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Sample records for resident work hours

  1. Surgical resident working hours in South Africa | Kong | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical training has undergone major changes worldwide, especially with regard to work hour regulations. Very little is known regarding the situation in South Africa, and how it compares with other countries. Method: We conducted a retrospective review of the hours worked by surgical residents in a major ...

  2. Canadian Plastic Surgery Resident Work Hour Restrictions: Practices and Perceptions of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Colin W; Vorstenbosch, Joshua; Chard, Ryan; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Buchel, Edward W; Islur, Avinash

    2018-02-01

    The impact of resident work hour restrictions on training and patient care remains a highly controversial topic, and to date, there lacks a formal assessment as it pertains to Canadian plastic surgery residents. To characterize the work hour profile of Canadian plastic surgery residents and assess the perspectives of residents and program directors regarding work hour restrictions related to surgical competency, resident wellness, and patient safety. An anonymous online survey developed by the authors was sent to all Canadian plastic surgery residents and program directors. Basic summary statistics were calculated. Eighty (53%) residents and 10 (77%) program directors responded. Residents reported working an average of 73 hours in hospital per week with 8 call shifts per month and sleep 4.7 hours/night while on call. Most residents (88%) reported averaging 0 post-call days off per month and 61% will work post-call without any sleep. The majority want the option of working post-call (63%) and oppose an 80-hour weekly maximum (77%). Surgical and medical errors attributed to post-call fatigue were self-reported by 26% and 49% of residents, respectively. Residents and program directors expressed concern about the ability to master surgical skills without working post-call. The majority of respondents oppose duty hour restrictions. The reason is likely multifactorial, including the desire of residents to meet perceived expectations and to master their surgical skills while supervised. If duty hour restrictions are aggressively implemented, many respondents feel that an increased duration of training may be necessary.

  3. Surgical resident learning styles have changed with work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, Ralph C; Cortez, Alexander R; Pritts, Timothy A; Hanseman, Dennis J; Edwards, Michael J; Davis, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education instituted the 80-h workweek for residency programs in 2003. This presented a unique challenge for surgery residents who must acquire a medical and technical knowledge base during training. Therefore, learning should be delivered in an environment congruent with an individual's learning style. In this study, we evaluated the learning styles of general surgery residents to determine how learning styles changed after the implementation to the 80-h workweek. Kolb learning style inventory was taken by general surgery residents at the University of Cincinnati's Department of Surgery, and results from 1999-2012 were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-squared, logistic regression and Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Significance was defined as a P value of learning styles after the institution of the 80-h workweek to converging (43.9%) and accommodating (40.4%, P learning. This change paralleled the transition to a more team-based approach to patient care with the implementation of the 80-h workweek. These findings are important for surgical educators to consider in the development of surgical resident curriculum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of a night-team system on resident sleep and work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kao-Ping; Gordon, Mary Beth; Sectish, Theodore; Landrigan, Christopher P

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, Children's Hospital Boston implemented a night-team system on general pediatric wards to reduce extended work shifts. Residents worked 5 consecutive nights for 1 week and worked day shifts for the remainder of the rotation. Of note, resident staffing at night decreased under this system. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of this system on resident sleep and work hours. We conducted a prospective cohort study in which residents on the night-team system logged their sleep and work hours on work days. These data were compared with similar data collected in 2004, when there was a traditional call system. In 2004 and 2009, mean shift length was 15.22 ± 6.86 and 12.92 ± 5.70 hours, respectively (P = .161). Daily work hours were 10.49 ± 6.85 and 8.79 ± 6.42 hours, respectively (P = .08). Nightly sleep time decreased from 6.72 ± 2.60 to 4.77 ± 2.46 hours (P team system was unexpectedly associated with decreased sleep hours. As residency programs create work schedules that are compliant with the 2011 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour standards, resident sleep should be monitored carefully.

  5. The impact of the implementation of work hour requirements on residents' career satisfaction, attitudes and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongseok; Dickey, Jamie; Wessel, Kristen; Girard, Donald E

    2006-10-17

    To assess the impact of work hours' limitations required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) on residents' career satisfaction, emotions and attitudes. A validated survey instrument was used to assess residents' levels of career satisfaction, emotions and attitudes before and after the ACGME duty hour requirements were implemented. The "pre" implementation survey was distributed in December 2002 and the "post" implementation one in December 2004. Only the latter included work-hour related questions. The response rates were 56% for the 2002 and 72% for the 2004 surveys respectively. Although career satisfaction remained unchanged, numerous changes occurred in both emotions and attitudes. Compared to those residents who did not violate work-hour requirements, those who did were significantly more negative in attitudes and emotions. With the implementation of the ACGME work hour limitations, the training experience became more negative for those residents who violated the work hour limits and had a small positive impact on those who did not violate them. Graduate medical education leaders must innovate to make the experiences for selected residents improved and still maintain compliance with the work hour requirements.

  6. The effect of limiting residents' work hours on their surgical training: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Ken

    2004-05-01

    Restrictions in residents' work hours have been in place in Canada for roughly a decade, having been negotiated rather than imposed. The changes in residents' schedules that resulted are roughly equivalent to the limitation of 80 duty hours per week in the United States. When work-hours restrictions began, surgery faculty were worried that residents' experience would be compromised. But these fears have not materialized. Why? The author maintains there are many reasons. (1) Most surgical procedures are now faster, and lengthy inpatient care has diminished, all of which saves time. (2) Formerly difficult or risky procedures are now performed more frequently and safely, which increases residents' education about difficult conditions. (3) A variety of resources (e.g., skills-transfer courses, surgical simulators, etc.) are now available for residents to learn and evolve surgical techniques, and residents take advantage of these resources, being highly motivated to learn the best in the time available to them. (4) There have been positive changes in residents' education that have helped them become more efficient learners than before, with improved resources and skills for faster access to information. The author maintains that in his present surgery residency program, the residents still work extremely hard but are more protected from the unending demands for patient care. They have more time for orderly study and greater opportunities to develop skills other than technical ones. They are in a happier work setting, which the author strongly believes facilitates improved patient care.

  7. Strategies to accommodate resident work-hour restrictions: impact on surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburg, Carter; James, Ted; Ashikaga, Takamura; Moalem, Jacob; Cherr, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of duty-hour restrictions has impacted surgical training. Several strategies were introduced by training programs in response to these restrictions. The purpose of this study was to assess the various strategies employed by residency programs to comply with work-hour restrictions with respect to the impact on the quality of surgical education. A national survey was developed and distributed to resident members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons in all accredited residency programs across North America. Questions in the survey addressed 10 separate accommodation strategies used by training programs to adhere to resident work-hour restrictions. Resident respondents completed a 5-point Likert scale rating each strategy according to its impact on surgical education (detrimental, not very helpful, neutral, somewhat helpful, and very helpful). A total of 599 (9.7%) responses were received from 6186 members of the Resident Associate Society. The use of health information technology (IT), nurse practitioners, and physician assistants were most highly rated. Hiring clinical fellows, establishing nonteaching services, and shift-work scheduling were the three most poorly rated accommodations to work-hour restrictions with respect to resident education. Hospital IT and nonphysician care providers were rated by residents to optimize surgical education in the current work-hour limitation environment. We infer that strategies which lead to increased efficiency and redistribution of resident workload allow surgical trainees to spend more time on activities perceived to have higher educational value. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. US public opinion regarding proposed limits on resident physician work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Raiszadeh, Farbod; Shea, Sandra; Mermin, David; Lurie, Peter; Landrigan, Christopher P; Czeisler, Charles A

    2010-06-01

    In both Europe and the US, resident physician work hour reduction has been a source of controversy within academic medicine. In 2008, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended a reduction in resident physician work hours. We sought to assess the American public perspective on this issue. We conducted a national survey of 1,200 representative members of the public via random digit telephone dialing in order to describe US public opinion on resident physician work hour regulation, particularly with reference to the IOM recommendations. Respondents estimated that resident physicians currently work 12.9-h shifts (95% CI 12.5 to 13.3 h) and 58.3-h work weeks (95% CI 57.3 to 59.3 h). They believed the maximum shift duration should be 10.9 h (95% CI 10.6 to 11.3 h) and the maximum work week should be 50 h (95% CI 49.4 to 50.8 h), with 1% approving of shifts lasting >24 h (95% CI 0.6% to 2%). A total of 81% (95% CI 79% to 84%) believed reducing resident physician work hours would be very or somewhat effective in reducing medical errors, and 68% (95% CI 65% to 71%) favored the IOM proposal that resident physicians not work more than 16 h over an alternative IOM proposal permitting 30-h shifts with > or =5 h protected sleep time. In all, 81% believed patients should be informed if a treating resident physician had been working for >24 h and 80% (95% CI 78% to 83%) would then want a different doctor. The American public overwhelmingly favors discontinuation of the 30-h shifts without protected sleep routinely worked by US resident physicians and strongly supports implementation of restrictions on resident physician work hours that are as strict, or stricter, than those proposed by the IOM. Strong support exists to restrict resident physicians' work to 16 or fewer consecutive hours, similar to current limits in New Zealand, the UK and the rest of Europe.

  9. US public opinion regarding proposed limits on resident physician work hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurie Peter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In both Europe and the US, resident physician work hour reduction has been a source of controversy within academic medicine. In 2008, the Institute of Medicine (IOM recommended a reduction in resident physician work hours. We sought to assess the American public perspective on this issue. Methods We conducted a national survey of 1,200 representative members of the public via random digit telephone dialing in order to describe US public opinion on resident physician work hour regulation, particularly with reference to the IOM recommendations. Results Respondents estimated that resident physicians currently work 12.9-h shifts (95% CI 12.5 to 13.3 h and 58.3-h work weeks (95% CI 57.3 to 59.3 h. They believed the maximum shift duration should be 10.9 h (95% CI 10.6 to 11.3 h and the maximum work week should be 50 h (95% CI 49.4 to 50.8 h, with 1% approving of shifts lasting >24 h (95% CI 0.6% to 2%. A total of 81% (95% CI 79% to 84% believed reducing resident physician work hours would be very or somewhat effective in reducing medical errors, and 68% (95% CI 65% to 71% favored the IOM proposal that resident physicians not work more than 16 h over an alternative IOM proposal permitting 30-h shifts with ≥5 h protected sleep time. In all, 81% believed patients should be informed if a treating resident physician had been working for >24 h and 80% (95% CI 78% to 83% would then want a different doctor. Conclusions The American public overwhelmingly favors discontinuation of the 30-h shifts without protected sleep routinely worked by US resident physicians and strongly supports implementation of restrictions on resident physician work hours that are as strict, or stricter, than those proposed by the IOM. Strong support exists to restrict resident physicians' work to 16 or fewer consecutive hours, similar to current limits in New Zealand, the UK and the rest of Europe.

  10. Scheduling the resident 80-hour work week: an operations research algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, T Eugene; Napoli, Joseph T; Kuo, Paul C

    2006-01-01

    The resident 80-hour work week requires that programs now schedule duty hours. Typically, scheduling is performed in an empirical "trial-and-error" fashion. However, this is a classic "scheduling" problem from the field of operations research (OR). It is similar to scheduling issues that airlines must face with pilots and planes routing through various airports at various times. The authors hypothesized that an OR approach using iterative computer algorithms could provide a rational scheduling solution. Institution-specific constraints of the residency problem were formulated. A total of 56 residents are rotating through 4 hospitals. Additional constraints were dictated by the Residency Review Committee (RRC) rules or the specific surgical service. For example, at Hospital 1, during the weekday hours between 6 am and 6 pm, there will be a PGY4 or PGY5 and a PGY2 or PGY3 on-duty to cover Service "A." A series of equations and logic statements was generated to satisfy all constraints and requirements. These were restated in the Optimization Programming Language used by the ILOG software suite for solving mixed integer programming problems. An integer programming solution was generated to this resource-constrained assignment problem. A total of 30,900 variables and 12,443 constraints were required. A total of man-hours of programming were used; computer run-time was 25.9 hours. A weekly schedule was generated for each resident that satisfied the RRC regulations while fulfilling all stated surgical service requirements. Each required between 64 and 80 weekly resident duty hours. The authors conclude that OR is a viable approach to schedule resident work hours. This technique is sufficiently robust to accommodate changes in resident numbers, service requirements, and service and hospital rotations.

  11. Business process improvement: an electronic system to monitor compliance with medical resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landesman, Linda Young; Markowitz, Forest; Conde, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The limitation of medical intern and resident work hours, known as the Bell 405 regulations, was initiated in New York State in 1989 with a modification to the state hospital code. The Bell 405 regulations were strengthened in 2000, and facilities would now be fined for noncompliance. Monitoring systems in place at that time were insufficient to provide an adequate level of review for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) with more than 7,000 medical residents whose training is based at or who rotate through these public hospitals. A "simple to use," yet comprehensive, method of monitoring compliance needed to be developed to ensure that residents and interns complied with laws regulating working hours. The subsequent development of national accreditation standards increased the stakes for reliable scrutiny. HHC developed and implemented a Web-based Structured Query Language (SQL) application that facilitated easy access to work hour surveys captured through electronic time sheets. The time sheet data automatically entered a database that provided instant analysis of conformance to state law. The development of an electronic on-line application accessible from anywhere allowed HHC to efficiently identify nonconformance and pinpoint corrective action. Since the inception of the application and its expansion allowing access through the intranet, 26,000 individual time sheets have been submitted for evaluation. With the national movement regulating work hours, other hospitals still at the pencil and manual computation stage would greatly benefit by developing a similar application.

  12. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release

  13. What effects have resident work-hour changes had on education, quality of life, and safety? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Staheli, Greg; LeClere, Lance; Andersone, Diana; McCormick, Frank

    2015-05-01

    More than 15 years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified medical error as a problem worthy of greater attention; in the wake of the IOM report, numerous changes were made to regulations to limit residents' duty hours. However, the effect of resident work-hour changes remains controversial within the field of orthopaedics. We performed a systematic review to determine whether work-hour restrictions have measurably influenced quality-of-life measures, operative and technical skill development, resident surgical education, patient care outcomes (including mortality, morbidity, adverse events, sentinel events, complications), and surgeon and resident attitudes (such as perceived effect on learning and training experiences, personal benefit, direct clinical experience, clinical preparedness). We performed a systematic review of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and Google Scholar using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Inclusion criteria were any English language peer-reviewed articles that analyzed the effect(s) of orthopaedic surgery resident work-hour restrictions on patient safety, resident education, resident/surgeon quality of life, resident technical operative skill development, and resident surgeon attitudes toward work-hour restrictions. Eleven studies met study inclusion criteria. One study was a prospective analysis, whereas 10 studies were of level IV evidence (review of surgical case logs) or survey results. Within our identified studies, there was some support for improved resident quality of life, improved resident sleep and less fatigue, a perceived negative impact on surgical operative and technical skill, and conflicting evidence on the topic of resident education, patient outcomes, and variable attitudes toward the work-hour changes. There is a paucity of high-level or clear evidence evaluating the effect of the changes to resident work

  14. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blum AB

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alexander B Blum1, Sandra Shea2, Charles A Czeisler3,4, Christopher P Landrigan3-5, Lucian Leape61Department of Health and Evidence Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Committee of Interns and Residents, SEIU Healthcare Division, Service Employees International Union, New York, NY, USA; 3Harvard Work Hours, Health and Safety Group, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 5Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine.

  15. Sleep deprivation in resident physicians, work hour limitations, and related outcomes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansukhani, Meghna P; Kolla, Bhanu Prakash; Surani, Salim; Varon, Joseph; Ramar, Kannan

    2012-07-01

    Extended work hours, interrupted sleep, and shift work are integral parts of medical training among all specialties. The need for 24-hour patient care coverage and economic factors have resulted in prolonged work hours for resident physicians. This has traditionally been thought to enhance medical educational experience. These long and erratic work hours lead to acute and chronic sleep deprivation and poor sleep quality, resulting in numerous adverse consequences. Impairments may occur in several domains, including attention, cognition, motor skills, and mood. Resident performance, professionalism, safety, and well-being are affected by sleep deprivation, causing potentially adverse implications for patient care. Studies have shown adverse health consequences, motor vehicle accidents, increased alcohol and medication use, and serious medical errors to occur in association with both sleep deprivation and shift work. Resident work hour limitations have been mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in response to patient safety concerns. Studies evaluating the impact of these regulations on resident physicians have generated conflicting reports on patient outcomes, demonstrating only a modest increase in sleep duration for resident physicians, along with negative perceptions regarding their education. This literature review summarizes research on the effects of sleep deprivation and shift work, and examines current literature on the impact of recent work hour limitations on resident physicians and patient-related outcomes.

  16. Teaching and Learning in an 80-Hour Work Week: A Novel Day-float Rotation for Medical Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Jeffrey G; Holmboe, Eric S; Huot, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    The 80-hour workweek limit for residents provides an opportunity for residency directors to creatively innovate their programs. Our novel day-float rotation augmented both the educational structure within the inpatient team setting and the ability for house staff to complete their work within the mandated limits. Descriptive evaluation of the rotation was performed through an end-of-rotation questionnaire. The average length of the ward residents’ work week was quantified before and after the...

  17. Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Fadi T; Deckelbaum, Dan; Sauve, Alexandre; Khwaja, Kosar; Razek, Tarek; Fata, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training. We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions. Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life. The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fatigue in Residency Education: Understanding the Influence of Work Hours Regulations in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Taryn S; Teunissen, Pim W; Dornan, Tim; Lingard, Lorelei

    2017-12-01

    Although one proposed solution to the problem of fatigued medical trainees is the implementation of work hours regulations, concerns about the effectiveness of these regulations are growing. Canada remains one of the few Western jurisdictions without legislated regulation. Recent research suggests that fatigue is a complex social construct, rather than simply a lack of sleep; thus, the authors explored how regulations and fatigue are understood in countries with established work hours frameworks to better inform other jurisdictions looking to address trainee fatigue. Using constructivist grounded theory methodology, the authors conducted individual, semistructured interviews in 2015-2016 with 13 postgraduate medical trainees from four European countries with established work hours regulations. Data collection and analysis proceeded iteratively, and the authors used a constant comparative approach to analysis. Trainees reported that they were commonly fatigued and that they violated the work hours restrictions for various reasons, including educational pursuits. Although they understood the regulations were legislated specifically to ensure safe patient care and optimize trainee well-being, they also described implicit meanings (e.g., monitoring for trainee efficiency) and unintended consequences (e.g., losing a sense of vocation). Work hours regulations carry multiple, conflicting meanings for trainees that are captured by three predominant rhetorics: the rhetoric of patient safety, of well-being, and of efficiency. Tensions within each of those rhetorics reveal that managing fatigue within clinical training environments is complex. These findings suggest that straightforward solutions are unlikely to solve the problem of fatigue, assure patient safety, and improve trainee well-being.

  19. Improving education under work-hour restrictions: comparing learning and teaching preferences of faculty, residents, and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Megan C; Kenkare, Sonya B; Saville, Benjamin R; Beidler, Stephanie K; Saba, Sam C; West, Alisha N; Hanemann, Michael S; van Aalst, John A

    2010-01-01

    Faced with work-hour restrictions, educators are mandated to improve the efficiency of resident and medical student education. Few studies have assessed learning styles in medicine; none have compared teaching and learning preferences. Validated tools exist to study these deficiencies. Kolb describes 4 learning styles: converging (practical), diverging (imaginative), assimilating (inductive), and accommodating (active). Grasha Teaching Styles are categorized into "clusters": 1 (teacher-centered, knowledge acquisition), 2 (teacher-centered, role modeling), 3 (student-centered, problem-solving), and 4 (student-centered, facilitative). Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (HayGroup, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and Grasha-Riechmann's TSS were administered to surgical faculty (n = 61), residents (n = 96), and medical students (n = 183) at a tertiary academic medical center, after informed consent was obtained (IRB # 06-0612). Statistical analysis was performed using χ(2) and Fisher exact tests. Surgical residents preferred active learning (p = 0.053), whereas faculty preferred reflective learning (p teaching preferences, although both groups preferred student-centered, facilitative teaching, faculty preferred teacher-centered, role-modeling instruction (p = 0.02) more often. Residents had no dominant teaching style more often than surgical faculty (p = 0.01). Medical students preferred converging learning (42%) and cluster 4 teaching (35%). Statistical significance was unchanged when corrected for gender, resident training level, and subspecialization. Significant differences exist between faculty and residents in both learning and teaching preferences; this finding suggests inefficiency in resident education, as previous research suggests that learning styles parallel teaching styles. Absence of a predominant teaching style in residents suggests these individuals are learning to be teachers. The adaptation of faculty teaching methods to account for variations in resident

  20. Resident work hour restrictions do not improve patient safety in surgery: a critical appraisal based on 7 years of experience in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Businger, Adrian P; Laffer, Urban; Kaderli, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In 2005 the Swiss government implemented new work-hour limitations for all residency programs in Switzerland, including a 50-hour weekly limit. The reduction in the working hours of doctors in training implicate an increase in their rest time and suggest an amelioration of doctors' clinical performance and consequently in patients' outcomes and safety - which was not detectable in a preliminary study at a large referral center in Switzerland. It remains elusive why work-hour restrict...

  1. Resident work hour restrictions do not improve patient safety in surgery: a critical appraisal based on 7 years of experience in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Businger Adrian P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2005 the Swiss government implemented new work-hour limitations for all residency programs in Switzerland, including a 50-hour weekly limit. The reduction in the working hours of doctors in training implicate an increase in their rest time and suggest an amelioration of doctors' clinical performance and consequently in patients' outcomes and safety - which was not detectable in a preliminary study at a large referral center in Switzerland. It remains elusive why work-hour restrictions did not improve patient safety. We are well advised to thoroughly examine and eliminate the known adverse effects of reduced work-hours to improve our patients' safety.

  2. Increased error rates in preliminary reports issued by radiology residents working more than 10 consecutive hours overnight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruutiainen, Alexander T; Durand, Daniel J; Scanlon, Mary H; Itri, Jason N

    2013-03-01

    To determine if the rate of major discrepancies between resident preliminary reports and faculty final reports increases during the final hours of consecutive 12-hour overnight call shifts. Institutional review board exemption status was obtained for this study. All overnight radiology reports interpreted by residents on-call between January 2010 and June 2010 were reviewed by board-certified faculty and categorized as major discrepancies if they contained a change in interpretation with the potential to impact patient management or outcome. Initial determination of a major discrepancy was at the discretion of individual faculty radiologists based on this general definition. Studies categorized as major discrepancies were secondarily reviewed by the residency program director (M.H.S.) to ensure consistent application of the major discrepancy designation. Multiple variables associated with each report were collected and analyzed, including the time of preliminary interpretation, time into shift study was interpreted, volume of studies interpreted during each shift, day of the week, patient location (inpatient or emergency department), block of shift (2-hour blocks for 12-hour shifts), imaging modality, patient age and gender, resident identification, and faculty identification. Univariate risk factor analysis was performed to determine the optimal data format of each variable (ie, continuous versus categorical). A multivariate logistic regression model was then constructed to account for confounding between variables and identify independent risk factors for major discrepancies. We analyzed 8062 preliminary resident reports with 79 major discrepancies (1.0%). There was a statistically significant increase in major discrepancy rate during the final 2 hours of consecutive 12-hour call shifts. Multivariate analysis confirmed that interpretation during the last 2 hours of 12-hour call shifts (odds ratio (OR) 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-3.21), cross

  3. Improvement of resident perceptions of nurse practitioners after the introduction of a collaborative care model: a benefit of work hour reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Lisa M; Shea, Judy A

    2006-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are assuming larger roles in many residency programs as a result of work hour reform, which is creating the potential for collaboration with interns and residents. To assess housestaff perceptions of NPs. We used a 17-item survey before and after the implementation of a collaborative care model in a university-based medicine residency. The majority of residents held favorable attitudes about NPs before the introduction of the collaborative care model. After 1 year, more interns and residents appreciated NPs' clinical judgment (effect size [ES] = .26, p =.02), thought they should be able to order laboratory tests (ES = .23, p = .05) and perform basic procedures (ES = .67, p collaborative care can be an unintended consequence of work hour reform. Educators are encouraged to think about how changes in the curriculum structure can provide opportunities for positive collaborative care experiences.

  4. Modeling Hourly Resident Productivity in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Henning, Daniel J; Strouse, Connie S; Chiu, David T; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2017-08-01

    Resident productivity, defined as new patients per hour, carries important implications for emergency department operations. In high-volume academic centers, essential staffing decisions can be made on the assumption that residents see patients at a static rate. However, it is unclear whether this model mirrors reality; previous studies have not rigorously examined whether productivity changes over time. We examine residents' productivity across shifts to determine whether it remained consistent. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an urban academic hospital with a 3-year emergency medicine training program in which residents acquire patients ad libitum throughout their shift. Time stamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged. A linear mixed model was constructed to predict productivity per shift hour. A total of 14,364 8- and 9-hour shifts were worked by 75 residents between July 1, 2010, and June 20, 2015. This comprised 6,127 (42.7%) postgraduate year (PGY) 1 shifts, 7,236 (50.4%) PGY-2 shifts, and 998 (6.9%) PGY-3 nonsupervisory shifts (Table 1). Overall, residents treated a mean of 10.1 patients per shift (SD 3.2), with most patients at Emergency Severity Index level 3 or more acute (93.8%). In the initial hour, residents treated a mean of 2.14 patients (SD 1.2), and every subsequent hour was associated with a significant decrease, with the largest in the second, third, and final hours. Emergency medicine resident productivity during a single shift follows a reliable pattern that decreases significantly hourly, a pattern preserved across PGY years and types of shifts. This suggests that resident productivity is a dynamic process, which should be considered in staffing decisions and studied further. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trauma morning report is the ideal environment to teach and evaluate resident communication and sign-outs in the 80 hour work week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Mary E; Monaghan, Sean F; Gregg, Shea C; Stephen, Andrew H; Connolly, Michael D; Harrington, David T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G; Heffernan, Daithi S

    2017-09-01

    The 80h work week has raised concerns that complications may increase due to multiple sign-outs or poor communication. Trauma Surgery manages complex trauma and acute care surgical patients with rapidly changing physiology, clinical demands and a large volume of data that must be communicated to render safe, effective patient care. Trauma Morning Report format may offer the ideal situation to study and teach sign-outs and resident communication. Surgery Residents were assessed on a 1-5 scale for their ability to communicate to their fellow residents. This consisted of 10 critical points of the presentation, treatment and workup from the previous night's trauma admissions. Scores were grouped into three areas. Each area was scored out of 15. Area 1 consisted of Initial patient presentation. Area 2 consisted of events in the trauma bay. Area 3 assessed clarity of language and ability to communicate to their fellow residents. The residents were assessed for inclusion of pertinent positive and negative findings, as well as overall clarity of communication. In phase 1, residents were unaware of the evaluation process. Phase 2 followed a series of resident education session about effective communication, sign-out techniques and delineation of evaluation criteria. Phase 3 was a resident-blinded phase which evaluated the sustainability of the improvements in resident communication. 50 patient presentations in phase 1, 200 in phase 2, and 50 presentations in phase 3 were evaluated. Comparisons were made between the Phase 1 and Phase 2 evaluations. Area 1 (initial events) improved from 6.18 to 12.4 out of 15 (pReport, with diverse attendance including surgical attendings and residents in various training years, is the ideal venue for real-time teaching and evaluation of sign-outs and reinforcing good communication skills in residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Social Participation and Hours Worked

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Bartolini; Ennio Bilancini

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between social participation and the hours worked in the market. Social participation is the component of social capital that measures individuals? engagement in groups, associations and non-governmental organizations. We provide a model of consumer choice where social participation may be either a substitute or a complement to material consumption ? depending on whether participation is instrumentally or non-instrumentally motivated ? and where a local environ...

  7. The Impact of the 80-Hour Resident Workweek on Surgical Residents and Attending Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Matthew M.; Kellogg, Katherine C.; Ferguson, Charles M.; Abbott, William M.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of the 80-hour resident workweek restrictions on surgical residents and attending surgeons. Summary Background Data: The ACGME mandated resident duty hour restrictions have required a major workforce restructuring. The impact of these changes needs to be critically evaluated for both the resident and attending surgeons, specifically with regards to the impact on motivation, job satisfaction, the quality of surgeon training, the quality of the surgeon's life, and the quality of patient care. Methods: Four prospective studies were performed at a single academic surgical program with data collected both before the necessary workforce restructuring and 1 year after, including: 1) time cards to assess changes in components of daily activity; 2) Web-based surveys using validated instruments to assess burnout and motivation to work; 3) structured, taped, one-on-one interviews with an external PhD investigator; and 4) statistical analyses of objective, quantitative data. Results: After the work-hour changes, surgical residents have decreased “burnout” scores, with significantly less “emotional exhaustion” (Maslach Burnout Inventory: 29.1 “high” vs. 23.1 “medium,” P = 0.02). Residents have better quality of life both in and out of the hospital. They felt they got more sleep, have a lighter workload, and have increased motivation to work (Herzberg Motivation Dimensions). We found no measurable, statistically significant difference in the quality of patient care (NSQIP data). Resident training and education objectively were not statistically diminished (ACGME case logs, ABSITE scores). Attending surgeons perceived that their quality of their life inside and outside of the hospital was “somewhat worse” because of the work-hour changes, as they had anticipated. Many concerns were identified with regards to the professional development of future surgeons, including a change toward a shift-worker mentality that is not patient

  8. ACGME proposes dropping the 16 hour resident shift limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME is proposing that first-year residents would no longer be limited to 16-hour shifts during the 2017-2018 academic year under a controversial proposal released today (1. Instead, individual residency programs could assign first-year trainees to shifts as long as 28 hours, the current limit for all other residents. The 28-hour maximum includes 4 transitional hours that's designed in part to help residents improve continuity of care. The plan to revise training requirements does not change other rules designed to protect all residents from overwork. including the maximum80 hours per week. The ACGME capped the shifts of first-year residents at 16 hours in 2011 as a part of an ongoing effort to make trainee schedules more humane and avoid clinical errors caused by sleep deprivation. ACGME CEO Thomas Nasca, MD, told Medscape Medical News that the problem arises largely from first-year residents not being ...

  9. No Correlation Between Work-Hours and Operative Volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Jane; Sillesen, Martin; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Since 2003, United States residents have been limited to an 80-hour workweek. This has prompted concerns of reduced educational quality, especially inadequate operating exposure. In contrast, the Danish surgical specialty-training program mandates a cap on working hours of 37 per week....

  10. Registrar working hours in Cape Town

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    In the past surgical registrars were expected to work unusual- ly long hours. This was thought to provide better patient care, and to result in better registrar training. Junior doctors in the USA worked between 95 and 136 hours per week.1. The paradigm changed in 1984 after the death of Libby Zion in a New York hospital ...

  11. Long Working Hours and Cognitive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Ferrie, Jane E.; Gimeno, David; Marmot, Michael G.; Elovainio, Marko; Jokela, Markus; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimäki, Mika

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the association between long working hours and cognitive function in middle age. Data were collected in 1997–1999 (baseline) and 2002–2004 (follow-up) from a prospective study of 2,214 British civil servants who were in full-time employment at baseline and had data on cognitive tests and covariates. A battery of cognitive tests (short-term memory, Alice Heim 4-I, Mill Hill vocabulary, phonemic fluency, and semantic fluency) were measured at baseline and at follow-up. Compared with working 40 hours per week at most, working more than 55 hours per week was associated with lower scores in the vocabulary test at both baseline and follow-up. Long working hours also predicted decline in performance on the reasoning test (Alice Heim 4-I). Similar results were obtained by using working hours as a continuous variable; the associations between working hours and cognitive function were robust to adjustments for several potential confounding factors including age, sex, marital status, education, occupation, income, physical diseases, psychosocial factors, sleep disturbances, and health risk behaviors. This study shows that long working hours may have a negative effect on cognitive performance in middle age. PMID:19126590

  12. Long working hours and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Madsen, Ida E. H.

    2016-01-01

    per week was associated with 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval 1.12–2.29) increase in female breast cancer risk independently of age, socioeconomic position, shift- and night-time work and lifestyle factors, but this observation may have been influenced by residual confounding from parity......Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk...... in 116 462 men and women who were free of cancer at baseline. Incident cancers were ascertained from national cancer, hospitalisation and death registers; weekly working hours were self-reported. Results: During median follow-up of 10.8 years, 4371 participants developed cancer (n colorectal cancer: 393...

  13. Training for fitness: reconsidering the 80-hour work week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldicott, Catherine V; Holsapple, James W

    2008-01-01

    The medical literature is replete with articles about the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 2003 resident duty hour restrictions. Most of these papers describe creative and thoughtful responses to the new system. However, others express concern that the "80-hour work week" could hamper continuity of care and educational activities. Nevertheless, if fatigue impairs resident learning and medical care quality, then work hour restrictions seem worthwhile. We add our voices to the critics' for additional reasons. Data support that fatigue occurs even with reasonable work schedules, and residents do not reliably use time off from work to rest. Regulated work schedules can interfere with adequate rehearsal of the physical and mental stamina required in certain specialties, yet patients have a right to expect their physicians to be trained in the particular demands of those specialties. Similarly, residents have a right to a realistic understanding of authentic clinical practice. Further, while self-sacrifice need not be routine, trainees should feel that occasional self-sacrifice is appropriate and acceptable for a physician. We reject uniform, arbitrary duty hour limits for all specialties. Rather, we propose that a subspecialty-based system can foster the development of the endurance, skills, and reasoning that patients and colleagues expect.

  14. 10 CFR 26.205 - Work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., training, or pre-shift briefings for special evolutions; and holdovers for interviews needed for event... of this subpart, a break is defined as an interval of time that falls between successive work periods... shall— (1) Review the actual work hours and performance of individuals who are subject to this section...

  15. Long working hours and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies......, supplemented with manual searches. Unpublished individual participant data were obtained from 27 additional studies. REVIEW METHODS: The search strategy was designed to retrieve cross sectional and prospective studies of the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Summary estimates were...... countries. The pooled maximum adjusted odds ratio for the association between long working hours and alcohol use was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.18) in the cross sectional analysis of published and unpublished data. Odds ratio of new onset risky alcohol use was 1.12 (1.04 to 1...

  16. Persistence and Cycles in US Hours Worked

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmo Maria Caporale; Luis A. Gil-Alana

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses monthly hours worked in the US over the sample period 1939m1 – 2011m10 using a cyclical long memory model; this is based on Gegenbauer processes and characterised by autocorrelations decaying to zero cyclically and at a hyperbolic rate along with a spectral density that is unbounded at a non-zero frequency. The reason for choosing this specification is that the periodogram of the hours worked series has a peak at a frequency away from zero. The empirical results confirm th...

  17. Limitation of duty hour regulations for pediatric resident wellness: A mixed methods study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Ishiguro, Akira; Sakai, Hirokazu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Duty hour regulations have been placed in residency programs to address mental health concerns and to improve wellness. Here, we elucidate the prevalence of depressive symptoms after implementing an overnight call shift system and the factors associated with burnout or depression among residents.A sequential exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in a tertiary care pediatric and perinatal hospital in Tokyo, Japan. A total of 41 pediatric residents participated in the cross-sectional survey. We determined and compared the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the number of actual working hours before and after implementing the shift system. A follow-up focus-group interview with 4 residents was conducted to explore the factors that may trigger or prevent depression and burnout.Mean working hours significantly decreased from 75.2 hours to 64.9 hours per week. Prevalence of depressive symptoms remained similar before and after implementation of the shift system. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization from the burnout scale were markedly associated with depression. High workload, stress intolerance, interpersonal difficulties, and generation gaps regarding work-life balance could cause burnout. Stress tolerance, workload monitoring and balancing, appropriate supervision, and peer support could prevent burnout.Although the overnight call shift system was effective in reducing working hours, its effectiveness in managing mental health issues among pediatric residents remains unclear. Resident wellness programs represent an additional strategy and they should be aimed at fostering peer support and improvement of resident-faculty interactions. Such an approach could be beneficial to the relationship between physicians of different generations with conflicting belief structures.

  18. The Media Response to the ACGME's 2017 Relaxed Resident Duty-Hour Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi; Krauthamer, Alan V; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2018-03-01

    In March 2017, the ACGME relaxed resident duty-hour restrictions to allow first-year residents to work 24-hour shifts, affecting the internship experience of incoming radiology residents. The aim of this study was to assess the media response to this duty-hour change, comparing news articles with favorable and unfavorable views. Google News was used to identify 36 relevant unique news articles published over a 4-week period after the announcement. Articles' stance was categorized as favorable, unfavorable, or neutral. Additional article characteristics were explored. Article sources were 58% national, 22% local, and 20% medical news. Article stance was most commonly unfavorable for national news sources (48%), compared with neutral for local (62%) and medical (72%) news sources. Most common reasons for unfavorable stance were sleep deprivation (n = 11), medical errors (n = 11), residents' health (n = 9), risk for car accidents (n = 9), a patriarchal hazing system (n = 6), and work-life balance (n = 5). Most common reasons for favorable stance were impact on resident education (n = 7) and continuity of care (n = 7). Supporting data were cited by 38% of unfavorable and 100% of favorable articles. Unfavorable articles most commonly quoted physicians affiliated with resident advocacy groups; favorable articles most commonly quoted physicians affiliated with the ACGME. The relaxed duty-hour restrictions received an overall unfavorable media response, particularly in nonmedical news sources, driven by concerns regarding sleep-deprived doctors. Favorable articles ubiquitously cited data supporting the safety of relaxed duty hour restrictions. Further research is warranted to better understand the impact of relaxed resident duty-hour limits on sleep deprivation, residents' health and education, and the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long working hours and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies......, supplemented with manual searches. Unpublished individual participant data were obtained from 27 additional studies. REVIEW METHODS: The search strategy was designed to retrieve cross sectional and prospective studies of the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Summary estimates were...... obtained with random effects meta-analysis. Sources of heterogeneity were examined with meta-regression. RESULTS: Cross sectional analysis was based on 61 studies representing 333 693 participants from 14 countries. Prospective analysis was based on 20 studies representing 100 602 participants from nine...

  20. Long working hours and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies......, supplemented with manual searches. Unpublished individual participant data were obtained from 27 additional studies. REVIEW METHODS: The search strategy was designed to retrieve cross sectional and prospective studies of the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Summary estimates were...... obtained with random effects meta-analysis. Sources of heterogeneity were examined with meta-regression. RESULTS: Cross sectional analysis was based on 61 studies representing 333,693 participants from 14 countries. Prospective analysis was based on 20 studies representing 100,602 participants from nine...

  1. Resident duty hour modification affects perceptions in medical education, general wellness, and ability to provide patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Andrew; Webber, Jordan; Epstein, Ian

    2016-07-13

    Resident duty hours have recently been under criticism, with concerns for resident and patient well-being. Historically, call shifts have been long, and some residency training programs have now restricted shift lengths. Data and opinions about the effects of such restrictions are conflicting. The Internal Medicine Residency Program at Dalhousie University recently moved from a traditional call structure to a day float/night float system. This study evaluated how this change in duty hours affected resident perceptions in several key domains. Senior residents from an internal medicine training program in Canada responded to an anonymous online survey immediately before and 6 months after the implementation of duty hour reform. The survey contained questions relating to three major domains: resident wellness, ability to deliver quality health care, and medical education experience. Mean pre- and post-intervention scores were compared using the t-test for paired samples. Twenty-three of 27 (85 %) senior residents completed both pre- and post-reform surveys. Residents perceived significant changes in many domains with duty hour reform. These included improved general wellness, less exposure to personal harm, fewer feelings of isolation, less potential for error, improvement in clinical skills expertise, increased work efficiency, more successful teaching, increased proficiency in medical skills, more successful learning, and fewer rotation disruptions. Senior residents in a Canadian internal medicine training program perceived significant benefits in medical education experience, ability to deliver healthcare, and resident wellness after implementation of duty hour reform.

  2. Globalization and working time: working hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2009-01-01

    This article challenges popular wisdom that economic globalization uniformly increases working time in industrialized countries. International investment and trade, they argue, have uneven effects for workplace bargaining over standard hours and over work-time flexibility, such as use of temporary

  3. Japanese Non Resident Language Refresher Course; 210 Hour Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This military intelligence unit refresher course in Japanese is designed for 210 hours of audiolingual instruction. The materials, prepared by the Defense Language Institute, are intended for students with considerable intensive training in spoken and written Japanese who are preparing for a military language assignment. [Not available in hard…

  4. Pediatric resident perceptions of shift work in ward rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Jasti, Harish; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although the long working hours of physicians are considered to be a social issue, no effective policies such as duty hour regulations have so far been proposed in Japan. We implemented an overnight call shift (OCS) system for ward rotations to improve the working environment for residents in a pediatric residency program. We later conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire asking the residents to compare this system with the traditional overnight call system. Forty-one pediatric residents participated in this survey. The residents felt that the quality of patient care improved (80.4% agreed). Most felt that there was less emphasis on education (26.8%) and more emphasis on service (31.7%). Overall, the residents reported that the OCS was beneficial (90.2%). In conclusion, the pediatric residents considered the OCS system during ward rotations as beneficial. Alternative solutions are vital to balance improvements in resident work conditions with the requirement for a high quality of education. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Do economic stresses influence child work hours on family farms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, Anne; de Long, Rachel; Burdick, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Economic stresses are a frequently cited reason for children doing farm work. To explore the relationship between economic indicators and child agricultural work hours between January 2001 and October 2003. This ecologic study design compares trends in aggregate child work hours with national and regional economic indicators. Child work hours were obtained from quarterly surveillance data from a randomized field trial of agricultural task guidelines for children. 2,360 children living or working on 845 farms in central New York participated in the original study. The relationship between child work hours and three economic indicators: national all farm index (AFI) ratio, national fuel index, and regional milk prices was analyzed using times series plots, correlation, and multiple linear regression. The AFI ratio was positively correlated with child work hours (r = 0.49, p = 0.008) but there was no significant correlation between child work hours and fuel or milk prices. Multiple linear regression demonstrated that the relationship between AFI and child work hours is independent of a seasonal effect. Increased child work hours may be associated with periods of higher farm sector productivity, rather than economic stress per se. Findings are limited by the ecologic study design, use of national economic indicators, and the limited number of cycles of child work hours available for time series analysis. Economic conditions may influence decisions about children's farm work.

  6. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P general surgery patient outcomes or differences in resident examination performance. The implications of these findings should be considered when evaluating the merit of the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform and revising related policies in the future.

  7. Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T.; Batty, G. David

    2017-01-01

    Aims Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working...... confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association. Conclusion Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours....

  8. Migration plans and hours of work in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillin, E D; Sumner, D A

    1985-01-01

    "This article describes characteristics of prospective migrants in the Malaysian Family Life Survey and investigates how planning to move affects hours of work. [The authors] use ideas about intertemporal substitution...to discuss the response to temporary and permanent wage expectations on the part of potential migrants. [An] econometric section presents reduced-form estimates for wage rates and planned migration equations and two-stage least squares estimates for hours of work. Men currently planning a move were found to work fewer hours. Those originally planning only a temporary stay at their current location work more hours." excerpt

  9. Precarious employment, working hours, work-life conflict and health in hotel work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria; Bohle, Philip; Quinlan, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Precarious or temporary work is associated with adverse outcomes including low control over working hours, work-life conflict and stress. The rise in precarious employment is most marked in the service sector but little research has been done on its health effects in this sector. This study compares permanent and temporary workers in the hotel industry, where working hours are highly variable. Survey data from 150 workers from eight 3-Star hotels in urban and regional areas around Sydney were analyzed. Forty-five per cent were male and 52 per cent were female. Fifty four per cent were permanent full-time and 46 per cent were temporary workers. The effects of employment status on perceived job security, control over working hours, and work-life conflict are investigated using PLS-Graph 3.0. The effects of control over working hours, on work-life conflict and subsequent health outcomes are also explored. Temporary workers perceived themselves as less in control of their working hours, than permanent workers (β = .27). However, they also reported lower levels of work intensity (β = .25) and working hours (β = .38). The effects of low hours control (β = .20), work intensity (β = .29), and excessive hours (β = .39) on work-life conflict (r² = .50), and subsequent health effects (r² = .30), are illustrated in the final structural equation model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana da Costa Fernandes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279. RESULTS: men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. CONCLUSION: both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  11. Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

  12. Operator alertness and performance on 8-hour and 12-hour work shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, T.L.; Campbell, S.S.; Dawson, D.; Moore-Ede, M.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to the alertness and performance problems of rotational shiftworkers in the nuclear power industry. Growing awareness of higher rates of human errors and accidents on night shifts and reports of operations personnel falling asleep on the job have contributed to the heightened interest in this subject. The industry is now considering the effects of different shift rotation systems, including evaluation of the most recent of industry trends in shift scheduling-schedules that include 12 hour work shifts. Surveys show that within the past 5 years about 20% of commercially operational nuclear power plants have instituted schedules that use only 12 hour shifts, or schedules using a combination of 8-hour and 12-hour shifts. Many more plants routinely use 12-hour work shifts during plant outages and refueling operations. In response to this growing trend, the NRC has funded research which is a first attempt to compare alertness, operator performance, and sleep-wake patterns in subjects working simulated 8-hour and 12-hour shifts at the Human Alertness Research Center (HARC), located at the Institute of Circadian Physiology in Boston, MA. This paper will describe in greater detail the design of the study, measurement techniques for alertness and sleep, work routine, work task performance measures, and cognitive performance test protocols. It will review the role of circadian factors in human alertness and performance, and discuss previous research findings in this area. It will discuss other variables that are known to influence human alertness in the workplace, such as caffeine, alcohol, and working environment. The physiological basis for shift worker sleep problems will be explained in the context of the ongoing research project at HARC. Finally, the paper presents previous research on shift work and fatigue which may be relevant to a comparison of 8-hour and 12-hour shifts

  13. [A systematic review of working hours and mental health burden].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yoshihisa; Horie, Seichi; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Takao; Tanaka, Yayoi

    2006-07-01

    There is growing concern over the possible increase in mental health problems among Japanese workers. This trend is generally regarded as a reflection of Japan's prolonged economic depression and changes in working environment. In fact, claims for compensation for industrial accidents related to mental health diseases have been rapidly increasing in recent years. Working hours, personal-relationships, support from supervisors/co-workers, job demand, job control, and payment are known to affect workers mental health. In 2004, the Government announced a guideline to combat overwork and mental health problems at work places. This guideline articulates that long overtime working is a major indicator, and workers who work over 100 h overtime in a month should be encouraged to see an occupational physician. This guideline takes into account the practicalities of occupational health at work places and the empiric knowledge that long working hours might associate with workers mental health status. It may be reasonable to assume that long working hours affect workers health status both psychologically and physiologically, interacting with a variety of occupational factors, particularly job stress. However, the association between working hours and workers mental health status has not been fully clarified. The present article aimed to provide a systematic review of the association between working hours and mental health problems. The authors conducted a systematic review of the published literature on the association between working hours and mental health problems using PubMed. Of 131 abstracts and citations reviewed, 17 studies met the predefined criteria. Ten of these are longitudinal studies, and the others are cross-sectional studies. Seven of the 17 studies report statistically significant associations between working hours and mental health problems, while the others report no association. In addition, comparison among these studies is difficult because a variety of

  14. Working Hours, Promotion and the Gender Gap in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Takao; Owan, Hideo; Ogawa, Hiromasa

    hours: and (ii) the worker's OJT ability (the worker's ability to accumulate valuable human capital on the job through learning by doing). The worker's cost of working long hours is known only to the worker, while the worker's OJT ability is accurately assessed only by the firm observing him......This paper presents a novel model of promotion within the firm which sheds new light on the interplay between working hours and the odds of subsequent promotion. The model's key feature is the coexistence of two different sources of asymmetric information: (i) the worker's cost of long working....../her on the job. Long working hours signal the worker's commitment to the firm, which determines the surplus produced when the worker is promoted. Thus, the firm provides the worker with managerial training only after observing the employee's hours worked, a signal of his/her commitment to the firm or lack...

  15. Duty hours, quality of care, and patient safety: general surgery resident perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Karen R; Jones, Andrew T; Shea, Judy A

    2012-07-01

    The balance between patient treatment risks and training residents to proficiency is confounded by duty-hour limits. Stricter limits have been recommended to enhance quality and safety, although supporting data are scarce. A previously piloted survey was delivered with the 2010 American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE). First postgraduate year (PGY1) and PGY2 trainees took the Junior examination (IJE); PGY3 and above took the Senior examination (ISE). Residency type, size, and location were linked to examinees using program codes. Five survey items queried all residents about the impact of further hour limits on care quality; online test residents answered 7 more items probing medical error sources. Data were analyzed using factorial ANOVA for association with sex, PGY level, and program demographics. There were 6,161 categorical surgery residents who took the ABSITE: 60% men, 60% ISE, and two-thirds in university programs. Paper (n = 5,079) and online (n = 1,082) examinees were similar. Item response rates ranged from 91% to 98%. Few (surgery residents do not perceive that reduced duty hours will noticeably improve quality of care. Resident perceptions of causes of medical errors suggest that system changes are more likely to enhance patient safety than further hour limits. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Roman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003 were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well.

  17. Emotional exhaustion may trigger cut in working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in the Netherlands have been examining to what extent workers are modifying their hours to cope with high levels of work-related emotional exhaustion. Findings reveal that most full-time employees would prefer a cut in their hours, with those reporting emotional exhaustion wanting a

  18. Flexible working hours and well-being in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandolin, I; Härmä, M; Toivanen, M

    2001-12-01

    Flexibility of working hours became more prevalent in the 1990s in Finland. According to a representative survey on Finnish wage and salary earners (n = 1790) at the beginning of 2000, a great majority of male (76%) and female (65%) employees regularly worked overtime and/or had irregular working hours every month. These employees were flexible in meeting the needs of their companies/employers. Individual flexibility of working hours was far less common, only one third of male and female employees were able to regulate their working hours. A better balance between company-controlled and individual flexibility would, however, improve the well-being of employees. Employees working overtime without being allowed to regulate their working hours felt more symptoms of distress and had more conflicts in combining workplace and family roles than those who could individually determine their working hours flexibly. An investment in individually determined flexibility, for example by means of participatory planning, would improve the well-being of employees, and thus also improve the productivity of the organization.

