are essential. •Adaptable management would contribute to promote further wind project development.

  5. [Morbidity in a population living close to urban waste incinerator plants in Lazio Region (Central Italy): a retrospective cohort study using a before-after design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golini, Martina Nicole; Ancona, Carla; Badaloni, Chiara; Bolignano, Andrea; Bucci, Simone; Sozzi, Roberto; Davoli, Marina; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    the body of evidence on health effects of residential exposure to urban waste incinerators suggests association with reproductive outcomes and some cancers, but the overall evidence is still limited. we evaluated the impact of two incinerators on hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in a cohort of people living nearby two incineration plants in Lazio Region (Central Italy) using a before-and-after design. the study area was defined as the 7-km radius around the incinerators. People who were resident in the area from 1996 to 2008 were enrolled in a retrospective longitudinal study. All addresses were geocoded. A Lagrangian dispersion model (SPRAY) for PM₁₀ (ng/m³) was used for incinerators exposure assessment. Average annual concentration of background PM₁₀ (μg/m³) was estimated on a regional basis by means of RAMS and FARM models. Both PM₁₀ exposures were estimated at the residential address. All subjects were followed for hospital admissions in the period before (1996-2002) and after (2003-2008) the activation of the plants. The association between exposure to emissions from incinerators and hospitalizations in the two periods was estimated using the multivariate Cox model (for repeated events), adjusting for age, area-level socioeconomic status, distance from industries, traffic roads and highways. An interaction term between the period of follow-up (before or after the activation of the plants) and the exposure levels was used to test the effect of the incinerators. 47,192 subjects resident in the study area were enrolled. No clear association between pollution exposure from incinerators and cause-specific morbidity of residents in highest concentration areas was found when compared to the reference group. However, an effect of PM₁₀ on respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was suggested. The effect was due to excesses of hospitalizations for the same causes among men living in highest

  6. Long-term air pollution exposure and living close to busy roads are associated with COPD in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung function and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have been associated with short-term exposure to air pollution. However, the effect of long-term exposure to particulate matter from industry and traffic on COPD as defined by lung function has not been evaluated so far. Our study was designed to investigate the influence of long-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in 55-year-old women. We especially focused on COPD as defined by GOLD criteria and additionally compared the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms by questionnaire data and by lung function measurements. Methods In consecutive cross sectional studies conducted between 1985–1994, we investigated 4757 women living in the Rhine-Ruhr Basin of Germany. NO2 and PM10 exposure was assessed by measurements done in an 8 km grid, and traffic exposure by distance from the residential address to the nearest major road using Geographic Information System data. Lung function was determined and COPD was defined by using the GOLD criteria. Chronic respiratory symptoms and possible confounders were defined by questionnaire data. Linear and logistic regressions, including random effects were used to account for confounding and clustering on city level. Results The prevalence of COPD (GOLD stages 1–4 was 4.5%. COPD and pulmonary function were strongest affected by PM10 and traffic related exposure. A 7 μg/m3 increase in five year means of PM10 (interquartile range was associated with a 5.1% (95% CI 2.5%–7.7% decrease in FEV1, a 3.7% (95% CI 1.8%–5.5% decrease in FVC and an odds ratio (OR of 1.33 (95% CI 1.03–1.72 for COPD. Women living less than 100 m from a busy road also had a significantly decreased lung function and COPD was 1.79 times more likely (95% CI 1.06–3.02 than for those living farther away. Chronic symptoms as based on questionnaire information showed effects in the same

  7. Living at a residency away from home during radiotherapy as narrated by 52 patients with breast cancer: a cage of safety and discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilliehorn, Sara; Salander, Pär

    2018-02-01

    In the Nordic countries many patients with cancer conclude their treatment with 5-6 weeks of radiotherapy while staying at a residency far away from home. The experience of this stay, from a rehabilitation perspective, has not previously been studied. Fifty-two women with breast cancer were followed with repeated thematic interviews from diagnosis up to 2 years. The majority of women saw both pros and cons with their stay, and overall the stay could be described as "A cage of safety and discomfort". Pros included "Safety", "Closeness and learning", and "Feeling like being on holiday", while cons included "An intruding self-image", "Isolation and increased vulnerability", and "A loss of function". Some patients supported their own rehabilitation by socializing with their "fellow sisters", while others isolated themselves and mainly found it burdensome to be there. The residence becomes an interactional field with the potential to facilitate patients in resuming a new everyday life. The women who do not interact with others and/or who are stuck with feelings of anxiety should be offered the opportunity to take part in a group exclusively for "fellow sisters" in a similar situation. Implications for Rehabilitation Staying in accommodations together with other patients receiving daily radiotherapy for cancer for 5-6 weeks lends itself to personal interactions with a rehabilitative impact. Some patients take advantage of this possibility, which might facilitate the integration of the cancer experience into a new self-image. To some more vulnerable patients the stay at the patient hotel is burdensome, and these patients represent a target group for staff interventions aiming to facilitate their stay and their resumption of a new everyday life. A suggestion is that the specialist nurses meet with every patient after about a week in order to identify women who would benefit from psychosocial interventions.

  8. The effect of cross-border mobility on alcohol and drug use among Mexican-American residents living at the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Ye, Yu; Zemore, Sarah E; Bond, Jason; Borges, Guilherme

    2015-11-01

    Little epidemiological evidence exists on alcohol or other substance use and related problems along the U.S.-Mexico border, although the border has been the focus of recent media attention related to the escalating drug/violence "epidemic". The purpose of this study was to analyze the association of variables related to crossing the border (cross-border mobility) with three substance use outcomes reported for the last year: 1) heavy drinking (5+ drinks per day for men or 4+ for women), 2) alcohol use disorder (AUD), and 3) co-occurring heavy drinking and drug use (any use of illicit and/or non-medically prescribed drugs). Household surveys were conducted, using area probability sampling of 1565 Mexican-American residents, aged 18-65, living at the Texas-Mexico border in the metropolitan areas of Laredo and McAllen/Brownsville. Among those 18-29, more frequent crossing of the border was significantly predictive of AUD (OR = 1.61, p border mobility may play an important role in substance use and problems, especially among those 18-29. Findings also highlight the importance of "drug tourism" in substance use across the age spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. THE EFFECT OF CROSS-BORDER MOBILITY ON ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE AMONG MEXICAN-AMERICAN RESIDENTS LIVING AT THE U.S–MEXICO BORDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Ye, Yu; Zemore, Sarah E.; Bond, Jason; Borges, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Little epidemiological evidence exists on alcohol or other substance use and related problems along the U.S.-Mexico border, although the border has been the focus of recent media attention related to the escalating drug/violence “epidemic”. The purpose of this study was to analyze the association of variables related to crossing the border (cross-border mobility) with three substance use outcomes reported for the last year: 1) heavy drinking (5+ drinks per day for men or 4+ for women), 2) alcohol use disorder (AUD), and 3) co-occurring heavy drinking and drug use (any use of illicit and/or non-medically prescribed drugs). Methods Household surveys were conducted, using area probability sampling of 1,565 Mexican-Americans residents, aged 18–65, living at the Texas-Mexico border in the metropolitan areas of Laredo and McAllen/Brownsville. Results Among those 18–29, more frequent crossing of the border was significantly predictive of AUD (OR=1.61, pborder mobility may play an important role in substance use and problems, especially among those 18–29. Findings also highlight the importance of “drug tourism” in substance use across the age spectrum. PMID:26103423

  10. Healing the body, healing the self: the interrelationship of sickness, health, and faith in the lives of St. Lawrence Island Yupik residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolles, Carol Zane

    2003-01-01

    For about 15 years, Carol Jolles has been traveling to St. Lawrence Island, Alaska to study the role faith plays in the lives of Sivuqaq (Gambell) residents. From the outset, she was aware of the strong presence of two Christian faith traditions in the community. She was present when people “spoke in tongues” (entered a spiritual state, sometimes identified as an altered state of consciousness), and she was aware that people relied on prayer, often uttered in a spiritually inspired context, to ease the pain of daily life and to find the strength to do difficult tasks. Many months passed, however, before she realized that many people relied on faith to heal. From the perspective of her long-term working relationships and friendships with community members, Jolles takes a fresh look at some of the situations from her early work where faith and healing were intertwined. She also looks at more recent examples to place faith-based healing in a more general context. In the process, she focuses on a few special individuals to highlight the components of faith and healing associated with illness and mental distress.

  11. Pathogenic free-living amoebae in a closed-loop power plant; risk assessment and risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanes, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Service Etudes Medicales; Pringuez, E.; Siclet, F.; Khalanski, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Bard, D. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), 92 (France); Pernin, P. [Faculte de Pharmacie de Lyon, 69 (France)

    1998-07-01

    Since 1980, the water used for cooling in French power plants has been tested for pathogenic amoebae, especially Naegleria fowleri, the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapid fatal disease of the central nervous system. The replacement of brass condensers by stainless steel condensers resulted in increased Naegleria fowleri development, to a density of as much as 3000 l{sup -1} in the Dampierre power plant cooling water. Downstream from Dampierre, the maximum detected density of this amoeba during the summer of 1995 was 80 l{sup -1}, at low river flow. The replacement of a second condenser in 1996 at the same power plant was expected to double the amoebae concentration in the river. The hypothetical PAM risk for swimmers was then predicted to be 10{sup -4} per swim. To reduce the risk continuous chlorination of the closed-loop cooling system was implemented at a free residual chlorine level in the range of 0.3-0.5 mg.l{sup -1}. Naegleria fowleri concentrations decreased immediately and thereafter remained under 4 l{sup -1}. Total residual chlorine and chlorinated organic compounds were also monitored in the evaluation of the environmental impact of this preventive action. (authors)

  12. Pathogenic free-living amoebae in a closed-loop power plant; risk assessment and risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanes, P.; Pernin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1980, the water used for cooling in French power plants has been tested for pathogenic amoebae, especially Naegleria fowleri, the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapid fatal disease of the central nervous system. The replacement of brass condensers by stainless steel condensers resulted in increased Naegleria fowleri development, to a density of as much as 3000 l -1 in the Dampierre power plant cooling water. Downstream from Dampierre, the maximum detected density of this amoeba during the summer of 1995 was 80 l -1 , at low river flow. The replacement of a second condenser in 1996 at the same power plant was expected to double the amoebae concentration in the river. The hypothetical PAM risk for swimmers was then predicted to be 10 -4 per swim. To reduce the risk continuous chlorination of the closed-loop cooling system was implemented at a free residual chlorine level in the range of 0.3-0.5 mg.l -1 . Naegleria fowleri concentrations decreased immediately and thereafter remained under 4 l -1 . Total residual chlorine and chlorinated organic compounds were also monitored in the evaluation of the environmental impact of this preventive action. (authors)

  13. Quality of life of residents with dementia in long-term care settings in the Netherlands and Belgium: design of a longitudinal comparative study in traditional nursing homes and small-scale living facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luijkx Katrien G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in the number of people with dementia will lead to greater demand for residential care. Currently, large nursing homes are trying to transform their traditional care for residents with dementia to a more home-like approach, by developing small-scale living facilities. It is often assumed that small-scale living will improve the quality of life of residents with dementia. However, little scientific evidence is currently available to test this. The following research question is addressed in this study: Which (combination of changes in elements affects (different dimensions of the quality of life of elderly residents with dementia in long-term care settings over the course of one year? Methods/design A longitudinal comparative study in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings, which follows a quasi-experimental design, will be carried out in Belgium and the Netherlands. To answer the research question, a model has been developed which incorporates relevant elements influencing quality of life in long-term care settings. Validated instruments will be used to evaluate the role of these elements, divided into environmental characteristics (country, type of ward, group size and nursing staff; basic personal characteristics (age, sex, cognitive decline, weight and activities of daily living; behavioural characteristics (behavioural problems and depression; behavioural interventions (use of restraints and use of psychotropic medication; and social interaction (social engagement and visiting frequency of relatives. The main outcome measure for residents in the model is quality of life. Data are collected at baseline, after six and twelve months, from residents living in either small-scale or traditional care settings. Discussion The results of this study will provide an insight into the determinants of quality of life for people with dementia living in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings in

  14. Does where you live matter to your health? Investigating factors that influence the self-rated health of urban and rural Chinese residents: evidence drawn from Chinese General Social Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Zhenjun; Li, Zhigang

    2017-04-21

    China's rapid urbanization over the past decades has exacerbated the problems of environmental degradation and health disparities. However, few studies have analysed the differences between urban and rural residents in relation to how environmental quality impacts health outcomes. This study examines the associations between Chinese people's perceptions of environmental quality and their self-rated health, particularly focusing on differences between rural and urban residents in environment-health relationships. Using a logistic regression model and data from the 2013 Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), a representative sample of data for 3,402 urban residents (46 ± 16 years) and 2,439 rural residents (48 ± 15 years) was analysed. The dependent variable used for the logistic regressions was whether or not respondents reported being healthy. Independent variables included respondents' evaluations of the living environment, and how frequently they participated in physical activities. Interaction terms were employed to measure the moderating effects of physical exercise on the relationship between perceived environmental quality and health. The percentage of healthy urban residents was significantly larger than that of healthy rural respondents (70.87% versus 62.87%). Urban respondents living in areas with sufficient green space were more likely to report good health (OR = 0.749, CI = [0.628, 0.895]), while rural respondents without reliable access to fresh water were more likely to report poor health (OR = 0.762, CI = [0.612, 0.949]). Urban respondents who were exposed to green spaces and exercised frequently were 21.6 per cent more likely to report good health than those who exercised infrequently (OR = 1.216, CI = [1.047, 1.413]). Those who lived in areas with insufficient green space and exercised frequently were 19.1 per cent less likely to report good health than those who exercised infrequently (OR = 0.805, CI = [0

  15. Factors influencing resident's decision to reside in gated and guarded community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudin, Zarina; Shamsudin, Shafiza; Zainal, Rozlin

    2017-10-01

    Gated communities are residential areas developed with restricted access with strictly controlled entrances and surrounded by a close perimeter of wall or fences. Developers, conscious of the need to fulfill the requirement of living in modern and sophisticated lifestyle and gated properties become the trend and mushroomed over the past decade. Nowadays, it is obvious that gated and guarded communities become almost a dominant feature of Malaysia housing development projects. The focus of this paper is to identify the factors contribute resident's decision to reside in gated and guarded community and to study social interaction among gated communities' residents. 150 questionnaires were distributed to the residents of selected gated and guarded community area in order to achieve the objectives and analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) and descriptive analysis. The result was tabulated and presented in charts and graphs for a clear and better understanding. The five main factors contribute to resident decision to reside in gated communities were identified and ranked; there are privacy, security, location, lifestyle and prestige. Besides, the residents are feeling neutral towards the facilities and services provided in their gated and guarded residential area. A comprehensive improvement towards the facilities and services is needed to reach higher satisfaction from the residents.

  16. The health risk levels of different age groups of residents living in the vicinity of municipal solid waste incinerator posed by PCDD/Fs in atmosphere and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiafu; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Tingting; Hao, Huawei; Wu, Hao; Wang, Lili; Chen, Yuxing; Xing, Limin; Niu, Zhiguang

    2018-03-07

    In our study, health risk levels of different age groups of residents living in the vicinity of a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) posed by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in atmosphere and soil were evaluated. The toxic equivalent concentrations of PCDD/Fs (TEQ) in surrounding atmosphere and soil of studied MSWI were 0.05-0.12 pg I-TEQ Nm -3 and 7.622-15.450 ng I-TEQ kg -1 , respectively. The PCDFs/PCDDs (F/D) values of PCDD/Fs in surrounding atmosphere of studied MSWI ranged from 0.40 to 5.90 with a mean of 1.80, suggesting that the PCDD/Fs mainly came from combustion sources and studied MSWI could be a key source of PCDD/Fs in surrounding atmosphere. The F/D ratios of PCDD/Fs in surrounding soil ranged from 0.18 to 1.81 with a mean of 0.90, suggesting combustion is not the mainly sources of PCDD/Fs in surrounding soil, and studied MSWI may have limited influence on PCDD/Fs in surrounding soil. O8CDD and 2,3,4,7,8-P5CDF could be the total PCDD/Fs and TEQ indicators in surrounding atmosphere of studied MSWI, respectively. The carcinogenic risk (CR) values of PCDD/Fs in surrounding atmosphere and soil for children, teens and adults were 1.24E-06, 9.06E-07 and 4.41E-06, respectively, suggesting that the potential cancer risk occurred but the risk was at acceptable levels for both children and adults (atmosphere was performed, which will help us have a good view of the health risk levels of PCDD/Fs in surrounding environment of MWSI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. ‘Everyone has a secret they keep close to their hearts’: challenges faced by adolescents living with HIV infection at the Kenyan coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Abubakar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The upsurge in the uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART has led to a significant increase in the survival of vertically acquired HIV infected children, many of whom are currently living into adolescence and early adulthood. However little if anything is known of the lived experiences and the challenges faced by HIV positive adolescents in the African context. We set out to investigate psychosocial challenges faced by HIV infected adolescents on the Kenyan coast. Methods A total of 44 participants (12 HIV-infected adolescents, 7 HIV uninfected adolescents, and 25 key informants took part in this qualitative study, using individually administered in-depth interviews. A framework approach was used to analyze the data using NVIVO software. Results We observed that the challenges faced by adolescents in rural Kenya could be placed into six major themes: poverty, poor mental and physical health, the lack of a school system that is responsive to their needs, challenges in how to disclose to peers and family members, high levels of stigma in its various forms, and challenges of medical adherence leading to the need for close monitoring. Conclusion In this African community, vertically acquired HIV-infected adolescents face a complex set of social, economic and medical challenges. Our study points to the urgent need to develop multisectorial intervention support programmes to fully address these challenges.

  18. Effects of individually tailored physical and daily activities in nursing home residents on activities of daily living, physical performance and physical activity level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Frändin, Kerstin; Bergland, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    , evidence for the benefit of rehabilitation in nursing home residents is conflicting and inconclusive. Objective: To evaluate the effect of an individually tailored intervention program of 3 months, for nursing home residents, on ADL, balance, physical activity level, mobility and muscle strength. Methods...... outcomes were ADL and balance, and secondary outcomes physical activity level, mobility and musclestrength. Results: At baseline, 322 nursing home residents were included, of whom 266 were assessed after 3 months of intervention. Following the intervention, a significant difference was found between...... min/week significantly improved their balance and physical activity level. Participation in more than 10 weeks of intervention significantly improved physical activity and walking/wheelchair speed, while a deterioration was seen in those who had participated less. Conclusion: Individually tailored...

  19. 45 CFR 233.40 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... For purposes of this section: (1) A resident of a State is one: (i) Who is living in the State... resident of the State in which he or she is living other than on a temporary basis. Residence may not depend upon the reason for which the individual entered the State, except insofar as it may bear upon...

  20. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  1. [Influence of self efficacy, social support and sense of community on health-related quality of life for middle-aged and elderly residents living in a rural community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Cho, Sung Hye; Kim, Jung Hee; Kim, Yune Kyong; Choo, Hyang Im

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-efficacy, social support, sense of community and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), including the direct and indirect effects of the variables on HRQoL. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 249 middle-aged and elderly residents living in a rural community in A-County, K Province. The structured questionnaire included 4 scales from the Euro Quality of life-5 Dimensions (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression), and measures of General Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Sense of Community. Data were analyzed using SPSS WIN 20.0 and AMOS 21.0 program. The mean HRQoL score for the participants was 0.87±0.13. Self-efficacy (β=.13, p=.039) and age (β= -.38, pelderly residents in rural communities.

  2. Feasibility of a portable bihormonal closed-loop system to control glucose excursions at home under free-living conditions for 48 hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Arianne C.; Luijf, Yoeri M.; Koebrugge, Rob; Koops, Robin; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of a portable bihormonal closed-loop system at home. Sixteen pump-treated patients with type 1 diabetes received 48 h of closed-loop therapy with a telemonitored insulin- and glucagon-delivering closed-loop system and 48 h of patient-managed open-loop therapy.

  3. Pathways to Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Mary M.; Perkins, Molly M.; Hollingsworth, Carole; Whittington, Frank J.; King, Sharon V.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how race and class influence decisions to move to assisted living facilities. Qualitative methods were used to study moving decisions of residents in 10 assisted living facilities varying in size and location, as well as race and socioeconomic status of residents. Data were derived from in-depth interviews with 60 residents, 43 family members and friends, and 12 administrators. Grounded theory analysis identified three types of residents based on their decision-making control: proactive, compliant, and passive/resistant. Only proactive residents (less than a quarter of residents) had primary control. Findings show that control of decision making for elders who are moving to assisted living is influenced by class, though not directly by race. The impact of class primarily related to assisted-living placement options and strategies available to forestall moves. Factors influencing the decision-making process were similar for Black and White elders of comparable socioeconomic status. PMID:19756172

  4. Families and Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Kane, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on assisted living (AL) as a residential care option for older adults, the social ramifications of residents' transitions to AL are relatively unexplored. This article examines family involvement in AL, including family structures of residents, types of involvement from family members living outside the AL…

  5. Quality of Life of Men and Women with Borderline Intelligence and Attention Deficit Disorders Living in Community Residences: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmerman, Arie; Yurkevich, Oren; Birger, Moshe; Araten-Bergman, Tal

    2005-01-01

    The research studies the quality of life (QOL) of 127 men and women diagnosed as having a borderline IQ and ADHD living in two major residential programs of the Sharon region in central Israel in respect to their personal, disability, and social ecological variables. Core findings indicate that men and women differ significantly according to their…

  6. Thermal storage in a heat pump heated living room floor for urban district power balancing - effects on thermal comfort, energy loss and costs for residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; de Wit, J.B.; Fink, J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    For the Dutch smart grid demonstration project Meppelenergie, the effects of controlled thermal energy storage within the floor heating structure of a living room by a heat pump are investigated. Storage possibilities are constrained by room operative and floor temperatures. Simulations indicate

  7. Do co-residence and intentions make a difference? Relationship satisfaction in married, cohabiting, and living apart together couples in four countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsui-o Tai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large body of research has compared relationship satisfaction and quality in cohabiting versus married relationships. Despite increased recognition of couples in living apart together (LAT relationships, very little research has examined the experiences of couples in LAT relationships compared to co-residential unions. Objective: Our aim is to develop knowledge about the experiences of different union types by investigating relationship satisfaction of people in LAT, cohabiting, and marital relationships. We differentiate those with intentions to marry for cohabiters, and those with intentions to marry or live together in LAT relationships. We also examine differences by gender and country. Methods: Using data from Wave 1 of the Generations and Gender Survey in France, Germany, Australia, and Russia (n = 9,604, OLS regressions are estimated to investigate a differences in relationship satisfaction across relationship types, and b across countries. Results: Married people have the highest levels of relationship satisfaction. People in non-marital unions with intentions to marry or live together are significantly more satisfied than those without marriage or cohabitation intentions. Those in LAT relationships with no intentions to live together have the lowest levels of relationship satisfaction. There is evidence of cross-national variation with differences in relationship satisfaction by union type most pronounced in Australia and Russia. Gender differences are found with women reporting lower levels of relationship satisfaction than men. Conclusions: LAT relationships are qualitatively different to co-residential unions. It is important to further develop our understanding of the experiences of couples in these relationships.

  8. Assessment of metal and bacterial contamination in cultivated fish and impact on human health for residents living in the Mekong Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanpiwat, Penradee; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Widmer, Kenneth; Himeno, Seiichiro; Miyataka, Hideki; Vu, Ngoc-Ut; Tran, Van-Viet; Pham, Thi-Tuyet-Ngan

    2016-11-01

    Fish is the main source of animal protein and micronutrients for inhabitants in the lower Mekong River basin. Consumption of fish in the basin ranges from 41 to 51 kg capita(-1) year(-1). Thus, concerns of human health impacts caused by daily intake of metals contained in fish, and the incidence of bacterial contamination from Listeria and Escherichia coli have been raised. This study was conducted to 1) determine concentrations of metals, fecal indicator organisms, and Listeria spp. in cultivated common diet fish, and 2) assess human health risks as results of fish consumption on a daily basis. The results showed significant impacts of metal accumulation in fish especially from the intensive aquaculture. Chemical use to promote the rapid allometric growth of fish was expected to be the explanation for this finding. Concentrations of metals contained in different fish species were not statistically different with the exceptions of Na, Mn, and Zn. This might be due to the mobility of elements in aquaculture farms. Listeria and E. coli log CFU/g were 1.36 ± 0.11 (standard error) and 1.57 ± 0.1 s.e., respectively with higher counts observed in samples collected in market sites. Lastly, for human health risk assessment via fish consumption, it was found that hazard quotients of consuming As, Cu, and Zn contained in all fish species could contribute adverse health effects to the local residents (hazard quotients higher than 1). Therefore, risk management measures must be promoted and implemented in all study areas to reduce potential risks to local Vietnamese residents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 'Everyone has a secret they keep close to their hearts' : Challenges faced by adolescents living with HIV infection at the Kenyan coast Infectious Disease epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar, Amina; Van De Vijver, Fons J R; Fischer, Ronald; Hassan, Amin S.; Gona, Joseph K.; Dzombo, Judith Tumaini; Bomu, Grace; Katana, Khamis; Newton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The upsurge in the uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to a significant increase in the survival of vertically acquired HIV infected children, many of whom are currently living into adolescence and early adulthood. However little if anything is known of the lived experiences and the challenges faced by HIV positive adolescents in the African context. We set out to investigate psychosocial challenges faced by HIV infected adolescents on the Kenyan coast. Methods: A total...

