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Sample records for resident professor model

  1. Professor in Residence: An Innovative Academic-Practice Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinic, Katherine; Kowalski, Mildred Ortu; Silverstein, Wendy

    2017-12-01

    This article describes an academic-practice partnership between an American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet ® -designated hospital and an academic nurse educator that has increased the hospital's capacity for research, evidence-based practice, and support for nurses continuing their education. Through close collaboration with the full-time nurse researcher and members of the nursing education department, the professor in residence consults with clinical staff to support completion of research and evidence-based practice projects. The collaboration also has resulted in the development of a formal year-long mentoring program for clinical nurses in the area of evidence-based practice. Individual support and academic consults are offered to nurses enrolled in school to promote advancement of nurses' educational level. This collaboration has been beneficial for both the hospital and the university, increasing the capacity for scholarly activities for nurses in the hospital and serving as a forum for ongoing faculty practice and scholarship. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):552-556. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Professor in residence program: a nursing faculty practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, David Anthony; O'Keefe, Trish; Torres, Sara

    2008-01-01

    The Interdisciplinary Health Research Consultant-Professor in Residence Program is a partnership between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Nursing (SN), the New Jersey Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Center for Evidence Based Practice, and Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health (MMH/AH). It provides MMH with the expert research and evidence-based practice (EBP) consultation and affiliation of a UMDNJ-SN faculty member and the resources of the New Jersey JBI Center for Evidence Based Practice. For the participating SN faculty member, it provides a clinical laboratory to pursue an individualized program of scientific research and scholarly publication. This research scholar works closely with the MMH/AH to (a) identify and evaluate existing mechanisms to support interdisciplinary health research and EBP at MMH; (b) develop and implement new mechanisms to support interdisciplinary health research and EBP; (c) implement the findings of published research using EBP strategies; (d) replicate interdisciplinary research studies; (e) conduct original interdisciplinary research studies; (f) seek intra- or extramural funding to support interdisciplinary research studies; and (g) support requirements for American Nurses' Credentialing Center accreditation for Magnet designation. The program has been successful in its first year of implementation.

  3. [Learning styles in medical residents and their professors of a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Muñoz, Irina Elizabeth; Gómez-Negrete, Alonso; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Mercado-Arellano, José Agustín; Sciandra-Rico, Martha Minerva; Matute-González, Mario Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background: the learning styles are cognitive, emotional, and psychological characteristics, which function as relatively stable indicators of how teachers and students perceive, interact, and respond to their learning environments. Knowing students' styles allows teachers to have tools to improve medical education. Our objective was to identify learning styles in pediatric residents and professors from a pediatric hospital. Methods: a learning styles questionnaire was applied to residents and theirs professors; data was analyzed in SPSS 12 software. Results: the dominant learning style in pediatric residents was reflexive and for professors was theoretical. There wasn't any difference between sexes or between medical or surgical specialities. There was more correlation between professors and residents when there was an increase in training time. Conclusions: the learning styles between professors and residents are different, especially at the beginning of the medical specialty courses; that's why it is necessary to realize a confrontation between the students' learning styles and teaching methods used by professors to improve significant learning. To know learning styles gives residents an important alternative to find a better study strategy.

  4. Reflections of a Professor on Nine Years of Living in the Dorms ... I Mean Residence Halls!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs aim to strengthen the intellectual climate in residential facilities. This article presents the author's reflections on nine years of living in a residence hall as a Faculty-In-Residence (FIR) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The author shares an insider's observations on the role he played as a…

  5. Model Legislation on Student Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education in the States, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Because of the radical variance in residency requirements from state to state and sometimes from institution to institution, and because of several court cases involving this issue, the Education Commission of the States appointed a Committee to develop (1) a statement of principles for consideration in drafting legislation in connection with…

  6. A Survey on the Attitude of Professors & Residents of Clinical Wards about Disclosing the Results of Diagnoses for Incurable Patients at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Miri Ghaffarzadeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: One of the most important and complicated problems in medical ethics is to disclose the full truth about diagnosis of incurable diseases which leads to death, and each therapist may be encountered with it during the years of medical profession.

    The aim of this study was to survey on attitude of professors and residents of clinical wards to disclose the diagnosis for incurable patients leading to death.

     

    Methods: In this descriptive study, sampling was carried out by a survey. All faculty members and their residents of teaching hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran, were surveyed as sample in 2007. Of 145 subjects, 138 responded to the questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using Pearson and Spearman correlation tests with a p≤0.05 being considered as significant.

     

    Results: In this study, the tendency to disclose the diagnosis among faculty members and residents was 64.63%. Also, there was no significant relation between age, sex, university degree, educational field, years of service of the faculty members and residents of clinical wards with the tendency for telling the truth to incurable patients.

     

    Conclusion: Final analyses revealed that the faculty members and clinical residents of different fields in terms of diagnosis disclosure do not have a definite idea. However, the majority of them agree to disclose the full truth about diagnoses.

     

  7. Evaluating a novel resident role-modelling programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternszus, Robert; Steinert, Yvonne; Bhanji, Farhan; Andonian, Sero; Snell, Linda S

    2017-05-09

    Role modelling is a fundamental method by which students learn from residents. To our knowledge, however, resident-as-teacher curricula have not explicitly addressed resident role modelling. The purpose of this project was to design, implement and evaluate an innovative programme to teach residents about role modelling. The authors designed a resident role-modelling programme and incorporated it into the 2015 and 2016 McGill University resident-as-teacher curriculum. Influenced by experiential and social learning theories, the programme incorporated flipped-classroom and simulation approaches to teach residents to be aware and deliberate role models. Outcomes were assessed through a pre- and immediate post-programme questionnaire evaluating reaction and learning, a delayed post-programme questionnaire evaluating learning, and a retrospective pre-post questionnaire (1 month following the programme) evaluating self-reported behaviour changes. Thirty-three of 38 (87%) residents who participated in the programme completed the evaluation, with 25 residents (66%) completing all questionnaires. Participants rated the programme highly on a five-point Likert scale (where 1 = not helpful and 5 = very helpful; mean score, M = 4.57; standard deviation, SD = 0.50), and showed significant improvement in their perceptions of their importance as role models and their knowledge of deliberate role modelling. Residents also reported an increased use of deliberate role-modelling strategies 1 month after completing the programme. Resident-as-teacher curricula have not explicitly addressed resident role modelling DISCUSSION: The incorporation of resident role modelling into our resident-as-teacher curriculum positively influenced the participants' perceptions of their role-modelling abilities. This programme responds to a gap in resident training and has the potential to guide further programme development in this important and often overlooked area. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  8. The SIOP Model: Transforming the Experiences of College Professors. Part I. Lesson Planning, Building Background, and Comprehensible Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Diana M.

    2010-01-01

    This article, the first of two, presents the introduction, context, and analysis of professor experiences in an on-going research project for implementing a new educational model in a bilingual teacher's college in Bogotá, Colombia. The model, the sheltered instruction observation protocol (SIOP) promotes eight components for a bilingual education…

  9. Residence time modeling of hot melt extrusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Elena; Podhaisky, Helmut; Ely, David; Thommes, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The hot melt extrusion process is a widespread technique to mix viscous melts. The residence time of material in the process frequently determines the product properties. An experimental setup and a corresponding mathematical model were developed to evaluate residence time and residence time distribution in twin screw extrusion processes. The extrusion process was modeled as the convolution of a mass transport process described by a Gaussian probability function, and a mixing process represented by an exponential function. The residence time of the extrusion process was determined by introducing a tracer at the extruder inlet and measuring the tracer concentration at the die. These concentrations were fitted to the residence time model, and an adequate correlation was found. Different parameters were derived to characterize the extrusion process including the dead time, the apparent mixing volume, and a transport related axial mixing. A 2(3) design of experiments was performed to evaluate the effect of powder feed rate, screw speed, and melt viscosity of the material on the residence time. All three parameters affect the residence time of material in the extruder. In conclusion, a residence time model was developed to interpret experimental data and to get insights into the hot melt extrusion process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stochastic reliability and maintenance modeling essays in honor of Professor Shunji Osaki on his 70th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    In honor of the work of Professor Shunji Osaki, Stochastic Reliability and Maintenance Modeling provides a comprehensive study of the legacy of and ongoing research in stochastic reliability and maintenance modeling. Including associated application areas such as dependable computing, performance evaluation, software engineering, communication engineering, distinguished researchers review and build on the contributions over the last four decades by Professor Shunji Osaki. Fundamental yet significant research results are presented and discussed clearly alongside new ideas and topics on stochastic reliability and maintenance modeling to inspire future research. Across 15 chapters readers gain the knowledge and understanding to apply reliability and maintenance theory to computer and communication systems. Stochastic Reliability and Maintenance Modeling is ideal for graduate students and researchers in reliability engineering, and workers, managers and engineers engaged in computer, maintenance and management wo...

  11. Professor Avatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite its image as an all-American city, downtown Peoria, Illinois, home of Bradley University, is also a place of strip clubs and violent crime. For undergraduates, it's a risky environment in which to conduct field research. Edward Lamoureux, an associate professor in Bradley's multimedia program, saw a better place in the virtual world Second…

  12. Modeling Hourly Resident Productivity in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Henning, Daniel J; Strouse, Connie S; Chiu, David T; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2017-08-01

    Resident productivity, defined as new patients per hour, carries important implications for emergency department operations. In high-volume academic centers, essential staffing decisions can be made on the assumption that residents see patients at a static rate. However, it is unclear whether this model mirrors reality; previous studies have not rigorously examined whether productivity changes over time. We examine residents' productivity across shifts to determine whether it remained consistent. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an urban academic hospital with a 3-year emergency medicine training program in which residents acquire patients ad libitum throughout their shift. Time stamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged. A linear mixed model was constructed to predict productivity per shift hour. A total of 14,364 8- and 9-hour shifts were worked by 75 residents between July 1, 2010, and June 20, 2015. This comprised 6,127 (42.7%) postgraduate year (PGY) 1 shifts, 7,236 (50.4%) PGY-2 shifts, and 998 (6.9%) PGY-3 nonsupervisory shifts (Table 1). Overall, residents treated a mean of 10.1 patients per shift (SD 3.2), with most patients at Emergency Severity Index level 3 or more acute (93.8%). In the initial hour, residents treated a mean of 2.14 patients (SD 1.2), and every subsequent hour was associated with a significant decrease, with the largest in the second, third, and final hours. Emergency medicine resident productivity during a single shift follows a reliable pattern that decreases significantly hourly, a pattern preserved across PGY years and types of shifts. This suggests that resident productivity is a dynamic process, which should be considered in staffing decisions and studied further. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling spatial variation in avian survival and residency probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracco, James F.; Royle, J. Andrew; DeSante, David F.; Gardner, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The importance of understanding spatial variation in processes driving animal population dynamics is widely recognized. Yet little attention has been paid to spatial modeling of vital rates. Here we describe a hierarchical spatial autoregressive model to provide spatially explicit year-specific estimates of apparent survival (phi) and residency (pi) probabilities from capture-recapture data. We apply the model to data collected on a declining bird species, Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), as part of a broad-scale bird-banding network, the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program. The Wood Thrush analysis showed variability in both phi and pi among years and across space. Spatial heterogeneity in residency probability was particularly striking, suggesting the importance of understanding the role of transients in local populations. We found broad-scale spatial patterning in Wood Thrush phi and pi that lend insight into population trends and can direct conservation and research. The spatial model developed here represents a significant advance over approaches to investigating spatial pattern in vital rates that aggregate data at coarse spatial scales and do not explicitly incorporate spatial information in the model. Further development and application of hierarchical capture-recapture models offers the opportunity to more fully investigate spatiotemporal variation in the processes that drive population changes.

  14. Development of a Night Float Call Model for Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency: The Process and Residents' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lynn; McCaffrey, Carmen; Secter, Michael; Rich, Rebecca; Green, Jessica; Shirreff, Lindsay; Steele, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The 2013 pan-Canadian consensus Report on Resident Duty Hours identified that traditional 24-hour duty periods pose risks to the well-being of residents and should be avoided. In anticipation of duty-hour restrictions, the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency Program at the University of Toronto developed and implemented a night float (NF) call model over a three-year span. Quarterly resident surveys have consistently shown that the NF system is preferred to traditional 24-hour call and has resulted in reduced fatigue and improved continuity of patient care. Through many iterations, the NF model achieved levels of resident morale, surgical experience, and impact on family relationships that are comparable to the 24-hour call system. We review here our process for developing an NF call model and the perceptions and experiences of residents, with the goal of providing insight for other residency programs that are considering or instituting NF call systems. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling the Residence Time of Mobile Bay in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M. M.; Park, K.

    2016-02-01

    The Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic-Eutrophication Model/Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (HEM3D/EFDC) was used to calculate the residence time of Mobile Bay in Alabama using Eulerian passive tracer method. Mobile Bay is about 50 km long and 20 km wide, so it can be divided into several sections which may have different residence times. Three typical boundary conditions that affect residence time are tide, river discharge, and wind. Mobile Bay is located in the northern Gulf of Mexico and is a micro-tidal region. Two most important tidal components here are K1 and O1, and the maximum tidal range of tropic (spring) tide is less than 0.6 m. There is a difference between the simulation results with and without tidal condition (K1+O1) even though the tidal range is relatively smaller than that in macro-tidal regions. Also the minimum, mean, and maximum of daily mean river discharge for 38 years (1976-2013) in Mobile and Tensaw River are 80.7 m3/s, 1700.8 m3/s, and 14186.7 m3/s respectively, and there are daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual variations. The residence time can be largely affected by the river discharge because of its large deviation. Even though the dominant wind here is southerly in the spring and summer and is northerly in the fall and winter, the wind speed and direction change over time. Continuous winds from similar directions can reduce and increase the residence time such as the southerly, southwesterly, northerly, and northeasterly winds in alignment with the direction of the inlet and outlet of Mobile Bay. Also the short term changes of wind direction and speed can affect it complicatedly. Therefore, the simulations with the combinations of three boundary conditions allow us to understand the water circulation in Mobile Bay well and to predict the residence time when some accidents happen such as contaminations by factories, sewage plants, ships and oil spills.

  16. Defining and implementing a model for pharmacy resident research projects

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    Dick TB

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a standard approach to provide a support structure for pharmacy resident research that emphasizes self-identification of a residency research project. Methods: A subcommittee of the residency advisory committee was formed at our institution. The committee was initially comprised of 2 clinical pharmacy specialists, 1 drug information pharmacist, and 2 pharmacy administrators. The committee developed research guidelines that are distributed to residents prior to the residency start that detail the research process, important deadlines, and available resources. Instructions for institutional review board (IRB training and deadlines for various assignments and presentations throughout the residency year are clearly defined. Residents conceive their own research project and emphasis is placed on completing assignments early in the residency year. Results: In the 4 years this research process has been in place, 15 of 16 (94% residents successfully identified their own research question. All 15 residents submitted a complete research protocol to the IRB by the August deadline. Four residents have presented the results of their research at multi-disciplinary national professional meetings and 1 has published a manuscript. Feedback from outgoing residents has been positive overall and their perceptions of their research projects and the process are positive. Conclusion: Pharmacy residents selecting their own research projects for their residency year is a feasible alternative to assigning or providing lists of research projects from which to select a project.

  17. Modelling travel and residence times in the eastern Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, T.; Hartnett, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Irish Sea, which lies between 51 deg. N-56 deg. N and 2 deg. 50'W-7 deg. W, provides a sheltered environment to exploit valuable fisheries resource. Anthropogenic activity is a real threat to its water quality. The majority of freshwater input down rivers flows into the eastern Irish Sea. The structure of the water circulation was not well understood during the planning of Sellafield nuclear plant outfall site in the eastern Irish Sea. A three-dimensional primitive equation numerical model was applied to the Irish Sea to simulate both barotropic and baroclinic circulation within the region. High accuracy was achieved with regard to the prediction of both tidal circulation and surface and nearbed water temperatures across the region. The model properly represented the Western Irish Sea Gyre, induced by thermal stratification and not known during planning Sellafield. Passive tracer simulations based on the developed hydrodynamic model were used to deliver residence times of the eastern Irish Sea region for various times of the year as well as travel times from the Sellafield outfall site to various locations within the Irish Sea. The results indicate a strong seasonal variability of travel times from Sellafield to the examined locations. Travel time to the Clyde Sea is the shortest for the autumnal tracer release (90 days); it takes almost a year for the tracer to arrive at the same location if it is released in January. Travel times from Sellafield to Dublin Bay fall within the range of 180-360 days. The average residence time of the entire eastern Irish Sea is around 7 months. The areas surrounding the Isle of Man are initially flushed due to a predominant northward flow; a backwater is formed in Liverpool Bay. Thus, elevated tracer concentrations are predicted in Liverpool Bay in the case of accidental spills at the Sellafield outfall site

  18. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H; Reber, Kris M; Trittmann, Jennifer K B; Huang, Hong; Tomblin, Jordanna; Moorehead, Pamela A; Bauer, John A; Smith, Charles V; Mahan, John D

    2011-01-01

    Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience. This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey. The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, pteaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education. While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both resident and fellow learning and satisfaction. Further investigation into the value of utilizing fellows as a positive force in

  19. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience.This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey.The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, p<0.05 and overall resident learning (3.60 out of 5 versus 4.61, p<0.001. Fellows rated the acquisition of teaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education.While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both

  20. Effect of student loan indebtedness and repayment on resident physicians' cash flow. An analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernried, J; Binder, L; Hernried, P

    1990-02-23

    Cumulative figures of "average medical student indebtedness," although meaningful, do not convey the effect of loan repayments on residents' cash flow, effect on a resident's value system and residency performance, and effect on trends in health care manpower allocation. Using a computer-based cash flow model, a "typical" house officer with $20,000 in undergraduate indebtedness who is training in a less expensive city will realize a $2390 deficit during internship and negative cash flow throughout a 5-year residency. House officers with extreme indebtedness (greater than $80,000) who are training in an expensive metropolitan area would accumulate an overall deficit approaching $75,000 or more, in excess of their undergraduate indebtedness, during a 5-year residency program. Effects of these findings on residency education and health care manpower issues, along with potential solutions for alleviating residents' cash flow problems, are discussed.