  19. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Resident Duty Hour Restrictions in Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Katharine S.; Keshet, Itay; Spicer, Jonathan; Imrie, Kevin; Feldman, Liane; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Kayssi, Ahmed; Lipsman, Nir; Elmi, Maryam; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Parshuram, Chris; Mainprize, Todd; Warren, Richard J.; Fata, Paola; Gorman, M. Sean; Feinberg, Stan; Rutka, James

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated 80-hour resident duty limits. In 2011 the ACGME mandated 16-hour duty maximums for PGY1 (post graduate year) residents. The stated goals were to improve patient safety, resident well-being, and education. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the impact of resident duty hours (RDH) on clinical and educational outcomes in surgery. Methods: A systematic review (1980–2013) was executed on CINAHL, Cochrane Database, Embase, Medline, and Scopus. Quality of articles was assessed using the GRADE guidelines. Sixteen-hour shifts and night float systems were analyzed separately. Articles that examined mortality data were combined in a random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of RDH on patient mortality. Results: A total of 135 articles met the inclusion criteria. Among these, 42% (N = 57) were considered moderate-high quality. There was no overall improvement in patient outcomes as a result of RDH; however, some studies suggest increased complication rates in high-acuity patients. There was no improvement in education related to RDH restrictions, and performance on certification examinations has declined in some specialties. Survey studies revealed a perception of worsened education and patient safety. There were improvements in resident wellness after the 80-hour workweek, but there was little improvement or negative effects on wellness after 16-hour duty maximums were implemented. Conclusions: Recent RDH changes are not consistently associated with improvements in resident well-being, and have negative impacts on patient outcomes and performance on certification examinations. Greater flexibility to accommodate resident training needs is required. Further erosion of training time should be considered with great caution. PMID:24662409

  20. Making sense: duty hours, work flow, and waste in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Roger W; Philibert, Ingrid

    2009-12-01

    Parsimony, and not industry, is the immediate cause of the increase of capital. Industry, indeed, provides the subject which parsimony accumulates. But whatever industry might acquire, if parsimony did not save and store up, the capital would never be the greater.Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations, book 2, chapter 31In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented resident duty hour limits that included a weekly limit and limits on continuous hours. Recent recommendations for added reductions in resident duty hours have produced concern about concomitant reductions in future graduates' preparedness for independent practice. The current debate about resident hours largely does not consider whether all hours residents spend in the educational and clinical-care environment contribute meaningfully either to residents' learning or to effective patient care. This may distract the community from waste in the current clinical-education model. We propose that use of "lean production" and quality improvement methods may assist teaching institutions in attaining a deeper understanding of work flow and waste. These methods can be used to assign value to patient- and learner-centered activities and outputs and to optimize the competing and synergistic aspects of all desired outcomes to produce the care the Institute of Medicine recommends: safe, effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely, and equitable. Finally, engagement of senior clinical faculty in determining the culture of the care and education system will contribute to an advanced social-learning and care network.

  1. [Medical justification of the eight-hour shift work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro-García, Luis; Sánchez-Román, Raúl; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc Arturo; Larios-Díaz, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    The 8-hour shift work is one of the main achievements of the organized workers. International solidarity with United States miners, who were massacred in Chicago in 1886, and the aftermath of World War I promoted the establishment of 8-hour shift work in many countries. In Mexico, the 1917 Social Rights Declaration adhered to this position under the idea that the excessive workload above the 8-hour limit had negative effects on the health of workers; nevertheless, this statement seems to be sustained only by testimonies, anecdotal opinions and/or by the logic and common sense that then prevailed. For this reason, a literature review was carried out in search for the evidence supporting this apparently immovable length of the shift work. The globalization of the economy and the tendency towards flexibility and deregulation of current contractual relationships, are the new challenges that the 8-hour shift work is facing.

  2. “Friday off”: Reducing Working Hours in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Rossiter

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the pros and cons for reducing working hours in Europe. To arrive to an informed judgment we review critically the theoretical and empirical literature, mostly from economics, concerning the relation between working hours on the one hand, and productivity, employment, quality of life, and the environment, on the other. We adopt a binary economics distinction between capital and labor productiveness, and are concerned with how working hours may be reduced without harming the earning capacity of workers. There are reasons to believe that reducing working hours may absorb some unemployment, especially in the short-run, even if less than what is advocated by proponents of the proposal. Further, there may well be strong benefits for the quality of peoples’ lives. Environmental benefits are likely but depend crucially on complementary policies or social conditions that will ensure that the time liberated will not be directed to resource-intensive or environmentally harmful consumption. It is questionable whether reduced working hours are sustainable in the long-term given resource limits and climate change. We conclude that while the results of reducing working hours are uncertain, this may be a risk worth taking, especially as an interim measure that may relieve unemployment while other necessary structural changes are instituted.

  3. Studying the association between postgraduate trainees' work hours, stress and the use of maladaptive coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasi, Pashtoon Murtaza; Khawar, Talha; Khan, Farooq Hasan; Kiani, Jawad Ghazanfar; Khan, Umber Zaheer; Khan, Hadi Mohammad; Khuwaja, Urooj Bakht; Rahim, Musa

    2007-01-01

    The growing debate regarding long working hours of postgraduate trainees has been receiving considerable attention recently. This greater workload contributes to increasing stress. Our objective was to specifically study the association between long working hours, stress and the greater use of 'maladaptive' coping strategies. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out on all interns and residents at the Aga Khan University Hospital during February to May, 2005. Level of stress was measured by use of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the use of maladaptive coping mechanisms through Brief Cope-28. 55.1% scored over the threshold for mild stress i.e. GHQ > 3, while more than 46% of the trainees scored over the threshold of more than 4 for morbid stress. Trainees under stress reported more working hours on average as compared to those not under stress, 83.8 and 74.7 hours respectively. At the same time, those working for longer hours were more likely to have used these negative coping mechanisms, which would further contribute to more stress rather than relieving it. Significant levels of stress have been identified. Along with this, those working for longer hours were more likely to have used these negative coping mechanisms. Reduction of working hours is important. Simultaneously, interventions need to be planned at imparting knowledge, awareness and skills to cope with various kinds of stressors encountered by a trainee during his/her training. Additionally, limits need to be devised for the working hours of the trainees.

  4. Flexible work in call centres: Working hours, work-life conflict & health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Philip; Willaby, Harold; Quinlan, Michael; McNamara, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Call-centre workers encounter major psychosocial pressures, including high work intensity and undesirable working hours. Little is known, however, about whether these pressures vary with employment status and how they affect work-life conflict and health. Questionnaire data were collected from 179 telephone operators in Sydney, Australia, of whom 124 (69.3%) were female and 54 (30.2%) were male. Ninety-three (52%) were permanent full-time workers, 37 (20.7%) were permanent part-time, and 49 (27.4%) were casual employees. Hypothesised structural relationships between employment status, working hours and work organisation, work-life conflict and health were tested using partial least squares modelling in PLS (Chin, 1998). The final model demonstrated satisfactory fit. It supported important elements of the hypothesised structure, although four of the proposed paths failed to reach significance and the fit was enhanced by adding a path. The final model indicated that casual workers reported more variable working hours which were relatively weakly associated with greater dissatisfaction with hours. The interaction of schedule control and variability of hours also predicted dissatisfaction with hours. Conversely, permanent workers reported greater work intensity, which was associated with both lower work schedule control and greater work-life conflict. Greater work-life conflict was associated with more fatigue and psychological symptoms. Labour market factors and the undesirability of longer hours in a stressful, high-intensity work environment appear to have contributed to the results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Characteristics and outcomes for women physicians who work reduced hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Phyllis L; Gareis, Karen C; Barnett, Rosalind C

    2003-05-01

    To understand the characteristics of women physicians who work reduced hours in dual-earner couples and how such work schedules affect the quality of the marital role, parental role, and job role, as well as indicators of psychological distress, burnout, career satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Survey of a random sample of female physicians between 25 and 50 years of age, working within 25 miles of Boston, whose names were obtained from the Registry of Board Certification in Medicine in Massachusetts. Interviewers conducted a 60-minute face-to-face close-ended interview after a 20-minute mailed questionnaire had been completed. Fifty-one full-time physicians and 47 reduced-hours physicians completed the study, for a completion rate of 49.5%. There was no difference in age, number of years as a physician, mean household income, number of children, or presence of an infant in the home between reduced-hours and full-time physicians. Reduced-hours physicians, however, were more likely to be in a generalist specialty (40% vs. 12%, p = 0.001) and to spend a greater portion of their time in patient care (64.5% vs. 50.1%, p = 0.003) and less time in research (4.9% vs. 18.0%, p = 0.002) than full-time physicians. In addition, there was no difference between the two groups in the perception of work interfering with family life (1.8 vs. 1.7, p = 0.17; scale 1-7 with 7 high) or family life interfering with work (1.4 vs. 1.5, p = 0.62). Physicians who worked their preferred number of hours (25% of full-time and 57% of reduced-hours physicians), regardless of full-time (self-reported hours 35-90 hours per week) or reduced-hours (20-60 hours per week) status, reported better job role quality (r = 0.35, p = 0.001), schedule fit (r = 0.41, p Women physicians who work their preferred number of hours achieve the best balance of work and family outcomes.

  6. Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents' duty hours: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafloor, Cameron W; Lochnan, Heather A; Code, Catherine; Keely, Erin J; Rothwell, Deanna M; Forster, Alan J; Huang, Allen R

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, medical residents' long duty hours have been under scrutiny as a factor affecting patient safety and the work environment for the residents. After several mandated changes in duty hours, it is important to understand how residents spend their time before proposing and implementing future changes. Time-motion methodology may provide reliable information on what residents do while on duty. The purpose of this study is to review all available literature pertaining to time-motion studies of internal medicine residents while on a medicine service and to understand how much of their time is apportioned to various categories of tasks, and also to determine the effects of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-mandated duty hour changes on resident workflow in North America. Electronic bibliographic databases were searched for articles in English between 1941 and April 2013 reporting time-motion studies of internal medicine residents rotating through a general medicine service. Eight articles were included. Residents spent 41.8% of time in patient care activities, 18.1% communicating, 13.8% in educational activities, 19.7% in personal/other, and 6.6% in transit. North American data showed the following changes after the implementation of the ACGME 2003 duty hours standard: patient care activities from 41.8% to 40.8%, communication activities from 19.0% to 22.3%, educational activities from 17.7% to 11.6%, and personal/other activities from 21.5% to 17.1%. There was a paucity of time-motion data. There was great variability in the operational definitions of task categories reported in the studies. Implementation of the ACGME duty hour standards did not have a significant effect on the percentage of time spent in particular tasks. There are conflicting reports on how duty hour changes have affected patient safety. A low proportion of time spent in educational activities deserves further study and may point to a review of the

  7. Quantitative and qualitative perceptions of the 2011 residency duty hour restrictions: a multicenter, multispecialty cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William S; Elkin, Rachel L; Nielsen, Craig D

    2015-03-25

    July 2011 saw the implementation of the newest duty hour restrictions, further limiting the working hours of first year residents and necessitating a variety of adaptations on the part of residency programs. The present study sought to characterize the perceived impact of these restrictions on residency program personnel using a multi-specialty and multi-site approach. We developed and administered a survey to internal medicine and general surgery residency programs at three academic medical centers within an urban region. The survey combined quantitative and qualitative components to gain a broader understanding of the impact of the newest regulations. Quantitative responses were compared between Internal Medicine and General Surgery programs with Student t-tests. Other comparisons were performed using ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis testing as appropriate. For all comparisons, the threshold for significance was set at 0.01. Two independent reviewers coded all qualitative data and assigned one or more themes based on content. Descriptive statistics were calculated and the diversity of themes identified. No between-group comparisons were conducted with the qualitative data. We found significant differences in the overall perceptions of duty hour restrictions across specialty (internal medicine more positive than general surgery) and across position (first year residents more positive than senior residents and faculty). Notably, individuals who trained at osteopathic medical schools reported significantly more negative views of the duty hour restrictions than those who had trained at allopathic or international medical schools, suggesting an influence of undergraduate medical training. The complementary qualitative data offered insights into the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the duty hour restrictions, as well as actionable suggestions that could help to improve residency program function. This study characterizes responses to the new duty hour restrictions from a

  8. 48 CFR 536.570-5 - Working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Working hours. 536.570-5 Section 536.570-5 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 536.570-5 Working...

  9. The effect of duty hour regulation on resident surgical case volume in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Stuart H; Miller, Robert H; Weng, Cindy; Gurgel, Richard K

    2014-10-01

    Evaluate the effect of duty hour regulation on graduating otolaryngology resident surgical case volume and analyze trends in surgical case volume for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) key indicator cases from 1996 to 2011. Time-trend analysis of surgical case volume. Nationwide sample of otolaryngology residency programs. Operative logs from the American Board of Otolaryngology and ACGME for otolaryngology residents graduating in the years 1996 to 2011. Key indicator volumes and grouped domain volumes before and after resident duty hour regulations (2003) were calculated and compared. Independent t test was performed to evaluate overall difference in operative volume. Wilcoxon rank sum test evaluated differences between procedures per time period. Linear regression evaluated trend. The average total number of key indicator cases per graduating resident was 440.8 in 1996-2003 compared to 500.4 cases in 2004-2011, and overall average per number of key indicators was 31.5 and 36.2, respectively (P = .067). Four key indicator cases showed statistically significant (P otolaryngology residents. The overall trend in operative volume is increasing for several specific key indicators. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  10. Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 4) - Special working hours

    CERN Multimedia

    Department Head Office - HR Department

    2016-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 4) entitled "Special working hours", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1st September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208539.   This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 3) also entitled "Special working hours" of January 2013. This document contains modifications to reflect the new career structure and ensuring the provision consistent with practice that compensation or remuneration of special working hours performed remotely is possible only in case of emergency.   This circular will enter into force on 1st September 2016.

  11. Working Hour and its Impact on Backache from Gender Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Pradhan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the association between work burden and backache among women and men. The study design is descriptive cross sectional. Thirty two households are selected. From each of the households sample size of 64 in terms of a pair of either married couple or the unmarried sister and brother are selected. Respondent's age is between 15 to 49 years. Semi structured questionnaire is used to collect data. This study shows significant differences in working hour between male and female. The working hour is significantly higher among the persons with backache. Gender inequality is a stark reality. The gender division of labour may add more work to women resulting into longer working hour for women. This may reflect in some health hazards among women. Hence, more focused attention is needed to understand the non reproductive health problems of women. Keywords: working hour; backache; women empowerment; health problem; health seeking behaviour DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4523 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.235-246

  12. Residency Training: Work engagement during neurology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zis, Panagiotis; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Artemiadis, Artemios K

    2016-08-02

    Work engagement, defined as a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption, can ameliorate patient care and reduce medical errors. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate work engagement among neurology residents in the region of Attica, Greece. In total, 113 residents participated in this study. Demographic and work-related characteristics, as well as emotional exhaustion and personality traits (neuroticism), were examined via an anonymous questionnaire. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The study sample had a mean age of 34.6 ± 3.6 years, ranging from 26 to 45 years. Sixty-two (54.9%) participants were women and 45 (39.8%) were married. After adjusting for sex, emotional exhaustion, and neuroticism, the main factors associated with work engagement were autonomy and chances for professional development. Providing more chances for trainees' professional development as well as allowing for and supporting greater job autonomy may improve work engagement during neurology training. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Morbidity in surgery: impact of the 50-hour work-week limitation in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderli, R; Businger, A; Oesch, A; Stefenelli, U; Laffer, U

    2012-01-24

    Work-hour regulations for residency programmes in Switzerland, including a 50-hour weekly limit, were set in on 1 January 2005. Patient safety was one of the major arguments for the implementation. As the effect of the restriction of residency work hours on patient care in Switzerland has not yet been evaluated on objective data, the aim of the present study was to assess its impact by comparing the patients' morbidity and mortality before (2001-2004) and after (2005-2008) the implementation. Retrospective analysis of records of the Spitalzentrum Biel AG, a large referral center classified according to the Swiss Medical Association, collected in the database of the Association for Quality Assurance in Surgery (AQC), a prospective database of consecutive patients undergoing surgical procedures in Switzerland. A selection of 2,686 patients with common surgeries, operated on by residents, was performed. There were 1,259 (46.9%) patients meeting our inclusion criteria who were admitted during the period before introduction of work-hour limitation and 1,427 (53.1%) patients after introduction. The in-hospital mortality and postoperative surgical complication rate were significantly higher after the reform (p limitation implemented in Switzerland was not associated with surgical patient safety measure improvement for common surgeries (i.e., morbidity and mortality rate). Further research on a nationwide basis is needed to assess the value of the higher surgical complication and mortality rate.

  14. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2010-01-01

    We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker's marginal utility of leisure t...

  15. Work hours, social value of leisure and globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2012-01-01

    to be increasing in the leisure time taken by other workers. Coordination takes the form of internalising the leisure externality and other relevant constraints (e.g., labour demand). The extent of openness is measured by the degree of capital mobility. We find that: coordination lowers equilibrium work hours...

  16. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller; Montagna, Catia

    to be increasing in the leisure time taken by other workers. Coordination takes the form of internalising the leisure externality and other relevant constraints (e.g., labour demand). The extent of openness is measured by the degree of capital mobility. We find that: coordination lowers equilibrium work hours...

  17. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  18. The surgical residency interview: a candidate-centered, working approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabott, Heather; Smith, Ryan K; Alseidi, Adnan; Thirlby, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    The interview process is a pivotal, differentiating component of the residency match. Our bias is toward a working interview, producing better fulfillment of the needs of both parties, and a more informed match selection for the candidates and program. We describe a "candidate-centered" approach for integrating applicant interviews into our daily work schedule. Applicants are informed upon accepting the interview of the working interview model. Our program offers 33 interview days over a 12-week period. A maximum of 5 applicants are hosted per day. Applicants are assigned to 1 of our general, thoracic, vascular, or plastic surgery teams. The interview day begins with the applicant changing into scrubs, attending a morning conference, and taking part in a program overview by a Chief Resident. Applicants join their host team where 4-8 hours are spent observing the operative team, on rounds and sharing lunch. The faculty and senior residents are responsible for interviewing and evaluating applicants though the Electronic Residency Application Service. A total of 13 surgeons are involved in the interview process resulting in broad-based evaluations. Each surgeon interviewed between 3 and 12 applicants. Faculty rate this interview approach highly because it allows them to maintain a rigorous operative schedule while interacting with applicants. Current residents are engaged in welcoming applicants to view the program. Faculty and residents believe cooperating in a real world manner aids their assessment of the applicant. Applicants routinely provide positive feedback, relaying this approach is informative, transparent, and should be the "standard." Applicants believe they are presented a realistic view of the program. Ultimately, this candidate-centered process may be attributable to our resident cohort who exhibit high satisfaction, excellent resident morale, and very low dropout rate. We present a candidate-centered, working interview approach used in the selection of

  19. Remaking Surgical Socialization: Work Hour Restrictions, Rites of Passage, and Occupational Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Joanna Veazey; Bosk, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    We examine how a policy aimed at improving patient safety by limiting residents’ work hours brought with it an unintended and unexamined consequence: altered socialization due to modified rites of passage during residency that endangered the stereotypical “Surgical Personality” and created a potential rift between the occupational identities of surgical residents who train under duty hour regulations and those who trained before they were imposed. Through participant observation occurring between June 2008 and June 2010, in-depth interviews (n=13), and focus groups (n=2), we explore how surgical residents training in four U.S. hospitals think about the threats that the shift from unrestricted to restricted duty hours creates for their claims of competence and professionalism. We identify three types of resident responses: (1) neutralizing statements that deny any significant change to occupational identity has occurred; (2) embracing statements that express the belief that a changed and more balanced occupational identity is needed; and (3) apprehensive statements that expressed fear of an altered occupational identity and an anxiety about readiness for individual practice. PMID:22863331

  20. Assessing the Effects of the 2003 Resident Duty Hours Reform on Internal Medicine Board Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Patrick S.; Itani, Kamal M.F.; Rosen, Amy K.; Small, Dylan; Lipner, Rebecca S.; Bosk, Charles L.; Wang, Yanli; Halenar, Michael J.; Korovaichuk, Sophia; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hours reform affected medical knowledge as reflected by written board scores for internal medicine (IM) residents. Method The authors conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) Internal Medicine residents who started training before and after the 2003 duty hour reform using a merged data set of American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Board examination and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NMBE) United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 2 Clinical Knowledge test scores. Specifically, using four regression models, the authors compared IM residents beginning PGY-1 training in 2000 and completing training unexposed to the 2003 duty hours reform (PGY-1 2000 cohort, n = 5,475) to PGY-1 cohorts starting in 2001 through 2005 (n = 28,008), all with some exposure to the reform. Results The mean ABIM board score for the unexposed PGY-1 2000 cohort (n = 5,475) was 491, SD = 85. Adjusting for demographics, program, and USMLE Step 2 exam score, the mean differences (95% CI) in ABIM board scores between the PGY-1 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 cohorts minus the PGY-1 2000 cohort were −5.43 (−7.63, −3.23), −3.44 (−5.65, −1.24), 2.58 (0.36, 4.79), 11.10 (8.88, 13.33) and 11.28 (8.98, 13.58) points respectively. None of these differences exceeded one-fifth of an SD in ABIM board scores. Conclusions The duty hours reforms of 2003 did not meaningfully affect medical knowledge as measured by scores on the ABIM board examinations. PMID:24556772

  1. Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents' duty hours: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leafloor CW

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cameron W Leafloor,1 Heather A Lochnan,2,3,6 Catherine Code,2,4 Erin J Keely,2,3,6 Deanna M Rothwell,5,6 Alan J Forster,2,4–6 Allen R Huang2,6,7 1Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, 4Division of General Internal Medicine, 5Performance Measurement and Innovation, 6Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 7Division of Geriatric Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Background: Since the mid-1980s, medical residents' long duty hours have been under scrutiny as a factor affecting patient safety and the work environment for the residents. After several mandated changes in duty hours, it is important to understand how residents spend their time before proposing and implementing future changes. Time-motion methodology may provide reliable information on what residents do while on duty.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review all available literature pertaining to time-motion studies of internal medicine residents while on a medicine service and to understand how much of their time is apportioned to various categories of tasks, and also to determine the effects of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME-mandated duty hour changes on resident workflow in North America.Methods: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched for articles in English between 1941 and April 2013 reporting time-motion studies of internal medicine residents rotating through a general medicine service.Results: Eight articles were included. Residents spent 41.8% of time in patient care activities, 18.1% communicating, 13.8% in educational activities, 19.7% in personal/other, and 6.6% in transit. North American data showed the following changes after the implementation of the ACGME 2003 duty hours standard: patient care activities from 41.8% to 40.8%, communication activities from 19.0% to 22.3%, educational activities from 17.7% to 11.6%, and personal

  2. Health and psychosocial effects of flexible working hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Janssen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine whether any impairments in health and social lives can be found under different kinds of flexible working hours, and whether such effects are related to specific characteristics of these working hours. METHODS: Two studies - a company based survey (N=660 and an internet survey (N=528 - have been conducted. The first one was a questionnaire study (paper and pencil on employees working under some 'typical' kinds of different flexible working time arrangements in different companies and different occupational fields (health care, manufacturing, retail, administration, call centres. The second study was an internet-based survey, using an adaptation of the questionnaire from the first study. RESULTS: The results of both studies consistently show that high variability of working hours is associated with increased impairments in health and well-being and this is especially true if this variability is company controlled. These effects are less pronounced if variability is self-controlled; however, autonomy does not compensate the effects of variability. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for an appropriate design of flexible working hours should be developed in order to minimize any impairing effects on health and psychosocial well-being; these recommendations should include - besides allowing for discretion in controlling one's (flexible working hours - that variability in flexible working hours should be kept low (or at least moderate, even if this variability is self-controlled.OBJETIVO: Investigar se ocorre prejuízo à saúde e à vida social com diferentes tipos de horas de trabalho flexíveis e se há relação entre estes efeitos e características específicas das horas de trabalho. MÉTODOS: Foram realizados dois estudos, uma pesquisa em uma empresa (N=660 e outra pela Internet (N=528. O primeiro estudo consistiu de um questionário (papel e lápis aplicado a funcionários sujeitos a diferentes ajustes "típicos" de horas de

  3. Ten-year trends in family medicine residency productivity and staffing: impact of electronic health records, resident duty hours, and the medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Sarah; Hughes, Lauren; Fitch, Wes; Pauwels, Judith

    2012-02-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs), resident duty hour restrictions, and Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) innovations have all impacted the clinical practices of residency programs over the past decade. The University of Washington Family Medicine Network (UWFMN) residencies have collaborated for 10 years in collecting and comparing data regarding the productivity and operations of their training programs to identify the program-level effects of such changes. Based on five survey results from 2000 to 2010, this study examines changes in faculty and resident productivity and staffing models of UWFMN residency training clinics using a standardized methodology, specifically describing the productivity impact of EHR changes and duty hour restrictions and the implementation of the PCMH by residencies. Data were systematically collected via standardized questionnaire, evaluated for quality, clarified, and then analyzed. Resident productivity decreased over the 10-year interval, with resident total yearly patient visits down 17.2%. Core family medicine faculty productivity was highly variable among programs, and nonphysician provider visits increased. Faculty part-time status increased. Front office, medical assistant, and nursing staffing grew significantly, but other administrative staff decreased, resulting in minimal change in total non-provider staffing. A majority of programs engaged in PCMH initiatives in 2010 and had implemented an EHR. Physician productivity in UWFMN residency programs decreased for all resident physicians from 2000 to 2010, likely due to a combination of decreased resident duty hours and other clinical practice changes. Productivity trends have implications for the structure and training requirements for family medicine residency programs.

  4. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  5. Multi-sensory stimulation in 24-hour dementia care: effects of snoezelen on residents and caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, J.; van Dulmen, S.; Bensing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Dementia among nursing home residents is oftenaccompanied by behavioural disturbances and high caredependency. Multi-Sensory Stimulation or snoezelen,integrated in 24-h dementia care, is an approach thatmight improve mood and behaviour of demented elderlyas well as the quality of working life of

  6. Multi-sensory stimulation in 24-hour dementia care: effects of snoezelen on residents and caregivers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J. van; Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Dementia among nursing home residents is oftenaccompanied by behavioural disturbances and high caredependency. Multi-Sensory Stimulation or snoezelen,integrated in 24-h dementia care, is an approach thatmight improve mood and behaviour of demented elderlyas well as the quality of working life of

  7. Hour-glass ceilings: Work-hour thresholds, gendered health inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Huong; Strazdins, Lyndall; Welsh, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Long workhours erode health, which the setting of maximum weekly hours aims to avert. This 48-h limit, and the evidence base to support it, has evolved from a workforce that was largely male, whose time in the labour force was enabled by women's domestic work and care giving. The gender composition of the workforce has now changed, and many women (as well as some men) combine care-giving with paid work, a change viewed as fundamental for gender equality. However, it raises questions on the suitability of the work time limit and the extent it is protective of health. We estimate workhour-mental health thresholds, testing if they vary for men and women due to gendered workloads and constraints on and off the job. Using six waves of data from a nationally representative sample of Australian adults (24-65 years), surveyed in the Household Income Labour Dynamics of Australia Survey (N = 3828 men; 4062 women), our study uses a longitudinal, simultaneous equation approach to address endogeneity. Averaging over the sample, we find an overall threshold of 39 h per week beyond which mental health declines. Separate curves then estimate thresholds for men and women, by high or low care and domestic time constraints, using stratified and pooled samples. We find gendered workhour-health limits (43.5 for men, 38 for women) which widen further once differences in resources on and off the job are considered. Only when time is 'unencumbered' and similar time constraints and contexts are assumed, do gender gaps narrow and thresholds approximate the 48-h limit. Our study reveals limits to contemporary workhour regulation which may be systematically disadvantaging women's health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Risk of Developing Diabetes in Association With Long Working Hours Differs by Shift Work Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, Akira; Yoshioka, Eiji; Saijo, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Sachiko; Kishi, Reiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-09-05

    The impact of long working hours on diabetes is controversial; however, shift work is known to increase the risk of diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and diabetes among civil servants in Japan separately by shift work schedules. A prospective cohort study was conducted from April 2003 to March 2009. A total of 3195 men aged ≥35 years who underwent an annual health checkup at baseline were analyzed by shift work schedules (2371 non-shift workers and 824 shift workers). Self-reported working hours were categorized as 35-44 and ≥45 hours per week. The incidence of diabetes was confirmed by fasting plasma glucose concentration ≥126 mg/dL and/or self-reported medical diagnosis of diabetes at the annual checkup. A Cox proportional model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for developing diabetes associated with long working hours. The median follow-up period of non-shift and shift workers was 5.0 and 4.9 years, respectively. During this period, 138 non-shift workers and 46 shift workers developed diabetes. A decreased HR was found among non-shift workers working ≥45 hours per week (HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.57-1.24); however, shift workers working ≥45 hours per week had a significantly increased risk of diabetes (HR 2.43; 95% CI, 1.21-5.10) compared with those working 35-44 hours per week. An analysis restricted to non-clerical workers also showed similar results. The risk of diabetes associated with long working hours differed by shift work schedules.

  9. Working hours, work-life conflict and health in precarious and "permanent" employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Philip; Quinlan, Michael; Kennedy, David; Williamson, Ann

    2004-12-01

    The expansion of precarious employment in OECD countries has been widely associated with negative health and safety effects. Although many shiftworkers are precariously employed, shiftwork research has concentrated on full-time workers in continuing employment. This paper examines the impact of precarious employment on working hours, work-life conflict and health by comparing casual employees to full-time, "permanent" employees working in the same occupations and workplaces. Thirty-nine convergent interviews were conducted in two five-star hotels. The participants included 26 full-time and 13 casual (temporary) employees. They ranged in age from 19 to 61 years and included 17 females and 22 males. Working hours ranged from zero to 73 hours per week. Marked differences emerged between the reports of casual and full-time employees about working hours, work-life conflict and health. Casuals were more likely to work highly irregular hours over which they had little control. Their daily and weekly working hours ranged from very long to very short according to organisational requirements. Long working hours, combined with low predictability and control, produced greater disruption to family and social lives and poorer work-life balance for casuals. Uncoordinated hours across multiple jobs exacerbated these problems in some cases. Health-related issues reported to arise from work-life conflict included sleep disturbance, fatigue and disrupted exercise and dietary regimes. This study identified significant disadvantages of casual employment. In the same hotels, and doing largely the same jobs, casual employees had less desirable and predictable work schedules, greater work-life conflict and more associated health complaints than "permanent" workers.

  10. Paediatric cardiology fellowship training: effect of work-hour regulations on scholarly activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronai, Christina; Lang, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In 2003, work-hour regulations were implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Much has been published regarding resident rest and quality of life as well as patient safety. There has been no examination on the effect of work-hour restrictions on academic productivity of fellows in training. Paediatric subspecialty fellows have a scholarly requirement mandated by the American Board of Pediatrics. We have examined the impact of work-hour restrictions on the scholarly productivity of paediatric cardiology fellows during their fellowship. We conducted a literature search for all paediatric cardiology fellows between 1998 and 2007 at a single academic institution as first or senior authors on papers published during their 3-year fellowship and 3 years after completion of their categorical fellowship (n=63, 30 fellows before 2003 and 33 fellows after 2003). The numbers of first- or senior-author fellow publications before and after 2003 were compared. We also collected data on final paediatric cardiology subspecialty career choice. There was no difference in the number of fellow first-author publications before and after 2003. Before work-hour restrictions, the mean number of publications per fellow was 2.1 (±2.2), and after work-hour restrictions it was 2.0 (±1.8), (p=0.89). By subspecialty career choice, fellows who select electrophysiology, preventative cardiology, and heart failure always published within the 6-year time period. Since the implementation of work-hour regulations, total number of fellow first-authored publications has not changed. The role of subspecialty choice may play a role in academic productivity of fellows in training.

  11. Globalization and working time: Work-place hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how economic globalization affects work-place arrangements regulating working time in industrialized countries. Exposure to foreign direct investment and trade can have off-setting effects for work-place bargaining over standard hours and work-time flexibilization, and can be

  12. Long Working Hours and Work-related Cerebro-cardiovascular Disease in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHUNG, Yun Kyung; KWON, Young-jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a good discriminatory cutoff for long working hours as a surrogate of chronic overload at work, which is associated with the approval of workers’ compensation claims for work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD) in Korea. We evaluated weekly working hours for four weeks prior to the onset of disease for all manufacturing industry claimants (N=319) of WR-CVD in 2010. The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker’s compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases. The cutoff was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve with 95% CI using the receiver operating curve (ROC) method. The cutoff point was thus calculated to be 60.75 h (AUC=0.89, 95% CI [0.84–0.93]), showing a sensitivity value of 65% and specificity of 94%. This is the first study to report that long working hours could be a predictor with good discrimination and high specificity of approval of WR-CVD cases. In Korea, long working hours and widespread chronic overload at work are recognized as a social problem. Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD. Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation. PMID:23892901

  13. Perceptions of the 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements among residents in all core programs at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefur, Benjamin J; Shewmaker, Diana M; Lohse, Christine M; Rose, Steven H; Colletti, James E

    2017-11-10

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented revisions to resident duty hour requirements (DHRs) in 2011 to improve patient safety and resident well-being. Perceptions of DHRs have been reported to vary by training stage and specialty among internal medicine and general surgery residents. The authors explored perceptions of DHRs among all residents at a large academic medical center. The authors administered an anonymous cross-sectional survey about DHRs to residents enrolled in all ACGME-accredited core residency programs at their institution. Residents were categorized as medical and pediatric, surgery, or other. In total, 736 residents representing 24 core specialty residency programs were surveyed. The authors received responses from 495 residents (67%). A majority reported satisfaction (78%) with DHRs and believed DHRs positively affect their training (73%). Residents in surgical specialties and in advanced stages of training were significantly less likely to view DHRs favorably. Most respondents believed fatigue contributes to errors (89%) and DHRs reduce both fatigue (80%) and performance of clinical duties while fatigued (74%). A minority of respondents (37%) believed that DHRs decrease medical errors. This finding may reflect beliefs that handovers contribute more to errors than fatigue (41%). Negative perceived effects included diminished patient familiarity and continuity of care (62%) and diminished clinical educational experiences for residents (41%). A majority of residents reported satisfaction with the 2011 DHRs, although satisfaction was significantly less among residents in surgical specialties and those in advanced stages of training.

  14. Work-Related Quality of Life among Medical Residents at a University Hospital in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsila, Nattamon; Chaiear, Naesinee; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Tiamkao, Somsak

    2015-12-01

    1) To assess work-related quality of life (WRQOL) among medical residents at a university hospital in northeast Thailand. 2) To determine the strength of the association between personal and working condition components and WRQOL among medical residents. A descriptive study was used to describe the WRQOL among medical residents. The study population comprised of all 375 residents affiliated with the university hospital. The Thai version of a self-administered work-related quality of life scale-2 was used for data collection. Testing the reliability revealed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.908. Questionnaires were completed by 259 of 375 (68.3%). The study found that the mean rating by residents for overall WRQOL was 113.8 out of 170 (SD 14.8). Most rated WRQOL as moderate (76.6%). The seven sub-factors were rated as moderate to high for employee engagement and control at work, moderate for home/work interface, general well-being and working conditions, high-moderate for job career satisfaction, and low-moderate for stress at work. Relationships between the personal and working condition components and WRQOL were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Residents in minor specialties had a higher WRQOL than those in major specialties (OR 2.522, 95% CI: 1.37, 4.63). Residents who had less than eight duty shifts/week had a higher WRQOL than those with more than eight duty shifts/week (OR 2.263, 95% CI: 1.16, 4.41). Similarly, residents working with less than 80 hours/week had a higher WRQOL than those working more than 80 hours/week (OR 2.344, 95% CI: 1.17, 4.72). A subgroup analyzes of those working in minor specialties showed the trend that working less than eight shifts/month and working less than 80 hours/week had the potential association with good quality of work-life (QWL). This phenomenon is presented in the subgroup analyses of those working in major specialties. Therefore, working hours and number of shifts might have played important role in contributing good QWL

  15. Multi-sensory stimulation in 24-hour dementia care: effects of snoezelen on residents and caregivers.

    OpenAIRE

    Weert, J. van; Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Dementia among nursing home residents is oftenaccompanied by behavioural disturbances and high caredependency. Multi-Sensory Stimulation or snoezelen,integrated in 24-h dementia care, is an approach thatmight improve mood and behaviour of demented elderlyas well as the quality of working life of dementiacaregivers. This book describes a study in which six intervention wards received a training program ‘snoezelen for caregivers’. They were compared with six control wards providing 'usual care'...

  16. Nurse practitioners' work hours and overtime: How much, and under what working conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2016-03-01

    To explore the nature and prevalence of nurse practitioner (NP) overtime, work hours, and their relationship to practice within NP work conditions. A secondary analysis of data extracted from the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The focus in this study was on data from NPs in active practice in clinical settings. The final analytic sample consisted of 9010 NPs. NPs working in hospitals and long-term care settings tended to work more than 40 h/week (p health records (p health records (p = .002), NPs were found to work more hours per week than those who did not. Regarding the type of relationships with physicians, NPs who worked more than 40 h/week either had hierarchical relationships with them (p work hours/overtime and work conditions related to longer work hours. Further study is indicated to assess the potential impact of work hours/overtime on NP roles and patient outcomes. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident duty hour new standards: history, changes, and impact on staffing of intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastores, Stephen M; O'Connor, Michael F; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Napolitano, Lena; Ward, Nicholas; Bailey, Heatherlee; Mollenkopf, Fred P; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently released new standards for supervision and duty hours for residency programs. These new standards, which will affect over 100,000 residents, take effect in July 2011. In response to these new guidelines, the Society of Critical Care Medicine convened a task force to develop a white paper on the impact of changes in resident duty hours on the critical care workforce and staffing of intensive care units. A multidisciplinary group of professionals with expertise in critical care education and clinical practice. Relevant medical literature was accessed through a systematic MEDLINE search and by requesting references from all task force members. Material published by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and other specialty organizations was also reviewed. Collaboratively and iteratively, the task force corresponded by electronic mail and held several conference calls to finalize this report. The new rules mandate that all first-year residents work no more than 16 hrs continuously, preserving the 80-hr limit on the resident workweek and 10-hr period between duty periods. More senior trainees may work a maximum of 24 hrs continuously, with an additional 4 hrs permitted for handoffs. Strategic napping is strongly suggested for trainees working longer shifts. Compliance with the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour standards will compel workflow restructuring in intensive care units, which depend on residents to provide a substantial portion of care. Potential solutions include expanded utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants, telemedicine, offering critical care training positions to emergency medicine residents, and partnerships with hospitalists. Additional research will be necessary to evaluate the impact of the new standards on patient safety, continuity of care, resident learning, and staffing in the intensive care unit.

  18. Bottleneck congestion and distribution of work start times: The economics of staggered work hours revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Since the seminal work of Henderson (1981), a number of studies examined the effect of staggered work hours by analyzing models of work start time choice that consider the trade-off between negative congestion externalities and positive production externalities. However, these studies described traffic congestion using flow congestion models. This study develops a model of work start time choice with bottleneck congestion and discloses the intrinsic properties of the model. To this end, this ...

  19. Association of Otolaryngology Resident Duty Hour Restrictions With Procedure-Specific Outcomes in Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Braden, Lauren; Wan, Jim; Sebelik, Merry

    2017-06-01

    Graduate medical education has undergone a transformation from traditional long work hours to a restricted plan to allow adequate rest for residents. The initial goal of this restriction is to improve patient outcomes. To determine whether duty hour restrictions had any impact on surgery-specific outcomes by analyzing complications following thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed before and after duty hour reform. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS).The NIS was queried for procedure codes associated with thyroid and parathyroid procedures for the years 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008. Hospitals were divided based on teaching status into 3 groups: nonteaching hospitals (NTHs), teaching hospitals without otolaryngology programs (THs), and teaching hospitals with otolaryngology programs (THs-OTO). Procedure-specific complication rates, length of stay, and mortality rates were collected. SAS statistical software (version 9.4) was used for analysis with adjustment using Charlson comorbidity index. Total numbers of head and neck endocrine procedures were 34 685 and 39 770 (a 14.7% increase), for 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008, respectively. THs-OTO contributed a greater share of procedures in 2006 to 2008 (from 18% to 25%). With the earlier period serving as the reference, length of stay remained constant (2.1 days); however, total hospital charges increased (from $12 978 to $23 708; P otolaryngology programs.

  20. Hours of Work and Gender Identity : Does Part-time Work make the Family Happier?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account inter-dependence within the family, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and happiness.We use panel data from the new Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.Our analysis indicates that part-time women are more satisfied with working hours than

  1. Working memory capacity is decreased in sleep-deprived internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohar, Ashraf; Adams, Alexander; Gertner, Elie; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Heitz, Richard; Engle, Randall; Haus, Erhard; Bijwadia, Jagdeep

    2009-06-15

    Concerns about medical errors due to sleep deprivation during residency training led the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to mandate reductions in work schedules. Although call rotations with extended shifts continue, effects on resident sleep-wake times and working memory capacity (WMC) have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to measure effects of call rotations on sleep-wake times and WMC in internal medicine residents. During 2 months of an internal medicine training program adhering to ACGME work-hour restrictions (between April 2006 and June 2007), residents completed daily WMC tests, wore actigraphy watches, and logged their sleep hours. This observational study was conducted during a call month requiring 30-hour call rotations every fourth night, whereas the noncall month, which allowed sleep/wake cycle freedom, was used as the control. Sleep hours per night and WMC testing. Thirty-nine residents completing the study had less sleep per night during their call month (6.4 vs 7.3 h per night noncall, p errors occurred when on call (+1.07/test, p error rates were not evaluated.

  2. Changes in outcomes for internal medicine inpatients after work-hour regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Leora I; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Lin, Zhenqiu; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2007-07-17

    Limits on resident work hours are intended to reduce fatigue-related errors, but may raise risk by increasing transfers of responsibility for patients. To examine changes in outcomes for internal medicine patients after the implementation of work-hour regulations. Retrospective cohort study. Urban, academic medical center. 14,260 consecutive patients discharged from the teaching (housestaff) service and 6664 consecutive patients discharged from the nonteaching (hospitalist) service between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2004. Outcomes included intensive care unit utilization, length of stay, discharge disposition, 30-day readmission rate to the study institution, pharmacist interventions to prevent error, drug-drug interactions and in-hospital death. The teaching service had net improvements in 3 outcomes. Relative to changes experienced by the nonteaching service, the rate of intensive care unit utilization decreased by 2.1% (95% CI, -3.3% to -0.7%; P = 0.002), the rate of discharge to home or rehabilitation facility versus elsewhere improved by 5.3% (CI, 2.6% to 7.6%; P error were reduced by 1.92 interventions per 100 patient-days (CI, -2.74 to -1.03 interventions per 100 patient-days; P < 0.001). Teaching and nonteaching services had similar changes over time in length of stay, 30-day readmission rate, and adverse drug-drug interactions. In-hospital death was uncommon in both groups, and change over time was similar in the 2 groups. The study was a retrospective, nonrandomized design that assessed a limited number of outcomes. Teaching and nonteaching cohorts may not have been affected similarly by secular trends in patient care. After the implementation of work-hour regulations, 3 of 7 outcomes improved for patients in the teaching service relative to those in the nonteaching service. The authors found no evidence of adverse unintended consequences after the institution of work-hour regulations.

  3. Workplace flexibility, work hours, and work-life conflict: finding an extra day or two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E Jeffrey; Erickson, Jenet Jacob; Holmes, Erin K; Ferris, Maria

    2010-06-01

    This study explores the influence of workplace flexibility on work-life conflict for a global sample of workers from four groups of countries. Data are from the 2007 International Business Machines Global Work and Life Issues Survey administered in 75 countries (N = 24,436). We specifically examine flexibility in where (work-at-home) and when (perceived schedule flexibility) workers engage in work-related tasks. Multivariate results indicate that work-at-home and perceived schedule flexibility are generally related to less work-life conflict. Break point analyses of sub-groups reveal that employees with workplace flexibility are able to work longer hours (often equivalent to one or two 8-hr days more per week) before reporting work-life conflict. The benefit of work-at-home is increased when combined with schedule flexibility. These findings were generally consistent across all four groups of countries, supporting the case that workplace flexibility is beneficial both to individuals (in the form of reduced work-life conflict) and to businesses (in the form of capacity for longer work hours). However, work-at-home appears less beneficial in countries with collectivist cultures. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Working hours associated with unintentional sleep at work among airline pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Marqueze

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Tto identify factors associated with unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots. METHODS This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted with 1,235 Brazilian airline pilots, who work national or international flights. Data collection has been performed online. We carried out a bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis, having as dependent variable unintentional sleep at work. The independent variables were related to biodemographic data, characteristics of the work, lifestyle, and aspects of sleep. RESULTS The prevalence of unintentional sleep while flying the airplane was 57.8%. The factors associated with unintentional sleep at work were: flying for more than 65 hours a month, frequent technical delays, greater need for recovery after work, work ability below optimal, insufficient sleep, and excessive sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots is associated with factors related to the organization of the work and health.

  5. Use of a Night Float System to Comply With Resident Duty Hours Restrictions: Perceptions of Workplace Changes and Their Effects on Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning-Zi; Gan, Runye; Snell, Linda; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Although some evidence suggests that resident duty hours reforms can lead to shift-worker mentality and loss of patient ownership, other evidence links long hours and fatigue to poor work performance and loss of empathy, suggesting the restrictions could positively affect professionalism. The authors explored perceived impacts of a 16-hour duty restriction, achieved using a night float (NF) system, on the workplace and professionalism. In 2013, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with 18 residents, 9 staff physicians, and 3 residency program directors in the McGill University core internal medicine residency program regarding their perceptions of the program's 12-hour shift-based NF system. Interviews were transcribed and coded for common themes. The authors used a descriptive qualitative methodology. Participants viewed implementation of the NF system as leading to decreased physical and mental exhaustion, more consistent interaction with patients, and more stable team structure within shifts compared with the previous 24-hour call system. These workplace changes were felt to improve teamwork and patient ownership within shifts, quality of work performed, and empathy. Across shifts, however, more frequent sign-overs, stricter application of shift time boundaries, and loose integration between daytime and NF teams were perceived as leading to emergence of shift-worker mentality around sign-over. Perceptions of optimal patient ownership changed from the traditional single-physician-24/7 model to team-based shared ownership. Duty hours restrictions, as exemplified by an NF system, have both positive and negative impacts on professionalism. Interventions and training toward effective team-based care are needed to curb emergence of shift-worker mentality.

  6. Resident operative experience in general surgery, plastic surgery, and urology 5 years after implementation of the ACGME duty hour policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simien, Christopher; Holt, Kathleen D; Richter, Thomas H; Whalen, Thomas V; Coburn, Michael; Havlik, Robert J; Miller, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Resident duty hour restrictions were implemented in 2002-2003. This study examines changes in resident surgical experience since these restrictions were put into place. Operative log data for 3 specialties were examined: general surgery, urology, and plastic surgery. The academic year immediately preceding the duty hour restrictions, 2002-2003, was used as a baseline for comparison to subsequent academic years. Operative log data for graduating residents through 2007-2008 were the primary focus of the analysis. Examination of associated variables that may moderate the relationship between fewer duty hours and surgical volume was also included. Plastic surgery showed no changes in operative volume following duty hour restrictions. Operative volume increased in urology programs. General surgery showed a decrease in volume in some operative categories but an increase in others. Specifically the procedures in vascular, plastic, and thoracic areas showed a consistent decrease. There was no increase in the percentage of programs' graduates falling below minimum requirements. Procedures in pancreas, endocrine, and laparoscopic areas demonstrated an increase in volume. Graduates in larger surgical programs performed fewer procedures than graduates in smaller programs; this was not the case for urology or plastic surgery programs. The reduction of duty hours has not resulted in an across the board decrease in operative volume. Factors other than duty hour reforms may be responsible for some of the observed findings.

  7. Work hours and work-family conflict: the double-edged sword of involvement in work and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Russell A; Swody, Cathleen A; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we examine the role of work hours in a model that incorporates involvement in both work and family with experiences of work-family conflict and subjective well-being. Self-report data were collected from 383 full-time employees and analysed using structural equation modelling techniques. Results demonstrate that role salience was positively related to behavioural involvement with work and with family. In turn, behavioural family involvement was negatively related to work hours and family-to-work conflict, while behavioural work involvement was positively related to work hours. Behavioural family involvement was also positively related to life satisfaction. Finally, both family-to-work conflict and end-of-workday strain were negatively related to life satisfaction. Our results provide insight into unexpected problems that might arise when employees place overly high importance on work and work long hours. This study serves as a foundation for researchers to examine the interplay of time spent with work and family with other aspects of the work-family interface. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Attitudes toward working conditions: are European Union workers satisfied with their working hours and work-life balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla-Santander, Nuria; Lidón-Moyano, Cristina; González-Marrón, Adrián; Bunch, Kailey; Martín-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sánchez, José M

    2017-12-23

    To describe the satisfaction with working hours and satisfaction with work-life balance and their association in the European Union (EU-28). This is a cross-sectional study based on data from the Flash Eurobarometer 398 among workers of the EU-28 from 2014 (n=13,683). We calculated percentages and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). We also applied a multi-level generalised linear model using the Poisson family, to calculate the adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) of satisfaction with work-life balance based on working hours. All analyses were stratified by individual, employment and welfare regime country classification. The satisfaction with working hours and work-life balance was 80.62% and 74.48%, respectively, and was significantly higher among women. The highest percentages of satisfaction were found in the Nordic welfare regime countries (90.2% and 85.3%, respectively). There was a statistically significant association between satisfaction with working hours and work-life balance (aPR: 2.63; 95%CI: 2.28-3.04), and the magnitude of the association differed in individual, employment and welfare regime country classifications. The main reasons declared for dissatisfaction were "excessive working hours" (48.7%), "shift work" (27.9%), and "inability to influence the work schedule" (28.3%). Differences were observed according to sex and type of welfare regime. The differences found in the association between satisfaction with work-life balance and working hours according to sociodemographic characteristics and welfare regime show that there are inequalities in the working conditions in the EU countries. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Vital working hour schemes: The dynamic balance between various interests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, G.A.; Jansen, B.; van Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    "Balancing Interests", the theme of the 17th International Symposium on Shift Work and Working Time held in Hoofddorp, The Netherlands (September 2005), refers to the ambition to reach an optimal balance between the various aspects of shift work. Economic, ergonomic, physical, and psychosocial

  10. Flexible Work Hours and Other Job Factors in Parental Time with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Flexible working hours are typically seen to be advantageous to working parents, as the flexible hours more easily allow responsibilities of care and employment be balanced. But do flexible work hours actually mean that parents can spend more time with their children? This article explores this for parents of young children in Australia. The…

  11. Impact of Age and Hearing Impairment on Work Performance during Long Working Hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Wagner-Hartl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on demographic prognoses, it must be assumed that a greater number of older workers will be found in the future labor market. How to deal with their possible age-related impairments of sensory functions, like hearing impairment and work performance during extended working time, has not been addressed explicitly until now. The study addresses this interplay. The study was performed on two consecutive days after normal working hours. The 55 participants had to “work” in the study at least three additional hours to simulate a situation of long working hours. The tested measures for (job performance were: general attention, long-term selective attention, concentration, and reaction time. All of the investigated variables were taken at both days of the study (2 × 2 × 2 repeated measurement design. The results show effects for age, the interaction of hearing impairment and time of measurement, and effects of the measurement time. Older participants reacted slower than younger participants did. Furthermore, younger participants reacted more frequently in a correct way. Hearing impairment seems to have a negative impact especially on measures of false reactions, and therefore especially on measurement time 1. The results can be interpreted in a way that hearing-impaired participants are able to compensate their deficits over time.