  10. News Competition: Physics Olympiad hits Thailand Report: Institute carries out survey into maths in physics at university Event: A day for everyone teaching physics Conference: Welsh conference celebrates birthday Schools: Researchers in Residence scheme set to close Teachers: A day for new physics teachers Social: Network combines fun and physics Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Competition: Physics Olympiad hits Thailand Report: Institute carries out survey into maths in physics at university Event: A day for everyone teaching physics Conference: Welsh conference celebrates birthday Schools: Researchers in Residence scheme set to close Teachers: A day for new physics teachers Social: Network combines fun and physics Forthcoming events

  11. Efficacy of an Exercise and Nutritional Supplement Program on Physical Performance and Nutritional Status in Older Adults With Mobility Limitations Residing at Senior Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Michael P; Nelson, Miriam E; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Reid, Kieran F; Kirn, Dylan; Fielding, Roger A; Chui, Kenneth K H; Folta, Sara C

    2017-07-01

    This cluster-randomized trial was designed to determine the efficacy of a 6-month exercise-nutritional supplement program (ENP) on physical function and nutritional status for older adults and the feasibility of implementing this program in a senior living setting. Twenty senior-living facilities were randomized to either a 3 day per week group-based ENP led by a trained facility staff member or a health education program (SAP). Participants (N = 121) completed a short physical performance battery, 400-m walk, handgrip strength test, and mini-nutrition assessment. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], insulin-like growth-factor 1 (IGF-1), and activity level were also measured. The ENP did not significantly improve physical function or nutritional status compared with the SAP. Compared with baseline, participants in the ENP engaged in 39 min less physical activity per week at 6 months. Several facility characteristics hindered implementation of the ENP. This study highlights the complexity of implementing an evidence-based program in a field setting.

  12. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  13. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  14. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... set forth in § 431.52 of this chapter. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section—Institution has... intent, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living with the intention to remain...), the State of residence is the State where the individual is— (i) Living with the intention to remain...

  15. 24 CFR 206.39 - Principal residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal residence. 206.39 Section... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.39 Principal residence. The property must be the principal residence of each mortgagor at closing. For purposes of this section, the...

  16. Noise annoyances from wind power: Survey of the population living close to a wind power plant. Final report: Part 3 Main study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Eja; Persson-Waye, K.

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of annoyance from wind turbines, a study was performed in Laholm in May 2000. The aim was to obtain dose response relationships between calculated sound levels and noise annoyance and appropriate sound description as well as analysing the influence of other variables on noise annoyance. A questionnaire survey was performed in 6 areas comprising 16 wind turbines, of which 14 had an effect of 600 kW. The purpose of the study was masked. Among questions on living conditions in the countryside, questions directly related to wind turbines were included. The study population (n=518) comprised one randomly selected subject between the ages of 18 to 75 years in each household living within a calculated wind turbine sound level of 25 to 40 dBA. The response rate was 68.7% (n=356). Calculated distributions of A-weighted sound level were performed for each area and plotted on geographical maps in 2.5 dBA steps. Each dwelling could thus be given a sound level within an interval of 2.5 dBA. The most frequently occurring source of noise annoyance was noise from rotor blades. The proportions of respondents annoyed by noise increased with calculated sound level. Among respondents exposed to sound levels of 35.0-37.5 dBA, 43% responded themselves to be rather or much annoyed. A-weighted sound level was only one variable explaining annoyance. Annoyance was correlated to a larger extent by the intrusiveness of the sound character swishing. Noise annoyance was interrelated to the respondents' opinion of the visual impact of wind turbines, while attitude towards wind power in general had no greater influence. Disturbance of spoilt view was reported to a similar degree as noise disturbance. Further investigations are needed to clarify factors of importance for the disturbance of view. All the wind turbines in the study had constant rotation speed. The greater wind turbines that are now erected often have variable speed, which may lead to a sound comprising

  17. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  18. Urban living from a resident's perspective : Draft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, J.

    2009-01-01

    For some decades governments in Europe, the US and Australia promote compact city concepts, to achieve more sustainable patterns of travel and reduce energy use. For over 30 years spatial planning policies of the Dutch government are aimed at implementing compact urbanization in various forms. In

  19. Nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Mi So; Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Sung Ok

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to clarify and conceptualise nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home residents suffering from physical-cognitive functional decline. Older adults experience physical, psychological and social changes, but their remaining abilities differ across individuals. This study used a qualitative research to gain a deeper understanding of nursing homes nurses' clinical decision-making. In-depth interviews with 32 experienced nurses were undertaken. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Six categories and 58 subcategories of nursing practice related to managing the remaining abilities of residents with physical-cognitive functional decline were generated. The results of this study revealed five themes: (1) seeing residents' potential, (2) physical, emotional and psychosocial care in daily routines, (3) keeping personalised charts, (4) encouraging, promoting and physical and emotional support and (5) preparing residents for more independent living. The results were categorised into nurses' personal strategies based on their experience, practical nursing knowledge, nursing interventions and nursing evaluation criteria. The themes reflected positive views on the residents' functional abilities and the nursing homes nurses' perception that their goal was to help residents achieve their highest level of independence. Preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities represents nurses' optimistic view of residents' functional status. Routine care tailored for preserving the remaining abilities of individual nursing home residents with physical-cognitive functional decline is needed. Preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home resident is supported by therapeutic interactions including close contact as well as physical and emotional support. Nurses' main goal in working with residents with remaining abilities is improving their independence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Early Intake of Radiocesium by Residents Living Near the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Accident. Part 1: Internal Doses Based on Whole-body Measurements by NIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Tani, Kotaro; Hachiya, Misao; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 resulted in a release of radionuclides into the environment (I: 142.9 PBq, Cs:12.4 PBq). This study presents the results of internal doses to 174 residents living near the FDNPP at the time of the accident based on whole-body (WB) measurements performed by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period between 27 June and 28 July 2011. The 174 subjects consisted of 125 adults (≥18-y) and 49 children ( females) was observed in the adults but not the children. In this study, the committed effective dose (CED) from Cs and Cs was calculated based on individual WB contents (Cs) corrected against body size, the observed body content ratio of Cs to Cs, and the assumed intake scenario (namely, acute inhalation of Type F compounds on 12 March 2011 when the first explosive event occurred at the site of the FDNPP). The 90th-percentile CED value for the adults was around 0.1 mSv and the maximum CED (0.63 mSv) was found in an elderly male. Comparable CED results were obtained in other WB measurements subsequently performed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in a similar manner to that of the NIRS, suggesting that the contribution of ingestion to the WB content observed would be trivial for most of the JAEA subjects. The intake ratio of I to Cs was evaluated to be 3~5 based on the I thyroid measurement data of Tokonami et al. Using the average intake ratio of 3.8, the resulting median and maximum thyroid-equivalent doses to the adult subjects of this study were estimated at 3.5 mSv and 84 mSv, respectively.

  1. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Definition. For purposes of this section—Institution has the same meaning as Institution and Medical... intention to remain there permanently or for an indefinite period. (2) For any individual not residing in an... of residence is the State where the individual is— (i) Living with the intention to remain there...

  2. Recognition structure of semipalatinsk residents caused by nuclear explosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Kyoko; Satoh, Kenichi; Ohtaki, Megu; Muldagaliyev, T.; Apsalikov, K.; Kawano, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Authors' team of Hiroshima University and Scientific Research Institute of Radiation Medicine and Ecology (Kazakhstan) has been investigating the health state, exposure route, contents and mental effect of nuclear explosion tests of Semipalatinsk residents through their witness and questionnaire since 2002, to elucidate the humanistic damage of nuclear tests. Reported here is the recognition structure in the title statistically analyzed with use of frequently spoken words in the witness. The audit was performed in 2002-2007 to 994 residents who had experienced ground explosion tests during the period from 1949 to 1962 and were living in 26 villages near the old test site. Asked questions concerning nuclear tests involved such items as still unforgettable matters, dreadful events, regretting things, thought about the test, requests; and matters about themselves, their family, close friends and anything. The frequency of the test site-related words heard in the interview were analyzed with hierarchical clustering and multi-dimensional scaling with a statistic software R for computation and MeCab for morphological analysis. Residents' recognition was found to be of two structures of memory at explosion tests and anger/dissatisfaction/anxiety to the present state. The former contained the frequent words of mushroom cloud, flash, blast, ground tremble and outdoor evacuation, and the latter, mostly anxiety about health of themselves and family. Thus residents have had to be confronted with uneasiness of their health even 20 years after the closure of the test site. (T.T.)

  3. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Development and Validation of a Global Positioning System–based “Map Book” System for Categorizing Cluster Residency Status of Community Members Living in High-Density Urban Slums in Blantyre, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Peter; Choko, Augustine T.; Webb, Emily L.; Thindwa, Deus; Squire, S. Bertel; Sambakunsi, Rodrick; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Chunda, Treza; Chavula, Kondwani; Makombe, Simon D.; Lalloo, David G.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    A significant methodological challenge in implementing community-based cluster-randomized trials is how to accurately categorize cluster residency when data are collected at a site distant from households. This study set out to validate a map book system for use in urban slums with no municipal address systems, where classification has been shown to be inaccurate when address descriptions were used. Between April and July 2011, 28 noncontiguous clusters were demarcated in Blantyre, Malawi. In December 2011, antiretroviral therapy initiators were asked to identify themselves as cluster residents (yes/no and which cluster) by using map books. A random sample of antiretroviral therapy initiators was used to validate map book categorization against Global Positioning System coordinates taken from participants' households. Of the 202 antiretroviral therapy initiators, 48 (23.8%) were categorized with the map book system as in-cluster residents and 147 (72.8%) as out-of-cluster residents, and 7 (3.4%) were unsure. Agreement between map books and the Global Positioning System was 100% in the 20 adults selected for validation and was 95.0% (κ = 0.96, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.00) in an additional 20 in-cluster residents (overall κ = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.90, 1.00). With map books, cluster residents were classified rapidly and accurately. If validated elsewhere, this approach could be of widespread value in that it would enable accurate categorization without home visits. PMID:23589586

  5. Development and validation of a global positioning system-based "map book" system for categorizing cluster residency status of community members living in high-density urban slums in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Peter; Choko, Augustine T; Webb, Emily L; Thindwa, Deus; Squire, S Bertel; Sambakunsi, Rodrick; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Chunda, Treza; Chavula, Kondwani; Makombe, Simon D; Lalloo, David G; Corbett, Elizabeth L

    2013-05-15

    A significant methodological challenge in implementing community-based cluster-randomized trials is how to accurately categorize cluster residency when data are collected at a site distant from households. This study set out to validate a map book system for use in urban slums with no municipal address systems, where classification has been shown to be inaccurate when address descriptions were used. Between April and July 2011, 28 noncontiguous clusters were demarcated in Blantyre, Malawi. In December 2011, antiretroviral therapy initiators were asked to identify themselves as cluster residents (yes/no and which cluster) by using map books. A random sample of antiretroviral therapy initiators was used to validate map book categorization against Global Positioning System coordinates taken from participants' households. Of the 202 antiretroviral therapy initiators, 48 (23.8%) were categorized with the map book system as in-cluster residents and 147 (72.8%) as out-of-cluster residents, and 7 (3.4%) were unsure. Agreement between map books and the Global Positioning System was 100% in the 20 adults selected for validation and was 95.0% (κ = 0.96, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.00) in an additional 20 in-cluster residents (overall κ = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.90, 1.00). With map books, cluster residents were classified rapidly and accurately. If validated elsewhere, this approach could be of widespread value in that it would enable accurate categorization without home visits.

  6. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  7. Cytogenetic abnormalities of the descendants of permanent residents of heavily contaminated East Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Madiyeva, Madina; Tanaka, Kimio; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kawano, Noriyuki; Noso, Yoshihiro; Takeichi, Nobuo; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Urazalina, Nailya; Dovgal, Galina; Rymbaeva, Tamara; Tokanova, Sholpan; Beisengazina, Meruert; Kembayeva, Kulypash; Inoue, Ken

    2017-11-01

    More than 400 nuclear explosion tests were conducted at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) and significant radioactive substances were released. The long-term consequences of the activities at the SNTS and the appearance of any hereditary effects remain insufficiently studied about 25 years after the test site was closed. The population living in villages near the SNTS are considered to have been heavily exposed to external and internal radiation. This study aims to perform an assessment and comprehensive cytogenetic analysis of the inhabitants living near the SNTS, and their first-(F1) and second-(F2) generation children. Residents of the East Kazakhstan region living in the area covered by the former SNTS were included in the study. To evaluate the hereditary effects of nuclear testing, comprehensive chromosome analyses were performed in lymphocytes using conventional Giemsa and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods in 115 F1 and F2 descendants in the villages of Dolon and Sarzhal, which were heavily contaminated. The parents of the subjects had permanently lived in the villages. A higher number of stable-type chromosome aberrations such as translocations was found in these residents than in 80 residents of the control area, Kokpecty, which indicates the possibility that radiation had biological effects on the exposed subjects.

  8. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  9. Engaging with residents' perceived risks and benefits about technologies as a way of resolving remediation dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Jason; Rai, Tapan

    2017-12-01

    In recent decades the diversity of remediation technologies has increased significantly, with the breadth of technologies ranging from dig and dump to emergent technologies like phytoremediation and nanoremediation. The benefits of these technologies to the environment and human health are believed to be substantial. However, they also potentially constitute risks. Whilst there is a growing body of knowledge about the risks and benefits of these technologies from the perspective of experts, little is known about how residents perceive the risks and benefits of the application of these technologies to address contaminants in their local environment. This absence of knowledge poses a challenge to remediation practitioners and policy makers who are increasingly seeking to engage these affected local residents in choosing technology applications. Building on broader research into the perceived benefits and risks of technologies, and data from a telephone survey of 2009 residents living near 13 contaminated sites in Australia, regression analysis of closed-ended survey questions and coding of open-ended questions are combined to identify the main predictors of resident's perceived levels of risk and benefit to resident's health and to their local environment from remediation technologies. This research identifies a range of factors associated with the residents' physical context, their engagement with institutions during remediation processes, and the technologies which are associated with residents' level of perceived risk and benefit for human health and the local environment. The analysis found that bioremediation technologies were perceived as less risky and more beneficial than chemical, thermal and physical technologies. The paper also supports broader technology research that reports an inverse correlation between levels of perceived risks and benefits. In addition, the paper reveals the types of risks and benefits to human health and the local environment that

  10. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  11. Closing remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reig, J.

    2007-01-01

    Good afternoon. Before providing the closing remarks on behalf of the NEA, I would like to take this opportunity and make some personal reflections, if you allow me Mr. Chairman. I have had the opportunity to take part in the three workshops on public communication organised by the NEA. In the first one in Paris in 2000, representing my country, Spain, and in the two last ones in Ottawa in 2004 and Tokyo today, on behalf of the NEA. The topics for the three workshops follow a logical order, first the focus was on investing in trust in a time when public communication was becoming a big challenge for the regulators. Second, maintaining and measuring public confidence to assess how credible regulators are in front of the public; and finally here in Tokyo, transparency, which is a basic element to achieve trust and credibility. In my view, a regulatory decision has three main components, it has to be technically sound. legally correct and well communicated. The emphasis in the early years was in the technical matters, till legal issues became a key element to achieve the political acceptance from governments and local authorities. Finally the public communication aspects resulted into a major effort and challenge to achieve social acceptance. (author)

  12. Dignity and the challenge of dying in nursing homes: the residents' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleschberger, Sabine

    2007-03-01

    aspects like (i) being active to the very last, (ii) respecting one's will and being allowed to die, (iii) not being in pain, (iv) being amongst persons close to one (valediction and showing respect). the study emphasizes the high vulnerability of nursing home residents with regard to dignity. They place their dignity under the constraints of the need for help and care into question. This appears alarming, if one does not manage to, with the help of different ethics, obtain a new perspective on these phases of life. It is evident that the understanding of dignity is not solely individualistic and personal, but rather has a close relationship to social ideas of value, which ultimately influence the basic requirements of institutions in which 'frail old people' live.

  13. ISS Live!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jennifer; Harris, Philip; Hochstetler, Bruce; Guerra, Mark; Mendez, Israel; Healy, Matthew; Khan, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    International Space Station Live! (ISSLive!) is a Web application that uses a proprietary commercial technology called Lightstreamer to push data across the Internet using the standard http port (port 80). ISSLive! uses the push technology to display real-time telemetry and mission timeline data from the space station in any common Web browser or Internet- enabled mobile device. ISSLive! is designed to fill a unique niche in the education and outreach areas by providing access to real-time space station data without a physical presence in the mission control center. The technology conforms to Internet standards, supports the throughput needed for real-time space station data, and is flexible enough to work on a large number of Internet-enabled devices. ISSLive! consists of two custom components: (1) a series of data adapters that resides server-side in the mission control center at Johnson Space Center, and (2) a set of public html that renders the data pushed from the data adapters. A third component, the Lightstreamer server, is commercially available from a third party and acts as an intermediary between custom components (1) and (2). Lightstreamer also provides proprietary software libraries that are required to use the custom components. At the time of this reporting, this is the first usage of Web-based, push streaming technology in the aerospace industry.

  14. Closing Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjoranta, T.

    2015-01-01

    For me, this week has been a success. I have been impressed with the range and depth of discussion that has taken place, not only in the formal sessions, but also in the coffee breaks, over lunch and into the evening. When we placed an international call for papers earlier this year, we did not expect that we would receive 400 abstracts and end up arranging 237 oral presentations and 91 poster sessions. There have been over 600 participants originating from 54 Member States and 11 invited organizations. A wealth of information and analysis arising from this week's deliberations is now available on the Agency website. This provides you with the chance to catch up on any presentations that you may have missed the first time, as well as providing a resource for future research and application. If you recall, the purpose of the symposium was to foster dialogue and exchange of information involving Member States, the nuclear industry and members of the broader nuclear non-proliferation community, including civil society. I believe we have succeeded on that score. We are living in a rapidly changing world and the nuclear world is no exception. More nuclear material and facilities are coming under safeguards all the time. International nuclear cooperation between States is intensifying with an expansion of trade and services in nuclear and related equipment, items and materials. Also, technologies are changing. Many older nuclear plants are being modernized and becoming more technologically sophisticated. The geographical focus of these expanding programmes also continues to change. Yet, our budget remains static. This means that the only way we can maintain our effectiveness in the face of rising demand for our services, is to become more productive. That is the backdrop to this symposium. The overarching theme was to link strategy, implementation and people: the three core processes of any business. As I said on Monday, the strength of the link between these three

  15. Comparison of Emergency Medicine Malpractice Cases Involving Residents to Non-Resident Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Kiersten L; Grossman, Shamai A; Janes, Margaret; Yu-Moe, C Winnie; Song, Ellen; Tibbles, Carrie D; Shapiro, Nathan I; Rosen, Carlo L

    2018-04-17

    Data are lacking on how emergency medicine (EM) malpractice cases with resident involvement differs from cases that do not name a resident. To compare malpractice case characteristics in cases where a resident is involved (resident case) to cases that do not involve a resident (non-resident case) and to determine factors that contribute to malpractice cases utilizing EM as a model for malpractice claims across other medical specialties. We used data from the Controlled Risk Insurance Company (CRICO) Strategies' division Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS) to analyze open and closed EM cases asserted from 2009-2013. The CBS database is a national repository that contains professional liability data on > 400 hospitals and > 165,000 physicians, representing over 30% of all malpractice cases in the U.S (> 350,000 claims). We compared cases naming residents (either alone or in combination with an attending) to those that did not involve a resident (non-resident cohort). We reported the case statistics, allegation categories, severity scores, procedural data, final diagnoses and contributing factors. Fisher's exact test or t-test was used for comparisons (alpha set at 0.05). Eight hundred and forty-five EM cases were identified of which 732 (87%) did not name a resident (non-resident cases), while 113 (13%) included a resident (resident cases) (Figure 1). There were higher total incurred losses for non-resident cases (Table 1). The most frequent allegation categories in both cohorts were "Failure or Delay in Diagnosis/Misdiagnosis" and "Medical Treatment" (non-surgical procedures or treatment regimens i.e. central line placement). Allegation categories of Safety and Security, Patient Monitoring, Hospital Policy and Procedure and Breach of Confidentiality were found in the non-resident cases. Resident cases incurred lower payments on average ($51,163 vs. $156,212 per case). Sixty six percent (75) of resident vs 57% (415) of non-resident cases were high severity claims

  16. Four Residents' Narratives on Abortion Training: A Residency Climate of Reflection, Support, and Mutual Respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Janet; Fiascone, Stephen; Huber, Warren J; Hunter, Tiffany C; Sperling, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The decision on the part of obstetrics and gynecology residents to opt in or out of abortion training is, for many, a complex one. Although the public debate surrounding abortion can be filled with polarizing rhetoric, residents often discover that the boundaries between pro-choice and pro-life beliefs are not so neatly divided. We present narratives from four residents, training at a 32-resident program in the Northeast, who have a range of views surrounding abortion. Their stories reveal how some struggle with the real-life experience of providing abortions, while others feel angst over lacking the skills to terminate a life-threatening pregnancy. These residents have found that close relationships with coworkers from all sides of this issue, along with a residency program that encourages open conversation, have fostered understanding. Their narratives demonstrate that reasonable providers can disagree fundamentally and still work effectively with one another and that the close relationships formed in residency can allow both sides to see beyond the black and white of the public abortion debate. Our objectives in this commentary are to encourage a more nuanced discussion of abortion among obstetrician-gynecologists, to describe the aspects of our residency program that facilitate open dialogue and respect across diverse viewpoints, and to demonstrate that the clear distinction between being pro-life and pro-choice often breaks down when one is immediately responsible for the care of pregnant women.

  17. What about the grandparents? Children's postdivorce residence arrangements and contact with grandparents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westphal, Sarah Katharina; Poortman, Anne Rigt; Van der Lippe, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of grandparents in their grandchildren's lives, little is known about grandparent-grandchild contact after parental divorce. In this study, the authors investigated differences in grandparent-grandchild contact across 3 postdivorce residence arrangements (mother residence,

  18. Closing Remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed

    1996-01-01

    were occurring throughout the five divisions of the NCI. How does one assess the impact of a career on a discipline such as cancer treatment? It's not easy! Each of the articles contributed to this tribute were written by a person who trained directly with Bruce Chabner, or was otherwise directly impacted by Bruce's guidance. As can be seen from the list of contributors to these Proceedings, each individual has made major contributions to the area of cancer treatment in his or her own right. However, Bruce's contribution to cancer treatment goes far beyond the individuals he trained. The many thousands of human lives who have benefited from his efforts cannot be accurately estimated, because his contributions have been so wide-ranging, as indicated below. Being "Scientific Director" is similar in a number of ways to being a football quarterback. One of those ways is that when things go well the quarterback may get a little too much credit, and when things go not-so-well the quarterback may get too much blame. However, it is the quarterback who "calls the plays." With that in mind, a partial list of the accomplishments of the Intramural Program of the DCT while Bruce Chabner was "quarterback" includes the following: * The first human retroviruses, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2, were discovered and shown to be directly linked to the development of specific human malignancies. * Adoptive immunotherapy for human cancer was developed, offering exciting new additions to the anticancer armamentarium. * Paclitaxel (Taxol®) was developed, and shown to be the most important new anticancer agent in the past two decades. * The human genes responsible for the development of several specific malignancies were discovered, such as those for kidney cancer. * Development of blood tests to detect HIV-tainted blood. * Treatment strategies for pediatric AIDS were developed. * The AIDS Drug Development Program within the NIH was established. * New drugs for the treatment of AIDS and AIDS

  19. Relationships among residence environment and individual levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study explored the relationship among urban and rural residence living and level of exercise in the Republic of Korea. The study analysed the data from the 2012 Korean Survey of Citizens' Sports Participation project with a total of 4,479 males and 4,521 females participating. The sampling method used the ...