  1. A Professor's Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Matthew

    This book describes a year-long participant-observer case study of the professorship as a profession. Following an introductory chapter, each chapter examines one aspect of the professor's occupation by recounting the specific experiences of the author, a sociology professor at Wright State University (Ohio). Chapter 2 looks at the department as…

  2. A Model for Clinical Informatics Education for Residents: Addressing an Unmet Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Mark V; Luo, Brooke T; Orenstein, Evan W; Luberti, Anthony A

    2018-04-01

    Opportunities for education in clinical informatics exist throughout the spectrum of formal education extending from high school to postgraduate training. However, physicians in residency represent an underdeveloped source of potential informaticians. Despite the rapid growth of accredited fellowship programs since clinical informatics became a board-eligible subspecialty in 2011, few resident physicians are aware of their role at the intersection of clinical medicine and health information technology or associated opportunities. In an effort to educate and engage residents in clinical informatics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has developed a three-pronged model: (1) an elective rotation with hands-on project experience; (2) a longitudinal experience that offers increased exposure and mentorship; and (3) a resident founded and led working group in clinical informatics. We describe resident participation in these initiatives and lessons learned, as well as resident perceptions of how these components have positively influenced informatics knowledge and career choices. Since inception of this model, five residents have pursued the clinical informatics fellowship. This educational model supports resident involvement in hospital-wide informatics efforts with tangible projects and promotes wider engagement through educational opportunities commensurate with the resident's level of interest. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  3. Assessing the New Competencies for Resident Education: A Model from an Emergency Medicine Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisdorff, Earl J.; Hayes, Oliver W.; Carlson, Dale J.; Walker, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the experience of Michigan State University's emergency medicine residency program, proposes a practical method for modifying an existing student evaluation format. The model provides a template other programs could use in assessing residents' acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes reflected in the six general competencies…

  4. How residency duration affects the outcome of a territorial contest: Complementary game-theoretic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Sherratt, Tom N

    2016-04-07

    While the first individuals to discover and maintain territories are generally respected as owners, under some conditions there may be ambiguity as to who got there first. Here we attempt to understand the evolutionary consequences of this ambiguity by developing a pair of game-theoretic models in which we explicitly consider rival residency-based claims to ownership. Following earlier qualitative explanations for residency effects, we assume that either the value of the territory (Model A) or an interloper׳s self-belief that it is the owner (Model B) increases with duration of residency. Model A clearly demonstrates that if the value of a territory increases to a resident over time, so should its motivation to fight in terms of the effort it invests in fighting. Indeed, only a small increase in territory value with residency duration can be sufficient for longer established residents to win disputes, even without any arbitrary convention or other form of priority effect. Likewise, Model B shows that the observed increase in fighting persistence with residency duration can be readily explained as a consequence of increasing confidence on behalf of the interloper that it is the rightful owner. Collectively, the models help to explain some general findings long observed by empiricists, and shed light on the nature of conflicts that can arise when individuals do not have complete information about rival claims to ownership. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A model of determining a fair market value for teaching residents: who profits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Edward J; Lawless, Stephen T; Hertzog, James H; Penfil, Scott; Bradford, Kathleen K; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Corddry, David H; Costarino, Andrew T

    2003-07-01

    Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Health Resources and Services Administration Children's Hospitals Graduate Medical Education (GME) Payment Program now supports freestanding children's teaching hospitals. To analyze the fair market value impact of GME payment on resident teaching efforts in our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Cost-accounting model, developed from a 1-year retrospective, descriptive, single-institution, longitudinal study, applied to physician teachers, residents, and CMS. Sixteen-bed PICU in a freestanding, university-affiliated children's teaching hospital. Pediatric critical care physicians, second-year residents. Cost of physician opportunity time; CMS investment return; the teaching physicians' investment return; residents' investment return; service balance between CMS and teaching service investment margins; economic balance points; fair market value. GME payments to our hospital increased 4.8-fold from 577 886 dollars to 2 772 606 dollars during a 1-year period. Critical care physicians' teaching opportunity cost rose from 250 097 dollars to 262 215 dollars to provide 1523 educational hours (6853 relative value units). Residents' net financial value for service provided to the PICU rose from 245 964 dollars to 317 299 dollars. There is an uneven return on investment in resident education for CMS, critical care physicians, and residents. Economic balance points are achievable for the present educational efforts of the CMS, critical care physicians, and residents if the present direct medical education payment increases from 29.38% to 36%. The current CMS Health Resources and Services Administration Children's Hospitals GME Payment Program produces uneven investment returns for CMS, critical care physicians, and residents. We propose a cost-accounting model, based on perceived production capability measured in relative value units and available GME funds, that would allow a clinical service to balance and obtain a fair

  6. Happy Birthday Professor Telegdi

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Professor Telegdi, pictured with Luciano Maiani and Alexander Skrinsky, receiving the medal of foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences in June 2000. Professor Valentine Telegdi celebrated his 80th birthday on Friday, 11th January. A brilliant American physicist of Hungarian origin, Professor Telegdi was a professor at the University of Chicago, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) and the California Institute of Technology and took part in many CERN experiments, of which NA10 and L3 were the most recent. He served as Chairman of CERN's Scientific Policy Committee from 1981 to 1983. A member of numerous scientific academies, he shared the prestigious Wolf Prize with Maurice Goldhaber in 1991 in recognition of their separate seminal contributions to nuclear and particle physics, particularly those concerning weak interactions involving leptons.

  7. Professor Martin Hairer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Barons

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Professor Martin Hairer was one of four recipients of the 2014 Fields Medal, widely viewed as the highest honour a mathematician can receive. He is currently Regius Professor of Mathematics in the Mathematics Department at the University of Warwick. Professor Hairer has contributed significantly to the field of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs, which engages with interdisciplinary approaches to mathematics and physics. He has enjoyed great success communicating mathematics to a range of audiences and has also developed music editing software. In this interview, early career mathematicians, Dr Martine Barons (MJB and Dr Paul Chleboun ask Professor Hairer (MH about how his interest in mathematics developed; the awards ceremony where he received the Fields Medal; Amadeus Pro, the music software he developed and continues to maintain; and the challenges of engaging a sceptical and sometimes critical public as a mathematician.

  8. On models and methods of mechanics of pneumatic tires and rubber-cord shells. Development of the ideas due to Professor V. L. Biderman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, A. E.; Mukhin, O. N.; Sorokin, F. D.

    2017-05-01

    A survey of work of Professor V. L. Biderman's scientific school concerned with the mechanics of tires and rubber-cord shells is presented. Analytical models of diagonal and radial tires aimed at analyzing their stress-strain state, calculating the critical rolling speed, and determining their operating characteristics are discussed. The theory of pneumatic lattice shells is presented in detail, and its new technical applications are considered. The equations of lattice shells of revolution are generalized to the case of nonsymmetric cord placement.

  9. MODELING HOW A HURRICANE BARRIER IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS, AFFECTS THE HYDRODYNAMICS AND RESIDENCE TIMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport models were used to simulate tidal and subtidal circulation, residence times, and the longitudinal distributions of conservative constituents in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, before and after a hurricane barrier was constructed. The...

  10. Urology residents training in laparoscopic surgery. Development of a virtual reality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Baños, J L; Ballestero-Diego, R; Truan-Cacho, D; Aguilera-Tubet, C; Villanueva-Peña, A; Manuel-Palazuelos, J C

    2015-11-01

    The training and learning of residents in laparoscopic surgery has legal, financial and technological limitations. Simulation is an essential tool in the training of residents as a supplement to their training in laparoscopic surgery. The training should be structured in an appropriate environment, with previously established and clear objectives, taught by professionals with clinical and teaching experience in simulation. The training should be conducted with realistic models using animals and ex-vivo tissue from animals. It is essential to incorporate mechanisms to assess the objectives during the residents' training progress. We present the training model for laparoscopic surgery for urology residents at the University Hospital Valdecilla. The training is conducted at the Virtual Hospital Valdecilla, which is associated with the Center for Medical Simulation in Boston and is accredited by the American College of Surgeons. The model is designed in 3 blocks, basic for R1, intermediate for R2-3 and advanced for R4-5, with 9 training modules. The training is conducted in 4-hour sessions for 4 afternoons, for 3 weeks per year of residence. Residents therefore perform 240 hours of simulated laparoscopic training by the end of the course. For each module, we use structured objective assessments to measure each resident's training progress. Since 2003, 9 urology residents have been trained, in addition to the 5 who are currently in training. The model has undergone changes according to the needs expressed in the student feedback. The acquisition of skills in a virtual reality model has enabled the safe transfer of those skills to actual practice. A laparoscopic surgery training program designed in structured blocks and with progressive complexity provides appropriate training for transferring the skills acquired using this model to an actual scenario while maintaining patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A tissue phantom model for training residents in ultrasound-guided liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aarti; Sun, Maryellen R; Siewert, Bettina

    2014-07-01

    The apprenticeship model for training of percutaneous liver biopsy has limitations, and costs of commercially available simulation models can be prohibitive. We created an inexpensive tissue phantom for liver biopsy simulation and evaluated the utility of this model for training radiology residents. A bovine-porcine tissue phantom was devised as a simulation model and consisted of bovine liver with a porcine rib layer and inserted pimento olives simulating target lesions. Training sessions (a 20-minute didactic lecture and a 90-minute practice session) were offered to all residents in a diagnostic radiology residency. Effect of training was assessed by questionnaire before and after training. Level of knowledge of topics covered in the didactic session, confidence in technical skills, and anxiety level were evaluated on a five-point scale (1, poor to 5, excellent). Thirty-five of 38 residents received training on the models (~$40). Mean reported value score for training was 4.88/5. Improvement was greatest for knowledge of technique (2.3-4.1/5, P Technical confidence increased (2.4-3.8/5, P < .001) and anxiety related to performing liver biopsy improved (2.7-3.7/5, P < .001). Residents with no prior experience in liver biopsy (n = 21) had significantly greater increases in all categories than residents with prior experience (n = 14), except for knowledge about obtaining informed consent and anxiety levels. Utilization of an inexpensively created bovine/porcine liver biopsy simulation model was well perceived by radiology residents and can be used as an educational tool during residency. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas J; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2012-04-01

      Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents) evaluations of the teaching qualities of faculty members and their perceptions of faculty members as role-model specialists.   We carried out a cross-sectional survey within a longitudinal study of the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) of clinical teachers. The study sample included 889 residents and 1014 faculty members in 61 teaching programmes spanning 22 specialties in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands. Main outcome measures included residents' (i) global and (ii) specific ratings of faculty member teaching qualities, and (iii) global ratings of faculty members as role-model specialists. Statistical analysis was conducted using adjusted multivariable logistic generalised estimating equations.   In total, 690 residents (77.6%) completed 6485 evaluations of 962 faculty members, 848 (83.6%) of whom also self-evaluated. More recently certified faculty members, those who had attended a teacher training programme, and those who spent more time teaching than seeing patients or conducting research were more likely to score highly on most teaching qualities. However, faculty members who had undergone teacher training were less likely to be seen as role models (odds ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.88). In addition, faculty members were evaluated slightly higher by male than female residents on core teaching domains and overall teaching quality, but were less likely to be seen as role models by male residents (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.97). Lastly, faculty members had higher odds of receiving top scores in specific teaching domains from residents in the first 4 years of residency and were less likely to be considered as role models by more

  13. Autoconceito dos professores: principais factores usando modelos de Análise de Dados Multivariada Teachers' self-concept: finding main factors and clusters by EDA models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Franco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O autoconceito tem sido considerado uma dimensão muito importante da personalidade do professor, da sua prática e do seu desenvolvimento pessoal (MARKUS; WURF, 1987; SIMÕES, 2001. A investigação que apresentamos foi efectuada com 281 professores de Ciências da Natureza, do terceiro ciclo do Ensino Básico, em Portugal, usando o ICAC- Inventário Clínico do Auto Conceito (VAZ-SERRA, 1986. Na análise dos dados obtidos foram usados diferentes métodos de Análise Multivariada, apresentando-se os resultados da análise factorial de correspondências e nos modelos de classificação hierárquica baseados no coeficiente de afinidade. Os resultados obtidos: 1 confirmam a importância de dois grandes factores presentes no Autoconceito: aceitação social e auto-eficácia; 2 caracterizam estes principais factores no que se refere ao Autoconceito clínico dos professores; 3 mostram como esses factores são determinantes na forma como cada professor constroi o seu autoconceito.The self-concept has been considered as a very important dimension on teacher's personality, practice and development (MARKUS; WURF, 1987;SIMÕES, 2001. The present research concerns a sample of 281 teachers of Natural Science of the Third Cycle of Basic Education from Portugal that responded to the I.C.A.C. - Self-Concept Clinical Inventory (VAZ-SERRA, 1986. In the analysis of the questionnaires different multivariate data analysis methods have been used. This paper describes some results issued from correspondence analysis and hierarchical clustering models based on the affinity coefficient. The results obtained: 1 confirm the importance of two general main factors / types which are present in self-concept: social acceptance and self-efficiency; 2 characterise these main factors when teachers'clinical self-concept is concerned and 3 show how determinant these factors are for the building of self-concept that allow us to differentiate teachers.

  14. Professor Adrianus van Seims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. van Wyk

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Professor Adrianus van Seims An eulogy in honour of the late Professor A van Seims (1906-1984, who filled the chair of Semitic Languages at the University of Pretoria from 1948 to 1971. It is an introduction to Volume 41, 2 (1985 of the Hervormie Teologiese Studies?, journal of the Faculty of Theology (Section A at the University of Pretoria. The specific Number is entitled Dedicata Adrianus van Seims. The articles concerned are contributions of some of his postgraduated students who lecture Semitic Languages or Old and New Testament at South African universities. The eulogy contains a review of the life and work of Professor Van Seims as well as a complete list of his publications.

  15. Joint Residence-Workplace Location Choice Model Based on Household Decision Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Residence location and workplace are the two most important urban land-use types, and there exist strong interdependences between them. Existing researches often assume that one choice dimension is correlated to the other. Using the mixed logit framework, three groups of choice models are developed to illustrate such choice dependencies. First, for all households, this paper presents a basic methodology of the residence location and workplace choice without decision sequence based on the assumption that the two choice behaviors are independent of each other. Second, the paper clusters all households into two groups, choosing residence or workplace first, and formulates the residence location and workplace choice models under the constraint of decision sequence. Third, this paper combines the residence location and workplace together as the choice alternative and puts forward the joint choice model. A questionnaire survey is implemented in Beijing city to collect the data of 1994 households. Estimation results indicate that the joint choice model fits the data significantly better, and the elasticity effects analyses show that the joint choice model reflects the influences of relevant factors to the choice probability well and leads to the job-housing balance.

  16. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate...... the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate...

  17. Preceptors' understanding and use of role modeling to develop the CanMEDS competencies in residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Luc; Laughrea, Patricia-Ann

    2014-06-01

    Role modeling by preceptors is a key strategy for training residents in the competencies defined within the CanMEDS conceptual framework. However, little is known about the extent to which preceptors are aware of the importance of role modeling or how they perceive and enact it in their daily interactions with residents. The purpose of this study was to describe how preceptors understand and use role modeling to develop CanMEDS competencies in residents. In 2010, the authors conducted a descriptive qualitative study with preceptors in medical, surgical, and laboratory specialties who supervised residents on a regular basis at the Université Laval Faculty of Medicine (Québec, Canada). Respondents participated in semistructured, individual interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts was conducted using triangulation. Most participants highlighted the importance of role modeling to support residents' development of the CanMEDS competencies, particularly communication, collaboration, and professionalism, which preceptors perceived as "less scientific" and the most difficult to teach. Although most participants reported using an implicit, unstructured role modeling process, some described more explicit strategies. Eight types of educational challenges in role modeling the CanMEDS competencies were identified, including encouraging reflective practice, understanding the competencies and their importance in one's specialty, and being aware of one's strengths and weaknesses as a clinical teacher. Preceptors are aware of the importance of role modeling competencies for residents, but many do so only implicitly. This study's findings are important for improving strategies for role modeling and for the professional development of preceptors.

  18. A proposed model curriculum in global child health for pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchdev, Parminder S; Shah, Ankoor; Derby, Kiersten S; Hall, Lauren; Schubert, Chuck; Pak-Gorstein, Suzinne; Howard, Cindy; Wagner, Sabrina; Anspacher, Melanie; Staton, Donna; O'Callahan, Cliff; Herran, Marisa; Arnold, Linda; Stewart, Christopher C; Kamat, Deepak; Batra, Maneesh; Gutman, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In response to the increasing engagement in global health (GH) among pediatric residents and faculty, academic GH training opportunities are growing rapidly in scale and number. However, consensus to guide residency programs regarding best practice guidelines or model curricula has not been established. We aimed to highlight critical components of well-established GH tracks and develop a model curriculum in GH for pediatric residency programs. We identified 43 existing formal GH curricula offered by U.S. pediatric residency programs in April 2011 and selected 8 programs with GH tracks on the basis of our inclusion criteria. A working group composed of the directors of these GH tracks, medical educators, and trainees and faculty with GH experience collaborated to develop a consensus model curriculum, which included GH core topics, learning modalities, and approaches to evaluation within the framework of the competencies for residency education outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Common curricular components among the identified GH tracks included didactics in various topics of global child health, domestic and international field experiences, completion of a scholarly project, and mentorship. The proposed model curriculum identifies strengths of established pediatric GH tracks and uses competency-based learning objectives. This proposed pediatric GH curriculum based on lessons learned by directors of established GH residency tracks will support residency programs in creating and sustaining successful programs in GH education. The curriculum can be adapted to fit the needs of various programs, depending on their resources and focus areas. Evaluation outcomes need to be standardized so that the impact of this curriculum can be effectively measured. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal model of radiocarbon residence time in exchange reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergachev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiocarbon content variations in the earth atmosphere were studied using a mathematical model. The so-called exchange reservoir was considered consisting of layers, and the radiocarbon exchange rate at the interfaces between these layers was supposed to be constant. The process of 14 C mixing and exchange in a dynamic system is described by a system of nonhomogeneous 1st order differential equations. The model also accounts for the change in rate of radiocarbon formation in the earth atmosphere due to cosmic and geophysical effects (solar activity, solar cycle, etc.). (J.P.)