  12. Multinationals versus domestic firms: wages, working hours and industrial relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, M.; Tijdens, K.

    2011-01-01

    This Working Paper aims to present and discuss recent evidence on the effect of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on wages, working conditions and industrial relations. It presents a. an overview of the available literature on the effects of FDI on wages, particularly in developed countries; b. the

  13. 29 CFR 553.221 - Compensable hours of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... station must be evacuated because of an electrical failure and the employees are expected to remain in the... who is given a patrol car to drive home and use on personal business, is not working during the travel...

  14. Falls From Agricultural Machinery: Risk Factors Related to Work Experience, Worked Hours, and Operators' Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffaro, Federica; Roccato, Michele; Micheletti Cremasco, Margherita; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2018-02-01

    Objective We investigated the risk factors for falls when egressing from agricultural tractors, analyzing the role played by worked hours, work experience, operators' behavior, and near misses. Background Many accidents occur within the agricultural sector each year. Among them, falls while dismounting the tractor represent a major source of injuries. Previous studies pointed out frequent hazardous movements and incorrect behaviors adopted by operators to exit the tractor cab. However, less is known about the determinants of such behaviors. In addition, near misses are known to be important predictors of accidents, but they have been under-investigated in the agricultural sector in general and as concerns falls in particular. Method A questionnaire assessing dismounting behaviors, previous accidents and near misses, and participants' relation with work was administered to a sample of Italian tractor operators ( n = 286). Results A mediated model showed that worked hours increase unsafe behaviors, whereas work experience decreases them. Unsafe behaviors in turn show a positive association with accidents, via the mediation of near misses. Conclusions We gave a novel contribution to the knowledge of the chain of events leading to fall accidents in the agricultural sector, which is one of the most hazardous industries. Applications Besides tractor design improvements, preventive training interventions may focus on the redesign of the actual working strategies and the adoption of engaging training methods in the use of machinery to optimize the learning of safety practices and safe behaviors.

  15. Assessing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among otolaryngology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin; Grundfast, Kenneth M; Levi, Jessica R

    Previous studies have suggested that musculoskeletal symptoms are common among practicing otolaryngologists. Early training can be the ideal time to foster knowledge of ergonomics and develop safe work habits, however, little data exists regarding musculoskeletal symptoms in residents. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize musculoskeletal symptoms in a preliminary sample of otolaryngology residents. A cross-sectional survey incorporating the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was sent to 30 Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residencies to examine musculoskeletal symptoms among residents. A two-sample test of proportions was performed to compare symptoms between male and female residents. In total, 141 respondents (response rate=34.7%) completed the survey. Fifty-five percent of survey respondents were male and 45% were female. Musculoskeletal symptoms were most frequently reported in the neck (82.3%), followed by the lower back (56%), upper back (40.4%), and shoulders (40.4%). The most common symptoms were stiffness in the neck (71.6%), pain in the neck (61.7%), and pain in the lower back (48.2%). In total, 6.4% of residents missed work and 16.3% of residents stopped during an operation at some point due to their symptoms. Most residents (88.3%) believed their musculoskeletal symptoms were attributed to their surgical training. Female residents were significantly more likely to experience neck (p<0.0001) and wrist/hand (p=0.019) discomfort compared to male residents. Musculoskeletal symptoms were common among residents, approaching rates similar to those previously identified in practicing otolaryngologists. Increased emphasis on surgical ergonomics is warranted to improve workplace safety and prevent future injury. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Comfort level of post graduate residents working in different clinical domains in managing common ophthalmic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffar, S.; Tayyab, A.; Shah, S.S.; Naseem, S.; Ghazanfar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmological conditions are frequently encountered in almost all clinical specialties. Assessing the adequacy of ophthalmology teaching in undergraduate medical education is important in order to diagnose and manage different ophthalmological conditions. The objective of this study was to determine the comfort level of post graduate residents working in different clinical domains in managing common ophthalmic conditions. Methods: A cross sectional survey involving 277 post graduate residents was carried out over a period of six months in both private and public tertiary care hospital. A questionnaire containing two sections and 17 variables in total were distributed among Medical Residents of different specialties except ophthalmology residents. Participants of the study were selected through consecutive non probability sampling. Results: Mean hours of classroom based ophthalmology instruction during during undergraduate program was 59.38 hours (55.9) and mean hours of clinical based ophthalmology instruction during undergraduate program was 62.73 hours (60.8) 54 percentage were either not comfortable or somewhat comfortable in managing common ophthalmic condition. Conclusion: Teaching hours in under graduate program meet or exceed requisite criteria. However graduating doctors generally feel that the time spent does not provide them with the comfort and skill level required to care for patients with ocular presentations. (author)

  17. Working overtime hours: Relations with fatigue, work motivation, and the quality of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, DGJ; van der Linden, D; Smulders, PGW; Kompier, MAJ; van Veldhoven, MJPM; Van Yperen, NW

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to better understand the relationship between overtime and mental fatigue by taking into account work motivation and the quality of overtime work and studying theoretically derived subgroups. Methods: We conducted a survey-study among a representative sample of the Dutch

  18. Is suicidal ideation linked to working hours and shift work in Korea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Gyo; Bae, Kyu-Jung; Kang, Mo-Yeol; Yoon, Jin-Ha

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to use the community health survey (CHS) to identify the effect of long working hours (long WHs) and night/shift work on suicidal ideation among the employed population of Korea. This study used data from 67,471 subjects who were administered the 2008 CHS which obtained information regarding sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors and working environment, using structured questionnaires and personal interviews. We adopted multiple logistic regression models for gender and employment stratification. Among male employees, suicidal ideation was significantly associated with only moderately long WHs (51-60 hours), after controlling covariates (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 1.07 to 1.57). Self-employed/male employer populations had higher suicidal ideation when they had moderately long WHs (aOR, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.01 to 1.50) and very long WHs (over 60 hours) (aOR, 1.31; 95%CI, 1.08 to 1.59). Among the female population, suicidal ideation was significantly association with moderately long WHs in the employee group (aOR, 1.31; 95%CI, 1.08 to 1.58) and moderately (aOR, 1.35; 95%CI, 1.08 to 1.69) and very (aOR, 1.33; 95%CI, 1.07 to 1.65) long WHs in the self-employed/employer group. Shift work was a significant predictor only in the female population in the employee groups (aOR, 1.45; 95%CI, 1.23 to 1.70). Long WHs and shift work were associated with suicidal ideation when taking into account gender and employment differences. The harmful effects of exceptionally long WHs in Korea, among other Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, raise concerns about public and occupational health. To address the issue of long WHs, labor policies that reduce maximum working hours and facilitate job stability are needed.

  19. Work hours, weight status, and weight-related behaviors: a study of metro transit workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan Peter J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Associations between hours worked per week and Body Mass Index (BMI, food intake, physical activity, and perceptions of eating healthy at work were examined in a sample of transit workers. Methods Survey data were collected from 1086 transit workers. Participants reported hours worked per week, food choices, leisure-time physical activity and perceptions of the work environment with regard to healthy eating. Height and weight were measured for each participant. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations between work hours and behavioral variables. Associations were examined in the full sample and stratified by gender. Results Transit workers working in the highest work hour categories had higher BMI and poorer dietary habits, with results differing by gender. Working 50 or more hours per week was associated with higher BMI among men but not women. Additionally, working 50 or more hours per week was significantly associated with higher frequency of accessing cold beverage, cold food, and snack vending machines among men. Working 40 or more hours per week was associated with higher frequency of accessing cold food vending machines among women. Reported frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was highest among women working 50 or more hours per week. Intake of sweets, sugar sweetened beverages, and fast food did not vary with work hours in men or women. Physical activity and perception of ease of eating healthy at work were not associated with work hours in men or women. Conclusions Long work hours were associated with more frequent use of garage vending machines and higher BMI in transit workers, with associations found primarily among men. Long work hours may increase dependence upon food availability at the worksite, which highlights the importance of availability of healthy food choices.

  20. Work status, work hours and health in women with and without children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floderus, B; Hagman, M; Aronsson, G; Marklund, S; Wikman, A

    2009-10-01

    The authors studied self-reported health in women with and without children in relation to their work status (employed, student, job seeker or homemaker), work hours and having an employed partner. The study group comprised of 6515 women born in 1960-1979 who were interviewed in one of the Swedish Surveys of Living Conditions in 1994-2003. Self-rated health, fatigue and symptoms of anxiety were analysed. Having children increased the odds of poor self-rated health and fatigue in employed women, female students and job seekers. The presence of a working partner marginally buffered the effects. In dual-earner couples, mothers reported anxiety symptoms less often than women without children. Few women were homemakers (5.8%). The odds of poor self-rated health and fatigue increased with increasing number of children in employed women, and in women working 40 h or more. Poor self-rated health was also associated with the number of children in students. Many mothers wished to reduce their working hours, suggesting time stress was a factor in their impaired health. The associations between having children and health symptoms were not exclusively attributed to having young children. Having children may contribute to fatigue and poor self-rated health particularly in women working 40 h or more per week. Student mothers and job seeking mothers were also at increased risk of poor self-rated health. The results should be noted by Swedish policy-makers. Also countries aiming for economic and gender equality should consider factors that may facilitate successful merging of work and family life.

  1. Working hours, work-life conflict and health in precarious and "permanent" employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bohle

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The expansion of precarious employment in OECD countries has been widely associated with negative health and safety effects. Although many shiftworkers are precariously employed, shiftwork research has concentrated on full-time workers in continuing employment. This paper examines the impact of precarious employment on working hours, work-life conflict and health by comparing casual employees to full-time, "permanent" employees working in the same occupations and workplaces. METHODS: Thirty-nine convergent interviews were conducted in two five-star hotels. The participants included 26 full-time and 13 casual (temporary employees. They ranged in age from 19 to 61 years and included 17 females and 22 males. Working hours ranged from zero to 73 hours per week. RESULTS: Marked differences emerged between the reports of casual and full-time employees about working hours, work-life conflict and health. Casuals were more likely to work highly irregular hours over which they had little control. Their daily and weekly working hours ranged from very long to very short according to organisational requirements. Long working hours, combined with low predictability and control, produced greater disruption to family and social lives and poorer work-life balance for casuals. Uncoordinated hours across multiple jobs exacerbated these problems in some cases. Health-related issues reported to arise from work-life conflict included sleep disturbance, fatigue and disrupted exercise and dietary regimes. CONCLUSIONS:This study identified significant disadvantages of casual employment. In the same hotels, and doing largely the same jobs, casual employees had less desirable and predictable work schedules, greater work-life conflict and more associated health complaints than "permanent" workers.OBJETIVOS: O crescimento do número de empregos precários em países da OECD está largamente associado a efeitos negativos à saúde e segurança. Embora muitos

  2. How Do Average Hours Worked Vary with Development? Cross-Country Evidence and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs-Schündeln, Nicola; Bick, Alexander; Lagakos, David

    2016-01-01

    How do average hours worked vary across the world income distribution? To answer this question, we build a new internationally comparable database of hours worked covering countries of all income levels. We document that average hours worked per adult are substantially higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries. This pattern holds for both men and women, for adults of all ages and education levels, and along both the extensive margin (employment rates) and intensive margin (...

  3. Physiological and psychological impacts of extended work hours in logging operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana Mitchell; Tom Gallagher

    2007-01-01

    A study was initiated in 2006 to develop an understanding of the considerations of using extended work hours in the logging industry in the southeastern United States. Through semistructured interviews, it was obvious that loggers were individually creating ways of successfully implementing extended working hours without understanding the impacts that extended working...

  4. Long working hours and pregnancy complications: women physicians survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masumi; Rahman, Mahbubur; Ishiguro, Aya; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-07-23

    Previous studies have investigated the impact of occupational risk factors on health outcomes among physicians. However, few studies have investigated the effects on pregnancy outcomes among physicians. In this study, we examined the association between working hours during pregnancy and pregnancy complications among physicians. A cross-sectional study was based on a survey conducted in 2009-2011 of 1,684 alumnae (mean age, 44 ± 8 years) who had graduated from 13 private medical schools in Japan. Data on threatened abortion (TA), preterm birth (PTB), and the number of working hours during the first trimester of pregnancy were obtained via retrospective assessments. Of the 939 physicians with a first pregnancy, 15% experienced TA and 12% experienced PTB. Women who experienced TA (mean weekly working hours: 62 h vs. 50 h, P women who worked 40 hours or less per week, women who worked 71 hours or more per week had a three-fold higher risk of experiencing TA (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-6.0) even after adjusting for medical specialty, maternal age, and current household income. The risk of experiencing PTB was 2.5 times higher (95% CI:1.2-5.2) in women who worked 51-70 hours and 4.2 times higher (95% CI: 1.9-9.2) in women who worked 71 hours or more even after adjusting for specialty, maternal age, and current household income. The trend in the P statistic reflecting the effect of the quartile of hours worked per week (40 hours, 41-50 hours, 51-70 hours, ≥ 71 hours) on TA or PTB was 0.0001 in the multivariate logistic regression models. These results suggest that working long hours during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with TA and PTB.

  5. Bullying Behavior, Parents' Work Hours and Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Time Spent with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie-Mizell, C. Andre; Keil, Jacqueline M.; Laske, Mary Therese; Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother's and father's work hours, and early adolescents' perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change…

  6. New Measures of Teachers' Work Hours and Implications for Wage Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Kristine L.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have good data on teachers' annual salaries but a hazy understanding of teachers' hours of work. This makes it difficult to calculate an accurate hourly wage and leads policy makers to default to anecdote rather than fact when debating teacher pay. Using data from the American Time Use Survey, I find that teachers work an average of…

  7. Chicago Mothers on Finding and Using Child Care during Nonstandard Work Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Marcia; Alexander, David; Nicpon, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Few issues confound child care policy more than the fact that very large numbers of mothers work evenings, overnight, or weekend hours when fewer child care programs operate. The authors interviewed 50 single Chicago mothers with nontraditional work hours about their experiences finding and using child care. Participants' responses addressed…

  8. 45 CFR 2543.84 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. 2543... OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Statutory Compliance § 2543.84 Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. Where applicable, all contracts awarded by recipients in excess of $2000 for construction...

  9. Working hours associated with unintentional sleep at work among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqueze, Elaine Cristina; Nicola, Ana Carolina B; Diniz, Dag Hammarskjoeld M D; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2017-06-26

    Tto identify factors associated with unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots. This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted with 1,235 Brazilian airline pilots, who work national or international flights. Data collection has been performed online. We carried out a bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis, having as dependent variable unintentional sleep at work. The independent variables were related to biodemographic data, characteristics of the work, lifestyle, and aspects of sleep. The prevalence of unintentional sleep while flying the airplane was 57.8%. The factors associated with unintentional sleep at work were: flying for more than 65 hours a month, frequent technical delays, greater need for recovery after work, work ability below optimal, insufficient sleep, and excessive sleepiness. The occurrence of unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots is associated with factors related to the organization of the work and health. Identificar fatores associados aos cochilos não intencionais durante as jornadas de trabalho de pilotos da aviação regular. Estudo epidemiológico transversal conduzido com 1.235 pilotos brasileiros de avião do transporte aéreo regular, que realizavam voos nacionais ou internacionais, sendo a coleta de dados realizada on-line. Foi realizada análise de regressão logística bivariada e múltipla, tendo como variável dependente o cochilo não intencional durante o horário de trabalho. As variáveis independentes foram relacionadas a dados biodemográficos, características do trabalho, estilo de vida e aspectos do sono. A prevalência do cochilo não intencional enquanto pilotava o avião foi de 57,8%. Os fatores associados ao cochilo não intencional foram: voar por mais de 65 horas por mês, atrasos técnicos frequentes, maior necessidade de recuperação após o trabalho, capacidade para o trabalho inferior à ótima, sono insuficiente e sonolência excessiva. A ocorrência do cochilo n

  10. Work-related operating theatre accidents among surgical residents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information concerning the most recent occupational injury inside the operating theatre revealed that 31(86.1%) of the residents sustained work-related accident in the 6 months preceding the survey, 8(25.8%) of which involved a high risk patient. All of the 8 (100%) of the recent high risk injuries and 22(95.6%) of the ...

  11. Office workers' objectively measured sedentary behavior and physical activity during and outside working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemes, Stacy A; O'Connell, Sophie E; Edwardson, Charlotte L

    2014-03-01

    To examine objectively determined sedentary behavior and physical activity (PA) during and outside working hours in full-time office workers. A total of 170 participants wore an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer for 7 days. Time spent sedentary (working hours and nonworking hours) and nonworkdays. Participants accumulated significantly higher levels of sedentary behavior (68% vs 60%) and lower levels of light-intensity activity (28% vs 36%) on workdays in comparison with nonworkdays. Up to 71% of working hours were spent sedentary. Individuals who were most sedentary at work were also more sedentary outside work. Those who are most sedentary at work do not compensate by increasing their PA or reducing their sedentary time outside work. Occupational interventions should address workplace and leisure-time sedentary behavior.

  12. The Impact of Work and Volunteer Hours on the Health of Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Alyssa M; Autry, Dana M; Day, Carol R T; Oswalt, Sara B

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of work and volunteer hours on 4 health issues among undergraduate college students. Full-time undergraduate students (N = 70,068) enrolled at 129 institutions who participated in the Spring 2011 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II survey. Multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression were used to examine work and volunteer hour impact on depression, feelings of being overwhelmed, sleep, and physical activity. The impact of work and volunteer hours was inconsistent among the health outcomes. Increased work hours tended to negatively affect sleep and increase feelings of being overwhelmed. Students who volunteered were more likely to meet physical activity guidelines, and those who volunteered 1 to 9 hours per week reported less depression. College health professionals should consider integrating discussion of students' employment and volunteering and their intersection with health outcomes into clinical visits, programming, and other services.

  13. Relationship of work hours with selected health behaviors and academic progress among a college student cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. The authors randomly selected a sample of 1,700 undergraduates from a southeastern US university and mailed to them a survey requesting a variety of self-reported health behaviors and hours worked. A total of 903 completed questionnaires were received, indicating a response rate of 57.3%. Binge drinking, less sleep, and lower academic performance were significantly associated with working 20 or more hours per week. Those variables were not associated with working fewer than 20 hours per week. Although administrators and others in higher education are aware of the impact of economics on a school's ability to operate, they may not be aware of the impact on students' health.

  14. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    -response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p=0·002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (ptrendEmployees who work......, Economic and Social Research Council, European Union New and Emerging Risks in Occupational Safety and Health research programme, Finnish Work Environment Fund, Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Research, German Social Accident Insurance, Danish National Research Centre for the Working......BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We...

  15. The effects of health status and health shocks on hours worked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lixin; Mavromaras, Kostas; Oguzoglu, Umut

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the impact of health on working hours. This is in recognition of the fact that leaving the labour market because of persistently low levels of health status, or because of new health shocks, is only one of the possible responses open to employees. We use the first six waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey to estimate the joint effect of health status and health shocks on working hours. To account for zero working hours, we use a dynamic random effects Tobit model of working hours. We follow Heckman (1981) and approximate the unknown initial conditions with a static equation that utilises information from the first wave of the data. Predicted individual health status is used to ameliorate the possible effects of measurement error and endogeneity. We conclude that overall, lower health status results in fewer working hours and that when they occur, health shocks lead to further reductions in working hours. Estimation results show that the model performs well in separating the time-persistent effect of health status and the potentially more transient health shocks on working hours. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Physiological responses to four hours of low-level repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, A Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Jensen, Bente R

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study investigated physiological responses to 4 hours of standardized low-level repetitive work. It was hypothesized that accumulative effects not observed after 1 hour could be found after 4 hours of repetitive work. METHODS: Ten healthy women performed intermittent (5 seconds + 5...... seconds) handgrip contractions at 10% of the maximal voluntary contraction combined with mental demands for concentration and attention. Muscle activity in the working forearm muscles, cardiovascular responses, and concentrations of biomarkers in biological fluids were recorded along with exerted force...

  17. Influence on working hours among shift workers and effects on sleep quality - An intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Aust, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present intervention study was to examine if increased influence on working hours among shift workers led to better sleep quality. 391 employees were categorized into groups based on the performed activities: High (self-rostering), moderate (education and/or policy for working hours......), and low intensity intervention (meetings and discussions) and reference. Sleep quality was assessed by Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ) at baseline and follow-up (12 months). To elucidate the process of the intervention interviews were conducted. Influence on one's own working hours increased only...

  18. Poor safety climate, long work hours, and musculoskeletal discomfort among Latino horse farm workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer; Clouser, Jessica Miller; Gan, Wenqi; Flunker, John C; Westneat, Susan; Browning, Steven R

    2017-09-03

    This study investigated the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) and work-related factors associated with elevated MSD among Latino thoroughbred farm workers. Participants (N = 225) were recruited using a community-based purposive sampling approach to participate in in-person interviews. Of these workers, 85% experienced MSD. MSD was divided into tertiles; the upper tertile was defined as elevated. Multivariable Poisson regression revealed associations between any elevated MSD and longer tenure on horse farms, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated neck/back MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated upper extremity MSD was associated with age and poor safety climate. Elevated lower extremity MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and being female. Musculoskeletal discomfort is common among these workers. Improving safety climate and minimizing long work hours is recommended.

  19. Chronic Disease Risks From Exposure to Long-Hour Work Schedules Over a 32-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembe, Allard E; Yao, Xiaoxi

    2016-09-01

    This study aims at evaluating the chronic disease risk related to prolonged work in long-hour schedules for eight major chronic diseases: heart disease, non-skin cancer, arthritis, diabetes, chronic lung disease, asthma, chronic depression, and hypertension. The study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 covering 32 years of job history (1978 to 2009) for 7492 respondents. Logistic regression analyses were performed to test the relationship between average weekly work hours, and the reported prevalence of those conditions for each individual. Regularly working long hours over 32 years was significantly associated with elevated risks of heart disease, non-skin cancer, arthritis, and diabetes. The observed risk was much larger among women than among men. Working long-hour schedules over many years increases the risk for some specific chronic diseases, especially for women.

  20. The Gender-Specific Effect of Working Hours on Family Happiness in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Rudolf; Seo-Young Cho

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses detailed longitudinal data from the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS) stretching from 1998 to 2008 to analyze the relationship between working hours and family happiness in Korea. The Korean labor market is characterized by high levels of gender inequality which is partly due to long working hours, a significant gender gap in earnings, yet also to traditional gender roles maintained until today. Therefore, post-marriage labor force participation rates for men are sti...

  1. Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

  2. Marriage markets as explanation for why heavier people work more hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Grossbard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Is BMI related to hours of work through marriage market mechanisms? We empirically explore this issue using data from the NLSY79 and NLSY97 and a number of estimation strategies (including OLS, IV, and sibling FE. Our IV estimates (with same-sex sibling’s BMI as an instrument and a large set of controls including wage suggest that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to an almost 2% increase in White married women’s hours of work. However, BMI is not associated with hours of work of married men. We also find that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to a 1.4% increase in White single women’s hours of work, suggesting that single women may expect future in-marriage transfers that vary by body weight. We show that the positive association between BMI and hours of work of White single women increases with self-assessed probability of future marriage and varies with expected cumulative spousal income. Comparisons between the association between BMI and hours of work for White and Black married women suggest a possible racial gap in intra-marriage transfers from husbands to wives.

  3. Work hours and turnover intention among hospital physicians in Taiwan: does income matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Tsai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician shortage has become an urgent and critical challenge to many countries. According to the workforce dynamic model, long work hours may be one major pressure point to the attrition of physicians. Financial incentive is a common tool to human power retention. Therefore, this large-scale physician study investigated how pay satisfaction may influence the relationship between work hours and hospital physician’s turnover intention. Methods Data were obtained from a nationwide survey of full-time hospital staff members working at 100 hospitals in Taiwan. The analysis sample comprised 2423 full-time physicians. Dependent variable was degree of the physicians’ turnover intention to leave the current hospital. The pay satisfaction was assessed by physicians themselves. We employed ordinal logistic regression models to analyze the association between the number of work hours and turnover intention. To consider the cluster effect of hospitals, we used the “gllamm” command in the statistical software package Stata Version 12.1. Results The results show that 351 (14.5% of surveyed physicians reported strong intention to leave current hospital. The average work hours per week among hospital physicians was 59.8 h. As expected, work hours exhibited an independent relationship with turnover intention. More importantly, pay satisfaction could not effectively moderate the positive relationship between work hours and intentions to leave current hospital. Conclusions The findings show that overtime work is prevalent among hospital physicians in Taiwan. Both the Taiwanese government and hospitals must take action to address the emerging problem of physician high turnover rate. Furthermore, hospitals should not consider relying solely on financial incentives to solve the problem. This study encouraged tackling work hour problem, which would lead to the possibility of solving high turnover intention among hospital physicians in

  4. Sunlight Exposure, Work Hours, Caffeine Consumption, and Sleep Duration in the Naval Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Nita L; Matsangas, Panagiotis

    2017-06-01

    Sailors in the U.S. Navy are habitual shiftworkers, often experiencing circadian misalignment due to their irregular work/rest schedules. This study assessed the effect of sunlight exposure, work hours, and caffeinated beverage consumption on the daily sleep duration of crewmembers of a U.S. Navy ship during a 2-wk underway period. Working in an artificially lit area with no access to sunlight during work hours, U.S. Navy crew members (N = 91) used daily logs to report their daily activity, caffeinated beverage consumption, and exposure to sunlight while off-duty; sleep was assessed by wrist-worn actigraphy. Hours of sunlight exposure, work duration, and the amount of coffee/tea/soft drinks were statistically significant predictors of sleep duration. On average, crewmembers who reported more than one half-hour of sunlight each day slept on average ∼40 min (10%) less than their peers working the same shifts who received less than one half-hour of sunlight (on average 6.05 ± 0.90 h vs. 6.71 ± 0.91 h, respectively). Exposure to sunlight, work hours, and consumption of caffeinated beverages are important factors when planning watchstanding schedules at sea. Even though further research is needed, our results suggest that even brief exposure to sunlight may contribute to circadian misalignment that negatively affects sleep in the operational environment. Educating crewmembers about sleep hygiene, especially the important roles played by sunlight and caffeine, could potentially improve the sleep and fatigue levels of this population of maritime shiftworkers.Shattuck NL, Matsangas P. Sunlight exposure, work hours, caffeine consumption, and sleep duration in the naval environment. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):579-585.

  5. Long and atypical working hours and the impact on intimate family life social activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.

    marriages or in general the intimate social activities of families. That is, some research point to the fact that having atypical working hours in families might have positive influence on family social activities, like supporting possibilities for the number of activities in which mothers and/or fathers......An increasing number of families has to meet the challenges of working in a 24-7 society and at the same time striving to take part in everyday family life. Research is not conclusive with respect to what degree atypical working hours has an impact on, for example, work-family balance, instable...... participate in together with their children (e.g. enjoying breakfasts together). On the other hand other research shows that factors like both parents having atypical working hours and small children in the home suggests a negative impact on family life. In addition, not much research has scrutinized...

  6. A physically active occupation does not result in compensatory inactivity during out-of-work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigbe, William W; Lean, Michael E J; Granat, Malcolm H

    2011-01-01

    To examine differences in non-occupational physical activity behaviour in workers who engage in high and low occupational physical activity. Cross-sectional survey of 112 otherwise comparable volunteers in active (56 walking postal delivery workers) or inactive (56 administrative postal workers) occupations in Glasgow (Scotland) in 2007. Twenty four-hour physical activity (steps and time standing, walking and sedentary) patterns were measured using activPAL™ for seven days. Comparisons were made during 8-hour work-shifts, during non-work hours on work-days and during the 2 non-work days. Age and body mass index of delivery and office staff, respectively, were (means (SD)) 38 (9) years versus 40 (7) years and 26.3 (3) kg m(-2) versus 27.4 (4) kg m(-2). Delivery staff spent substantially longer time than office staff upright (6.0 (1.1) h versus 3.9 (1.5) h) and walking (3.1 (0.7) h versus 1.6 (0.7) h) and amassed more steps (16,035 (4264) versus 6709 (2808)) during 8-hour work-shifts and over 24h on work days. During non-work hours of work-days and during non-work days, there were no significant differences in physical activity between the groups. The results were unchanged when the 15 women were excluded. Having a more active occupation is not associated with more inactivity during non-work hours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Career satisfaction and retention of a sample of women physicians who work reduced hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Rosalind C; Gareis, Karen C; Carr, Phyllis L

    2005-03-01

    To better understand the career satisfaction and factors related to retention of women physicians who work reduced hours and are in dual-earner couples in comparison to their full-time counterparts. Survey of a random sample of female physicians between 25 and 50 years of age working within 25 miles of Boston, whose names were obtained from the Board of Registration in Medicine in Massachusetts. Interviewers conducted a 60-minute face-to-face closed-ended interview after interviewees completed a 20-minute mailed questionnaire. Fifty-one full-time physicians and 47 reduced hours physicians completed the study; the completion rate was 49.5%. The two groups were similar in age, years as a physician, mean household income, number of children, and presence of an infant in the home. Reduced hours physicians in this sample had a different relationship to experiences in the family than full-time physicians. (1) When reduced hours physicians had low marital role quality, there was an associated lower career satisfaction; full-time physicians report high career satisfaction regardless of their marital role quality. (2) When reduced hours physicians had low marital role or parental role quality, there was an associated higher intention to leave their jobs than for full-time physicians; when marital role or parental role quality was high, there was an associated lower intention to leave their jobs than for full-time physicians. (3) When reduced hours physicians perceived that work interfering with family was high, there was an associated greater intention to leave their jobs that was not apparent for full-time physicians. Women physicians in this sample who worked reduced hours had stronger relationships between family experiences (marital and parental role quality and work interference with family) and professional outcomes than had their full-time counterparts. Both career satisfaction and intention to leave their employment are correlated with the quality of home life for

  8. Productivity, Hours Worked, and Tax/Benefit Systems in Europe and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Kaitila, Ville

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the development of labour productivity and hours worked by the working-aged population in the EU25 countries and other OECD countries in 1960-2004. We emphasise the possible effects of taxes, benefits and other labour-market variables. First, we describe the trends in productivity and hours worked especially in the EU15 countries relative to the United States. Then we use both cross-section analyses of the 1995-2004 period and pooled least squares panel data analyses of the 1960-20...

  9. The relation between maternal work hours and cognitive outcomes of young school-aged children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Künn-Nelen, A.C.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first that analyzes the relation between maternal work hours and the cognitive outcomes of young school-going children. When children attend school, the potential time working mothers miss out with their children, is smaller than when children do not yet attend school. At the same

  10. Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan

    Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, part-time working women are as likely to receive

  11. Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, parttime working women are as likely to receive training

  12. The effectiveness of a four-hour challenge course on leadership efficacy and work efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa Odello; Eddie Hill; Edwin Gomez

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the effects of participation in a 4-hour challenge course on leadership efficacy and work efficacy of college students. The findings of this research indicate that both leadership and work efficacy increased significantly after participation in a challenge course and that increased levels of the participants' self-efficacy remained 6 weeks...

  13. Employees' use of social media for private reasons during working hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnlaugsdottir, Johanna

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to find out: Whether Icelandic organizations allowed open access to social media (SM), whether the respondents used SM for private reasons during working hours, which SM they used, how much time they devoted to such use, and what was the attitude of managers and the employees themselves towards such use. The respondents were asked to disclose whether they worked in the private or the public sector and the type of organization that they worked for. This was a two-dimensional study: A questionnaire sent to an internet panel and a telephone survey both based on a random sample selected from the National Registry in February 2013. A similar study has not been performed in Iceland before. Foreign studies of the same nature are not known, only related research. The main findings were that about half of the organizations allowed open access to SM, just below 50% of respondents took advantage of SM for personal use during working hours and the great majority used Facebook. Employees used a considerable part of their working hours for personal use of SM. The majority of respondents were of the opinion that managers objected to the use of SM during working hours and a larger majority believed that such use of themselves was unacceptable. The survey adds valuable information for a better understanding of the status of SM at places of work. The results could be of value to organizations that want to evaluate the pros and cons of SM for the organization.

  14. Otorhinolaryngology residency in Spain: training satisfaction, working environment and conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oker, N; Alotaibi, N H; Herman, P; Bernal-Sprekelsen, M; Albers, A E

    2016-06-01

    Europe-wide efforts are being initiated to define quality standards and harmonize Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (ORL-HNS)-specialty-training by creating an European board examination. However, differences within and between countries remain and are underinvestigated making comparisons and further improvement more difficult. The study aimed at assessing quality of training, satisfaction and quality of life of residents and recent ORL-HNS specialists in Spain and to trace similarities and differences to France and Germany administering anonymous online-questionnaire to ORL-HNS-residents and recent specialists. 146 questionnaires were returned with answers of 75.6 % of residents, a mean age of 30 years and a female to male ratio of 1.46:1. The global satisfaction of training was high as 76 % would choose the same ENT training again, 86 % confirmed that responsibilities which were given to them were adapted to their level of training and 97 % felt well considered in their department. Ninety-two confirmed that helpful seniors contributed to a good work environment (75 %) and to a good organization within the department (69 %). The respondents spent on average 8.8 h per day at the hospital and covered on average 4.8 night duties or week-end shifts per month with mostly no post-day off (86 %). Seventy-four percent participated regularly at complementary training sessions. Research work was supported and guided in 59 %. This study is the first one, to our best of knowledge, to assess the ORL-HNS-training in Spain and to trace parallelisms and differences to other European countries, such as France and Germany. The satisfaction of training and supervision was high in Spain, but there are still efforts to make concerning resident's quality of life. Compared to France and Germany, satisfaction with ORL-HNS-training and the support and guidance provided by seniors was similar. Work conditions were comparable to those in France. Motivation, teaching and

  15. Part-time work and work hour preferences : An international comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielers, Rudolf; Münderlein, Maria; Koster, Ferry

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to explain cross-country differences in over- and under-employment. The focus is on the effects of the growth of part-time work. We argue and demonstrate that the spread and acceptance of part-time work results in a downward adaptation of descriptive norms regulating work

  16. Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 2) - Compensation for hours of long-term shift work

    CERN Multimedia

    Department Head Office - HR Department

    2016-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 2) entitled "Compensation for hours of long-term shift work",  approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1st September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208538.   This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 1) also entitled "Compensation for hours of long-term shift work" of March 2011. This document contains minor changes to reflect the new career structure. This circular will enter into force on 1st September 2016.

  17. Work Hours Offer in Colombia: an Approach to its Determinants, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Eduardo Rangel Jiménez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When participating in the job market, an individual must determine the amount of work hours to offer, a situation illustrated by economic theory through the income and substitution effects. This paper reports the results of the econometric estimation of a three-stage model of the hours of individual work for Colombia, based on the 2012 Quality of Life Survey. In the first stage, a model of the probability of being employed is made; then, a Mincer Equation corrected by selection bias is estimated and, finally, an equation of work hours is estimated using the Tobit model, in terms of wages predicted to correct endogeneity. Results show that the substitution effect takes precedence over the income effect; that age (up to a threshold, being head of household, having children under five years of age, being married or living in a common-law marriage and, finally, having a written employment contract, have a positive effect on the number of hours offered; on the other hand, unearned income has a negative effect on the number of hours offered.

  18. Objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict among hospital employees in the Finnish public sector study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhula, Kati; Puttonen, Sampsa; Ropponen, Annina; Koskinen, Aki; Ojajärvi, Anneli; Kivimäki, Mika; Härmä, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    This epidemiological cohort study, based on Finnish public sector data, investigated the associations between objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict in day and shift work. The comprehensive data of hospital workers (n = 8 931, 92% women, average age 45 years), consisted of survey responses from 2012, linked with the payroll data of working hour characteristics from 91 days preceding the survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between working hour characteristics and experiencing work-life conflict often/very often. The analyses were adjusted for age (50 years), sex, level of education, marital status, number of small (0-6 years) and school-aged (7-18 years) children, and the overall stressfulness of the life situation. We also conducted stratified analyses of age and sex on the basis of significant interactions. Difficulties in combining work and life were more often associated with shift work without night shifts and shift work with night shifts than with day work (41% and 34 versus 27%; OR for shift work with night shifts 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-2.00, OR for shift work without night shifts 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60). A high proportion (> 25%) of long (> 40h, (OR 1.26, 95% 1.14-1.39) and very long (> 48h, OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15-1.49) weekly working hours were associated with work-life conflict, and in the stratified analysis, the latter was also true among women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.25-1.89). Of the unsocial working hour characteristics, a relatively large amount (> 10% of all shifts) of evening (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.41-1.72) and night shifts (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.32-1.61), a high proportion (> 25% of all shifts) of quick returns (work (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.31-1.58) were associated with work-life conflict. A large amount of single days off (> 25% of all days off) was associated with work-life conflict among men (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.25), but not in the whole sample. When the two types of shift work were analyzed separately

  19. Does too much work hamper innovation? Evidence for diminishing returns of work hours for patent grants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celbis, M.G.; Turkeli, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study suggests that individual time is an important factor that needs to be considered in innovation research. We define two types of time: work time and free time. We find that work time has a positive but diminishing effect on innovative output such that after a certain point the

  20. Work and family life of childrearing women workers in Japan: comparison of non-regular employees with short working hours, non-regular employees with long working hours, and regular employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Masako; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Maruyama, Soichiro

    2006-05-01

    This study assessed the working and family life characteristics, and the degree of domestic and work strain of female workers with different employment statuses and weekly working hours who are rearing children. Participants were the mothers of preschoolers in a large Japanese city. We classified the women into three groups according to the hours they worked and their employment conditions. The three groups were: non-regular employees working less than 30 h a week (n=136); non-regular employees working 30 h or more per week (n=141); and regular employees working 30 h or more a week (n=184). We compared among the groups the subjective values of work, financial difficulties, childcare and housework burdens, psychological effects, and strains such as work and family strain, work-family conflict, and work dissatisfaction. Regular employees were more likely to report job pressures and inflexible work schedules and to experience more strain related to work and family than non-regular employees. Non-regular employees were more likely to be facing financial difficulties. In particular, non-regular employees working longer hours tended to encounter socioeconomic difficulties and often lacked support from family and friends. Female workers with children may have different social backgrounds and different stressors according to their working hours and work status.

  1. Work-related violence against educators in Minnesota: rates and risks based on hours exposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chia; Gerberich, Susan G; Alexander, Bruce H; Ryan, Andy D; Nachreiner, Nancy M; Mongin, Steve J

    2013-02-01

    Violence is a major occupational problem; yet, rigorous studies focused on educators to address this problem are limited. The objective was to identify educators' potential risks for physical assault (PA) and nonphysical violence (NPV), based on hours exposed. A total of 4,731 licensed kindergarten through grade 12 Minnesota educators, identified from the Minnesota Department of Education database, participated. Specially designed mailed questionnaires (12-month recall) enabled data collection. Calculated PA and NPV rates, per 100,000 working hours, used Poisson regression. Directed acyclic graphs identified confounders for multivariable analysis, adjusted for non-response and unknown eligibility. The total PA rate was 5.3; PA risks increased for educators who: were non-married versus married; held master's degrees, or education specialist degrees, versus associate/bachelor's degrees; worked in public alternative and various school types, versus public schools; worked as social workers, in special education or multiple activities, versus standard classroom teaching; worked with risks for NPV included: 30-39 and 60-79, versus 50-59years of age; non-married versus married; working in public alternative versus public schools; working part-time or substitute, versus full-time; teaching in special education or multiple activities, versus standard classroom teaching; teaching in class sizes risks for violence against educators, based on hours worked. In addition, they provided a basis for further investigations to reduce violence against educators in the school environment. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Maternal working hours and early childhood overweight in Japan: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Suzuki, Etsuji; Takao, Soshi; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing concern that maternal employment could have adverse or beneficial effects on children's health. Although recent studies demonstrated that maternal employment was associated with a higher risk of childhood overweight, the evidence remains sparse in Asian countries. We sought to examine the relationship between maternal working hours and early childhood overweight in a rural town in Okayama Prefecture. In February 2008, questionnaires were sent to parents of all preschool children aged ≥3 yr in the town to assess maternal working status (working hours and form of employment), children's body mass index, and potential confounders. Childhood overweight was defined following the age and sex-specific criteria of the International Obesity Task Force. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for childhood overweight were estimated in a logistic regression. We used generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation matrix, considering the correlation between siblings. We analyzed 364 preschool children. Adjusting for each child's characteristics (age, sex), mother's characteristics (age, obesity, educational attainment, smoking status, and social participation), and family's characteristics (number of siblings), children whose mothers work children of non-working mothers, whereas the relationship was less pronounced among children whose mothers work ≥8 h/day (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.19, 2.68). We observed similar patterns in a stratified analysis by the form of maternal employment. Short maternal working hours are associated with a lower odds of early childhood overweight.

  3. Reducing Risks to Women Linked to Shift Work, Long Work Hours, and Related Workplace Sleep and Fatigue Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Claire C

    2015-10-01

    In the United States, an estimated 12% to 28% of working women are on shift work schedules, and 12% work more than 48 hours per week. Shift work and long work hours are associated with many health and safety risks, including obesity, injuries, and negative reproductive outcomes. Over time, the worker is at risk for developing a wide range of chronic diseases. These work schedules can also strain personal relationships, owing to fatigue and poor mood from sleep deprivation and reduced quality time to spend with family and friends. Worker errors from fatigue can lead to reduced quality of goods and services, negatively impacting the employer. In addition, mistakes by fatigued workers can have far-reaching negative effects on the community, ranging from medical care errors to motor vehicle crashes and industrial disasters that endanger others. To reduce the many risks that are linked to these demanding work hours, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducts research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, and translates and disseminates scientific information to protect workers, their families, employers, and the community. The key message to reduce these risks is making sleep a priority in the employer's systems for organizing work and in the worker's personal life. The NIOSH website has freely available online training programs with suggestions for workers and their managers to help them better cope with this workplace hazard.

  4. Mismatch in working hours and affective commitment : Differential relationships for distinct employee groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, I.J. Hetty van; Sanders, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – This study examined the relationship between two types of mismatch (i.e. non-correspondence between preferred and actual number of hours), and affective commitment. It was argued that specific groups of employees, i.e. women and part-time working employees, attach more importance to their

  5. Flexible working hours, health, and well-being in Europe: some considerations from a SALTSA project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Giovanni; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Nachreiner, Friedhelm; Baltieri, Federica; Carvalhais, José; Folkard, Simon; Frings-Dresen, Monique; Gadbois, Charles; Gartner, Johannes; Sukalo, Hiltraud Grzech; Härmä, Mikko; Kandolin, Irja; Sartori, Samantha; Silvério, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    The project brought together researchers from 9 EU-Countries and resulted in a number of actions, in particular the following: (a) There is an urgent need of defining the concept of flexible working hours, since it has been used in many different and even counterintuitive ways; the most obvious

  6. Mothers' and Fathers' Work Hours, Child Gender, and Behavior in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah; Li, Jianghong; Kendall, Garth; Strazdins, Lyndall; Jacoby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the association between typical parental work hours (including nonemployed parents) and children's behavior in two-parent heterosexual families. Child behavior was measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at ages 5, 8, and 10 in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study ("N" = 4,201 child-year…

  7. School Foodservice Employees' Perceptions of Practice: Differences by Generational Age and Hours Worked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohbehn, Catherine; Jun, Jinhyun; Arendt, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigated the influences of school foodservice employees' age and average number of hours worked per week on perceived safe food handling practices, barriers, and motivators. Methods: A bilingual survey (English and Spanish) was developed to assess reported food safety practices, barriers, and motivators to…

  8. Weekly hours of informal caregiving and paid work, and the risk of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis

    2017-01-01

    with 1396 informal caregivers in gainful employment, from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health and the Whitehall II study. Informal caregiving was defined as care for an aged or disabled relative. The outcome was CVD during 10 years follow-up. Analyzes were adjusted for age, sex, children...... this risk to be markedly higher among long-term caregivers (6.17, 95%CI: 1.73; 22.1) compared to short-term caregivers (0.89, 95%CI: 0.10; 8.08). Caregivers working ≥55 h weekly were at higher risk of CVD (2.23, 95%CI: 1.14; 4.35) compared to those working 35-40 h weekly. Those providing care >8 h...... and working ≤40 h weekly had a higher risk of CVD compared to those providing care 1-8 h and working ≤40 h (3.23, 95%CI: 1.25; 8.37). Conclusion: A high number of weekly hours of informal caregiving as opposed to few weekly hours is associated with a higher risk of CVD, irrespectively of weekly work hours...

  9. Long working hours and metabolic syndrome among Japanese men: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Tomoko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The link between long working hours and health has been extensively studied for decades. Despite global concern regarding metabolic syndrome, however, no studies to date have solely evaluated the relationship between long working hours and that syndrome. We therefore examined the association between long working hours and metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study. Methods Between May and October 2009, we collected data from annual health checkups and questionnaires from employees at a manufacturing company in Shizuoka, Japan. Questionnaires were returned by 1,601 workers (response rate: 96.2%; 1,314 men, 287 women. After exclusions, including women because of a lack of overtime work, the analysis was performed for 933 men. We calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for metabolic syndrome. Further, we conducted a stratified analysis by age-group ( Results Metabolic syndrome was identified in 110 workers (11.8%. We observed a positive association between working hours and metabolic syndrome after adjusting for age, occupation, shift work, smoking status, frequency of alcohol consumption, and cohabiting status. Compared with subjects who worked 7–8 h/day, multivariate ORs for metabolic syndrome were 1.66 (95% CI, 0.91–3.01, 1.48 (95% CI, 0.75–2.90, and 2.32 (95% CI, 1.04–5.16 for those working 8–9 h/day, 9–10 h/day, and >10 h/day, respectively. Similar patterns were obtained when we excluded shift workers from the analysis. In age-stratified analysis, the corresponding ORs among workers aged ≥40 years were 2.02 (95% CI, 1.04–3.90, 1.21 (95% CI, 0.53–2.77, and 3.14 (95% CI, 1.24–7.95. In contrast, no clear association was found among workers aged Conclusions The present study suggests that 10 h/day may be a trigger level of working hours for increased risk of metabolic syndrome among Japanese male workers.

  10. Does how much a resident teaches impact performance? A comparison of preclinical teaching hours to pathology residents’ in-service examination scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talmon GA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Geoffrey A Talmon,1 Donna K Czarnecki,2 Harlan R Sayles3 1Department of Pathology and Microbiology, 2Educational Support Office, 3Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA Background: While others have studied the effects of resident teaching on medical student performance, few have examined the benefits to the resident educator. Our study compared the quantity of pathology residents’ didactic teaching with their performance on in-service examinations. Methods: The academic records of anatomic/clinical pathology residents over 10 years were reviewed. Scores on step I of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE®, the annual percentile on the in-service examination, and preclinical teaching hours for each resident were obtained. Results: Average annual teaching hours showed a weak positive correlation with mean in-service examination performance. Those below the 50th percentile had a lower number of teaching hours (average 7.8 than above the 50th percentile (mean 10.4, P=0.01. The incremental positive association between the two metrics increased by year in training and was strongest among senior residents, even controlling for USMLE performance (P<0.01. Conclusion: There is an association between the amount of pathology residents’ preclinical educational activity and their mean performance on in-service examinations. Keywords: residency, medical student, USMLE

  11. Influence of flexibility and variability of working hours on health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Giovanni; Sartori, Samantha; Akerstedt, Torbjorn

    2006-01-01

    Flexible working hours can have several meanings and can be arranged in a number of ways to suit the worker and/or employer. Two aspects of "flexible" arrangement of working hours were considered: one more subjected to company control and decision (variability) and one more connected to individual discretion and autonomy (flexibility). The aim of the study was to analyze these two dimensions in relation to health and well-being, taking into consideration the interaction with some relevant background variables related to demographics plus working and social conditions. The dataset of the Third European Survey on working conditions, conducted in 2000 and involving 21,505 workers, was used. Nineteen health disorders and four psycho-social conditions were tested by means of multiple logistic regression analysis, in which mutually adjusted odds ratios were calculated for age, gender, marital status, number of children, occupation, mode of employment, shift work, night work, time pressure, mental and physical workload, job satisfaction, and participation in work organization. The flexibility and variability of working hours appeared inversely related to health and psycho-social well-being: the most favorable effects were associated with higher flexibility and lower variability. The analysis of the interactions with the twelve intervening variables showed that physical work, age, and flexibility are the three most important factors affecting health and well-being. Flexibility resulted as the most important factor to influence work satisfaction; the second to affect family and social commitment and the ability to do the same job when 60 years old, as well as trauma, overall fatigue, irritability, and headache; and the third to influence heart disease, stomachache, anxiety, injury, and the feeling that health being at risk because of work. Variability was the third most important factor influencing family and social commitments. Moreover, shift and night work confirmed to

  12. The organization of working hours of selected employee categories in Czech businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbancová Hana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current dynamic working environment, the adaptation of working hours is an important instrument for supporting the work and performance of all groups of employees. It also serves as an instrument that encourages their identification with the company. The aim of this article is to identify and evaluate the utilization of individual methods of work organization among selected groups of employees in Czech companies across the gamut of the business sector. The analysed data comes from a quantitative questionnairebased survey (n=315. The results show that in the Czech companies, flexitime is most frequent among regular employees (51.7% and graduates up to 30 years old (24.1%. A reduced work schedule is most frequently used by mothers with children and senior citizens (41.3%, 27% and as part-time work among students (41%. The use of flexible working hours is an instrument of diversity management and builds the company brand through enlisting the cooperation of different groups of employees.