  20. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  1. U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs), also known as “green card” holders, are non-citizens who are lawfully authorized to live permanently within the United States.

  2. Estimates of the Legal Permanent Resident Population: 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the legal permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States on January 1, 2011. The LPR population includes persons...

  3. Social, recreational and housing habits of residents of Selebi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents a survey of the existing status of the social, recreational and housing habits related to the environmental health of residents living within the Selebi-Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana. Primary data of residents obtained through the administration of questionnaire and structured interviews was processed ...

  4. Open and Closed Biographical Politicization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Michel-Schertges

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with political socialization with particular consideration of open and closed processes of biographical politicization, i.e. biographical alienation. Based on narrative-biographical and theme-oriented interviews with two survivors of the Holocaust, processes of consciousness are analyzed. Henri LEFEBVRE refers in the chapter "the lived and the living" in his third volume of the "Critique of Everyday Live" (1975 to the complexity of processes of consciousness. According to LEFEBVRE there is a dialectic between the "lived" and the "living", thus the "lived" cannot be characterized only as past actions but as past experiences, constituting dialectically the present—the "living." For LEFEBVRE there is an inescapable conflict between past experiences and present life, i.e. the past could be seen as a constituting part of the conditions of individual (and societal present consciousness. Following this line of thought, one could state that to analyze former biographical (extraordinary experiences, i.e. "the lived," is crucial to better understanding of the constitutional conditions of processes of political socialization. Thus former extraordinary biographical experiences might have an essential impact on political socialization and, therefore, on political attitudes. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1102225

  5. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  6. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  7. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  8. Real Closed Rings and Real Closed * Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Capco, Jose

    2007-01-01

    Here we try to distinguish and compare different notions of real closedness mainly one developed by N. Schwartz in his Habilitationschrift and the other developed by A. Sankaranand K. Varadarajan which we shall call real closed *. We stick to the definition of real closed rings as defined and characterized N. Schwartz and we try to determine and characterize real closed rings that are real closed *. The main result is that real closed rings have unique real closure * and that real closure of ...

  9. Communal breeding promotes a matrilineal social system where husband and wife live apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Jia; He, Qiao-Qiao; Deng, Ling-Ling; Wang, Shi-Chang; Mace, Ruth; Ji, Ting; Tao, Yi

    2013-05-07

    The matrilineal Mosuo of southwest China live in large communal houses where brothers and sisters of three generations live together, and adult males walk to visit their wives only at night; hence males do not reside with their own offspring. This duolocal residence with 'walking' or 'visiting' marriage is described in only a handful of matrilineal peasant societies. Benefits to women of living with matrilineal kin, who cooperate with child-care, are clear. But why any kinship system can evolve where males invest more in their sister's offspring than their own is a puzzle for evolutionary anthropologists. Here, we present a new hypothesis for a matrilineal bias in male investment. We argue that, when household resources are communal, relatedness to the whole household matters more than relatedness to individual offspring. We use an inclusive fitness model to show that the more sisters (and other closely related females) co-reside, the more effort males should spend working on their sister's farm and less on their wife's farm. The model shows that paternity uncertainty may be a cause of lower overall work rates in males, but it is not likely to be the cause of a matrilineal bias. The bias in work effort towards working on their natal farm, and thus the duolocal residence and 'visiting marriage' system, can be understood as maximizing inclusive fitness in circumstances where female kin breed communally.

  10. General health status of residents of the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekosse, Georges

    2005-10-01

    Residents of the Selebi Phikwe area, Botswana where nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) is being exploited often exhibit symptoms of varied degrees of ailments, sicknesses and diseases. A need to investigate their general health status was therefore eminent. Primary data was obtained by means of a questionnaire and structured interviews conducted with individuals, health service providers, business enterprises and educational Institutions. The generated data revealed common ailments, sicknesses and diseases in the area with the four most frequent health complaints being frequent coughing headaches, influenza/common colds and rampant chest pains. Research findings indicated that residents had respiratory tract-related problems, suspected to be linked to the effects of air pollution caused by the emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from mining and smelting activities. Residents were frequently in contact with SO2 and related gases and fumes, mineral and silica dust generated from the mining processes. No clearly demarcating differences were noticed in the health status of residents living in the control site from those in the main study area. However, sites most affected were those close to where Ni-Cu is exploited. Environmental factors resulting from mining and smelting activities, among others, could be contributory to the negative health effects occurring at Selebi Phikwe.

  11. Saúde bucal e percepção sobre o atendimento odontológico em pacientes com transtorno psíquico moradores de residências terapêuticas Oral health and perceptions regarding dental care in patients with mental disorders living in therapeutic residences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina Jamelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Os pacientes portadores de transtornos psíquicos têm grande dificuldade de acesso ao tratamento dentário. Os problemas enfrentados vão desde a recusa dos profissionais em atender a essa clientela à inapropriada formação profissional dos mesmos. Este estudo, realizado em residências terapêuticas, objetivou avaliar as condições de saúde bucal dos moradores, assim como a percepção dos mesmos em relação ao atendimento odontológico recebido. Fizeram parte do estudo 38 indivíduos, sendo os dados coletados através de exame clínico e entrevista semiestruturada. A análise dos dados indicou elevado índice de cárie e de necessidade protética, com 42,5% dos indivíduos necessitando de prótese total e 30,3%, de próteses parciais. Com relação às condições periodontais, 28,5% dos elementos dentários apresentaram perda de inserção periodontal maior que 4 mm. Os dados da entrevistas foram averiguados pela análise de conteúdo temática, possibilitando a construção de duas categorias: associação de dor com a presença de dentes e o atendimento odontológico mutilador. A presença de saúde bucal foi associada à extração dentária, sendo esta a única solução para os incômodos na boca, indicando que, para esta população, ter saúde bucal é não ter dentes.Patients with mental disorders have considerable difficulty in access to dental care, including the refusal of oral health professionals to offer care to this clientele and the inadequate professional training of oral health professionals regarding this issue. The present study was carried out in therapeutic residences in order to assess the oral health conditions of the residents as well as their perceptions regarding the dental care they have received. Thirty-eight individuals participated in the study. Data were collected through clinical examinations and a semi-structured interview. Data analysis revealed a high number of caries and the need for dentures, with

  12. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  13. Prevalence of intellectual dysfunctioning and its correlates in a community-residing elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, N; Tatara, K; Shinsho, F; Takatorige, T; Murakami, S; Fukuda, H

    1998-09-01

    To examine the prevalence of intellectual dysfunctioning and its correlates in community-residing elderly people, a randomly selected sample of 1,405 people aged 65 and over living in Settsu, Osaka, were investigated in October 1992. Data for assessing intellectual dysfunctioning were obtained from 1,364 people (97.1%), excluding 21 clinically demented people (1.5%); 17.6/100, 5.6/100, and 3.3/100 of the population showed minor, moderate, and appreciable intellectual dysfunctioning, respectively, and the prevalence of intellectual dysfunctioning increased with age. By multivariate analyses using logistic regression, age over 75, poor general health, including current medical treatment, and psychosocial conditions such as no participation in social activities, no life worth living (no Ikigai), and anxiety about the future were independent risk factors for intellectual dysfunctioning. We conclude that intellectual dysfunctioning is closely associated with health and psychosocial conditions.

  14. Closed Strings From Nothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Albion

    2001-01-01

    We study the physics of open strings in bosonic and type II string theories in the presence of unstable D-branes. When the potential energy of the open string tachyon is at its minimum, Sen has argued that only closed strings remain in the perturbative spectrum. We explore the scenario of Yi and of Bergman, Hori and Yi, who argue that the open string degrees of freedom are strongly coupled and disappear through confinement. We discuss arguments using open string field theory and worldsheet boundary RG flows, which seem to indicate otherwise. We then describe a solitonic excitation of the open string tachyon and gauge field with the charge and tension of a fundamental closed string. This requires a double scaling limit where the tachyon is taken to its minimal value and the electric field is taken to its maximum value. The resulting flux tube has an unconstrained spatial profile; and for large fundamental string charge, it appears to have light, weakly coupled open strings living in the core. We argue that the flux tube acquires a size or order α' through sigma model and string coupling effects; and we argue that confinement effects make the light degrees of freedom heavy and strongly interacting

  15. Closed Strings From Nothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, Albion

    2001-07-25

    We study the physics of open strings in bosonic and type II string theories in the presence of unstable D-branes. When the potential energy of the open string tachyon is at its minimum, Sen has argued that only closed strings remain in the perturbative spectrum. We explore the scenario of Yi and of Bergman, Hori and Yi, who argue that the open string degrees of freedom are strongly coupled and disappear through confinement. We discuss arguments using open string field theory and worldsheet boundary RG flows, which seem to indicate otherwise. We then describe a solitonic excitation of the open string tachyon and gauge field with the charge and tension of a fundamental closed string. This requires a double scaling limit where the tachyon is taken to its minimal value and the electric field is taken to its maximum value. The resulting flux tube has an unconstrained spatial profile; and for large fundamental string charge, it appears to have light, weakly coupled open strings living in the core. We argue that the flux tube acquires a size or order {alpha}' through sigma model and string coupling effects; and we argue that confinement effects make the light degrees of freedom heavy and strongly interacting.

  16. Early Intake of Radiocesium by Residents Living Near the Tepco Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant After the Accident. Part 2: Relationship Between Internal Dose and Evacuation Behavior in Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishima, Naoaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nakano, Takashi; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Tani, Kotaro; Furuyama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Shozo; Hachiya, Misao; Naoi, Yutaka; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident exposed members of the public to radiation. This study analyses the relation between personal behavior data obtained from 112 out of 174 subjects who underwent whole-body measurements by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period from 27 June to 28 July 2011 and their committed effective doses (CEDs) from Cs and Cs. The whereabouts of the 112 persons living in municipalities near the FDNPP (mainly, Namie town) on several days in March 2011 are graphed on maps. It was confirmed that most subjects started evacuation promptly and had left the 20-km-radius of the FDNPP by the end of 12 March. The individual CEDs were poorly correlated with the person's distances from the FDNPP at any day in March. Meanwhile, the percentage of persons remaining within the 20-km radius of the FDNPP was 100% at 16:00 on 12 March and 42.9% at 0:00 on 15 March for those with CEDs > 0.1 mSv, whereas the corresponding values were much lower for those with CEDs ≤ 0.1 mSv. This suggests that the time of evacuation would be one of the crucial factors for the early intake; however, more personal behavior data are needed to be analyzed to clarify the relevance to the individual internal dose.

  17. Deprivation of Dignity in Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2016-01-01

    deepened knowledge in how to maintain and promote dignity in nursing home residents. The purpose of this paper is to present results concerning the question: How is nursing home residents’ dignity maintained or deprived from the perspective of close family caregivers? In this presentation we only focus...... on deprivation of dignity. Methodology: The overall design of this study is modified clinical application research. The study took place at six different nursing home residences in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Data collection methods were individual research interviews. All together the sample consisted of 28...

  18. Discharge residence of TLD tagged fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romberg, G.P.; Prepejchal, W.

    1974-01-01

    Although visual observations suggested that fish remained in the discharge for considerable periods, temperature-sensitive tags indicated the majority of fish spend less than 50 hr or 10 percent of the time at discharge temperatures. During 1974 a second fish tagging study was conducted, using temperature-sensitive tags to yield discharge residence times of Lake Michigan salmonids at Point Beach thermal discharge. Preliminary results revealed that many fish tag values were close to Unit I line indicating that calculated maximum discharge residence times for these fish will be nearly 100 percent of the elapsed time

  19. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  20. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assisted living is for adults who need help with everyday tasks. They may need help with dressing, bathing, ... don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement communities. Others are ...

  1. Living conditions—The key issue of housing development in Beijing Fengtai District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen Tao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Good life cannot be achieved without having good living conditions. Living conditions are the most important factor in people’s lives. In the Beijing Fengtai District, the second largest district in Beijing (area: 306 km2; population: 1,360,000, there were three types of housing that had been chosen for the survey: apartment, traditional house and terrace house. The objectives contained in this research are to study residents’ perspectives and preferences of future living conditions in Beijing’s Fengtai District. Also, the study is to know the government’s opinion on living conditions and for future housing development. The close-ended questionnaire with the five-point Likert scale is used as the study methodology. It includes eight attributes of living conditions, residents’ opinion on living conditions now and preferences in the future. A random sample was selected in order to choose the potential respondents for the survey purposes. Additionally, residents’ positive satisfaction can also produce the high return rate to housing development. Based on this research, residents’ in Beijing Fengtai District showed their high aspirations regarding future housing and desired good living conditions. Therefore, to improve the living conditions of their houses, the government, developers and residents should cooperate together to contribute to housing development in the Beijing Fengtai District. Finally, it is hoped that this research could give some suggestions to the other areas in housing development.

  2. Estimation of live birth underreporting with a capture-recapture method, Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Bianca; Silva, Nilza Nunes da

    2011-12-01

    Estimate the number of live births and, therefore, underreporting of live births. The databases of the Live Birth Information System and the Civil Registry of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, from the second and third trimesters of 2006 in Sergipe state (Northeastern Brazil) were paired by deterministic linkage based on the number of the Live Birth Declaration. The geographic disaggregation utilized was mother's microregion of residence. Huggins closed population models were used to estimate the capture probabilities for each database and the total live births during the period, within each geographic subdivision. MARK® software was used for the estimates. Underregistration during the period studied was 19.3%. Application of the capture-recapture method to estimate underregistration of live births is possible, including for geographic disaggregations smaller than a state. The deterministic linkage was impaired in four microregions, due to non-inclusion of the Live Birth Declaration number in the database of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Maternal age, a heterogeneity characteristic in the population of live births, affected the probability of capture by the civil registry. Capture-recapture was a viable method to estimate the underregistration of live births.

  3. Roles of Communication Problems and Communication Strategies on Resident-Related Role Demand and Role Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Lee, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of dementia-related communication difficulties and communication strategies used by staff on resident-related indicators of role demand and role satisfaction. Formal/paid long-term care staff caregivers (N = 109) of residents with dementia completed questionnaires on dementia-related communication difficulties, communication strategies, role demand (ie, residents make unreasonable demands), and role satisfaction (measured by relationship closeness and influence over residents). Three types of communication strategies were included: (a) effective repair strategies, (b) completing actions by oneself, and (c) tuning out or ignoring the resident. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that communication problems were positively linked with role demand. Repair strategies were positively linked with relationship closeness and influence over residents. Completing actions by oneself was positively linked to role demand and influence over residents, whereas tuning out was negatively linked with influence over residents. The findings underscore that effective caregiver communication skills are essential in enhancing staff-resident relationships.

  4. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home ... Primarily, older persons or their families pay the cost of assisted living. Some health and long-term care insurance policies ...

  5. What determines the preference for future living arrangements of middle-aged and older people in urban China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijuan Meng

    Full Text Available Living arrangements are important to the elderly. However, it is common for elderly parents in urban China to not have a living situation that they consider ideal. An understanding of their preferences assists us in responding to the needs of the elderly as well as in anticipating future long-term care demands. The aim of this study is to provide a clear understanding of preferences for future living arrangements and their associated factors among middle-aged and older people in urban China.Data were extracted from the CHARLS 2011-2012 national baseline survey of middle-aged and elderly people. In the 2011 wave of the CHARLS, a total of 17,708 individual participants (10,069 main respondents and 7,638 spouses were interviewed; 2509 of the main respondents lived in urban areas. In this group, 41 people who were younger than 45 years old and 162 who had missing data in the variable "living arrangement preference" were excluded. Additionally, 42 people were excluded because they chose "other" for the variable "living arrangement preference" (which was a choice with no specific answer. Finally, a total of 2264 participants were included in our study.The most popular preference for future living arrangements was living close to their children in the same community/neighborhoods, followed by living with adult children. The degree of community handicapped access, number of surviving children, age, marital status, access to community-based elderly care centers and number of years lived in the same community were significantly associated with the preferences for future living arrangements among the respondents.There is a trend towards preference for living near adult children in urban China. Additionally, age has a positive effect on preference for living close to their children. Considerations should be made in housing design and urban community development plans to fulfill older adults' expectations. In addition, increasing the accessibility of public

  6. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Arnold

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods: A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank – an online resident community – conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Results: Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module “Self-Care Series” focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module “Clinical Care Series” focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. Conclusion: The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness.

  7. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  8. Childhood leukaemia close to high-voltage power lines--the Geocap study, 2002-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermage-Faure, C; Demoury, C; Rudant, J; Goujon-Bellec, S; Guyot-Goubin, A; Deschamps, F; Hemon, D; Clavel, J

    2013-05-14

    High-voltage overhead power lines (HVOLs) are a source of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs), which are classified as possible risk factors for childhood acute leukaemia (AL). The study was carried out to test the hypothesis of an increased AL incidence in children living close to HVOL of 225-400 kV (VHV-HVOL) and 63-150 kV (HV-HVOL). The nationwide Geocap study included all the 2779 cases of childhood AL diagnosed in France over 2002-2007 and 30 000 contemporaneous population controls. The addresses at the time of inclusion were geocoded and precisely located around the whole HVOL network. Increased odds ratios (ORs) were observed for AL occurrence and living within 50 m of a VHV-HVOL (OR=1.7 (0.9-3.6)). In contrast, there was no association with living beyond that distance from a VHV-HVOL or within 50 m of a HV-HVOL. The present study, free from any participation bias, supports the previous international findings of an increase in AL incidence close to VHV-HVOL. In order to investigate for a potential role of ELF-MF in the results, ELF-MF at the residences close to HVOL are to be estimated, using models based on the annual current loads and local characteristics of the lines.

  9. Variables Related to Life Satisfaction among Senior Adults in Assisted Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar-Moe, J. L.; McDermott, D.; Edwards, L. M.; Pedrotti, J. T.; LaRue, S.; Stone, M. E.; Spalitto, S. V.; Diamond, K. L.

    As the population of the United States rapidly grays, the plight of older people living in assisted living situations is of growing concern to health and mental health care teams, as well as the families of the individuals residing in these living environments. This large group of residents, past the stage of living in their own homes, yet not in…

  10. Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at anyone who is interested in learning more about living technology, whether coming from business, the government, policy centers, academia, or anywhere else. Its purpose is to help people to learn what living technology is, what it might develop into, and how it might impact...... our lives. The phrase 'living technology' was coined to refer to technology that is alive as well as technology that is useful because it shares the fundamental properties of living systems. In particular, the invention of this phrase was called for to describe the trend of our technology becoming...... increasingly life-like or literally alive. Still, the phrase has different interpretations depending on how one views what life is. This book presents nineteen perspectives on living technology. Taken together, the interviews convey the collective wisdom on living technology's power and promise, as well as its...

  11. Potential prescription drug misuse in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Handler, Steven M; Wagner, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse among older adults includes inappropriate and harmful use of these drugs. In this study, prescription drug misuse in assisted living settings as reported by direct care workers (DCWs) was examined. Data came from DCWs in 45 assisted living settings located in Pennsylvania. A total of 944 DCWs completed a questionnaire on their opinions of prescription drug misuse. DCWs believed most assisted living residents take prescription medications. In addition, 10% of DCWs observed or had evidence that residents used unnecessarily high doses, 30% were preoccupied with the cost of prescription drugs, and 26% had problems understanding the complexity of their drug treatment regimen. Prescription drug misuse may be a problem of importance in assisted living settings. Assisted living has experienced rapid growth in capacity, yet the ability of these settings and their residents to manage prescription drugs may not have kept pace with this growth. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  13. Sleep pattern in medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojomi, Marzieh; Ghalhe Bandi, Mir Farhad; Kaffashi, Siyamak

    2009-11-01

    Sleep disturbances is a distressing and disabling condition that affects many people, and can affect on quality of work and education of medical students and residents. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders in medical students and residents. A representative sample of medical students and residents of Iran University of medical students in Teharn, Iran, were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. This study covers 400 medical students from the first to seventh year and residents from the first to the last year between December 2007 and February 2008. The questionnaire includes questions on demographic characteristics (6 questions), sleep/wake habits (6 questions), insomnia-related symptoms (4 questions), symptoms of parasomnia (6 questions), cognitive and psychomotor behaviors (6 questions), lifestyle (4 questions), self-perception of sleep satisfaction, and use of sleeping pills (2 questions). The sample included 135 (33.8%) pre-internship students, 150 (37.5%) interns, and 115 (28.7%) medical residents. Sleep satisfaction was reported as "perfect" in only 14%. 44% and 30% reported "good" and "fair" satisfaction. The use of sleeping pills in the previous 30 days was reported by only 3.3% of respondents. One hundred and three (25.7%) participants reported working while studying (sometimes to full-time). Between 43% and 48% of participants had gone to bed later than usual one to three times a week. About 14% of subjects reported snoring. The mean+/-SD of insomnia and parasomnia scales were 7.0+/-2.3 and 6.8+/-1.2, respectively. The mean of insomnia were more among females, subjects with noise in their living place, and students who worked full-time while studying, and was less in person who did exercise (PSleep disturbances are an important issue among medical students and residents and associated with age, gender, living conditions, doing exercise, and workload.

  14. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  15. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  16. Cross-border utilization of health care services by United States residents living near the Mexican border Utilización transfronteriza de los servicios de salud por residentes en los Estados Unidos que viven cerca de la frontera con México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L. Byrd

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine what proportion of El Paso (Texas, United States of America residents access health care services in Mexico, which services they use, and why they cross for care. METHODS: A cross-sectional, telephone survey of El Paso County residents was conducted from October-November 2007 to determine use of health care services in Mexico. At total of 2560 telephone interviews were completed. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square analysis were used to determine the proportion crossing the US-Mexico border for care and identify correlates of crossing. RESULTS: The proportion of El Paso residents that had crossed into Mexico for some type of health care service during the two years prior to the survey interview was 32.5%. Of border crossers, 27.1% used health services; 63.2%, dental services; 82.0%, pharmacy; and 9.8%, traditional healers. Reasons given were cost, lack of health insurance, language barriers, and convenience. Hispanic ethnicity, having lived in Ciudad Juárez, being uninsured, and younger age were associated with crossing. The majority were satisfied with the health services received. CONCLUSIONS: Crossing the border to access health care services in Mexico is not uncommon for US residents living in El Paso County, Texas. Given the high rate of uninsured in the United States and the increasingly stringent security requirements, health policies may be needed that allow for cross-border care, making use of this alternative health care system easier and safer.OBJETIVOS: Determinar la proporción de habitantes de El Paso (Texas, Estados Unidos de América que acceden a los servicios de salud de México, los servicios utilizados y las razones para buscar atención del otro lado de la frontera. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal mediante encuesta telefónica a personas residentes en el condado de El Paso. La encuesta se aplicó a 2560 personas entre octubre y noviembre de 2007 para determinar el uso de servicios de

  17. Pathways to Assisted Living: The Influence of Race and Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Mary M; Perkins, Molly M; Hollingsworth, Carole; Whittington, Frank J; King, Sharon V

    2009-02-01

    This article examines how race and class influence decisions to move to assisted living facilities. Qualitative methods were used to study moving decisions of residents in 10 assisted living facilities varying in size and location, as well as race and socioeconomic status of residents. Data were derived from in-depth interviews with 60 residents, 43 family members and friends, and 12 administrators. Grounded theory analysis identified three types of residents based on their decision-making control: proactive, compliant, and passive/resistant. Only proactive residents (less than a quarter of residents) had primary control. Findings show that control of decision making for elders who are moving to assisted living is influenced by class, though not directly by race. The impact of class primarily related to assisted-living placement options and strategies available to forestall moves. Factors influencing the decision-making process were similar for Black and White elders of comparable socioeconomic status.