  20. Women Law Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Donna

    1980-01-01

    Women have made considerable progress toward becoming part of tenure-track legal faculties, but women law professors continue to be academically disproportionately inbred and overrepresented in some areas, such as family law and legal research and writing. (Journal availability: American Bar Foundation, 1155 E. 60th St., Chicago, IL 60637.) (MSE)

  1. Professor Wolfgang Panofsky

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Professor Wolfgang panofsky, who died on September 24 aged 88, was a particle physicists and director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC) in California; with Jack Steinberger, he was the first to isolate the neutral pi meson, one of the subatomic particles which had been predicted by theoretical scientists to account for the strng force which binds the nuclei of atoms." (1 page)

  2. Professor Tiina Tasmuth Helsingis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Tervisekasvatuse õppetooli professor Tiina Tasmuth osales 11.-14. juunini Helsingis toimunud rahvusvahelise konverentsi "2nd Psycho-Social Impacts of Breast Cancer" töös ning esines ettekandega teemal "Chronic post-treatment symptoms in patients with breast cancer" : [täistekst

  3. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical

  4. Three-dimensional brain arteriovenous malformation models for clinical use and resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mengqi; Chen, Guangzhong; Li, Jianyi; Qin, Kun; Ding, Xiaowen; Peng, Chao; Zhou, Dong; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    To fabricate three-dimensional (3D) models of brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) and report our experience with customized 3D printed models of patients with bAVM as an educational and clinical tool for patients, doctors, and surgical residents. Using computerized tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images, the rapid prototyping process was completed with specialized software and "in-house" 3D printing service. Intraoperative validation of model fidelity was performed by comparing to DSA images of the same patient during the endovascular treatment process. 3D bAVM models were used for preoperative patient education and consultation, surgical planning, and resident training. 3D printed bAVM models were successful made. By neurosurgeons' evaluation, the printed models precisely replicated the actual bAVM structure of the same patients (n = 7, 97% concordance, range 95%-99% with average of 3D models was associated shorter time for preoperative patient education and consultation, higher acceptable of the procedure for patients and relatives, shorter time between obtaining intraoperative DSA data and the start of endovascular treatment. Thirty surgical residents from residency programs tested the bAVM models and provided feedback on their resemblance to real bAVM structures and the usefulness of printed solid model as an educational tool. Patient-specific 3D printed models of bAVM can be constructed with high fidelity. 3D printed bAVM models were proven to be helpful in preoperative patient consultation, surgical planning, and resident training. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Burnout in Medical Residents: A Study Based on the Job Demands-Resources Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Zis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Burnout is a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job. The purpose of our cross-sectional study was to estimate the burnout rates among medical residents in the largest Greek hospital in 2012 and identify factors associated with it, based on the job demands-resources model (JD-R. Method. Job demands were examined via a 17-item questionnaire assessing 4 characteristics (emotional demands, intellectual demands, workload, and home-work demands’ interface and job resources were measured via a 14-item questionnaire assessing 4 characteristics (autonomy, opportunities for professional development, support from colleagues, and supervisor’s support. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was used to measure burnout. Results. Of the 290 eligible residents, 90.7% responded. In total 14.4% of the residents were found to experience burnout. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that each increased point in the JD-R questionnaire score regarding home-work interface was associated with an increase in the odds of burnout by 25.5%. Conversely, each increased point for autonomy, opportunities in professional development, and each extra resident per specialist were associated with a decrease in the odds of burnout by 37.1%, 39.4%, and 59.0%, respectively. Conclusions. Burnout among medical residents is associated with home-work interface, autonomy, professional development, and resident to specialist ratio.

  6. Evaluating Surgical Residents' Patient-Centered Communication Skills: Practical Alternatives to the "Apprenticeship Model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Anna; Trickey, Amber W; Lita, Elena; Dort, Jonathan

    2017-10-06

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires residency programs to assess communication skills and provide feedback to residents. We aimed to develop a feasible data collection process that generates objective clinical performance information to guide training activities, inform ACGME milestone evaluations, and validate assessment instruments. Residents care for patients in the surgical clinic and in the hospital, and participate in a communication curriculum providing practice with standardized patients (SPs). We measured perception of resident communication using the 14-item Communication Assessment Tool (CAT), collecting data from patients at the surgery clinic and surgical wards in the hospital, and from SP encounters during simulated training scenarios. We developed a handout of CAT example behaviors to guide patients completing the communication assessment. Independent academic medical center. General surgery residents. The primary outcome is the percentage of total items patients rated "excellent;" we collected data on 24 of 25 residents. Outpatient evaluations resulted in significantly higher scores (mean 84.5% vs. 68.6%, p communication assessments in their concurrent patient population (p = 0.017), and (2) receiving CAT example instructions was associated with a lower percentage of excellent ratings by 9.3% (p = 0.047). Our data collection process provides a model for obtaining meaningful information about resident communication proficiency. CAT evaluations of surgical residents by the inpatient population had not previously been described in the literature; our results provide important insight into relationships between the evaluations provided by inpatients, clinic patients, and SPs in simulation. Our example behaviors guide shows promise for addressing a common concern, minimizing ceiling effects when measuring physician-patient communication. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  7. Contextos e processos de mudança dos professores: uma proposta de modelo Contexts and processes of the teacher's change: a conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Veiga Simão

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo apresenta-se uma proposta de um modelo para a compreensão e análise da mudança do professor com base em resultados de três estudos empíricos realizados em Portugal. Partindo da perspectiva da complexidade, a mudança é encarada como um processo que implica simultaneamente factores contextuais, que podem ou não ser sustentados por estruturas formativas, e factores pessoais associados à aprendizagem e ao desenvolvimento profissional no local de trabalho.This article draws a proposal of a model for the understanding and analysis of the teachers' change based on results of the empirical studies carried out in Portugal. Considering the perspective of complexity, the change is viewed as a process that implies simultaneously contextual factors, which may or not be sustained by educational structures, and personal factors associated with learning and professional development in the work place.

  8. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbens, R.J.J.; Krans, A.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Methods Between June 2013 and May 2014

  9. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; Krans, Anita; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Methods: Between June 2013 and May 2014

  10. Social Relations and Resident Health in Assisted Living: An Application of the Convoy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Molly M.; Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article, based on analysis of data from a mixed methods study, builds on a growing body of assisted living (AL) research focusing on the link between residents' social relationships and health. A key aim of this analysis, which uses the social convoy model as a conceptual and methodological framework, was to examine the relative…

  11. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2015-04-25

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batchwise wet granulation processes. The twin-screw granulator (TSG) screws consist of transport and kneading element modules. Therefore, the granulation to a large extent is governed by the residence time distribution within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate on residence time. The study established that the kneading block in the screw configuration acts as a plug-flow zone inside the granulator. Furthermore, it was found that a balance between the throughput force and conveying rate is required to obtain a good axial mixing inside the twin-screw granulator. Although the granulation behaviour is different for other excipients, the experimental data collection and modelling methods applied in this study are generic and can be adapted to other excipients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling activity recognition of multi resident using label combination of multi label classification in smart home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Raihani; Perumal, Thinagaran; Sulaiman, Md Nasir; Mustapha, Norwati; Zainudin, M. N. Shah

    2017-10-01

    Pertaining to the human centric concern and non-obtrusive way, the ambient sensor type technology has been selected, accepted and embedded in the environment in resilient style. Human activities, everyday are gradually becoming complex and thus complicate the inferences of activities when it involving the multi resident in the same smart environment. Current works solutions focus on separate model between the resident, activities and interactions. Some study use data association and extra auxiliary of graphical nodes to model human tracking information in an environment and some produce separate framework to incorporate the auxiliary for interaction feature model. Thus, recognizing the activities and which resident perform the activity at the same time in the smart home are vital for the smart home development and future applications. This paper will cater the above issue by considering the simplification and efficient method using the multi label classification framework. This effort eliminates time consuming and simplifies a lot of pre-processing tasks comparing with previous approach. Applications to the multi resident multi label learning in smart home problems shows the LC (Label Combination) using Decision Tree (DT) as base classifier can tackle the above problems.

  13. A ATUAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES DE ENSINO SUPERIOR: INVESTIGANDO DOIS PROFESSORES BEM AVALIADOS PELOS ESTUDANTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Quadros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, higher education teacher training has received more didactic-pedagogical attention. Despite numerous criticisms to professors' work, some practices present differentials that make them a reference to students, even among university professors with undergraduate and graduate degrees in their specific areas of knowledge. To analyze the classes of such professors who become a reference to students, we selected two higher education professors of chemistry and videotaped their classes seeking to identify the teaching strategies that they use. After analysis, we shared the results with the subjects and complemented them with a semi-structured interview. We found out that these professors perform based on counter-models of professors who they had had in their undergraduate courses and developed strategies aiming to minimize for their students the difficulties they themselves had experienced.

  14. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  15. Improving skills development in residency using a deliberate-practice and learner-centered model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Nasir I; Ahmed, Aadil

    2015-10-01

    Work-hour restrictions, increased workload, and subjective assessment of competency are major threats to the efficacy of the traditional apprenticeship model of surgical training in modern surgical practice. In response, medical educators are developing time- and resource-efficient competency-based models of surgical training. The purpose of our project was to develop, implement, and measure the outcomes of such objective and structured programs in otolaryngology. We also investigated factors affecting the learning curve, especially deliberate practice, formative feedback, and learners' autonomy. Prospective, longitudinal study. To measure the surgical skills of residents, we first developed and tested objective tools for otolaryngology procedures. Based on these instruments, we identified milestones of the procedures. Training on a virtual-reality simulator was validated to shorten the learning curve. We also studied a learner-centered approach of training, factors affecting the learning curve, and barriers to a competency-based model. The objective tools were found to be a feasible, reliable, and valid opportunity for measuring competency in both the laboratory and operating room. With the formative assessment from these tools, residents had a remediation target to be achieved by deliberate practice. The milestones helped identify the threshold of competency, and deliberate practice on the simulator gave an opportunity for improving skills. The learner-centered approach allowed flexibility and personalized learning by shifting the responsibility of the learning process to the learners. The competency-based model of residency, based on the principles of deliberate practice and a learner-centered approach, is a feasible model of residency training that allows development of competent surgeons and hence improves patient outcomes. Despite these advantages, challenges to this model require a concerted effort to overcome and fully implement these principles of training

  16. Do Professors Have Customer-Based Brand Equity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Jillapalli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    This research endeavors to understand whether certain professors have customer-based brand equity (CBBE) in the minds of students. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to conceptualize, develop, and empirically test a model of customer-based professor brand equity. Survey data gathered from 465 undergraduate business students were used to…

  17. Professor Alex Callinicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saqer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Professor Alex Callinicos is a renowned social theorist and scholar of international political economy. He conducts research on Marx and Marxism, European social and political theory, contemporary political philosophy, critical theory, historiography, and international political economy. His work provides invaluable insights on issues of race and racism, social justice, the Third Way, imperialism, austerity, and EU politics, among many other fascinating contemporary issues. Alex studied Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford, and Philosophy of Science at the London School of Economics before writing a DPhil on Marx's Capital, also at Balliol. He was a Junior Research Fellow in Contemporary Social Thought at St Peter's College, Oxford from 1979 to 1981, after which he taught social and political theory at the Department of Politics at the University of York until 2005, when he moved to King's College London. Alex is currently the Professor of European Studies at King's and editor of International Socialism. Alex has been an active contributor to the development of the movement for another globalization, participating in the World Social Forum and an animator of the European Social Forum. Among his best known books are The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx (1983, Against Postmodernism (1990, Social Theory (1999, An Anti-Capitalist Manifesto (2003, The Resources of Critique (2006, Imperialism and Global Political Economy (2009. His most recent book is entitled Deciphering Capital: Marx’s Capital and its Destiny (2014.

  18. Otolaryngology-specific emergency room as a model for resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rosh K V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J; Gliklich, Richard E; Shrime, Mark G; Gray, Stacey T

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on junior resident training in common otolaryngology procedures such as ear debridement, nasal and laryngeal endoscopy, epistaxis management, and peritonsillar abscess drainage. These common procedures represent a critical aspect of training and are necessary skills in general otolaryngology practice. We sought to determine how a dedicated otolaryngology emergency room (ER) staffed by junior residents and a supervising attending provides exposure to common otolaryngologic procedures. Retrospective review. Diagnostic and procedural data for all patients examined in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary ER between January 2011 and September 2013 were evaluated. A total of 12,234 patients were evaluated. A total of 5,673 patients (46.4%) underwent a procedure. Each second-year resident performed over 450 procedures, with the majority seen Monday through Friday (75%). The most common procedures in our study included diagnostic nasolaryngoscopy (52.0%), ear debridement (34.4%), and epistaxis control (7.0%) An otolaryngology-specific ER provides junior residents with significant diagnostic and procedural volume in a concentrated period of time. This study demonstrates utility of a unique surgical education model and provides insight into new avenues of investigation for otolaryngology training. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Description and evaluation of a bench porcine model for teaching surgical residents vascular anastomosis skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauch Karl-Walter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models, of variable quality, exist to impart the complex skills required to perform vascular anastomosis. These models differ with regard to the kinds of materials used, as well as their sizes, the time needed for their preparation, their availability, and the associated costs. The present study describes a bench model that uses formalin-fixed porcine aorta, and its evaluation by young surgical residents during a recent skills course. Findings The aortic segments used were a by-product of slaughtering. They were fixed and stored after harvesting for eventual use. Ten young surgical residents participated, and each performed one end-to-side vascular anastomosis. The evaluation was a questionnaire maintaining anonymity of the participant containing questions addressing particular aspects of the model and the experiences of the trainee, along with their ratings concerning the need for a training course to learn vascular anastomosis techniques. The scoring on the survey was done using a global 6-point rating scale (Likert Scale. In addition, we ranked the present model by reviewing the current literature for models that address vascular anastomosis skills. The trainees who participated were within their first two years of training (1.25 ± 0.46. A strong agreement in terms of the necessity of training for vascular anastomosis techniques was evident among the participating trainees (5.90 ± 0.32, who had only few prior manual experiences (total number 1.50 ± 0.53. The query revealed a strong agreement that porcine aorta is a suitable model that fits the needs for training vascular anastomosis skills (5.70 ± 0.48. Only a few bench models designed to teach surgical residents vascular anastomosis techniques were available in the literature. Conclusions The preparatory and financial resources needed to perform anastomosis skills training using porcine aorta are few. The presented bench model appears to be appropriate for

  20. Moving improvement research closer to practice: the Researcher-in-Residence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Martin; Pagel, Christina; French, Catherine; Utley, Martin; Allwood, Dominique; Fulop, Naomi; Pope, Catherine; Banks, Victoria; Goldmann, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The traditional separation of the producers of research evidence in academia from the users of that evidence in healthcare organisations has not succeeded in closing the gap between what is known about the organisation and delivery of health services and what is actually done in practice. As a consequence, there is growing interest in alternative models of knowledge creation and mobilisation, ones which emphasise collaboration, active participation of all stakeholders, and a commitment to shared learning. Such models have robust historical, philosophical and methodological foundations but have not yet been embraced by many of the people working in the health sector. This paper presents an emerging model of participation, the Researcher-in-Residence. The model positions the researcher as a core member of a delivery team, actively negotiating a body of expertise which is different from, but complementary to, the expertise of managers and clinicians. Three examples of in-residence models are presented: an anthropologist working as a member of an executive team, operational researchers working in a front-line delivery team, and a Health Services Researcher working across an integrated care organisation. Each of these examples illustrates the contribution that an embedded researcher can make to a service-based team. They also highlight a number of unanswered questions about the model, including the required level of experience of the researcher and their areas of expertise, the institutional facilitators and barriers to embedding the model, and the risk that the independence of an embedded researcher might be compromised. The Researcher-in-Residence model has the potential to engage both academics and practitioners in the promotion of evidence-informed service improvement, but further evaluation is required before the model should be routinely used in practice. PMID:24894592

  1. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; Krans, Anita; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Between June 2013 and May 2014 seven assisted living facilities were contacted. A total of 221 persons completed the questionnaire on life-course determinants, frailty (using the Tilburg Frailty Indicator), self-reported chronic diseases, and adverse outcomes disability, quality of life, health care utilization, and falls. Adverse outcomes were analyzed with sequential (logistic) regression analyses. The integral model is partially validated. Life-course determinants and disease(s) affected only physical frailty. All three frailty domains (physical, psychological, social) together affected disability, quality of life, visits to a general practitioner, and falls. Contrary to the model, disease(s) had no effect on adverse outcomes after controlling for frailty. Life-course determinants affected adverse outcomes, with unhealthy lifestyle having consistent negative effects, and women had more disability, scored lower on physical health, and received more personal and informal care after controlling for all other predictors. The integral model of frailty is less useful for predicting adverse outcomes of residents of assisted living facilities than for community-dwelling older persons, because these residents are much frailer and already have access to healthcare facilities. The present study showed that a multidimensional assessment of frailty, distinguishing three domains of frailty (physical, psychological, social), is beneficial with respect to predicting adverse outcomes in residents of assisted living facilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  3. Estimating Estuarine Residence Times in the Westerschelde (the Netherlands) Using a Box Model with Fixed Dispersion Coefficients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Herman, P.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    The residence time of the water masses in the Westerschelde estuary was determined using a simple compartment-model that simulates the advective-diffusive transport of a conservative dissolved substance (chlorinity). The residence time of a water parcel in the upstream part of the estuary (i.e, the

  4. Numerical modeling of general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Hassan; Hadjizadeh Zaker, Nasser

    2018-01-01

    Gorgan Bay is a semi-enclosed basin located in the southeast of the Caspian Sea, Iran. The bay is recognized as a resting place for migratory birds as well as a spawning habitat for native fish. However, apparently, no detailed research on its physical processes has previously been conducted. In this study, a 3D coupled hydrodynamic and solute transport model was used to investigate general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay. Model outputs were validated against a set of field observations. Bottom friction and attenuation coefficient of light intensity were tuned in order to achieve optimum agreement with the observations. Results revealed that, due to the interaction between bathymetry and prevailing winds, a barotropic double-gyre circulation, dominating the general circulation, existed during all seasons in Gorgan Bay. Furthermore, temperature and salinity fluctuations in the bay were seasonal, due to the seasonal variability of atmospheric fluxes. Results also indicated that under the prevailing winds, the domain-averaged residence time in Gorgan Bay would be approximately 95 days. The rivers discharging into Gorgan Bay are considered as the main sources of nutrients in the bay. Since their mouths are located in the area with a residence time of over 100 days, Gorgan Bay could be at risk of eutrophication; it is necessary to adopt preventive measures against water quality degradation.