  13. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  14. Work hours, work stress, and collaboration among ward staff in relation to risk of hospital-associated infection among patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Kurvinen, Tiina; Terho, Kirsi; Oksanen, Tuula; Peltonen, Reijo; Vahtera, Jussi; Routamaa, Marianne; Elovainio, Marko; Kivimäki, Mika

    2009-03-01

    To examine the association between work hours, work stress, and collaboration among the ward personnel, and the risk of hospital-associated infection among patients. Cross-sectional data on hospital infections were collected between March and June 2004. These data were linked with ward-level responses to a personnel survey collected during the same time period. Medical records of patients in 60 non-psychiatric bed wards in 6 Finnish hospitals. One thousand ninety-two patients and 1159 staff survey responses. Prevalence surveillance was performed by 4 infection control nurses, using standard criteria. Data on several potential risk factors for infection were collected: sex, age, patient type (surgical vs. other), hospital type (university vs. regional hospital), unit type, number of patients in the ward, exposure to invasive devices, International Classification of Diseases version 10 diagnosis, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and use of corticosteroids. Staff working conditions were measured by survey scales. Ninety-nine cases (9.1%) of hospital-associated infection were found. Multilevel logistic regression analyses, adjusted for hospital factors and patient-related risk factors, showed that long work hours among staff were associated with increased risk of infection [odds ratio (OR) 2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-7.04]. Other staff-related correlates of infection were high work stress, as indicated by high imbalance between efforts and rewards (OR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.38-4.42), low trust between work unit members (OR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.27-4.43), injustice in the distribution of work (OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.04-3.16), and poor collaboration between ward supervisors (OR: 2.46; 95% CI: 1.38-4.38). Long work hours, high work stress, and poor collaboration among the ward staff are associated with hospital-associated infection among patients.

  15. Effects of worksite health interventions involving reduced work hours and physical exercise on sickness absence costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Hasson, Henna

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effects of physical exercise during work hours (PE) and reduced work hours (RWH) on direct and indirect costs associated with sickness absence (SA). Sickness absence and related costs at six workplaces, matched and randomized to three conditions (PE, RWH, and referents), were retrieved from company records and/or estimated using salary conversion methods or value-added equations on the basis of interview data. Although SA days decreased in all conditions (PE, 11.4%; RWH, 4.9%; referents, 15.9%), costs were reduced in the PE (22.2%) and RWH (4.9%) conditions but not among referents (10.2% increase). Worksite health interventions may generate savings in SA costs. Costs may not be linear to changes in SA days. Combing the friction method with indirect cost estimates on the basis of value-added productivity may help illuminate both direct and indirect SA costs.

  16. Long working hours, socioeconomic status, and the risk of incident type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Virtanen, Marianna; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Working long hours might have adverse health effects, but whether this is true for all socioeconomic status groups is unclear. In this meta-analysis stratified by socioeconomic status, we investigated the role of long working hours as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We......·0016). In an analysis stratified by socioeconomic status, the association between long working hours and diabetes was evident in the low socioeconomic status group (risk ratio 1·29, 95% CI 1·06-1·57, difference in incidence 13 per 10 000 person-years, I2=0%, p=0·4662), but was null in the high socioeconomic status...... group (1·00, 95% CI 0·80-1·25, incidence difference zero per 10 000 person-years, I(2)=15%, p=0·2464). The association in the low socioeconomic status group was robust to adjustment for age, sex, obesity, and physical activity, and remained after exclusion of shift workers. INTERPRETATION: In this meta...

  17. An electricity market without hourly metering. A working-group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    According to the Electricity Market Act even the least consumers shall, as from 1 January, be entitled to buy electricity direct from the market if the household is equipped with an electric that registers the consumption on an hour-to-hour basis. Access to the market may, however, for the very least-consuming households remain a theoretical option because of the high price of the meters. The working group set up by the Ministry of Trade and Industry to examine the possibility of an electricity market without meters operating on an hour-to-hour basis suggests that consumers who either buy electricity at less than 45 kW or have maximum 3x63A main fuses would be allowed to buy their electricity from the market without installing a new meter. The Ministry of Trade and Industry would, according to the proposal, issue a decision on so-called type load curves. Ordinary households, electrically heated apartments and other consumers would each have a curve of their own which would describe the temporal fluctuations in electricity consumption within the category. In specific cases, the net operator (i.e. the transmitting party) could apply even other curves to take account of local features. The net operator would decide to which consumer category each customer belongs. The working group considers that the proposed change would give small enterprises electrically and even electrically heated ordinary households a genuine access to the market. For those living in blocks of flats, the electricity bill is usually so small that their benefit from a tendering practice would remain very marginal after implementation of the proposal

  18. Dose-Response Relation Between Work Hours and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Findings From the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sadie H; Pompeii, Lisa A; Roberts, Robert E; Follis, Jack L; Gimeno, David

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the presence of a dose-response relationship between work hours and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a representative sample of U.S. workers. A retrospective cohort study of 1926 individuals from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1986 to 2011) employed for at least 10 years. Restricted cubic spline regression was used to estimate the dose-response relationship of work hours with CVD. A dose-response relationship was observed in which an average workweek of 46 hours or more for at least 10 years was associated with an increased risk of CVD. Compared with working 45 hours per week, working an additional 10 hours per week or more for at least 10 years increased CVD risk by at least 16%. Working more than 45 work hours per week for at least 10 years may be an independent risk factor for CVD.

  19. Age-related differences in working hours among male and female GPs: an SMS-based time use study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hassel, Daniël; van der Velden, Lud; de Bakker, Dinny; Batenburg, Ronald

    2017-12-19

    In several countries, the number of hours worked by general practitioners (GPs) has decreased, raising concern about current and impending workforce shortages. This shorter working week has been ascribed both to the feminisation of the workforce and to a younger generation of GPs who prefer more flexible working arrangements. There is, however, limited insight into how the impact of these determinants interact. We investigated the relative importance of differences in GPs' working hours in relation to gender, age, and employment position. An analysis was performed on real-time monitoring data collected by sending SMS text messages to 1051 Dutch GPs, who participated during a 1-week time use study. We used descriptive statistics, independent sample t-tests, and one-way ANOVA analysis to compare the working time of different GP groups. A path analysis was conducted to examine the difference in working time by gender, age, employment position, and their combinations. Female GPs worked significantly fewer hours than their male peers. GPs in their 50s worked the highest number of hours, followed by GPs age 60 and older. GPs younger than 40 worked the lowest number of hours. This relationship between working hours and age was not significantly different for women and men. As shown by path analysis, female GPs consistently worked fewer hours than their male counterparts, regardless of their age and employment position. The relationship between age and working hours was largely influenced by gender and employment position. The variation in working hours among GPs can be explained by the combination of gender, age, and employment position. Gender appears to be the most important predictor as the largest part of the variation in working hours is explained by a direct effect of this variable. It has previously been reported that the difference in working hours between male and female GPs had decreased over time. However, our findings suggest that gender remains a critical

  20. Optimization of work and rest hours for navigation officers on the ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simkuva H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the research as a whole is dedicated to studies of the work load of navigation officers and, consequently, is related to the current international research on the quality of working life. Issues of seafarers' working time are very topical because in recent years the load of navigation officers has significantly increased, either due to increase in shipping intensity, or in the context of the new international maritime law, for example, compliance with the requirements of the ISM CODE (International Management safety Code, THE ISPS (The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. Irregularities are observed in practice of the seafarers' working hours and rest hours, and even the mismatch, as presented in the port of inspection materials. This article is intended to assess the 2nd and 3rd Officer's load compliance with the regulatory enactments for the work and rest regime to develop proposals to load optimization. Load analysis of Navigation officers is based on international maritime regulations that determine the work and rest regime on ships STCW (The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, MLC (Maritime Labour Convention. In the article, concrete data is used from the research, which was conducted 18 months on the Handy type of tanker from July, 2012 till December, 2013 in the real time mode. In the article is also concrete data used from 340 survey respondents, which reflects the views of the navigation officers on violations of the work and rest regime on the ship and the fatigue issue.

  1. Developments in working long and unsocial hours in a Danish prospective cohort study on family and work life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.; Westerling, Allan

    , medical professionals and food processing workers. Several of the studies included pointed at life style behavior, well-being, fatigue and dys-functional sleep patterns as mediating factors while none of the studies had looked at work-family life interaction. The panel study is based on a randomized......A recent systematic literature review by Wagstaff and Sigstad Lie (2011) of shift and night work and long working hours found that those involved might have a higher risk of being involved in occupational accidents especially within safety critical occupations like long-distance lorry drivers...... sample (n=1600) of people born in 1968, living in Denmark in 2003. The panel has participated in two waves of data collection. One in 2003, collected via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews, and one in 2014, based on a web-based survey. The study shows that significant more people are working more...

  2. Does how much a resident teaches impact performance? A comparison of preclinical teaching hours to pathology residents? in-service examination scores

    OpenAIRE

    Talmon, Geoffrey A; Czarnecki, Donna K; Sayles, Harlan R

    2015-01-01

    Geoffrey A Talmon,1 Donna K Czarnecki,2 Harlan R Sayles3 1Department of Pathology and Microbiology, 2Educational Support Office, 3Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA Background: While others have studied the effects of resident teaching on medical student performance, few have examined the benefits to the resident educator. Our study compared the quantity of pathology residents’ didactic teaching with their performance on in-service ex...

  3. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, S.C.; Kecklund, L.G.; Rajaleid, K.; Leineweber, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and

  4. Mothers' Working Hours and Children's Obesity: Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goeun; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul

    2013-10-25

    The aim of this study is to find the association between mothers' working hours and obesity of their children according to children's age and gender. This study used data from the second and third year of KNHANES IV and the first year in KNHANES V (2008-2010). We calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) by using survey logistic regression to assess association of mother's working hours with overweight or obesity of her children. The model was adjusted with household income, mothers' education and obesity and mothers' job characteristics. 13-18 aged boys whose mothers worked under 40 hours per week were higher risk for obesity and overweight (including obesity) than 13-18 aged boys whose mothers worked 40-48 hours. 6-12 aged girls whose mothers worked 49-60 hours per week were more overweight (including obesity) than girls whose mothers worked 40-48 hours per week. 13-18 aged girls whose mothers worked over 60 hours were more overweight (including obesity) than the reference. This study showed that girls' obesity was associated with mothers' long working hours. Long working hours can influence health of workers' family.

  5. Identifying Factors Reinforcing Robotization: Interactive Forces of Employment, Working Hour and Wage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonmo Cho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Unlike previous studies on robotization approaching the future based on the cutting-edge technologies and adopting a framework where robotization is considered as an exogenous variable, this study considers that robotization occurs endogenously and uses it as a dependent variable for an objective examination of the effect of robotization on the labor market. To this end, a robotization indicator is created based on the actual number of industrial robots currently deployed in workplaces, and a multiple regression analysis is performed using the robotization indicator and labor variables such as employment, working hours, and wage. The results using the multiple regression considering the triangular relationship of employment–working-hours–wages show that job destruction due to robotization is not too remarkable yet that use. Our results show the complementary relation between employment and robotization, but the substituting relation between working hour and robotization. The results also demonstrate the effects of union, the size of the company and the proportion of production workers and simple labor workers etc. These findings indicate that the degree of robotization may vary with many factors of the labor market. Limitations of this study and implications for future research are also discussed.

  6. The importance of individual preferences when evaluating the associations between working hours and indicators of health and well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Kecklund, Göran; Ingre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the effect of a given shift schedule may depend on individual factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a misfit between individual preferences and actual working hours affected the association between working hours and self-reported indicator...

  7. Comparison of Shift Work-related Health Problems in 12-hour Shift Schedules of Petrochemical Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khavvaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims Shiftwork that affects diverse aspects of human life is arranged in various schedules, each has its own advantages and disadvantages. This study was carried out with the objectives of determination of common 12-hour shift schedules in petrochemical plants, comparison of shift work health-related problems among employees working in different shift schedules and recommendation of appropriate shift schedule for decrement of related health problems.      methodsThis cross-sectional study was conducted at 8 petrochemical plants in Asalooyeh region related to National Petrochemical Industries in which 12-hour shift schedules were applied. Study population consisted of 549 shift workers with age mean of 29.83±5.75 years. Data on personal details, shift schedule and adverse health effects of shiftwork (i.e. gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, psychological, sleep etc. disorders were collected by anonymous questionnaire.   Results Among 549 studied shift employees, 39.6% worked in 4N-7D-3N-7Res (4night-7day-3night-7rest, 29.1% in 7N-7D-7Res and 31.3% in 7D-7N-7Res schedules. Statistical comparison showed that the prevalence of h ealth problems such as gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders among 7D-7N-7Res schedule shiftworkers were significantly higher than that of other schedules (p0.05.     Conclusion Prevalence of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders in all schedules were high, but odds ratios of all problems among 7D-7N-7Res schedule shiftworkers were significantly more than those of the shiftworkers of the other schedules. This schedule should, therefore, be changed to decrease related-health problems. Fixed 14D/14N schedule may be an appropriate substitution.  

  8. Wanting more or wanting less? Mismatches between actual and preferred working hours in Spain, 2005-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Torre Fernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mismatches between the number of hours people actually work and the hours they would prefer to work are common, and they have important consequences for individual, family and organizational life. This study contributes to prior research examining how the quality of work is affected by the economic crisis. Using data from the Spanish Labor Force Survey from 2005 to 2014, it tests three possible competing predictions for trends in working hour mismatches during the economic downturn. The study reveals that the level of mismatches has increased significantly with the economic recession due to the growing number of people who would wish to work more hours than they actually do. Findings show that the increase in hour mismatches has been particularly striking among workers employed under fixed term contracts, part-time contracts, those in low-status occupations and women. The economic crisis has widened the gap between high- and low-status workers over the last decade.

  9. Whether Regular Working Hours Can Minimize The Blood Bbiochemical Effects of Shift Working: Across-Sectional Study In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Soleimani

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Irregular Working hours, including night work and shift work,have been found to be associated with alteration in various levels of biochemical factors. And some studies have showed association between shift work and blood biochemical disturbances in blood. In this epidemiological study we investigated,whether regular schedule of working hours can minimize the associated biochemical effects.Methods: Atotal of 442 air traffic controllers between the ages of 21 and 59 years in this study filled out questionnaire, and triglyceride, total cholesterol, and HDL-C concentration and FBS were measured after 12- hours fasting. The correlation between shift work and the biochemical variables was measured. The SPSS software version 11.5 and STATAversion 8 were used for statistical analysis, the X2 and fisher's exact test used for comparing the qualitative variables and the parametric tests for quantitative variables with normal distribution. Odd's ratio (OR, and 95% confidence interval (95% CI were used for estimating the effect of shift work on lipid profile and high blood glucose levels. Logistic regression modeling was used for multivariable analysis and adjusting the effect of different variables.Results: sample size of this cross-sectional study was consisted of 305(69% shift workers and 137(31% day workers. The mean age of the shift workers was 40 ± 10 years old and the day workers 40 ± 9.The mean of variables in the present study for total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose in the shift workers were respectively: 195±37mg/dl, 116.8±34.8mg/dl, 48.2±15.1mg/dl, 154±80mg/dl, 92±20mg/dl and in the day workers were respectively: 200±40mg/dl, 125.3±38.6mg/dl, 48.8±23.3mg/dl,151± 77mg/dl, 90± 14mg/dl. Adjusted Odd's ratio for the effect of shift working on the biochemical blood factors did not change the results.Conclusion: This study showed that air traffic control workers with various shift did not

  10. New Results on the Effect of Mothers’ Working Hours on Children’s Overweight Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Jane

    During the last 30 years almost all developed countries have experienced an increase in the number of overweight children. Existing empirical research derives mainly from the U.S., Canada, Australia and the UK, and points at maternal employment as an explanation for the increasing trend in child...... weight. This paper uses the Danish Longitudinal Survey of Children (DALSC) merged with Danish register data from 1995 to 2002 to explore whether a causal relationship exists between maternal working hours and Danish children’s overweight status at age 7½. The instrumental variables technique is used......, as results show that maternal employment has a reducing effect on children’s overweight status in formal daycare (kindergarten). For children in informal daycare (family daycare), maternal employment has no significant effect....

  11. Investigation of Psychophysiological and Subjective Effects of Long Working Hours – Do Age and Hearing Impairment Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Wagner-Hartl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Following current prognosis, demographic development raises expectations of an aging of the working population. Therefore, keeping employees healthy and strengthening their ability to work, becomes more and more important. When employees become older, dealing with age-related impairments of sensory functions, such as hearing impairment, is a central issue. Recent evidence suggests that negative effects that are associated with reduced hearing can have a strong impact at work. Especially under exhausting working situations such as working overtime hours, age and hearing impairment might influence employees’ well-being. Until now, neither the problem of aged workers and long working hours, nor the problem of hearing impairment and prolonged working time has been addressed explicitly. Therefore, a laboratory study was examined to answer the research question: Do age and hearing impairment have an impact on psychophysiological and subjective effects of long working hours. In total, 51 white-collar workers, aged between 24 and 63 years, participated in the laboratory study. The results show no significant effects for age and hearing impairment on the intensity of subjective consequences (perceived recovery and fatigue, subjective emotional well-being and physical symptoms of long working hours. However, the psychophysiological response (the saliva cortisol level to long working hours differs significantly between hearing impaired and normal hearing employees. Interestingly, the results suggest that from a psychophysiological point of view long working hours were more demanding for normal hearing employees.

  12. Interrelation between the prevalence rate of suicides and the length of working hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Korotkov

    2017-01-01

    results of Pedroni panel cointegration tests show that the studied variables are likely cointegrated. The models of panel regression of linear, logarithmic and parabolic specifications are actualized: namely the model for mean values, the model with fixed effects and the model with random effects. As a result of econometric analysis it was determined that the difference in the level of prevalence of suicides of employees in timing inside one country is best explained by a logarithmic dependence from an average factual duration of working time by using a model with fixed effects and a difference between countries – by U-shaped dependence by using a model with random effects. As a result it was established that using the minimal solution of the equation of the parabolic model with random effects, the optimal value of the average actual duration of the working week (38,7 hours is determined, at which the minimum of suicides is reached. Existence of a best value of working time opens up opportunities for scientifically proven regulation of working time towards optimum in order to reduce the number of suicides.

  13. The Identification of a Threshold of Long Work Hours for Predicting Elevated Risks of Adverse Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sadie H; Pompeii, Lisa A; Gimeno Ruiz de Porras, David; Follis, Jack L; Roberts, Robert E

    2017-07-15

    Working long hours has been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, a definition of long work hours relative to adverse health risk has not been established. Repeated measures of work hours among approximately 2,000 participants from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1986-2011), conducted in the United States, were retrospectively analyzed to derive statistically optimized cutpoints of long work hours that best predicted three health outcomes. Work-hours cutpoints were assessed for model fit, calibration, and discrimination separately for the outcomes of poor self-reported general health, incident cardiovascular disease, and incident cancer. For each outcome, the work-hours threshold that best predicted increased risk was 52 hours per week or more for a minimum of 10 years. Workers exposed at this level had a higher risk of poor self-reported general health (relative risk (RR) = 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.53), cardiovascular disease (RR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.24, 1.63), and cancer (RR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.22, 2.17) compared with those working 35-51 hours per week for the same duration. This study provides the first health risk-based definition of long work hours. Further examination of the predictive power of this cutpoint on other health outcomes and in other study populations is needed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Twenty-four-hour shift work, depressive symptoms, and job dissatisfaction among Japanese firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Yasuaki; Ueno, Takeji; Hashimoto, Yoshihiro

    2008-05-01

    The influence of a 24-hr shift-work burden on firefighters' mental health has not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study is to clarify the relationships between specific workload items among firefighters engaged in 24-hr shift work and job stress as estimated by the generic job-stress questionnaire on depressive symptoms and job dissatisfaction from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The subjects were 1,301 firefighters. The questionnaire covered age, gender, job type, job class, marital status, smoking and drinking habits, number of attendances, turnout time, extra work hours, average nap-time, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and questions from the NIOSH generic job-stress questionnaire, including those on job satisfaction. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, a model that included all variables except the measures from the NIOSH generic job-stress questionnaire showed that shorter nap-time had significant higher odds ratios (ORs) for depressive symptoms and job dissatisfaction, but the significances disappeared in a fully adjusted model. In fully adjusted logistic regression analyses, low quantitative workload, low variance in workload, high intra- and intergroup conflict, low social support from a supervisor, high role conflict and ambiguity, and low self-esteem had significant higher ORs for depressive symptoms and/or job dissatisfaction. Amount of workload, variance in workload, intra- and intergroup conflict, social support from a supervisor, role conflict and ambiguity, and self-esteem were significantly related to depressive symptoms and/or job dissatisfaction among Japanese firefighters. Moreover, inadequate nap-time may affect their mental health. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gender-Based Differences in Surgical Residents' Perceptions of Patient Safety, Continuity of Care, and Well-Being: An Analysis from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Chung, Jeanette W; Matulewicz, Richard S; Kelz, Rachel R; Shea, Judy A; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Yang, Anthony D; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about gender differences in residency training experiences and whether duty hour policies affect these differences. Using data from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial, we examined gender differences in surgical resident perceptions of patient safety, education, health and well-being, and job satisfaction, and assessed whether duty hour policies affected gender differences. We compared proportions of male and female residents expressing dissatisfaction or perceiving a negative effect of duty hours on aspects of residency training (ie patient safety, resident education, well-being, job satisfaction) overall and by PGY. Logistic regression models with robust clustered SEs were used to test for significant gender differences and interaction effects of duty hour policies on gender differences. Female PGY2 to 3 residents were more likely than males to be dissatisfied with patient safety (odds ratio [OR] = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.29-4.84) and to perceive a negative effect of duty hours on most health and well-being outcomes (OR = 1.51-2.10; all p gender differences in career dissatisfaction among interns (p = 0.028), but widened gender differences in negative perceptions of duty hours on patient safety (p job satisfaction (p Gender differences exist in perceptions of surgical residency. These differences vary across cohorts and can be influenced by duty hour policies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From Minimum Wage to Standard Work Hour: HKSAR Labour Politics in Regime Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence K. K. Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the significance of labour issues – namely, the minimum wage (MW and standard working hours (SWH – in shaping candidates’ electoral platforms in the 2012 chief executive (CE election of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR under the sovereignty of the People’s Republic of China (PRC. We first offer a brief review of labour politics regarding the MW case as a precursor to the SWH drafting and enactment process. We then provide an analytical delineation of some of the labour and socio-economic dimensions of the CE electoral contest by comparing the candidates’ campaign planks in relation to SWH. We then attempt to predict the likely course of the SWH debate under the leadership of Leung Chun-ying, who eventually won the CE election and assumed power on 1 July 2012. We conclude by examining Leung’s social engineering attempts to increase popular support amongst low- and middle-income (LMI households as part of his long-term strategy for the 2017 CE elections and his broader Beijing-entrusted political agenda.

  18. It is worth 10 million working hours a year to have your toilet paper folded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Rickard; Ljung, Hedvig; Ljung, Harald

    2016-01-01

    From our experience the toilet paper is folded in the bathrooms in rooms in branded hotels. We aimed to study the total time yearly spent in the world on folding hotel toilet paper. Three investigators clocked 60 folding toilet paper events and calculated the mean time. The mean folding time was 5.73 s (interquartile range 4.50-6.56). Using the calculated extra time it takes to fold the toilet paper and the number of hotel nights spent we estimated the total time spent in the world each year to fold the toilet paper. For sensitivity analyses we used different assumptions on number of hotel beds, occupancy rate and folding time. Assuming an extra 10 s spent on folding toilet paper, approximately 10 million hours are globally spent on folding toilet paper every year. This corresponds to more than 5000 man-years of work. In a hotel with yearly full coverage of 200 beds skipping folding the toilet paper corresponds to around 200 h of time that could be spent elsewhere. To take away unnecessary duties from hotel room cleaners would increase their health and well-being and save time that could be better spent. Is it really defendable and appropriate that someone else has spent time on folding the toilet paper you are just about to use?

  19. Work-Related Quality of Life of US General Surgery Residents: Is It Really so Bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Muhammad H; Hussain, Lala R; Williams, Kristen N; Grannan, Kevin J

    The quality of working life of US surgical residents has not been studied, and given the complexity of interaction between work and personal life there is a need to assess this interaction. We utilized a validated Work Related Quality of Life (WRQoL) questionnaire to evaluate the perceived work-related quality of life of general surgery residents, using a large, nationally representative sample in the United States. Between January 2016 and March 2016, all US general surgery residents enrolled in an ACGME general surgery training program were invited to participate. The WRQoL scale measures perceived quality of life covering six domains: General Well-Being (GWB), Home-Work Interface (HWI), Job and Career Satisfaction (JCS), Control at Work (CAW), Working Conditions (WCS) and Stress at Work (SAW). After excluding for missing data, the final analysis included 738 residents. The average age was 30 (±3) years, of whom 287 (38.9%) were female, 272 (36.9%) were from a community hospital, and 477 (64.6%) were juniors (postgraduate year ≤ 3). Demographically, the respondents matched expected percentages. When male and female residents were compared, males had statistically better HWI (pQuality of Life. Our findings suggest further study is needed to elucidate why female residents have or experience a lower perceived WRQoL than their male colleagues. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. BASS 4: a software system for ergonomic design and evaluation of working hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schomann

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To extend an existing computer programme for the evaluation and design of shift schedules (BASS 3 by integrating workload as well as economic aspects. METHODS: The redesigned prototype BASS 4 includes a new module with a suitable and easily applicable screening method (EBA for the assessment of the intensity of physical, emotional and cognitive workload components and their temporal patterns. Specified criterion functions based on these ratings allow for an adjustment of shift and rest duration according to the intensity of physical and mental workload. Furthermore, with regard to interactive effects both workload and temporal conditions, e.g. time of day, are taken into account. In a second new module, important economic aspects and criteria have been implemented. Different ergonomic solutions for scheduling problems can now also be evaluated with regard to their economic costs. RESULTS: The new version of the computer programme (BASS 4 can now simultaneously take into account numerous ergonomic, legal, agreed and economic criteria for the design and evaluation of working hours. CONCLUSIONS: BASS 4 can now be used as an instrument for the design and the evaluation of working hours with regard to legal, ergonomic and economic aspects at the shop floor as well as in administrative (e.g. health and safety inspection and research problems.OBJETIVOS: Expandir um programa computacional existente para planejamento e avaliação dos horários de turnos (BASS 3 por meio da incorporação da carga de trabalho e características econômicas. MÉTODOS: O protótipo BASS 4 contém um novo módulo com um método de triagem (EBA conveniente e de fácil aplicação para a avaliação da intensidade dos componentes físico, emocional e cognitivo da carga de trabalho e seus padrões temporais. O uso de critérios específicos com base nestas avaliações possibilita ajustar a duração do turno e do descanso de acordo com a intensidade da carga de

  1. An Exploratory Analysis of Work Engagement, Satisfaction, and Depression in Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Gaurava; Karpouzian, Tatiana

    2016-02-01

    This exploratory study aims to measure work engagement levels in psychiatry residents at three psychiatry residency programs using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). In addition, the study investigates the relationship between total engagement and its subscales, resident satisfaction, and a depression screen. Recruitment of 53/79 residents from three psychiatry residency programs in Illinois was completed. The residents were administered a questionnaire consisting of the UWES, the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (Prime-MD) depression screen, and a residency satisfaction scale. Statistical analysis using independent samples t test and a one-way analysis of variance was used to assess differences on engagement total score and subscales and satisfaction scale. A logistic regression was used with the engagement subscales and the satisfaction scale as predictors of belonging to the depressed or non-depressed group. Psychiatry residents scored in the high range for total engagement and all its subscales except for vigor which was in the moderate range. Residents who screened positive for depression reported lower total engagement than those who were negative on the depression screen. Vigor was the only significant predictor (p = .004) of being in the depressed group after logistic regression. Total engagement and the subscale of dedication significantly predicted overall residency satisfaction (β = .473, p = .016). Higher total UWES-15 and its subscales of vigor and dedication are correlated with a lower rate of screening positive for depression and higher residency satisfaction. This exploratory study lends support for further study of this psychological construct in medical training programs, but replication is needed.

  2. Age-related differences in working hours among male and female GPs: an SMS-based time-use study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassel, D. van; Velden, L. van der; Bakker, D. de; Batenburg, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In several countries, the number of hours worked by general practitioners (GPs) has decreased, raising concern about current and impending workforce shortages. This shorter working week has been ascribed both to the feminisation of the workforce and to a younger generation of GPs who

  3. A panel data analysis of the effects of wages, standard hours and unionisation on paid overtime work in Britain"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalwij, A.S.; Gregory, M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effects of the basic wage rate, standard working hours and unionisation on paid overtime work in Britain using individual-level data from the New Earnings Survey over the period 1975-2001. For this purpose we estimate a panel data model. We show that to obtain consistent

  4. Resident Perspectives on Work-Life Policies and Implications for Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westercamp, Nicole; Wang, Raziya S; Fassiotto, Magali

    2018-02-01

    As resident burnout increases, there is a need for better awareness, resources, and interventions. Challenges in balancing work and life priorities have been implicated in contributing to physician burnout. Institutional work-life policies (WLPs) are critical tools to meet work-life needs. This study investigates the influence of WLPs on residents' experiences. The authors emailed a SurveyMonkey link to the APA chief resident and Minority Fellow listservs and directly to 94 psychiatry program directors and 52 fellowship directors nationwide to distribute a survey to residents regarding WLP use and barriers, as well as burnout. Estimated response rate was 12-23%. The authors assessed the anonymous responses using SPSS to evaluate for relationships between awareness of WLPs, perceptions/barriers surrounding their usage, and burnout. The authors analyzed 255 responses. Awareness and use of policies ranged from 2 to 33%. A prominent barrier to WLPs is that use results in shifting workload to co-residents (48% agree). Respondents who perceived leadership to view use of WLPs as a sign of weakness (16% agree) were less likely to use WLPs (t (89) = -3.52, p burnout (41%) perceived vastly higher barriers to using WLPs as compared to those without burnout. This study supports the need for further investigation of WLPs to mitigate resident burnout and identifies important perceived barriers that affect the use of WLPs including low awareness, potential for shifting workload to co-residents, and negative perceptions of leadership attitudes toward WLPs.

  5. Long Work Hours, Part-Time Work, and Trends in the Gender Gap in Pay, the Motherhood Wage Penalty, and the Fatherhood Wage Premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A. Weeden

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We assess how changes in the social organization and compensation of work hours over the last three decades are associated with changes in wage differentials among mothers, fathers, childless women, and childless men. We find that large differences between gender and parental status groups in long work hours (fifty or more per week, coupled with sharply rising hourly wages for long work hours, contributed to rising gender gaps in wages (especially among parents, motherhood wage penalties, and fatherhood wage premiums. Changes in the representation of these groups in part-time work, by contrast, is associated with a decline in the gender gap in wages among parents and in the motherhood wage penalty, but an increase in the fatherhood wage premium. These findings offer important clues into why gender and family wage differentials still persist.

  6. Employees’ Preferences for more or fewer Working Hours. The Effects of Usual, Contractual and Standard Working Time, Family Phase and Household Characteristics, and Job Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.

    2002-01-01

    This study seeks explanations for working time preferences, using cross-sectional multinomial logits for the 2001/2002 Wage Indicator dataset (N=21,727). As expected, the preferences are predominately influenced by working hours’ characteristics, showing that employees with long hours prefer to work

  7. 29 CFR 5.8 - Liquidated damages under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... notwithstanding the exercise of due care upon the part of the contractor or subcontractor involved, and the amount... Hours and Safety Standards Act notwithstanding the exercise of due care upon the part of the contractor... recommendations to this effect or a report to the Department of Labor. This delegation of authority is made under...

  8. Shift work, long working hours, and later risk of dementia: A long-term follow-up of the Copenhagen Male Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Ishtiak-Ahmed, Kazi; Gyntelberg, Finn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Waldemar, Gunhild; Westendorp, Rudi Gj; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2017-11-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shift work and long working hours in midlife on the risk of dementia in old age. Methods The present study comprised 4766 participants from the Copenhagen Male Study. We used information on shift work (collected in 1970-1971 and 1985-1986), long working hours defined as >45 hours per week (collected in 1970-1971), socioeconomic status, sleep, stress, and cardiovascular risk factors. Information about dementia diagnoses was obtained from registers. Participants were followed until 2014 (mean length of follow-up was 17.8 years). We employed Poisson regression for the survival analyses and estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We found no statistically significant association between shift work (IRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70-1.05) or long working hours (IRR 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.19) and dementia. Adjustment for potential confounders and mediators did not change the estimates. Working shifts at both time points of exposure assessment was not associated with a higher incidence of dementia compared with non-shift workers at both time points (IRR 0.99, 95% CI 0.69-1.42). The lowest incidence of dementia was observed among participants who reported shift work at one time point (only in 1985-1986: IRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.16-1.23 and only in 1970-1971: IRR 0.58, 95% CI 0.31-1.11). Conclusion We did not find positive evidence of an association between shift work or long working hours and the incidence of dementia, but the negative findings may reflect the crude assessment of shift work and long working hours, which is a major limitation of the present study.

  9. Deterioration of Neurobehavioral Performance in Resident Physicians During Repeated Exposure to Extended Duration Work Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Clare; Sullivan, Jason P.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Cade, Brian E.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although acute sleep loss during 24- to 30-h extended duration work shifts (EDWS) has been shown to impair the performance of resident physicians, little is known about the effects of cumulative sleep deficiency on performance during residency training. Chronic sleep restriction induces a gradual degradation of neurobehavioral performance and exacerbates the effects of acute sleep loss in the laboratory, yet the extent to which this occurs under real-world conditions is unknown. In this study, the authors quantify the time course of neurobehavioral deterioration due to repeated exposure to EDWS during a 3-week residency rotation. Design: A prospective, repeated-measures, within-subject design. Setting: Medical and cardiac intensive care units, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. Participants: Thirty-four postgraduate year one resident physicians (23 males; age 28.0 ± 1.83 (standard deviation) years) Measurements and Results: Residents working a 3-week Q3 schedule (24- to 30-h work shift starts every 3rd day), consisting of alternating 24- to 30-h (EDWS) and approximately 8-h shifts, underwent psychomotor vigilance testing before, during, and after each work shift. Mean response time, number of lapses, and slowest 10% of responses were calculated for each test. Residents also maintained daily sleep/wake/work logs. EDWS resulted in cumulative sleep deficiency over the 21-day rotation (6.3 h sleep obtained per day; average 2.3 h sleep obtained per extended shift). Response times deteriorated over a single 24- to 30-h shift (P Cade BE; Czeisler CA; Lockley SW. Deterioration of neurobehavioral performance in resident physicians during repeated exposure to extended duration work shifts. SLEEP 2012;35(8):1137-1146. PMID:22851809

  10. What is an anesthesiology resident worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Marisa H; Beaman, Shawn T; Metro, David G; Handley, Linda J; Walker, James E

    2009-08-01

    To determine the cost of replacing an anesthesiology resident with a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for equal operating room (OR) work. Retrospective financial analysis. Academic anesthesiology department. Clinical anesthesia (CA)-1 through CA-3 residents. Cost of replacing anesthesiology residents with CRNAs for equal OR work was determined. The cost of replacing one anesthesiology resident with a CRNA for the same number of OR hours ranged from $9,940.32 to $43,300 per month ($106,241.68 to $432,937.50 per yr). Numbers varied depending on the CRNA pay scale and whether the calculations were based on the number of OR hours worked at our residency program or OR hours worked in a maximum duty hour model. A CRNA is paid substantially more per OR hour worked, at all pay levels, than an anesthesiology resident.

  11. Schedule Control, Supervisor Support and Work Engagement: A Winning Combination for Workers in Hourly Jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer E.; McKechnie, Sharon P.; Ojha, Mamta U.; James, Jacquelyn B.

    2011-01-01

    The changing natures of both work and the lives of the U.S. workforce have created an array of challenges for organizations attempting to foster work engagement. To accommodate the work and family needs of an increasingly diverse workforce, many firms are offering flexible work solutions to employees. However, the distribution of these types of…

  12. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original

  13. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care Contract...

  14. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual? 261.60 Section 261.60 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING...

  15. Combined effects of working hours, income, and leisure time on suicide in all 47 prefectures of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akito; Sakano, Noriko; Miyatake, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study describes an ecological study that evaluated the combined effects of working hours, income, and leisure time on suicide in all 47 prefectures of Japan. In men, the age-adjusted rate of suicide (per 100,000 population) was significantly correlated with working hours (r=0.587, pincome (r=-0.517, p=0.0002) and times for the leisure activities of self-education (r=-0.447, p=0.0016) and hobbies (r=-0.511, p=0.0002). In addition, a stepwise multiple regression analysis identified time for leisure social activities as a determining factor in suicide rate, even after adjusting for working hours and income. However, the impact of time for leisure social activities on suicide rate was smaller than that of working hours and income. In contrast, none of these factors affected suicide rate in women. These results suggest that increasing leisure time may be useful for preventing suicide among men in Japan.

  16. Female Labor Supply in Japan: Implications of the Informal Sector for Labor Force Participation and Hours of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. Anne

    1989-01-01

    Looks at the simultaneous labor force participation and hours of work decisions for Japanese wives, both employees and family workers. Although the estimated aggregate wage and income fluctuations for employees are somewhat higher than previous estimates for the United States, they are of the same order of magnitude. (JOW)

  17. Perception of Preparedness for Clinical Work Among New Residents: A Cross-sectional Study from Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Al Sinawi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate new residents’ perceptions of their own preparedness for clinical practice and examine the associated factors. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on August 20−23, 2016. New residents accepted for postgraduate training by Oman Medical Specialty Board were asked to complete the Preparation for Hospital Practice Questionnaire (PHPQ. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22. Results: A total of 160 residents were invited to participate in this study. Out of 160, 140 residents participated (87.5%, 70.7% were female and 59.3% were graduates from Sultan Qaboos University (SQU. Ninety-nine percent of the graduates were either ‘well prepared’ or ‘fairly well prepared’ for hospital practice. Male residents scored higher in the confidence scale, while residents who did a post-internship general practice placement scored higher in understanding science. Graduates from Oman Medical College felt more prepared compared to graduates from SQU. Conclusions: Most of the new residents were well prepared to clinical work. Factors such as place of undergraduate study, training, and duration of internship significantly influenced the residents’ perception of preparedness. Addressing these factors will enhance residents’ preparedness for clinical work.

  18. [Burn-out, commitment, personality and experiences during work and training; survey among psychiatry residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, R; Ewalds, A L; van der Heijden, P T; Penterman, E J M; Grootens, K P

    2017-01-01

    In the last few years international studies have reported on increase in burn-out and depressive symptoms among psychiatry residents. In the field of research, however, commitment and dedication are now being mentioned more frequently as positive factors that counterbalance burn-out. To find out how a group of Dutch psychiatry residents feel about their work, to discover their degree of burn-out and commitment and to clarify the various factors involved. 59 psychiatry residents from four teaching hospitals were asked to complete questionnaires concerning burn-out (U-BOS-C), commitment (UWES-15) and personality (BFI-NL). Respondents were also asked to describe how they felt about their experiences during their work and to give their views on the instruction and training they were receiving. In the U-BOS-C section only four trainees (almost 7%) met the criteria for burn-out. In the BFI-NL section the psychiatry residents obtained significantly lower scores on neuroticism and higher scores on empathy than did a comparable norm group of a similar age. The scores of the psychiatry residents indicated that the term 'being proud of your work' was significantly related to a feeling of commitment and particularly to all subscales that reflected commitment. In our study the percentage of psychiatry residents with burn-out is significantly lower than the percentage reported elsewhere in the literature. In fact, our results demonstrate that the psychiatry residents who were the subject of our study regarded themselves as being emotionally stable, friendly and committed to their work.

  19. Working hours and incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components in a Mediterranean cohort: the SUN project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Adriano M; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Sayon-Orea, Carmen; Gea, Alfredo; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Enrique; Lopez-Iracheta, Roberto; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important and priority public health problem globally. Long working hours have been proposed as a modifiable risk factor for MetS, despite sparse epidemiological evidence. Thus, the aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the associations between working hours and incidence of MetS and each of its components. We assessed 6845 participants of a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort of university graduates (the SUN project), initially free of any specific criteria of MetS, and followed-up for a median of 8.3 years. Weekly working hours were collected at baseline and grouped into four categories: >0-24, 25-39, 40-49 and ≥50 h. MetS was defined according to the updated harmonizing criteria. We estimated multivariable adjusted Relative Risks (RR) of MetS and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI), using Poisson regression models. The cumulative incidence of MetS was 6.0%. Working hours were not independently related to MetS (25-39 h/week = RR: 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.25; 40-49 h/week = RR: 1.45, 95% CI 0.91-2.30; ≥50 h/week = RR: 1.49, 95% CI 0.91-2.42, P for trend = 0.235) nor to any of its individual definition criteria. Our findings do not suggest that long working hours increase the risk of MetS development or each of its components. Further longitudinal studies in general population should be conducted to confirm these results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Sophie C; Kecklund, Göran; Rajaleid, Kristiina; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-06-01

    Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and control over time off, was related to depressive symptoms over time and examined causal, reversed-causal, and reciprocal pathways. The study was based on four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health which is a follow-up of representative samples of the Swedish working population. WTC was measured using a 5-item index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a brief subscale of the Symptom Checklist. Latent growth curve models and cross-lagged panel models were tested. Best fit was found for a model with correlated intercepts (control over daily hours) and both correlated intercepts and slopes (control over time off) between WTC and depressive symptoms, with stronger associations for control over time off. Causal models estimating impacts from WTC to subsequent depressive symptoms were best fitting, with a standardised coefficient between -0.023 and -0.048. Results were mainly based on self-report data and mean age in the study sample was relatively high. Higher WTC was related to fewer depressive symptoms over time albeit small effects. Giving workers control over working hours - especially over taking breaks and vacation - may improve working conditions and buffer against developing depression, potentially by enabling workers to recover more easily and promoting work-life balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. From Gods to goddesses : Horai management as an approach to coordinating working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alis, D.; Karsten, L.; Leopold, J.

    Flexibility in working time arrangements may lead to heterogeneity of working-time patterns. Drawing on the societal perspective, we consider three interrelated spheres of: professional relations, organizational, and domestic space. Greek mythology assists us to contrast chrono management and Horai

  2. Predicting medical specialists' working (long) hours: Testing a contemporary career model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Eisinga, R.N.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With the feminization (in numbers) of several professions, changing gender role prescriptions regarding parenthood and an increased attention for work-life balance, career theorists recently addressed the need for a more contemporary career model taking a work-home perspective. In this study, we

  3. Changing Hours of Work: A Review and Analysis of the Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, William F.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the positive and negative effects of compressed work weeks and flextime on employee performance, satisfaction, absenteeism and tardiness, and turnover, as well as their effect on the quality of work done and the frequency of accidents. (IRT)

  4. Are shorter work hours good for the environment? A comparison of U.S. and European energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnick, David; Weisbrot, Mark

    2007-01-01

    European employees work fewer hours per year, and use less energy per person, than their American counterparts. This article compares the European and U.S. models of labor productivity, supply, and energy consumption. It finds that if employees in the EU-15 worked as many hours as those in the United States, they would consume at least 15 percent more energy. This aspect of the debate over Europe's economic model reaches globally. Over the coming decades, developing countries will decide how to make use of their increasing productivity. If, by 2050, the world works as do Americans, total energy consumption could be 15 to 30 percent higher than it would be if following a more European model. Translated directly into higher carbon emissions, this could mean an additional 1 to 2 degrees Celsius in global warming.

  5. Biological accidents at work among resident physicians in specialist training at Bari University Hospital, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Antonella; Serra, Rosaria; Drago, Ignazio; Soleo, Leonardo; Lovreglio, Piero

    2016-11-01

    The phenomenon of accidents at work was investigated among the resident physicians of the School of Medicine, Bari University, by a self-administered anonymous questionnaire probing personal details and inquiring about any accidents at work experienced during the training period, and by a comparison with the accidents reported to the Hospital Accidents Registry. At least 1 biological accident was reported by 18.2% of the 450 participants, this percentage being significantly higher in the surgical area (33.3%), where biological accidents were much more rarely reported to either the Residency School Director or the Accidents Registry. In conclusion, despite an overall reduction compared with the past, the frequency both of biological accidents and of underreporting is still high among resident physicians, particularly in the surgical area. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Residents' perceived barriers to communication skills learning: comparing two medical working contexts in postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eertwegh, Valerie; van Dalen, Jan; van Dulmen, Sandra; van der Vleuten, Cees; Scherpbier, Albert

    2014-04-01

    Contextual factors are known to influence the acquisition and application of communication skills in clinical settings. Little is known about residents' perceptions of these factors. This article aims to explore residents' perceptions of contextual factors affecting the acquisition and application of communication skills in the medical workplace. We conducted an exploratory study comprising seven focus groups with residents in two different specialities: general practice (n=23) and surgery (n=18). Residents perceive the use of summative assessment checklists that reduce communication skills to behavioural components as impeding the learning of their communication skills. Residents perceive encouragement to deliberately practise in an environment in which the value of communication skills is recognised and support is institutionalised with appropriate feedback from role models as the most important enhancing factors in communication skills learning. To gradually realise a clinical working environment in which the above results are incorporated, we propose to use transformative learning theory to guide further studies. Provided it is used continuously, an approach that combines self-directed learning with observation and discussion of resident-patient consultations seems an effective method for transformative learning of communication skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Linking Resident Satisfaction to Staff Perceptions of the Work Environment in Assisted Living: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between resident satisfaction and staff perceptions of the work environment in assisted living. Staff perceptions were assessed at the facility level, using aggregate measures of staff job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and views of organizational culture. Design and Methods: The sample…

  8. From living wage to living hours – the Nordic version of the working poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    , the article demonstrates how the increasing use of part-time and Sunday work since the crisis interacts with the increasing shares of young workers and migrant workers. The analysis focuses on retail and hotels/restaurants, which employ the majority of low-wage service workers in Denmark, Norway and Sweden....

  9. In the eyes of residents good supervisors need to be more than engaged physicians: the relevance of teacher work engagement in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2015-01-01

    During their development into competent medical specialists, residents benefit from their attending physicians' excellence in teaching and role modelling. Work engagement increases overall job performance, but it is unknown whether this also applies to attending physicians' teaching performance and

  10. Administrative circular n°23 (Rev. 3) – Special working hours

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 3) entitled “Special working hours”, approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 11 October 2012 and entering into force on 1 January 2013, is available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department.   This circular is applicable to staff members and fellows. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 2) entitled “Special working hours” of December 2008. Paragraph 6 a) of Annex II of this circular was revised following the modification of Article III 1.04 of the Staff Regulations approved by Council on 14 December 2012. The modification serves to adapt the minimum rest time to the fact that, in case of rapidly alternating shifts, a maximum of seven consecutive shifts may be performed. Department Head Office HR Department

  11. Sleep loss and accidents--work hours, life style, and sleep pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Philip, Pierre; Capelli, Aurore; Kecklund, Göran

    2011-01-01

    A very important outcome of reduced sleep is accidents. The present chapter will attempt to bring together some of the present knowledge in this area. We will focus on the driving situation, for which the evidence of the link between sleep loss and accidents is quite well established, but we will also bring up working life in general where evidence is more sparse. It should be emphasized that reduced sleep as a cause of accidents implies that the mediating factor is sleepiness (or fatigue). This link is discussed elsewhere in this volume, but here we will bring in sleepiness (subjective or physiological) as an explanatory factor of accidents. Another central observation is that many real life accident studies do not link accidents to reduced sleep, but infer reduced sleep and/or sleepiness from the context, like, for example, from work schedules, life styles, or sleep pathology. Reduced sleep is mainly due to suboptimal work schedules (or to a suboptimal life style) or to sleep pathology. We have divided the present chapter into two areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Physician nutrition and cognition during work hours: effect of a nutrition based intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemaire Jane B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians are often unable to eat and drink properly during their work day. Nutrition has been linked to cognition. We aimed to examine the effect of a nutrition based intervention, that of scheduled nutrition breaks during the work day, upon physician cognition, glucose, and hypoglycemic symptoms. Methods A volunteer sample of twenty staff physicians from a large urban teaching hospital were recruited from the doctors' lounge. During both the baseline and the intervention day, we measured subjects' cognitive function, capillary blood glucose, "hypoglycemic" nutrition-related symptoms, fluid and nutrient intake, level of physical activity, weight, and urinary output. Results Cognition scores as measured by a composite score of speed and accuracy (Tput statistic were superior on the intervention day on simple (220 vs. 209, p = 0.01 and complex (92 vs. 85, p Conclusions Our study provides evidence in support of adequate workplace nutrition as a contributor to improved physician cognition, adding to the body of research suggesting that physician wellness may ultimately benefit not only the physicians themselves but also their patients and the health care systems in which they work.