  18. Vulnerability to Elder Abuse and Neglect in Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stacey; Stephens, Mary

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the decision-making abilities of residents in assisted living regarding abuse and neglect. Design and Methods: Twenty-seven residents in assisted living facilities were recruited for this descriptive study. Participants were administered an interview to assess baseline knowledge of support…

  19. Noise annoyances from wind power: Survey of the population living close to a wind power plant. Final report: Part 3 Main study; Stoerningar fraan vindkraft: undersoekning bland maenniskor boende i naerheten av vindkraftverk. Slutrapport: Del 3 Huvudstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Eja [Halmstad Univ., Halmstad (Sweden). School of Business and Engineering; Persson-Waye, K. [Goeteborg Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Medicine

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of annoyance from wind turbines, a study was performed in Laholm in May 2000. The aim was to obtain dose response relationships between calculated sound levels and noise annoyance and appropriate sound description as well as analysing the influence of other variables on noise annoyance. A questionnaire survey was performed in 6 areas comprising 16 wind turbines, of which 14 had an effect of 600 kW. The purpose of the study was masked. Among questions on living conditions in the countryside, questions directly related to wind turbines were included. The study population (n=518) comprised one randomly selected subject between the ages of 18 to 75 years in each household living within a calculated wind turbine sound level of 25 to 40 dBA. The response rate was 68.7% (n=356). Calculated distributions of A-weighted sound level were performed for each area and plotted on geographical maps in 2.5 dBA steps. Each dwelling could thus be given a sound level within an interval of 2.5 dBA. The most frequently occurring source of noise annoyance was noise from rotor blades. The proportions of respondents annoyed by noise increased with calculated sound level. Among respondents exposed to sound levels of 35.0-37.5 dBA, 43% responded themselves to be rather or much annoyed. A-weighted sound level was only one variable explaining annoyance. Annoyance was correlated to a larger extent by the intrusiveness of the sound character swishing. Noise annoyance was interrelated to the respondents' opinion of the visual impact of wind turbines, while attitude towards wind power in general had no greater influence. Disturbance of spoilt view was reported to a similar degree as noise disturbance. Further investigations are needed to clarify factors of importance for the disturbance of view. All the wind turbines in the study had constant rotation speed. The greater wind turbines that are now erected often have variable speed, which may lead to a sound

  20. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Housing Types Group Home § 982.610 Group home: Who may reside in a group home. (a) An elderly person or a person with disabilities may reside in a State-approved group home. (b)(1) If approved by the PHA, a live-in aide may reside with a person with disabilities. (2) The PHA must approve a live-in aide if needed...

  1. Grandparent Education for Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Robert D.; Strom, Paris S.

    2017-01-01

    The assisted living population is forecast to increase at a rapid rate. Quality of life for residents should be improved by giving greater attention to their cognitive, emotional, and social needs. A university lifespan development team provided a grandparent education course at a large assisted living facility with the assistance of 20 resident…

  2. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Health Kids Environment Kids Health Menu Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works ... Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Expand Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works ...

  4. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also be higher than in other supported-living environments. Adult Foster Care Foster care homes generally provide ... board, and some help with activities of daily living. This is provided by ... more home-like environment. Regulations for foster care vary by state, and ...

  5. Family functionality in oldest old household residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Ivania; Lucchese, Roselma; Nakatani, Adélia Yaeko Kyosen; Pagotto, Valeria; Montefusco, Selma Rodrigues Alves; Sadoyama, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with family functionality of non-institutionalized long-lived subjects, who were residents in Goiânia (GO), Brazil. This was a population-based epidemiological study with cross-sectional outline. Evaluation scales of the functional and cognitive capacities were used. Family dynamics was measured using the Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve (APGAR) instrument by making home interviews with 131 long-lived individuals. There was prevalence of the female gender, average of age of 83.87 years old, widowhood condition, and residence in a big family, primary schooling, and self-perception of regular health. A great amount showed independence for self-care and partial dependence for daily life instrumental activities. Family functionality prevailed with score average of 9.06 points. In conclusion, family functionality in long-lived subjects is associated with self-perception of poor/bad health, osteoporosis, and fall. Results allowed characterizing long-lived subjects' family functionality with the aim of valuing and prioritizing family as a caregiver.

  6. Tandem bike design for apartment residents as an idea to reduce air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandriawan Bambang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical housing is recently popular in urban areas since the availability of land is very limited. A strong preference for living in the city is mainly due to the home to work travel that is relatively close for those who work in the city. While residing in the vertical housing (i.e. apartment can be an advantage, several accommodation facilities are often provided at their minimum standards. As such, a special design of bicycle for apartment residents may an effective solution. Multi-function bike, ridden either by one or two riders and its aesthetic part of interior element can be an attractive offer. Identification of marketing objectives and observation of comparable products were a crucial step in the initial process of tandem bike design. The use of bicycle in urban areas can overcome a number of motorized vehicles operating wherever the using of them may create issues such as traffic jam and air pollution. This study aims to adjust the tandem bike which can be produced commercially for the apartment residents. Stated in the research problems, the design process was successfully fulfilled. Fabrication and product testing were positively completed. A concise and comfortable bike to carry from the lobby to the apartment unit, or vice versa, was successfully created.

  7. Coping and Protective Behavior of Residents of Radioactive Contaminated Territories Depending on Age and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ирина Вадимовна Борисова

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the results of an empirical study of the coping and protective behavior of the residents of radioactive contaminated territories, depending on age and gender. The specifics of coping and protection are revealed depending on age and gender. It is shown that young men and women more often use non-constructive ways of coping behavior to cope with difficult life situations, in comparison with adult men and women. Men are worse than women at relieving stress and maintaining self-esteem in difficult life situations through the use of coping strategies. It was established that the residents of radioactive territories do not want to take responsibility for their lives, but passively expect assistance without any independent actions aimed at resolving their problems. It was revealed that substitution as a mechanism of psychological defense is more pronounced in adolescent and mature men than in girls and women, respectively. The relationship between defensive and coping behavior in adolescence and adulthood was described. It was established that in adolescence, confrontational coping, manifested through aggressive efforts aimed at actively asserting one’s opinion and desires in relations with others and trying to have one’s own way, through chaotic activities that do not change the situation, is closely related to the mechanisms of psychological defense. Substitution does not allow the use of constructive ways of coping both in adolescence and in adulthood. The results of the study can be used to provide psychological assistance to residents of radioactive contaminated areas.

  8. Permissive Residents: West Papuan refugees living in Papua New Guinea

    OpenAIRE

    Glazebrook, Diana

    2008-01-01

    This book offers another frame through which to view the event of the outrigger landing of 43 West Papuans in Australia in 2006. West Papuans have crossed boundaries to seek asylum since 1962, usually eastward into Papua New Guinea (PNG), and occasionally southward to Australia. Between 1984–86, around 11,000 people crossed into PNG seeking asylum. After the Government of PNG acceded to the United Nations Convention and Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, West Papuans were relocated ...

  9. Residents' concerns and attitudes toward a municipal solid waste landfill: integrating a questionnaire survey and GIS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yue; Yang, Kai; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Weiqian; Shang, Zhaoyi; Tai, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The ever-growing industry of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal appeals to the growing need for disposal facilities, and MSW treatment facilities are increasingly an environmental and public health concern. Residents living near MSW management facilities are confronted with various risk perceptions, especially odour. In this study, in an effort to assist responsible decision-makers in better planning and managing such a project, a structured questionnaire was designed and distributed to assess the nearby residents' concerns and attitudes surrounding the Laogang Landfill in Shanghai. Geographic information system techniques and relevance analysis were employed to conduct the spatial analysis of physical perceptions, especially odour annoyance. The findings of the research indicate that a significant percentage of the responding sample was aware of the negative impacts of landfills on the environment and public health, and residents in close proximity preferred to live farther from the landfill. The results from the spatial analysis demonstrated a definite degree of correlation between odour annoyance and distance to the facility and proved that the benefits of the socially disadvantaged have been neglected. The research findings also direct attention to the important role of public participation, information disclosure, transparency in management, and mutual communication to avoid conflicts and build social trust.

  10. Life in a university residence: Issues, concerns and responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Babar T; Deschamps, Jean-Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Students living in university residences experience frail living conditions, being away from their homes and families, the stress of studies, a bizarre routine, and absence of readily available guidance. Their overall health suffers. Our study aims at collecting information on health and related problems of the students in university residences and to identify the solutions to ameliorate the prevailing situation. A qualitative study conducted in five university residences of Nancy, Metz and Strasbourg, France. The majority of students have complaints about the living conditions in the residences. They mention that they are not in sound health. Stress, depression, fatigue, insomnia, and problems with diet are common. Foreign students suffer more due to culture shock, language, and nostalgia. A tendency for suicides has been observed, especially in girls. Financial problems, too much to study, and relationship break-up are important factors. For their health problems, they generally seek advice from a peer and consume medicines without prescription. Many do not use the "students' health service" because of lack of information or difficult access from certain universities or university residences. To solve their problems and to facilitate their social integration, student volunteers ought to be trained in the university residences because a majority prefers to have their peers' advice. Reinforcement of the role of administration of residences, of student-counselors and of the faculty in the university would be another crucial step. More leisure and social activities are imperative. This study itself constitutes the first element of creating awareness regarding the situation of the health of students living in residence halls in France.

  11. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  12. Uncertainty and decision making for residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Guarino, A J

    2011-08-01

    Uncertainty is a significant barrier confronting surrogate decision makers(SDMs) who make treatment decisions for nursing home (NH) residents with dementia. The study purpose is to describe uncertainty among SDMs of NH residents with dementia and to identify factors associated with greater Uncertainty. We employed a nonexperimental, cross-sectional design using mailed survey and recruited 155 SDM participants from eight NHs in New England. The survey contained the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale For Family Members. Independent variables included resident and SDM sociodemographic characteristics, Advance Directives, Credible Authority, Social Support, and Perceived Self-Efficacy for Surrogate Decision Making. Results of a simultaneous multiple regression analysis identified Perceived Self-Efficacy,Social Support, and Close Relative explained 22% of the Uncertainty variance.These findings suggest that close family relatives who serve as SDMs for NH residents with dementia may benefit from increasing social support and enhancing SDMs’ self-efficacy for decision making.

  13. Healthy living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bones, heart, and lungs, tones muscles, improves vitality, relieves depression, and helps you sleep better. Talk ... has a problem with alcohol. Many people whose lives have been affected by alcohol get benefit from ...

  14. Bachelor Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Sondra

    1974-01-01

    Male high school students in a Bachelor Living Class observed methods of child care including bottle feeding, spoon feeding, changing diapers, and method of holding. The purpose was for the students to grasp a better understanding of child development. (EK)

  15. Live Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets Act Against AIDS Live Well Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Being aware of your overall health beyond HIV can ...

  16. Living PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.G.K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to gain an understanding of the requirements for a PSA to be considered a Living PSA. The presentation is divided into the following topics: Definition; Planning/Documentation; Task Performance; Maintenance; Management. 4 figs

  17. Primary group interaction of residents in a retirement hotel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampe, G D; Blevins, A L

    1975-01-01

    The interaction patterns of sixty-three residents age 55 and over living in a retirement hotel for three types of primary groups-kin, friends, and neighbors-were studied. Almost all residents voiced high housing satisfaction and were involved to various degrees in their primary group network. The relative with whom visited the most, usually the adult child, influences the primary group interaction the most, but at the same time may contribute to feelings of uselessness on the part of the retired residents of the apartment complex.

  18. Resident satisfaction on their residence and environment (case study of Srondol Bumi Indah Housing of Semarang City)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyono, Paulus

    2017-12-01

    A piece of an architecture work will be meaningful if it meets the needs of the residents. Likewise, the design and natural environment of a residence will surely be meaningful if it is able to satisfy the residents. The degree of satisfaction can be referred to the theory of human need hierarchy proposed by Abraham Maslow. Although his theory is an old one, it is still a good one for a reference. Socio economic status (SES)also affects someone in understanding the comfort of his resident. This research has some purpose: 1) to know the satisfaction level of the residents, 2) to know the effects of socio economic status towards the residents, and 3) to know the natural environment aspect to resident satisfaction. The methode analysis used is qualitative analysis. The major finding are: 1)security factor is the main aspect of the human need residents; 2) upper and lowerclass residents have different knowledge and understanding regarding the natural environment satisfaction on the house they live.

  19. Lived Lives: A Pavee Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Kevin M; McGuinness, Seamus G; Cleary, Eimear; Jefferies, Janis; Owens, Christabel; Kelleher, Cecily C

    2017-04-13

    Background: Suicide is a significant public health concern, which impacts on health outcomes. Few suicide research studies have been interdisciplinary. We combined a psychobiographical autopsy with a visual arts autopsy, in which families donated stories, images and objects associated with the lived life of a loved one lost to suicide. From this interdisciplinary research platform, a mediated exhibition was created ( Lived Lives ) with artist, scientist and families, co-curated by communities, facilitating dialogue, response and public action around suicide prevention. Indigenous ethnic minorities (IEMs) bear a significant increased risk for suicide. Irish Travellers are an IEM with social and cultural parallels with IEMs internationally, experiencing racism, discrimination, and poor health outcomes including elevated suicide rates (SMR 6.6). Methods: An adjusted Lived Lives exhibition, Lived Lives: A Pavee Perspective manifested in Pavee Point, the national Traveller and Roma Centre. The project was evaluated by the Travelling Community as to how it related to suicide in their community, how it has shaped their understanding of suicide and its impacts, and its relevance to other socio-cultural contexts, nationally and internationally. The project also obtained feedback from all relevant stakeholders. Evaluation was carried out by an international visual arts research advisor and an independent observer from the field of suicide research. Results: Outputs included an arts-science mediated exhibition with reference to elevated Irish Traveller suicide rates. Digital online learning materials about suicide and its aftermath among Irish Travellers were also produced. The project reached its target audience, with a high level of engagement from members of the Travelling Community. Discussion: The Lived Lives methodology navigated the societal barriers of stigma and silence to foster communication and engagement, working with cultural values, consistent with an adapted

  20. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  1. Opportunities to Create New General Surgery Residency Programs to Alleviate the Shortage of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Ashley D; Beadles, Christopher A; Sheldon, George F; Charles, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    To estimate the capacity for supporting new general surgery residency programs among U.S. hospitals that currently do not have such programs. The authors compiled 2011 American Hospital Association data regarding the characteristics of hospitals with and without a general surgery residency program and 2012 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education data regarding existing general surgery residencies. They performed an ordinary least squares regression to model the number of residents who could be trained at existing programs on the basis of residency program-level variables. They identified candidate hospitals on the basis of a priori defined criteria for new general surgery residency programs and an out-of-sample prediction of resident capacity among the candidate hospitals. The authors found that 153 hospitals in 39 states could support a general surgery residency program. The characteristics of these hospitals closely resembled the characteristics of hospitals with existing programs. They identified 435 new residency positions: 40 hospitals could support 2 residents per year, 99 hospitals could support 3 residents, 12 hospitals could support 4 residents, and 2 hospitals could support 5 residents. Accounting for progressive specialization, new residency programs could add 287 additional general surgeons to the workforce annually (after an initial five- to seven-year lead time). By creating new general surgery residency programs, hospitals could increase the number of general surgeons entering the workforce each year by 25%. A challenge to achieving this growth remains finding new funding mechanisms within and outside Medicare. Such changes are needed to mitigate projected workforce shortages.

  2. The Need for Caregiver Education and Training in the Assisted Living Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Huzar, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Assisted living is dedicated to serving individuals with a wide array of disabilities. Training and education are vital for staff and residents in assisted-living facilities because resident care depends on staff knowledge to provide for their safety and welfare. However, little research has been conducted on assisted-living facilities, let alone…

  3. Close Air Support versus Close Combat Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    consequence when discussing the two different processes of close air support and close combat attack. This section focuses on service culture. Understanding...According to a RAND study written by Carl Builder, the Air Force “could be said to worship at the altar of technology.”67 These are not what Hofstede...characteristics that are highly prized in a culture and thus serve as models for behavior,” people like Billy Mitchell, Hap Arnold, Tooey Spaatz to name a

  4. Psychopathology and resident status - comparing asylum seekers, refugees, illegal migrants, labor migrants, and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeren, Martina; Wittmann, Lutz; Ehlert, Ulrike; Schnyder, Ulrich; Maier, Thomas; Müller, Julia

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to describe, compare, and predict mental health outcomes of different migrant groups and native residents in Switzerland. Asylum seekers (n=65); refugees holding permanent protection visas (n=34); illegal migrants (n=21); labor migrants (n=26); and residents (n=56) completed an assessment by questionnaire. Main outcome variables were symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression. It was tested whether resident status predicted psychopathology over and above the influence of control variables including social desirability, traumatic event types and post-migration resources. Asylum seekers (54.0%) and refugees (41.4%) fulfilled criteria of PTSD most frequently. Clinically relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression were most frequently reported by asylum seekers (84.6% and 63.1%, resp.) and illegal migrants (both 47.6%). Resident status contributed to psychopathology over and above the influence of control variables. Overall, asylum seekers, refugees, and illegal migrants showed high psychiatric morbidity. Differences in resident status appear to be specifically associated with mental health outcomes. This association persists even when controlling for social desirability, post-migration resources and traumatic events. This emphasizes the importance of current socio-political living conditions for mental health, even with respect to the psychopathological sequelae of past traumatic experiences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The neighborhood health exchange: developing a community partnership in residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Press, Valerie G; Freed, Benjamin H; Baker, Timothy; Tang, Joyce W; Cohen, Julie C; Laiteerapong, Neda; Alvarez, Kimberly; Schwartz, Mindy; Arora, Vineet M

    2010-09-01

    The current system of residency training focuses on the hospital setting, and resident exposure to the surrounding community is often limited. However, community interaction can play an important role in ambulatory training and in learning systems-based practice, a residency core competency. The goal of the Neighborhood Health Exchange was to develop a community partnership to provide internal medicine residents with an opportunity to interface with community members through a mutually beneficial educational experience. Internal medicine residents received training during their ambulatory block and participated in a voluntary field practicum designed to engage community members in discussions about their health. Community members participated in education sessions led by resident volunteers. Resident volunteers completed a survey on their experiences. All residents stated that the opportunity to lead an exchange was very useful to their overall residency training. Eight exchanges were held with a total of 61 community participants, who completed a 3-question survey following the session. This survey asked about the level of material, the helpfulness of the exchanges, and opportunities for improvement. We received 46 completed surveys from community members: 91% stated that the material was presented "at the right level" and 93% stated that the presentations were somewhat or very helpful. Eighty percent gave positive and encouraging comments about the exchange. Effective community partnerships involve assessing needs of the stakeholders, anticipating leadership turnover, and adapting the Neighborhood Health Exchange model to different groups. Community outreach can also enhance internal medicine ambulatory training experience, provide residents with patient counseling opportunities, and offer a novel method to enhance resident understanding of systems-based practice, especially within the larger community in which their patients live.

  6. Mental Illness in Assisted Living: Challenges for Quality of Life and Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leslie A; Perez, Rosa; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Nemec, Mary; Bennett, Colleen R

    2016-01-01

    An unknown number of mentally ill elders in the U.S. receive care in assisted living [AL], along with persons facing physical or cognitive challenges. While dementia is familiar in AL, our data indicate that neither staff nor residents are prepared to work or live with the mentally ill. Challenges are created for professionals, since these residents bring diverse needs. Daily inter-resident interactions are also disrupted or stressful. Qualitative data describe the impacts on quality of resident life as well as care and management dilemmas identified within five assisted living settings having varying presence of mental illness among residents.

  7. Physician perspectives on medical care delivery in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Philip D; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Perez, Rosa; Reed, David; Harris-Wallace, Brandy; Khandelwal, Christine; Beeber, Anna Song; Mitchell, C Madeline; Schumacher, John

    2011-12-01

    To describe the provision of medical care in assisted living (AL) as provided by physicians who are especially active in providing care to older adults and AL residents; to identify characteristics associated with physician confidence in AL staff; and to ask physicians a variety of questions about their experience providing care to AL residents and how it compares with providing care in the nursing home and home care settings. Cross-sectional descriptive study. AL communities in 27 states. One hundred sixty-five physicians and administrators of 125 AL settings in which they had patients. Interviews and questionnaires containing open- and close-ended questions regarding demographics, care arrangements, attitudes, and behaviors in managing medical problems. Most respondents were certified in internal medicine (46%) or family medicine (47%); 32% were certified in geriatrics and 30% in medical directorship. In this select sample, 48% visited the AL setting once a year or less, and 19% visited once a week or more. Mean physician confidence in AL staff was 3.3 (somewhat confident), with greater confidence associated with smaller AL community size, nursing presence, and the physician being the medical director. Qualitative analyses identified differences between settings including lack of vital sign assessment in the home setting, concern about the ability of AL staff to assess and monitor problems, and greater administrative and regulatory requirements in AL than in the other settings. Providing medical care for AL residents presents unique challenges and opportunities for physicians. Nursing presence and physician oversight and familiarity and communicating with AL staff who are highly familiar with a given resident and can monitor care may facilitate care. © 2011, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Close to the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Today, a new ALMA outreach and educational book was publicly presented to city officials of San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, as part of the celebrations of the anniversary of the Andean village. ESO PR Photo 50a/07 ESO PR Photo 50a/07 A Useful Tool for Schools Entitled "Close to the sky: Biological heritage in the ALMA area", and edited in English and Spanish by ESO in Chile, the book collects unique on-site observations of the flora and fauna of the ALMA region performed by experts commissioned to investigate it and to provide key initiatives to protect it. "I thank the ALMA project for providing us a book that will surely be a good support for the education of children and youngsters of San Pedro de Atacama. Thanks to this publication, we expect our rich flora and fauna to be better known. I invite teachers and students to take advantage of this educational resource, which will be available in our schools", commented Ms. Sandra Berna, the Mayor of San Pedro de Atacama, who was given the book by representatives of the ALMA global collaboration project. Copies of the book 'Close to the sky' will be donated to all schools in the area, as a contribution to the education of students and young people in northern Chile. "From the very beginning of the project, ALMA construction has had a firm commitment to environment and local culture, protecting unique flora and fauna species and preserving old estancias belonging to the Likan Antai culture," said Jacques Lassalle, who represented ALMA at the hand-over. "Animals like the llama, the fox or the condor do not only live in the region where ALMA is now being built, but they are also key elements of the ancient Andean constellations. In this sense they are part of the same sky that will be explored by ALMA in the near future." ESO PR Photo 50c/07 ESO PR Photo 50c/07 Presentation of the ALMA book The ALMA Project is a giant, international observatory currently under construction on the high-altitude Chajnantor site in Chile

  9. Close-Ups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2013-01-01

    Investigations in the close-up and its meaning regarding nearness, abstraction and transparency. Face, facelike and animism are also major key-words in thsi article... . I have always been fascinated with the close-up, not as an end, but a filter of opportunities to open up for and nearness...... of transcendence, associations and memories. The close-up is not the end, it rather in my view to be regarded as a beginning of different perceptions...

  10. Perception Analysis Of Living Environment At Taman Melati Residential Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDUL AZEEZ Kadar Hamsa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid physical development in a residential area will deteriorate living environment of the residents especially if it takes place haphazardly without applying adequate planning guidelines. It will, eventually, exert more pressure on physical infrastructure of the area. As a result, residents of the area will be subjected to dissatisfaction on the present supporting infrastructure as the demand exceeds the supply. Evidently, it may lead to poor living conditions of the area, which ultimately slow the progressiveness of the society to achieve the quality of living standards. This paper investigates residents' perceptions on present living environmental setting at Taman Melati residential area in Kuala Lumpur. Questionnaire survey was administered to determine the perceptions of the residents on physical environmental parameters such as air, noise, streetlight illuminance, and traffic volume. The level of satisfaction of the residents on the living environment had showed nearly 64% of the respondents expressed 'satisfied strongly' or 'satisfied'. The level of willingness of the residents to stay further continuously at Taman Melati indicates about 56% of the respondents expressed 'strongly willing' or 'willing'. It is also seen that the overall satisfaction level of the residents on the living environment was high albeit satisfaction level on individual physical environmental parameters was low.

  11. That which goes unsaid: Experiences of everyday life in residential care for residents with limited communication ability. A collective case study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MSc Donna Frost

    2008-01-01

    Background The experiences of residents who have communication difficulties such as dysphasia are largely absent from the literature. Aim To illuminate the everyday experiences of four residents with severe communication difficulties living in a residential care setting in the Netherlands.