  5. A model for the future. Certified nurse-midwives replace residents and house staff in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, L A; Hanson, L

    1998-01-01

    In one model of the future, certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) replace most obstetric residents and house staff in hospitals. This model offers numerous benefits, such as cost containment and quality outcomes. Furthermore, its application could open opportunities for educating CNMs and residents in a truly collaborative model in an educational setting and begin to balance the ratio of physicians to CNMs in the care of low-risk populations. This model was used with some success in the late 1980s to early 1990s at an inner-city Midwestern medical center. By definition, CNMs are educated in the two disciplines of nursing and midwifery and possess evidence of certification according to the requirements of the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM, 1978). Nurse-midwifery practice is the independent management of care of normal newborns and women, antepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, and/or gynecologically. Certified Nurse Midwifery practice occurs within a health care system that provides for medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral (ACNM, 1978). Physician and CNM roles differ. Certified nurse-midwives focus on supporting the process of normal birth, whereas physicians focus more on the management of complications. There are data that suggest that CNM outcomes are equivalent to those of physicians (American Nurses Association, 1992; Thompson, 1986; Wilson, 1989); that CNM costs are less than those of physicians (Bell & Mills, 1989; Cherry & Foster, 1982; Gravely & Littlefield, 1992; Rooks, 1986); and that the cost of educating CNMs is much less than the cost of educating physicians (Safriet, 1992). Within an environment of health care reform and cost containment, CNMs can replace residents and house staff in hospitals in the care of low-risk clients and work in consultation with physicians for the care of high-risk clients. This article compares medical education and nurse-midwifery education, reviews nurse-midwifery outcome data, and discusses

  6. A Statewide Model for Assisting Nursing Home Residents to Transition Successfully to the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Buttke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Minnesota’s Return to Community Initiative (RTCI is a novel, statewide initiative to assist private paying nursing home residents to return to the community and to remain in that setting without converting to Medicaid. The objective of this manuscript is to describe in detail RTCI’s development and design, its key operational components, and characteristics of its clients and their care outcomes. Data on client characteristics and outcomes come from the Minimum Data Set, staff assessments of clients and caregivers, and Medicaid eligibility files. Most clients transitioned by the RTCI had entered the nursing facility from a hospital. Clients overwhelmingly wanted to return to the community and fit a health and functional profile making them good candidates for community discharge. Most clients went to a private residence, living alone or with a spouse; yet, adult children were the most frequent caregivers. At one year of follow-up 76% of individuals were alive and living in the community and only a small percentage (8.2% had converted to Medicaid. The RTCI holds promise as a successful model for states to adopt in assisting individuals who are at risk to become long stay nursing home residents instead to return to the community.

  7. Recent extensions of the residence time distribution concept: unsteady state conditions and hydrodynamic model developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudel S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Two recent extensions of the residence time distribution concept are developed. The first one concerns the use of this method under transient conditions, a concept theoretically treated but rarely confirm by relevant experiments. In the present work, two experimental set-ups have been used to verify some limits of the concept. The second extension is devoted to the development of hydrodynamic models. Up to now, the hydrodynamics of the process are either determined by simple models (mixing cells in series, plug flow reactor with axial dispersion or by the complex calculation of the velocity profile obtained via the Navier-Stokes equations. An alternative is to develop a hydrodynamic model by use of a complex network of interconnected elementary reactors. Such models should be simple enough to be derived easily and sufficiently complex to give a good representation of the behavior of the process.

  8. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  9. The College Professor's Professional Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Walter S.; Rubin, Harvey W.

    1977-01-01

    The growing number of professional liability suits against professors warrants a close examination of the need for and provisions of available insurance coverage. The evolution of tort liability, the question of negligence, and the professional liability policy are discussed. (LBH)

  10. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-11-06

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ'E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ'E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models.

  11. The role of residence time in diagnostic models of global carbon storage capacity: model decomposition based on a traceable scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhao, Chen; Jianyang, Xia; Zhengguo, Sun; Jianlong, Li; Yiqi, Luo; Chengcheng, Gang; Zhaoqi, Wang

    2015-01-01

    As a key factor that determines carbon storage capacity, residence time (τE) is not well constrained in terrestrial biosphere models. This factor is recognized as an important source of model uncertainty. In this study, to understand how τE influences terrestrial carbon storage prediction in diagnostic models, we introduced a model decomposition scheme in the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) and then compared it with a prognostic model. The result showed that τE ranged from 32.7 to 158.2 years. The baseline residence time (τ′E) was stable for each biome, ranging from 12 to 53.7 years for forest biomes and 4.2 to 5.3 years for non-forest biomes. The spatiotemporal variations in τE were mainly determined by the environmental scalar (ξ). By comparing models, we found that the BEPS uses a more detailed pool construction but rougher parameterization for carbon allocation and decomposition. With respect to ξ comparison, the global difference in the temperature scalar (ξt) averaged 0.045, whereas the moisture scalar (ξw) had a much larger variation, with an average of 0.312. We propose that further evaluations and improvements in τ′E and ξw predictions are essential to reduce the uncertainties in predicting carbon storage by the BEPS and similar diagnostic models. PMID:26541245

  12. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  13. Competency-based residency training and the web log: modeling practice-based learning and enhancing medical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Matthew F

    2015-01-01

    By using web-based tools in medical education, there are opportunities to innovatively teach important principles from the general competencies of graduate medical education. Postulating that faculty transparency in learning from uncertainties in clinical work could help residents to incorporate the principles of practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) in their professional development, faculty in this community-based residency program modeled the steps of PBLI on a weekly basis through the use of a web log. The program confidentially surveyed residents before and after this project about actions consistent with PBLI and knowledge acquired through reading the web log. The frequency that residents encountered clinical situations where they felt uncertain declined over the course of the 24 weeks of the project from a mean frequency of uncertainty of 36% to 28% (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p=0.008); however, the frequency with which residents sought answers when faced with uncertainty did not change (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p=0.39), remaining high at approximately 80%. Residents answered a mean of 52% of knowledge questions correct when tested prior to faculty posts to the blog, rising to a mean of 65% of questions correct when tested at the end of the project (paired t-test, p=0.001). Faculty role modeling of PBLI behaviors and posting clinical questions and answers to a web log led to modest improvements in medical knowledge but did not alter behavior that was already taking place frequently among residents.

  14. Baylor Pediatric SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: model description and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James H; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Allen, Erin; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H

    2014-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program created for pediatric residents and provides an evaluation of the program. Ninety-five first-year pediatric residents participated in the training program. They were assessed on satisfaction with the program, self-rated skills, observed competency, and implementation into clinical practice. The program was successfully incorporated into the residency curricula in two pediatric residencies. Evaluations indicate a high degree of satisfaction with the program, self-reported improvement in SBIRT skills, observed proficiency in SBIRT skills, and utilization of SBIRT skills in clinical practice. SBIRT skills training can be incorporated into pediatric residency training, and residents are able to learn and implement the skills in clinical practice.

  15. "Good Enough" Psychiatric Residency Training in Borderline Personality Disorder: Challenges, Choice Points, and a Model Generalist Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Brandon T; Gunderson, John G

    2016-01-01

    While the public health burden posed by borderline personality disorder (BPD) rivals that associated with other major mental illnesses, the prevailing disposition of psychiatrists toward the disorder remains characterized by misinformation, stigma, aversive attitudes, and insufficient familiarity with effective generalist treatments that can be delivered in nonspecialized health care settings. Residency training programs are well positioned to better equip the next generation of psychiatrists to address these issues, but no consensus or guidelines currently exist for what and how residents should be taught about managing BPD. Instead, disproportionately limited curricular time, teaching of non-evidence-based approaches, and modeling of conceptually confused combinations of techniques drawn from specialty BPD treatments are offered. In this article, we (1) explain why training in a generalist model is sensible and why alternative approaches are not appropriate for residents, (2) propose a plan for giving residents adequate training via a generalist model, highlighting minimal didactic and clinical-training objectives (dubbed "core competencies" and "milestones") and a model curriculum developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital residency program, and (3) describe obstacles to implementation of effective generalist training posed by infrastructural, faculty-centered, and resident-centered variables.

  16. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Modeling analysis of the lymphocytopoiesis dynamics in chronically irradiated residents of Techa riverside villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, Olga A. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise Research and Technical Center of Radiation-Chemical Safety and Hygiene, Moscow (Russian Federation); Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM), Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Dimov, Georgy P. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM), Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    A biologically motivated dynamical model of the lymphocytopoietic system in irradiated humans is applied here to analyze the data obtained under hematological examinations of residents of Techa riverside villages. Those people were exposed to chronic irradiation with varying dose rates, due to the radioactive contamination of the river basin by the Mayak Production Association. Modeling studies revealed the relationship between the dynamics of the lymphocytopoietic system in the examined individuals and the variation of dose rate over the considered period of time. It is found that the developed model is capable of reproducing the decreased level of blood lymphocyte concentration observed during the period of maximum radiation exposure, the recovery processes in the system observed during the period of decreasing dose rate, as well as the enhanced mitotic activity of bone marrow precursor cells in this hematopoietic lineage observed during the entire period under consideration. Mechanisms of these effects of chronic irradiation on the human lymphocytopoietic system are elucidated based on the applied model. The results obtained demonstrate the efficiency of the developed model in the analysis, investigation, and prediction of effects of chronic irradiation with varying dose rate on the human lymphocytopoietic system. In particular, the developed model can be used for predicting any radiation injury of this vital system in people exposed to chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events, such as anthropogenic radiation accidents or radiological terroristic attacks. (orig.)

  18. A Sequential Implementation Model for Workforce Development: A Case Study of Medical Residency Training for Substance Use Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Yuan, Patrick; Satre, Derek D; Wamsley, Maria; Satterfield, Jason

    2018-01-01

    In graduate medical education, residency programs are often educationally isolated from each other, with varying needs and patient populations, so strategies are needed when attempting to implement training in evidence-based practices across multiple residencies. Using implementation science as a guide, we adapted a community development model to sequentially implement an evidence-based intervention, Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and drug use problems, across internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A grant-funded "executive" team coordinated the implementation, enrolled a new residency program annually, and served as the consultative team to span the programs. The team was attentive to aligning implementation with the needs of each program. To assist in planning, the team included a program champion 1 year prior to SBIRT implementation to provide the opportunity to develop resources and work with peers. We evaluated this model through an implementation science lens using a case study approach that included interviews and quantitative tabulation of products and resident perceptions. We successfully instituted SBIRT training in all 5 residency programs through the use of a supported local champion model. Teams developed 90 curricular products and had 57 presentations and publications. Residents reported satisfaction with the SBIRT activities. Champions reported that SBIRT was a useful approach and that they gained valuable knowledge and relationships from working with the executive team when designing learning materials appropriate for their residency. Champions successfully incorporated SBIRT into routine clinical practice. Having a strong team to support subsequent SBIRT champions was essential for implementation. The champions needed financial support to have the necessary time to implement training. The strategy of building a peer network

  19. δ2H and δ18O of human body water: a GIS model to distinguish residents from non-residents in the contiguous USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesak, David W; Bowen, Gabriel J; O'Grady, Shannon; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-06-01

    An understanding of the factors influencing the isotopic composition of body water is important to determine the isotopic composition of tissues that are used to reconstruct movement patterns of humans. The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water (δ(2)H(bw) and δ(18)O(bw)) are related to the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of drinking water (δ(2)H(dw) and δ(18)O(dw)), but clearly distinct because of other factors including the composition of food. Here, we develop a mechanistic geographical information system (GIS) model to produce spatial projections of δ(2)H(bw) and δ(18)O(bw) values for the USA. We investigate the influence of gender, food, and drinking water on the predicted values by comparing them with the published values. The strongest influence on the predicted values was related to the source of δ(2)H(dw) and δ(18)O(dw) values. We combine the model with equations that describe the rate of turnover to produce estimates for the time required for a non-resident to reach an isotopic equilibrium with a resident population.

  20. Rethinking Resident Supervision to Improve Safety: From Hierarchical to Interprofessional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamuz, Michal; Giardina, Traber Davis; Thomas, Eric J.; Menon, Shailaja; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-01-01

    Background Inadequate supervision is a significant contributing factor to medical errors involving trainees but supervision in high-risk settings such as the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is not well studied. Objective We explored how residents in the ICU experienced supervision related to medication safety not only from supervising physicians but also from other professionals. Design, Setting, Measurements Using qualitative methods, we examined in-depth interviews with 17 residents working in ICUs of three tertiary-care hospitals. We analyzed residents' perspectives on receiving and initiating supervision from physicians within the traditional medical hierarchy and from other professionals, including nurses, staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists (“interprofessional supervision”). Results While initiating their own supervision within the traditional hierarchy, residents believed in seeking assistance from fellows and attendings and articulated rules of thumb for doing so; however, they also experienced difficulties. Some residents were concerned that their questions would reflect poorly on them; others were embarrassed by their mistaken decisions. Conversely, residents described receiving interprofessional supervision from nurses and pharmacists, who proactively monitored, intervened in, and guided residents' decisions. Residents relied on nurses and pharmacists for non-judgmental answers to their queries, especially after-hours. To enhance both types of supervision, residents emphasized the importance of improving interpersonal communication skills. Conclusions Residents depended on interprofessional supervision when making decisions regarding medications in the ICU. Improving interprofessional supervision, which thus far has been under-recognized and underemphasized in graduate medical education, can potentially improve medication safety in high-risk settings. PMID:21990173

  1. Modeling Usersr Data Traces in Multi-Resident Ambient Assisted Living Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ghasemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling usersr data traces is of crucial importance for human behavior analysis and context-aware applications in ambient assisted living (AAL environments. However, learning the parameters of the underlying model is a challenging task in multi-occupant environments; because, the anonymous usersr data traces are aggregated temporally. This paper proposes a novel method for modeling usersr data traces in multi-resident sensor-based AAL environments. A Markov chain was considered as the underlying model. We aimed at estimating the parameters of the Markov chain directly out of usersr aggregate data. For this purpose, we hired the idea of conditional least squares (CLS estimation. However, the CLS estimations can be inconsistent in the circumstances of AAL environments. To tackle this problem, we proposed to regularize the CLS estimations using spatial information of sensors. This information was extracted using an accessibility graph, made out of the deployed sensor network. To evaluate the proposed method, a well-known and publicly available dataset was used. The proposed method was compared with the standard CLS, using Kullback-Leibler (KL divergence, and mean squared error (MSE criteria. The results conveyed that the proposed method results in estimations with lower KL divergences from ground truth, compared to CLS. Also, the proposed method outperformed CLS with a MSE of 2.7atimes;10lsupgaminus;3l/supg.

  2. A model of self-directed learning in internal medicine residency: a qualitative study using grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Ratelle, John T; Bonnes, Sara L; Egginton, Jason S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-02-02

    Existing theories of self-directed learning (SDL) have emphasized the importance of process, personal, and contextual factors. Previous medical education research has largely focused on the process of SDL. We explored the experience with and perception of SDL among internal medicine residents to gain understanding of the personal and contextual factors of SDL in graduate medical education. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted 7 focus group interviews with 46 internal medicine residents at an academic medical center. We processed the data by using open coding and writing analytic memos. Team members organized open codes to create axial codes, which were applied to all transcripts. Guided by a previous model of SDL, we developed a theoretical model that was revised through constant comparison with new data as they were collected, and we refined the theory until it had adequate explanatory power and was appropriately grounded in the experiences of residents. We developed a theoretical model of SDL to explain the process, personal, and contextual factors affecting SDL during residency training. The process of SDL began with a trigger that uncovered a knowledge gap. Residents progressed to formulating learning objectives, using resources, applying knowledge, and evaluating learning. Personal factors included motivations, individual characteristics, and the change in approach to SDL over time. Contextual factors included the need for external guidance, the influence of residency program structure and culture, and the presence of contextual barriers. We developed a theoretical model of SDL in medical education that can be used to promote and assess resident SDL through understanding the process, person, and context of SDL.

  3. Teaching Ethos of Reference Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Marcel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the teaching ethos of professors who are recognized for their good practice as trainers. The aim of our study is to analyze the influences of such professors’ professional constitution, as well as the explicit and/or tacit teaching knowledge they mobilize in their teaching practices. Based on Shulman, Gauthier, Tardif and Polanyi, we conducted interviews with three professors described by their students as reference. They were also observed in their classes, in the context of an undergraduate program in pedagogy at a public university. Data show similarities between the practices of the investigated professors, as well as a consistent description of their didactics, which is marked by intellective, moral, emotional and behavioral features.

  4. Professor@s e Eros Teachers and Eros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah P. Britzman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Professores/as são testemunhas do fantástico mundo da sexualidade. Esse artigo explora a centralidade de Eros para a educação e estabelece uma relação entre o desejo do/a professor/a e os acontecimentos emocionais da relação própria relação aluno/professor. Eu proponho que o aprendizado deva envolver nosso "eu" erótico, além das nossas fantasias. Mas esta perspectiva requer que professores/as considerem uma psicologia do amor como um caminho principal para a as situações emocionais de Eros. Na sua conclusão este trabalho sugere uma pedagogia que dê as boas vindas tanto à homossexualidade como a heterossexualidade como expressões humanas do amor.Teachers bear witness to the wondrous world of sexuality. This essay explores the centrality of Eros to education and links the teacher's desire to the emotional situation of the student/teacher relationship. I propose that learning involves our erotic selves and our fantasy life. But such a view requires that teachers consider a psychology of love as lending insight into the emotional situation of Eros. The paper concludes by suggesting a pedagogy that welcomes homosexuality and heterosexuality as human expressions of love.