  13. Maternal Work Hours and Adolescents' School Outcomes among Low-Income Families in Four Urban Counties. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #07-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennetian, Lisa A.; Lopoo, Leonard M.; London, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children's school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with 1,700 women who in May 1995 were welfare-reliant, single mothers of adolescents living in disadvantaged neighborhoods in four urban counties. We find unfavorable effects of…

  14. Analysis and Development in Method of Permissible Working Hours of Agricultural Wells in the Khorasan-e-Razavi Province- Case study: Neyshabour Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Haghayeghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Permissible working hours of agricultural wells in the Neyshabour plain was determined equal 4120 hours by regional water authority of Khorasan-e-Razavi. This research was conducted to introduce method of working hours of agricultural wells in the Khorasan-e-Razavi province (case study of Neyshabour plain and analyse effective parameters on working time of wells. For this purpose, the area of agronomy and horticulture crops was obtained for the years of 2001 to 2010. Water requirement of these crops was extracted from the water national document. Working hours of wells for every months would be calculated by deviding gross irrigation requirement to average hydromodul of three maximum months. The calculations to assess the effect of sowing pattern was done separately in two phases, for all crops pattern and for major crops pattern. In the thirth and forth phases, the effect of annual variation of water requirement and irrigation hydromodul were assessed on the working hours of Neyshabour plain wells. The results showed that instead of using all crops pattern, it is possible to use just major crops in calculating of working hours of wells. Annual variation of sowing pattern and water requirement in the Neyshabour plain have significant effect (95% confidence on working hours of wells. By suppose the constant area under crops in the Neyshabour plain, adjust in calculating of working hours of wells was done using measured hydromodul in the region. In adjusted method, the annual working hours showed increase averagely 440 (11% hours in compare to permissible working hours of Neyshabour plain (4120 hours. This variety in working hours of wells cause to be near to existence and realy conditions of the Neyshabour plain. In an agronomy year, it is possible to have an acceptable forcasting for working hours of regional wells by determining the sowing area of wheat and barley.

  15. Effects of pay resets following drug use on attendance and hours worked in a therapeutic workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtyn, August F; Silverman, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    This secondary data analysis examined effects of an abstinence contingency on participation in a therapeutic workplace. Participants exposed to a pay reset after drug use did not differ in overall attendance from participants who were not exposed to a pay reset after drug use; however, they initially worked less after a pay reset than participants who did not receive a pay reset, and their attendance increased as their pay increased. Overall participation was not influenced by the abstinence contingency, but transient decreases in attendance occurred. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  16. 24-hour pattern of work-related injury risk of French firemen: nocturnal peak time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Marc; Berrez, Stéphane; Pelisse, Didier; Brousse, Eric; Forget, Coralie; Marlot, Michel; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain

    2011-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to assess clock-time patterning of work-related injuries (WRIs) of firemen (FM) of Saône et Loire-71 (France) during the 4-yr span of 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2007. FM of this service are legally required to log every WRI and seek its evaluation by the medical service, whether the WRI was the result of worksite duties or exercise/sport activities at the station. WRI was defined specifically as a (nonexercise, nonsport, and nonemotional/stress) work-associated trauma, verified both by log book and medical records. For the corresponding years, the 24-h pattern of emergency calls (Calls) plus road traffic (Traffic) on the main roads of the service area was also assessed. Relative risk (R) of WRI was calculated as the quantity of WRIs/h divided by the quantity of Call responses/h × 1000, which takes into account the number of at-risk FM/unit time, since each dispatched emergency vehicle is staffed with 4 FM. Comparably trained regular (RFM) and volunteer (VFM) FM experienced a total of 187 WRIs. The 24-h WRI curve patterns of RFM and VFM were correlated (r = 0.4, p difference (p > .05). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) validated comparable clock-time patterns in WRIs of RFM and VFM each year and each season (all p  .0006; Cosinor analysis, p work performance) of FM of the same service to urgent medical calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Highest R of WRI at 02:00 h corresponded closely to longest LT (raw data at ∼02:00 h and Cosinor derived Ø of 02.54 h ± 71 min [SD]), thereby supporting the hypothesis of a common mechanism underlying the two 24-h profiles. A third aim was to determine the relevance of a new concept in work safety, "chronoprevention," for future FM training programs.

  17. Prior sleep with zolpidem enhances the effect of caffeine or modafinil during 18 hours continuous work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batéjat, Denise; Coste, Olivier; Van Beers, Pascal; Lagarde, Didier; Piérard, Christophe; Beaumont, Maurice

    2006-05-01

    Continuous military operations may disrupt sleep-wakefulness cycles, resulting in impaired performance and fatigue. We assessed the treatment efficacy of a hypnotic-psychostimulant combination to maintain sleep quality, performance, and alertness during a 42-h simulated military operation. A 6-h prophylactic sleep period with zolpidem (ZOL) followed by a 18-h continuous work period with administration at midway of 300 mg of slow release caffeine (CAF) or 200 mg of modafinil (MOD) was performed by eight healthy male subjects. Performance level was assessed with a reaction time test, a memory search test, a dual task, an attention test, and a computerized Stroop test. Cortical activation level was evaluated by the Critical Flicker Frequency test. Subjective sleepiness was evaluated using a visual analog scale and questionnaires. Effects of drugs on prophylactic and recovery sleep were also quantified from EEG recordings. CAF and MOD maintained performance and alertness throughout the 18-h work period. As shown by EEG recordings, ZOL improved prophylactic sleep without any deleterious effect on performance immediately after waking. As a result of its positive effects on prophylactic sleep, a lower pressure for slow wave sleep during recovery sleep was observed; nevertheless, zolpidem did not enhance the effects of either psychostimulant on performance. MOD and CAF may be of value in promoting performance and wakefulness during shiftwork or military operations while zolpidem improves prophylactic sleep quality without any deleterious effect after waking. We concluded that a zolpidem/ caffeine or modafinil combination could be useful in a context of environmental conditions not conducive to sleep.

  18. Mental health in medical residents: relationship with personal, work-related, and sociodemographic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Pereira-Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine association of sociodemographic characteristics, personality traits, social skills, and work variables with anxiety, depression, and alcohol dependence in medical residents. Methods: A total of 270 medical residents completed the following self-report instruments: sociodemographic and work questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-3 (AUDIT-3, Revised NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI-R, and Social Skills Inventory (SSI-Del-Prette. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed an association of neuroticism (odds ratio [OR] 2.60, p < 0.001, social skills (OR 0.41, p < 0.01, and number of shifts (OR 1.91, p = 0.03 with anxiety or depression, and of male sex (OR 3.14, p = 0.01, surgical residency (OR 4.40, p = 0.001, extraversion (OR 1.80, p < 0.01, and number of shifts (OR 2.32, p = 0.04 with alcohol dependence. Conclusion: The findings support a multidetermined nature of mental health problems in medical residents, in addition to providing data that may assist in the design of preventive measures to protect the mental health of this group.

  19. Strategies for managing work/life interaction among women and men with variable and unpredictable work hours in retail sales in Québec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Karen; Tissot, France; Couture, Vanessa; Bernstein, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, work schedules in retail sales are generated by software that takes into account variations in predicted sales. The resulting variable and unpredictable schedules require employees to be available, unpaid, over extended periods. At the request of a union, we studied schedule preferences in a retail chain in Québec using observations, interviews, and questionnaires. Shift start times had varied on average by four hours over the previous week; 83 percent had worked at least one day the previous weekend. Difficulties with work/life balance were associated with schedules and, among women, with family responsibilities. Most workers wanted: more advance notice; early shifts; regular schedules; two days off in sequence; and weekends off. Choices varied, so software could be adapted to take preferences into account. Also, employers could give better advance notice and establish systems for shift exchanges. Governments could limit store hours and schedule variability while prolonging the minimum sequential duration of leave per week.

  20. A case-crossover study of sleep and work hours and the risk of road traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Stefano; Marchetti, Riccardo; Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Barbone, Fabio

    2010-03-01

    Sleepiness, prolonged wakefulness, and extended work hours have been associated with increased risk of injuries and road accidents. The authors' objective was to study the relation between those factors and road accidents using a case-crossover design, effective in estimating the risk of acute events associated with transient, short effect exposures. Five hundred seventy-four injured drivers presenting for care after road accidents to the Emergency Room of Udine, Italy, were enrolled in the study from March 2007 to March 2008. Sleep, work, and driving patterns in the 48 h before the accident were assessed through an interview. The relative risk (RR) of accident associated with each exposure was estimated using the case-crossover matched pair interval approach. Sleeping > or = 11 h daily was associated with a decrease of the RR, as was sleeping less than usual. Being awake > or = 16 h and, possibly, working > 12 h daily were associated with increases in the RR. Extended work hours and prolonged wakefulness increase the risk of road accidents and suggest that awareness should be raised among drivers. The findings regarding acute sleep amount are less clear, possibly due to an effect of chronic sleep loss.

  1. Examination outcomes and work locations of international medical graduate family medicine residents in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Maria; Kandar, Rima; Slade, Steve; Yi, Yanqing; Beardall, Sue; Bourgeault, Ivy

    2017-10-01

    To describe the postgraduate medical education (PGME) examination outcomes and work locations of international medical graduates (IMGs); and to identify differences between Canadians studying abroad (CSAs) and non-CSAs. Cohort study using data from the National IMG Database and Scott's Medical Database. Canada. All IMGs who had first entered a family medicine residency program between 2005 and 2009, with the exclusion of US graduates, visa trainees, and fellowship trainees. We examined 4 outcomes: passing the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 2 (MCCQE2), obtaining Certification in Family Medicine (CCFP), working in Canada within 2 years of completing PGME training, and working in Canada in 2015. Of the 876 residents in the study, 96.1% passed the MCCQE2, 78.1% obtained a specialty designation, 37.7% worked in Canada within 2 years after their PGME, and 91.2% worked in Canada in 2015. Older graduates were more likely (odds ratio [OR] = 3.45; 95% CI 1.52 to 7.69) than recent graduates were to pass the MCCQE2, and residents who participated in a skills assessment program before their PGME training were more likely (OR = 9.60; 95% CI 1.29 to 71.63) than those who had not were to pass the MCCQE2. Women were more likely (OR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.20 to 2.33) to obtain a specialty designation than men were. Recent graduates were more likely (OR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.79) than older graduates were to work in Canada following training. Residents who were eligible for a full licence were more likely (OR = 3.72; 95% CI 2.30 to 5.99) to work in Canada in 2015 than those who were not eligible for a full licence were. While most IMGs who entered the family medicine PGME program passed the MCCQE2, 1 in 5 did not obtain Certification. Most IMG residents remain in Canada. Canadians studying abroad and non-CSA IMGs share similar examination success rates and retention rates. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  2. Analysis of Work Assignments After Medical Ethics Workshop for First-Year Residents at Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakda Sathirareuangchai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upon entering the residency training program, all 1st year residents at Siriraj Hospital must join medical ethics workshop held by the Division of Postgraduate Studies. At the end of the workshop, the residents were given a work assignment to write a clinical ethics situation they have encountered in their past practice. Methods: This study is an analysis of content described in the work assignments in order to gain the information regarding common medical ethics dilemmas, which the physicians faced in the early days of practice. Results: 740 work assignments were reviewed. The 4 most common ethical principle mentioned in these assign- ments were autonomy (144, 19.5%, palliative care (133, 18.0%, beneficence (121, 16.4%, and confidentiality (110, 14.9%. More than half of the situations described were during their internship (474, 64.1% and tended to distributed equally among community hospital (39.1%, university hospital (28.0%, and general hospital (24.3%. Conclusion: This study should raise the awareness of the medical educator towards these medical ethics issues during curriculum planning.

  3. Influence of income, hours worked, and loan repayment on medical students' decision to pursue a primary care career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M P; Diamond, J J; Rabinowitz, H K; Bauer, L C; Jones, R L; Kearl, G W; Kelly, R B; Sheets, K J; Jaffe, A; Jonas, A P

    To assess the specialty plans of current fourth-year medical students and, for those not choosing primary care specialties, to investigate the potential effect that changes in key economic or lifestyle factors could have in attracting such students to primary care. A survey study was sent to 901 fourth-year medical students in the 1993 graduating classes of six US medical schools. Comparisons were made between students choosing and not choosing primary care specialties. For the non-primary care students, we also evaluated whether alteration of income, hours worked, or loan repayment could attract them to primary care careers. Of the 688 responses (76% response rate), primary care specialties were chosen by 27% of the students and non-primary care specialties by 73%. One quarter (25%) of the non-primary care students indicated they would change to primary care for one of the following factors: income (10%), hours worked (11%), or loan repayment (4%). For students whose debt was $50,000 or greater, the loan repayment option became much more important than for students with lesser debt. In all, a total of 45% (n = 313) of the students indicated either they were planning to enter primary care (n = 188) or they would change to a primary care specialty (n = 125) with appropriate adjustments in income, hours worked, or loan repayment. Significant changes in economic and lifestyle factors could have a direct effect on the ability to attract students to primary care. Including such changes as part of health system reform, especially within the context of a supportive medical school environment, could enable the United States to approach a goal of graduating 50% generalist physicians.

  4. Information Meeting- Working Hours

    CERN Multimedia

    Maurin

    1972-01-01

    Mons. Maurin préside la séance et fait part des résultats aux questionnaires pour définir une ligne de conduite de l'association- ramener et harmoniser les horaires- changer les contrats de 44 à 40 heures- des gens travaillent en partie encore 48 h

  5. 24-hour care: Work and sleep conditions of migrant Filipino live-in caregivers in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kevin; Nazareno, Jennifer; Malish, Sterling

    2016-12-01

    Live-in formal caregivers spend consecutive days in patients' homes, raising questions about their ability to secure adequate sleep while on duty. Few studies have examined sleeping conditions and outcomes for this growing workforce. We collected weeklong sleep logs and interview data from 32 Filipino caregivers in Los Angeles who provide live-in services at least 3 consecutive days per week. Respondents recorded a total average of 6.4 sleep hours during workdays divided over 2.4 sleep periods. Caregivers rated sleep quality as lower while at work; over 40% indicated excessive daytime sleepiness. Female caregivers reported worse sleep outcomes than their male counterparts. Some variations in sleep outcomes were found by employment arrangements. Live-in caregivers experience frequent sleep interruptions at all hours of the day and night to attend to patients' needs. The resulting impacts on sleep quality pose risks for both work-related injury and errors in patient care. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:1120-1129, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Text paging of surgery residents: Efficacy, work intensity, and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ann D; de Vos, Marit S; Smink, Douglas S; Nguyen, Louis L; Ashley, Stanley W

    2016-03-01

    Text pages can communicate important information but also disrupt workflow, which can affect the safety of patient care. The purpose of this study was to analyze the content, volume, and distribution of text pages received by general surgery residents and physician's assistants (PAs) using natural language processing (NLP). We studied text pages received by residents and PAs at a tertiary care teaching hospital from March to May 2012 using NLP. The number and content of pages were stratified by recipient seniority, surgical service, patient census, and patient location. Chi-square tests, t test, and analysis of variance were used to detect statistical significance. We captured 48,202 pages. The average number (mean ± standard deviation) of pages per hour was 3.1 ± 2.2 for postgraduate year (PGY)-1s and 2.8 ± 1.9 for PAs (P < .0001). The greatest number of pages per day by Service was 86.1 ± 37.5 on the acute care surgery service. The most common paging topic was medications (18,444 [38.3%]) and the most common symptom was pain (6,240 pages [12.9%]). On services where patients were located near each other (regionalized), the number of pages per day per recipient per patient on census was almost half that compared with nonregionalized services (1.40 vs 2.43; P < .0001). Residents receive a high volume of pages at this tertiary care center, particularly regarding medications and pain. Services with regionalized patients exhibit less paging need per patient. Initiatives to improve pain management and regionalize patients may streamline communication, decrease the number of pages, and increase patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sickness presenteeism: The prevalence of coming to work while ill among paediatric resident physicians in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kevin J; Vayalumkal, Joseph V

    2017-05-01

    Sickness presenteeism is defined as the act of attending one's job despite ill-health. Recently, physicians and other health care workers have become the focus of sickness presenteeism research, because presenteeism in this population can put patients at risk of infection. There are currently no data on this topic among physicians in Canada. The aim of this study was to investigate sickness presenteeism in paediatric resident physicians in Canada. We conducted an anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey study in which all paediatric residents in Canada were eligible. Outcomes of interest included prevalences of sickness presenteeism, sickness during the study period and voluntary self-appointed personal protective equipment use when engaging in sickness presenteeism. Response rate was 56.5% (N=323). During the previous 2 months, 61% (95% confidence interval [CI] 55.7 to 66.3) of respondents reported having experienced an illness and 59% (95% CI 53.7 to 64.5) of respondents had come to work sick. Of those who reported becoming ill during the study period, 97.0% (95% CI 94.6 to 99.4) reported coming to work while sick. There was no difference in prevalence when comparing across post-graduate year training levels. Extra personal protective equipment was used by 86% (95% CI 82.1 to 91.7) when engaging in sickness presenteeism. Sickness presenteeism is a common phenomenon among paediatric resident physicians. Our results should influence residents and supervising staff physicians to encourage appropriate self-care at home, rather than presenteeism.

  8. The work of faculty-in-residence: An introduction and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healea, C Daryl; Scott, Joel H; Dhilla, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The unique work of faculty-in-residence (FIRs) is premised on a substantial amount of research, which demonstrates that faculty-student engagement benefits students positively. Still, there is a dearth of literature that focuses on FIR work. In particular, there is no published research on the historical context for FIRs and no published research that provides an overarching analysis of literature germane to FIR work. The objective of this article is to fill these gaps in the research literature by producing a historical study of FIR work and a review of research about FIR work. Qualitative methods were used for this study; namely, the authors employed both historical research methods and a literature review. This study is the first of its kind to trace the history of FIR work and to provide an overarching analysis of the limited literature on this topic. By filling in the gaps in the research literature and describing the current state of FIR work, this study contributes to a research base for future, iterative studies of FIR work. This study also offers a discussion of future directions for both the research and practice of FIR work on college campuses.

  9. In the eyes of residents good supervisors need to be more than engaged physicians: the relevance of teacher work engagement in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2015-05-01

    During their development into competent medical specialists, residents benefit from their attending physicians' excellence in teaching and role modelling. Work engagement increases overall job performance, but it is unknown whether this also applies to attending physicians' teaching performance and role modelling. Attending physicians in clinical teaching practice take on roles as doctors and teachers. Therefore, this study (a) examined levels of attending physicians' work engagement in both roles, and (b) quantified the relationships of both work engagement roles to their teaching performance and role model status. In this multicenter survey, residents evaluated attending physicians' teaching performance and role model status using the validated System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities. Attending physicians self-reported their work engagement on a 7-point scale, separately for their roles as doctors and teachers, using the validated 9-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. In total, 549 (68 %) residents filled out 4,305 attending physician evaluations and 627 (78 %) attending physicians participated. Attending physicians reported higher work engagement in their doctor than in their teacher roles (mean difference: 0.95; 95 % CI 0.86-1.04; p Teacher work engagement was positively related to teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.11; 95 % CI 0.08-0.14; p model status (B: 1.08; 95 % CI 0.10-1.18; p teacher work engagement were evaluated as better teachers.

  10. The Relation between Maternal Work Hours and Primary School Students’ Affect in China: The Role of the Frequency of Mother–Child Communication (FMCC) and Maternal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Lv, Bo; Guo, Xiaolin; Liu, Chunhui; Qi, Bing; Hu, Weiping; Liu, Zhaomin; Luo, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although substantial evidence suggests that maternal work hours may have a negative effect on children’s cognitive development, the link between maternal work hours and children’s affect remains unclear. Some studies have observed that non-daytime maternal work hours are associated with more emotional problems among children. However, few studies have focused on the effects of maternal work hours on workdays and non-workdays. Therefore, this study separately investigated the relation between maternal work hours on workdays and on non-workdays and explored the mediating role of the frequency of mother-child communication (FMCC) and the moderating role of maternal education. Method: Using cluster sampling, this study selected 879 students in grades 4–6 at two primary schools in the Hebei and Shandong provinces in China and their mothers as the study subjects. A multi-group structural equation model (SEM) was used to test the relations between maternal work hours, FMCC and children’s affect and the moderating effect of maternal education. Results: (1) Non-college-educated mothers’ work hours on workdays negatively predicted FMCC, but there was no such effect for college-educated mothers; (2) non-workday work hours of all employed mothers negatively predicted FMCC; (3) the FMCC of all employed mothers positively predicted children’s positive affect; (4) the FMCC of college-educated mothers negatively predicted children’s negative affect although there was no such relation for non-college-educated mothers; (5) there was a significant mediating effect of FMCC on the relation between maternal work hours and children’s affect only for non-college-educated mothers; and (6) the workday work hours of non-college-educated mothers positively predicted children’s negative affect, but this correlation was negative for college-educated mothers. Conclusion: Maternal work hours have a marginally significant negative effect on children’s affect through

  11. The Relation between Maternal Work Hours and Primary School Students’ Affect in China: The Role of the Frequency of Mother–Child Communication (FMCC and Maternal Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although substantial evidence suggests that maternal work hours may have a negative effect on children’s cognitive development, the link between maternal work hours and children’s affect remains unclear. Some studies have observed that non-daytime maternal work hours are associated with more emotional problems among children. However, few studies have focused on the effects of maternal work hours on workdays and non-workdays. Therefore, this study separately investigated the relation between maternal work hours on workdays and on non-workdays and explored the mediating role of the frequency of mother-child communication (FMCC and the moderating role of maternal education.Method: Using cluster sampling, this study selected 879 students in grades 4–6 at two primary schools in the Hebei and Shandong provinces in China and their mothers as the study subjects. A multi-group structural equation model (SEM was used to test the relations between maternal work hours, FMCC and children’s affect and the moderating effect of maternal education.Results: (1 Non-college-educated mothers’ work hours on workdays negatively predicted FMCC, but there was no such effect for college-educated mothers; (2 non-workday work hours of all employed mothers negatively predicted FMCC; (3 the FMCC of all employed mothers positively predicted children’s positive affect; (4 the FMCC of college-educated mothers negatively predicted children’s negative affect although there was no such relation for non-college-educated mothers; (5 there was a significant mediating effect of FMCC on the relation between maternal work hours and children’s affect only for non-college-educated mothers; and (6 the workday work hours of non-college-educated mothers positively predicted children’s negative affect, but this correlation was negative for college-educated mothers.Conclusion: Maternal work hours have a marginally significant negative effect on children

  12. The Relation between Maternal Work Hours and Primary School Students' Affect in China: The Role of the Frequency of Mother-Child Communication (FMCC) and Maternal Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Lv, Bo; Guo, Xiaolin; Liu, Chunhui; Qi, Bing; Hu, Weiping; Liu, Zhaomin; Luo, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although substantial evidence suggests that maternal work hours may have a negative effect on children's cognitive development, the link between maternal work hours and children's affect remains unclear. Some studies have observed that non-daytime maternal work hours are associated with more emotional problems among children. However, few studies have focused on the effects of maternal work hours on workdays and non-workdays. Therefore, this study separately investigated the relation between maternal work hours on workdays and on non-workdays and explored the mediating role of the frequency of mother-child communication (FMCC) and the moderating role of maternal education. Method: Using cluster sampling, this study selected 879 students in grades 4-6 at two primary schools in the Hebei and Shandong provinces in China and their mothers as the study subjects. A multi-group structural equation model (SEM) was used to test the relations between maternal work hours, FMCC and children's affect and the moderating effect of maternal education. Results: (1) Non-college-educated mothers' work hours on workdays negatively predicted FMCC, but there was no such effect for college-educated mothers; (2) non-workday work hours of all employed mothers negatively predicted FMCC; (3) the FMCC of all employed mothers positively predicted children's positive affect; (4) the FMCC of college-educated mothers negatively predicted children's negative affect although there was no such relation for non-college-educated mothers; (5) there was a significant mediating effect of FMCC on the relation between maternal work hours and children's affect only for non-college-educated mothers; and (6) the workday work hours of non-college-educated mothers positively predicted children's negative affect, but this correlation was negative for college-educated mothers. Conclusion: Maternal work hours have a marginally significant negative effect on children's affect through FMCC only for non

  13. [24-hour work: the interaction of stress and changes in the sleep-wake cycle in the police force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Disruption in police officers. In recent years there has been a widespread growth in services, available regardless of time or day organization (24/7 service) and a diffuse increase in their use, both in work and private lives, generally ignoring the importance of a regular sleep organization. Police officers - often need to work extended shifts and long hours under highly stressful conditions, which results in reduced levels of safety and operational effectiveness. In numerous studies, perceived stress has been found to correlate with both subjective and objective disturbances in sleep. Consequently, excessive daytime sleepiness is one of the most frequent health and safety hazards that police officers have to deal with. Sleep deprivation affects performance outcomes through a wide range of cognitive domains. Sleepiness and fatigue, caused by sleep loss, extended work and wakefulness, circadian misalignment and sleep disorders are major causes of workplace human errors, incidents, and accidents. Therefore, prevention of sleep loss, high levels of stress and fatigue is a key factor to consider when assessing emergency intervention. In order to combat fatigue and sleepiness, a 30-90 minutes nap before night shift could be a viable option.

  14. Working hours, sleep, salivary cortisol, fatigue and neuro-behavior during Mars analog mission: five crews study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Balwant; Foing, Bernard H; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2012-05-16

    The buoyancy of humans in exploring extreme space environments has been established during missions to the moon. Long duration missions like mission to Mars however, requires humans to adapt to systemic and complex environments beyond the human body's capacity. Astronauts will encounter both physiological and psychological extremes during this trip. Very few studies are conducted on effect of long duration work and sleepiness on cognitive performance. So, this study was planned to find out effects of leadership responsibility, sleepiness and long duration working hours on cognitive performance. The 30 members (leadership: normal; 10:20) were selected from MDRS crews (Mars Desert Research Station, USA). Neurobehavioral test performance, self-ratings of fatigue and sleepiness, and salivary cortisol levels were evaluated during first day, mid and end day of mission. The leadership group did not show any signs of reduced test performance, even in elevated fatigue and sleepiness. The leadership group had faster reaction times on end of mission as compared to first and after 7 day of mission. Salivary cortisol levels were significantly higher in leadership group as compared to normal group. The results suggest that long duration work and sleepiness does not affect the cognitive performance of crew member. Further study is required while taking into account all factors and large sample size to prove this fact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. EFFECTS OF LONG-TIME COMMUTING AND LONG-HOUR WORKING ON LIFESTYLE AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS IN TOKYO, JAPAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Marino; Hara, Akiko; Kikuchi, Kimiyo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of long-time commuting and long-hour working on lifestyle including sleeping, physical exercise, breakfast, smoking, alcohol intake and mental health. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 146 school teachers in Tokyo. The binary associations of commuting time and working hours with lifestyle, mental stress measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and stress coping measured by the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scores were examined. The Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Our results indicated that the mean commuting time and working hours per week of the respondents were 42.1 (SD 22.5) minutes and 50.4 (SD 8.6) hours, respectively. Longer commuting time was significantly associated with shorter working hours (p = 0.023), less physical exercise (p health questionnaire; sense of coherence

  16. Striving for work-life balance: effect of marriage and children on the experience of 4402 US general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael C; Yeo, Heather; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-03-01

    To determine how marital status and having children impact US general surgical residents' attitudes toward training and personal life. There is a paucity of research describing how family and children affect the experience of general surgery residents. Cross-sectional survey involving all US categorical general surgery residents. Responses were evaluated by resident/program characteristics. Statistical analysis included the χ test and hierarchical logistic regression modeling. A total of 4402 residents were included (82.4% response rate) and categorized as married, single, or other (separated/divorced/widowed). Men were more likely to be married (57.8% vs 37.9%, P work-life conflict. The complex effects of family on surgical residents should inform programs to target support mechanisms for their trainees.

  17. Job strain associated with increases in ambulatory blood and pulse pressure during and after work hours among female hotel room cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Matt; Krause, Niklas

    2018-03-22

    Previously documented elevated hypertension rates among Las Vegas hotel room cleaners are hypothesized to be associated with job strain. Job strain was assessed by questionnaire. Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was recorded among 419 female cleaners from five hotels during 18 waking hours. Multiple linear regression models assessed associations of job strain with ABP and pulse pressure for 18-h, work hours, and after work hours. Higher job strain was associated with increased 18-h systolic ABP, after work hours systolic ABP, and ambulatory pulse pressure. Dependents at home but not social support at work attenuated effects. Among hypertensive workers, job strain effects were partially buffered by anti-hypertensive medication. High job strain is positively associated with blood pressure among female hotel workers suggesting potential for primary prevention at work. Work organizational changes, stress management, and active ABP surveillance and hypertension management should be considered for integrated intervention programs. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Associations between social ecological factors and self-reported short physical activity breaks during work hours among desk-based employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennie, Jason A; Timperio, Anna F; Crawford, David A; Dunstan, David W; Salmon, Jo L

    2011-01-01

    To examine the associations between potential social ecological correlates and self-reported short physical activity breaks during work hours (defined as any interruption in sitting time during a typical work hour) among a sample of employees who commonly sit for working tasks. 801 employed adults aged 18-70 years from metropolitan Melbourne, Australia were surveyed in 2009 about their short physical activity breaks from sitting during work hours and potential social ecological correlates of this behaviour. Men reported significantly more short physical activity breaks per work hour than did women (2.5 vs. 2.3 breaks/h, p=0.02). A multivariable linear regression analysis adjusting for clustering and meeting the public health physical activity recommendations showed that the factors associated with frequency of short physical activity breaks per work hour were perceptions of lack of time for short physical activity breaks for men (-0.31 breaks/h, 95% confidence intervals [CI] -0.52, -0.09) and lack of information about taking short physical activity breaks for women (-0.20 breaks/h, CI -0.47, -0.05). These findings suggest that providing male employees with support for short physical activity breaks during work hours, and female employees with information on benefits of this behaviour may be useful for reducing workplace sedentary time. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Light and collisions: Julius von Bismark presents an update on his work after his CERN Residency

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    On 27 June 2012, Julius von Bismarck, the first winner of the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN, will give a special informal interim lecture for CERN on his ideas and work in progress.   Julius will disclose his personal reactions to his experiences at CERN, sharing with us how particle physics and the laboratory has started having an impact on his artistic practice. As he said when he won the prize at the first Collide@CERN public lecture: “For me, the Collide@CERN residency is a dream come true.” So has reality matched up with his dreams? And why in the first two weeks did he say: “For me already the residency is already a success.” What is his experience of the creative collisions between arts and science? There will be opportunities for the audience to ask questions, and the artist stresses that this will be a personal and informal presentation of ideas in progress. The lecture will take place in the Council Chamber (Room 503-1-001) from 4.3...

  20. Long working hours, job satisfaction, and depressive symptoms: a community-based cross-sectional study among Japanese employees in small- and medium-scale businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Akinori

    2017-08-08

    Although long working hours have been suspected to be a risk factor for depressive symptoms (DS), it is not well understood the conditions under which long working hours are associated with it. This study investigated the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between working hours and DS. A total of 2,375 full-time non-shift day workers (73% men), aged 18-79 (mean 45) years, in 296 small- and medium-scale businesses were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire evaluating working hours, job satisfaction, DS and covariates. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) was used to assess DS. Risk of DS (CES-D ≥ 16) by working hours, job satisfaction, and both combined was estimated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Compared to participants working 6-8 hrs/day, those working 12+ hrs/day had significantly higher odds of DS (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.49), while participants with low satisfaction, as opposed to high satisfaction, had increased odds of DS (aOR 1.81). Furthermore, compared to those working 6-8 hrs/day with high satisfaction (reference group), participants working 6-8 hrs/day, > 8 to 10 hrs/day, and > 10 hrs/day combined with low satisfaction had dose-response increase of DS (aOR 1.48, 2.21 and 2.31, respectively, p 8 to 10 hrs/day and > 10 hrs/day combined with high satisfaction had not (aOR 0.93 and 1.39, respectively, p > 0.10). The results suggest that long working hours are associated with increased risk of DS only under reduced job satisfaction condition, which highlights the importance of improving job satisfaction, particularly among those working excessive hours.

  1. Fatigue and related factors among hotel workers: the effects of emotional labor and non-standard working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Jong; Moon, Hyun Jey; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Kim, Joo Ja

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed fatigue and its association with emotional labor and non-standard working hours among hotel workers. A structured self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1,320 employees of five hotels located in Seoul. The questionnaire survey included questions concerning the participants' sociodemographics, health-related behaviors, job-related factors, emotional labor, and fatigue. Fatigue was assessed using the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (MFS). Multiple logistic regression modeling was used to determine the associations between fatigue and emotional labor. Among male workers, there was a significant association between fatigue and both emotional disharmony (OR=5.52, 95% CI=2.35-12.97) and emotional effort (OR=3.48, 95% CI=1.54-7.86). These same associations were seen among the female workers (emotional disharmony: OR=6.91, 95% CI=2.93-16.33; emotional effort: OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.00-5.16). These results indicate that fatigue is associated with emotional labor and, especially, emotional disharmony among hotel workers. Therefore, emotional disharmony management would prove helpful for the prevention of fatigue.

  2. Long work hours and physical fitness: 30-year risk of ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among middle-aged Caucasian men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Burr, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    No previous long-term studies have examined if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality due to long work hours. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis.......No previous long-term studies have examined if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality due to long work hours. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis....

  3. WP 22 - A panel data analysis of the effects of wages, standard hours and unionisation on paid overtime work in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaan Kalwij; Gregory, M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effects of the basic wage rate, standard working hours and unionisation on paid overtime work in Britain using individual-level data from the New Earnings Survey over the period 1975-2001. For this purpose we estimate a panel data model. We show that to obtain consistent estimates it is important to allow for both the censoring of paid overtime hours at zero and for correlations between the explanatory variables and unobserved individual specific effects. The main empi...

  4. Different Views about Work-Hour Limitations in Medicine: A Qualitative Content Analysis of Surgeons', Lawyers', and Pilots' Positive and Negative Arguments

    OpenAIRE

    Businger, Adrian P.; Kaderli, Reto M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Whereas work-hour regulations have been taken for granted since 1940 in other occupational settings, such as commercial aviation, they have been implemented only recently in medical professions, where they lead to a lively debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate arguments in favour of and against work-hour limitations in medicine given by Swiss surgeons, lawyers, and pilots. Methods An electronic questionnaire survey with four free-response items addressing the questio...

  5. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  6. Residents’ perception of duty hour limits through teaching hospital accreditation status—experience in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsi Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Residents’ work overload is a rising issue in Taiwan. Duty hours of the residents in the United States have been limited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Program Requirements since 2003; similar standards were not implemented in Taiwan until 2013. Taiwanese duty hour standards are the work hour limits adopted as part of the required teaching hospital accreditation status. In January 2015, the Ministry of Health and Welfare conducted a national survey for all house officers in Taiwan. We collected data including those on demographics and perceptions of residents regarding duty hour limits. Most respondents reported positive perceptions of the duty hour standards. They felt that these limits will improve resident education, quality of life, and patient safety. The strong incentive to follow the regulations (through teaching hospital accreditation could help protect residents (and patients from unsafe working conditions. However, further studies on the influence of shortened duty hour on professional development are necessary for future improvement.

  7. Non-linear relationship between maternal work hours and child body weight: Evidence from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianghong; Akaliyski, Plamen; Schäfer, Jakob; Kendall, Garth; Oddy, Wendy H; Stanley, Fiona; Strazdins, Lyndall

    2017-08-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Western Australia Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study and both random-effects and fixed-effects models, this study examined the connection between maternal work hours and child overweight or obesity. Following children in two-parent families from early childhood to early adolescence, multivariate analyses revealed a non-linear and developmentally dynamic relationship. Among preschool children (ages 2 to 5), we found lower likelihood of child overweight and obesity when mothers worked 24 h or less per week, compared to when mothers worked 35 or more hours. This effect was stronger in low-to-medium income families. For older children (ages 8 to 14), compared to working 35-40 h a week, working shorter hours (1-24, 25-34) or longer hours (41 or more) was both associated with increases in child overweight and obesity. These non-linear effects were more pronounced in low-to-medium income families, particularly when fathers also worked long hours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Do Journal Clubs Work? The Effectiveness of Journal Clubs in a Clinical Pastoral Education Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleenor, David; Sharma, Vanshdeep; Hirschmann, Jo; Swarts, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    Journal clubs are an established means of ongoing learning in medicine. Beginning with physicians in the nineteenth century, journal clubs have gradually become established in nursing and other allied health professions. However, their use in Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is relatively new. We describe the creation of a journal club for CPE residents and discuss the lessons learned from this effort. Over two years, a journal club was conducted with two different cohorts of residents. Residents were surveyed regarding the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the journal club and their recommendations for improvement. A small group of six to eight residents appears to be most effective. Focusing on a specific topic is preferable to broad-based readings. Residents preferred greater discussion about the applicability of the research findings to their clinical activity. Finally, the pros and cons of residents selecting articles and use of the Rush Research Summary Worksheet are discussed.

  9. Simulation in Pre-departure Training for Residents Planning Clinical Work in a Low-Income Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Schwartz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasingly, pediatric and emergency medicine (EM residents are pursuing clinical rotations in low-income countries. Optimal pre-departure preparation for such rotations has not yet been established. High-fidelity simulation represents a potentially effective modality for such preparation. This study was designed to assess whether a pre-departure high-fidelity medical simulation curriculum is effective in helping to prepare residents for clinical rotations in a low-income country. Methods: 43 pediatric and EM residents planning clinical rotations in Liberia, West Africa, participated in a simulation-based curriculum focused on severe pediatric malaria and malnutrition and were then assessed by survey at three time points: pre-simulation, post-simulation, and after returning from work abroad. Results: Prior to simulation, 1/43 (2% participants reported they were comfortable with the diagnosis and management of severe malnutrition; this increased to 30/42 (71% after simulation and 24/31 (77% after working abroad. Prior to simulation, 1/43 (2% of residents reported comfort with the diagnosis and management of severe malaria; this increased to 26/42 (62% after simulation and 28/31 (90% after working abroad; 36/42 (86% of residents agreed that a simulation-based global health curriculum is more useful than a didactic curriculum alone, and 41/42 (98% felt a simulator-based curriculum should be offered to all residents planning a clinical trip to a low-income country. Conclusion: High-fidelity simulation is effective in increasing residents’ self-rated comfort in management of pediatric malaria and malnutrition and a majority of participating residents feel it should be included as a component of pre-departure training for all residents rotating clinically to low-income countries.

  10. How personality traits affect clinician-supervisors' work engagement and subsequently their teaching performance in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2016-11-01

    Clinician-supervisors often work simultaneously as doctors and teachers. Supervisors who are more engaged for their teacher work are evaluated as better supervisors. Work engagement is affected by the work environment, yet the role of supervisors' personality traits is unclear. This study examined (i) the impact of supervisors' personality traits on work engagement in their doctors' and teachers' roles and (ii) how work engagement in both roles affects their teaching performance. Residents evaluated supervisors' teaching performance, using the validated System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities. Supervisors' reported work engagement in doctor and teacher roles separately using the validated Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Supervisors' personality traits were measured using the Big Five Inventory's five factor model covering conscientiousness, agreeableness, extraversion, emotional stability and openness. Overall, 549 (68%) residents and 636 (78%) supervisors participated. Conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness were positively associated with supervisors' engagement in their teacher work, which was subsequently positively associated with teaching performance. Conscientious, extraverted, and agreeable supervisors showed more engagement with their teacher work, which made them more likely to deliver adequate residency training. In addition to optimizing the work environment, faculty development and career planning could be tailor-made to fit supervisors' personality traits.

  11. Different views about work-hour limitations in medicine: a qualitative content analysis of surgeons', lawyers', and pilots' positive and negative arguments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businger, Adrian P; Kaderli, Reto M

    2014-01-01

    Whereas work-hour regulations have been taken for granted since 1940 in other occupational settings, such as commercial aviation, they have been implemented only recently in medical professions, where they lead to a lively debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate arguments in favour of and against work-hour limitations in medicine given by Swiss surgeons, lawyers, and pilots. An electronic questionnaire survey with four free-response items addressing the question of what arguments speak in favour of or against work-hour limitations in general and in medicine was sent to a random sample of board-certified surgeons, lawyers in labour law, and pilots from SWISS International Airlines Ltd. In all, 279/497 (56%) of the respondents answered the survey: 67/117 surgeons, 92/226 lawyers, and 120/154 pilots. Support for work-hour limitations in general and in medicine was present and higher among lawyers and pilots than it was in surgeons (plimitations in general than in medicine (plimitations were "quality and patient safety," "health and fitness," and "leisure and work-family balance," whereas the lack of "flexibility" was the most important argument against. Surgeons expected more often that their "education" and the "quality of their work" would be threatened (plimitations should be supported in medicine also, but a way must be found to reduce problems resulting from discontinuity in patient care and to minimise the work in medicine, which has no education value.

  12. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  13. Socio-demographic determinants of participation in swimming amongst working residents of warsaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Elżbieta

    2012-05-01

    The aim of research is to assess the correlation between socio-demographic factors and swimming activity among the working population of Warsaw. The questionnaire survey included 4405 randomly selected residents of Warsaw. The correlation between the swimming activity and the variables characterizing the socio-demographic structure of the respondents were assessed by log-linear modelling. The significance of the impact of factors included in the analysis was determined using the chi-square test. Thirty-five per cent of the respondents declared recreational swimming. Gender, age, BMI, education, occupation, and income were significantly related to the swimming activity. Women (33%) - compared to men (38%) - were almost 1.2 times less likely to participate in swimming; similarly, overweight people (33%, OR = 0.90) and obese people (33%, OR = 0.92). People from Warsaw from 20-29 years (43%), with higher education (40%), incomes above the national average (40%), and representing the profession of an actor (52%), swam relatively more often. The results of the study might help in developing marketing plans and market segmentation strategies, as well as in forecasting the development trends of the leisure activity.

  14. Change in working characteristics of the steam turbine metal with operating time of more than 330000 hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladshteyn, V. I.; Troitskiy, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Research of a metal of the stop valve case (SVC) of the K-300-23.5 LMZ turbine (steel grade 15Kh1M1FL), destroyed after operation for 331000 hours, is performed. It's chemical composition and properties are determined as follows: a short-term mechanical tensile stress at 20°C and at elevated temperature, critical temperature, fragility, critical crack opening at elevated temperature, and long-term strength. Furthermore, nature of the microstructure, packing density of carbide particles and their size, and chemical composition of carbide sediment are estimated. A manifestation of metal properties for the main case components by comparison with a forecast of the respective characteristics made for the operating time of 331000 hours is tested. Property-time relationships are built for the forecast using statistical treatment of the test results for the samples cut out from more than 300 parts. Representativeness of the research results is proved: the statistical treatment of their differences are within the range of ±5%. It has been found that, after 150000 hours of operation, only the tensile strength insignificantly depends on the operating time at 20°C, whereas indicators of strength at elevated temperature significantly reduce, depending on the operating time. A brittle-to-ductile transition temperature (BDTT) raises, a critical notch opening changes in a complicated way, a long-term strength reduces. It has been found empirically that the limit of a long-term strength of the SVC metal at 540°C and the operating time of 105 hours is almost 1.6 times less than the required value in the as-delivered state. It is possible to evaluate a service life of the operating valves with the operating time of more than 330000 hours with respect to the long-term strength of the metal taking into account the actual temperature and stress. Guidelines for the control of similar parts are provided.

  15. Effects of resident duty hour reform on surgical and procedural patient safety indicators among hospitalized Veterans Health Administration and Medicare patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Amy K; Loveland, Susan A; Romano, Patrick S; Itani, Kamal M F; Silber, Jeffrey H; Even-Shoshan, Orit O; Halenar, Michael J; Teng, Yun; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G

    2009-07-01

    Improving patient safety was a strong motivation behind duty hour regulations implemented by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education on July 1, 2003. We investigated whether rates of patient safety indicators (PSIs) changed after these reforms. Observational study of patients admitted to Veterans Health Administration (VA) (N = 826,047) and Medicare (N = 13,367,273) acute-care hospitals from July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005. We examined changes in patient safety events in more versus less teaching-intensive hospitals before (2000-2003) and after (2003-2005) duty hour reform, using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for patient age, gender, comorbidities, secular trends, baseline severity, and hospital site. Ten PSIs were aggregated into 3 composite measures based on factor analyses: "Continuity of Care," "Technical Care," and "Other" composites. Continuity of Care composite rates showed no significant changes postreform in hospitals of different teaching intensity in either VA or Medicare. In the VA, there were no significant changes postreform for the technical care composite. In Medicare, the odds of a Technical Care PSI event in more versus less teaching-intensive hospitals in postreform year 1 were 1.12 (95% CI; 1.01-1.25); there were no significant relative changes in postreform year 2. Other composite rates increased in VA in postreform year 2 in more versus less teaching-intensive hospitals (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% CI; 1.10-2.41), but not in Medicare in either postreform year. Duty hour reform had no systematic impact on PSI rates. In the few cases where there were statistically significant increases in the relative odds of developing a PSI, the magnitude of the absolute increases were too small to be clinically meaningful.

  16. Mothers’ Working Hours and Children’s Obesity: Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Goeun; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to find the association between mothers’ working hours and obesity of their children according to children’s age and gender. Methods This study used data from the second and third year of KNHANES IV and the first year in KNHANES V (2008–2010). We calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) by using survey logistic regression to assess association of mother’s working hours with overweight or obesity of her children. The model was adjusted with...

  17. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603,838 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Fransson, Eleonor I; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A; Hamer, Mark; Hooftman, Wendela E; Houtman, Irene L; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Lunau, Thorsten; Madsen, Ida E H; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Shipley, Martin J; Siegrist, Johannes; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; O'Reilly, Dermot; Kumari, Meena; Batty, G David; Ferrie, Jane E; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-10-31

    Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603,838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease at baseline; the meta-analysis of stroke comprised data for 528,908 men and women who were free from stroke at baseline. Follow-up for coronary heart disease was 5·1 million person-years (mean 8·5 years), in which 4768 events were recorded, and for stroke was 3·8 million person-years (mean 7·2 years), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (≥55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1·13, 95% CI 1·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p

  18. The Labour Market Status of Australian Students: Who Is Unemployed, Who Is Working and for How Many Hours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    This paper looks at the factors associated with the decision by school students in Australia to work part-time. I find substantial variation in the probability of working across the eight Australian states and territories, as well as by remoteness. Those who live in households with low income are less likely to work. A person's ancestry is also…

  19. Are Mothers' Working Hours Associated with General and Abdominal Obesity in Children and Adolescents? The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyeong; Park, Eun-Cheol; Choi, Young; Park, Sohee

    2018-04-01

    Objectives Despite an increase in the female work force and recent increase in childhood obesity, the association between working hours of mothers and childhood obesity as well as how such association differs according to mothers' weight and intake frequency of energy-dense, nutrition-poor (EDNP) foods remain unclear. Methods Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2012) that included samples from 3914 children in 2526 households were analyzed. Two-level (household-children) mixed-effects modeling was performed to investigate the association between mothers' working hours and childhood obesity based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Results Long working hours (h) of mothers were associated with both BMI (β = - 0.14; P = 0.324 for 1-20 h, β = 0.10; P = 0.334 for ≤ 21-40 h; β = 0.09; P = 0.429 for 41-68 h, β = 0.51; P = 0.015 for ≥ 69 h) and WC of the child (β = 0.06; P = 0.809 for 1-20 h; β = 0.46; P = 0.017 for ≤ 21-40 h; β = 0.59; P = 0.004 for 41-68 h, β = 1.35; P mothers working ≥ 69 h compared to those working 0 h. We also observed that the association between mothers' working hours and child's BMI and WC was greater for children whose mothers were either overweight or obese and frequently consumed energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods (EDNP). Conclusions for Practice Long working hours of mothers are associated with higher BMI and WC in children. Thus, it is important to improve labor welfare for mothers who work long hours, and provide interventions to promote good health behaviors in both children and working mothers.

  20. Increasing Teachers' Workloads in the Form of Quantitative Expansion in Extracurricular Activities: Aggregated Data Analysis of Past Working Hours Using a General Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbayashi, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, teachers' increased workloads have become an issue for policy, and have been multiply pointed out, deriving as they do from peripheral duties such as paperwork, in academic research as well. However, these mentions have not been based on sufficiently solid proof. Here, this paper compares teacher working hours surveys extant from…

  1. Nursing home nurses' experiences of resident transfers to the emergency department: no empathy for our work environment difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Li

    2016-03-01

    To explore the experiences of nursing home nurses when they transfer residents from nursing homes to the emergency department in Taiwan. The transfer of residents between nursing homes and emergency departments challenges continuity of care. Understanding nursing home nurses' experiences during these transfers may help to improve residents' continuity of care. However, few empirical data are available on these nurses' transfer experiences worldwide, and none could be found in Asian countries. Qualitative descriptive study. Data were collected from August 2012-June 2013 in audiotaped, individual, in-depth interviews with 25 nurses at five nursing homes in Taiwan. Interview transcripts were analysed by constant comparative analysis. Analysis of interview transcripts revealed that the core theme of nursing home nurses' transfer experience was discontinuity in nursing home to emergency department transitions. This core theme comprised three themes: discontinuity in family involvement, discontinuity in medical resources and expectations, and discontinuity in nurses' professional role. Nursing home nurses need a working environment that is better connected to residents' family members and more immediate and/or easier access to acute care for residents. Communication between nurses and residents' family could be improved by using text messages or social media by mobile phones, which are widely used in Taiwan and worldwide. To improve access to acute care, we suggest developing a real-time telehealth transfer system tailored to the medical culture and policies of each country. This system should facilitate communication among nursing home staff, family members and hospital staff. Our findings on nurses' experiences during transfer of nursing home residents to the emergency department can be used to design more effective transfer policies such as telemedicine systems in Taiwan and other Asian countries or in those with large populations of Chinese immigrants. © 2016 John

  2. Effects of working full-time and studying in the evening hours among young apprentices and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Andréa Aparecida; da Silva, Miryam Cristina Mazieiro Vergueiro; Turte, Samantha Lemos; Lopes, Marildo de Oliveira; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-12-01

    This research aims to assess apprentices' and trainees' work conditions, psychosocial factors at work, as well as health symptoms after joining the labor force. Despite the fact that there are over 3.5 million young working students in Brazil,this increasing rate brings with it difficult working conditions such as work pressure, heavy workloads,and lack of safety training. This study was carried out in a nongovernmental organization (NGO) with 40 young members of a first job program in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. They filled out a comprehensive questionnaire focused on sociodemographic variables, working conditions,and health symptoms. Individual and collective semi-structured interviews were conducted. Empirical data analysis was performed using analysis of content. The majority of participants mentioned difficulties in dealing with the pressure and their share of responsibilities at work. Body pains, headaches, sleep deprivation during the workweek, and frequent colds were mentioned. Lack of appropriate task and safety training contributed to the occurrence of work injuries. Having a full-time job during the day coupled with evening high school attendance may jeopardize these people's health and future. This study can make a contribution to the revision and implementation of work training programs for adolescents. It can also help in the creation of more sensible policies regarding youth employment.