  12. Closing the Gender Gap: Act Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Gender gaps are pervasive in all walks of economic life and imply large losses in terms of foregone productivity and living standards to the individuals concerned and the economy. This new OECD report focuses on how best to close these gender gaps under four broad headings: (1) Gender equality, social norms and public policies; and gender equality…

  13. Screening Mammography Utilization in Tennessee Women: The Association with Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen C.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.; Neutens, James J.; Klein, Diane A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Approximately 70% of US women over age 40 report mammography screening within 2 years. However, rates are likely to vary by age, income, educational level, and residence. Purpose: To describe the prevalence of screening mammography and associated factors in women living in rural and urban areas of Tennessee. Methods: Using pooled data…

  14. Environmental perceptions of residents of a multifunctional building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael L. Berger

    1977-01-01

    A multifunctional building in which residents could live, work, and entertain themselves without contact with the surrounding external urban environment is the subject of this study. To what extent do inhabitants of this structure perceive their thermal and acoustical environments within the building to be different from or similar to that outside? To what degree are...

  15. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  16. students' off-campus residence and impact on localities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LUCY

    The landlords should also provide boreholes in the hostels for students use. KEYWORDS: Students' residence, village, impact, ... Modake an area close to it into an urban unit. The expansion gave rise to land speculation in ..... Geography, Second Edition Busil Black well Ltd. UN. Marge, G., 2005. The Importance of ...

  17. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-11-02

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Mauna Loa--history, hazards and risk of living with the world's largest volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusdell, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Mauna Loa on the Island Hawaiʻi is the world’s largest volcano. People residing on its flanks face many hazards that come with living on or near an active volcano, including lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and local tsunami (giant seawaves). The County of Hawaiʻi (Island of Hawaiʻi) is the fastest growing County in the State of Hawaii. Its expanding population and increasing development mean that risk from volcano hazards will continue to grow. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) closely monitor and study Mauna Loa Volcano to enable timely warning of hazardous activity and help protect lives and property.

  19. Physical performance deterioration of temporary housing residents after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ishii

    2015-01-01

    We revealed that standing stability was impaired among elderly temporary housing residents 1.5 years after the disaster. Disaster responders should take into account the health risks associated with living in temporary housing.

  20. Estimates of the Lawful Permanent Resident Population in the United States: January 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the lawful permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States on January 1, 2014. The LPR population includes persons...

  1. Estimates of the Lawful Permanent Resident Population in the United States: January 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the lawful permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States on January 1, 2013. The LPR population includes persons...

  2. Depression and Its Associated Factors in Elderly Nursing Home Residents: A Screening Study in Khorramabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mirzaei

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion Given the high prevalence of depression in the elderly population living in institutions, assessment and screening of elderly residents of nursing home especially younger elderly with lower educational levels, is essential.

  3. 24 CFR 902.53 - Resident service and satisfaction scoring and thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the survey results. The survey content will focus on resident evaluation of the overall living... Federal Register. HUD may revise this notice in the future, but HUD will publish for comment any...

  4. Targeting Memory Improvement in Assisted Living: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Kristine N.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study tested an intervention designed to improve memory for Assisted Living (AL) residents. Seven residents in one midwestern AL facility participated in a 6-session memory program based on qualitative research that identified typical memory challenges of residents (remembering names, schedules, and appointments). Scores on memory self-efficacy (the Memory Complaint in Age-Associated Impairment [MAC-Q]) and performance (Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test) measures were compared befor...

  5. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  6. Superstorm Sandy: How the New York University Psychiatry Residency Training Program Weathered the Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Rebecca; Adler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    The teaching hospitals of the New York University psychiatry residency program were evacuated and then closed for a minimum of 3 months in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Faculty and residents were deployed to alternate clinical sites. The authors examine the consequences of Superstorm Sandy and its implications for the New York University psychiatry residency training program. A survey was administered to faculty and residents. The authors tabulated 98 surveys, for which 24 % of faculty and 84 % of residents responded. Among respondents, 61 % believed that being involved in the evacuation of the hospitals was a positive experience. During deployment, most (85 %) found being placed with peers and supervisors to be beneficial, but there were significant disruptions. Despite facing multiple challenges including closed facilities, deployment to nonaffiliated hospitals, and exhausted personal resources, the training program continued to provide accredited clinical experiences, a core curriculum, and supervision for psychiatry residents during and after Superstorm Sandy.

  7. Prevalence of mental disorders in migrants compared with original residents and local residents in Ningxia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhong Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological migrants has a special background compared with other types of migrant. However, the mental health status of ecological migrants who were expected to benefit from a massive “ecological migration project” initiated by the Chinese government is unknown. This study aims to explore the influence of environmental change on individuals’ mental health and to improve current understanding of the mechanisms that mental disorders occurred. Methods The data were extracted from a cross-sectional study. Anxiety disorders, mood disorders and substance use disorders were assessed using the Chinese version WHO-CIDI. The prevalence of mental disorders was stratified by migration status into ecological migrant, local resident and original resident groups. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to calculate the risk of prevalence among these three groups. Results After controlling for gender, ethnicity, age, marriage, and education, the migrants had lower risk of mental disorders than original residents [OR = 0.70 (95 % CI: 0.57–0.86], p < 0.001, but had a higher risk of mental disorders than local residents [OR = 1.29 (95 % CI: 1.06–1.55], p = 0.007. Conclusion The ecological migration project may be beneficial to people’s mental health by improving their living environment and social economy.

  8. Lively package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaremko, G.

    1997-01-01

    Progress on the Lloydminster Heavy Oil Interpretive Centre, sponsored by the Lloydminster Oilfield Technical Society and expected to open in late 1998, was discussed. Some $150,000 of the $750,000 budget is already in the bank, and another $150,000 is in the pipeline. The Centre will be added to an existing and well-established visitor's site. It is reported to contain a lively and imaginatively-designed exhibit package, and promises to become a combination of educational tool and tourist attraction for the town of Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, in the heart of heavy oil country

  9. 24 CFR 982.606 - Congregate housing: Who may reside in congregate housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Special Housing Types Congregate Housing § 982.606 Congregate housing: Who may reside in congregate housing. (a) An elderly person or a person with disabilities may reside in a congregate housing unit. (b... person with disabilities. (2) The PHA must approve a live-in aide if needed as a reasonable accommodation...

  10. Residents' Perceived Social-Economic Impact of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mark; Chen, Li; Lei, Ouyang; Malone, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether the Olympic Games was a catalyst for changes to Beijing residents' quality of life based on social-economic perspectives and how these changes affected their continuous support for the Games. Residents who lived in Beijing 18 months or longer were invited to participate in this survey research (N = 412)…

  11. Developing an Instrument to Examine Student-Faculty Interaction in Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Rishi; McLevain, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs are a distinct feature of residential colleges (Ryan, 2001), but more recently, institutions of higher education have created more opportunities for faculty to reside in various types of living-learning programs, including theme housing and first-year experience communities. Within the context of this study,…

  12. Project WINDFARMperception Visual and acoustic impact of wind turbine farms on residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F.; Pedersen, E.; Bouma, J.; Bakker, R.

    2008-01-01

    This report gives the results of the EU financed study WINDFARMpertception on how residents perceive a wind farm in their living environment as far as sound and sight are concerned. The study includes a postal survey among Dutch residents (n = 725, response rate: 37%) and an assessment of their

  13. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  14. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  15. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  16. Living with wildfire in Boulder County, Colorado, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Champ; Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Nicholas Flores

    2011-01-01

    The devastating impact of wildfire on residents living in fire prone areas has become an all too common media story in recent years. While significant efforts have been made to inform residents in fire prone areas of the risk, it is not clear to what extent property owners are taking action to reduce risk. Likewise, we know little about what factors are related to...

  17. Living with wildfire in Larimer County, Colorado, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Champ; Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Nicholas Flores

    2011-01-01

    The devastating impact of wildfire on residents living in fire prone areas has become an all too common media story in recent years. While significant efforts have been made to inform residents in fire prone areas of the risk, it is not clear to what extent property owners are taking action to reduce risk. Likewise, we know little about what factors are related to...

  18. Closed string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1987-01-01

    A gauge invariant cubic action describing bosonic closed string field theory is constructed. The gauge symmetries include local spacetime diffeomorphisms. The conventional closed string spectrum and trilinear couplings are reproduced after spontaneous symmetry breaking. The action S is constructed from the usual ''open string'' field of ghost number minus one half. It is given by the associator of the string field product which is non-vanishing because of associativity anomalies. S does not describe open string propagation because open string states associate and can thereby be shifted away. A field theory of closed and open strings can be obtained by adding to S the cubic open string action. (orig.)

  19. Pseudo Algebraically Closed Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bary-Soroker, Lior

    2009-07-01

    This PhD deals with the notion of pseudo algebraically closed (PAC) extensions of fields. It develops a group-theoretic machinery, based on a generalization of embedding problems, to study these extensions. Perhaps the main result is that although there are many PAC extensions, the Galois closure of a proper PAC extension is separably closed. The dissertation also contains the following subjects. The group theoretical counterpart of pseudo algebraically closed extensions, the so-called projective pairs. Applications to seemingly unrelated subjects, e.g., an analog of Dirichlet's theorem about primes in arithmetic progression for polynomial rings in one variable over infinite fields.

  20. The Impact of Emotional Solidarity on Residents? Attitude and Tourism Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hasani, Ali; Moghavvemi, Sedigheh; Hamzah, Amran

    2016-01-01

    In many countries, especially one such as Malaysia, tourism has become a key factor in economic development, and the industry heavily relies on feedback from local residents. It is essential to observe and examine the perceptions of residents towards tourists and tourism development for better planning in realizing successful and sustainable tourism development. Therefore, this research measured the relationship between residents' welcoming nature, emotional closeness, and sympathetic underst...

  1. Lives Remembered: Telling the Stories of Older People - An Anthology University of York Lives Remembered: Telling the Stories of Older People - An Anthology £5 42pp 9780901931061 0901931063 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    THREE NURSING students at the University of York have each written a short story based on the memories of a nursing home resident. It is a great read - a snapshot of the residents' younger lives and times long gone.

  2. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  3. Surgical residency: A tenant's view

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'To sleep: perchance to dream', is the frequent mantra of the surgical resident. However, unlike. Hamlet, there is no ensuing speculation as to what dreams may come as there are seldom any!! Surgical residency has been both vilified and immortalized, but the fact remains that it is one of the most challenging, provocative ...

  4. Closed Claim Query File

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This file is used to hold information about disability claims that have been closed and have been selected for sampling.Sampling is the process whereby OQR reviews...

  5. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  7. Autonomy and social functioning of recently admitted nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, Kristel; Goossens, Katrien; Elseviers, Monique; Van Bogaert, Peter; Dilles, Tinne

    2017-09-01

    This paper examines recently admitted nursing home residents' practical autonomy, their remaining social environment and their social functioning. In a cross-sectional design, 391 newly admitted residents of 67 nursing homes participated. All respondents were ≥65 years old, had mini-mental state examination ≥18 and were living in the nursing home for at least 1 month. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and validated measuring tools. The mean age was 84, 64% were female, 23% had a partner, 80% children, 75% grandchildren and 59% siblings. The mean social functioning score was 3/9 (or 33%) and the autonomy and importance of autonomy score 6/9 (or 67%). More autonomy was observed when residents could perform activities of daily living more independently, and cognitive functioning, quality of life and social functioning were high. Residents with depressive feelings scored lower on autonomy and social functioning compared to those without depressive feelings. Having siblings and the frequency of visits positively correlated with social functioning. In turn, social functioning correlated positively with quality of life. Moreover, a higher score on social functioning lowered the probability of depression. Autonomy or self-determination and maintaining remaining social relationships were considered to be important by the new residents. The remaining social environment, social functioning, quality of life, autonomy and depressive feelings influenced each other, but the cause--effect relation was not clear.

  8. Living Lands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Suna Møller

    2015-01-01

    in West Greenland were carried out when it was hunting season for mux ox and caribou, exploring relations between education and perception of environment. All these trips have called for attention to the relation between actual engagement with ‘nature’ and experienced human-nature relations. Based on my......, hunters attended to questions like safe-journeying on ice or the role of natural surroundings in children’s education, in ways revealing a relational perception of ‘nature’ and dissolving culture-nature dualisms. Hunters’ experiences in living the land afforded children a dwelling position from which...... to grow with the features of the land. Framed this way, ‘nature’ was regarded as part of the social world. I suggest that learning among Arctic hunters is social and twofold. First, we can learn how human-environment relations influence individual life trajectories. Secondly, ‘nature’ as part...

  9. Insufficient Living

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a traumatic health event, and recovery is often associated with massive physical deconditioning and reduced quality of life. Patients also report reduced cognitive functioning and are at risk of developing anxiety and depression as well as posttraumatic...... stress disorder. Although studies have found that survivors of IE have impaired physical functioning and mental health, little is known about patient experiences contributing to these findings. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of recovery after IE. SUBJECTS...... interpretation and discussion. FINDINGS:: The overall concept that emerged was "Insufficient Living." Patients all experienced a life after illness, which was perceived as insufficient. The overall concept can be interpreted in terms of the following 3 themes. The first was "an altered life," where participants...

  10. Living edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2014-01-01

    on the ground level, but there is a lack of recognition in the significance of communicative characters as well at the higher part of the edge. The city’s planning approach is “Consider urban life before urban space. Consider urban space before buildings” This urban strategy neglects the possible architectural...... is a collection of material from the case study of an ongoing PhD study titled: LIVING EDGE - The Architectural and Urban Prospect of Domestic Borders. The paper includes a description of the problem analysis, research question, method, discussion and conclusion.......“What is an edge? We can think about an edge as having been of two sorts. In one, it is a border. In the other, it is a boundary. A border is a zone of interaction where things meet and intersect. A boundary is a place where something ends” Architects and planners normally approach domestic borders...

  11. The Living Challenges of Ambient Assisted Living - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    due to its complexity of people and practices challenging the technological development and use. This calls for methods that support research carried out in close co-operations with the living environment and facilitate the complexity of stakeholders within the use-domain in a constructive......Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) is a rapidly evolving research and development area propelled by scarcity of health resources caused by an aging workforce and increase of Citizens in need of health care and health assistance on a regular basis. This paper presents a literature review of the current...... an overview of the current status of AAL within the following categories: technology, users, application domains, rationales, successes and challenges of AAL. The paper concludes that the living part, i.e. the everyday practice of people living with Assistive Technology, is the primary challenge to the field...

  12. A Closed Universe Expanding Forever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva N. P.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper, the expression a ( t = e H 0 T 0 [ ( t T 0 where = 0 : 5804, was proposed for the expansion factor of our Universe. According to it, gravity dominates the expan- sion ( matter era until the age of T ⋆ = 3 : 214 Gyr and, after that, dark energy dominates ( dark energy era leading to an eternal expansion, no matter if the Universe is closed, flat or open. In this paper we consider only the closed version and show that there is an upper limit for the size of the radial comoving coordinate, beyond which nothing is observed by our fundamental observer, on Earth. Our observable Universe may be only a tiny portion of a much bigger Universe most of it unobservable to us. This leads to the idea that an endless number of other fundamental observers may live on equal number of Universes similar to ours. Either we talk about many Universes — Multiverse — or about an unique Universe, only part of it observable to us.

  13. One's Colonies: a virtual reality environment of oriental residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a statement about my virtual reality environment project, One's Colonies, and a description of the creative process of the project. I was inspired by the buildings in my hometown-Taiwan, which is really different from the architectural style in the United States. By analyzing the unique style of dwellings in Taiwan, I want to demonstrate how the difference between geography, weather and culture change the appearance of the living space. Through this project I want to express the relationship between architectural style and cultural difference, and how the emotional condition or characteristics of the residents are affected by their residencies.

  14. Expatriate Compound Living: An Ethnographic Field Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In certain countries, closed expatriate compounds have developed.  They serve to provide resident expatriates and accompanying family members with a comfortable and safe environment. Unfortunately, not much is known about compound life since associated empirical research is scarce. Through ethnog...

  15. Close binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson-Leander, G.

    1979-01-01

    Studies of close binary stars are being persued more vigorously than ever, with about 3000 research papers and notes pertaining to the field being published during the triennium 1976-1978. Many major advances and spectacular discoveries were made, mostly due to increased observational efficiency and precision, especially in the X-ray, radio, and ultraviolet domains. Progress reports are presented in the following areas: observational techniques, methods of analyzing light curves, observational data, physical data, structure and models of close binaries, statistical investigations, and origin and evolution of close binaries. Reports from the Coordinates Programs Committee, the Committee for Extra-Terrestrial Observations and the Working Group on RS CVn binaries are included. (Auth./C.F.)

  16. Survival prediction among nursing home residents: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Ho, Lily Yuen Wah; Chin, Kenny Chi Wing; Kwong, Enid Wai Yung

    2018-03-01

    To determine the survival time and predictors of survival of residents in a nursing home. Nursing home residents admitted from June 2008 (when the nursing home started operating) to December 2012 (n = 230) to a new nursing home in Hong Kong were prospectively followed. The predictors of survival in the residents were assessed annually, with the exception of those who did not want to continue with the study, or were hospitalized, discharged from the nursing home or died, to compare changes occurring from 2008 to 2012. Cox's regression analysis was used to examine the predictors of survival. A total of 66 of the nursing home residents (28.7%) died during the study period. The median length of survival was 20.46 months. Sex, the number of diseases, depressive symptoms, cognitive status and nutritional status were found to be significant predictors of survival. It is crucial for healthcare providers to offer quality care to residents in long-term care to enhance their well-being in the final sojourn of their lives. Although there are no consistent reports of predictors in the international literature, it is important to address the modifiable predictors, as this might lead to improvements in the quality of life of the residents. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 428-433. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case ...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  18. Closed Loop Subspace Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir W. Nilsen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A new three step closed loop subspace identifications algorithm based on an already existing algorithm and the Kalman filter properties is presented. The Kalman filter contains noise free states which implies that the states and innovation are uneorre lated. The idea is that a Kalman filter found by a good subspace identification algorithm will give an output which is sufficiently uncorrelated with the noise on the output of the actual process. Using feedback from the output of the estimated Kalman filter in the closed loop system a subspace identification algorithm can be used to estimate an unbiased model.

  19. A national survey of assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Catherine; Phillips, Charles D; Rose, Miriam; Holan, Scott; Sherman, Michael

    2003-12-01

    Throughout the 1990s, assisted living was the most rapidly growing form of senior housing. The purpose of this paper is to describe the existing supply of assisted living facilities (ALFs) and examine the extent to which they matched the philosophy of assisted living. The study involved a multistage sample design to produce nationally representative estimates for the ALF industry. Administrators of nearly 1,500 eligible ALFs were interviewed by telephone. As of 1998, there were an estimated 11,459 ALFs nationwide, with 611,300 beds and 521,500 residents. Nearly 60% offered a combination of low services and low or minimal privacy, whereas only 11% offered relatively high services and high privacy. Seventy-three percent of the resident rooms or apartments were private. Aging-in-place was limited by discharge policies in most ALFs for residents who needed help with transfers, had moderate to severe cognitive impairment, had any behavioral symptoms, or needed nursing care. The industry is largely private pay and unaffordable for low- or moderate-income persons aged >/=75 unless they use assets as well as income to pay. ALFs differed widely in ownership, size, policies, and the degree to which they manifested the philosophy of assisted living. This diversity represents a challenge for consumers in terms of selecting an appropriate facility and for policy makers in terms of deciding what role they want assisted living to play in long-term care.

  20. Evaluation of Quality of Life of Those Living near a Wind Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Bożena; Banaś, Joanna; Machowska-Szewczyk, Małgorzata; Kurpas, Donata

    2015-05-29

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) can serve as a multidimensional means of evaluating the relationship between the presence of wind turbines in residential areas and their consequence for health. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between the presence of wind farms at different stages of development and the HRQoL of people living in their vicinity in Poland. The instruments employed in this study were the SF-36v2, a questionnaire measuring self-reported health problems, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The study involved 1277 people who lived within 2 km from a wind turbine. The highest overall QoL scores were obtained by respondents living the closest to wind turbines. The mental health, role emotional, and social functioning scores were significantly higher among respondents living near wind farms and wind-farm construction sites than among those living close to locations where wind farms were planned but where construction had not yet begun. Positive correlations were found between physical and mental component scores and reactions to the news of plans to construct a wind farm. Significant differences in physical and mental component scores were observed between residents who reacted calmly and those who responded with apprehension. Residents who expected the improvement of their financial standing as a result of the wind farm assessed their general health higher than those who did not expect to receive any economic benefits. The lowest QoL scores corresponded to frequent headaches, stomach aches, and back pain over the previous three months, as well as recurrent problems with falling asleep, anxiety, and a lack of acceptance of the project. The lowest overall QoL and general health scores were noted among residents of places where wind-farm developments were either at the stage of planning or under construction. In order to find ways of reducing environmental stress and its adverse effects on health, it is

  1. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  2. 98th LHCC meeting Agenda OPEN Session and CLOSED Session

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    OPEN Session on Wednesday, 8 July at 9h00-11h00 in Main Auditorium, Live webcast, followed by CLOSED Session, Conference room 160-1-009 11h20-17h00. CLOSED Session continued on Thursday, 9 July at 9h00-12h30

  3. Closed Circuit Videoinstallationen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacunko, Slavko

    be seen with only insignificant qualification as a specific characteristic of the medium. The closed-circuit video installations based on it represent the attest field of experiment for the assumptions on art and the theory and history of the medium that it might lead one make. In recent years...

  4. Review: The Closing Circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Two views of prominent biologists are presented side-by-side. Focal point is Barry Commoner's book, The Closing Circle, with a subsequent review by Paul Ehrlich. Growth of population, increases in affluence, and increased pollution from products of technology are considered. (BL)

  5. 'Closed Circuit' Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The advantages of using rebreathing circuits in anaes- thesia are discussed and the principles for their correct employment are outlined. Practical methods are described. By using closed circuit equipment in the manner described, the initial cost of the apparatus could be recouped within one year, because of the saving in ...

  6. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  7. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  8. Experiences of people living with HIV and people living close to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated that there was an increase in knowledge in all the groups, as well as experiences of enhanced relationships and of being equipped with leadership skills in order to go out into the community and being part of HIV stigma reduction actions. The intervention in its comprehensive nature was found to have ...

  9. Perceived effects of home renovation on independence of physically disabled Koreans living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeunsook; Park, Jiyoung; Jang, Miseon

    2017-06-06

    This study aims to identify the potential effects of home renovation on independence promotion of physically disabled Koreans living at home. The method of the study is a survey with a questionnaire; subjects are physically disabled people living at home in rural and urban areas in Korea. The Functional Independence Measure was used to measure changes in subjects' levels of independence. It was expected that if homes were renovated according to individual needs, disabled people's independence level would be increased by one or more level compared to their current daily independence level in their existing homes. In particular, independence levels concerning bathing and locomotion, which are low in existing conditions, were expected to increase significantly with renovation. Such effects on independence level were conspicuous for disabled people in rural area. The results prove the positive effects of home renovations of disabled people's independence, thus providing meaningful academic evidence on home renovations for disabled people. Implication for rehabilitation Korea had a culture where support measures to aid the life independence of disabled persons relied heavily on human services, leading to a lack of diversity in support measures. By closing the gap between the resident's disability and the inadequacy in their prevailing environment, house remodeling can be a crucial intervention for improving the independence of disabled persons in their daily lives. Depending on the nature of their disabilities and their residential arrangements, disabled persons have diverse needs regarding home remodeling. Implementing home remodeling in such a manner that suits the resident's needs is crucial to boosting their independence. Because of this, remodeling personnel must interact with residents prior to the renovation while also strengthening their expertise.

  10. VA nursing home residents with substance use disorders: Mental health comorbidities, functioning, and problem behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sonne; Schaefer, Jeanne A

    2010-07-01

    This research addresses whether residents with substance use disorders (SUDs) in VA nursing homes (VANHs) are distinctive in terms of their demographic characteristics, medical and mental health comorbidities, functioning, and problem behaviors. Residents over age 55 admitted to VANHs (n = 27,002) were identified in VA administrative files, and SUD and non-SUD residents were compared. Compared with other residents, the residents with SUDs (18% of admissions over age 55) were more likely to be younger, male, African-American, unmarried, have low income and a tobacco use disorder. Controlling for demographic factors and smoking, SUD residents were more likely to have mental health comorbidities (dementia, serious mental illness, depressive disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder), as well as AIDS/hepatitis, pulmonary disease, gastro-intestinal disorders, and injuries. SUD residents were less likely to have cancer, diabetes, neurological disorders, heart failure, and renal failure. SUD residents were more independent in activities of daily living, such as mobility and toileting. They were more likely to engage in verbal disruption but not in other problem behaviors such as aggression. With demographic factors and comorbidities controlled, the functioning differences were diminished, and SUD and non-SUD residents did not differ in the levels of problem behaviors. VANH residents with SUDs have distinctive patterns of comorbidities and functioning. SUD appears to represent a separate risk factor for VANH admission. Residents with SUDs present challenges but may have good potential for positive discharge outcomes if their substance use problems and limited resources can be addressed.