  5. Aesthetic Surgery Training during Residency in the United States: A Comparison of the Integrated, Combined, and Independent Training Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Kim, Rebecca Y.; Wan, Derrick C.; Izadpanah, Ali; Lee, Gordon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Three educational models for plastic surgery training exist in the United States, the integrated, combined, and independent model. The present study is a comparative analysis of aesthetic surgery training, to assess whether one model is particularly suitable to provide for high-quality training in aesthetic surgery. Methods. An 18-item online survey was developed to assess residents' perceptions regarding the quality of training in aesthetic surgery in the US. The survey had three distinct sections: demographic information, current state of aesthetic surgery training, and residents' perception regarding the quality of aesthetic surgery training. Results. A total of 86 senior plastic surgery residents completed the survey. Twenty-three, 24, and 39 residents were in integrated, combined, and independent residency programs, respectively. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to number of aesthetic surgery procedures performed, additional training received in minimal-invasive cosmetic procedures, median level of confidence with index cosmetic surgery procedures, or perceived quality of aesthetic surgery training. Facial aesthetic procedures were felt to be the most challenging procedures. Exposure to minimally invasive aesthetic procedures was limited. Conclusion. While the educational experience in aesthetic surgery appears to be similar, weaknesses still exist with respect to training in minimally invasive/nonsurgical aesthetic procedures. PMID:25225615

  6. A novel adolescent chronic social defeat model: reverse-Resident-Intruder Paradigm (rRIP) in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Kevin M; Levine, Wendy A; Seckler, Joshua C; Iskander, Anthony N; Reich, Christian G

    2018-03-01

    Psychosocial stress is linked to the etiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Major Depressive Disorder and Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder. Adolescence is a critical neurobehavioral developmental period wherein the maturing nervous system is sensitive to stress-related psychosocial events. The effects of social defeat stress, an animal model of psychosocial stress, on adolescent neurobehavioral phenomena are not well explored. Using the standard Resident-Intruder-Paradigm (RIP), adolescent Long-Evans (LE, residents, n = 100) and Sprague-Dawley (SD, intruders, n = 100) rats interacted for five days to invoke chronic social stress. Tests of depressive behavior (forced-swim-test (FST)), fear conditioning, and long-term synaptic plasticity are affected in various adult rodent chronic stress models, thus we hypothesized that these phenomena would be similarly affected in adolescent rats. Serendipitously, we observed the Intruders became the dominant rats and the Residents were the defeated/submissive rats. This robust and reliable role-reversal resulted in defeated LE-Residents showing a depressive-like state (increased time spent immobile in the FST), enhanced fear conditioning in both hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent fear paradigms and altered hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity, measured electrophysiologically in vitro in hippocampal slices. Importantly, SD-Intruders, SD and LE controls did not significantly differ from each other in any of these assessments. This reverse-Resident-Intruder-Paradigm (rRIP) represents a novel animal model to study the effects of stress on adolescent neurobehavioral phenomenon.

  7. Symposia on Time Series and Econometric Modelling : Advances in the Statistical Sciences : Festschrift in Honor of Professor V.M. Joshi's 70th birthday : v.III

    CERN Document Server

    Umphrey, Gary; Carter, Richard; McLeod, A; Ullah, Aman

    1987-01-01

    On May 27-31, 1985, a series of symposia was held at The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada, to celebrate the 70th birthday of Professor V. M. Joshi. These symposia were chosen to reflect Professor Joshi's research interests as well as areas of expertise in statistical science among faculty in the Departments of Statistical and Actuarial Sciences, Economics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Philosophy. From these symposia, the six volumes which comprise the "Joshi Festschrift" have arisen. The 117 articles in this work reflect the broad interests and high quality of research of those who attended our conference. We would like to thank all of the contributors for their superb cooperation in helping us to complete this project. Our deepest gratitude must go to the three people who have spent so much of their time in the past year typing these volumes: Jackie Bell, Lise Constant, and Sandy Tarnowski. This work has been printed from "camera ready" copy produced by our Vax 785 computer and QMS Laserg...

  8. Competency-based residency training and the web log: modeling practice-based learning and enhancing medical knowledge†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    Background By using web-based tools in medical education, there are opportunities to innovatively teach important principles from the general competencies of graduate medical education. Objectives Postulating that faculty transparency in learning from uncertainties in clinical work could help residents to incorporate the principles of practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) in their professional development, faculty in this community-based residency program modeled the steps of PBLI on a weekly basis through the use of a web log. Method The program confidentially surveyed residents before and after this project about actions consistent with PBLI and knowledge acquired through reading the web log. Results The frequency that residents encountered clinical situations where they felt uncertain declined over the course of the 24 weeks of the project from a mean frequency of uncertainty of 36% to 28% (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p=0.008); however, the frequency with which residents sought answers when faced with uncertainty did not change (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p=0.39), remaining high at approximately 80%. Residents answered a mean of 52% of knowledge questions correct when tested prior to faculty posts to the blog, rising to a mean of 65% of questions correct when tested at the end of the project (paired t-test, p=0.001). Conclusions Faculty role modeling of PBLI behaviors and posting clinical questions and answers to a web log led to modest improvements in medical knowledge but did not alter behavior that was already taking place frequently among residents. PMID:26653701

  9. Competency-based residency training and the web log: modeling practice-based learning and enhancing medical knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F. Hollon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: By using web-based tools in medical education, there are opportunities to innovatively teach important principles from the general competencies of graduate medical education. Objectives: Postulating that faculty transparency in learning from uncertainties in clinical work could help residents to incorporate the principles of practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI in their professional development, faculty in this community-based residency program modeled the steps of PBLI on a weekly basis through the use of a web log. Method: The program confidentially surveyed residents before and after this project about actions consistent with PBLI and knowledge acquired through reading the web log. Results: The frequency that residents encountered clinical situations where they felt uncertain declined over the course of the 24 weeks of the project from a mean frequency of uncertainty of 36% to 28% (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p=0.008; however, the frequency with which residents sought answers when faced with uncertainty did not change (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p=0.39, remaining high at approximately 80%. Residents answered a mean of 52% of knowledge questions correct when tested prior to faculty posts to the blog, rising to a mean of 65% of questions correct when tested at the end of the project (paired t-test, p=0.001. Conclusions: Faculty role modeling of PBLI behaviors and posting clinical questions and answers to a web log led to modest improvements in medical knowledge but did not alter behavior that was already taking place frequently among residents.

  10. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas J.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents)

  11. 'Supermentoring' of assistant professors' teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Ole

    Aarhus University offers a mandatory pedagogical training program for assistant professors, required in order to obtain tenure at a Danish university. At Business and Social Sciences, this program is supplemented by voluntary observation and (first of all formative) supervision of the assistant...

  12. Professors of the New Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Profiles four professors who epitomize the increasing influence of academe on new technology-driven Internet business: a start-up maven, Steven Kaplan; a social psychologist, Michael Ray; a cyberlawyer, David Post; and an e-commerce expert, Andrew B. Whinston. (DB)

  13. Carta do professor Geraldo Cavalcanti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Maria da Rocha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Geraldo Cavalcanti é reconhecido por muitos profissionais que atuam na educação de surdos como um grande mestre. Foi professor do INES nas décadas de trinta, quarenta, cinquenta, sessenta e setenta.

  14. Investigation of residence time and groundwater flux in Venice Lagoon: comparing radium isotope and hydrodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaglia, John; Ferrarin, Christian; Zaggia, Luca; Moore, Willard S; Umgiesser, Georg; Garcia-Solsona, Ester; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Masqué, Pere

    2010-07-01

    The four naturally-occurring isotopes of radium were coupled with a previously evaluated hydrodynamic model to determine the apparent age of surface waters and to quantify submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the Venice Lagoon, Italy. Mean apparent age of water in the Venice Lagoon was calculated using the ratio of 224Ra to 228Ra determined from 30 monitoring stations and a mean pore water end member. Average apparent age was calculated to be 6.0 d using Ra ratios. This calculated age was very similar to average residence time calculated for the same period using a hydrodynamic model (5.8 d). A mass balance of Ra was accomplished by quantifying each of the sources and sinks of Ra in the lagoon, with the unknown variable being attributed to SGD. Total SGD were calculated to be 4.1 +/- 1.5, 3.8 +/- 0.7, 3.0 +/- 1.3, and 3.5 +/- 1.0 x 10(10) L d(-1) for (223,224,226, 228)Ra, respectively, which are an order of magnitude larger than total mean fluvial discharge into the Venice Lagoon (3.1 x 10(9) L d(-1)). The SGD as a source of nutrients in the Venice Lagoon is also discussed and, though significant to the nutrient budget, is likely to be less important as the dominant control on SGD is recirculated seawater rather than freshwater. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Model Curriculum for an Emergency Medical Services (EMS Rotation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mancera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This EMS curriculum is designed for Emergency Medicine residents at all levels of training. Introduction: Emergency Medicine (EM physicians have routine interaction with Emergency Medical Services (EMS in their clinical practice. Additionally, the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandates that all Emergency Medicine resident physicians receive specific training in the area of EMS.1 Historically, EMS training for EM residents has been conducted in the absence of a standardized didactic curriculum. Despite advancements in the area of prehospital training, there remains wide inconsistency in EMS training experiences among EM residency training programs.2 To our knowledge a standardized and reproducible EMS curriculum for EM residents does not exist. Objectives: The aim of this curriculum is to provide a robust learning experience for EM residents around prehospital care and EMS that fulfills the ACGME requirements and which can be easily replicated and implemented in a variety of EM residency training programs. Method: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include didactics, asynchronous learning through online modules and a focused reading list, experiential learning through ride-alongs, structured small group discussion, supervised medical command shifts, and mentored practice in organizing and delivering didactics to EMS providers.

  16. A Neighborhood-Scale Green Infrastructure Retrofit: Experimental Results, Model Simulations, and Resident Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, A.; Avellaneda, P. M.; Jarden, K. M.; Turner, V. K.; Grieser, J.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed green infrastructure approaches to stormwater management that can be retrofit into existing development are of growing interest, but questions remain about their effectiveness at the watershed-scale. In suburban northeastern Ohio, homeowners on a residential street with 55% impervious surface were given the opportunity for free rain barrels, rain gardens, and bioretention cells. Of 163 parcels, only 22 owners (13.5%) chose to participate, despite intense outreach efforts. After pre-treatment monitoring, 37 rain barrels, 7 rain gardens, and 16 street-side bioretention cells were installed in 2013-2014. Using a paired watershed approach, a reduction in up to 33% of peak flow and 40% of total runoff volume per storm was measured in the storm sewer. Using the monitoring data, a calibrated and validated SWMM model was built to explore the long-term effectiveness of the green infrastructure against a wider range of hydrological conditions. Model results confirm the effectiveness of green infrastructure in reducing surface runoff and increasing infiltration and evaporation. Based on 20 years of historical precipitation data, the model shows that the green infrastructure is capable of reducing flows by >40% at the 1, 2, and 5 year return period, suggesting some resilience to projected increases in precipitation intensity in a changing climate. Further, in this project, more benefit is derived from the street-side bioretention cells than from the rain barrels and gardens that treat rooftop runoff. Substantial hydrological gains were achieved despite low homeowner participation. Surveys indicate that many residents viewed stormwater as the city's problem and had negative perceptions of green infrastructure, despite slightly pro-environment values generally. Overall, this study demonstrates green infrastructure's hydrological effectiveness but raises challenging questions about overcoming social barriers retrofits at the neighborhood scale.

  17. Target Strength of Southern Resident Killer Whales (Orcinus orca): Measurement and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Moore, Brian

    2012-04-04

    A major criterion for tidal power licensing in Washington’s Puget Sound is the management of the risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades. An active monitoring system is being proposed for killer whale detection, tracking, and alerting that links to and triggers temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision. Target strength (TS) modeling of the killer whale is critical to the design and application of any active monitoring system. A 1996 study performed a high-resolution measurement of acoustic reflectivity as a function of frequency of a female bottlenose dolphin (2.2 m length) at broadside aspect and TS as a function of incident angle at 67 kHz frequency. Assuming that killer whales share similar morphology structure with the bottlenose dolphin, we extrapolated the TS of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at 67 kHz frequency with -8 dB at broadside aspect and -28 dB at tail side. The backscattering data from three Southern Resident killer whales were analyzed to obtain the TS measurement. These data were collected at Lime Kiln State Park using a split-beam system deployed from a boat. The TS of the killer whale at higher frequency (200 kHz) was estimated based on a three-layer model for plane wave reflection from the lung of the whale. The TS data of killer whales were in good agreement with our model. In this paper, we also discuss and explain possible causes for measurement estimation error.

  18. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: model description and initial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James H; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the first year of the project. The program was successfully incorporated into the residency curricula in family medicine, internal medicine, and psychiatry. Initial evaluations indicate a high degree of satisfaction with the program and, despite a slight decrease in satisfaction scores, participants remained satisfied with the program after 30 days. Implementation barriers, solutions, and future directions of the program are discussed.

  19. Impact of community capacity on the health status of residents: understanding with the contextual multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Choi, Mankyu

    2013-01-01

    There has been little conceptual understanding as to how community capacity works, although it allows for an important, population-based health promotional strategy. In this study, the mechanism of community capacity was studied through literature reviews to suggest a comprehensive conceptual model. The research results found that the key to community capacity prevailed in how actively the capacities of individuals and their communities are able to interact with one another. Under active interactions, community-based organizations, which are a type of voluntary association, were created within the community, and cohesion among residents was enhanced. In addition, people were more willing to address community issues. During the process, many services were initiated to meet the people's health needs and strengthen their social and psychological ties. The characteristics of community capacity were named as the contextual multilevel effects. Because an increase in community capacity contributes to a boosted health status, encourages health behaviors, and eventually leads to the overall prosperity of the community, more public health-related attention is required.

  20. ICT Use by Journalism Professors in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Elias Said

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses how journalism professors at Colombian universities use information and communications technologies (ICT) in their teaching. Survey data was obtained during the first trimester of 2009 from 63 professors in journalism departments and from a total of 865 professors who are affiliated with journalism departments at 29…

  1. Reliability and acceptability of a five-station multiple mini-interview model for residency program recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Diaz Fraga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard interviews are used by most residency programs in the United States for assessment of aptitude of the non-cognitive competencies, but variability of interviewer skill, interviewer bias, interviewer leniency or stringency, and context specificity limit reliability. Aim: To investigate reliability and acceptability of five-station multiple mini-interview (MMI model for resident selection into an internal medicine residency program in the United States. Setting: One independent academic medical center. Participants: Two hundred and thirty-seven applicants and 17 faculty interviewers. Program description: Five, 10-min MMI stations with five different interviewers blinded to the candidate's records and one traditional 20-min interview with the program director. Candidates were rated on two items: interpersonal and communication skills, and overall performance. Program evaluation: Generalizability data showed that the reliability of our process was high (>0.9. The results of anonymous surveys demonstrated that both applicants and interviewers consider the MMI as a fair and more effective tool to evaluate non-cognitive traits, and prefer the MMI to standard interviews. Discussion: The MMI process for residency interviews can generate reliable interview results using only five stations, and it is acceptable and preferred over standard interview modalities by the applicants and faculty members of one US residency program.

  2. Gravity models to classify commuting vs. resident workers. An application to the analysis of residential risk in a contaminated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorino, Guido; Pasetto, Roberto; Gatto, Elisa; Mucciardi, Massimo; La Rocca, Marina; Mudu, Pierpaolo

    2011-01-27

    The analysis of risk for the population residing and/or working in contaminated areas raises the topic of commuting. In fact, especially in contaminated areas, commuting groups are likely to be subject to lower exposure than residents. Only very recently environmental epidemiology has started considering the role of commuting as a differential source of exposure in contaminated areas. In order to improve the categorization of groups, this paper applies a gravitational model to the analysis of residential risk for workers in the Gela petrochemical complex, which began life in the early 60s in the municipality of Gela (Sicily, Italy) and is the main source of industrial pollution in the local area. A logistic regression model is implemented to measure the capacity of Gela "central location" to attract commuting flows from other sites. Drawing from gravity models, the proposed methodology: a) defines the probability of finding commuters from municipalities outside Gela as a function of the origin's "economic mass" and of its distance from each destination; b) establishes "commuting thresholds" relative to the origin's mass. The analysis includes 367 out of the 390 Sicilian municipalities. Results are applied to define "commuters" and "residents" within the cohort of petrochemical workers. The study population is composed of 5,627 workers. Different categories of residence in Gela are compared calculating Mortality Rate Ratios for lung cancer through a Poisson regression model, controlling for age and calendar period. The mobility model correctly classifies almost 90% of observations. Its application to the mortality analysis confirms a major risk for lung cancer associated with residence in Gela. Commuting is a critical aspect of the health-environment relationship in contaminated areas. The proposed methodology can be replicated to different contexts when residential information is lacking or unreliable; however, a careful consideration of the territorial

  3. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  4. Maintenance of Clinical Expertise and Clinical Research by the Clinical Professors at Gifu Pharmaceutical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Tomoya; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2017-01-01

    The clinical professors at Gifu Pharmaceutical University (GPU) provide pharmaceutical services at GPU Pharmacy, Gifu University Hospital, and Gifu Municipal Hospital to keep their clinical skills up-to-date; they also perform clinical research in collaboration with many clinical institutes. The Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy is part of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, to which the clinical professors belong, and is composed of three clinical professors (a professor, an associate professor, and an assistant professor). The professor administers the GPU Pharmacy as its director, while the associate professor and assistant professor provide pharmaceutical services to patients at Gifu Municipal Hospital, and also provide practical training for students in the GPU Pharmacy. Collectively, they have performed research on such topics as medication education for students, clinical communication education, and analysis of clinical big data. They have also conducted research in collaboration with clinical institutes, hospitals, and pharmacies. Here, we introduce the collaborative research between the Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy and Gifu Municipal Hospital. These studies include "Risk factors contributing to urinary protein expression resulting from bevacizumab combination chemotherapy", "Hyponatremia and hypokalemia as risk factors for falls", "Economic evaluation of adjustments of levofloxacin dosage by dispensing pharmacists for patients with renal dysfunction", and "Effect of patient education upon discharge for use of a medication notebook on purchasing over-the-counter drugs and health foods". In this symposium, we would like to demonstrate one model of the association and collaborative research between these clinical professors and clinical institutes.

  5. Characteristics of research tracks in dermatology residency programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narala, Saisindhu; Loh, Tiffany; Shinkai, Kanade; Paravar, Taraneh

    2017-12-15

    Pursuing research is encouraged in dermatology residency programs. Some programs offer specific research or investigative tracks. Currently, there is little data on the structure or scope of research tracks in dermatology residency programs. An anonymous online survey was distributed to the Association of Professors of Dermatology listserve in 2016. Program directors of dermatology residency programs in the United States were asked to participate and 38 of the 95 program directors responded. The survey results confirmed that a 2+2 research track, which is two years of clinical training followed by two years of research, was the most common investigator trackmodel and may promote an academic career at the resident's home institution. Further studies will help determine the most effective research track models to promote long-term outcomes.