  3. Work or place? Assessing the concurrent effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on individual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaner, Carles; Li, Yong; Ng, Edwin; Benach, Joan; Chung, Haejoo

    2011-01-01

    Building on previous multilevel studies in social epidemiology, this cross-sectional study examines, simultaneously, the contextual effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on social inequalities in health among low-income nursing assistants. A total of 868 nursing assistants recruited from 55 nursing homes in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia were surveyed between 1999 and 2001. Using a cross-classified multilevel design, the authors tested the effects of area-of-residence (income inequality and racial segregation), workplace (type of nursing home ownership and managerial pressure), and individual-level (age, gender, race/ethnicity, health insurance, length of employment, social support, type of nursing unit, preexisting psychopathology, physical health, education, and income) variables on health (self-reported health and activity limitations) and behavioral outcomes (alcohol use and caffeine consumption). Findings reveal that overall health was associated with both workplace exploitation and area-of-residence income inequality; area of residence was associated with activity limitations and binge drinking; and workplace exploitation was associated with caffeine consumption. This study explicitly accounts for the multiple contextual structure and effects of economic inequality on health. More work is necessary to replicate the current findings and establish robust conclusions on workplace and area of residence that might help inform interventions.

  4. [Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudia Regina; Sousa, Rafael Queiroz de; Arcanjo, Francisco Sávio Alves; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de Menezes; Gomes, Josenília Maria Alves; Giaxa, Renata Rocha Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the Social Representation Theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians), who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with prior and posterior experience to the establishment of residency. From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment of a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. METHOD: Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the social representation theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians, who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with a prior and a posteriori experience to the establishment of residency. RESULTS: From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, and recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident from upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries.

  6. Modafinil, d-amphetamine and placebo during 64 hours of sustained mental work. I. Effects on mood, fatigue, cognitive performance and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeau; Naitoh; Buguet; McCann; Baranski; Taylor; Thompson; MacK

    1995-12-01

    Modafinil is an alerting substance that is considered safer than amphetamine with fewer side effects. Although modafinil has been used successfully to treat narcolepsy, relatively little is known about its ability to ameliorate fatigue and declines in mental performance due to sleep deprivation (SD) in a normal population. Forty-one military subjects received either 300 mg of modafinil, 20 mg of d-amphetamine, or placebo on 3 separate occasions during 64 hours of continuous cognitive work and sleep loss. Three drug treatments were given: at 23.30 hours and 05.30 hours during the first and second SD nights, respectively, and once at 15.30 hours during the third day of continuous work. Subjective estimates of mood, fatigue and sleepiness, as well as objective measures of reaction time, logical reasoning and short-term memory clearly showed better performance with both modafinil and amphetamine relative to placebo. Both modafinil and amphetamine maintained or increased body temperature compared to the natural circadian cycle observed in the placebo group. Also, from subject debriefs at the end of the study, modafinil elicited fewer side-effects than amphetamine, although more than the placebo group. Modafinil appears to be a good alternative to amphetamine for counteracting the debilitating mood and cognitive effects of sleep loss during sustained operations.

  7. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  8. "It's tough hanging-up a call": The relationships between calling and work hours, psychological detachment, sleep quality, and morning vigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Michael E; Conway, Neil; Sturges, Jane

    2017-01-01

    It has been argued that when people believe that their work is a calling, it can often be experienced as an intense and consuming passion with significant personal meaning. While callings have been demonstrated to have several positive outcomes for individuals, less is known about the potential downsides for those who experience work in this way. This study develops a multiple-meditation model proposing that, while the intensity of a calling has a positive direct effect on work-related vigor, it motivates people to work longer hours, which both directly and indirectly via longer work hours, limits their psychological detachment from work in the evenings. In turn, this process reduces sleep quality and morning vigor. Survey and diary data of 193 church ministers supported all hypotheses associated with this model. This implies that intense callings may limit the process of recovery from work experiences. The findings contribute to a more balanced theoretical understanding of callings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Nature contact and organizational support during office working hours: Benefits relating to stress reduction, subjective health complaints, and sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnstad, Siv; Patil, Grete G; Raanaas, Ruth K

    2015-01-01

    Improving social support, and providing nature contact at work are potential health promoting workplace interventions. The objective was to investigate whether nature contact at work is associated with employee's health and participation, and to study whether the possible associations between nature contact and health can be explained by perceived organizational support. Data were collected through a web-based, cross-sectional survey of employees in seven public and private office workplaces in Norway (n = 707, 40% response rate). Multiple linear and logistic regression analysis were performed on 565 participants fulfilling inclusion criteria. A greater amount of indoor nature contact at work was significantly associated with less job stress (B = -0.18, CI = -0.318 to -0.042), fewer subjective health complaints (B = -0.278, CI = -0.445 to -0.112) and less sickness absence (B = -0.061, CI = -0.009 to -0.002). Perceived organizational support mediated the associations between indoor nature contact and job stress and sickness absence, and partly mediated the association with subjective health complaints. Outdoor nature contact showed no reliable association with the outcomes in this study. Extending nature contact in the physical work environment in offices, can add to the variety of possible health-promoting workplace interventions, primarily since it influences the social climate on the workplace.

  10. Responsive upper limb and cognitive fatigue measures during light precision work: an 8-hour simulated micro-pipetting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Marcus; Wells, Richard P

    2017-07-01

    Many contemporary occupations are characterised by long periods of low loads. These lower force levels, which are relevant to the development of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, are usually not the focus of fatigue studies. In studies that did measure fatigue in light manual or precision work, within and between measurement responses were inconsistent. The aim of this study was to identify fatigue measures that were responsive at lower force levels (fatigue measures, reflecting both neuromuscular and cognitive mechanisms, was measured during a light precision micro-pipetting task performed by 11 participants. Nine measures were found to be significantly responsive over the 8-h period, including: ratings of perceived fatigue, postural tremor, blink frequency and critical flicker fusion frequency threshold. Common field measures, specifically electromyography RMS amplitude and maximum voluntary contractions, did not lead to extraordinary time effects. Practitioner summary: The findings provide insight towards the responsiveness of a complementary set of field usable fatigue measures at low work intensities Although commonly used measures did not reveal significant increases in fatigue, nine alternative measures were significantly responsive over the 8-h period.

  11. Long working hours, socioeconomic status, and the risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data from 222 120 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Virtanen, Marianna; Kawachi, Ichiro; Nyberg, Solja T; Alfredsson, Lars; Batty, G David; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Brunner, Eric J; Burr, Hermann; Dragano, Nico; Ferrie, Jane E; Fransson, Eleonor I; Hamer, Mark; Heikkilä, Katriina; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Madsen, Ida E H; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Siegrist, Johannes; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Jokela, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Working long hours might have adverse health effects, but whether this is true for all socioeconomic status groups is unclear. In this meta-analysis stratified by socioeconomic status, we investigated the role of long working hours as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. We identified four published studies through a systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase up to April 30, 2014. Study inclusion criteria were English-language publication; prospective design (cohort study); investigation of the effect of working hours or overtime work; incident diabetes as an outcome; and relative risks, odds ratios, or hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, or sufficient information to calculate these estimates. Additionally, we used unpublished individual-level data from 19 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working-Populations Consortium and international open-access data archives. Effect estimates from published and unpublished data from 222 120 men and women from the USA, Europe, Japan, and Australia were pooled with random-effects meta-analysis. During 1·7 million person-years at risk, 4963 individuals developed diabetes (incidence 29 per 10 000 person-years). The minimally adjusted summary risk ratio for long (≥55 h per week) compared with standard working hours (35-40 h) was 1·07 (95% CI 0·89-1·27, difference in incidence three cases per 10 000 person-years) with significant heterogeneity in study-specific estimates (I(2)=53%, p=0·0016). In an analysis stratified by socioeconomic status, the association between long working hours and diabetes was evident in the low socioeconomic status group (risk ratio 1·29, 95% CI 1·06-1·57, difference in incidence 13 per 10 000 person-years, I(2)=0%, p=0·4662), but was null in the high socioeconomic status group (1·00, 95% CI 0·80-1·25, incidence difference zero per 10 000 person-years, I(2)=15%, p=0·2464). The association in the low socioeconomic status group was robust to

  12. Evaluation of stress experienced by pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hung M; Young, Shardae D

    2017-04-15

    Results of a study of stress and negative affect levels in postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residents are presented. A cross-sectional approach was used. Pharmacy residency program directors received e-mailed invitation letters requesting that they ask their residents to participate in an online survey in 2011. The main study outcomes included evaluation of resident scores on the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10) and the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist-Revised (MAACL-R) anxiety, depression, hostility, and dysphoria subscales. Of the 524 pharmacy residents included in the study, 75.4% were female, 41.2% were under 26 years of age, and 41% reported working more than 60 hours per week. There were no significant differences between PGY1 and PGY2 residents in stress levels, as assessed with the PSS10 (mean ± S.D. score, 19.05 ± 5.96 versus 19.09 ± 5.77). MAACL-R scores for hostility were, on average, higher among PGY2 residents (mean ± S.D., 50.83 ± 10.02) than among PGY1 residents (48.62 ± 8.96), while there were no significant differences in anxiety, depression, and dysphoria levels. Relative to residents who worked 60 or fewer hours per week, those who worked more than 60 hours had higher perceived stress levels as well as higher depression, hostility, and dysphoria scores. Pharmacy residents exhibited high levels of perceived stress, especially those who worked more than 60 hours per week. Perceived stress was highly correlated to negative affect levels. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Living hours under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Larsen, Trine Pernille; Felbo-Kolding, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants – and their agreem......Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants...... in industrial cleaning includes a minimum floor of 15 weekly working hours – this is not the case in retail, hotels and restaurants. This creates a loophole in the latter two sectors that can be exploited by employers to gain wage flexibility through part-time work. Originality/value The living wage literature...

  14. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Content and conceptual frameworks of psychology and social work preceptor feedback related to the educational requests of family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Luc; Rocque, Rhéa; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2017-06-01

    Supervision of communication competency in clinical settings in medicine is an important component of professional training. The purpose of this study was to describe the content and rationale of psychology and social work preceptor feedback to family medicine residents who express educational needs during case-based written vignettes. We conducted a qualitative study with 25 psychology and social work preceptors from family medicine departments of the three French-speaking universities in the province of Quebec, Canada. During an individual interview, preceptors were asked to respond to three short case-based written vignettes depicting resident educational issues regarding communication and to explain their responses. Authors analyzed the content of responses and the conceptual frameworks reported. The three vignettes elicited 475 responses, including 58 distinct responses and 33 distinct conceptual frameworks. Therapeutic alliance and stages of grief were the two most reported conceptual frameworks. The vignettes stimulated a wealth of responses and conceptual frameworks among psychology and social work preceptors in family medicine. The complete list of responses could be useful for faculty development activities by stimulating preceptors' reflexive practice with regard to their responses, the educational goals of these responses and the conceptual frameworks underlying their feedback. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Motherhood during residency training: challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Allyn; Gold, Michelle; Jensen, Phyllis; Jedrzkiewicz, Michelle

    2005-07-01

    To determine what factors enable or impede women in a Canadian family medicine residency program from combining motherhood with residency training. To determine how policies can support these women, given that in recent decades the number of female family medicine residents has increased. Qualitative study using in-person interviews. McMaster University Family Medicine Residency Program. Twenty-one of 27 family medicine residents taking maternity leave between 1994 and 1999. Semistructured interviews. The research team reviewed transcripts of audiotaped interviews for emerging themes; consensus was reached on content and meaning. NVIVO software was used for data analysis. Long hours, unpredictable work demands, guilt because absences from work increase workload for colleagues, and residents' high expectations of themselves cause pregnant residents severe stress. This stress continues upon return to work; finding adequate child care is an added stress. Residents report receiving less support from colleagues and supervisors upon return to work; they associate this with no longer being visibly pregnant. Physically demanding training rotations put additional strain on pregnant residents and those newly returned to work. Flexibility in scheduling rotations can help accommodate needs at home. Providing breaks, privacy, and refrigerators at work can help maintain breastfeeding. Allowing residents to remain involved in academic and clinical work during maternity leave helps maintain clinical skills, build new knowledge, and promote peer support. Pregnancy during residency training is common and becoming more common. Training programs can successfully enhance the experience of motherhood during residency by providing flexibility at work to facilitate a healthy balance among the competing demands of family, work, and student life.

  17. Measuring Child Work and Residence Adjustments to Parents'Long-Term Care Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Stern

    1996-01-01

    This article estimates the effects of various parent and child characteristics on the choice of care arrangements of the parent, taking inot account the potential endogeneity of some of the child chararcteristics. Three equations are estimated: a care choice equation, a child location equation, and a child work equation. Results suggest a hieracrchy of family decision making; child locations affect the care decision, which affect child work decisions. The results also question previous resear...

  18. Organizational factors related to the confidence of workers in working with residents with dementia or depression in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Mellor, David; Karantzas, Gery; Von Treuer, Kathryn; Davison, Tanya E; O'Connor, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    There has been limited research examining how organizational factors are associated with the level of confidence of residential aged care staff in managing both residents' depression and the behavioural and psychological symptoms of residents with dementia (BPSD). This study investigated this issue. A cross-sectional study design was employed. In total, 255 aged care staff (131 senior staff, 124 junior staff) from 21 residential care facilities participated in the study. All staff completed measures of self-efficacy in managing BPSD as well as confidence in working with older people with depression. They also completed measures of organizational climate (autonomy, cohesion, trust, pressure, support, recognition, fairness and encouragement of innovation) and measures of workplace experience (job role, number of years working in aged care facilities), job stress and satisfaction, and knowledge of depression. The results demonstrated that autonomy, trust, support, and job stress were associated with confidence in managing BPSD, while the factors related to confidence in managing depression were autonomy, support, job stress, job satisfaction, and knowledge of depression. These findings highlight that organizational climate factors need to be addressed in order to increase staff confidence in managing BPSD and depression. In particular, the findings demonstrate the importance of fostering organizational environments in which autonomy is promoted and there is support and cooperation among aged care staff. Attention to these factors is likely to increase the confidence of staff as they carry out their carer role.

  19. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  1. Work-related health problems among resident immigrant workers in Italy and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: in both Spain and Italy the number of immigrants has strongly increased in the last 20 years, currently representing more than the 10% of workforce in each country. The segregation of immigrants into unskilled or risky jobs brings negative consequences for their health. The objective of this study is to compare prevalence of work-related health problems between immigrants and native workers in Italy and Spain.

    Methods: data come from the Italian Labour Force Survey (n=65 779 and Spanish Working Conditions Survey (n=11 019, both conducted in 2007. We analyzed merged datasets to evaluate whether interviewees, both natives and migrants, judge their health being affected by their work conditions and, if so, which specific diseases. For migrants, we considered those coming from countries with a value of the Human Development Index lower than 0.85. Logistic regression models were used, including gender, age, and education as adjusting factors.

    Results: migrants reported skin diseases (Mantel-Haenszel pooled OR=1.49; 95%CI: 0.59-3.74 and musculoskeletal problems among those employed in agricultural sector (Mantel-Haenszel pooled OR=1.16; 95%CI: 0.69-1.96 more frequently than natives; country-specific analysis showed higher risks of musculoskeletal problems among migrants compared to the non-migrant population in Italy (OR=1.17; 95% CI: 0.48-1.59 and of respiratory problems in Spain (OR=2.02; 95%CI: 1.02-4.0. In both countries the risk of psychological stress was predominant among national workers.

    Conclusions: this collaborative study allows to strength the evidence concerning the health of migrant workers in Southern European countries.

  2. How to enhance route learning and visuo-spatial working memory in aging: a training for residential care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitolo, Micaela; Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Carbone, Elena; Pazzaglia, Francesca

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a route-learning training in a group of older adults living in a residential care home. We verified the presence of training-specific effects in tasks similar to those trained - route-learning tasks - as well as transfer effects on related cognitive processes - visuo-spatial short-term memory (VSSTM; Corsi Blocks Test (CBT), forward version), visuo-spatial working memory (VSWM; CBT, backward version; Pathway Span Tasks; Jigsaw Puzzle Test) - and in self-report measures. The maintenance of training benefits was examined after 3 months. Thirty 70-90-year-old residential care home residents were randomly assigned to the route-learning training group or to an active control group (involved in non-visuo-spatial activities). The trained group performed better than the control group in the route-learning tasks, retaining this benefit 3 months later. Immediate transfer effects were also seen in visuo-spatial span tasks (i.e., CBT forward and backward version and Pathway Span Task); these benefits had been substantially maintained at the 3-month follow-up. These findings suggest that a training on route learning is a promising approach to sustain older adults' environmental learning and some related abilities (e.g., VSSTM and VSWM), even in residential care home residents.

  3. Effect of a staffing strategy based on voluntary increase in working hours on quality of patient care in a hospital in KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. McIntosh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Two of the issues facing the South African Health Care System are the shortage of nursing staff and a lack of adequate skills to provide quality patient care. The hospital under study experienced a critical shortage of applications from professional registered nurses, consequently a staffing strategy was implemented to overcome the shortage of nurses and to maintain quality patient care. The strategy introduced encouraged nurses to voluntarily work an additional ten hours per week with remuneration. A non-experimental, descriptive design with a quantitative approach was applied to investigate the effect of a staffing strategy aimed at improving the quality of care in a hospital in Kwa-Zulu Natal based on voluntarily increasing staff working hours. The investigation compared the quality of nursing care before and after the implementation of the staffing strategy through retrospective audits of randomly selected patient files 372 (11% of the total population of 400 files were audited. A random sample of 4 boxes each containing a 100 patient files, of a total of 34 boxes, was selected from the hospital filing system. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed and correlations between various variables using the Chi-square test. No statistically significant differences (p<0.05 were found between the quality of nursing care before and after the implementation of the management strategy, even though deterioration of results after the implementation was observed. The study shows that the quality of nursing care in most wards deteriorated after implementation. The staffing strategy failed to improve or maintain the quality of nursing care.

  4. Burnout syndrome among psychiatric trainees in 22 countries: Risk increased by long working hours, lack of supervision, and psychiatry not being first career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, N; Podlesek, A; Volpe, U; Barrett, E; Ferrari, S; Rojnic Kuzman, M; Wuyts, P; Papp, S; Nawka, A; Vaida, A; Moscoso, A; Andlauer, O; Tateno, M; Lydall, G; Wong, V; Rujevic, J; Platz Clausen, N; Psaras, R; Delic, A; Losevich, M A; Flegar, S; Crépin, P; Shmunk, E; Kuvshinov, I; Loibl-Weiß, E; Beezhold, J

    2016-02-01

    Postgraduate medical trainees experience high rates of burnout, but evidence regarding psychiatric trainees is missing. We aim to determine burnout rates among psychiatric trainees, and identify individual, educational and work-related factors associated with severe burnout. In an online survey psychiatric trainees from 22 countries were asked to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS) and provide information on individual, educational and work-related parameters. Linear mixed models were used to predict the MBI-GS scores, and a generalized linear mixed model to predict severe burnout. This is the largest study on burnout and training conditions among psychiatric trainees to date. Complete data were obtained from 1980 out of 7625 approached trainees (26%; range 17.8-65.6%). Participants were 31.9 (SD 5.3) years old with 2.8 (SD 1.9) years of training. Severe burnout was found in 726 (36.7%) trainees. The risk was higher for trainees who were younger (Pburnout, severe burnout remained associated with long working hours (Pburnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Modafinil, d-amphetamine and placebo during 64 hours of sustained mental work. II. Effects on two nights of recovery sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buguet; Montmayeur; Pigeau; Naitoh

    1995-12-01

    Polysomnograms were obtained from 37 volunteers, before (baseline) and after (two consecutive recovery nights) a 64-h sleep deprivation, with (d-amphetamine or modafinil) or without (placebo) alerting substances. The drugs were administered at 23.00 hours during the first sleep deprivation night (after 17.5 h of wakefulness), to determine whether decrements in cognitive performance would be prevented; at 05.30 hours during the second night of sleep deprivation (after 47.5 h of wakefulness), to see whether performance would be restored; and at 15.30 hours during the third day of continuous work, to study effects on recovery sleep. The second recovery night served to verify whether drug-induced sleep disturbances on the first recovery night would carry over to a second night of sleep. Recovery sleep for the placebo group was as expected: the debt in slow-wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep was paid back during the first recovery night, the rebound in SWS occurring mainly during the first half of the night, and that of REM sleep being distributed evenly across REM sleep episodes. Recovery sleep for the amphetamine group was also consistent with previously published work: increased sleep latency and intrasleep wakefulness, decreased total sleep time and sleep efficiency, alterations in stage shifts, Stage 1, Stage 2 and SWS, and decreased REM sleep with a longer REM sleep latency. For this group, REM sleep rebound was observed only during the second recovery night. Results for the modafinil group exhibited decreased time in bed and sleep period time, suggesting a reduced requirement for recovery sleep than for the other two groups. This group showed fewer disturbances during the first recovery night than the amphetamine group. In particular, there was no REM sleep deficit, with longer REM sleep episodes and a shorter REM latency, and the REM sleep rebound was limited to the first REM sleep episode. The difference with the amphetamine group was also marked by less NREM sleep

  6. Immigration and the labor mobility of working Mexican legal residents at a border town in the United States: Calexico, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Fimbres Durazo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the labor mobility of a group of Mexican migrant workers that are permanent legal residents in the city of Caléxico, Ca. USA. Since the beginnings of the XX century, this city has been a settlement of immigrants from different countries, among them stands out the Mexican immigrant group that, legally or illegally, has arrived to work temporal or permanently. In order to have and approach to the study of the labor milility of the immigrant workers and identify some situations that made it possible, this paper presents an overview of the historic events that favored the immigration of Mexican workers to this city as well as their participation in the labor market.

  7. A survey-based cross-sectional study of doctors’ expectations and experiences of non-technical skills for Out of Hours work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Shaw, Dominick; Sharples, Sarah; Jeune, Ivan Le; Blakey, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The skill set required for junior doctors to work efficiently and safely Out of Hours (OoH) in hospitals has not been established. This is despite the OoH period representing 75% of the year and it being the time of highest mortality. We set out to explore the expectations of medical students and experiences of junior doctors of the non-technical skills needed to work OoH. Design Survey-based cross-sectional study informed by focus groups. Setting Online survey with participants from five large teaching hospitals across the UK. Participants 300 Medical Students and Doctors Outcome measure Participants ranked the importance of non-technical skills, as identified by literature review and focus groups, needed for OoH care. Results The focus groups revealed a total of eight non-technical skills deemed to be important. In the survey ‘Task Prioritisation’ (mean rank 1.617) was consistently identified as the most important non-technical skill. Stage of training affected the ranking of skills, with significant differences for ‘Communication with Senior Doctors’, ‘Dealing with Clinical Isolation’, ‘Task Prioritisation’ and ‘Communication with Patients’. Importantly, there was a significant discrepancy between the medical student expectations and experiences of doctors undertaking work. Conclusions Our findings suggest that medical staff particularly value task prioritisation skills; however, these are not routinely taught in medical schools. The discrepancy between expectations of students and experience of doctors reinforces the idea that there is a gap in training. Doctors of different grades place different importance on specific non-technical skills with implications for postgraduate training. There is a pressing need for medical schools and deaneries to review non-technical training to include more than communication skills. PMID:25687899

  8. A survey-based cross-sectional study of doctors' expectations and experiences of non-technical skills for Out of Hours work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Shaw, Dominick; Sharples, Sarah; Jeune, Ivan Le; Blakey, John

    2015-02-16

    The skill set required for junior doctors to work efficiently and safely Out of Hours (OoH) in hospitals has not been established. This is despite the OoH period representing 75% of the year and it being the time of highest mortality. We set out to explore the expectations of medical students and experiences of junior doctors of the non-technical skills needed to work OoH. Survey-based cross-sectional study informed by focus groups. Online survey with participants from five large teaching hospitals across the UK. 300 Medical Students and Doctors Participants ranked the importance of non-technical skills, as identified by literature review and focus groups, needed for OoH care. The focus groups revealed a total of eight non-technical skills deemed to be important. In the survey 'Task Prioritisation' (mean rank 1.617) was consistently identified as the most important non-technical skill. Stage of training affected the ranking of skills, with significant differences for 'Communication with Senior Doctors', 'Dealing with Clinical Isolation', 'Task Prioritisation' and 'Communication with Patients'. Importantly, there was a significant discrepancy between the medical student expectations and experiences of doctors undertaking work. Our findings suggest that medical staff particularly value task prioritisation skills; however, these are not routinely taught in medical schools. The discrepancy between expectations of students and experience of doctors reinforces the idea that there is a gap in training. Doctors of different grades place different importance on specific non-technical skills with implications for postgraduate training. There is a pressing need for medical schools and deaneries to review non-technical training to include more than communication skills. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Administrative circulars No. 22A (rev. 1) – Award of additional periods of membership in the Pensions Fund for long-term shift work and No. 22B (rev. 1) – Compensation for long-term shift work hours

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Administrative Circulars No. 22A (Rev. 1) entitled "Award of additional periods of membership in the Pension Fund for long-term shift work" and No. 22B (Rev.1) entitled “Compensation for long-term shift work hours”, adopted following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 21 September 2010 and entering into force on 1 March 2011, are available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department: http://cern.ch/hr-docs/admincirc/admincirc.asp They cancel and replace Administrative Circulars No. 22A and 22B entitled "Award of additional periods of membership in the Pension Fund to shift workers (Early Departure)” and “Duration and special compensation for shift work” of January 2000. This new version clarifies, in particular, the compensation of effective long-term shift work hours. Department Head Office  

  10. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Burt, Lindsay M; Mancini, Brandon R; Morris, Zachary S; Walker, Amanda J; Miller, Seth M; Bhavsar, Shripal; Mohindra, Pranshu; Kim, Miranda B; Kharofa, Jordan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period. This analysis may serve as a valuable tool for those seeking to

  11. Time to talk about work-hour impact on anesthesiologists: The effects of sleep deprivation on Profile of Mood States and cognitive tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Haleh; Bissonnette, Bruno; Tumin, Dmitry; Thung, Arlyne; Rice, Julie; Barry, N'Diris; Tobias, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A physician's fatigue raises significant concerns regarding personal and patient safety. Effects of sleep deprivation on clinical performance and the quality of patient care are major considerations of today's health care environment. To evaluate the impact of partial sleep deprivation after a 17-h overnight call (3 pm-7 am) on the mood status and cognitive skills of anesthesiologists in an academic clinical hospital setting, as compared to these parameters during regular working hours. Taking circadian rhythm into account, the following measures were assessed in 21 pediatric anesthesiologists at two time points over the course of the study; (i) between 7 and 8 am on a regular non call day, and (ii) between 7 and 8 am after a 17-h in-house call (3 pm-7 am). Six mood states were assessed using the Profile of Mood States. A Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) score was obtained as the sum of all mood scores minus vigor. The total score provides a global estimate of affective state. Simple cognitive tests were similarly administered to assess cognitive skills. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to compare data between regular and post call days. A P sleep deprivation affects the total mood status of anesthesiologists and impacts their cognitive skills. These findings are particularly relevant in a context of increased work expectation, particularly on clinical performance in our modern medical system. Such observations suggest that there may be changes that impact the safety of our patients and the quality of health care that is provided. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Work-related health complaints in surgical residents and the influence of social support and job-related autonomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerjan, M.; Bluyssen, S.J.; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Goor, H. van

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the influence of job-related autonomy and social support provided by consultants and colleagues on the stress-related health complaints of surgical residents in the Netherlands. METHODS: All (n = 400) Dutch residents in training in

  13. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-10-07

    A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between countries. Moreover, the common trends observed in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan may be useful to improve PSC in other countries. The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of long nurse working hours on PSC in Japan, the US, and Chinese Taiwan using HSOPS. The HSOPS questionnaire measures 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, with higher scores indicating a more positive PSC. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a generalized linear mixed model to evaluate the impact of working hours on PSC outcome measures (patient safety grade and number of events reported). Tukey's test and Cohen's d values were used to verify the relationships between nurse working hours and the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC. Nurses working ≥60 h/week in Japan and the US had a significantly lower OR for patient safety grade than those working Japan and Chinese Taiwan. Patient safety grade deteriorated and the number of events reported increased with long working hours. Among the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, long working hours had an impact on 'staffing' and 'teamwork within units' in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan.

  14. Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere

  15. "It Feels Like a Lot of Extra Work": Resident Attitudes About Quality Improvement and Implications for an Effective Learning Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jorie M; Anderson, Katherine A; Supiano, Mark A; Weir, Charlene R

    2017-07-01

    The learning health care system promotes development and application of evidence generated within the health care system to enhance the quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to understand resident attitudes about quality improvement (QI) in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved programs. Four focus groups were conducted with 45 residents at the University of Utah School of Medicine during September and October 2014. Residents discussed the perceived value of QI and their experiences with QI. Qualitative analysis was conducted iteratively, resulting in a set of constructs that were then consolidated into overarching themes. Five themes emerged from the qualitative analysis. Four of these represented QI participation barriers: challenges with understanding the vision of QI, confusion about basic aspects of QI, a sense that resident contributions to QI are not valued/valuable to the QI process, and challenges with prioritizing responsibilities relating to QI compared with other responsibilities. One theme represented a facilitator of successful QI: factors that make QI work successfully (e.g., clear goals and a sense of being on the "same page"). If resident attitudes about QI do not improve, the culture of the learning health care system is threatened. An important step in enhancing the perceived value of QI is resolving the perceived tension between providing excellent patient care and satisfying other goals. Involving residents more effectively in QI may result in improved attitudes and promote development of a better-functioning learning health care system.

  16. 29 CFR 794.142 - Special compensation when overtime in excess of 12 daily or 56 weekly hours is worked in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... unless all the straight time compensation due him for the nonovertime hours under his contract (express or implied) or under any applicable statute has been paid (§ 778.315 of this chapter). In computing...

  17. Enhancement of resident education in sonography using high-speed PACS/ATM image transmission: work in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Grant, Edward G.; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Valentino, Daniel J.

    1996-05-01

    Transmission of high quality images between hospitals would be of value by exposing residents at individual institutions to a greater mix of disease processes. This problem is particularly serious in ultrasound where individual hospitals may not perform the entire range of examinations. We undertook this study to assess the effectiveness of image transmission via a PACS/ATM global network in improving ultrasound education among residents at affiliated hospitals. Image management was performed by AGFA PACS; global network was Asynchronous Transfer Mode. Selected cases from the two hospitals (OB/GYN cases at one, vascular at the other) were transmitted. Readout/teaching sessions included cases performed at base hospital and those received via network. Evaluation forms were collected from participants at both institutions. No image degradation occurred with transmission. Residents' exposure to ultrasound cases increased at the two hospitals. The system was considered an excellent teaching tool by all faculty and residents surveyed.

  18. Perceived impact of the 80-hour workweek: five years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozois, Eric J; Holubar, Stefan D; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L; Malireddy, Kishore; Cima, Robert R; Farley, David R; Larson, David W

    2009-09-01

    We aimed to assess perceptions of the effects of the 80-hour workweek (80hWW) restriction on patient care, education, and resident quality of life. In April 2007, attending surgeons and residents in nine surgical specialties at our institution were surveyed. Respondents were categorized into three groups: (1) attending surgeons; (2) residents beginning their training before the 80hWW implementation (ResBefore); and (3) residents beginning training after the 80hWW implementation (ResAfter). Differences between groups were assessed with univariate analysis. The overall response rate was 57%. A minority in all three groups ( or =84%) agreed that midlevel providers were now critical to successfully deliver health care (P = 0.40). Fewer attending surgeons (21%) and ResBefore (29%) perceived improvements in education compared with ResAfter (68%; P work-life balance for residents (attending surgeons [85%], ResBefore [71%], and ResAfter [92%]; P = 0.008), but 76% of attending surgeons reported decreased job satisfaction. We showed a discrepancy between perceptions of attending surgeons and residents regarding the effect of the 80hWW on patient care and surgical education. Quality of life was improved for residents but not for attending surgeons. The impact of the 80hWW on patient care and surgical education needs to be quantified.

  19. A Study Identifying and Validating Competencies Needed for Mid-Managers That Work in Housing and Residence Life at Colleges and Universities in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Hassel Andre

    2016-01-01

    The researcher identified a gap in the knowledge of competencies needed for midmanagers that work in housing and residence life at the southeast colleges and universities in the United States. The purpose of this study was to identify and develop a consensus on competencies needed by mid-managers. The review of the literature describes and…

  20. Adaptive Influence of Long Term High Altitude Residence on Spatial Working Memory: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jiaxing; Gong, Qiyong; Weng, Xuchu

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing population living at a high altitude (HA), the impact of HA residence on human cognitive function has raised concerns. We recruited two groups of college students with one group born and grew up at HA until early adulthood and the control group born and grew up at near sea level (SL); the two groups were matched at age, gender…

  1. Helping Students Achieve Their Goals: The Experience of Working with Students with Mental Health Concerns in a Residence Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals living with a mental health issue and attending college may experience significant opportunities for growth and also personal challenges in their development into young adulthood. Residence hall directors may be instrumental in assisting this population during their college years. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine…

  2. The league of extraordinary generalists: a qualitative study of professional identity and perceptions of role of GPs working on a national after hours helpline in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Rosemary; Williamson, Michelle

    2016-04-22

    Telephone triage and advice services (TTAS) have become commonplace in western health care systems particularly as an aid to patient access and demand management in the after hours period. In 2011 an after hours general practitioner (GP) helpline was established as a supplementary service to existing 24-h nurse-TTAS in Australia. Callers to the service in the after hours period who are triaged by a nurse as needing to see a GP immediately or within 24 h may speak with a GP on the line to obtain further assessment and advice. While much research has been undertaken on the roles of nurses in TTAS and the professional identities and attitudes to new technology of community-based GPs, little is known of the perceptions of role and identity of GPs providing after hours advice on primary care helplines. This qualitative study explored the perceptions of professional identity and role, motivations and contributions to the health system of GPs employed on the Australian afterhours GP helpline in 2011-2013. The study took a phenomenographic approach seeking to understand the essence of being a telephone GP, probing professional identity while also exploring role tensions. Twelve GPs, or 15% of the helpline GP workforce participated in the qualitative study. The GPs experienced both personal and professional benefits and believed they were strengthening patient care and the Australian health system. However the role required a re-alignment of practice that challenged professional autonomy, the doctor-patient relationship and commitment to continuity of care. Some GPs made this role realignment more readily than others and were well suited to the helpline role. There was a strong collegial bond amongst the helpline GPs which facilitated the maintenance of professional autonomy. Telephone GP assessment and advice does not demonstrate the same breadth as face-to-face practice and provides little opportunity for continuity of care, but this has not prevented those performing the

  3. Evaluation of the impact of collaborative work by teams from the National Medical Residency Committee and the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery. Retrospective and prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renato Antunes Dos; Snell, Linda; Nunes, Maria do Patrocínio Tenório

    2016-04-01

    Training for specialist physicians in Brazil can take place in different ways. Closer liaison between institutions providing this training and assessment and health care services may improve qualifications. This article analyzes the impact of closer links and joint work by teams from the National Medical Residency Committee (Comissão Nacional de Residência Médica, CNRM) and the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery (Sociedade Brasileira de Neurocirurgia, SBN) towards evaluating these programs. Retrospective and prospective study, conducted in a public university on a pilot project developed between CNRM and SBN for joint assessment of training programs across Brazil. The literature in the most relevant databases was reviewed. Documents and legislation produced by official government bodies were evaluated. Training locations were visited. Reports produced about residency programs were analyzed. Only 26% of the programs were immediately approved. The joint assessments found problems relating to teaching and to functioning of clinical service in 35% of the programs. The distribution of programs in this country has a strong relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) of the regions and is very similar to the distribution of specialists. Closer collaboration between the SBN and CNRM had a positive impact on assessment of neurosurgery medical residency across the country. The low rates of direct approval have produced modifications and improvements to the quality of teaching and care (services). Closer links between the CNRM and other medical specialties have the capability to positively change the structure and function of specialty training in Brazil.

  4. How personality traits affect clinician-supervisors' work engagement and subsequently their teaching performance in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinician-supervisors often work simultaneously as doctors and teachers. Supervisors who are more engaged for their teacher work are evaluated as better supervisors. Work engagement is affected by the work environment, yet the role of supervisors' personality traits is unclear. This study examined

  5. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  6. Compassion Fatigue is Similar in Emergency Medicine Residents Compared to other Medical and Surgical Specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fernanda Bellolio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Compassion fatigue (CF is the emotional and physical burden felt by those helping others in distress, leading to a reduced capacity and interest in being empathetic towards future suffering. Emergency care providers are at an increased risk of CF secondary to their first responder roles and exposure to traumatic events. We aimed to investigate the current state of compassion fatigue among emergency medicine (EM resident physicians, including an assessment of contributing factors. Methods: We distributed a validated electronic questionnaire consisting of the Professional Quality of Life Scale with subscales for the three components of CF (compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary traumatic stress, with each category scored independently. We collected data pertaining to day- versus night-shift distribution, hourly workload and child dependents. We included residents in EM, neurology, orthopedics, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and general surgery. Results: We surveyed 255 residents, with a response rate of 75%. Of the 188 resident respondents, 18% worked a majority of their clinical shifts overnight, and 32% had child dependents. Burnout scores for residents who worked greater than 80 hours per week, or primarily worked overnight shifts, were higher than residents who worked less than 80 hours (mean score 25.0 vs 21.5; p=0.013, or did not work overnight (mean score 23.5 vs 21.3; p=0.022. EM residents had similar scores in all three components of CF when compared to other specialties. Secondary traumatic stress scores for residents who worked greater than 80 hours were higher than residents who worked less than 80 hours (mean score 22.2 vs 19.5; p=0.048, and those with child dependents had higher secondary traumatic stress than those without children (mean score 21.0 vs 19.1; p=0.012. Conclusion: CF scores in EM residents are similar to residents in other surgical and medical specialties. Residents working primarily

  7. Neurosurgery resident leadership development: an innovative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeffrey E; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Albert, Gregory W; Greenlee, Jeremy D

    2011-02-01

    A great deal of time and resources go into the development and training of neurosurgeons. One area that has minimal literature and assessment is leadership development. Under the core competency of interpersonal and communication skills, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has indicated that residents are expected to work effectively as a member or leader of a healthcare team. This article reveals how a structured leadership program was developed so that residents are better prepared for the role of chief resident and future leadership roles. Beginning in October 2006, residents attended a series of 1-hour workshops conducted monthly. Topics included leadership style, conflict management, effective feedback, team building, team leadership, motivation, and moving from peer to leader. A retrospective pretest was conducted at the end of the program. Residents reported a significant knowledge gain for the majority of topics. Resident comments indicated a greater awareness of the impact of leading and ways to improve their personal leadership. Quantitatively and qualitatively, residents and faculty reported that the leadership program made a significant impact on the development of future neurosurgical leaders.

  8. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  9. Exploring the Changing Landscape of Surgical Residency Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Hopmans (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWithin the past decade, the structure and format of surgical residency training has changed radically by the introduction of competency-based training programs, the progressive fragmentation of general surgery into subspecialties, and the implementation of stringent work hour

  10. The impact of a novel resident leadership training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Samir S; Hayley, Barbara; Fagan, Shawn P; Berger, David H; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2004-11-01

    Today's complex health care environment coupled with the 80-hour workweek mandate has required that surgical resident team interactions evolve from a military command-and-control style to a collaborative leadership style. A novel educational curriculum was implemented with objectives of training the residents to have the capacity/ability to create and manage powerful teams through alignment, communication, and integrity integral tools to practicing a collaborative leadership style while working 80 hours per week. Specific strategies were as follows: (1) to focus on quality of patient care and service while receiving a high education-to-service ratio, and (2) to maximize efficiency through time management. This article shows that leadership training as part of a resident curriculum can significantly increase a resident's view of leadership in the areas of alignment, communication, and integrity; tools previously shown in business models to be vital for effective and efficient teams. This curriculum, over the course of the surgical residency, can provide residents with the necessary tools to deliver efficient quality of care while working within the 80-hour workweek mandate in a more collaborative style environment.

  11. A mid year comparison study of career satisfaction and emotional states between residents and faculty at one academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Kristen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME new requirements raise multiple challenges for academic medical centers. We sought to evaluate career satisfaction, emotional states, positive and negative experiences, work hours and sleep among residents and faculty simultaneously in one academic medical center after implementation of the ACGME duty hour requirements. Methods Residents and faculty (1330 in the academic health center were asked to participate in a confidential survey; 72% of the residents and 66% of the faculty completed the survey. Results Compared to residents, faculty had higher levels of satisfaction with career choice, competence, importance and usefulness; lower levels of anxiousness and depression. The most positive experiences for both groups corresponded to strong interpersonal relationships and educational value; most negative experiences to poor interpersonal relationships and issues perceived outside of the physician's control. Approximately 13% of the residents and 14% of the faculty were out of compliance with duty hour requirements. Nearly 5% of faculty reported working more than 100 hours per week. For faculty who worked 24 hour shifts, nearly 60% were out of compliance with the duty-hour requirements. Conclusion Reasons for increased satisfaction with career choice, positive emotional states and experiences for faculty compared to residents are unexplained. Earlier studies from this institution identified similar positive findings among advanced residents compared to more junior residents. Faculty are more frequently at risk for duty-hour violations. If patient safety is of prime importance, faculty, in particular, should be compliant with the duty hour requirements. Perhaps the ACGME should contain faculty work hours as part of its regulatory function.

  12. 45 CFR 261.32 - How many hours must work-eligible individuals participate for the family to count in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provided through the Nutrition Assistance Program in the same manner as a State must include food stamp... disability or is not caring for a child with a disability, then the work-eligible individuals must be... Nutrition Assistance Program in the same manner as a State must include food stamp benefits under paragraph...

  13. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  14. Results of the American Academy of Neurology resident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, W D; Nolte, C M; Matthews, B R; Coleman, M; Corboy, J R

    2011-03-29

    To assess the effect of neurology residency education as trainees advance into independent practice, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) elected to survey all graduating neurology residents at time of graduation and in 3-year cycles thereafter. A 22-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2007. Of 523 eligible residents, 285 (54.5%) responded. Of these, 92% reported good to excellent quality teaching of basic neurology from their faculty; however, 47% noted less than ideal training in basic neuroscience. Two-thirds indicated that the Residency In-service Training Examination was used only as a self-assessment tool, but reports of misuse were made by some residents. After residency, 78% entered fellowships (with 61% choosing a fellowship based on interactions with a mentor at their institution), whereas 20% entered practice directly. After adjustment for the proportion of residents who worked before the duty hour rules were implemented and after their implementation, more than half reported improvement in quality of life (87%), education (60%), and patient care (62%). The majority of international medical graduates reported wanting to stay in the United States to practice rather than return to their country of residence. Neurology residents are generally satisfied with training, and most entered a fellowship. Duty hour implementation may have improved resident quality of life, but reciprocal concerns were raised about impact on patient care and education. Despite the majority of international trainees wishing to stay in the United States, stricter immigration laws may limit their entry into the future neurology workforce.

  15. The Effect of Fatherhood on Employment Hours: Variation by Birth Timing, Marriage and Coresidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinshenker, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the life course paradigm, I assess how the effect of fatherhood on employment hours varies by age of becoming a parent and time elapsed since the birth. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - 1979 Cohort from 1979 to 2002 (N = 28,514 observations), separate effects are estimated based on fathers' marital status and co-residence with own children. Only unmarried men who became fathers before 24 work longer hours immediately after a first birth, but in the long run, most early fathers work fewer hours as a result of parenthood. Over time, unmarried but coresident men who became fathers between 24 and 29 increase their hours, as do married, coresident men who delayed fatherhood until 30 or older. However, the latter increase is moderated by support for egalitarian gender roles. The findings shed light on the contemporary transition to adulthood and on men's work-family balance.

  16. Policy implications of the purchasing intentions towards energy-efficient appliances among China’s urban residents: Do subsidies work?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaohua; Wang, Xiaomeng; Guo, Dongxue

    2017-01-01

    Incentive policies are always used to sway purchase, retail stocking, and production decisions toward energy-efficient products by many countries or regions. So the effectiveness of such subsidies has been of much concern to scholars. This research focused on whether, or not, subsidy policies have guided people's intentions and behaviours. We investigated 436 urban residents from 22 provinces in China, covering the seven major geographic regions, and made an empirical analysis of the factors influencing Chinese urban residents’ purchasing intentions towards energy-efficient appliances based on the structural equation model. On theoretical aspect, we developed the theory of planned behaviour. Our results show that the variable “POLICY” is insignificant which indicates that policy environment and media propaganda in China do not have significant effect on Chinese residents’ willingness to pay for energy-efficient appliances. While, the residents’ environmental awareness, past purchasing experiences, social relationships, age, and level of education all exert a significant influence on Chinese residents’ purchasing intentions. Finally, based on the above research results, the corresponding policy suggestions which mainly focus on the time of subsidy, the object of subsidy and the method of subsidy are offered for policy makers. - Highlights: • We researched people’s behaviour combined with a policy implementation background. • We found that the subsidy policy didn’t change people’s purchase intentions. • Past purchasing experiences significantly influence consumers’ purchase intentions. • We proposed policy advices about the time, types and methods of incentive policies.

  17. Correlation of 2 hour, 4 hour, 8 hour and 12 hour urine protein with 24 hour urinary protein in preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Rani Singhal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To find shortest and reliable time period of urine collection for determination of proteinuria.It is a prospective study carried out on 125 pregnant women with preeclampsia after 20 weeks of gestation having urine albumin >1 using dipstick test. Urine was collected in five different time intervals in colors labeled containers with the assistance of nursing staff; the total collection time was 24 hours. Total urine protein of two-hour, four-hour, eight-hour, 12-hour and 24-hour urine was measured and compared with 24-hour collection. Data was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient.There was significant correlation (p value < 0.01 in two, four, eight and 12-hour urine protein with 24-urine protein, with correlation coefficient of 0.97, 0.97, 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. When a cut off value of 25 mg, 50 mg. 100 mg, and 150 mg for urine protein were used for 2-hour, 4-hours, 8-hour and 12-hour urine collection, a sensitivity of 92.45%, 95.28%, 91.51%, and 96.23% and a specificity of 68.42%, 94.74%, 84.21% and 84.21% were obtained, respectively.Two-hour urine proteins can be used for assessment of proteinuria in preeclampsia instead of gold standard 24-hour urine collection for early diagnosis and better patient compliance.

  18. Resident burnout: evaluating the role of the learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vendeloo, Stefan N; Godderis, Lode; Brand, Paul L P; Verheyen, Kees C P M; Rowell, Suria A; Hoekstra, Harm

    2018-03-27

    Although burnout is viewed as a syndrome rooted in the working environment and organizational culture, the role of the learning environment in the development of resident burnout remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the association between burnout and the learning environment in a cohort of Belgian residents. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among residents in a large university hospital in Belgium. We used the Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (UBOS-C) to assess burnout and the Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT) to assess the learning environment. A total of 236 residents (29 specialties) completed the survey (response rate 34.6%), of which 98 (41.5%) met standard criteria for burnout. After multivariate regression analysis adjusting for hours worked per week, quality of life and satisfaction with work-life balance, we found an inverse association between D-RECT scores and the risk of burnout (adjusted odds ratio; 0.47 for each point increase in D-RECT score; 95% CI, 0.23 - 0.95; p = 0.01). Resident burnout is highly prevalent in our cohort of Belgian residents. Our results suggest that the learning environment plays an important role in reducing the risk of burnout among residents.

  19. [The young resident between work and family. Status quo and approaches to a solution in orthopedics and traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeweg, D; Achatz, G; Liebig, K; Lorenz, O

    2013-01-01

    The compatibility between the family and the medical profession requires a new challenge of leadership in hospitals, politics and medical societies. The generation change in the medical profession needs the implementation of modern framework conditions in the departments of orthopedics and traumatology. Topics such as work organisation, family support and programs to assist the return to work need to be discussed and should be used as a competitive advantage. Employees of generation y need a gender-independent role model in the field of modern management methods in employee leadership.

  20. [Cross-sectional study of the variability of work-related stress among post-graduate medical residents at the main University Polyclinic of Sicily].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Claudio; Albeggiani, Valentina; Bonfante, Maria Stefania; Monte, Caterina; Lo Cascio, Nunzio; Mazzucco, Walter

    2015-02-10

    Among health care workers (HCWs), work-related stress is one of the main topics in risk assessment and prevention at the workplace. Post-graduate medical residents (MRs) are a group of HCWs comparable to medical doctors in terms of occupational exposure and occurrence of work-related stress syndromes. Risk assessment of work-related stress among MRs attending the major University Hospital of Sicily. A cross-sectional survey via an anonymous and self-administered questionnaire. 45% of clinical MRs and 37% of surgical MRs had access to compensatory rest days against 92% of MRs of the services area (p<0.001). A work attendance recording system for MRs was available in 80% of the postgraduate medical schools of the services area, in 60% of the clinical postgraduate schools and in 50% of the surgical postgraduate schools (p<0.001). MRs of the postgraduate surgical schools reported having access to work breaks (41%) with less frequency compared to clinical (60%) and services MRs (74%) (p<0.001). Both clinical (47%) and surgical MRs (47%) were more exposed to work-related stress than MRs of the services area (27%) (p<0.001). The survey demonstrated excess exposure to work-related stress for all the considered variables in MRs of the surgical area, compared with MRs of clinical and services areas. It is strongly recommended to provide specific training programmes aimed at managing the MRs' risk of exposure to work-related stress, focusing both on the workers and the work environment.