  11. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Selection criteria of residents for residency programs in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Yousef; Ayed, Adel

    2013-01-19

    In Kuwait, 21 residency training programs were offered in the year 2011; however, no data is available regarding the criteria of selecting residents for these programs. This study aims to provide information about the importance of these criteria. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from members (e.g. chairmen, directors, assistants …etc.) of residency programs in Kuwait. A total of 108 members were invited to participate. They were asked to rate the importance level (scale from 1 to 5) of criteria that may affect the acceptance of an applicant to their residency programs. Average scores were calculated for each criterion. Of the 108 members invited to participate, only 12 (11.1%) declined to participate. Interview performance was ranked as the most important criteria for selecting residents (average score: 4.63/5.00), followed by grade point average (average score: 3.78/5.00) and honors during medical school (average score: 3.67/5.00). On the other hand, receiving disciplinary action during medical school and failure in a required clerkship were considered as the most concerning among other criteria used to reject applicants (average scores: 3.83/5.00 and 3.54/5.00 respectively). Minor differences regarding the importance level of each criterion were noted across different programs. This study provided general information about the criteria that are used to accept/reject applicants to residency programs in Kuwait. Future studies should be conducted to investigate each criterion individually, and to assess if these criteria are related to residents' success during their training.

  13. ROSC rates and live discharge rates after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by different CPR teams - a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Park, Young Mi; Do, Sang-Hwan; Hwang, Jung-Won; Song, In-Ae

    2017-12-04

    Previous studies have reported that the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is closely associated with patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare patient CPR outcomes across resident, emergency medicine, and rapid response teams. The records of patients who underwent CPR at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Return of spontaneous circulation, 10- and 30-day survival, and live discharge after return of spontaneous circulation were compared across patients treated by the three CPR teams. Of the 1145 CPR cases, 444 (39%) were conducted by the resident team, 431 (38%) by the rapid response team, and 270 (23%) by the emergency medicine team. The adjusted odds ratios for the return of spontaneous circulation and subsequent 10-day survival among patients who received CPR from the resident team compared to the rapid response team were 0.59 (P = 0.001) and 0.71 (P = 0.037), respectively. There were no significant differences in the 30-day survival and rate of live discharge between patients who received CPR from the rapid response and resident teams; likewise, no significant differences were observed between patients who received CPR from the emergency medicine and rapid response teams. Patients receiving CPR from the rapid response team may have higher 10-day survival and return of spontaneous circulation rates than those who receive CPR from the resident team. However, our results are limited by the differences in approach, time of CPR, and room settings between teams.

  14. “Out of our control”: Living through Cyclone Yasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Woods

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of people who lived through Cyclone Yasi on 3 February 2011. Data from two open-ended questions (Q1: n=344; and Q2: n=339 within a survey completed by 433 residents of cyclone-affected areas between Cairns and Townsville, Australia, were analysed using a qualitative, thematic approach. Experiences were portrayed in three main themes: (1 living in the mode of existential threat describes survivors’ sense of panic and feeling at the mercy of nature as they feared for their life; (2 unforgettable memories describe feelings of emotional helplessness and the unimaginable chaos that the cyclone wrought; and (3 centrality of others shows how community support and closeness helped alleviate losses and uncertainty. A critical finding from this study was the negative role of the media in escalating fears for life prior to and during the cyclone, highlighting the need for government, community leaders, and health professionals to have a media plan in place to ensure that disaster warnings are taken seriously without inciting unnecessary panic. Although survivors experienced extreme vulnerability and a threat to life, the disaster also brought communities closer together and connected family, friends, and neighbours through the caring, support, and help they offered each other. This highlights the central role of others during the recovery process and underlines the importance of promoting and facilitating social support to aid recovery post disaster.

  15. Can Marginal Rates of Substitution Be Inferred From Happiness Data? Evidence from Residency Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffetz, Ori; Kimball, Miles S.; Rees-Jones, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We survey 561 students from U.S. medical schools shortly after they submit choice rankings over residencies to the National Resident Matching Program. We elicit (a) these choice rankings, (b) anticipated subjective well-being (SWB) rankings, and (c) expected features of the residencies (such as prestige). We find substantial differences between choice and anticipated-SWB rankings in the implied tradeoffs between residency features. In our data, evaluative SWB measures (life satisfaction and Cantril's ladder) imply tradeoffs closer to choice than does affective happiness (even time-integrated), and as close as do multi-measure SWB indices. We discuss implications for using SWB data in applied work. PMID:25404759

  16. Living with Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home › Living With Parkinson's Living With Parkinson's While living with Parkinson's can be challenging, there ... life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Managing Parkinson's Read More In Your Area Read More Resources & ...

  17. The Impact of Emotional Solidarity on Residents' Attitude and Tourism Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, Ali; Moghavvemi, Sedigheh; Hamzah, Amran

    2016-01-01

    In many countries, especially one such as Malaysia, tourism has become a key factor in economic development, and the industry heavily relies on feedback from local residents. It is essential to observe and examine the perceptions of residents towards tourists and tourism development for better planning in realizing successful and sustainable tourism development. Therefore, this research measured the relationship between residents' welcoming nature, emotional closeness, and sympathetic understanding (emotional solidarity) towards tourists and their respective attitudes towards supporting tourism development. To test the proposed research model, we collected data using a questionnaire survey from 333 residents in rural areas in Malaysia. We used the structural equation modelling technique (Amos) to evaluate the research model, and the results revealed that the residents' willingness (welcoming nature) to accept tourists is the strongest factor that effects the residents' attitudes towards supporting tourism development. However, there was no significant relationship between residents' emotional closeness and their sympathetic understanding towards tourists with their attitude and support towards tourism development. Welcoming nature, emotional closeness, and sympathetic understanding are able to predict 48% of residents' attitudes towards tourism development and 62% of their support towards tourism development.

  18. The Impact of Emotional Solidarity on Residents' Attitude and Tourism Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hasani

    Full Text Available In many countries, especially one such as Malaysia, tourism has become a key factor in economic development, and the industry heavily relies on feedback from local residents. It is essential to observe and examine the perceptions of residents towards tourists and tourism development for better planning in realizing successful and sustainable tourism development. Therefore, this research measured the relationship between residents' welcoming nature, emotional closeness, and sympathetic understanding (emotional solidarity towards tourists and their respective attitudes towards supporting tourism development. To test the proposed research model, we collected data using a questionnaire survey from 333 residents in rural areas in Malaysia. We used the structural equation modelling technique (Amos to evaluate the research model, and the results revealed that the residents' willingness (welcoming nature to accept tourists is the strongest factor that effects the residents' attitudes towards supporting tourism development. However, there was no significant relationship between residents' emotional closeness and their sympathetic understanding towards tourists with their attitude and support towards tourism development. Welcoming nature, emotional closeness, and sympathetic understanding are able to predict 48% of residents' attitudes towards tourism development and 62% of their support towards tourism development.

  19. The Changing Selenium Nutritional Status of Chinese Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumei Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The selenium (Se content in human hair is useful as an indicator of human Se intake and status. In this regard, when measuring the hair Se concentrations in Chinese inhabitants across northeast to southeast China, the results indicated that generally 84% of all residents have normal hair Se content. Between the sexes, the average hair Se content of males was higher than that of females, irrespective of districts. When comparing geographical regions, the average hair Se content of southern residents was greater than that of northern residents, regardless of gender. Historically, the overall hair Se content of today’s inhabitants decreased between 24% and 46% when compared with the inhabitants living in the same geographic region 20 years ago. The decrease of hair Se content may be related to the overall decrease of grain consumption and the lower Se content in the staple food rice.

  20. Determinants for the use of psychotropics among nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, A; Gulmann, N C

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To characterise the prescription pattern of psychotropics in Danish nursing homes and to identify diagnostic, behavioural, cognitive and performance characteristics associated with prevalent psychotropic drug use. Methods Prescribed daily medication was recorded from nurses' files. Based...... on the Anatomical Therapeutical Chemical (ATC) classification index, psychotropics were categorised into neuroleptics, benzodiazepines and antidepressants. Two hundred and eight-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS–AGECAT. One hundred and eighteen staff members were interviewed about the residents......'s Activities of Daily Living (ADL), behavioural problems (Nursing Home Behavior Problem Scale), orientation, communication skills and if the resident had any psychiatric disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that determined the use of psychotropics. Results Fifty-six percent...

  1. Living Nanomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, M.-F.; Helfer, E.; Wade, R.; Haraux, F.

    The living cell is a kind of factory on the microscopic scale, in which an assembly of modular machines carries out, in a spatially and temporally coordinated way, a whole range of activities internal to the cell, including the synthesis of substances essential to its survival, intracellular traffic, waste disposal, and cell division, but also activities related to intercellular communication and exchanges with the outside world, i.e., the ability of the cell to change shape, to move within a tissue, or to organise its own defence against attack by pathogens, injury, and so on. These nanomachines are made up of macromolecular assemblies with varying degrees of complexity, forged by evolution, within which work is done as a result of changes in interactions between proteins, or between proteins and nucleic acids, or between proteins and membrane components. All these cell components measure a few nanometers across, so the mechanical activity of these nanomachines all happens on the nanometric scale. The directional nature of the work carried out by biological nanomachines is associated with a dissipation of energy. As examples of protein assemblies, one could mention the proteasome, which is responsible for the degradation of proteins, and linear molecular motors such as actomyosin, responsible for muscle contraction, the dynein-microtubule system, responsible for flagellar motility, and the kinesin-microtubule system, responsible for transport of vesicles, which transform chemical energy into motion. Nucleic acid-protein assemblies include the ribosome, responsible for synthesising proteins, polymerases, helicases, elongation factors, and the machinery of DNA replication and repair; the mitotic spindle is an integrated system involving several of these activities which drive chromosome segregation. The machinery coupling membranes and proteins includes systems involved in the energy metabolism, such as the ATP synthase rotary motor, signalling cascades, endocytosis

  2. Evaluation of 222Rn concentration of the internal and external environments of residences at Monte Alegre municipality, Para, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Vicente de Paula

    1999-01-01

    The human being is constantly exposed to the natural radioactivity in the environment where he lives. This radioactivity comes mainly from materials present in the terrestrial crust that possess in their constitution chemical elements belonging to the radioactive families of uranium and thorium. The use of such materials for the construction of houses constitutes an important exposure form to the natural radiation, above all to the radioactive gas 222 Rn, that it is exhaled from them. The Brazilian soil is composed, among other, of minerals that contain appreciable concentrations of these elements. The inhabitants of Monte Alegre town in Para, located at 2 deg 00' 24,9 'S ; 54 deg 04 ' 13,5 W , used in the construction of their houses stones obtained from an area 20 km distant of Monte Alegre, denominated Ingles de Souza, located at 01 deg 56' 4 0,1 S; 54 deg 12 149,7 W, where a small residential village, denominated National Agricultural Colony of Para (CANP), is located. The objective of this work was to evaluate the indoor concentration of 222 Rn in the residences of Monte Alegre and CANP. Determinations of the 238 U and 226 Ra concentrations, measurements of the radon flux in samples of stones and soils of the two regions, as well as measurements to the gamma dose close of the soil and inside the residences, were also carried out. The average results of the radon concentration in the air of the investigated residences did not exceed the limits of 200 Bq. m 3 (action level) and 600 Bq. m 3 (intervention level) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The concentrations of natural radionuclides and the radon flux determined at the village showed values 17 times higher than those found at the urban area of Monte Alegre, while the average indoor gamma dose rate in the village residences was 0.86 mSv/a. (author)

  3. Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case-control study using life grid interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R; Pless-Mulloli, T; Howel, D; Chadwick, T; Bhopal, R; Harrison, R; Gribbin, H

    2006-12-01

    The incidence of lung cancer among women is high in the highly industrialised area of Teesside in north-east England. Previous research has implicated industrial pollution as a possible cause. A study was undertaken to investigate whether prolonged residence close to heavy industry is associated with lung cancer among women in Teesside. Two hundred and four women aged 25 years v 0 years near (within 0-5 km) heavy industry in Teesside was 2.13 (95% CI 1.34 to 3.38). After adjustment for confounding factors the OR was 1.83 (95% CI 0.82 to 4.08) for >25 years or 1.10 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.26) for an additional 10 years living near industry. ORs were similar after residence near heavy industry outside Teesside was also included, and when latency was allowed for by disregarding residential exposures within the last 20 years. Adjustment for active smoking had the greatest effect on the OR. This population based study using life grid interviews for life course exposure assessment has addressed many deficiencies in the design of previous studies. The findings support those in most of the international literature of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study.

  4. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  5. Closing the loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2010-02-01

    The dream of closing the loop is actually the dream of creating an artificial pancreas and freeing the patients from being involved with the care of their own diabetes. Insulin-dependent diabetes (type 1) is a chronic incurable disease which requires constant therapy without the possibility of any 'holidays' or insulin-free days. It means that patients have to inject insulin every day of their life, several times per day, and in order to do it safely they also have to measure their blood glucose levels several times per day. Patients need to plan their meals, their physical activities and their insulin regime - there is only very small room for spontaneous activities. This is why the desire for an artificial pancreas is so strong despite the fact that it will not cure the diabetic patients. Attempts to develop a closed-loop system started in the 1960s but never got to a clinical practical stage of development. In recent years the availability of continuous glucose sensors revived those efforts and stimulated the clinician and researchers to believe that closing the loop might be possible nowadays. Many papers have been published over the years describing several different ideas on how to close the loop. Most of the suggested systems have a sensing arm that measures the blood glucose repeatedly or continuously, an insulin delivery arm that injects insulin upon command and a computer that makes the decisions of when and how much insulin to deliver. The differences between the various published systems in the literature are mainly in their control algorithms. However, there are also differences related to the method and site of glucose measurement and insulin delivery. SC glucose measurements and insulin delivery are the most studied option but other combinations of insulin measurements and glucose delivery including intravascular and intraperitoneal (IP) are explored. We tried to select recent publications that we believe had influenced and inspired people interested

  6. Live from the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, W. K.; Haines-Stiles, G.; Warburton, J.; Sunwood, K.

    2003-12-01

    residents speak in eloquent terms of the changes they see around them, manifested in new patterns of vegetation, the melting of permafrost and the absence of game species that used to be abundant. Meanwhile, new satellites and more sophisticated sensors on the ground and in the ice, add scientific testimony that seems to support and even extend native perceptions. Live from the Arctic will unify both perspectives, and use todays most powerful and effective communications media to connect young people and general audiences all across America to researchers and communities living and working in the Arctic. During IPY there will be a level of interest in the Polar regions unprecedented in a generation. Live from the Arctic offers unique resources to satisfy that curiosity, and encourage active participation and engagement in understanding some of Earths most significant peoples, places and rapidly changing conditions.

  7. Sexuality and Intimacy in Assisted Living: Residents’ Perspectives and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Ann Christine; Clark, Leanne J.

    2014-01-01

    The assisted living industry provides residential, medical, nutritional, functional, and social services for approximately 1 million older adults in the United States. Despite their holistic approach to person-centered care and their emphasis on a consumer-empowered, social environment, assisted living providers pay scant attention to clients’ sexual needs. In this article, the authors discuss the realities of sex and intimacy in assisted living from the perspectives of residents, families, managers, and staff, exploring the discourse of sexuality, the impact of institutional structure and the role of oversight on sexual attitudes and behaviors, and the relationship of assisted living industry values to residents’ sexual expression. Also presented are practical recommendations and policy implications for addressing the sexual and intimacy needs of current and future cohorts of assisted living residents. Data for this article were drawn from 3 National Institute on Aging–funded ethnographic studies conducted in 13 assisted living settings over 9 years. PMID:25568640

  8. The global need for lived experience leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Louise; Stratford, Anthony; Davidson, Larry

    2018-03-01

    Common challenges and experiences of the lived experience/peer workforce globally are considered, with an emphasis on ensuring that future developments both protect and promote the unique lived experience perspective. In the Western world, rapid growth in lived experience roles has led to an urgent need for training and workforce development. However, research indicates the roles risk being coopted without clear lived experience leadership, which is often not occurring. In developing countries and in many Western contexts, the lived experience role has not yet been accepted within the mental health workforce. The need for lived experience leadership to guide these issues is highlighted. Peer-reviewed research, relevant gray literature, and professional experience in countries where little published material currently exists. A window of opportunity currently exists to maximize lived experience leadership, and that window may be closing fast if broad-based actions are not initiated now. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  10. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  11. Closing the health gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmot, Michael

    2017-11-01

    One way of characterising the good society is one that has achieved a high degree of health equity. For a low-income country, one route to this achievement is to increase national income. But other features of society come to the fore, for low, middle and high-income societies alike. In England, my review of health inequalities highlighted: good early child development, education and life long learning, employment and working conditions, having enough income to lead a healthy life, healthy and sustainable places to live and work, taking a social determinants approach to prevention. Taking action on these requires commitment and cross-government action.

  12. Descriptive study of evolution experienced by users of mental health residence, after 10 years of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascorz, David; Serrats, Eva; Ruiz, Bibiana; Ximenos, Anna R; Vegué, Joan; Pérez, Víctor

    2018-01-01

    The transformation of the social-health benefits system must demonstrate efficiency. The objective of the current work is to evaluate the evolution of those living in a residence during the first 10 years of its operation. Of the 205 patients used in the assessment, 93 were admitted. The evolutionary study was done with the 62 patients that were cared for between 2002-2012. The variables studied include the ENAR-CPB Scale, days hospitalized, community activities, a satisfaction survey and QOL. After the assessment process only 45% of those proposed for admission were actually admitted. Resident rotation is 3.4% annually. Many leave the program after being referred to a long-term psychiatric hospital; 14.5% leave the residence in order to have a more autonomous life. After living 2 years in the residence there is a general improvement in the majority of residents, which is maintained after 5 years as well. This improvement is maintained even after 10 years, however a general loss of capacities is experienced. Living in a Residence favors improvement in the quality of life, both subjectively as well as objectively. Institutional treatment consists of working with the patients in a way that treats them as individuals, so they can go about their lives and perform their tasks with creativity. In order for this to be possible, an individualized and flexible model is required.

  13. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  14. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  15. Closing the gasoline system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheson, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a representative of the Oil Companies' European Organization for Environmental and Health Protection (CONCAWE), argues the advantages of closing the gasoline system. Because this decouples the product from the environment, health risks and environmental damage are reduced. It is also more effective than changing the composition of gasoline because it offers better cost effectiveness, energy efficiency and the minimization of carbon dioxide release into the environment. However it will take time and political will to change until all European vehicles are fitted with three way catalysts and carbon canisters: control systems to monitor such systems will also need to be set up. However CONCAWE still recommends its adoption. (UK)

  16. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a... legal representative. (5) Conveyance upon death. Upon the death of a resident with a personal fund...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must meet...

  17. Mentorship in orthopaedic and trauma residency training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mentorship is important in residency training as it is necessary for personal and professional development of the resident trainees. Objectives: This study documents mentorship in orthopaedic residency training programme in Nigeria by assessing the awareness of orthopaedic residents on the role of a mentor, ...

  18. Surgery resident learning styles and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Jack; Ciardiello, Kenneth A; Perlman, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    To determine if surgical residents share a preferred learning style as measured by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and if a relationship exists between resident learning style and achievement as measured by a standardized examination (AME). Also, core faculty learning styles were assessed to determine if faculty and residents share a preferred learning style. Kolb's LSI, Version 3, was administered to 16 surgical residents and the residency program's core faculty of 6 attending physicians. To measure academic achievement, the American Medical Education (AME) examination was administered to residents. The Hospital of Saint Raphael, General Surgery Residency Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Both instruments were administered to residents during protected core curriculum time. Core faculty were administered the LSI on an individual basis. Surgical residents of the Hospital of Saint Raphael's General Surgery Residency Program and 6 core faculty members Analysis of resident learning style preference revealed Converging as the most commonly occurring style for residents (7) followed by Accommodating (5), Assimilating (3), and Diverging (1). The predominant learning style for core faculty was also Converging (4) with 2 Divergers. The average score for the Convergers on the AME was 62.6 compared with 42 for the next most frequently occurring learning style, Accommodators. In this surgical residency program, a preferred learning style for residents seems to exist (Converging), which confirms what previous studies have found. Additionally, residents with this learning style attained a higher average achievement score as measured by the AME. Also, core faculty share the same preferential learning style as this subset of residents.

  19. The resident's view of residency training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, D G

    1966-04-09

    In the view of residents in their last year of specialty training, the Fellowship is now becoming the operative standard for obtaining hospital privileges in urban centres and they felt that this implied that the two standards, the Certificate and the Fellowship of the Royal College, were not achieving the purpose for which they were designed. Although 80% of the residents intended to write the Fellowship, few viewed a year in a basic science department or in research as of intrinsic value in terms of their future practice.The examinations of the Royal College were the subject of criticism, most residents feeling that the examinations did not test the knowledge and ability gained in training. Most expressed a desire for ongoing evaluation during the training period.Service responsibilities were generally regarded as too heavy.Despite the criticism of both training and examination, most residents felt that their training had provided them with the experience and background they needed to practise as specialists.

  20. How close can you go?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrubbeltrang, Lotte Stausgaard; Rasmussen, Annette

    In ethnographic research the direct involvement and long-term engagement of the researcher constitute key elements. Acknowledgements of numerous publications resulting from ethnographic studies illustrate that the researchers are often deeply indebted to the research subjects for allowing the res......, and to ensure that the subjects under scrutiny are not subject to ethical violations. With this in mind the above dilemmas of proximity will be addressed and discussed in our paper....... having gained access to participate in and describe the lives of the participants of a given context, the next ethical question facing the researcher is the one of involvement. Again, the researcher has an interest in obtaining as much confidence as possible, whereas the interest of the observed subjects...... might be more dubious and a matter of difficulty to handle by the researcher. The obvious dilemma of conflicting interests and difficult handling of proximity is our focus of interest in this paper: One side of this dilemma is to ask the question, how close you need to go to obtain the confidence...

  1. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools — a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, Aafke C L; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To facilitate this, neighbourhoods should be mapped in a way that is relevant to them. One way to do this is participative neighbourhood auditing. This paper provides an insight into availability and characteristics of participatory neighbourhood audit instruments. Methods A scoping review in scientific and grey literature, consisting of the following steps: literature search, identification and selection of relevant audit instruments, data extraction and data charting (including a work meeting to discuss outputs), reporting. Results In total, 13 participatory instruments were identified. The role of residents in most instruments was as ‘data collectors’; only few instruments included residents in other audit activities like problem definition or analysis of data. The instruments identified focus mainly on physical, not social, neighbourhood characteristics. Paper forms containing closed-ended questions or scales were the most often applied registration method. Conclusions The results show that neighbourhood auditing could be improved by including social aspects in the audit tools. They also show that the role of residents in neighbourhood auditing is limited; however, little is known about how their engagement takes place in practice. Developers of new instruments need to balance not only social and physical aspects, but also resident engagement and scientific robustness. Technologies like mobile applications pose new opportunities for participative approaches in neighbourhood auditing. PMID:29346663

  2. CPSP/HSE Postgraduate Overseas Rotational Programme: Residents' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Khalid Masood; Iqbal, Uzma; Arif, Seema; Ahmed, Arslan; Khan, Umair Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    To get direct upward feedback from the residents of first batch of CPSP/HSE Postgraduate Scholarship Programme. Mixed methods qualitative research study. CPSP, Regional Office, Lahore, in June 2015. It is a mixed-method study that was conducted in June, 2015. Data was collected through an email survey with 33 medical residents doing their rotation in Ireland; and focus group discussions were carried out with 8 residents, who had successfully completed their rotation. Data were collected through pre-designed questionnaires comprising of open- and close-ended questions. The data were entered into SPSS version 21 and analyzed. The mean age of residents was 29.9 ±1.1 years, 7 (21.2%) were females and 24 (72.7%) respondents were males. Residents agreed that HSE programme has improved their evidence-based decision making (mean score of 3.3 ±1.2) and enhanced professionalism (mean score of 3.6 ±1.1). They disagreed that training has polished their procedural skills (mean score 2.4 ±1.2). The identified strengths of the programme are: adopting a systematic approach towards patients, evidence-based decision making, better exposure and opportunities, financial stability and development of communication skills. The weaknesses are: less exposure to procedural skills, difficulty in synopsis and dissertation writing and difficulty in adjustment with rotational schedules. Residents of CPSP/HSE Programme believed that CPSP/HSE has improved their professionalism, communication skills and increased their future opportunities for career growth. Better communication between CPSP focal person and residents will help sort out many minor but important issues.