  6. Professor dr hab. Maria Lisiewska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stasińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Maria Lisiewska. She earned master’s degree and Ph.D. in natural sciences from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. After earning her doctoral degree, she stayed at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań and conducted her thrilling research on mycology and taught until now. Prof. Maria Lisiewska is an author of many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  7. Work process of nursing professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Giordano, Denisse; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2017-12-04

    to analyze the work process of nursing professors. descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, developed with a focus on critical epidemiology, carried out at a School of Nursing in Chile. The research subjects consist of 17 nursing professors, with whom individual semi-structured interviews were carried out and nine participated in a focus group. The Ethics Committee approved this study. 88.2% were female, mean age of 42 years, 47% were married, 94% were Chilean, average length of service in the institution of 2.8 years, and 23.5% had a master's degree. Regarding the work process, the students were the work object, the tools used were the knowledge and the experience as a nurse, and the work environment was considered good. Regarding the form of work organization, 76% have a 44-hour workweek, the wage was considered inadequate and the workload was higher than foreseen in the contract. The dialectic of the nursing work process is evidenced, demonstrating the contradiction between the low wages and labor overload and the narratives reporting a good work environment, personal fulfillment and transcendence that goes far beyond work. the work process allows describing the work components of the nursing professors, which are consistent with the results of the literature and show the dialectic of the nursing work process.

  8. New perspectives on health professions students' e-learning: Looking through the lens of the "visitor and resident" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Maralyn; Howden, Stella

    2017-07-01

    The growth of e-learning in health professional education reflects expansion of personal use of online resources. Understanding the user perspective in a fast-changing digital world is essential to maintain the currency of our approach. Mixed methods were used to investigate a cohort of postgraduate, e-learning healthcare students' perspectives on their use of online resources for personal and/or professional roles, via questionnaire and student-constructed diagrams, capturing use of online resources (underpinned by White's model of "resident" and "visitor" online engagement). Semistructured interviews explored the use and value of resources afforded via the online environment. The 45 study participants described a range of prior experiences with online resources in personal and professional capacities, but overall students tended to use online "tools" ("visitor" mode) rather than highly collaborative networks ("resident" mode). In relation to e-learning, the dominant interview theme was valuing knowledge transfer from the tutor and using "visitor" behaviors to maximize knowledge acquisition. Peer-learning opportunities were less valued and barriers to collaborative "resident" modes were identified. These findings help to inform e-learning course design to promote engagement. The results enable recommendations for use of the "Visitor and Residents" model and for planning activities that learners might utilize effectively.

  9. A Multicomponent Library Resource Model to Enhance Academic Global Health Education Among Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rupa R; Ravichandran, Sandhiya; Doering, Michelle M; Hardi, Angela C

    2017-01-01

    Global health is becoming an increasingly important component of medical education. Medical libraries have an opportunity to assist global health residents with their information needs, but first it is important to identify what those needs are and how best they can be addressed. This article reports a collaboration between global health faculty and an academic medical librarian to assess the information needs of global health pathway residents and how assessment data are used to create a multicomponent program designed to enhance global health education.

  10. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  11. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant; Zhang, Yong; Starn, Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3− reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He),14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3− and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3− reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3− trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  12. Catchment virtual observatory for sharing flow and transport models outputs: using residence time distribution to compare contrasting catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Zahra; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; Kolbe, Tamara; Abbott, Ben; Marcais, Jean; Peiffer, Stefan; Frei, Sven; Bishop, Kevin; Le Henaff, Geneviève; Squividant, Hervé; Pichelin, Pascal; Pinay, Gilles; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2017-04-01

    The distribution of groundwater residence time in a catchment provides synoptic information about catchment functioning (e.g. nutrient retention and removal, hydrograph flashiness). In contrast with interpreted model results, which are often not directly comparable between studies, residence time distribution is a general output that could be used to compare catchment behaviors and test hypotheses about landscape controls on catchment functioning. In this goal, we created a virtual observatory platform called Catchment Virtual Observatory for Sharing Flow and Transport Model Outputs (COnSOrT). The main goal of COnSOrT is to collect outputs from calibrated groundwater models from a wide range of environments. By comparing a wide variety of catchments from different climatic, topographic and hydrogeological contexts, we expect to enhance understanding of catchment connectivity, resilience to anthropogenic disturbance, and overall functioning. The web-based observatory will also provide software tools to analyze model outputs. The observatory will enable modelers to test their models in a wide range of catchment environments to evaluate the generality of their findings and robustness of their post-processing methods. Researchers with calibrated numerical models can benefit from observatory by using the post-processing methods to implement a new approach to analyzing their data. Field scientists interested in contributing data could invite modelers associated with the observatory to test their models against observed catchment behavior. COnSOrT will allow meta-analyses with community contributions to generate new understanding and identify promising pathways forward to moving beyond single catchment ecohydrology. Keywords: Residence time distribution, Models outputs, Catchment hydrology, Inter-catchment comparison

  13. Residents and urban greenways:  Modeling support for the Atlanta BeltLine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan P. Palardy; B. Bynum Boley; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2018-01-01

    Urban greenways have received significant attention due to their many publicized benefits and costs that make them contentious recreational developments. Most prior studies have approached urban greenways from a demand-side perspective solely focused on their users. This study adds to the literature by taking a supply-side approach to assessing resident attitudes...

  14. Stand-By Fee Taxable in Residence State under Art. 15 of the OECD Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potgens, F.P.G.

    2008-01-01

    this article considers the decision of the Netherlands supreme Court of 22 December 2006, BNB 2007/97. The Netherlands supreme Court held that the employee's Residence State has the exclusive authority to tax a stand-by fee under Art. 15 of the Netherlands tax treaties that are based on the OECD

  15. Incorporating topography in a cellular automata model to simulate residents evacuation in a mountain area in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Mao; Meng, Bo

    2013-02-01

    In China, both the mountainous areas and the number of people who live in mountain areas occupy a significant proportion. When production accidents or natural disasters happen, the residents in mountain areas should be evacuated and the evacuation is of obvious importance to public safety. But it is a pity that there are few studies on safety evacuation in rough terrain. The particularity of the complex terrain in mountain areas, however, makes it difficult to study pedestrian evacuation. In this paper, a three-dimensional surface cellular automata model is proposed to numerically simulate the real time dynamic evacuation of residents. The model takes into account topographic characteristics (the slope gradient) of the environment and the biomechanics characteristics (weight and leg extensor power) of the residents to calculate the walking speed. This paper only focuses on the influence of topography and the physiological parameters are defined as constants according to a statistical report. Velocity varies with the topography. In order to simulate the behavior of a crowd with varying movement velocities, and a numerical algorithm is used to determine the time step of iteration. By doing so, a numerical simulation can be conducted in a 3D surface CA model. Moreover, considering residents evacuation around a gas well in a mountain area as a case, a visualization system for a three-dimensional simulation of pedestrian evacuation is developed. In the simulation process, population behaviors of congestion, queuing and collision avoidance can be observed. The simulation results are explained reasonably. Therefore, the model presented in this paper can realize a 3D dynamic simulation of pedestrian evacuation vividly in complex terrain and predict the evacuation procedure and evacuation time required, which can supply some valuable information for emergency management.

  16. Entrevista com professor Bertrand Badie

    OpenAIRE

    Mere Marques Aveiro, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Bertrand Badie é cientista político, professor na Sciences Po, Paris, pesquisador do CERI (Centro de Estudos e Pesquisas Internacionais), codiretor da coleção L’etat du monde, publicada anualmente desde 2010 e coeditor da Enciclopédia Internacional de Ciência Política. Entre 2002 e 2005, foi Diretor do Centro de Estudos Internacionais sobre a paz e resoluções de conflitos. Por dez anos (1994 –2003), foi Diretor das publicações da Sciences Po.Desde 2000, ministra o Curso Espaço Mundial que, a ...

  17. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U.

    1999-05-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the final disposal of radioactive waste into the bedrock. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on chemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions which control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto has been created and the significance of chemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flowpaths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (63 altogether) obtained from precipitation, Baltic Sea, soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and eight deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and fracture calcite and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Olkiluoto to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used in the evaluation of evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution and mixing of palaeo water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Olkiluoto reveals the complex nature of hydrogeochemical evolution at the site. Changes in

  18. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Kivetty site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the final disposal of radioactive waste into the bedrock. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on chemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions which control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the bedrock at Kivetty has been created and the significance of chemical reactions along different flowpaths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on groundwater samples (38 altogether) obtained from the soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and five deep multi-packered boreholes (KRI-KR5) in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Kivetty to a depth of 850m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used in the evaluation of evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution and C-14 age calculations of groundwater was given a mass-balance approach (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The hydrogeochemistry of Kivetty is characterised by evolution from low-saline-carbonate-rich recharge water towards Na-Ca-Cl-type water. The salinity remains low. The most important changes in the chemistry of the

  19. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Olkiluoto site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the final disposal of radioactive waste into the bedrock. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on chemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions which control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto has been created and the significance of chemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flowpaths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (63 altogether) obtained from precipitation, Baltic Sea, soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and eight deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and fracture calcite and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Olkiluoto to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used in the evaluation of evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution and mixing of palaeo water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Olkiluoto reveals the complex nature of hydrogeochemical evolution at the site. Changes in

  20. Postcards from a Road Trip to Innovation: One Professor's Sabbatical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Precious moments in life for an educator are taking time to reflect upon his or her teaching practices to evaluate effectiveness and overall impact. Often this reflection is a weekly if not a daily process for educators using a reflective practitioner model (SchÖn, 1983). For professors, many universities have opportunities for tenured faculty to…

  1. Theater in professor Charcot's galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Jacques; Philippon, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot, famous professor of the Chair of Clinic for Diseases of the Nervous System at Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, was himself an artist, surrounded by artists, and adored the theater. His close colleague Charles Brown-Séquard was ridiculed by Georges Feydeau in a brief freakish monologue recited by Coquelin Cadet, from the Comédie-Française, concerning his claims to rejuvenate himself and others with animal testicle extracts. His friend and patient Alphonse Daudet had written many novels, short stories, and plays. Léon Daudet, Alphonse Daudet's son (and friend of Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the son of the professor), after having abandoned his medical studies, became a writer whose novel Les morticoles was a cruel satire of the medical profession. Among Charcot's pupils, Alfred Binet, Gilbert Ballet, Édouard Brissaud, and Joseph Babinski were particularly involved in the theater. Gilbert Ballet wrote the foreword to La folie au théâtre (Madness in Theatre) by André de Latour. Édouard Brissaud wrote a satiric play Le chèque (The Check), and Joseph Babinski, under the pseudonym of Olaf, was the coauthor with Palau of the drama Les détraquées (The Deranged Women). However, when all is said and done, perhaps the greatest actor in his entourage was Charcot himself. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  3. Radiology in Lithuania: impressions of a visiting professor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucas, J

    1995-07-01

    In the fall of 1993, I had the privilege of spending 3 months as a Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) International Visiting Professor at the Kaunas Medical Academy in Lithuania. This visiting professor program was started in 1986 and is funded by the RSNA Research and Education Fund [1]. It is designed for a visiting professor who can spend 3 months or longer at a radiology residency training program in an evolving country. Lithuania, with a population of about 4 million, is located on the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea, just north of Poland. The land area is approximately equal to that of Switzerland. An independent country until World War II, when it was forcibly occupied and integrated into the Soviet Union, it regained independence in 1990. As a result of 50 years of communist rule, two generations grew up having little knowledge about Western medicine in general and radiology in particular. A communist legacy is still evident not only in education but also in the thought process of the people, although there is a clear desire to integrate into western Europe. Currently Western and Asian consumer goods are readily available, but the country has undergone steep inflation and it is the perception of many that the standard of living continues to decline.

  4. Nursing scholarship and the asymmetrical professor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Gary

    2007-05-01

    A recent editorial by David Thompson and Roger Watson prompted the question 'Nursing professors: what do they profess?', with the stated intention of stimulating thought about the role of professors and their scholarly endeavours. This paper has been written in response to their challenge, and outlines a scholarly role for the professor of nursing which is very different from Thompson and Watson's 'pipe dream' of the university without students. In particular, I argue for a fully-rounded 'symmetrical professor' whose role is not predominantly to conduct research, but rather to 'profess the profession'.

  5. Improvement of resident perceptions of nurse practitioners after the introduction of a collaborative care model: a benefit of work hour reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Lisa M; Shea, Judy A

    2006-01-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are assuming larger roles in many residency programs as a result of work hour reform, which is creating the potential for collaboration with interns and residents. To assess housestaff perceptions of NPs. We used a 17-item survey before and after the implementation of a collaborative care model in a university-based medicine residency. The majority of residents held favorable attitudes about NPs before the introduction of the collaborative care model. After 1 year, more interns and residents appreciated NPs' clinical judgment (effect size [ES] = .26, p =.02), thought they should be able to order laboratory tests (ES = .23, p = .05) and perform basic procedures (ES = .67, p collaborative care can be an unintended consequence of work hour reform. Educators are encouraged to think about how changes in the curriculum structure can provide opportunities for positive collaborative care experiences.

  6. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  7. Exploring residents' communication learning process in the workplace: a five-phase model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie van den Eertwegh

    Full Text Available Competency-based education is a resurgent paradigm in professional medical education. However, more specific knowledge is needed about the learning process of such competencies, since they consist of complex skills. We chose to focus on the competency of skilled communication and want to further explore its learning process, since it is regarded as a main competency in medical education.This study aims to explore in more detail the learning process that residents in general practice go through during workplace-based learning in order to become skilled communicators.A qualitative study was conducted in which twelve GP residents were observed during their regular consultations, and were interviewed in-depth afterwards.Analysis of the data resulted in the construction of five phases and two overall conditions to describe the development towards becoming a skilled communicator: Confrontation with (undesired behaviour or clinical outcomes was the first phase. Becoming conscious of one's own behaviour and changing the underlying frame of reference formed the second phase. The third phase consisted of the search for alternative behaviour. In the fourth phase, personalization of the alternative behaviour had to occur, this was perceived as difficult and required much time. Finally, the fifth phase concerned full internalization of the new behaviour, which by then had become an integrated part of the residents' clinical repertoire. Safety and cognitive & emotional space were labelled as overall conditions influencing this learning process.Knowledge and awareness of these five phases can be used to adjust medical working and learning environments in such a way that development of skilled medical communication can come to full fruition and its benefits are more fully reaped.

  8. Exploring residents' communication learning process in the workplace: a five-phase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eertwegh, Valerie; van der Vleuten, Cees; Stalmeijer, Renée; van Dalen, Jan; Scherpbier, Albert; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education is a resurgent paradigm in professional medical education. However, more specific knowledge is needed about the learning process of such competencies, since they consist of complex skills. We chose to focus on the competency of skilled communication and want to further explore its learning process, since it is regarded as a main competency in medical education. This study aims to explore in more detail the learning process that residents in general practice go through during workplace-based learning in order to become skilled communicators. A qualitative study was conducted in which twelve GP residents were observed during their regular consultations, and were interviewed in-depth afterwards. Analysis of the data resulted in the construction of five phases and two overall conditions to describe the development towards becoming a skilled communicator: Confrontation with (un)desired behaviour or clinical outcomes was the first phase. Becoming conscious of one's own behaviour and changing the underlying frame of reference formed the second phase. The third phase consisted of the search for alternative behaviour. In the fourth phase, personalization of the alternative behaviour had to occur, this was perceived as difficult and required much time. Finally, the fifth phase concerned full internalization of the new behaviour, which by then had become an integrated part of the residents' clinical repertoire. Safety and cognitive & emotional space were labelled as overall conditions influencing this learning process. Knowledge and awareness of these five phases can be used to adjust medical working and learning environments in such a way that development of skilled medical communication can come to full fruition and its benefits are more fully reaped.

  9. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  10. The Education Professorate: Teaching an "Artificial" Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, James W.

    This paper argues that conceiving the education professor's role in higher education as that of teaching an "artificial" science is a helpful metaphor for re-contextualizing this mission. How the use of the metaphor of an artificial science bears on the role of the education professorate is examined by applying the purposive-inner…

  11. The Professors behind the MOOC Hype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolowich, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom. The survey, conducted by "The…

  12. A nonresident cardiovascular inpatient service improves residents' experiences in an academic medical center: a new model to meet the challenges of the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rick A; Linderbaum, Jane A; Naessens, James M; Spurrier, Barbara; Koch, Mark B; Gaines, Kim A

    2004-05-01

    Hospital practices in academic medical centers have fewer medical residents available to provide hospital care, necessitating alternative models for patient care. This article reports a new model for care of inpatients with cardiovascular diseases. In 1998, a new nonresident cardiovascular patient care (Cardiology IV) service was implemented that used a team approach of staff attending cardiologists, cardiovascular fellows, midlevel practitioners (nurse practitioners and physician's assistants), and nurses to evaluate and treat patients. Standard dismissal information was collected for all patients dismissed in 1998 to compare diagnosis-related group, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day readmission rates for Cardiology IV. These characteristics were compared with those for the remaining resident teaching services. Patients' satisfaction surveys from 1997 and 1998 were compared. Attending physicians' and internal medicine residents' satisfaction before and after the implementation of the new service was also compared. Staff and resident physicians were more satisfied with their hospital rotations after this intervention was introduced. Optimal patient care was maintained, and efficiency enhanced. Patients on Cardiology IV had a shorter length of stay compared with patients on the resident teaching service. This new hospital model has provided an alternative to patient care without the need for residents and protects education on the conventional teaching services. This model maintains optimal patient care and has resulted in enhanced satisfaction of attending staff and residents.

  13. Training surgical residents for a career in academic global surgery: a novel training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, JaBaris D; Matousek, Alexi C; Scott, John W; Cooper, Zara; Smink, Douglas S; Bolman, Ralph Morton; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Zinner, Michael J; Riviello, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Academic global surgery is a nascent field focused on improving surgical care in resource-poor settings through a broad-based scholarship agenda. Although there is increasing momentum to expand training opportunities in low-resource settings among academic surgical programs, most focus solely on establishing short-term elective rotations rather than fostering research or career development. Given the complex nature of surgical care delivery and programmatic capacity building in the resource-poor settings, many challenges remain before global surgery is accepted as an academic discipline and an established career path. Brigham and Women's Hospital has established a specialized global surgery track within the general surgery residency program to develop academic leaders in this growing area of need and opportunity. Here we describe our experience with the design and development of the program followed by practical applications and lessons learned from our early experiences. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MODELLING THE EFFECTS OF THE FISCALITY OF REVENUES OBTAINED BY NON-RESIDENTS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacian Sorin Dudaş

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The empirical analysis we performed demonstrated that concluding any convention withthird-party states for avoiding double taxation puts Romania at advantage, as the fiscalmultiplier is confirmed, at the present stage of economic development of the country, theeffects generated by signing conventions for eliminating double taxation with third-partystates, are superior to those by which the internal gross product liberates fiscal revenues.The advantages that maximise fiscal incomes on the basis of conventions for eliminatingdouble taxation are determined by the high number of people Romania has in third-partystates, as non-residents, a fact that enables Romania to obtain a large part of the taxablematter, and also by the type of method used for alleviating the effects of double taxation.