  1. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  2. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  3. Harm to patients and others caused by impaired junior doctors compelled to work 30-hour shifts or longer: Can the minister of health, provincial MECs for health and public health officials be held liable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jan McQuoid-Mason

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Junior doctors in most provinces in South Africa are compelled to work 30-hour shifts without a break. Shifts in excess of 24 hours can result in serious bodily harm to patients, third parties and the doctors themselves. These risks have been drawn to the attention of the health authorities but the 30-hour policy continues to be implemented in all provinces, except recently in the Western Cape. Public health officials may be held directly liable for the harm caused to patients, third parties or the junior doctors themselves, if it can be shown that they are at fault and are acting unlawfully in violation of the Constitution. Where officials carry out the unlawful orders of senior officials, including the minister of health and provincial members of the executive council (MECs for health, they may not raise the defence of ‘obedience to orders’ and may be held directly liable for harm caused. Superior officials issuing such orders will also be held directly liable for harm caused.

  4. [Sleep deprivation effects on cognitive, psychomotor skills and its relationship with personal characteristics of resident doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Liz; Barragán-Pérez, Virginia; Fuentes-García, Ruth; Monsalvo-Obregón, Erika Cristina; Fouilloux-Morales, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In countries such as United States and European Nations changes have been proposed regarding to duty and academic structure of specialists in training, this implies adjustments in the norms concerning the number of hours a week that residents work. The main argument which has underpinned such transformations is based on the assumption that excessive working hours (more than 16 hours uninterrupted) cause cognitive and psychomotor disorders in residents. To evaluate the association between sleep deprivation and cognitive and psychomotor skills of a sample of residents of different specialties of Medicine. Longitudinal study with measurements pre and post shifts, in 31 residents of Medicine. The measured variables were: cognitive and psychomotor skills, demographic data and conditions of the shift, quality of sleep and psychopathology. 81% residents showed detriment in at least one of the tests, however, in psychomotor skills significant different results were found in CPR maneuvers between pre and post shift with an improvement in scores. Sleep deprivation causes detriment of cognitive and psychomotor skills. While our results can't be generalized, they may constitute a precedent for possible changes in the working hours of medical residencies.

  5. Association of neighbourhood residence and preferences with the built environment, work-related travel behaviours, and health implications for employed adults: findings from the URBAN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badland, Hannah M; Oliver, Melody; Kearns, Robin A; Mavoa, Suzanne; Witten, Karen; Duncan, Mitch J; Batty, G David

    2012-10-01

    Although the neighbourhoods and health field is well established, the relationships between neighbourhood selection, neighbourhood preference, work-related travel behaviours, and transport infrastructure have not been fully explored. It is likely that understanding these complex relationships more fully will inform urban policy development, and planning for neighbourhoods that support health behaviours. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to identify associations between these variables in a sample of employed adults. Self-reported demographic, work-related transport behaviours, and neighbourhood preference data were collected from 1616 employed adults recruited from 48 neighbourhoods located across four New Zealand cities. Data were collected between April 2008 and September 2010. Neighbourhood built environment measures were generated using geographical information systems. Findings demonstrated that more people preferred to live in urban (more walkable), rather than suburban (less walkable) settings. Those living in more suburban neighbourhoods had significantly longer work commute distances and lower density of public transport stops available within the neighbourhood when compared with those who lived in more urban neighbourhoods. Those preferring a suburban style neighbourhood commuted approximately 1.5 km further to work when compared with participants preferring urban settings. Respondents who preferred a suburban style neighbourhood were less likely to take public or active transport to/from work when compared with those who preferred an urban style setting, regardless of the neighbourhood type in which they resided. Although it is unlikely that constructing more walkable environments will result in work-related travel behaviour change for all, providing additional highly walkable environments will help satisfy the demand for these settings, reinforce positive health behaviours, and support those amenable to change to engage in higher levels of

  6. [Commercial sexual exploitation of children: Meanings and practices of people who work and reside in downtown Medellin (Colombia), 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa-Estrada, Diego Alejandro; Muñoz-Echeverri, Iván Felipe

    2017-01-01

    The commercial sexual exploitation of children is a public health problem and a serious violation of the rights of children and adolescents. The response to this problem has been affected by the meanings and practices of the actors involved. In order to contribute to a better understanding of the problem, a qualitative social study using a grounded theory approach was carried out between 2014 and 2015. The aim was to understand the meanings and practices regarding this issue of people who spend time in an area of the city center with a high presence of commercial sexual exploitation of children and adolescents. The techniques used were participant observation and semi-structured interviews. We found that the predominate conceptions lead to practices that aggravate and perpetuate rights violations. Although practices of protection towards victims were identified, these were limited to critical aspects of the context. Actions to eradicate commercial sexual exploitation should work with the community and the meanings within the community regarding sexual exploitation so as to potentiate the victim protection practices carried out and reduce barriers to such practices.

  7. Comparison of the levels of knowledge and approaches in relation with child abuse and neglect in residents of pediatrics, pediatricians and practitioners working in the province of Ankara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Özlem; Çalışkan, Deniz; Suskan, Emine

    2014-03-01

    In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the levels of knowledge and approaches related with child abuse and neglect in pediatricians and practitioners who have a significant role in recognition and prevention of child abuse and neglect. Two hundred residents of pediatrics and 100 pediatricians working in university and education and research hospitals in the center of Ankara province and 250 practicioners working in primary health care centers were included in the study. A scale composed of five parts including history, physical examination, radiology, risk groups and symptoms was prepared to determine the level of knowledge of physician related with child abuse and neglect. The correct answers given to the questions included in the scale were added and knowledge scores for the subscales and the total score were calculated. Approval was obtained from Ankara University, Medical Faculty Ethics Committee for the study. The data were evaluated using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis test. A total of 550 physicians (339 female and 221 male) were included in the study. The mean total knowledge score related with child abuse and neglect was found to be 12.4±4.5 in residents of pediatrics, 13.7±2.8 in pediatricians and 13.6±2.8 in practitioners. The level of knowledge was found to be significantly higher in women, married physicians, physicians who received education before and after graduation, physician who confronted with cases of abuse or suspicious abuse and made a legal notice. In the light of these findings, child abuse and neglect should be included in education programs before and after graduation for physicians who have a key role in the subject of child abuse and neglect.

  8. Dementia care worker stress associations with unit type, resident, and work environment characteristics: a cross-sectional secondary data analysis of the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resources Project (SHURP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Barbara; De Geest, Sabina; Fierz, Katharina; Beckmann, Sonja; Zúñiga, Franziska

    2017-03-01

    Although caring for residents with dementia in nursing homes is associated with various stressors for care workers, the role of the unit type, and particularly the proportion of residents with dementia, remains unclear. This study aimed to explore associations between unit type and care worker stress, taking into account additional potential stressors. This cross-sectional study was a secondary data analysis in the Swiss Nursing Homes Human Resources Project, which included data from 3,922 care workers from 156 Swiss nursing homes. Care workers' stress was measured with a shortened version of the Health Professions Stress Inventory. Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess care worker stress and its relationships with three unit types (special care units and others with high or low proportions of residents with dementia), work environment factors, and aggressive resident behavior. After including all potential stressors in the models, no significant differences between the three unit types regarding care worker stress were found. However, increased care worker stress levels were significantly related to lower ratings of staffing and resources adequacy, the experience of verbal aggression, and the observation of verbal or physical aggression among residents. Although the unit type plays only a minor role regarding care worker stress, this study confirms that work environment and aggressive behavior of residents are important factors associated with work-related stress. To prevent increases of care worker stress, interventions to improve the work environment and strengthen care workers' ability to cope with aggressive behavior are suggested.

  9. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein - 24 hour; Chronic kidney disease - urine protein; Kidney failure - urine protein ... Heart failure High blood pressure during pregnancy ( preeclampsia ) Kidney disease caused by diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune disorders, ...

  10. Three Mile Island - The hour-by-hour account of what really happened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.

    1980-01-01

    An hour-by-hour account is given of the progression of events leading up to and during the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor. The emergency procedures followed, the evacuation of local residents and the decisions taken as the possibility of a meltdown became apparent are recorded in detail together with aspects of the media coverage and the problems of communication. (U.K.)

  11. Medical education and the ACGME duty hour requirements: assessing the effect of a day float system on educational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roey, Steve

    2006-01-01

    In July 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted new resident work hour mandates, which are being shown to improve resident well-being and patient safety. However, there are limited data on the impact these new mandates may have on educational activities. To assess the impact on educational activities of a day float system created to meet ACGME work hour mandates. The inpatient ward coverage was changed by adding a day float team responsible for new patient admissions in the morning, with the on-call teams starting later and being responsible for new patient admissions thereafter. I surveyed the residents to assess the impact of this new system on educational activities-resident autonomy, attending teaching, conference attendance, resident teaching, self-directed learning, and ability to complete patient care responsibilities. There was no adverse effect of the day float system on educational activities. House staff reported increased autonomy, enhanced teaching from attending physicians, and improved ability to complete patient care responsibilities. Additionally, house staff demonstrated improved compliance with the ACGME mandates. The implementation of a novel day float system for the inpatient medicine ward service improved compliance with ACGME work duty requirements and did not adversely impact educational activities of the residency training program.

  12. Challenges to neurology residency education in today's health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bega, Danny; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Residency training has had to adapt to higher patient volumes, increased complexity of medical care, and the commercialized system of health care. These changes have led to a concerning culture shift in neurology. We review the relationship between the emerging health care delivery system and residency training, highlighting issues related to duty hours and work-life balance, the changing technological landscape, high patient volumes, and complex service obligations. We propose that the current challenges in health care delivery offer the opportunity to improve neurology residency through faculty development programs, bringing teaching back to the bedside, increasing resident autonomy, utilizing near-peer teaching, and rewarding educators who facilitate an environment of inquiry and scholarship, with the ultimate goal of better alignment between education and patient care. Ann Neurol 2016;80:315-320. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  13. Effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Washington, Chantel I; Stewart, Katherine I; Shen, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Previous work has shown American obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents are lacking in menopause training. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum in improving OB/GYN residents' knowledge and self-assessed competency in menopause topics. We developed a menopause medicine-teaching curriculum for OB/GYN residents at our academic hospital-based residency program. The 2-year curriculum was composed of year 1: four 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab with cases presentations, and year 2: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab. Core topics included menopause physiology, hormone therapy, breast health, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune disease. Pre- and posttests assessed resident knowledge and comfort in core topics, and a pre- and postcurriculum survey assessed utility and learning satisfaction. From July 2011 to June 2013, 34 OB/GYN residents completed the menopause curriculum annually with an average attendance at each module of 23 residents. Pre-/posttest scores improved from a mean pretest score of 57.3% to a mean posttest score of 78.7% (P menopause patients with 75.8% reporting feeling "barely comfortable" and 8.4% feeling "not at all comfortable." After the 2-year curriculum, 85.7% reported feeling "comfortable/very comfortable" taking care of menopause patients. The majority of residents (95.2%) reported the menopause curriculum was "extremely useful." A 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for OB/GYN residents utilizing lectures and a lab with case studies is an effective modality to improve resident knowledge required to manage menopause patients.

  14. 75 FR 2467 - Hours of Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ...-consecutive-hour off-duty period long enough to provide restorative sleep regardless of the number of hours... short rest periods during the work day improve driver alertness in the operation of a CMV? How long should these rest periods be? At what point in the duty cycle or drive-time would short rest periods...

  15. Cost-efficient staffing under annualized hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Hans, Elias W.; Veltman, Bart; Berrevoets, Leo M.; Berden, Hubert J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We study how flexibility in workforce capacity can be used to efficiently match capacity and demand. Flexibility in workforce capacity is introduced by the annualized hours regime. Annualized hours allow organizations to measure working time per year, instead of per month or per week. An additional

  16. 7 positions in 2 hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ackerman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 7 positions in 2 hours (2013 is a drawing that documents the process of making the short film Role Reversal Rehearsal. It became quickly apparent that the process of making the work was more dynamic and interesting than the finished piece itself. Relationships between the childcare arrangements of the participants and the collective working process brought about the necessity of collaboration for parent artists. Each participant gave their time, energy and creative insight towards filming a series of birthing positions with roles reversed. The male performer became the central figure in an attempt to prompt empathy, humour, and to embody the importance of the male role in childbirth. There were two hours to choreograph, rehearse, and film the sequence. The drawing by Ackerman encapsulates the 'rhizomatic' approach to producing creative work under the constraints of parenthood. The 'arborescent' structure of hierarchy encouraged in industrial filmmaking is subsumed in favour of a horizontal structure. This new structure allows for the creative input, and flow of collaboration between all people involved - including the 3 and 5 year olds, who contributed ideas for camera and soundtrack in situ.

  17. New gate opening hours

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    Please note the new opening hours of the gates as well as the intersites tunnel from the 19 May 2009: GATE A 7h - 19h GATE B 24h/24 GATE C 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h GATE D 8h - 12h\t13h - 16h GATE E 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h Prévessin 24h/24 The intersites tunnel will be opened from 7h30 to 18h non stop. GS-SEM Group Infrastructure and General Services Department

  18. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  19. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  20. Assessment of procedural skills in residents working in a research and training institute: An effort to ensure patient safety and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Kamlesh; Samra, Tanvir; Naik, B Naveen; Saini, Vikas

    2018-01-01

    To ensure patient safety, it is important to regularly assess the knowledge and practical skills of anesthesia trainees. This study was conducted to evaluate the competency of the residents and the impact of various corrective measures in the form of didactic lectures and clinical skill demonstrations on the conduct of various procedural skills by the residents. Ninety-five junior residents were enrolled in this study. Assessment of competency of 1 st , 2 nd , and 3 rd year residents in performing various procedure skills of anesthesia was done in two stages using procedure specific checklist (PSC) and Global Rating Scales (GRSs). Preliminary results of the first assessment (Score 1) were discussed with the residents; deficiencies were identified and corrective measures suggested by didactic lectures and clinical skill demonstrations which were followed by a subsequent assessment after 3 months (Score 2). There was a statistically significant improvement in the PSC and GRS scores after corrective measures for all the procedural interventions studied. Percentage increase in scores was maximum in 1 st year (42.98 ± 6.62) followed by 2 nd year (34.62 ± 5.49) and minimum in 3 rd year residents (18.06 ± 3.69). The percentage increase of scores was almost similar for all subset of procedural skills; low, intermediate, and high skill anesthetic procedures. For assessment of procedural skills of residents, use of PSC and GRS scores should be incorporated and the same should be used to monitor the impact of various corrective measures (didactic lectures and clinical skill demonstrations) on the conduct of various procedural skills by the resident.

  1. Pregnancy during otolaryngology residency: experience and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephanie; Arnold, Michelle; Sanderson, Alicia; Cupp, Craig

    2009-05-01

    Pregnancy during graduate medical training became a pertinent issue in the United States during the 10-year interval between 1992 and 2002 as the number of female residents trended steadily upward to over 25 per cent. Surgical training programs characteristically present unique challenges and stressors for all trainees, and pregnancy introduces additional physical, professional, and emotional demands for the pregnant woman and her coworkers. A qualitative study was performed using in-person interviews of female otolaryngology residents who had given birth within the previous 12 months. Items addressed included the pregnancy course and its complications, specific stressors during and after pregnancy, and solutions implemented by the resident and her program director. Reactions and level of support from coworkers were also discussed. Five pregnancies were reported among three residents interviewed. One resident experienced preterm delivery, which necessitated a week-long stay in the neonatal intensive care unit for her infant. Another had chorioamnionitis during delivery of two infants. One child had low birth weight. The third resident had a miscarriage during the first trimester of her first pregnancy and sustained a minor head injury after fainting in the operating room during her second pregnancy. Overall, long hours, unpredictable work demands, and guilt over colleagues' increased workloads and altered schedules were noted as significant sources of stress among these residents; the women also described high expectations of themselves, along with misgivings over their ability to balance pregnancy and parenthood with career demands. The most significant postpartum stress indicator was the matter of child care, especially as it related to finding adequate coverage for on-call periods ranging from 3 to 14 days per month. Maintaining breastfeeding was an additional concern in the postpartum period. Pregnancy during surgical residency is a significant source of

  2. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  3. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  4. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P general surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves. PMID:23864049

  5. Les 2x12h : une solution au conflit de temporalités du travail posté ? The 12-hour shifts system: A way to settle conflicting temporalities in shift work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Barthe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Les horaires de travail en 2x12h semblent faciliter l’articulation des temporalités mise à mal par le travail posté, articulation avec les dimensions temporelles du fonctionnement humain : les rythmicités biologiques, l’organisation de la vie socio-familiale et la fatigue notamment. Dans un contexte social et économique favorable à la diffusion des 2x12h, cet article propose une synthèse des effets de ces horaires de travail posté sur la santé, sur la vie personnelle des opérateurs concernés et sur le travail. Même si, comparés aux autres systèmes d’horaires, les 2x12h semblent avoir des conséquences moindres sur la santé et la vie personnelle, cette synthèse montre l’importance d’autres facteurs (caractéristiques des personnes, temps d’exposition aux horaires, propriétés du système d’horaires, par exemple sur ces effets et la nécessité d’intégrer l’analyse du contenu du travail et des exigences du travail dans l’analyse de ces effets. Avant de penser le 2x12h comme une solution au conflit de temporalités du travail posté, la réflexion d’aménagement des horaires de travail se doit d’intégrer une analyse systémique et détaillée du travail, prenant en compte le contenu du travail, les exigences des tâches et les stratégies d’accord des temporalités mises en place par les opérateurs concernés au niveau de leur activité de travail.Twelve-hour shifts appear to facilitate the flow of temporalities involved in shift work schedules and the different temporal dimensions of human functioning: particularly biological rhythms, private life, and fatigue. In a social and economic context that favors the increase of 12-h shifts, this paper sums up the effects of 12-h shifts on health, personal life, and work. 12-h shifts seem to have less impact on health and personal life, when compared with other shift-work systems. This synthesis shows the importance of other factors (characteristics of the

  6. Rethinking Resident Supervision to Improve Safety: From Hierarchical to Interprofessional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamuz, Michal; Giardina, Traber Davis; Thomas, Eric J.; Menon, Shailaja; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-01-01

    Background Inadequate supervision is a significant contributing factor to medical errors involving trainees but supervision in high-risk settings such as the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is not well studied. Objective We explored how residents in the ICU experienced supervision related to medication safety not only from supervising physicians but also from other professionals. Design, Setting, Measurements Using qualitative methods, we examined in-depth interviews with 17 residents working in ICUs of three tertiary-care hospitals. We analyzed residents' perspectives on receiving and initiating supervision from physicians within the traditional medical hierarchy and from other professionals, including nurses, staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists (“interprofessional supervision”). Results While initiating their own supervision within the traditional hierarchy, residents believed in seeking assistance from fellows and attendings and articulated rules of thumb for doing so; however, they also experienced difficulties. Some residents were concerned that their questions would reflect poorly on them; others were embarrassed by their mistaken decisions. Conversely, residents described receiving interprofessional supervision from nurses and pharmacists, who proactively monitored, intervened in, and guided residents' decisions. Residents relied on nurses and pharmacists for non-judgmental answers to their queries, especially after-hours. To enhance both types of supervision, residents emphasized the importance of improving interpersonal communication skills. Conclusions Residents depended on interprofessional supervision when making decisions regarding medications in the ICU. Improving interprofessional supervision, which thus far has been under-recognized and underemphasized in graduate medical education, can potentially improve medication safety in high-risk settings. PMID:21990173

  7. Personal satisfaction and mentorship are critical factors for today's resident surgeons to seek surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukish, Jeffrey; Cruess, David

    2005-11-01

    The specific aim of this study was to summarize the viewpoints of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons (RAS-ACS) membership regarding current training and quality of life-related issues prior to implementation of the new duty-hour guidelines. The goal was to gain insight of the members that may be useful to recruit and guide the future training of surgical residents. An Internet-based survey was developed to evaluate the viewpoints of RAS-ACS. The survey was administered by Esurveymaker.com via the ACS Web page from 2000 to 2003. RAS-ACS member participation was voluntary and anonymous. Analyses were performed to determine the frequency of response for each survey item. Two hundred thirty-five members completed the survey representing 5 per cent of RAS-ACS. Eighty-four per cent were general surgery residents. Personal satisfaction (64%) and mentorship (49%) were top factors for respondents to pursue surgical training; discussion with colleagues and future income was less important. Forty-five per cent reported that job performance was their most important concern during residency. A rewarding surgical career and family life were ranked as the most important expectations. Eighty-six per cent reported that they were satisfied with their residency, and 66 per cent reported that work hours should be limited. Personal satisfaction and mentorship were critical factors for members of the RAS-ACS to seek surgical training. Although most of the members report that work hours should be limited, an overwhelming majority reports satisfaction with surgical training prior to institution of the new duty-hour guidelines. Further emphasis on mentorship and work-hour reform may be beneficial in recruiting medical students into surgical residencies.

  8. A "Resident-as-Teacher" Curriculum Using a Flipped Classroom Approach: Can a Model Designed for Efficiency Also Be Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Binny D; Schumacher, Heidi K; Reese, Kristen; Bhansali, Priti; Kern, Jeremy R; Simmens, Samuel J; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie W

    2017-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires training that enhances resident teaching skills. Despite this requirement, many residency training programs struggle to implement effective resident-as-teacher (RAT) curricula, particularly within the context of the 80-hour resident workweek. In 2013, the authors developed and evaluated an intensive one-day RAT curriculum using a flipped classroom approach. Twenty-nine second-year residents participated in daylong RAT sessions. The curriculum included four 1-hour workshops focusing on adult learning principles, giving feedback, teaching a skill, and orienting a learner. Each workshop, preceded by independent reading, featured peer co-teaching, application, and feedback. The authors evaluated the curriculum using pre- and postworkshop objective structured teaching examinations (OSTEs) and attitudinal and self-efficacy teaching questionnaires. Residents demonstrated statistically significant improvements in performance between pre- and postworkshop OSTEs on each of three core skills: giving feedback (P = .005), orienting a learner (P flipped classroom approach is an efficient and effective method for training residents to improve teaching skills, especially in an era of work hour restrictions. They have committed to the continuation of this curriculum and are planning to include assessment of its long-term effects on resident behavior change and educational outcomes.

  9. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  10. Future Career Plans and Practice Patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jason; Coolen, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The practice patterns of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists continue to evolve with each new generation of physicians. Diversifying subspecialties, changes in resident duty hours, job market saturation, and desire for work-life balance are playing stronger roles. Professional practice direction and needs assessment may be aided by awareness of future Obstetrics and Gynaecology physician career plans and expectations. The objective of this study was to determine the expected career plans and practice patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents following residency. The SOGC Junior Member Committee administered its third career planning survey to Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents electronically in December 2011. The data collected was statistically analyzed and compared to previous surveys. There were 183 responses giving a response rate of 43%. More than one half of all residents were considering postgraduate training (58%). Projected practice patterns included: 84% maintaining obstetrical practice, 60% locuming, and 50% job-sharing. The majority of residents expected to work in a 6 to 10 person call group (48%), work 3 to 5 call shifts per month (72%), work 41 to 60 hours weekly (69%), and practise in a city with a population greater than 500 000 (45%). Only 18% of residents surveyed were in favour of streaming residency programs in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Canadian resident career plan and expected practice pattern assessment remains an important tool for aiding in resource allocation and strategic development of care and training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Canada. Copyright © 2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Resident Station Contact Information for Application Developers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — SSA provides a web service and downloadable file for SSA Resident Station locations, telephone numbers, and hours of operation. (Note: If you think an office might...

  12. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  13. The History of the Student Credit Hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Jessica M.

    2003-01-01

    Traces the history of the student credit hour, designed at the end of the 19th century to translate high school work to college admissions officers. It was expanded to higher education to record elective course work and became widespread in response to calls to document workload and institutional productivity. (SLD)

  14. 75 FR 285 - Hours of Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... period long enough to provide restorative sleep regardless of the number of hours worked prior to the... split into two periods, what is the minimum time in each period necessary to provide restorative sleep... periods during the work day improve driver alertness in the operation of a CMV? How long should these rest...

  15. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  16. Trabalho em equipe multiprofissional: a perspectiva dos residentes médicos em saúde da família Working in multiprofessional teams: the perspectives of family health residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Corrêa Ferreira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A residência médica brasileira, cada vez mais, especializa os médicos em suas práticas, desprezando as práticas multiprofissionais que orientam a integralidade em saúde. Na tentativa de romper com essa prática, a residência multiprofissional em saúde da família foi proposta objetivando formar profissionais que visem o cuidado integral à saúde das pessoas. Neste contexto, a Faculdade de Medicina de Marília, em 2003, iniciou esta residência, tendo como núcleo central o trabalho multiprofissional em equipes de saúde da família. Analisou-se, neste estudo, a percepção dos residentes médicos em saúde da família acerca do trabalho multiprofissional desenvolvido no Programa de Saúde da Família. A abordagem qualitativa foi o método desta investigação. Os dados coletados foram interpretados por meio da análise temática de conteúdo, construindo-se três categorias empíricas: Âncoras e balizas da visão interdisciplinar no trabalho em equipe permeiam a perspectiva da residência em saúde da família; Os conflitos e paradoxos do trabalho em equipe e a manutenção da linha de montagem; Dilemas do trabalho em equipe frente a uma estrutura hierarquizada. A análise dos dados aponta para o avanço que o trabalho em equipe multiprofissional traz para a formação médica, pois permite uma visão de perspectivas que, sem a equipe, não seria possível.Brazilian medical residency is increasingly specializing physicians in his practices undervaluing the multiprofessional practices that guide the integrality in health. Aiming at changing this practice, the multiprofessional residency in family health was proposed to prepare professionals searching for a comprehensive health care to the general public. In this context, in 2003, Faculdade de Medicina de Marília started this residency program having as the main idea the multiprofessional work in family health teams. The study shows the perception of family health residents at Faculdade

  17. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  18. Are Self-study Procedural Teaching Methods Effective? A Pilot Study of a Family Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Brandy; Langner, Shannon; Khodaee, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    A family medicine residency is a unique training environment where residents are exposed to care in multiple settings, across all ages. Procedures are an integral part of family medicine practice. Family medicine residency (FMR) programs are tasked with the job of teaching these skills at a level of intensity and frequency that allows a resident to achieve competency of such skills. In an environment that is limited by work hour restrictions, self-study teaching methods are one way to ensure all residents receive the fundamental knowledge of how to perform procedures. We developed and evaluated the efficacy of a self-study procedure teaching method and procedure evaluation checklist. A self-study procedure teaching intervention was created, consisting of instructional articles and videos on three procedures. To assess the efficacy of the intervention, and the competency of the residents, pre- and postintervention procedure performance sessions were completed. These sessions were reviewed and scored using a standardized procedure performance checklist. All 24 residents participated in the study. Overall, the resident procedure knowledge increased on two of the three procedures studied, and ability to perform procedure according to expert-validated checklist improved significantly on all procedures. A self-study intervention is a simple but effective way to increase and improve procedure training in a way that fits the complex scheduling needs of a residency training program. In addition, this study demonstrates that the procedure performance checklists are a simple and reliable way to increase assessment of resident procedure performance skills in a residency setting.

  19. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  20. US Naval Observatory Hourly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations journal from the National Observatory in Washington DC. The observatory is the first station in the United States to produce hourly observations...

  1. Neurohospitalists enhance resident perception of the educational and clinical value of a night float rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James G

    2013-10-01

    Neurology residency training programs have been profoundly impacted by recent changes in resident duty hours, workloads, and supervisory requirements. In response, many programs have adopted a night float coverage system to minimize the requirements for overnight call. The majority involves residents working a block of night shifts in what is typically a service-oriented rotation. Recently, concerns have arisen regarding the impact of this design on resident education and patient care. We have developed a novel on-site nighttime neurohospitalist model for the explicit purpose of steepening the initial learning curve for neurology residents in an effort to rapidly improve their neurological skills and, in conjunction, overnight patient care. We surveyed residents after the initiation of this system to assess their perception of the impact of direct overnight supervision on education and patient care. As part of ongoing quality improvement efforts, surveys were administered to neurology house staff at a tertiary academic medical center after they had completed service on the night float rotation both with and without an attending in the hospital using a retrospective pre/postdesign. There was a robust positive impact on resident's perception of overall quality, educational value, and clinical quality on the night float rotation with an attending on-site. Despite an overall perception that their autonomy was maintained, residents believed barriers to contact the attending were lower, and attending interaction during critical decision making was more frequent. Direct overnight supervision by a neurohospitalist enhances the educational value and care quality on overnight resident rotations.

  2. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  3. A social work study on the effect of gender on mental ability and depression among institutionalized elderly versus nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the level of depression and mental ability among elderly people who live in institutional elderly versus nursing home residents. The investigation designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 345 elderly people who are residences of both places. The study implements Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS test where mental ability includes seven factors including “general information”, “orientation”, “mind control”, “logical memory” and “repeated figures”, “visual memory” and “learn association”. The study performs some statistical tests and the results show that gender has no impact on two groups of elderly people in terms of mental utilization as well as depression level when the level of significance is five percent.

  4. The impact of sleep deprivation on sleepiness, risk factors and professional performance in medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikovsky, Oleg; Oron, Maly; Shiyovich, Arthur; Perry, Zvi H; Nesher, Lior

    2013-12-01

    Prolonged working hours and sleep deprivation can exert negative effects on professional performance and health. To assess the relationship between sleep deprivation, key metabolic markers, and professional performance in medical residents. We compared 35 residents working the in-house night shift with 35 senior year medical students in a cross-sectional cohort study. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) questionnaire was administered and blood tests for complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistry panel, lipid profile and C-reactive protein (CRP) were obtained from all participants. Medical students and medical residents were comparable demographically except for age, weekly working hours, reported weight gain, and physical activity. The ESS questionnaires indicated a significantly higher and abnormal mean score and higher risk of falling asleep during five of eight daily activities among medical residents as compared with medical students. Medical residents had lower high density lipoprotein levels, a trend towards higher triglyceride levels and higher monocyte count than did medical students. CRP levels and other laboratory tests were normal and similar in both groups. Among the residents, 5 (15%) were involved in a car accident during residency, and 63% and 49% reported low professional performance and judgment levels after the night shift, respectively. Medical residency service was associated with increased sleepiness, deleterious lifestyle changes, poorer lipid profile, mild CBC changes, and reduced professional performance and judgment after working the night shift. However, no significant changes were observed in CRP or in blood chemistry panel. Larger prospective cohort studies are warranted to evaluate the dynamics in sleepiness and metabolic factors overtime.

  5. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  6. The State of Communication Education in Family Medicine Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kate L; Rosenbaum, Marcy E

    2016-06-01

    Communication skills are essential to medical training and have lasting effects on patient satisfaction and adherence rates. However, relatively little is reported in the literature identifying how communication is taught in the context of residency education. Our goal was to determine current practices in communication curricula across family medicine residency programs. Behavioral scientists and program directors in US family medicine residencies were surveyed via email and professional organization listservs. Questions included whether programs use a standardized communication model, methods used for teaching communication, hours devoted to teaching communication, as well as strengths and areas for improvement in their program. Analysis identified response frequencies and ranges complemented by analysis of narrative comments. A total of 204 programs out of 458 family medicine residency training sites responded (45%), with 48 out of 50 US states represented. The majority of respondents were behavioral scientists. Seventy-five percent of programs identified using a standard communication model; Mauksch's patient-centered observation model (34%) was most often used. Training programs generally dedicated more time to experiential teaching methods (video review, work with simulated patients, role plays, small groups, and direct observation of patient encounters) than to lectures (62% of time and 24% of time, respectively). The amount of time dedicated to communication education varied across programs (average of 25 hours per year). Respondent comments suggest that time dedicated to communication education and having a formal curriculum in place are most valued by educators. This study provides a picture of how communication skills teaching is conducted in US family medicine residency programs. These findings can provide a comparative reference and rationale for residency programs seeking to evaluate their current approaches to communication skills teaching and

  7. 75 FR 9376 - Hours of Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... is the minimum time in each period necessary to provide restorative sleep? 2. Could the 14-hour on... FMCSA. A. Rest and On-Duty Time 1. Would mandatory short rest periods during the work day improve driver alertness in the operation of a CMV? How long should these rest periods be? At what point in the duty cycle...

  8. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  9. Surgical Pathology Resident Rotation Restructuring at a Tertiary Care Academic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea R. Mehr MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the field of pathology and resident education necessitate ongoing evaluation of residency training. Evolutionary change is particularly important for surgical pathology rotations, which form the core of anatomic pathology training programs. In the past, we organized this rotation based on subjective insight. When faced with the recent need to restructure the rotation, we strove for a more evidence-based process. Our approach involved 2 primary sources of data. We quantified the number of cases and blocks submitted per case type to estimate workload and surveyed residents about the time required to gross specimens in all organ systems. A multidisciplinary committee including faculty, residents, and staff evaluated the results and used the data to model how various changes to the rotation would affect resident workload, turnaround time, and other variables. Finally, we identified rotation structures that equally distributed work and created a point-based system that capped grossing time for residents of different experience. Following implementation, we retrospectively compared turnaround time and duty hour violations before and after these changes and surveyed residents about their experiences with both systems. We evaluated the accuracy of the point-based system by examining grossing times and comparing them to the assigned point values. We found overall improvement in the rotation following the implementation. As there is essentially no literature on the subject of surgical pathology rotation organization, we hope that our experience will provide a road map to improve pathology resident education at other institutions.

  10. E-Learning and Medical Residents, a Qualitative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerman, Jill; Crable, Elaine; Brodzinski, James

    2016-01-01

    Medical education helps ensure doctors acquire skills and knowledge needed to care for patients. However, resident duty hour restrictions have impacted the time residents have available for medical education, leaving resident educators searching for alternate options for effective medical education. Classroom situated e-learning, a blended…

  11. Is the Office Hour Obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A colleague can't make a coffee date at a time the author proposes because it would conflict with his office hour. No student has actually made an appointment with him during the hour, but he is committed to being in his office as promised in case someone drops by. The author's reaction to her colleague's faithfulness to his posted office hour…

  12. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  13. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  14. Sleep and Alertness in Medical Interns and Residents: An Observational Study on the Role of Extended Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Shea, Judy A; Small, Dylan S; Zhu, Jingsan; Norton, Laurie; Ecker, Adrian J; Novak, Cristina; Bellini, Lisa M; Volpp, Kevin G

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue from sleep loss is a risk to physician and patient safety, but objective data on physician sleep and alertness on different duty hour schedules is scarce. This study objectively quantified differences in sleep duration and alertness between medical interns working extended overnight shifts and residents not or rarely working extended overnight shifts. Sleep-wake activity of 137 interns and 87 PGY-2/3 residents on 2-week Internal Medicine and Oncology rotations was assessed with wrist-actigraphy. Alertness was assessed daily with a brief Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. Interns averaged 6.93 hours (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.84-7.03 hours) sleep per 24 hours across shifts, significantly less than residents not working overnight shifts (7.18 hours, 95% CI 7.06-7.30 hours, p = .007). Interns obtained on average 2.19 hours (95% CI 2.02-2.36 hours) sleep during on-call nights (17.5% obtained no sleep). Alertness was significantly lower on mornings after on-call nights compared to regular shifts (p Sleep inertia significantly affected alertness in the 60 minutes after waking on-call. Extended overnight shifts increase the likelihood of chronic sleep restriction in interns. Reduced levels of alertness after on-call nights need to be mitigated. A systematic comparison of sleep, alertness, and safety outcomes under current and past duty hour rules is encouraged. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Interrelationships between romance, life quality, and medical training of female residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Kan-Lin; Chang, Chin-Sung; Wu, Chih-Hsing

    2012-08-01

    For the past 30 years, there has been a steady increase in the number of female physicians, but the relationship between their romantic lives and their pattern of training has been inadequately reported. This study was designed to investigate the interrelationships between medical training, quality of life, and the attitudes that female residents have toward romance. Of the 106 female medical residents at our medical center in 2009, a total of 78 residents (73.6%) were enrolled for the study. Structured questionnaires (Cronbach α = 0.878), which included questions about female resident quality of life, attitude toward spousal choice, and the impact of programmed professional medical training, were self-administered through an anonymous process. Female residents, especially ward-care specialists, were determined to have excessively long working hours (84.6% > 88 work hours/week), insufficient and irregular sleep (44.9%), and inadequate personal time (73.1% romances, 87.5% (n = 40) of romantic partners were physicians and 58.3% (n = 28) initiated their relationships when they were medical students, but exhibited no preferential dating of senior medical students or physicians. Factors affecting the choice of spouses included time limitations, a limited circle of friends, differences in values, and work-related stress. Those presumptive factors influencing romance between the assumed partner being a doctor or a "nondoctor" were significantly different with regard to lack of time (p = 0.002), values (p Romance and quality of life were significantly influenced by the pattern of medical training in female residents. Setting duty-hour limits and initiating a new hobby were determined to be potentially beneficial to their quality of life and attitudes toward romance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Applying the Job Demands--Resources Model to the Work--Home Interface: A Study among Medical Residents and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B.; ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Prins, Jelle T.; van der Heijden, Frank M. M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Work-home interference (WHI) is a prevalent problem because most employees have substantial family responsibilities on top of their work demands. The present study hypothesized that high job demands in combination with low job resources contribute to WHI. The job demands-resources (JD-R) model was used as a theoretical framework. Using a sample of…

  17. National Survey of Burnout among US General Surgery Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Leisha C; Jeffe, Donna B; Jin, Linda; Awad, Michael M; Turnbull, Isaiah R

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout is a complex syndrome of emotional distress that can disproportionately affect individuals who work in healthcare professions. Study Design For a national survey of burnout in US general surgery residents, we asked all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited general surgery program directors to email their general surgery residents an invitation to complete an anonymous, online survey. Burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory; total scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP), and Personal Accomplishment (PA) subscales were calculated. Burnout was defined as having a score in the highest tertile for EE or DP or lowest tertile for PA. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to test associations between burnout tertiles for each subscale and various resident and training-program characteristics as appropriate. Results From April–December, 2014, 665 residents actively engaged in clinical training had data for analysis; 69% met the criterion for burnout on at least one subscale. Higher burnout on each subscale was reported by residents planning private practice compared with academic careers. A greater proportion of women than men reported burnout on EE and PA. Higher burnout on EE and DP was associated with greater work hours per week. Having a structured mentoring program was associated with lower burnout on each subscale. Conclusions The high rates of burnout among general surgery residents are concerning given the potential impact of burnout on the quality of patient care. Efforts to identify at-risk populations and to design targeted interventions to mitigate burnout in surgical trainees are warranted. PMID:27238875

  18. Comparison of Plastic Surgery Residency Training in United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianmin; Zhang, Boheng; Yin, Yiqing; Fang, Taolin; Wei, Ning; Lineaweaver, William C; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Residency training is internationally recognized as the only way for the physicians to be qualified to practice independently. China has instituted a new residency training program for the specialty of plastic surgery. Meanwhile, plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States are presently in a transition because of restricted work hours. The purpose of this study is to compare the current characteristics of plastic surgery residency training in 2 countries. Flow path, structure, curriculum, operative experience, research, and evaluation of training in 2 countries were measured. The number of required cases was compared quantitatively whereas other aspects were compared qualitatively. Plastic surgery residency training programs in 2 countries differ regarding specific characteristics. Requirements to become a plastic surgery resident in the United States are more rigorous. Ownership structure of the regulatory agency for residency training in 2 countries is diverse. Training duration in the United States is more flexible. Clinical and research training is more practical and the method of evaluation of residency training is more reasonable in the United States. The job opportunities after residency differ substantially between 2 countries. Not every resident has a chance to be an independent surgeon and would require much more training time in China than it does in the United States. Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States and China have their unique characteristics. The training programs in the United States are more standardized. Both the United States and China may complement each other to create training programs that will ultimately provide high-quality care for all people.

  19. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  20. New Approach To Hour-By-Hour Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Q. Q.; Wang, B.

    2017-12-01

    Fine hourly forecast in single station weather forecast is required in many human production and life application situations. Most previous MOS (Model Output Statistics) which used a linear regression model are hard to solve nonlinear natures of the weather prediction and forecast accuracy has not been sufficient at high temporal resolution. This study is to predict the future meteorological elements including temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and wind speed in a local region over a relatively short period of time at hourly level. By means of hour-to-hour NWP (Numeral Weather Prediction)meteorological field from Forcastio (https://darksky.net/dev/docs/forecast) and real-time instrumental observation including 29 stations in Yunnan and 3 stations in Tianjin of China from June to October 2016, predictions are made of the 24-hour hour-by-hour ahead. This study presents an ensemble approach to combine the information of instrumental observation itself and NWP. Use autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) model to predict future values of the observation time series. Put newest NWP products into the equations derived from the multiple linear regression MOS technique. Handle residual series of MOS outputs with autoregressive (AR) model for the linear property presented in time series. Due to the complexity of non-linear property of atmospheric flow, support vector machine (SVM) is also introduced . Therefore basic data quality control and cross validation makes it able to optimize the model function parameters , and do 24 hours ahead residual reduction with AR/SVM model. Results show that AR model technique is better than corresponding multi-variant MOS regression method especially at the early 4 hours when the predictor is temperature. MOS-AR combined model which is comparable to MOS-SVM model outperform than MOS. Both of their root mean square error and correlation coefficients for 2 m temperature are reduced to 1.6 degree Celsius and 0.91 respectively. The

  1. Review of 12-hour shifts at nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiley, A.; Moray, N.P.

    1989-04-01

    This project reviewed the practice of 12-hour shift work schedules at nuclear power plants, and its relationship to safety. The current literature was examined for information on accidents, fatigue and personal preferences. Interviews with operators and maintainers showed that these groups had attitude and preference differences related to both 12 hour shift schedules and overtime work opportunities. Several factors related to 12-hour schedules were identified which could affect safety, but which have not been adequately considered. (24 refs.)

  2. Ozone Nonattainment Areas - 1 Hour

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone - 1hour (Legacy...

  3. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  4. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  5. Comparison of nurse, system and quality patient care outcomes in 8-hour and 12-hour shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Du, Yunling; Cowell, Rhabia; Amsterdam, Norma; Helfrich, Thomas A; Linn, Robert W; Gladstein, Amy; Walsh, Mary; Mojica, Lorraine A

    2006-12-01

    Many nurses desire 12-hour shifts. However, there are concerns about implementation. We sought to compare the effects of 8- and 12-hour shifts on nurse, system, and quality patient care outcomes. We used a cross-sectional design with data collected from multiple sources in 2003-2004, including a nurse survey and administrative and patient records. We studied hospital nurses and patients in general adult wards, with outcomes including burnout, job satisfaction, scheduling satisfaction, preferences, intention to stay, and employee safety. System outcomes included recruitment and turnover, staffing, absenteeism, and related costs. A variety of quality patient care outcomes were measured from the 3 different types of data. Thirteen New York City hospitals participated; 805 surveys were examined from 99 nursing units (response rate 42%). Compared with nurses working 8-hour shifts, those working 12-hour shifts were on average more satisfied with their jobs, experienced less emotional exhaustion, 10 times more likely to be satisfied with schedules, 2 times as likely to perceive 12-hour schedules as important, and 58% less likely to report missing shifts; units with 12-hour shifts had lower vacancy rates and weeks to fill the position (all P values < or =0.05). There were no differences in patient outcomes. Nurses working 12-hour shifts were more satisfied. There were no differences in quality outcomes. Flexibility and choice in shift length are important elements in a positive nurse work environment. This study represents an innovative attempt by a labor-management bargaining group to make an evidence-based decision. We encourage others to conduct similar studies.

  6. Home within 24 hours of laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, D C; Rosen, D M; Cario, G M; Carlton, M A; Lam, A M; Chapman, M; Johns, C

    1999-05-01

    We assessed the feasibility of safe discharge home within 24 hours following laparoscopic hysterectomy in 30 patients who met the inclusion criteria and consented to be enrolled in the study group. Patients were admitted on the day of their surgery with the expectation of discharge within 24 hours. Appropriate home nursing follow-up and phone contact by the surgical team were organized preoperatively. Inclusion criteria were: age 30-65 years, absence of any major medical history that would require prolonged hospitalization, availability of home support for the first 48 hours after discharge and presence of a working telephone line and an address within the area of the Community Home Nursing service. All 30 operative procedures were completed without incident. Six patients underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) (all the procedures of hysterectomy being performed laparoscopically including the suturing of uterine arteries, colpotomy and closure of the vaginal vault. The uterus was removed vaginally) and 24 patients underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) (this techniques differs from TLH in that the colpotomy was performed laparoscopically but the uterosacral ligaments were divided vaginally and the vault also was closed vaginally after the uterus was removed vaginally). The average operating time was 115 minutes (range 85-150 minutes) and the average blood loss was 97 mL (20-250 mL). There were no intraoperative complications, no requirement for transfusion and no readmission to hospital for any of the patients in the study. Postoperative complications were minor (umbilical cellulitis (1), intestinal colic (1)) and both were treated with resolution of the symptoms. Ninety per cent of patients in the study were discharged within 24 hours of their surgery, the average duration of stay being 22.9 hours (20-24 hours). Three patients were not fit for discharge at 24 hours postoperatively due to general lethargy, migraine and nausea; their average discharge time

  7. Preoperative surgical rehearsal using cadaveric fresh tissue surgical simulation increases resident operative confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Erin L; Leland, Hyuma A; Azadgoli, Beina; Minneti, Michael; Carey, Joseph N

    2017-08-01

    Rehearsal is an essential part of mastering any technical skill. The efficacy of surgical rehearsal is currently limited by low fidelity simulation models. Fresh cadaver models, however, offer maximal surgical simulation. We hypothesize that preoperative surgical rehearsal using fresh tissue surgical simulation will improve resident confidence and serve as an important adjunct to current training methods. Preoperative rehearsal of surgical procedures was performed by plastic surgery residents using fresh cadavers in a simulated operative environment. Rehearsal was designed to mimic the clinical operation, complete with a surgical technician to assist. A retrospective, web-based survey was used to assess resident perception of pre- and post-procedure confidence, preparation, technique, speed, safety, and anatomical knowledge on a 5-point scale (1= not confident, 5= very confident). Twenty-six rehearsals were performed by 9 residents (PGY 1-7) an average of 4.7±2.1 days prior to performance of the scheduled operation. Surveys demonstrated a median pre-simulation confidence score of 2 and a post-rehearsal score of 4 (Psafety, and anatomical knowledge improved as a result of simulation. Fresh tissue-based preoperative surgical rehearsal was effectively implemented in the residency program. Resident confidence and perception of technique improved. Survey results suggest that cadaveric simulation is beneficial for all levels of residents. We believe that implementation of preoperative surgical rehearsal is an effective adjunct to surgical training at all skill levels in the current environment of decreased work hours.

  8. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  9. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  10. [Return of immigrants: a cluster analysis of mesotheliomas among residents of the Veneto region who used to work at the ETERNIT AG factory at Niederurnen, Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merler, E; Gioffré, F; Mabilia, T; De Marzio, N; Bizzotto, R; Sarto, F; Zambon, P

    2001-01-01

    We identified 5 mesotheliomas among Italian migrant workers who returned home and settled in the Veneto Region, after employment at the ETERNIT AG factory in Switzerland. During the 1970s the factory employed about 1000 workers and the presence of Italian migrants was relevant. The cluster confirms that migration for work has caused exposures to carcinogenic substances and confirms that neoplastic diseases are occurring among those resettled in Italy and helps explaining the high occurrence of mesotheliomas in this country.

  11. Excel VBA 24-hour trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Urtis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Master VBA automation quickly and easily to get more out of Excel Excel VBA 24-Hour Trainer, 2nd Edition is the quick-start guide to getting more out of Excel, using Visual Basic for Applications. This unique book/video package has been updated with fifteen new advanced video lessons, providing a total of eleven hours of video training and 45 total lessons to teach you the basics and beyond. This self-paced tutorial explains Excel VBA from the ground up, demonstrating with each advancing lesson how you can increase your productivity. Clear, concise, step-by-step instructions are combined wit

  12. 168 Hours Salt Fog Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin

    2011-01-01

    This report explained the test conducted in salt fog chamber to evaluate the effectiveness of mild steel, coated with rust converter, for 168 hours in artificial seawater exposure. The samples were compared with mild steel coated with commercial primer. The tests were conducted followed ASTM B117. Individual pictures were taken of each sample before the tests began, at 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 hours to see the progression of the corrosion. Results showed that the samples coated with rust converter provide a good significant protection against corrosion phenomenon than the samples coated with commercial primer that available in the market. (author)

  13. Vaccinations Administered During Off-Clinic Hours at a National Community Pharmacy: Implications for Increasing Patient Access and Convenience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Jeffery A.; Taitel, Michael S.; Fensterheim, Leonard E.; Cannon, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Approximately 50,000 adults die annually from vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States. Most traditional vaccine providers (eg, physician offices) administer vaccinations during standard clinic hours, but community pharmacies offer expanded hours that allow patients to be vaccinated at convenient times. We analyzed the types of vaccines administered and patient populations vaccinated during off-clinic hours in a national community pharmacy, and their implications for vaccination access and convenience. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed data for all vaccinations given at the Walgreens pharmacy chain between August 2011 and July 2012. The time of vaccination was categorized as occurring during traditional hours (9:00 am–6:00 pm weekdays) or off-clinic hours, consisting of weekday evenings, weekends, and federal holidays. We compared demographic characteristics and types of vaccine. We used a logistic regression model to identify predictors of being vaccinated during off-clinic hours. RESULTS During the study period, pharmacists administered 6,250,402 vaccinations, of which 30.5% were provided during off-clinic hours: 17.4% were provided on weekends, 10.2% on evenings, and 2.9% on holidays. Patients had significantly higher odds of off-clinic vaccination if they were younger than 65 years of age, were male, resided in an urban area, and did not have any chronic conditions. CONCLUSIONS A large proportion of adults being vaccinated receive their vaccines during evening, weekend, and holiday hours at the pharmacy, when traditional vaccine providers are likely unavailable. Younger, working-aged, healthy adults, in particular, a variety of immunizations during off-clinic hours. With the low rates of adult and adolescent vaccination in the United States, community pharmacies are creating new opportunities for vaccination that expand access and convenience. PMID:24019274

  14. Vaccinations administered during off-clinic hours at a national community pharmacy: implications for increasing patient access and convenience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Jeffery A; Taitel, Michael S; Fensterheim, Leonard E; Cannon, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50,000 adults die annually from vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States. Most traditional vaccine providers (eg, physician offices) administer vaccinations during standard clinic hours, but community pharmacies offer expanded hours that allow patients to be vaccinated at convenient times. We analyzed the types of vaccines administered and patient populations vaccinated during off-clinic hours in a national community pharmacy, and their implications for vaccination access and convenience. We retrospectively reviewed data for all vaccinations given at the Walgreens pharmacy chain between August 2011 and July 2012. The time of vaccination was categorized as occurring during traditional hours (9:00 am-6:00 pm weekdays) or off-clinic hours, consisting of weekday evenings, weekends, and federal holidays. We compared demographic characteristics and types of vaccine. We used a logistic regression model to identify predictors of being vaccinated during off-clinic hours. During the study period, pharmacists administered 6,250,402 vaccinations, of which 30.5% were provided during off-clinic hours: 17.4% were provided on weekends, 10.2% on evenings, and 2.9% on holidays. Patients had significantly higher odds of off-clinic vaccination if they were younger than 65 years of age, were male, resided in an urban area, and did not have any chronic conditions. A large proportion of adults being vaccinated receive their vaccines during evening, weekend, and holiday hours at the pharmacy, when traditional vaccine providers are likely unavailable. Younger, working-aged, healthy adults, in particular, a variety of immunizations during off-clinic hours. With the low rates of adult and adolescent vaccination in the United States, community pharmacies are creating new opportunities for vaccination that expand access and convenience.