  3. The importance of strong evaluation standards and procedures in training residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, J P

    1993-07-01

    A strong evaluation process in a residency offers faculty an opportunity to strengthen the educational program, to help residents know what is expected of them, and to remove with minimum difficulties those residents who are not progressing satisfactorily and do not appear to be salvageable. Despite these advantages, the evaluation of residents during their training is often done poorly or not at all. The author describes the kinds of standards and procedures that constitute a sound, strong evaluation process, proposes criteria for academic probation and due process when a resident is performing unacceptably, and describes the role that the medical school administration should play in the evaluation process, one that is flexible enough to allow each program to comply and still have program-specific procedures. The author closes with statistics on how few residents are dismissed for incompetency or unacceptable behaviors, and inquires how many more might be found if strong evaluation processes were more widely used. Even so, in the attempt to evaluate residents and to foster protection from legal problems, residency program directors must keep in mind the importance of letting residents make mistakes and learn from them; a good evaluation system strikes a balance that fosters the learning process and benefits the residents, the medical school, and the community.

  4. Associations between self-assessed masticatory disability and health of community-residing elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, N; Hino, Y; Ida, O; Fukuda, H; Shinsho, F; Tatara, K

    1999-10-01

    To examine the relationship between the self-assessed masticatory disability and the health of community-residing older people. Of 1473 randomly selected people aged 65 years and older living in Settsu, Osaka Prefecture, in October 1992, data on general health status, history of health management, psychosocial conditions, and dental conditions were obtained from 1405 people by interviews made during home visits. Follow-up for 54 months was completed for 1306 subjects (93.0%; 1072 living, 234 deceased). Being over 75 years of age, having poor general health and poor dental status, not using dental health checks, not using general health checks, not participating in social activities, not feeling that life is worth living (no "ikigai"), and feeling anxious about the future were univariately and significantly associated with self-assessed masticatory disability. Logistic regression analyses indicated that being older than 75 years, having poor general health and poor dental status, not using dental health checks, and not participating in social activities were independently associated with self-assessed masticatory disability. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that being male, over 75 years of age, and in poor general health, as well as not using general health checks, and not participating in social activities were independently associated with mortality. Self-assessed masticatory disability was univariately and significantly related to mortality, but by itself was not a significant risk factor for mortality, because of the potential influence of other variables. Certain health and psychosocial factors are closely associated with self-assessed masticatory disability among older people. Further investigations are needed to determine whether masticatory disability is a significant risk factor for mortality.

  5. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    questions improved from 13.6 ± 2.4 to 19 ± 1.2. The survey shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency is favored by all residents and that 1 week's duration is appropriate. All residents are of the opinion that the intensive workshop would benefit them in upcoming clinical rotations. Residents acknowledge becoming more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and providing counsel regarding radiation during pregnancy. An immersive, short-duration, clinically oriented physics rotation is well received by new or less experienced radiology trainees, correlates basic physics concepts with their relevance to clinical imaging, and more closely parallels expectations of the American Board of Radiology Core Examination. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Model Legislation on Student Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education in the States, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Because of the radical variance in residency requirements from state to state and sometimes from institution to institution, and because of several court cases involving this issue, the Education Commission of the States appointed a Committee to develop (1) a statement of principles for consideration in drafting legislation in connection with…

  7. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  8. Práticas de cuidados produzidas no serviço de residências terapêuticas: percorrendo os trilhos de retorno à sociedade Las prácticas de cuidados ofrecidos en el servicio de residencias terapéuticas: recorriendo los caminos de retorno a la sociedad Health-care practices performed at assisted living facilities: pursuing the paths back to society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Pires de Oliveira Santos Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa objetivou buscar a visão dos profissionais do Serviço de Residências Terapêuticas, sobre a prática de cuidado produzida neste dispositivo de atenção à saúde mental. Para isso, optou-se pela abordagem qualitativa, exploratória e analítica. Os instrumentos para a coleta de dados foram: formulário de observação sistemática, diário de campo e roteiro de entrevista semiestruturada, realizada com 10 profissionais atuantes nas residências. Como resultado, foi encontrado que o cuidado na moradia se dá de modo mais humanizado, valorizando a singularidade dos moradores, seus valores e crenças, tentando (reestabelecer as relações sociais dos indivíduos e estimulá-los para a prática do autocuidado. Percebe-se que esse modo de atenção vem alcançando uma (recidadanização e valorização da vida dos sofredores psíquicos.Esta investigación objetivó buscar la perspectiva de los profesionales del Servicio de Residencias Terapéuticas, sobre la práctica del cuidado ofrecida en este dispositivo de atención a la salud mental. Para esto, se optó por el abordaje cualitativo, exploratorio y analítico. Los instrumentos para la recolección de datos fueron: formulario de observación sistemática, diario de campo y guión de entrevista semiestructurada, realizada con 10 profesionales actuantes en las residencias. Como resultado, fue encontrado que el cuidado en la residencia se ofrece de modo más humanizado, valorizando la singularidad de los residentes, sus valores y creencias, tratando de (reestablecer las relaciones sociales de los individuos y estimularlos para practicar el auto cuidado. Se percibe que ese modo de atención viene alcanzando una (reciudadanización y valorización de la vida de los que sufren psíquicamente.The objective of this exploratory study was to understand the perspective of professionals working at assisted living facilities about the healthcare practices performed in the mental health

  9. Closed loop reflux system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Witt, R.; Jepson, B.E.; Schwind, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO 3 ). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO 3 , and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO 4 ) and SO 2 gas, which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO 2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO 4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ), which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H 2 SO 4 components, which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials. (U.S.)

  10. Jealousy and Relationship Closeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Attridge

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study confirmed a hypothesis from the Emotion-in-Relationships conceptual model, which predicts that greater interdependence between relationship partners—or closeness—creates the potential for jealousy. The study also sought to better define the positive side of romantic jealousy in addition to its more negative attributes. College students in premarital relationships (N = 229 completed a questionnaire, including 27 different measures and the Multidimensional Jealousy Scale. Select data were obtained from 122 cases at 3-month follow-up. Each jealousy scale was tested for associations with demographic (age, sex, and race, person (life satisfaction, loneliness, romantic attachment styles, love styles, and romantic beliefs, and relationship (affective, closeness, and social exchange theory constructs. Results clearly distinguished emotional/reactive jealousy as mostly “good” and cognitive/suspicious jealousy as “bad.” Behavioral jealousy was associated with few measures. Implications are discussed for the interdependence model of relationships and the transactional model of jealousy.

  11. Science policy up close

    CERN Document Server

    Marburger, John H

    2015-01-01

    In a career that included tenures as president of Stony Brook University, director of Brookhaven National Laboratory, and science advisor to President George W. Bush, John Marburger (1941 2011) found himself on the front line of battles that pulled science ever deeper into the political arena. From nuclear power to global warming and stem cell research, science controversies, he discovered, are never just about science. Science Policy Up Close" presents Marburger s reflections on the challenges science administrators face in the twenty-first century. In each phase of public service Marburger came into contact with a new dimension of science policy. The Shoreham Commission exposed him to the problem of handling a volatile public controversy over nuclear power. The Superconducting Super Collider episode gave him insights into the collision between government requirements and scientists expectations and feelings of entitlement. The Directorship of Brookhaven taught him how to talk to the public about the risks ...

  12. Student Expenses in Residency Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Nilsen, Kari; Callaway, Paul; Grothusen, Jill; Gillenwater, Cole; King, Samantha; Unruh, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    The student costs of residency interviewing are of increasing concern but limited current information is available. Updated, more detailed information would assist students and residency programs in decisions about residency selection. The study objective was to measure the expenses and time spent in residency interviewing by the 2016 graduating class of the University of Kansas School of Medicine and assess the impact of gender, regional campus location, and primary care application. All 195 students who participated in the 2016 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) received a 33 item questionnaire addressing interviewing activity, expenses incurred, time invested and related factors. Main measures were self-reported estimates of expenses and time spent interviewing. Descriptive analyses were applied to participant characteristics and responses. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and chi-square tests compared students by gender, campus (main/regional), and primary care/other specialties. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) on the dependent variables provided follow-up tests on significant MANOVA results. A total of 163 students (84%) completed the survey. The average student reported 38 (1-124) applications, 16 (1-54) invitations, 11 (1-28) completed interviews, and spent $3,500 ($20-$12,000) and 26 (1-90) days interviewing. No significant differences were found by gender. After MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, non-primary care applicants reported significantly more applications, interviews, and expenditures, but less program financial support. Regional campus students reported significantly fewer invitations, interviews, and days interviewing, but equivalent costs when controlled for primary care application. Cost was a limiting factor in accepting interviews for 63% and time for 53% of study respondents. Students reported investing significant time and money in interviewing. After controlling for other variables, primary care was associated with significantly

  13. Activities of Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Parkinson's › Managing Parkinson's › Activities of Daily Living Activities of Daily Living Sometimes Parkinson’s disease (PD) can complicate the basic daily activities a person with living with Parkinson’s once did ...

  14. The facade of stability in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leslie A; Rubinstein, Robert L; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Perez, Rosa; Roth, Erin G; Peeples, Amanda D; Nemec, Mary; Eckert, J Kevin; Goldman, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The study sought to identify the varied types of change arising from internal and external influences in assisted living (AL) settings, expanding upon the literature's limited focus on resident decline and staff turnover and clarifying the importance of changes to life and work there. This analysis employed qualitative interviews and observations from 4 studies involving 17 ALs to identify elements of change largely absent from the literature. Case material identified by the research team members relating to persons, groups, and settings exemplifying typical changes, as well as variations across settings, are presented. Multiple domains of AL change were identified, to include those in: (a) the external economic or competitive environments; (b) ownership, management, or key personnel; and (c) physical health or cognition of the aggregate resident population. In many cases, the changes influenced residents' satisfaction and perceived fit with the AL environment. Change of many types is a regular feature of AL; many changes alter routines or daily life; raise concerns of staff, residents, or families; or modify perceptions of residential normalcy. Environmental gerontology should more often extend the environment to include the social and interpersonal characteristics of collective living sites for elders.

  15. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  16. Atmospheric residence times of continental aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkanski, Y.J.

    1991-01-01

    The global atmospheric distributions of Rn-222 are simulated with a three-dimensional model of atmospheric transport based on the meteorology of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model. The short-lived radioactive gas Rn-222 (half-life = 3.8d) is emitted almost exclusively from land, at a relatively uniform rate; hence it is an excellent tracer of continental influences. Lead-210 is produced by decay of Rn-222 and immediately condenses to preexisting aerosol surfaces. It provides an excellent measure of aerosol residence times in the atmosphere because its source is accurately defined by the Rn-222 distribution. Results from the three-dimensional model are compared to measurements of Rn-222 and Pb-210 atmospheric concentrations to evaluate model's long-range transport over oceanic regions and to study the deposition mechanisms of atmospheric aerosols. Model results for Rn-222 are used to examine the long-range transport of continental air over two selected oceanic regions, the subantarctic Indian Ocean and the North Pacific. It is shown that the fast transport of air from southern Africa causes substantial continental pollution at southern mid-latitudes, a region usually regarded as pristine. Air over the North Pacific is heavily impacted by continental influences year round, but the altitude at which the transport occurs varies seasonally. Observations of aerosols at island sites, which are commonly used as diagnostics of continental influences, may be misleading because they do not account for influences at high altitude and because aerosols are efficiently scavenged by deposition during transport. The study of Pb-210 focuses on defining the residence times of submicron aerosols in the troposphere. Scavenging in wet convective updrafts is found to provide the dominant sink on a global scale

  17. Precarious Residents: Migration Control, Membership and the Rights of Non-Citizens

    OpenAIRE

    Gibney, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the situation of a subgroup of non-citizens found in virtually all contemporary states, what I call “precarious residents”. Precarious residents can be defined as non-citizens living in the state that possess few social, political or economic rights, are highly vulnerable to deportation, and have little or no option for making secure their immigration status. The archetypal precarious resident is the undocumented (or unlawful) migrant. However, there are many other barely ...

  18. Proximity of Residence to Bodies of Water and Risk for West Nile Virus Infection: A Case-Control Study in Houston, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Nolan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV, a mosquito-borne virus, has clinically affected hundreds of residents in the Houston metropolitan area since its introduction in 2002. This study aimed to determine if living within close proximity to a water source increases one’s odds of infection with WNV. We identified 356 eligible WNV-positive cases and 356 controls using a population proportionate to size model with US Census Bureau data. We found that living near slow moving water sources was statistically associated with increased odds for human infection, while living near moderate moving water systems was associated with decreased odds for human infection. Living near bayous lined with vegetation as opposed to concrete also showed increased risk of infection. The habitats of slow moving and vegetation lined water sources appear to favor the mosquito-human transmission cycle. These methods can be used by resource-limited health entities to identify high-risk areas for arboviral disease surveillance and efficient mosquito management initiatives.

  19. Interactive distance learning for orthodontic residents: utilization and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katherine P; Hannum, Wallace M; Koroluk, Lorne D; Proffit, William R

    2012-03-01

    Sharing resources through distance education has been proposed as 1 way to deal with a lack of full-time faculty in orthodontic residency programs. To keep distance education for orthodontic residents as cost-effective as possible while retaining interaction, we developed a "blended" interactive distance learning approach that combines observation of Web-based seminars with live postseminar discussions. For the 2009-2010 academic year, a grant from the American Association of Orthodontists opened access to the blended learning experience to all orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada. The specific aims of this project were to (1) measure programmatic interest in using blended distance learning, (2) determine resident and faculty interest, (3) determine the seminars' perceived usefulness, and (4) elicit feedback regarding future use. Participants in this project were expected to (1) read all assigned articles before viewing a recorded seminar, (2) watch a 1 to 1.5 hour recording of an actual interactive seminar on a Web site, and (3) participate in a 30-minute follow-up discussion immediately after watching the recorded seminar either with a faculty member at the participating institution or via a videoconference with the leader of the Web-based seminar. The residents and faculty then completed surveys about the experience. Half (52%) of the 63 orthodontic programs in the United States fully participated in this project. The blended approach to distance learning was judged to be effective and enjoyable; faculty members were somewhat more enthusiastic about the experience than were residents. Most residents were not adequately prepared for the seminars (only 14% read all preparatory articles in depth); this impacted their perception of the effectiveness and enjoyability of the experience (P = 0.0016). Prepared residents reported a greater ability to learn from the seminars (P = 0.0035) than those who did not read, and also indicated that they were more

  20. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.D.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a patient safety course for medical residents based on the views of medical residents and their supervisors. Methods: In 2007, questionnaires were distributed to investigate residents' and supervisors' perspectives on the current patient safety performance and educational

  1. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  2. Alcohol Trajectories over Three Years in a Swedish Residence Hall Student Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriettae Ståhlbrandt

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that college students have a high alcohol consumption, less is known about the long-term drinking trajectories amongst college students and, in particular, students living in residence halls, known to be high-risk drinkers. Over four consecutive years, the drinking habits of 556 Swedish residence hall students were analyzed. The main instruments for measuring outcome were AUDIT (Alcohol Use Identification Disorders Test, SIP (Short Index of Problems and eBAC (estimated Blood Alcohol Concentration. The drinking trajectories among Swedish residence hall students showed stable and decreasing drinking patterns, with age and gender being predictors of group membership.

  3. Alcohol trajectories over three years in a Swedish residence hall student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlbrandt, Henriettae; Leifman, Anders; Johnsson, Kent O; Berglund, Mats

    2010-04-01

    Although it is known that college students have a high alcohol consumption, less is known about the long-term drinking trajectories amongst college students and, in particular, students living in residence halls, known to be high-risk drinkers. Over four consecutive years, the drinking habits of 556 Swedish residence hall students were analyzed. The main instruments for measuring outcome were AUDIT (Alcohol Use Identification Disorders Test), SIP (Short Index of Problems) and eBAC (estimated Blood Alcohol Concentration). The drinking trajectories among Swedish residence hall students showed stable and decreasing drinking patterns, with age and gender being predictors of group membership.

  4. An ethnonursing research study: adults residing in a midwestern Christian philosophy urban homeless shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbert, Ann O

    2005-07-01

    The ethnonursing study's purpose was to explore the subculture of homeless adults residing in one shelter, with discovery of their meanings and experiences of care, or lack of care. Leininger's theory of culture care was used to identify, analyze, and discuss the cultural care patterns. The findings included themes that were identified in two categories: two themes before shelter residence (no caring practices in their lives) and two themes during shelter residence (acceptance and hope). Ethnonursing discovery contributes to nurses' knowledge about who the homeless people are and why they are homeless and develops culturally congruent care practices.

  5. Alcohol Trajectories over Three Years in a Swedish Residence Hall Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlbrandt, Henriettae; Leifman, Anders; Johnsson, Kent O.; Berglund, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Although it is known that college students have a high alcohol consumption, less is known about the long-term drinking trajectories amongst college students and, in particular, students living in residence halls, known to be high-risk drinkers. Over four consecutive years, the drinking habits of 556 Swedish residence hall students were analyzed. The main instruments for measuring outcome were AUDIT (Alcohol Use Identification Disorders Test), SIP (Short Index of Problems) and eBAC (estimated Blood Alcohol Concentration). The drinking trajectories among Swedish residence hall students showed stable and decreasing drinking patterns, with age and gender being predictors of group membership. PMID:20617038

  6. [Living wills in a nursing home, guaranteeing freedom of expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigard Guyader, Céline; Richard, Christian

    The drawing up of a living will in a nursing home for elderly people is a complex process. Not only must the resident think about the end of life, which is not easy, but the institution must be fully aware of the law. Guaranteeing the resident's expression is essential. A study enabled this subject to be reviewed in a nursing home where different players are present around the resident. It enabled professionals to reflect on their practices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Allergy, living and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivato, T; Valovirta, E; Dahl, R

    2012-01-01

    Allergy Living and Learning (ALL) is a European initiative designed to increase knowledge and understanding of people living with allergies in order to improve respiratory allergy care.......Allergy Living and Learning (ALL) is a European initiative designed to increase knowledge and understanding of people living with allergies in order to improve respiratory allergy care....

  8. Close Reading in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Close reading is a recommended instructional approach to meet the challenges of teaching complex texts. But close readings are more common in high school and college than in elementary schools. In this article, we identify the components of close reading that were developed after a group of elementary school teachers observed their colleges in…

  9. A Policy Analysis of Missouri Community College Residence Hall Discipline Policies with an Analysis of Changes in the State Fair Community College Residence Hall Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgour, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States have long been known as institutions of equal opportunity and affordable education. One facet of student life appearing at more and more community colleges is the addition of residence halls. Still, the number of community colleges with on-campus living is relatively small, and for the campuses with…

  10. Marital Status and Persons With Dementia in Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Noelle L; Richardson, Virginia E; Schuman, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Despite the prevalence of dementia among residents in assisted living (AL), few researchers have focused on the length of stay (LOS) in AL among this population. Little is known about the factors that may contribute to LOS in these settings, particularly for residents with dementia. In the current study, a sub-set of AL residents with dementia (n = 112) was utilized to examine whether marital status was associated with LOS in AL as this has received sparse attention in previous research despite studies suggesting that marital status influences LOS in other health-care and long-term care settings. The Andersen-Newman behavioral model was used as a conceptual framework for the basis of this study of LOS, marital status, and dementia in AL. We hypothesized that persons with dementia who were married would have longer LOS than unmarried persons with dementia in AL. Cox regression was used to examine the association between marital status and LOS in AL of residents with dementia and whether activities of daily living were related to discharge from AL settings among married and unmarried residents with dementia. Main effects for marital status and the interaction between marital status and mobility with LOS were examined. Study findings provide information related to the psychosocial needs of AL residents with dementia and offer implications for assessing the on-going needs of vulnerable AL residents.

  11. Giving residents tools to talk about behavior change: a motivational interviewing curriculum description and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Julie W; Bost, James E; Kraemer, Kevin L; Cluss, Patricia A; Spagnoletti, Carla L; Gonzaga, Alda Maria R; Arnold, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether a motivational interviewing (MI) curriculum is effective in teaching internal medicine residents core MI skills and the empathic, nonjudgmental MI style. Nineteen third-year residents met for 12 h with a faculty instructor. Teaching methods included lecture, written exercises, a simulated patient exercise, and discussion of residents' behavior change issues. Residents' adoption of MI skills was evaluated before and after the course with the Helpful Responses Questionnaire. Residents decreased use of closed-ended questions (from a score of 1.13 to 0.37, p=0.036) and MI roadblocks (4.00-1.08, pcommunication skills in a written measure, and was highly rated. Future work should examine whether teaching of the empathic, collaborative MI stance impacts patient outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  13. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  14. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  15. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  16. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  17. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  18. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  19. Elder abuse in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas; Beach, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Assisted Living (AL) currently represents one of the most numerous institutional care settings for elders. Very little information exists on abuse in AL. Descriptive information on elder abuse reported by nurse aides working in AL is presented from a survey sent to nurse aides. The questionnaire had items addressing verbal, physical, psychological, caregiving, medication, material, and sexual abuse. The responses to the questions included in the verbal abuse, physical abuse, psychological abuse, caregiving abuse, medication abuse, and material exploitation abuse sections (28 questions) show that suspected abuse is not uncommon. We could not objectively verify the cases of abuse described in the survey, still, they give a first indication that staff abuse may occur in AL. This may be significant given the large number of ALs in the United States and may influence the health, quality of life, and safety of many residents.

  20. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  1. Constructing the meaning of quality of life for residents in care homes in the Lebanon: perspectives of residents, staff and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adra, Marina Gharibian; Hopton, John; Keady, John

    2015-12-01

    Located in two care homes in Lebanon, the study explores the perspectives of quality of life for a sample of older residents, care staff and family caregivers. Quality of life for older people living in care homes is traditionally reported in the literature as a Westernised construct and so far little is known about its meanings from an Arabic cultural perspective and context. There is also a knowledge gap about the conditions of older people living in care homes in Lebanon. The study was a qualitative exploration of perspectives of quality of life of older residents, care staff and family caregivers. Two care homes for older people situated in Beirut took part in the study. Between 2010 and 2011 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of 20 residents, eight family caregivers and 11 care staff. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Four categories emerged from this analytical process: (i) maintaining family connectedness; (ii) engaging in worthwhile activities; (iii) maintaining and developing significant relationships; and (iv) holding and practicing spiritual beliefs. The emergence of these categories confirmed the complex, interrelated and multidimensional nature of quality of life for residents and other stakeholders. The findings supplement an emerging body of knowledge about the composition of quality of life for older residents in Lebanon. Improving the quality of life of older residents will require action in respect of all of the domains identified in study. Moving nursing practice from task-based care to relationship-centred approaches was seen as pivotal in helping to develop quality of life for residents living in the participating care homes. The findings have implications for education, nursing practice and research in Lebanon and help start an evidence base for care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Methods and resources for physics education in radiology residency programs: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresolin, Linda; Bisset, George S; Hendee, William R; Kwakwa, Francis A

    2008-11-01

    Over the past 2 years, ongoing efforts have been made to reevaluate and restructure the way physics education is provided to radiology residents. Program directors and faculty from North American radiology residency programs were surveyed about how physics is being taught and what resources are currently being used for their residents. Substantial needs were identified for additional educational resources in physics, better integration of physics into clinical training, and a standardized physics curriculum closely linked to the initial certification examination of the American Board of Radiology. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  3. Change of Job and Change of Residence - Geographical Mobility of the Labour Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette; Filges, Trine

    Solving regional labour market discrepancies through geographical mobility has gained increased political interest. The decision of changing job is closely related to the decision of changing residence as either change may imply a change in commuting cost. In this paper we set up a search model...... that can explain the residence and job changing behaviour of workers. The model is a double search model, in the sense that workers search for better jobs and dwellings simultaneously. Results show that the interrelationship between change of job and change of residence is very complex. However, scope...