  15. Memorial to Professor Antonio Barone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Pepe, Giampiero; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-04-01

    Antonio Barone prematurely passed away on 4 December 2011 at the age of 72, after a one-year battle with cancer. He left behind his wife Sveva and his two sons, Alberto and Livio. Antonio was Professor Emeritus at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he had been teaching for about 40 years. The initial research activity of Antonio was in the field of nuclear physics. In this context, almost 45 years ago, the Ge 'Lithium drift' semiconductor detectors represented a novelty, due to the high energy resolution enabled by those devices. Superconductors stimulated new approaches to radiation detection and this motivated Antonio's interest towards superconductivity. Following the birth of the Laboratorio di Cibernetica of the CNR in 1967 he was given the opportunity to work on a joint USA-Italy project (University of Wisconsin, Madison and CNR Naples) in the field of superconductivity on the peculiar subject of the superconductive 'Neuristors'. His research activity on Josephson junctions opened up a wide variety of very stimulating subjects in which he was deeply involved, ranging from the soliton propagation in 'long' Josephson structures to fluctuations phenomena, from light-sensitive junctions and proximity effect to the development of innovative superconducting devices. The strong interaction of Antonio with the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, characterizes a long period of his research activity with a precious merging of theoretical and experimental aspects. This body of work converged into the famous monograph on the 'Physics and Applications of the Josephson Effect', written in collaboration with Gianfranco Paternò in 1982. This rapidly became the reference text for the Josephson effect, as documented by thousands of citations and the fact that it was translated into Russian, Japanese and Chinese. In 1983 Antonio was awarded the highest academic title of 'Doctor of the Physical-Mathematical Sciences' by the

  16. Modeling sediment transport processes and residence times in the shallow coastal bay complex of the Virginia Coast Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, I.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Patterns of sediment transport and particle residence times influence the morphology and ecology of shallow coastal bays in important ways. The Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR), a barrier island-lagoon-marsh system on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, is typical of many shallow coastal bay complexes that lack a significant fluvial source of freshwater and sediment. Sediment redistribution within the bays in response to storms and sea-level rise, together with the dynamics of marsh and lagoon-bottom plants, largely governs the morphological evolution of this system. There are also important feedbacks between sediment and ecosystem dynamics. This is particularly true in the VCR, which is relatively unaffected by human activities. As a step towards evaluating the impact of hydrodynamics on sediment and ecological processes in the VCR, a single unified model that accounts for circulation, surface waves, wave-current interaction, and sediment processes is employed. This three-dimensional unstructured grid finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) is validated with field observations of wind- and tide-induced water flow (water level and current velocities) in Hog Island Bay, centrally located within the VCR. Here, the resulting patterns of sediment transport and particle residence times over event and seasonal time scales are presented. Water and particle exchange within the VCR and between the VCR and the ocean is examined with the Lagrangian particle-tracking module in FVCOM. We focus on three bays with strongly varying bathymetry and coastline geometry, which are also located along a gradient of nitrogen input to the system. The results indicate that residence time of particles within the system vary greatly depending on the location of particle release, bay morphology, and wind conditions. The implications for morphologic evolution and ecosystem response to climate and land-use changes are evaluated.

  17. PROFESSORES: IMAGENS DO FUTURO PRESENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitê Alves Bezerra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ao observar a comunidade portuguesa que busca compreender a historicidade das formas e dos processos de escolarização por meio do estabelecimento de intenso diálogo com outras comunidades, é impossível não dar destaque à figura de António Manuel Seixas Nóvoa. Nascido em Lisboa no ano de 1954, aos 18 anos inicia o curso de Ciências da Educação na Universidade de Lisboa. Após lecionar em importantes universidades tais como Paris V, Oxford e Columbia University, atualmente acumula as posições de reitor da Universidade de Lisboa e professor catedrático da Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da Educação na Instituição. Nóvoa tem se destacado à frente de debates internacionais a respeito da história da educação e educação comparada.

  18. Volume celebrating the 60th birthday of Professor Dr. Franz Fie; Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler zum 60. Geburtstag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheng, K.D. [ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report was compiled in honor of Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler on the occasion of his 60th birthday on 7 January 1998. Its contributions deal with mesoscale modelling, the propagation of air pollutants, measurements of precipitation using radar, and prediction models. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht wurde aus Anlass des 60. Geburtstags von Herrn Prof. Dr. Franz Fiedler am 7. Januar 1998 zusammengestellt. Die Beitraege behandeln mesoskalige Modellierung, Ausbreitung von Luftschadstoffen, Niederschlagsmessung mit Radar und Vorhersagemodelle. (orig.)

  19. Cost-effectiveness of investing in sidewalks as a means of increasing physical activity: a RESIDE modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerman, J Lennert; Zapata-Diomedi, Belen; Gunn, Lucy; McCormack, Gavin R; Cobiac, Linda J; Mantilla Herrera, Ana Maria; Giles-Corti, Billie; Shiell, Alan

    2016-09-20

    Studies consistently find that supportive neighbourhood built environments increase physical activity by encouraging walking and cycling. However, evidence on the cost-effectiveness of investing in built environment interventions as a means of promoting physical activity is lacking. In this study, we assess the cost-effectiveness of increasing sidewalk availability as one means of encouraging walking. Using data from the RESIDE study in Perth, Australia, we modelled the cost impact and change in health-adjusted life years (HALYs) of installing additional sidewalks in established neighbourhoods. Estimates of the relationship between sidewalk availability and walking were taken from a previous study. Multistate life table models were used to estimate HALYs associated with changes in walking frequency and duration. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the impact of variations in population density, discount rates, sidewalk costs and the inclusion of unrelated healthcare costs in added life years. Installing and maintaining an additional 10 km of sidewalk in an average neighbourhood with 19 000 adult residents was estimated to cost A$4.2 million over 30 years and gain 24 HALYs over the lifetime of an average neighbourhood adult resident population. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was A$176 000/HALY. However, sensitivity results indicated that increasing population densities improves cost-effectiveness. In low-density cities such as in Australia, installing sidewalks in established neighbourhoods as a single intervention is unlikely to cost-effectively improve health. Sidewalks must be considered alongside other complementary elements of walkability, such as density, land use mix and street connectivity. Population density is particularly important because at higher densities, more residents are exposed and this improves the cost-effectiveness. Health gain is one of many benefits of enhancing neighbourhood walkability and future studies might

  20. Effectiveness of a Drill-assisted Intraosseous Catheter versus Manual Intraosseous Catheter by Resident Physicians in a Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John William

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our objective was to compare the effectiveness, speed, and complication rate of the traditional manually placed intraosseous (IO catheter to a mechanical drill-assisted IO catheter by emergency medicine (EM resident physicians in a training environment. Methods: Twenty-one EM residents participated in a randomized prospective crossover experiment placing 2 intraosseous needles (Cook® Intraosseous Needle, Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN; and EZ-IO® Infusion System, Vidacare, San Antonio, TX. IO needles were placed in anesthetized mixed breed swine (mass range: 25 kg to 27.2 kg. The order of IO placement and puncture location (proximal tibia or distal femur were randomly assigned. IO placement time was recorded from skin puncture until the operator felt they had achieved successful placement. We used 3 verification criteria: aspiration of marrow blood, easy infusion of 10 mL saline mixed with methylene blue, and lack of stained soft tissue extravasation. Successful placement was defined as meeting 2 out of the 3 predetermined criteria. We surveyed participants regarding previous IO experience, device preferences, and comfort levels using multiple choice, Likert scale, and visual analog scale (VAS questions. IO completion times, VAS, and mean Likert scales were compared using Student’s t-test and success rates were compared using Fisher’s exact test with p<0.05 considered significant.Results: Drill-assisted IO needle placement was faster than manually placed IO needle placement (3.66 vs. 33.57 seconds; p=0.01. Success rates were 100% with the drill-assisted IO needle and 76.2% with the manual IO needle (p=0.04. The most common complication of the manual IO insertion was a bent needle (33.3% of attempts. Participants surveyed preferred the drill-assisted IO insertion more than the manual IO insertion (p<0.0001 and felt the drill-assisted IO was easier to place (p<0.0001.Conclusion: In an experimental swine model, drill-assisted IO

  1. The university professor: integration between the personal and professional dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier BERMÚDEZ-APONTE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this article, the authors explain how the teaching role is affected by certain social and cultural changes, like the knowledge society emergence, the universities orientation towards marketing, the constant demand and pressure exerted on teachers to publish, the loss of the ethical sense in the academic activity and the disparity of tasks that are being assigned to the university professors. In view of the above, a comprehensive model, compound by two concepts –personal and professional– of a university professor is proposed; in fact, this model incorporates and summarises different contributions regarding this theme. Finally, this article aims to defend the need to understand the teaching role as a vocation, in the broadest sense of the word, a vocation carries the inclination to pursue an aim: the education of those students that teachers have in charge.

  2. Turning university professors into competent learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanova, Eliza; Ilieva, Miroslava; Nikolova, Nikolina; Stefanov, Krassen

    2008-01-01

    Stefanova, E., Ilieva, M., Nikolova, N, & Stefanov, K. (2008). Turning university professors into competent learners. In H. W. Sligte & R. Koper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th TENCompetence Open Workshop. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: pedagogical, organisational and

  3. NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS H. Johnson Nenty, Professor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    , Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. He is a Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Society and member of the International Society for Third Sector. Research (ISTR). Daniel Eseme Gberevbie, Associate Professor, Department of Political ...

  4. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  5. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  6. Professor dr hab. Anna Maria Bujakiewicz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kujawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Anna Bujakiewicz. After receiving her master’s degree and doctorate in biology and mycology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Professor Bujakiewicz continued her exciting research and teaching on mycology at her Alma Mater Posnaniensis for more than 50 years. Her publications in this field include many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  7. Comparison of groundwater residence time using isotope techniques and numerical groundwater flow model in Gneissic Terrain, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, D.S.; Kim, C.S.; Koh, Y.K.; Kim, K.S.; Song, M.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The prediction of groundwater flow affecting the migration of radionuclides is an important component of the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. Groundwater flow in fractured rock mass is controlled by fracture networks, transmissivity and hydraulic gradient. Furthermore the scale-dependent and anisotropic properties of hydraulic parameters are resulted mainly from irregular patterns of fracture system, which are very complex to evaluate properly with the current techniques available. For the purpose of characterizing a groundwater flow in fractured rock mass, the discrete fracture network (DFN) concept is available on the basis of assumptions of groundwater flowing only along fractures and flowpaths in rock mass formed by interconnected fractures. To increase the reliability of assessment in groundwater flow phenomena, numerical groundwater flow model and isotopic techniques were applied. Fracture mapping, borehole acoustic scanning were performed to identify conductive fractures in gneissic terrane. Tracer techniques, using deuterium, oxygen-18 and tritium were applied to evaluate the recharge area and groundwater residence time

  8. Comparison of the didactic lecture with the simulation/model approach for the teaching of a novel perioperative ultrasound curriculum to anesthesiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Alexander, Brenton; Le, Khanhvan; Williams, Wendell; Canales, Cecilia; Cannesson, Maxime

    2014-09-01

    To expose residents to two methods of education for point-of-care ultrasound, a traditional didactic lecture and a model/simulation-based lecture, which focus on concepts of cardiopulmonary function, volume status, and evaluation of severe thoracic/abdominal injuries; and to assess which method is more effective. Single-center, prospective, blinded trial. University hospital. Anesthesiology residents who were assigned to an educational day during the two-month research study period. Residents were allocated to two groups to receive either a 90-minute, one-on-one didactic lecture or a 90-minute lecture in a simulation center, during which they practiced on a human model and simulation mannequin (normal pathology). Data points included a pre-lecture multiple-choice test, post-lecture multiple-choice test, and post-lecture, human model-based examination. Post-lecture tests were performed within three weeks of the lecture. An experienced sonographer who was blinded to the education modality graded the model-based skill assessment examinations. Participants completed a follow-up survey to assess the perceptions of the quality of their instruction between the two groups. 20 residents completed the study. No differences were noted between the two groups in pre-lecture test scores (P = 0.97), but significantly higher scores for the model/simulation group occurred on both the post-lecture multiple choice (P = 0.038) and post-lecture model (P = 0.041) examinations. Follow-up resident surveys showed significantly higher scores in the model/simulation group regarding overall interest in perioperative ultrasound (P = 0.047) as well understanding of the physiologic concepts (P = 0.021). A model/simulation-based based lecture series may be more effective in teaching the skills needed to perform a point-of-care ultrasound examination to anesthesiology residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Professor Peter Higgs: "My Life as a Boson"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Professor Peter Higgs played a key role in the development of the Standard Model, our current theory of fundamental physics. The search for the Higgs Boson is the centrepiece of the LHC programme at CERN, and the existence of this famously elusive particle is likely to be confirmed or refuted with data currently being collected, using apparatus partly designed at Bristol. Professor Higgs will introduce the ideas of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and discuss how these developed from their application in condensed matter through the earlier work of Yoichiro Nambu and Jeffrey Goldstone, to the work of Robert Brout, Francois Englert and himself in 1964. The subsequent application of these ideas to electroweak theory will be discussed briefly.

  11. Food Web Bioaccumulation Model for Resident Killer Whales from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean as a Tool for the Derivation of PBDE-Sediment Quality Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alava, Juan José; Ross, Peter S; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2016-01-01

    Resident killer whale populations in the NE Pacific Ocean are at risk due to the accumulation of pollutants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To assess the impact of PBDEs in water and sediments in killer whale critical habitat, we developed a food web bioaccumulation model. The model was designed to estimate PBDE concentrations in killer whales based on PBDE concentrations in sediments and the water column throughout a lifetime of exposure. Calculated and observed PBDE concentrations exceeded the only toxicity reference value available for PBDEs in marine mammals (1500 μg/kg lipid) in southern resident killer whales but not in northern resident killer whales. Temporal trends (1993-2006) for PBDEs observed in southern resident killer whales showed a doubling time of ≈5 years. If current sediment quality guidelines available in Canada for polychlorinated biphenyls are applied to PBDEs, it can be expected that PBDE concentrations in killer whales will exceed available toxicity reference values by a large margin. Model calculations suggest that a PBDE concentration in sediments of approximately 1.0 μg/kg dw produces PBDE concentrations in resident killer whales that are below the current toxicity reference value for 95 % of the population, with this value serving as a precautionary benchmark for a management-based approach to reducing PBDE health risks to killer whales. The food web bioaccumulation model may be a useful risk management tool in support of regulatory protection for killer whales.

  12. Model Legislation on Student Residency. An Act Providing for Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes at Public Institutions of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    On January 26, 1971 the Chairman of the Education Commission of the States issued a statement of principles and possible model legislation for the various states in the highly complex area of determination of student residency for tuition purposes at public institutions of higher education. The original model legislation was related to the…

  13. Accounting Professor Qualification in Digital Age: A Perception Study on Brazilian Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendruscolo, Maria Ivanice; Behar, Patrícia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    This papers aims at analyzing the perception of Accounting professors about the necessary qualifications in Accounting undergraduate courses. The contribution of this study is to theoretically discuss the education of Accounting professors, with empirical data, because Accounting teaching requires specific competencies in the digital area. The…

  14. Perceptions of Unprofessional Attitudes and Behaviors: Implications for Faculty Role Modeling and Teaching Professionalism During Pathology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissette, Mark D; Johnson, Kristen A; Raciti, Patricia M; McCloskey, Cindy B; Gratzinger, Dita A; Conran, Richard Michael; Domen, Ronald E; Hoffman, Robert D; Post, Miriam D; Roberts, Cory Anthony; Rojiani, Amyn M; Powell, Suzanne Zein-Eldin

    2017-10-01

    - Changes occurring in medicine have raised issues about medical professionalism. Professionalism is included in the Core Competencies and Milestones for all pathology residents. Previous studies have looked at resident professionalism attitudes and behaviors in primary care but none have looked specifically at pathology. - To examine behavior and attitudes toward professionalism within pathology and to determine how professionalism is taught in residency programs. - Surveys were sent to all College of American Pathologists junior members and all pathology residency program directors, and responses were compared. - Although no single behavior received the same professionalism rating among residents and program directors, both groups identified the same behaviors as being the most unprofessional: posting identifiable patient information or case images to social media, making a disparaging comment about a physician colleague or member of the support staff on social media or in a public hospital space, and missing work without reporting the time off. Faculty were observed displaying most of these behaviors as often or more often than residents by both groups. The most common means to teach professionalism in pathology residencies is providing feedback as situations arise and teaching by example. Age differences were found within each group and between groups for observed behaviors and attitudes. - As teaching by example was identified as a common educational method, faculty must be aware of the role their behavior and attitudes have in shaping resident behavior and attitudes. These results suggest a need for additional resources to teach professionalism during pathology residency.

  15. Quantifying the residence time and flushing characteristics of a shallow, back-barrier estuary: Application of hydrodynamic and particle tracking models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Estuarine residence time is a major driver of eutrophication and water quality. Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor (BB-LEH), New Jersey, is a lagoonal back-barrier estuary that is subject to anthropogenic pressures including nutrient loading, eutrophication, and subsequent declines in water quality. A combination of hydrodynamic and particle tracking modeling was used to identify the mechanisms controlling flushing, residence time, and spatial variability of particle retention. The models demonstrated a pronounced northward subtidal flow from Little Egg Inlet in the south to Pt. Pleasant Canal in the north due to frictional effects in the inlets, leading to better flushing of the southern half of the estuary and particle retention in the northern estuary. Mean residence time for BB-LEH was 13 days but spatial variability was between ∼0 and 30 days depending on the initial particle location. Mean residence time with tidal forcing alone was 24 days (spatial variability between ∼0 and 50 days); the tides were relatively inefficient in flushing the northern end of the Bay. Scenarios with successive exclusion of physical processes from the models revealed that meteorological and remote offshore forcing were stronger drivers of exchange than riverine inflow. Investigations of water quality and eutrophication should take into account spatial variability in hydrodynamics and residence time in order to better quantify the roles of nutrient loading, production, and flushing.