  15. Trainee satisfaction in surgery residency programs: modern management tools ensure trainee motivation and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Websky, Martin W; Oberkofler, Christian E; Rufibach, Kaspar; Raptis, Dimitri A; Lehmann, Kuno; Hahnloser, Dieter; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2012-11-01

    To assess trainee satisfaction in their surgery residency with a validated instrument and identify the contributing factors. Currently, surgery is deemed unattractive by medical students and ignored by many candidates planning to enter an academic career. New insights on the rational for such lack of interest are needed. Job satisfaction is a central concept in organizational and behavioral research that is well understood by large companies such as Google, IBM, and Toyota. Similar assessment can likewise be used to improve trainee satisfaction in surgery residency. A survey among 2039 surgery residents was conducted in three European countries analyzing satisfaction at work using the Global Job Satisfaction Instrument (validated in Emergency Room physicians). Crucial factors covering different aspects of surgery residency where identified using the GJS instrument combined with multiple logistic regression analysis. With an overall response rate of 23%, we identified trainee dissatisfaction in one third of residents. Factors affecting satisfaction related almost exclusively to training issues, such as assignment of surgery procedures according to skills (OR 4.2), training courses (OR 2.7), availability of a structured training curriculum (OR 2.4), bedside teaching, and availability of morbidity-mortality conferences (OR 2.3). A good working climate among residents (OR 3.7) and the option for part time work (OR 2.1) were also significant factors for trainee satisfaction. Increased working hours had a modest (OR 0.98)-though cumulative- negative effect. The sex of the trainee was not related to trainee satisfaction. Validated measurement of job satisfaction as used in the industry appears to be an efficient tool to assess trainee satisfaction in surgery residency and thereby identify the key contributing factors. Improvement of conceptual training structures and working conditions might facilitate recruitment, decrease drop-out, and attract motivated candidates with

  16. Factors associated with residents' satisfaction with their training as specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Morillas, L E; Fuentes-Ferrer, M E; Sánchez-Díaz, J; Rumayor-Zarzuelo, M; Fernández-Pérez, C; Marco-Martínez, F

    2014-05-01

    We do not know what factors influence residents' perceived satisfaction during their training. The aim of this study was to analyze the satisfaction of specialists with their training and its associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study using self-completion surveys of residents in training at the Clinic Hospital San Carlos for the courses conducted in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2012. The study's dependent variable was overall satisfaction with the training; the independent factors were demographic and occupational characteristics, variables related to healthcare, teaching and research activity. The total participation percentage was 83.7% (1,424/1,701), and the mean age was 28.4 years (SD, 3.2 years). The overall satisfaction percentage was 75.2%. The factors statistically associated with overall satisfaction in the multivariate analysis were the involvement of the teaching staff (tutors and assistants) in the training, greater satisfaction in medical versus surgical specialties, the year of residence, the facilities for completing the thesis, working less than 40 h a week, adequate time to perform daily tasks, appropriate number of department meetings and not having a previous specialty. the activities related to research and teaching are associated with the overall satisfaction of residents. The routine activity factors most closely associated with satisfaction were the time available and the work hours. More studies are necessary to understand the impact of resident satisfaction on care quality and in their activity as future specialists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Interns shall not sleep: the duty hours boomerang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan SF

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. On March 10, 2017, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME announced revisions to its common program requirements related to duty hours (1. Effective on July 1, 2017, the most important change will be an increase in the maximum consecutive hours that an intern may work. Interns will now be able to continuously perform patient care work up to a maximum of 24 hours with an additional 4 hours for managing care transitions. This reverses the controversial reduction to 16 hours that occurred in 2011 (2. The regulation of house staff duty hours formally began in the late 1980s. It was precipitated largely because of the publicity resulting from the 1984 death of Libby Zion in a New York teaching hospital that was attributed partly to poor decisions made by fatigued and overworked house staff (3. Consequently, the state of New York in 1989 passed laws restricting the …

  18. The Embassy of Zemarkh to the Residence of the Great Kaghan (fragmentary translation and commentary of the work of Menander Protector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Zhdanovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present article contains the translation and commentary to a fragment from the text of early Byzantine historian Menander Protector of the 6th century who describes the first Byzantine embassy to the Turks in 568. This source is extremely important for the study of relations between civilizations in the early medieval period. When commenting the original source, the author sought to look through the eyes of the Romans on the relationship between European Byzantine and Asian steppe civilizations. The Turks drew attention to Byzantium in order to achieve with its help the diplomatic blockade of Persia and to derive from this maximum benefit. In 568, the Turkic khagan sent to Constantinople an embassy headed by the military leader Maniah. As a result of the negotiations, both sides agreed on joint military operations, which were to be undertaken, if necessary, against Persia and Avar tribes. But more important was the fact that the Turks obtained from Byzantium the right to control over Silk Road. In August 568, there occurred a reciprocal visit to the khanate. The Byzantine embassy was headed by Zemarh, commander of the eastern cities. The Romans’ journey to Altai was interesting and exciting since they knew nothing about the customs and lifestyle of the Turks before the travel. It was the completely unknown world to the Byzantines with an absolutely different mentality, way of life and mode of thinking. Zemarh’s diplomatic mission was described by Menander Protector who was a contemporary of Zemarh, historian and politician, and who knew the Byzantine court ceremonies and all diplomatic nuances. Obviously, the historian used in his work the protocols and reports of the embassy. Description of the Zemarh’s journey to the southern Altai, preserved in fragments of the Menander’s «History», provides us with a complete picture of how the Romans perceived the Turks.

  19. The 24-hour report as an effective monitoring and communication tool in infection prevention and control in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Jay; McNamara, Sara E; Lansing, Bonnie J; Mody, Lona

    2014-10-01

    Twenty-four-hour reports are filled out by nurses daily to monitor nursing home residents and document any changes in resident status. Semistructured interviews conducted with ICPs from 12 southeast Michigan nursing homes showed that although 24-hour reports were used, they were not standardized for infection prevention activities. Our results indicate 24-hour reports can be an effective communication tool and potentially aid in early recognition of infections and outbreaks. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  1. OPENING HOURS FOR CARDS OFFICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Due to the extra workload generated by the global renewal of French cards and in order to preserve the level of service offered by the cards office, please note that this office will in future be open every morning from 8.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. until further notice. The service can be contacted by telephone during the same hours. Thank you for your understanding.

  2. Effect of a 12-hour/day shift on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.M.; Swaim, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The operating crews at the Fast Flux Facility near Richland, Washington, changed their rotating shift schedule from an 8- to 12- hour/day work schedule. The primary reason for the change was to reduce the attrition of operators by increasing their job satisfaction. Eighty-four percent of the operators favored the change. Plant performance and safety were not adversely affected. A statistical analysis of 53 operator-related, off-normal events in 28 months concluded that there was no significant difference in either the number or the severity of off-normal events on the 12-hour shift. A statistical analysis of 200,000 log entries concluded that the error rate in completing logs actually declined by 25 percent on the 12-hour shift. Alertness, which was measured using computerized tests of mathematics and logical reasoning, reach a nadir on the first night shift for the 8- and 12-hour schedules alike, which indicates that the primary cause of fatigue was sleep disruption, not cumulative hours of work. All supervisors and 52 percent of the operators believe their crews work more effectively on the 12-hour shift; only 12 percent of the operators believe that their crews work less effectively. The evaluation indicated that the 12-hour shift scheduled is a reasonable alternative to an 8-hour schedule at this facility. 2 refs

  3. Prevalence and cost of full-time research fellowships during general surgery residency: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M; Klingensmith, Mary E; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-01-01

    To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1 to 3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Response rate was 200 of 239 (84%). A total of 381 of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and postresidency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (P < 0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work hour regulations for clinical residents, whereas a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. Although performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after postgraduate training.

  4. The impact of an ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop on resident knowledge: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth in the use of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in the past decade. Residency programs have been trying to find the best way to teach these newer techniques. Our department decided to develop a teaching workshop for our residents with the purpose of improving knowledge and skills in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The hypothesis was that the workshop would improve overall knowledge of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia as determined by a test developed for this activity. In addition, the goal was to help improve imaging and technical skills. A one-day workshop was organized for the CA1 and CA3 resident classes. The workshop was organized with the following learning objectives: (1) be able to identify basic ultrasound anatomy; (2) learn how to apply principles of ultrasound physics in order to obtain good ultrasound images; (3) develop basic ultrasound imaging skills on human models; and (4) develop needle visualization skills on gel models. The workshop included: a pre-test, a 2-hour didactic session, a 2-hour imaging and skills workshop, and a post-test. A twenty-question exam was developed by our faculty for this activity. A total of 20 residents participated in the two workshops. Tests scores (number correct out of twenty) were 9.5 ± 2.8 for the pre-test and 16.0 ± 1.9 for the post-test (P type of setting. Furthermore, knowledge acquired during the workshop was retained when CA1 residents were re-tested one year after the workshop. The ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop will become part of the didactic series for our CA1 residents and will be a required learning activity. Additional work still needs to be done to find out the best way to test knowledge and skill outcomes in residents learning new technology and techniques.

  5. Evaluation of a twelve-hour/day shift schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.M.; Swaim, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    In April 1985, the operating crews at the Fast Flux Test Facility near Richland, Washington, changed their rotating shift schedule from an 8-hour to a 12-hour a day work schedule. The primary purpose of the change was to reduce the attrition of operators by increasing their job satisfaction. Eighty-four percent of the operators favored the change. A program was established to evaluate the effects on plant performance, operator alertness, attrition, sleep, health, job satisfaction, and off-the-job satisfaction. Preliminary results from that evaluation program indicate that the 12-hour shift schedule is a reasonable alternative to an 8-hour schedule at this facility

  6. Synoptic philosophy in a neurosurgical residency: a book and cinema club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Rishi; Thakur, Jai Deep; Cardenas, Raul; Wright, Jeri; Nanda, Anil

    2013-11-01

    Introduction of a book and cinema club in a Department of Neurosurgery has helped combine an education in humanities with neurosurgical training. The authors believe the addition of teaching in humanities adds to the specialty and helps in fulfilling the six core competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The goal is to encourage synoptic philosophy and impart creative ways of interacting with the world. Books and movies with a medical basis and nonmedical basis were selected and reviewed in an open forum. Efforts were made to integrate the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education six core competencies into the discussions. Residents anonymously completed a questionnaire pertaining to the usefulness of the book club in residency. There were 13 residents who attended the sessions and responded to the questionnaire. Of residents, 61.5% believed the topics were pertinent to their everyday life, and 77% believed that the club had helped them somehow in residency. Most (7 of 13) believed the club should not be included as part of the curriculum in an 80-hour work week. Institution of a book and movie club seems to be an effective way of integrating humanities within a neurosurgical residency. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  8. Introducing "optimal challenges" in resident training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anette Bagger; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    Background: Residents are often caught between two interests: the resident’s desire to participate in challenging learning situations and the department’s work planning. However, these interests may clash if they are not coordinated by the senior doctors, and challenging learning situations risk...... being subject to work planning. Summary of work: Inspired by Csikszentmihalyi’s concept of optimal challenges, an intervention study aimed at introducing a more suitable planning of residents' learning in terms of optimal allocation of educational patient contacts. The objective was to coordinating...... residents’ individual competences and learning needs with patient characteristics in order to match each resident with a case (an outpatient or a patient) that meets the learning needs of the resident and thus pose an optimal challenge to the resident. Summary of results: The preliminary results show...

  9. Java programming 24-hour trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, Yakov

    2015-01-01

    Quick and painless Java programming with expert multimedia instruction Java Programming 24-Hour Trainer, 2nd Edition is your complete beginner's guide to the Java programming language, with easy-to-follow lessons and supplemental exercises that help you get up and running quickly. Step-by-step instruction walks you through the basics of object-oriented programming, syntax, interfaces, and more, before building upon your skills to develop games, web apps, networks, and automations. This second edition has been updated to align with Java SE 8 and Java EE 7, and includes new information on GUI b

  10. HTML5 24-Hour Trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Lowery, Joseph W

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive written and interactive instruction for learning HTML5 HTML is the core technology for building websites. Today, with HTML5 opening the Internet to new levels of rich content and dynamic interactivity, developers are looking for information to learn and utilize HTML5. HTML5 24-Hour Trainer provides that information, giving new and aspiring web developers the knowledge they need to achieve early success when building websites. Covers the most basic aspects of a web page, including a brief introduction to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Provides lessons that are backed up by prof

  11. Temporary new opening hours for Gate C

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Please note the new temporary opening hours for the gate C as from 22 September 2010 until 29 October 2010 (working days): Morning: between 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. Lunch: between 12:00 and 2:00 p.m. Evening: between 5:00 pm and 7:00 p.m. Traffic flow will be permitted in both directions during this period. Please minimize your speed accordingly and respect all road signs. GS-SEM Group General Infrastructure Services Department

  12. Gate A: changes to opening hours

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Due to maintenance work, the opening hours of Gate A (near Reception) will be modified between Monday, 13 and Friday, 17 April 2015.   During this period, the gate will be open to vehicles between 7 a.m. and 9.30 a.m., then between 4.30 p.m. and 7 p.m. It will be completely closed to traffic between 9.30 a.m. and 4.30 p.m. Pedestrians and cyclists may continue to use the gate. We apologise for any inconvenience and thank you for your understanding.

  13. Recovery of Sleep or Recovery of Self? A Grounded Theory Study of Residents' Decision Making Regarding How to Spend Their Nonclinical Postcall Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Taryn S; Nisker, Jeff; Teunissen, Pim W; Dornan, Tim; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-03-01

    As resident work hours policies evolve, residents' off-duty time remains poorly understood. Despite assumptions about how residents should be using their postcall, off-duty time, there is little research on how residents actually use this time and the reasoning underpinning their activities. This study sought to understand residents' nonclinical postcall activities when they leave the hospital, their decision-making processes, and their perspectives on the relationship between these activities and their well-being or recovery. The study took place at a Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited Canadian medical school from 2012 to 2014. The authors recruited a purposive and convenience sample of postgraduate year 1-5 residents from six surgical and nonsurgical specialties at three hospitals affiliated with the medical school. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed, anonymized, and combined with field notes. The authors analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative analysis and performed post hoc member checking. Twenty-four residents participated. Residents characterized their predominant approach to postcall decision making as one of making trade-offs between multiple, competing, seemingly incompatible, but equally valuable, activities. Participants exhibited two different trade-off orientations: being oriented toward maintaining a normal life or toward mitigating fatigue. The authors' findings on residents' trade-off orientations suggest a dual recovery model with postcall trade-offs motivated by the recovery of sleep or of self. This model challenges the dominant viewpoint in the current duty hours literature and suggests that the duty hours discussion must be broadened to include other recovery processes.

  14. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein Nejad, Hooman; Bagherabadi, Mehdi; Sistani, Alireza; Dargahi, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents' teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students' perception of the residents' teaching quality. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick's model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents' teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. The results indicated that residents' attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pTeacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick's model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third

  15. Residência multiprofissional em saúde da família e a formação de psicólogos para a atuação na atenção básica Family health multiprofessional residency and the education of psychologists to work in basic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Clemente

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O Programa de Saúde da Família (PSF surgiu como estratégia de reorientação da atenção básica em saúde. A incorporação de profissionais de saúde mental no PSF não foi prevista na Portaria nº 648 (2006, que definiu os recursos mínimos para a atuação das equipes. O Ministério da Saúde, em 2007, aprovou os Núcleos de Atenção à Saúde da Família. A Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde da Família foi uma proposta coordenada pela Faculdade e Casa de Saúde Santa Marcelina, contando com dez categorias profissionais, entre elas a psicologia. Este trabalho tem o objetivo de refletir sobre a prática do psicólogo residente e analisá-la, contribuindo para a discussão das possibilidades de atuação do psicólogo no PSF na cidade de São Paulo. Trata-se de uma pesquisa avaliativa do tipo estudo de caso, que tem o objetivo de sistematizar as intervenções realizadas, o processo de construção da planilha mensal de produção e alguns dados que ela fornece. Os resultados são: a descrição das categorias, a planilha mensal de produção com adaptações a partir dos códigos do Sistema de Informação Ambulatorial (SIA atribuídos aos psicólogos e um quadro com os dados quantitativos. Foi possível perceber que os princípios do PSF, a formação em psicologia e a vinculação com a Residência estão relacionados com os caminhos percorridos. Concluiu-se, então, que a quantificação é necessária para a visualização das ações, entretanto, não é suficiente para avaliar a abrangência, a eficácia e a efetividade das ações e o quanto o SIA não está preparado para o registro, o controle e a fiscalização do psicólogo inserido no PSF.The Family Health Program (FHP emerged in Brazil as a strategy of basic health care reorientation. The incorporation of Mental Health professionals in the FHP was not included in Directive 648 (year?, which defines minimum resources for the teams' work. In 2007, the Brazilian Ministry

  16. Development of a Night Float Call Model for Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency: The Process and Residents' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lynn; McCaffrey, Carmen; Secter, Michael; Rich, Rebecca; Green, Jessica; Shirreff, Lindsay; Steele, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The 2013 pan-Canadian consensus Report on Resident Duty Hours identified that traditional 24-hour duty periods pose risks to the well-being of residents and should be avoided. In anticipation of duty-hour restrictions, the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency Program at the University of Toronto developed and implemented a night float (NF) call model over a three-year span. Quarterly resident surveys have consistently shown that the NF system is preferred to traditional 24-hour call and has resulted in reduced fatigue and improved continuity of patient care. Through many iterations, the NF model achieved levels of resident morale, surgical experience, and impact on family relationships that are comparable to the 24-hour call system. We review here our process for developing an NF call model and the perceptions and experiences of residents, with the goal of providing insight for other residency programs that are considering or instituting NF call systems. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  18. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Roger Y; Roberts, J Mark

    2007-11-07

    To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18-19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response) was high throughout (range 3.64 +/- 0.21, 3.84 +/- 0.14 out of 4), which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  19. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  20. Implementation of a "Flipped Classroom" for Neurosurgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P

    2018-01-01

    Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A "flipped classroom" model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly, each resident was randomly assigned to research a specific aspect of an assigned topic appropriate to his or her level of experience: junior residents about what characterizes each clinical entity, midlevel residents about when to intervene, and chief residents about how to administer treatment. Residents completed an anonymous survey 6 months after implementation. Board examination performance was assessed before and after implementation. A total of 12 residents participated in the program. Weekly, 1.75±0.40 hours were spent in preparation, with senior residents reporting less time than junior residents. All residents indicated that the accumulation of experience across 7 years of residency was a major advantage of this program, and all preferred it to lectures. Performance on the board examination significantly increased after implementation (from 316±36 to 468±45, pflipped classroom is a viable approach to resident education and is associated with increased engagement and improved performance using validated knowledge-assessment tools.

  1. Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T.; Batty, G. David

    2017-01-01

    .003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I2=0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N= 2006, hazard ratio= 1.36, 95% CI= 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential...

  2. The Effect of CHIP on Pediatricians Work Hours

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Enrollment in public health insurance coverage will expand significantly beginning in 2014. We have only a limited understanding of what happens when an influx of...

  3. Child Care during Nonstandard Work Hours: Research to Policy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In November 2014, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 was signed into law, reauthorizing the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)--the federal child care subsidy program--for the first time since 1996. In December 2015, the U.S. Office of Child Care issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which updated CCDF regulations…

  4. The effects of the implementation of snoezelen on the quality of working life in psychogeriatric care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, J.C.M.; van Dulmen, A.M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia among nursing home residents is often accompanied by high care dependency and behavioral disturbances, resulting in an increased workload for the caregivers. Snoezelen, integrated into 24-hour dementia care, is an approach that might improve the quality of working life of

  5. The effects of the implementation of snoezelen on the quality of working life in psychogeriatric care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J.C.M. van; Dulmen, A.M. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bensing, J.M.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia among nursing home residents is often accompanied by high care dependency and behavioral disturbances, resulting in an increased workload for the caregivers. Snoezelen, integrated into 24-hour dementia care, is an approach that might improve the quality of working life of

  6. Short hours, long hours: Hour levels and trends in the retail industry in the United States, Canada, and Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Carré, Françoise; Tilly, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In settings where most workers have full-time schedules, hourly wages are appropriate primary indicators of job quality and worker outcomes. However, in sectors where full-time schedules do not dominate - primarily service-producing activities - total hours matter, in addition to hourly wages, for job quality and worker outcomes. In this paper we employ a sector-focused, comparative framework to further examine hours levels - measured as average weekly hours - and trends in Canada, the United...

  7. Les effets conjoints du travail et des horaires alternants sur la santé des agents de surveillance des établissements pénitentiaires The effects of work content and working hours on the health of prison guards Los efectos combinados del trabajo y de los horarios alternantes sobre la salud de los guardianes de cárceles en los establecimientos penitenciarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Pavageau

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Les préoccupations en santé publique révèlent le peu Notre étude vise à comparer les effets sur la santé de trois formes d’organisation temporelle (horaires traditionnels, factions de 6 heures et de 12 heures au sein d’établissements pénitentiaires français, et plus particulièrement auprès des personnels de surveillance. Des moyens d’investigation complémentaires (questionnaire, observations du travail, traitement statistique ont été mis en œuvre pour tenter de faire la part entre le poids des horaires et le poids du travail sur l’état de santé des agents. Si les personnels en factions de 12 heures présentent des résultats meilleurs que les personnels en 6 heures, c’est en particulier dû à des avantages dans la vie extra-professionnelle, bien que des signes certains de fatigue ne permettent pas de conclure significativement en faveur de telles modalités. Au-delà de l’alternance des horaires, le contenu du travail pèse de manière importante sur la santé des agents.The aim of our study is to compare the effects of three different forms of time organization (traditional 9 to 5 schedule, 6-hour shifts, and 12-hour shifts inside French prisons, and particularly on prison guard staff. Complementary means of investigation (questionnaire, work observations, statistical treatment were used to attempt to evaluate the difference between the effect of working hours and of the actual work on the guards’ health. Staff who worked 12-hour shifts had more positive results than staff who worked 6-hour shifts. This was mainly due to the advantages in their private lives. At the same time, some signs of fatigue prevent us from conclusively favouring this type of working rhythm. Beyond the alternation of schedules, the actual work content also has an important impact on the workers’ health.Nuestro estudio pretende comparar los efectos sobre la salud de tres formas de organización temporal (horarios tradicionales, turnos de

  8. National Cluster-Randomized Trial of Duty-Hour Flexibility in Surgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilimoria, Karl Y; Chung, Jeanette W; Hedges, Larry V; Dahlke, Allison R; Love, Remi; Cohen, Mark E; Hoyt, David B; Yang, Anthony D; Tarpley, John L; Mellinger, John D; Mahvi, David M; Kelz, Rachel R; Ko, Clifford Y; Odell, David D; Stulberg, Jonah J; Lewis, Frank R

    2016-02-25

    Concerns persist regarding the effect of current surgical resident duty-hour policies on patient outcomes, resident education, and resident well-being. We conducted a national, cluster-randomized, pragmatic, noninferiority trial involving 117 general surgery residency programs in the United States (2014-2015 academic year). Programs were randomly assigned to current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour policies (standard-policy group) or more flexible policies that waived rules on maximum shift lengths and time off between shifts (flexible-policy group). Outcomes included the 30-day rate of postoperative death or serious complications (primary outcome), other postoperative complications, and resident perceptions and satisfaction regarding their well-being, education, and patient care. In an analysis of data from 138,691 patients, flexible, less-restrictive duty-hour policies were not associated with an increased rate of death or serious complications (9.1% in the flexible-policy group and 9.0% in the standard-policy group, P=0.92; unadjusted odds ratio for the flexible-policy group, 0.96; 92% confidence interval, 0.87 to 1.06; P=0.44; noninferiority criteria satisfied) or of any secondary postoperative outcomes studied. Among 4330 residents, those in programs assigned to flexible policies did not report significantly greater dissatisfaction with overall education quality (11.0% in the flexible-policy group and 10.7% in the standard-policy group, P=0.86) or well-being (14.9% and 12.0%, respectively; P=0.10). Residents under flexible policies were less likely than those under standard policies to perceive negative effects of duty-hour policies on multiple aspects of patient safety, continuity of care, professionalism, and resident education but were more likely to perceive negative effects on personal activities. There were no significant differences between study groups in resident-reported perception of the effect of fatigue on

  9. Patient Perceptions of Whom is Most Involved in Their Care with Successive Duty Hour Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vineet M; Prochaska, Micah T; Farnan, Jeanne M; Meltzer, David O

    2015-09-01

    Although direct patient care is necessary for experiential learning during residency, inpatient perceptions of the roles of resident and attending physicians in their care may have changed with residency duty hours. We aimed to assess if patients' perceptions of who is most involved in their care changed with residency duty hours. This was a prospective observational study over 12 years at a single institution. Participants were 22,408 inpatients admitted to the general medicine teaching service from 2001 to 2013, who completed a 1-month follow-up phone interview. Percentage of inpatients who reported an attending, resident, or intern as most involved in their care by duty hour period (pre-2003, post-2003-pre-2011, post-2011). With successive duty hour limits, the percentage of patients who reported the attending as most involved in their care increased (pre-2003 20 %, post-2003-pre-2011 29 %, post-2011 37 %, p importance of experiential learning to the formation of clinical judgment for independent practice, further study on the implications of these trends for resident education and patient safety is warranted.

  10. Prevalence and Cost of Full-Time Research Fellowships During General Surgery Residency – A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M.; Klingensmith, Mary E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. Summary Background Data General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1-3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Methods Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Results Response rate was 200/239 (84%). A total of 381 out of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and post-residency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (p<0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of ACGME work hour regulations for clinical residents, while a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Conclusions Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. While performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after post-graduate training. PMID:19106692

  11. Factors associated with the subspecialty choices of internal medicine residents in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorpe Kevin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are more residents enrolled in cardiology training programs in Canada than in immunology, pharmacology, rheumatology, infectious diseases, geriatrics and endocrinology combined. There is no published data regarding the proportion of Canadian internal medicine residents applying to the various subspecialties, or the factors that residents consider important when deciding which subspecialty to pursue. To address the concern about physician imbalances in internal medicine subspecialties, we need to examine the factors that motivate residents when making career decisions. Methods In this two-phase study, Canadian internal medicine residents participating in the post graduate year 4 (PGY4 subspecialty match were invited to participate in a web-based survey and focus group discussions. The focus group discussions were based on issues identified from the survey results. Analysis of focus group transcripts grew on grounded theory. Results 110 PGY3 residents participating in the PGY4 subspecialty match from 10 participating Canadian universities participated in the web-based survey (54% response rate. 22 residents from 3 different training programs participated in 4 focus groups held across Canada. Our study found that residents are choosing careers that provide intellectual stimulation, are consistent with their personality, and that provide a challenge in diagnosis. From our focus group discussions it appears that lifestyle, role models, mentorship and the experience of the resident with the specialty appear to be equally important in career decisions. Males are more likely to choose procedure based specialties and are more concerned with the reputation of the specialty as well as the anticipated salary. In contrast, residents choosing non-procedure based specialties are more concerned with issues related to lifestyle, including work-related stress, work hours and time for leisure as well as the patient populations

  12. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  13. Changes in Personal Relationships During Residency and Their Effects on Resident Wellness: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Marcus; Lam, Michelle; Wu, Diana; Veinot, Paula; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Residency poses challenges for residents' personal relationships. Research suggests residents rely on family and friends for support during their training. The authors explored the impact of residency demands on residents' personal relationships and the effects changes in those relationships could have on their wellness. The authors used a constructivist grounded theory approach. In 2012-2014, they conducted semistructured interviews with a purposive and theoretical sample of 16 Canadian residents from various specialties and training levels. Data analysis occurred concurrently with data collection, allowing authors to use a constant comparative approach to explore emergent themes. Transcripts were coded; codes were organized into categories and then themes to develop a substantive theory. Residents perceived their relationships to be influenced by their evolving professional identity: Although personal relationships were important, being a doctor superseded them. Participants suggested they were forced to adapt their personal relationships, which resulted in the evolution of a hierarchy of relationships that was reinforced by the work-life imbalance imposed by their training. This poor work-life balance seemed to result in relationship issues and diminish residents' wellness. Participants applied coping mechanisms to manage the conflict arising from the adaptation and protect their relationships. To minimize the effects of identity dissonance, some gravitated toward relationships with others who shared their professional identity or sought social comparison as affirmation. Erosion of personal relationships could affect resident wellness and lead to burnout. Educators must consider how educational programs impact relationships and the subsequent effects on resident wellness.

  14. The challenges of residents teaching neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Samuel A; Józefowicz, Ralph F

    2004-07-01

    Teaching is integrated into the daily practice of residents, and it is a skill necessary for practice as well as academics. The settings in which teaching and learning take place are ubiquitous but include classrooms, small groups, bedside rounds, and grand rounds. Given the learning environment of residency, neurology residents should have working knowledge of basic principles of effective teaching to make learning successful. Teaching also reinforces knowledge, and residents will likely be better practitioners if some basic skills of teaching are practiced. Neurology teaching techniques for residents are rarely addressed in the medical literature. Although information regarding teaching principles in medicine exists, there is little information regarding how residents teach. We examine and review some of the more effective methods and appreciated qualities in teachers, with a particular emphasis for the neurology resident. We also review whom neurologists need to teach and the various settings in which teaching may take place. Neurology residents encounter a variety of audiences in a variety of settings that require diverse teaching skills to effectively convey information to other providers as well as patients. The majority of these skills should be learned in residency to establish a foundation for teaching, regardless of future practice settings.

  15. Education research: neurology training reassessed. The 2011 American Academy of Neurology Resident Survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Maas, Matthew B; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-10-23

    To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training.

  16. Introducing "optimal challenges" in resident training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anette Bagger; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    Background: Residents are often caught between two interests: the resident’s desire to participate in challenging learning situations and the department’s work planning. However, these interests may clash if they are not coordinated by the senior doctors, and challenging learning situations risk...... that the residents benefit from the intervention because they experienced more optimal challenges than before the intervention. However, the matching of resident and case seems to work against the established culture in the department: The daily work has for many years been organized so that senior doctors have...... relationships in order to meet the health system’s and the patients’ call for continuity in the treatment. Take-home message: The matching of resident and case stimulates optimal learning situations, but cultural and organizational values concerning the doctor-patient continuity are challenged....

  17. Managing a 24-hour lifestyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, N. [Schlumberger Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    This presentation on sleep deprivation highlighted the important factors that can increase the chances for human error because of lack of alertness. Effects that irregular work schedules have on the performance and alertness of employees were also discussed. Sleep deprivation and driver fatigue were listed as the major causes of single vehicle accidents. Alertness enhancing techniques, driving alertness management and other methods by which driver safety can be improved were presented. 22 diapositives.

  18. Managing a 24-hour lifestyle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, N.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation on sleep deprivation highlighted the important factors that can increase the chances for human error because of lack of alertness. Effects that irregular work schedules have on the performance and alertness of employees were also discussed. Sleep deprivation and driver fatigue were listed as the major causes of single vehicle accidents. Alertness enhancing techniques, driving alertness management and other methods by which driver safety can be improved were presented. 22 diapositives

  19. Resident-as-teacher in family medicine: a CERA survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Achkar, Morhaf; Davies, M Kelly; Busha, Michael E; Oh, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Teaching has been increasingly recognized as a primary responsibility of residents. Residents enjoy teaching, and their majority report interest in the continuation of teaching activities after graduation. Resident-as-teacher programs have emerged nationally as a means of enhancing teaching skills. This study examined the current use of residents-as-teachers programs in family medicine residencies through a national survey of family medicine residency program directors. This survey project was part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Education Research Alliance (CERA) 2014 survey to family medicine program directors that was conducted between February 2014 and May 2014. The response rate of the survey was 49.6% (224/451). The majority (85.8%) of residency programs offer residents formal instruction in teaching skills. The vast majority (95.6%) of programs mandated the training. The average total hours of teaching instruction residents receive while in residency training was 7.72. The residents are asked to formally evaluate the teaching instruction in 68.1% of the programs. Less than a quarter (22.6%) of residency programs offer the teaching instruction in collaboration with other programs. "Retreat, workshop, and seminars" were identified as the main form of instruction by 33.7% of programs. In 83.3% of programs not offering instruction, lack of resources was identified as the primary barrier. The majority of family medicine residency programs provide resident-as-teacher instructions, which reflects increasing recognition of importance of the teaching role of residents. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of such instruction on residents' teaching skills and their attitudes toward teaching.

  20. Burnout, engagement and resident physicians' self-reported errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; van der Heijden, F.M.M.A.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.; Bakker, A.B.; van de Wiel, H.B.M.; Jacobs, B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Burnout is a work-related syndrome that may negatively affect more than just the resident physician. On the other hand, engagement has been shown to protect employees; it may also positively affect the patient care that the residents provide. Little is known about the relationship between residents'

  1. Burnout Comparison among Residents in Different Medical Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Shahm; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Churchill, Amy; Balon, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate resident burnout in relation to work and home-related factors. Method: Maslach Burnout Inventory was mailed to residents in eight different medical specialties, with a response rate of 35%. Results: Overall, 50% of residents met burnout criteria, ranging from 75% (obstetrics/gynecology) to 27% (family medicine). The first…

  2. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  3. CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In the summer, the three CERN restaurants remain open during their usual hours. On Monday 1st August and Thursday 8 September, the Restaurant 1 will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.   The satellites will be open as follows: Building 6: normal hours Building 13: normal hours Building 30: normal hours Building 40: closing at 4:30 p.m. instead of 5:00 pm Building 54: normal hours in July, closed in August Building 864: normal hours Building 865: normal hours Building 774: normal hours

  4. Observational study using the tools of lean six sigma to improve the efficiency of the resident rounding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, David V

    2011-06-01

    Recent focus on resident work hours has challenged residency programs to modify their curricula to meet established duty hour restrictions and fulfill their mission to develop the next generation of clinicians. Simultaneously, health care systems strive to deliver efficient, high-quality care to patients and families. The primary goal of this observational study was to use a data-driven approach to eliminate examples of waste and variation identified in resident rounding using Lean Six Sigma methodology. A secondary goal was to improve the efficiency of the rounding process, as measured by the reduction in nonvalue-added time. We used the "DMAIC" methodology: define, measure, analyze, improve, and control. Pediatric and family medicine residents rotating on the pediatric hospitalist team participated in the observation phase. Residents, nurses, hospitalists, and parents of patients completed surveys to gauge their attitudes toward rounds. The Mann-Whitney test was used to test for differences in the median times measured during the preimprovement and postimprovement phases, and the Student t test was used for comparison of survey data. Collaborative, family-centered rounding with elimination of the "prerounding" process, as well as standard work instructions and pacing the process to meet customer demand (takt time), were implemented. Nonvalue-added time per patient was reduced by 64% (P  =  .005). Survey data suggested that team members preferred the collaborative, family-centered approach to the traditional model of rounding. Lean Six Sigma provides tools, a philosophy, and a structured, data-driven approach to address a problem. In our case this facilitated an effort to adhere to duty hour restrictions while promoting education and quality care. Such approaches will become increasingly useful as health care delivery and education continue to transform.

  5. The role of laboratory dissection training in neurosurgical residency: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshettry, Varun R; Mullin, Jeffrey P; Schlenk, Richard; Recinos, Pablo F; Benzel, Edward C

    2014-11-01

    Work hour restrictions and current quality, financial, and legal concerns have reduced resident operative volume and autonomy. Although laboratory (cadaveric or animal) dissection has a rich history in neurosurgery, its current role in resident training is unclear. Recent literature suggests educators have looked to simulation to accelerate the learning curve of acquiring neurosurgical technical skills. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, characteristics, and extent of laboratory dissection in neurosurgical residency programs in the United States. A survey was sent to program directors of all 100 neurosurgical residency programs in the United States. Response rate was 65%. Most programs (93.8%) incorporate laboratory dissection into resident training. Most programs have 1-3 (36.1%) or 4-6 (39.3%) sessions annually. Residents in postgraduate years 2-6 (85.2%-93.4%) most commonly participate. The most common topics are cranial approaches (100%), spinal approaches (88.5%), spine instrumentation (80.3%), and endoscopy (50.8%). Thirty-one (47.7%) programs use artificial physical model or virtual reality simulators; the most common simulators are endoscopy (15.4%), microvascular anastomosis (13.8%), and endovascular (10.8%). Only 8 programs (13.1%) formally grade dissection skills. Educators (95.4%) believe laboratory dissection is an integral component of training and no respondent believed simulation could currently provide greater educational benefit than laboratory dissection. Most (89.2%) respondents would support a national "suggested" dissection curriculum and manual. In neurosurgical resident education, laboratory dissection is widely used; however, significant variation exists. Nonetheless, program directors believe laboratory dissection plays an integral role in neurosurgical training and is currently associated with greater educational benefit than simulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Confidence, knowledge, and skills at the beginning of residency. A survey of pathology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cindy M; Nolan, Norris J

    2015-01-01

    To document the pathology learning experiences of pathology residents prior to residency and to determine how confident they were in their knowledge and technical skills. An online survey was distributed to all pathology residency program directors in the United States, who were requested to forward the survey link to their residents. Data were obtained on pathology electives, grossing experience, and frozen section experience. Likert scale questions assessed confidence level in knowledge and skills. In total, 201 pathology residents responded (8% of residents in the United States). Prior to starting residency, most respondents had exposure to anatomic pathology through elective rotations. Few respondents had work-related experience. Most did not feel confident in their pathology-related knowledge or skills, and many did not understand what pathology resident duties entail. Respondents gained exposure to pathology primarily through elective rotations, and most felt the elective experience prepared them for pathology residency. However, elective time may be enhanced by providing opportunities for students to increase hands-on experience and understanding of resident duties. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  7. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  8. Neurosurgical Resident Error: A Survey of U.S. Neurosurgery Residency Training Program Directors' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raghav; Moore, Justin M; Adeeb, Nimer; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Schneider, Anna M; Gandhi, Chirag D; Harsh, Griffith R; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Efforts to address resident errors and to enhance patient safety have included systemic reforms, such as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME's) mandated duty-hour restrictions, and specialty-specific initiatives such as the neurosurgery Milestone Project. However, there is currently little data describing the basis for these errors or outlining trends in neurosurgical resident error. An online questionnaire was distributed to program directors of 108 U.S. neurosurgery residency training programs to assess the frequency, most common forms and causes of resident error, the resulting patient outcomes, and the steps taken by residency programs to address these errors. Thirty-one (28.7%) responses were received. Procedural/surgical error was the most commonly observed type of error. Transient injury and no injury to the patient were perceived to be the 2 most frequent outcomes. Inexperience or resident mistake despite adequate training were cited as the most common causes of error. Twenty-three (74.2%) respondents stated that a lower post graduate year level correlated with an increased incidence of errors. There was a trend toward an association between an increased number of residents within a program and the number of errors attributable to a lack of supervision (r = 0.36; P = 0.06). Most (93.5%) program directors do not believe that mandated duty-hour restrictions reduce error frequency. Program directors believe that procedural error is the most commonly observed form of error, with post graduate year level believed to be an important predictor of error frequency. The perceived utility of systemic reforms that aim to reduce the incidence of resident error remains unclear. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Implementation of full patient simulation training in surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gladys L; Lee, Patrick C; Page, David W; D'Amour, Elizabeth M; Wait, Richard B; Seymour, Neal E

    2010-01-01

    Simulated patient care has gained acceptance as a medical education tool but is underused in surgical training. To improve resident clinical management in critical situations relevant to the surgical patient, high-fidelity full patient simulation training was instituted at Baystate Medical Center in 2005 and developed during successive years. We define surgical patient simulation as clinical management performed in a high fidelity environment using a manikin simulator. This technique is intended to be specifically modeled experiential learning related to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are fundamental to patient care. We report 3 academic years' use of a patient simulation curriculum. Learners were PGY 1-3 residents; 26 simulated patient care experiences were developed based on (1) designation as a critical management problem that would otherwise be difficult to practice, (2) ability to represent the specific problem in simulation, (3) relevance to the American Board of Surgery (ABS) certifying examination, and/or (4) relevance to institutional quality or morbidity and mortality reports. Although training started in 2005, data are drawn from the period of systematic and mandatory training spanning from July 2006 to June 2009. Training occurred during 1-hour sessions using a computer-driven manikin simulator (METI, Sarasota, Florida). Educational content was provided either before or during presimulation briefing sessions. Scenario areas included shock states, trauma and critical care case management, preoperative processes, and postoperative conditions and complications. All sessions were followed by facilitated debriefing. Likert scale-based multi-item assessments of core competency in medical knowledge, patient care, diagnosis, management, communication, and professionalism were used to generate a performance score for each resident for each simulation (percentage of best possible score). Performance was compared across PGYs by repeated

  10. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  11. Board review course effect on resident in-training examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, David

    2008-12-01

    The in-training examination is a national and yearly exam administered by the American Board of Emergency Medicine to all emergency medicine residents in the USA. The purpose of the examination is to evaluate a resident's progress toward obtaining the fundamental knowledge to practice independent emergency medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 40 hour board review lecture course on the resident in-training examination in emergency medicine. A 40 hour board review lecture course was designed and implemented during the weekly 5 hour long resident conferences during the 8 weeks preceding the in-training examination date in 2006. Attendance was mandatory at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) standard of 70% or greater. A positive result was considered to be a 10% increase or greater in the resident's individual national class percentile ranking among their national peers for their class year for the emergency medicine in-training examination. A resident was excluded from the study if there was no 2005 in-training examination score for self-comparison. The 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to analyze the results. Of 16 residents, 1 (6.25%; 95% CI: 0-18%) showed a positive result of increasing their national class percentile ranking by 10% or greater. For the PGY2, one of the eight had a positive result (12.5%; 95% CI: 0-35.4%). For PGY3, no resident (0%; 95% CI: 0-35.4%) had a positive result. A 40 hour board review lecture course has no positive effect on improving a resident's in-training examination score.

  12. Identifying Gaps and Launching Resident Wellness Initiatives: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Battaglioli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus for the medical education community, especially among learners in graduate medical education. In 2017 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME updated the Common Program Requirements to focus more on resident wellbeing. To address this issue, one working group from the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS focused on wellness program innovations and initiatives in emergency medicine (EM residency programs. Methods: Over a seven-month period leading up to the RWCS event, the Programmatic Initiatives workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online, resident community consisting of 142 residents from 100 EM residencies in North America. A 15-person subgroup (13 residents, two faculty facilitators met at the RWCS to develop a public, central repository of initiatives for programs, as well as tools to assist programs in identifying gaps in their overarching wellness programs. Results: An online submission form and central database of wellness initiatives were created and accessible to the public. Wellness Think Tank members collected an initial 36 submissions for the database by the time of the RWCS event. Based on general workplace, needs-assessment tools on employee wellbeing and Kern’s model for curriculum development, a resident-based needs-assessment survey and an implementation worksheet were created to assist residency programs in wellness program development. Conclusion: The Programmatic Initiatives workgroup from the resident-driven RWCS event created tools to assist EM residency programs in identifying existing initiatives and gaps in their wellness programs to meet the ACGME’s expanded focus on resident wellbeing.

  13. [Self-perception of the care and teaching work of family medicine mentors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Latorre, Francisca; Rivera Casares, Francisca

    2007-08-01

    To determine the characteristics of Family Medicine mentors' care and teaching work. Transversal, observational study. Teaching Health Centres in Valencia province, Spain. Ninety-one accredited mentors with third-year residents. Self-administered questionnaire collecting general data of mentors, characteristics of their care work, organisation of consultations between mentor and residents, teaching dedication, satisfaction and motivation, and proposals for improvement. Sixty-six per cent of the questionnaires sent out were analysed. Mentors had an average 7.1 years experience and 43.2 consultations/day. They devoted 4.4 hours a week solely to teaching, which 68.8% judged insufficient. 24% of mentors did a consultation at the same time as the resident. The satisfaction and motivation levels were high, with more advantages than disadvantages cited. On the whole, organisational strategies ensuring residents' autonomy were used. Mentors were satisfied and motivated, even though they thought the time devoted was insufficient.

  14. Benefits of a telepsychiatry consultation service for rural nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Terry; Murphy, Katharine M; Amour, Judith L; Ricci, Michael A; Caputo, Michael P; Newhouse, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric care for nursing home residents is difficult to obtain, especially in rural areas, and this deficiency may lead to significant morbidity or death. Providing this service by videoconference may be a helpful, cost-effective, and acceptable alternative to face-to-face treatment. We analyzed data for 278 telepsychiatry encounters for 106 nursing home residents to estimate potential cost and time savings associated with this modality compared to in-person care. A total of 843.5 hours (105.4 8-hour work days) of travel time was saved compared to in-person consultation for each of the 278 encounters if they had occurred separately. If four resident visits were possible for each trip, the time saved would decrease to 26.4 workdays. Travel distance saved was 43,000 miles; 10,750 miles if four visits per trip occurred. More than $3,700 would be spent on gasoline for 278 separate encounters; decreased to $925 for four visits per roundtrip. Personnel cost savings estimates ranged from $33,739 to $67,477. Physician costs associated with additional travel time ranged from $84,347 to $253,040 for 278 encounters, or from $21,087 to $63,260 for four encounters per visit. The telepsychiatry approach was enthusiastically accepted by virtually all residents, family members, and nursing home personnel, and led to successful patient management. Providing psychiatric care to rural nursing home residents by videoconference is cost effective and appears to be a medically acceptable alternative to face-to-face care. In addition, this approach will allow many nursing homes to provide essential care that would not otherwise be available.

  15. Social Workers as Workplace-Based Instructors of Alcohol and Drug Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for Emergency Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, David K; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Satre, Derek D; Soskin, Philippa; Satterfield, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Residency education is challenged by a shortage of personnel and time, particularly for teaching behavioral interventions such as screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) to reduce hazardous drinking and drug use. However, social workers may be well placed to teach SBIRT in clinical training settings. We describe a curriculum with social workers as SBIRT trainers of emergency medicine (EM) residents during actual clinical shifts in an EM residency training program. The curriculum required 1 EM faculty member working with social workers and 1 additional hour of formal residency conference teaching time. We implemented the curriculum at both a university tertiary care hospital emergency department and a county trauma center. We trained 8 social workers at both sites as SBIRT superusers to teach and assess EM resident SBIRT performance with actual patients. We measured the length and number of sessions to attain SBIRT competence, residents' satisfaction, and resident comments (coded by authors). Five of the 8 social workers trained residents between June 2013 and May 2014, 31 EM residents trained to a level indicating SBIRT competence with 114 patients. Each patient interaction averaged 8.8 minutes and residents averaged 3.13 patients. Twenty-four (77%) residents gave ratings of 1.58 (SD = .58) for the quality of teaching, 2.33 (SD = .87) for recommending the training to a colleague, 1.38 (SD = .49) for superusers' knowledge, 1.88 (SD = .95) for usefulness of instruction, 1.54 (SD = .72) for workplace learning, and 1.58 (SD = .78) for valuing learning from social workers (on a scale of 1 [very satisfied/strongly agree] to 5 [very dissatisfied/strongly disagree]). Residents preferred learning SBIRT during the 1st and 2nd training years and in the workplace. Social work colleagues can be effective in teaching SBIRT to residents in the workplace, and our residents highly valued learning from social workers, who all had prior training in

  16. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  17. Surgical resident learning styles: faculty and resident accuracy at identification of preferences and impact on ABSITE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Gilbert, Timothy; Ristig, Kyle; Chu, Quyen D

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of surgical resident duty hour restrictions, there is a need for faculty to utilize novel teaching methods to convey information in a more efficient manner. The current paradigm of surgical training, which has not changed significantly since the time of Halsted, assumes that all residents assimilate information in a similar fashion. However, recent data has shown that learners have preferences for the ways in which they receive and process information. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), and kinesthetic (K). The VARK learning style preferences of surgical residents have not been previously evaluated. In this study, the preferred learning styles of general surgery residents were determined, along with faculty and resident perception of resident learning styles. In addition, we hypothesized that American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam (ABSITE) scores are associated with preference for a read/write (R) learning style. The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was administered to all general surgery residents at a university hospital-based program. Responses on the inventory were scored to determine the preferred learning style for each resident. Faculty members were surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying the preferred learning style of each resident. All residents were also surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying their peers' VARK preferences. Resident ABSITE scores were examined for association with preferred learning styles. Twe