  4. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of fall risk increasing drugs in residents of retirement villages: a pilot study of long term care and retirement home residents in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos; Dadfar, Farzan; Wong, Andrea; Brown, Susan G

    2015-10-14

    Falls continue to be a problem for older people in long-term care (LTC) and retirement home (RH) settings and are associated with significant morbidity and health care use. Fall-risk increasing drugs (FRIDs) are known to increase fall risk and represent modifiable risk factors. There are limited data regarding the use of FRIDs in contemporary LTC and RH settings, and it has not been well documented to what extent medication regimens are reviewed and modified for those who have sustained falls. The objective of this study is to characterize medication related fall risk factors in LTC and RH residents and on-going use of medications known to increase fall risk. Retrospective chart review of residents aged >65 who sustained one or more falls living in LTC or RH settings. 105 residents who fell one or more times during 2009-2010 were identified with a mean age of 89 years, a mean of nine scheduled medications and seven diagnoses, and 83% were women. Residents in LTC were ostensibly at higher risk for falls relative to those in RH settings as suggested by higher proportion of residents with multiple falls, multiple comorbidities, comorbidities that increase fall risk and visual impairment. Post fall injuries were sustained by 42% of residents, and residents in RH sustained more injuries relative to LTC residents (47 vs 34%). Use of FRIDs such as benzodiazepines, antipsychotic, antidepressant and various antihypertensive drugs was common in the present sample. No medication regimen changes were noted in the 6-month post fall period. The present study documented common use FRIDs by LTC and RH residents with multiple falls. These potentially modifiable falls risk factors are not being adequately addressed in contemporary practice, demonstrating that there is much room for improvement with regards to the safe and appropriate use of medications in LTC and RH residents.

  6. Differences between Outdoor and Indoor Sound Levels for Open, Tilted, and Closed Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Barbara; Piquerez, André; Habermacher, Manuel; Ragettli, Martina; Röösli, Martin; Brink, Mark; Cajochen, Christian; Vienneau, Danielle; Foraster, Maria; Müller, Uwe; Wunderli, Jean Marc

    2018-01-18

    Noise exposure prediction models for health effect studies normally estimate free field exposure levels outside. However, to assess the noise exposure inside dwellings, an estimate of indoor sound levels is necessary. To date, little field data is available about the difference between indoor and outdoor noise levels and factors affecting the damping of outside noise. This is a major cause of uncertainty in indoor noise exposure prediction and may lead to exposure misclassification in health assessments. This study aims to determine sound level differences between the indoors and the outdoors for different window positions and how this sound damping is related to building characteristics. For this purpose, measurements were carried out at home in a sample of 102 Swiss residents exposed to road traffic noise. Sound pressure level recordings were performed outdoors and indoors, in the living room and in the bedroom. Three scenarios-of open, tilted, and closed windows-were recorded for three minutes each. For each situation, data on additional parameters such as the orientation towards the source, floor, and room, as well as sound insulation characteristics were collected. On that basis, linear regression models were established. The median outdoor-indoor sound level differences were of 10 dB(A) for open, 16 dB(A) for tilted, and 28 dB(A) for closed windows. For open and tilted windows, the most relevant parameters affecting the outdoor-indoor differences were the position of the window, the type and volume of the room, and the age of the building. For closed windows, the relevant parameters were the sound level outside, the material of the window frame, the existence of window gaskets, and the number of windows.

  7. 'If I had my residency I wouldn't worry': negotiating migration and HIV in Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Henrike

    2007-06-01

    To describe the interrelationships between migration and resettlement, the Australian immigration system and living with HIV. Data were collected through semi-structured, in-depth interviews with clients of the Multicultural HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Service and a sexual health clinic in the Sydney metropolitan area over an 18-month period in 2003-2004. Three major themes interwoven with migration were identified: HIV diagnosis, access to care and support, and forming social relations. Participants who applied for permanent residency in Australia rather than off-shore were usually diagnosed as HIV-positive as part of the health requirement for permanent residency. This jeopardized their prospect of staying in Australia and was at the same time a barrier to returning to the country of birth. It was also a barrier to accessing health care and support services and a major source of uncertainty. The meaning of an HIV-positive diagnosis was grounded in participants' knowledge about HIV from their country of birth: HIV infection was perceived as a terminal illness. Because of the stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, many had little or no contact with their ethnic communities in Australia. At the same time, they found it difficult to form new social relations in the Anglo-Celtic mainstream culture. A further problem was feeling torn between Australia and the promise of a better future, and the close emotional relationships with family and friends in the country of birth. New migrants with HIV need to negotiate two major life disruptions and two major uncertainties simultaneously: migration and HIV infection. In the Anglo-Celtic mainstream, language, cultural and financial barriers to health and support services should be removed or minimized. In ethnic communities, HIV-related stigma needs to be addressed to enable new migrants to form social relations in these communities and to rebuild their lives.

  8. Breaking Bad News - Perceptions of Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeta, M G; Krishnakumar, P

    2017-08-15

    The present study evaluated the perceptions and practice of 92 final year pediatric residents with regard to breaking bad news. Only 16% of residents had received any training in communication skills. Majority (65%) of the residents were not comfortable while breaking bad news.

  9. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying the...

  10. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  11. Pioneering partnerships: Resident involvement from multiple perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; Abma, T.A.; Boelsma, F.; Woelders, S.

    2013-01-01

    Resident involvement in residential care homes is a challenge due to shortcomings of consumerist and formal approaches such as resident councils. The PARTNER approach aims to involve residents through collective action to improve their community life and wellbeing. The purpose of this article is to

  12. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of household...

  13. Suicidal Thoughts Among Medical Residents with Burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Frank; Dillingh, Gea; Bakker, Arnold; Prins, Jelle

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recent research showed that medical residents have a high risk for developing burnout. The present study investigates the prevalence of burnout and its relationship with suicidal thoughts among medical residents. Methods: All Dutch medical residents (n = 5126) received a self-report

  14. Does Targeted Training Improve Residents' Teaching Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polreis, Sean; D'Eon, Marcel F.; Premkumar, Kalyani; Trinder, Krista; Bonnycastle, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Resident doctors have an important and integral responsibility of teaching a number of individuals. The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the University of Saskatchewan's resident-as-teacher training course--Teaching Improvement Project Systems (TIPS). Residents who attended the TIPS course from January, 2010 through June,…

  15. Negotiations of Acknowledgement among Middle Class Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Blom

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of communication processes between residents, between residents and people in the broader societal context as well as of media coverage of a fireworks disaster in a Danish suburb. It demonstrates how residents (all members of the Danish middle class) were able...

  16. Maintaining dignity. The perspective of nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The overall purpose of this cross-country Nordic study was to gain further knowledge about dignity in nursing homes and the circumstances which may have an impact on it. The aim of this part of the study is to present the results, exploring nursing home residents’ experiences on how...... dignity is maintained. Background. Elderly living in nursing homes are vulnerable which appeal to nursing care ethics and emphasise the importance of care for human dignity. There have been several attempts to define dignity as a theoretical concept, but few studies on how dignity is maintained from...... the perspective of the nursing home residents. Method. This qualitative study has an explorative design, based on qualitative individual research interviews. Twenty-eight nursing home residents were included from six nursing homes in Scandi-navia. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by Ricoeur...

  17. Slum residence and child health in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Günther; Günther, Isabel; Hill, Kenneth

    2014-08-01

    Continued population growth and increasing urbanization have led to the formation of large informal urban settlements in many developing countries in recent decades. The high prevalence of poverty, overcrowding, and poor sanitation observed in these settlements-commonly referred to as "slums"-suggests that slum residence constitutes a major health risk for children. In this article, we use data from 191 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) across 73 developing countries to investigate this concern empirically. Our results indicate that children in slums have better health outcomes than children living in rural areas yet fare worse than children in better-off neighborhoods of the same urban settlements. A large fraction of the observed health differences appears to be explained by pronounced differences in maternal education, household wealth, and access to health services across residential areas. After we control for these characteristics, children growing up in the slums and better-off neighborhoods of towns show levels of morbidity and mortality that are not statistically different from those of children living in rural areas. Compared with rural children, children living in cities (irrespective of slum or formal residence) fare better with respect to mortality and stunting but not with respect to recent illness episodes.

  18. Policies to Protect Persons With Dementia in Assisted Living: Déjà Vu All Over Again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskie, Brian P.; Nattinger, Matthew; Potter, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Continued growth in the number of individuals with dementia residing in assisted living (AL) raises concerns about their safety and protection. In this Forum, we review current AL practices relevant to residents with dementia and present a rationale for examining the government role in protecting these individuals within this context. Since public oversight of AL is currently a state prerogative, we assess states’ regulatory activity across 3 domains closely related to safety and protection of persons with dementia: environmental features, staffing, and use of chemical restraints. We then step back to consider the state policymaking environment and assess the feasibility of developing a minimum standard of regulations from one state to the next. This Forum concludes with a historical comparison between the contemporary AL market and the nursing home care market prior to the Nursing Home Reform Act of 1987, and we discuss how an increased amount of federal interest could improve existing state efforts to protect persons with dementia residing in AL. PMID:26035596

  19. Management of radioactive wastes. Closing meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The law from December 30, 1991, precisely defines 3 axes of researches for the management of high level and long-lived radioactive wastes: separation/transmutation, surface storage and underground disposal. A global evaluation report about these researches is to be supplied in 2006 by the French government to the Parliament. A first synthesis of the knowledge gained after 14 years of research has led the national commission of the public debate (CNDP) to organize a national debate about the general options of management of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes before the 2006 date line. The debate comprised 4 public hearings (September 2005: Bar-le-Duc, Saint-Dizier, Pont-du-Gard, Cherbourg), 12 round-tables (October and November 2005: Paris, Joinville, Caen, Nancy, Marseille), a synthesis meeting (December 2005, Dunkerque) and a closing meeting (January 2006, Lyon). This document is the proceedings of this closing meeting. The aim of this meeting is to make a status of the different public hearings and round-tables and to stress on some particular points of the nuclear waste management debate. Some points concern the social and democratic dimension of this debate which can be summarized in few words like: public information, decision making, secrecy, confidence, transparency, acceptability, ethics. Some other points concern the scientific and technical dimensions of nuclear waste management and refer to the advantages and drawbacks of the different options of the 1991 law (transmutation, deep geologic disposal, and subsurface storage). (J.S.)

  20. Active parenting or Solomon’s justice?
    Alternating residence in Sweden for children with separated parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Singer

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternating residence for children with separated parents has become increasingly popular in Sweden over the last few decades. In this article, a brief background to the use of alternating residence in Sweden will be provided. Relevant legislation will be described and some of the apparent problems in connection to this kind of living arrangement will also be discussed. It is estimated that approximately one out of every five children with separated parents today are living alternately with both parents. The high frequency of alternating residence can probably be explained, to a great extent, by determined legislative work to ensure that joint custody is the main rule for separated parents. Joint custody after separation encourages parents to take a more active part in the child’s life. Alternating residence can be seen as the optimal way to ensure that a child is provided natural and stress-free contact with both parents in the different events of everyday life that is not possible when the child lives with one parent. However, there are also problems related to alternating residence that need to be addressed. The possibility for the courts to decide on alternating residence against the will of one of the parents appears to have little justification considering that one of the prerequisites for this form of living arrangement is that it is beneficial for children if their parents can co-operate. There are also other aspects of the regulation of alternating residence that need to be improved, in particular questions concerning the child maintenance. Different aspects of the public social security system for children with separated parents also need to be adjusted to provide just and fair solutions for children with alternating residence. Finally, since alternating residence is motivated by a desire to protect the best interests of the child, further research clarifying the experiences of children with alternating residence needs to be carried

  1. Development and Implementation of a Novel HIV Primary Care Track for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, David A; Huang, Grace C; Potter, Jennifer; Baker, Joseph J; Libman, Howard

    2017-03-01

    Declining mortality has led to a rising number of persons living with HIV (PLWH) and concerns about a future shortage of HIV practitioners. To develop an HIV Primary Care Track for internal medicine residents. Academic hospital and community health center with a history of caring for PLWH and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. Internal medicine residents. We enrolled four residents annually in a 3-year track with the goal of having each provide continuity care to at least 20 PLWH. The curriculum included small group learning sessions, outpatient electives, a global health opportunity, and the development of a scholarly project. All residents successfully accrued 20 or more PLWH as continuity patients. Senior residents passed the American Academy of HIV Medicine certification exam, and 75 % of graduates took positions in primary care involving PLWH. Clinical performance of residents in HIV care quality measures was comparable to those reported in published cohorts. We developed and implemented a novel track to train medical residents in the care of PLWH and LGBT patients. Our results suggest that a designated residency track can serve as a model for training the next generation of HIV practitioners.

  2. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland: healthcare and health status compared to Portuguese residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luís; Azevedo, Ana; Barros, Henrique; Paccaud, Fred; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Most migrant studies have compared health characteristics between migrants and nationals of the host country. We aimed at comparing health characteristics of migrants with nationals from their home country. Portuguese national health survey (2005-6; 30,173 participants aged 18-75 years) and four national health surveys conducted in Switzerland (2002, 2004, 2007 and 2011, totalling 1,170 Portuguese migrants of the same age range). Self-reported data on length of stay, cardiovascular risk factors, healthcare use and health status were collected. Resident Portuguese were significantly older and more educated than migrants. Resident Portuguese had a higher mean BMI and prevalence of obesity than migrants. Resident Portuguese also reported more frequently being hypertensive and having their blood pressure screened within the last year. On the contrary, migrant Portuguese were more frequently smokers, had a medical visit in the previous year more frequently and self-rated their health higher than resident Portuguese. After adjustment for age, gender, marital status and education, migrants had a higher likelihood of smoking, of having a medical visit the previous year, and of self-rating their current health as good or very good than resident Portuguese. Compared to Portuguese residents, cholesterol screening in the previous year was more common only among migrants living in Switzerland for more than 17 years. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland do not differ substantially from resident Portuguese regarding most cardiovascular risk factors. Migrants consider themselves healthier than Portuguese residents and more often had a recent medical visit.

  3. Dietary intakes among South Asian adults differ by length of residence in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talegawkar, Sameera A; Kandula, Namratha R; Gadgil, Meghana D; Desai, Dipika; Kanaya, Alka M

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether nutrient and food intakes among South Asian adult immigrants differ by length of residence in the USA. Cross-sectional analysis to examine differences in nutrient and food intakes by length of residence in the USA. Dietary data were collected using an interviewer-administered, culturally appropriate FFQ, while self-reported length of residence was assessed using a questionnaire and modelled as tertiles. The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. Eight hundred and seventy-four South Asians (mean age=55 (sd 9) years; 47 % women; range of length of residence in the USA=2-58 years), part of the baseline examination of the MASALA study. Intakes of fat, including saturated and trans fats, dietary cholesterol and n-6 fatty acids, were directly associated with length of residence, while intakes of energy, carbohydrate, glycaemic index and load, protein, dietary fibre, folate and K were inversely associated with length of residence (P trend residence in the USA was also associated with higher intakes of alcoholic beverages, mixed dishes including pizza and pasta, fats and oils, and lower intakes of beans and lentils, breads, grains and flour products, milk and dairy products, rice, starchy vegetables and sugar, candy and jam (P for differences across groups residence in the USA influences diet and nutrient intakes among South Asian adult immigrants and should be considered when investigating and planning dietary interventions to mitigate chronic disease risk.

  4. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada

  5. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  6. Resident-Led Palliative Care Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Naomi; Cruz, Brian; Leigh, A E

    2016-04-01

    Despite the growth of palliative medicine, 39% of hospitals do not have palliative care teams for consultation or to provide resident education. We examined the impact of resident-led education in palliative care principles on attitudes toward and comfort with palliative medicine and end-of-life care among internal medicine residents. An educational module designed by the authors was presented to other internal medicine residents in the program. Pre- and post-intervention survey data measuring residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care were analyzed. Residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care on a 5-point Likert scale was analyzed. Following the intervention, participants reported improved comfort with general knowledge of palliative medicine (p palliative care and end-of-life care (p curriculum in palliative medicine can improve resident comfort within this still-under-represented area of medicine.

  7. Managing a Live Advanced Abdominal Twin Pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    examination revealed a closed, uneffaced, firm and posterior ... Advanced abdominal pregnancies with live twin fetuses are extremely rare and are misdiagnosed ... operating room. Leaving the placenta in situ is the best way to deal with abdominal pregnancy, based on previous experience and review of the literature.

  8. Evaluation of Metal Ion Concentration in Hard Tissues of Teeth in Residents of Central Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Wychowanski, Piotr; Malkiewicz, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was an assessment of the content of trace elements in enamel and dentin of teeth extracted in patients residing in urban and agricultural areas of Poland. Methods. The study included 30 generally healthy patients with retained third molars. 65 samples of enamel and dentin from individuals living in urban areas and 85 samples of enamel and dentin from individuals living in agricultural areas were prepared. The content of manganese, lead, cadmium, and chromium i...

  9. Correlates of caregiver-rated quality of life in assisted living: the Maryland Assisted Living study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samus, Quincy M; Rosenblatt, Adam; Onyike, Chiadi; Steele, Cynthia; Baker, Alva; Harper, Michael; Brandt, Jason; Mayer, Lawrence; Rabins, Peter V; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2006-09-01

    We used a cross-sectional study to examine the correlates of caregiver-rated quality of life (QOL) in 198 randomly selected residents from a stratified random sample of 22 assisted living facilities in central Maryland. We measured QOL by using the Alzheimer's Disease-Related Quality of Life Questionnaire. In general, despite cognitive impairment, residents in assisted living were rated as having a high QOL. In a multivariate regression, we found that nonmood neuropsychiatric symptoms were the strongest correlate of QOL, explaining 37% of the variance. Depressive symptoms, functional dependence, marital status, and cognition also contributed to the model, but only minimally. Because of the strong association of neuropsychiatric symptoms with QOL, special attention should be given to their recognition and amelioration.

  10. Day-and-Night Closed-Loop Glucose Control in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Under Free-Living Conditions: Results of a Single-Arm 1-Month Experience Compared With a Previously Reported Feasibility Study of Evening and Night at Home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renard, Eric; Farret, Anne; Kropff, Jort; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Messori, Mirko; Place, Jerome; Visentin, Roberto; Calore, Roberta; Toffanin, Chiara; Di Palma, Federico; Lanzola, Giordano; Magni, Paolo; Boscari, Federico; Galasso, Silvia; Avogaro, Angelo; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kovatchev, Boris; del Favero, Simone; Cobelli, Claudio; Magni, Lalo; DeVries, J. Hans

    2016-01-01

    After testing of a wearable artificial pancreas (AP) during evening and night (E/N-AP) under free-living conditions in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), we investigated AP during day and night (D/N-AP) for 1 month. Twenty adult patients with T1D who completed a previous randomized crossover study

  11. The effect of laughter therapy on the quality of life of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Nilgun; Kublay, Gulumser

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of Laughter therapy on the quality of life of nursing home residents. By improving the quality of life of residents living in nursing homes and allowing them to have a healthier existence, their lives can be extended. Therefore, interventions impacting the quality of life of older adults are of critical importance. Quasi-experimental design. The study was conducted between 2 March - 25 May 2015. The experimental group was composed of 32 nursing home residents from one nursing home, while the control group consisted of 33 nursing home residents from another nursing home in the capital city of Turkey. Laughter therapy was applied with nursing home residents of the experimental group two days per week (21 sessions in total). A socio-demographic form and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used for data collection. After the laughter therapy intervention, general and subscales (physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional and spiritual health) quality-of-life scores of residents in the experimental group significantly increased in comparison with the pretest. Laughter therapy improved the quality of life of nursing home residents. Therefore, nursing home management should integrate laughter therapy into health care and laughter therapy should be provided as a routine nursing intervention. The results indicated that the laughter therapy programme had a positive effect on the quality of life of nursing home residents. Nurses can use laughter therapy as an intervention to improve quality of life of nursing home residents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The health of the poor: Women living in informal settlements | Fink ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: A large share of the urban population in developing countries lives in informal settlements or “slums” today. This study investigates the association between slum residence and health among adult Ghanaian women residing in the Accra Metropolitan Area. Methods: Health data collected as part of the Women's ...

  13. [Habermas' and Giddens' modernization theories applied to homes for the aged and to somatic nursing homes. The long road toward greater equivalence between residents and staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belderok, J J

    1997-12-01

    The situation in homes for the elderly and nursing homes is for the residents both alarming and tragic. Recent Dutch legislation supports the movement towards more self-determination and autonomy for the residents. The staff are dedicated to making the living situation as good as possible for the residents. Nevertheless many publications describe how the dependence and helplessness of the residents stil continue. In this paper this helplessness is placed within the broader framework of modern society by application of Habermas' theory of communicative action and Giddens' structuration theory. Both theories show that the key to improve dependent making structures should be sought principally in the behaviour of both staff and residents. Habermas offers a perspective to more equivalent communicative action between residents and staff. Giddens draws attention to the knowledgeability of residents, with which they should be able to interact on an equal basis with professionals. This presupposes much dedication of both staff and residents.

  14. Pornography use and closeness with others in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Miodrag

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between pornography use and aspects of socioemotional closeness in a non-clinical sample of 164 males. Participants' actual and ideal socioemotional closeness was measured by the Perceived Interpersonal Closeness Scale (PICS; Popovic et al., 2003) while their pornography use was examined by the Background and Pornography Use Information Questionnaire (Popovic, 2009). Potential effects of these variables on each other as well as various findings concerning pornography consumption and related attitudes are presented. The results showed that there was no significant difference between self-reported pornography users and non-users in terms of specific socioemotional closeness with the most significant adults in their lives (i.e., partners, closest friends, mothers, and fathers). However, pornography users had significantly higher total closeness scores than non-users, showing possibly a craving for intimacy among pornography users versus non-pornography users. This "intimacy motive" and relevant and controversial findings are discussed.

  15. Administration for Community Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Input Working Together, in Our Communities The Administration for Community Living was created around the fundamental ... Meals on Wheels America - November 16, 2017 The Administration for Community Living recently awarded a three-year ...

  16. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools - a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, Aafke C L; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2018-02-01

    Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To facilitate this, neighbourhoods should be mapped in a way that is relevant to them. One way to do this is participative neighbourhood auditing. This paper provides an insight into availability and characteristics of participatory neighbourhood audit instruments. A scoping review in scientific and grey literature, consisting of the following steps: literature search, identification and selection of relevant audit instruments, data extraction and data charting (including a work meeting to discuss outputs), reporting. In total, 13 participatory instruments were identified. The role of residents in most instruments was as 'data collectors'; only few instruments included residents in other audit activities like problem definition or analysis of data. The instruments identified focus mainly on physical, not social, neighbourhood characteristics. Paper forms containing closed-ended questions or scales were the most often applied registration method. The results show that neighbourhood auditing could be improved by including social aspects in the audit tools. They also show that the role of residents in neighbourhood auditing is limited; however, little is known about how their engagement takes place in practice. Developers of new instruments need to balance not only social and physical aspects, but also resident engagement and scientific robustness. Technologies like mobile applications pose new opportunities for participative approaches in neighbourhood auditing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors associated with residents' satisfaction with their training as specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Morillas, L E; Fuentes-Ferrer, M E; Sánchez-Díaz, J; Rumayor-Zarzuelo, M; Fernández-Pérez, C; Marco-Martínez, F

    2014-05-01

    We do not know what factors influence residents' perceived satisfaction during their training. The aim of this study was to analyze the satisfaction of specialists with their training and its associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study using self-completion surveys of residents in training at the Clinic Hospital San Carlos for the courses conducted in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2012. The study's dependent variable was overall satisfaction with the training; the independent factors were demographic and occupational characteristics, variables related to healthcare, teaching and research activity. The total participation percentage was 83.7% (1,424/1,701), and the mean age was 28.4 years (SD, 3.2 years). The overall satisfaction percentage was 75.2%. The factors statistically associated with overall satisfaction in the multivariate analysis were the involvement of the teaching staff (tutors and assistants) in the training, greater satisfaction in medical versus surgical specialties, the year of residence, the facilities for completing the thesis, working less than 40 h a week, adequate time to perform daily tasks, appropriate number of department meetings and not having a previous specialty. the activities related to research and teaching are associated with the overall satisfaction of residents. The routine activity factors most closely associated with satisfaction were the time available and the work hours. More studies are necessary to understand the impact of resident satisfaction on care quality and in their activity as future specialists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. 47 CFR 79.1 - Closed captioning of video programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... programming. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section the following definitions shall apply: (1) Video... subtitles in the language of the target audience may be used in lieu of closed captioning; (3) Live... these networks in the top 25 television markets as defined by Nielsen's Designated Market Areas (DMAs...

  19. Feel Better. Live Better. See an Allergist / Immunologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergist/immunologist TTR Share | Feel Better. Live Better. See an Allergist / Immunologist Allergist / immunologists are specialists in ... specialist close to home. Video: When should I see an allergist? (what are allergists and what they ...

  20. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we