  16. The housekeeper and the professor a novel

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    He is a brilliant math Professor with a peculiar problem—ever since a traumatic head injury, he has lived with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. She is an astute young Housekeeper—with a ten-year-old son—who is hired to care for the Professor. And every morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are introduced to each other anew, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms between them. Though he cannot hold memories for long (his brain is like a tape that begins to erase itself every eighty minutes), the Professor's mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. And the numbers, in all of their articulate order, reveal a sheltering and poetic world to both the Housekeeper and her young son. The Professor is capable of discovering connections between the simplest of quantities—like the Housekeeper's shoe size—and the universe at large, drawing their lives ever closer and more profoundly together, even as his memory slips away. Yoko Ogawa's The Housekeeper and the Professo...

  17. Residency Training in Emergency Psychiatry: A Model Curriculum Developed by the Education Committee of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasch, Jennifer; Glick, Rachel Lipson; Cobb, Thomas G.; Richmond, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Describe training goals, objectives and requirements in emergency psychiatry to assist residency programs in developing comprehensive training programs to ensure psychiatric residents acquire the necessary skills and knowledge to competently assess and manage patients with psychiatric emergencies. Methods: The American Association for…

  18. A "Resident-as-Teacher" Curriculum Using a Flipped Classroom Approach: Can a Model Designed for Efficiency Also Be Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Binny D; Schumacher, Heidi K; Reese, Kristen; Bhansali, Priti; Kern, Jeremy R; Simmens, Samuel J; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie W

    2017-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires training that enhances resident teaching skills. Despite this requirement, many residency training programs struggle to implement effective resident-as-teacher (RAT) curricula, particularly within the context of the 80-hour resident workweek. In 2013, the authors developed and evaluated an intensive one-day RAT curriculum using a flipped classroom approach. Twenty-nine second-year residents participated in daylong RAT sessions. The curriculum included four 1-hour workshops focusing on adult learning principles, giving feedback, teaching a skill, and orienting a learner. Each workshop, preceded by independent reading, featured peer co-teaching, application, and feedback. The authors evaluated the curriculum using pre- and postworkshop objective structured teaching examinations (OSTEs) and attitudinal and self-efficacy teaching questionnaires. Residents demonstrated statistically significant improvements in performance between pre- and postworkshop OSTEs on each of three core skills: giving feedback (P = .005), orienting a learner (P flipped classroom approach is an efficient and effective method for training residents to improve teaching skills, especially in an era of work hour restrictions. They have committed to the continuation of this curriculum and are planning to include assessment of its long-term effects on resident behavior change and educational outcomes.

  19. [The Homburger Curriculum as a model for medical resident education for ophthalmologists at Saarland University Medical Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebels, S; Viestenz, A; Seitz, B

    2017-10-01

    The Homburger Curriculum was introduced in 2012 to enhance the medical resident education and professional satisfaction. At the same time different steps were taken to encourage applications of eligible candidates. To address candidates, the Homburger Curriculum is presented on the department's website and a short-term hospitation was introduced. The curriculum has been divided into time slots of 4 months throughout the 5 years of residency. In addition, a booklet of documented evidence of the rotations and a Resident's Compendium were introduced. Internal and external teaching programs, additional research projects and involvement of the residents in the organization of their curriculum were introduced. The paper describes the rationale behind the new structure of the curriculum and its practical outcomes for the department (e. g. a regular standby resident to fill in unexpected gaps). It is discussed in detail which steps were easy to implement and which steps were more difficult to introduce. After consolidation of the numerous steps, the number of resigning residents dropped significantly and the number of applicants increased. The new rotation schedule guarantees every young resident to be able to work at each work area of the Department of Ophthalmology. External training courses can be planned suitable to his/her rotations. An "internal competition" for popular rotations is no longer necessary. Clear organization and transparency in all areas provide good interpersonal climate in which much work still has to be done, but by motivated and satisfied residents.

  20. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Haestholmen site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino- Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the geological final disposal of radioactive waste. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on the geochemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions that control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors that control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Haestholmen has been created and the significance of geochemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flow paths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (64 altogether) obtained from precipitation, the Baltic Sea, the soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and 14 deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Haestholmen to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used to evaluate evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 34}S) and mixing of palaeo-water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Haestholmen suggest that changes in external conditions, such as glaciation

  1. Improvements in Modelling Bystander and Resident Exposure to Pesticide Spray Drift: Investigations into New Approaches for Characterizing the 'Collection Efficiency' of the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler Ellis, M Clare; Kennedy, Marc C; Kuster, Christian J; Alanis, Rafael; Tuck, Clive R

    2018-03-17

    The BREAM (Bystander and Resident Exposure Assessment Model) (Kennedy et al. in BREAM: A probabilistic bystander and resident exposure assessment model of spray drift from an agricultural boom sprayer. Comput Electron Agric 2012;88:63-71) for bystander and resident exposure to spray drift from boom sprayers has recently been incorporated into the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) guidance for determining non-dietary exposures of humans to plant protection products. The component of BREAM, which relates airborne spray concentrations to bystander and resident dermal exposure, has been reviewed to identify whether it is possible to improve this and its description of variability captured in the model. Two approaches have been explored: a more rigorous statistical analysis of the empirical data and a semi-mechanistic model based on established studies combined with new data obtained in a wind tunnel. A statistical comparison between field data and model outputs was used to determine which approach gave the better prediction of exposures. The semi-mechanistic approach gave the better prediction of experimental data and resulted in a reduction in the proposed regulatory values for the 75th and 95th percentiles of the exposure distribution.

  2. Professor Stewart's casebook of mathematical mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Like its wildly popular predecessors Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities and Hoard of Mathematical Treasures, Professor Stewart's brand-new book is a miscellany of over 150 mathematical curios and conundrums, packed with trademark humour and numerous illustrations. In addition to the fascinating formulae and thrilling theorems familiar to Professor Stewart's fans, the Casebook follows the adventures of the not-so-great detective Hemlock Soames and his sidekick Dr John Watsup (immortalised in the phrase 'Watsup, Doc?'). By a remarkable coincidence they live at 222B Baker Street, just a

  3. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  4. Consistency of priorities for quality improvement for nursing homes in Italy and Canada: A comparison of optimization models of resident satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, Sara; Walker, Kevin; Seghieri, Chiara; Rosa, Antonella; Wodchis, Walter P

    2017-08-01

    The paper seeks to identify aspects of care that may be easily modified to yield a desired level of improvement in residents' overall satisfaction with nursing homes, comparing data across Canada and Italy. Using a structured questionnaire, 681 and 1116 nursing home residents were surveyed in Ontario in 2009 and in Tuscany in 2012, respectively. Fourteen items were common to the surveys, including willingness to recommend (WTR), which was used as the dependent variable and measure of global satisfaction. The other analogous items were entered as covariates in ordinal logistic regression models predicting residents' WTR in each jurisdiction separately. Regression coefficients were then incorporated into a constrained nonlinear optimization problem selecting the most efficient combination of predictors necessary to increase WTR by as much as 15%. Staff-related aspects of care were selected first in the optimization models of each jurisdiction. In Ontario, to improve WTR the primary focus should be on staff relationships with residents, while in Tuscany it was the technical skill and knowledge of staff that was selected first by the optimization model. Different optimization solutions might mean that the strategies required to improve global satisfaction in one jurisdiction could be different than those for the other jurisdictions. The optimization model employed provides a novel solution for prioritizing areas of focus for quality improvement for nursing homes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Microscope-Integrated OCT on Ophthalmology Resident Performance of Anterior Segment Surgical Maneuvers in Model Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorich, Bozho; Shieh, Christine; DeSouza, Philip J; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Cunefare, David L; Stinnett, Sandra S; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina; Mruthyunjaya, Privthi; Kuo, Anthony N; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    The integration of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) into the operating microscope enables real-time, tissue-level three-dimensional (3D) imaging to aid in ophthalmic microsurgery. In this prospective randomized controlled study, we evaluated the impact of SS microscope-integrated OCT (MI-OCT) on ophthalmology residents' performance of ophthalmic microsurgical maneuvers. Fourteen ophthalmology residents from a single institution were stratified by year of training and randomized to perform four anterior segment surgical maneuvers on porcine eyes with (MI-OCT+) or without (MI-OCT-) direct intraoperative OCT guidance. Subsequently, both groups repeated the same maneuvers without MI-OCT feedback to test whether initial MI-OCT experience affected subsequent surgical performance. Finally, the MI-OCT- group was crossed over and allowed to repeat the same maneuvers with direct MI-OCT guidance. Each resident completed a survey at the completion of the study. With direct MI-OCT feedback, residents demonstrated enhanced performance in depth-based anterior segment maneuvers (corneal suture passes at 50% and 90% depth and corneal laceration repair) compared with the residents operating without MI-OCT. Microscope-integrated OCT+ residents continued to outperform the controls when both groups subsequently operated without MI-OCT. For clear corneal wound geometry, there was no statistically significant effect of MI-OCT as applied in this study. Overall, the resident surgeons rated their subjective experience of using MI-OCT very favorably. Microscope-integrated OCT feedback enhances performance of ophthalmology residents in select anterior segment surgical maneuvers. Microscope-integrated OCT represents a valuable tool in the surgical education of ophthalmology residents.

  6. Small Convenience Stores and the Local Food Environment: An Analysis of Resident Shopping Behavior Using Multilevel Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Ryan Richard; Akhund, Ali; Adjoian, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Local food environments can influence the diet and health of individuals through food availability, proximity to retail stores, pricing, and promotion. This study focused on how small convenience stores, known in New York City as bodegas, influence resident shopping behavior and the food environment. Using a cross-sectional design, 171 bodegas and 2118 shoppers were sampled. Small convenience stores in New York City. Any bodega shopper aged 18+ who purchased food or beverage from a participating store. Data collection consisted of a store assessment, a health and behavior survey given to exiting customers, and a bag check that recorded product information for all customer purchases. Descriptive statistics were generated for bodega store characteristics, shopper demographics, and purchase behavior. Multilevel models were used to assess the influence of product availability, placement, and advertising on consumer purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), water, and fruits and vegetables. Seventy-one percent of participants reported shopping at bodegas five or more times per week, and 35% reported purchasing all or most of their monthly food allotment at bodegas. Model results indicated that lower amounts of available fresh produce were significantly and independently associated with a higher likelihood of SSB purchases. A second, stratified multilevel model showed that the likelihood of purchasing an SSB increased with decreasing varieties of produce when produce was located at the front of the store. No significant effects were found for water placement and beverage advertising. Small convenience stores in New York City are an easily accessible source of foods and beverages. Bodegas may be suitable for interventions designed to improve food choice and diet.

  7. Student Attitudes toward Professors and Teaching Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, R. J.; Helsel, Diana G.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the results of a survey of several classes in a college of agriculture to determine whether students had different attitudes about being taught by professors vs. teaching assistants. Data indicated that professionalism and course content are the most important variables to students. (CW)

  8. Professor Jacques Cortes prantsuse keele lektoraadis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Juuni alguses külastas filoloogiateaduskonna romaani-germaani filoloogia osakonda Roueni ülikooli professor Jacques Cortes (Prantsusmaa). Ta korraldas 4. õa üliõpilastele prantsuse keele intensiivkursuse ja võttis vastu eksami ning kohtus prantsuse keele lektoraadi õppejõududega : [täistekst

  9. Professor Wind i Deadline om Spitzenkandidaten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    Professor og centerleder, Marlene Wind, var fredag den 23. februar 2018 i DR2 Deadline for at snakke om proceduren bag udvælgelsen af en ny formand for Europa Kommissionen. Professer Wind forklarede blandt andet, hvordan Europa Parlamentet, siden Lisabon Traktaten i 2009, har fortolket en del af...

  10. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  11. Veterinary medicine professor receives national honor

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    Marie-Suthers-McCabe, of Riner, Va., associate professor of small animal clinical sciences at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, has been awarded the highest honor in the nation for work in the area of the "human/animal bond."

  12. Understanding Asperger Syndrome: A Professor's Guide [DVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization for Autism Research (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    College can be a trying time in any individual's life. For adults with Asperger Syndrome this experience can be overwhelming. This title in the new DVD series Asperger Syndrome and Adulthood focuses on educating professors, teaching assistants, and others on what it means to be a college student on the spectrum and how they might best be able to…

  13. Russel Nye: The Professor in Public Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungiville, Maurice

    1995-01-01

    A discussion of the influence of Russel Nye, a college English professor at Michigan State University and journalist, focuses on the values that shaped his teaching, scholarship, and writing and his defense of democratic values, especially in education. It is concluded that Nye's experience suggests that public service can be a source of personal…

  14. Reflections of a Latino Associate Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2018-01-01

    The following reflection essay is about my experiences as a Latino Associate Professor who focuses on criminology, youth violence, juvenile justice, and the associated disparities with race, ethnicity, and immigration. I reflect about the "race and justice" job market, pursuing and establishing a Latina/o Criminology working group, often…

  15. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  16. Epistemology Shock: English Professors Confront Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Ian; Osborn, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This article raises questions and concerns regarding students from the sciences working with faculty in the humanities in interdisciplinary settings. It explores the experience of two English professors facing the privileging of "facts" and a science-based understanding of the world in their own classrooms. It poses both questions and…

  17. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book

  18. CFA or CFP: A Guide for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    The CFA Institute and the CFP Board of Standards provide professional certifications in the field of finance. In this paper, I provide my experience with the CFA and CFP programs in order to give other professors some insight into the process of attaining the designations. I hope to provide answers to some of the questions that other faculty…

  19. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  20. Residence and transport time scales associated with Shatt Al-Arab discharges under various hydrological conditions estimated using a numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosairi, Yousef; Pokavanich, Tanuspong

    2017-05-15

    Over the last several decades, concerns in the Northwest Arabian Gulf have risen regarding water quality and ecological conditions, particularly near Kuwait. This interest is mainly attributed to the reduction of freshwater discharge and its associated constituents from the Shatt Al Arab as a result of human activities at diverse scales. From the hydrological perspective, the reduction has also resulted in alteration to the dynamic regime and related residence time and transport conditions. Using a previously well-validated three-dimensional numerical model of the Northern Arabian Gulf (NAG) (Alosairi and Pokavanich, 2017), the residence and transport conditions of numerical tracers have been assessed through a series of numerical tests. The results indicate that density-driven circulations have played a key role in reducing the residence time in the Northwest Gulf by approximately 15% to 20% compared to tidal forces only. The transport conditions correlated well with the Shatt Al Arab discharges, but they were only significant along the Kuwait coast due to counter-clockwise circulations and alongshore currents. Arrival times and mixing processes varied reasonably with the Shatt Al Arab discharges; the results exhibited the enhancement in mixing and transport with increases in discharge. Residence times in the NAG associated with Shatt Al Arab discharge displayed spatial variations, particularly in Kuwait Bay, where the residence time increased by 60days during low discharge compared to high discharge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Elective time during dermatology residency: A survey of residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Pushpinder; Shantharam, Rohini; Kaufmann, Tara Lynn

    2017-12-15

    Elective time during residency training provides residents with exposure to different subspecialties. This opportunity gives residents the chance tonurture growth in particular areas of interest and broaden their knowledge base in certain topics in dermatology by having the chance to work withexperts in the field. The purpose of this study was to assess the views of residency program directors and dermatology residents on the value of elective time through a cross sectional survey. An eight-questionIRB exempt survey was sent out to 113 residency program directors via email through the American Professors of Dermatology (APD) program director listserv. Program directors were asked to forward a separate set of 9 questions to their residents. The majority of programs that responded allowed for some elective time within their schedule, often duringthe PGY 4 (3rd year of dermatology training), but the amount of time allowed widely varied among many residency programs. Overall, residents and program directors agree that elective is important in residencytraining, but no standardization is established across programs.

  2. Professores visitam as casas de seus alunos: uma experiência interpretada à luz da Pedagogia Social

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Bellinato

    2012-01-01

    Esta pesquisa tem como objetivo a releitura de uma prática educacional forjada no interior da Pedagogia Escolar à luz dos princípios da Pedagogia Social, visando descobrir aproximações entre os referenciais citados, com ênfase nas relações entre o professor e o educador social. A presente investigação está pautada na análise da experiência de professores da rede municipal de ensino de Taboão da Serra, Estado de São Paulo, os quais realizam visitas às residências de seus alunos cuja prática fa...

  3. Tuning Geneva+Pythia 8 Using Professor 2

    CERN Document Server

    Gellersen, Leif Erik

    2016-01-01

    We study the tuning of the Geneva Monte Carlo framework to LHC data. Geneva improves the predictions for Drell-Yan production by including NNLO QCD corrections and extending the resummation accuracy to NNLL$'$ for 0-jettiness and NLL for 1-jettiness. The partonic results provided by Geneva are interfaced to Pythia 8 for showering including its multiple parton interaction (MPI) model. This allows us to obtain sensible predictions for Underlying Event (UE) sensitive observables too. Retuning Geneva + Pythia 8 to LHC data with the Professor 2 package shows an improved agreement for both UE sensitive and more inclusive observables.

  4. Anti-Fat Bias by Professors Teaching Physical Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Fabio; Furtado, Ovande, Jr.; Mazzardo, Oldemar, Jr.; Hong, Deockki; de Campos, Wagner

    2017-01-01

    Anti-fat bias by professors in physical education departments may interfere with the training provided to pre-service teachers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of professors in physical education departments toward obese individuals. Professors from randomly selected institutions across all four US regions participated in…

  5. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  6. Welcome by Professor Roberto Bertolani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto BERTOLANI

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear All, I wish also extend the greetings and best wishes for a successful meeting from Lorena Rebecchi and Roberto Guidetti, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, co-organizers of the Symposium. I am very glad to meet you in Catania, some of you again, some others for the first time. Thank you to all participants. A particular welcome to Diane, the only person who shares with me participation to all ten Symposia. I hope that this meeting may be an important occasion for an exchange of information, ideas, suggestions and debates among researchers who use tardigrades as a model, but are also interested in general and stimulating problems of animal biology.

  7. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Ayora, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers (AR) is a standard technique to replenish and enhance groundwater resources, that have widely been used due to the increasing demand of quality water. AR through infiltration basins consists on infiltrate surface water, that might be affected in more or less degree by treatment plant effluents, runoff and others undesirables water sources, into an aquifer. The water quality enhances during the passage through the soil and organic matter, nutrients, organic contaminants, and bacteria are reduced mainly due to biodegradation and adsorption. Therefore, one of the goals of AR is to ensure a good quality status of the aquifer even if lesser quality water is used for recharge. Understand the behavior and transport of the potential contaminants is essential for an appropriate management of the artificial recharge system. The knowledge of the flux distribution around the recharge system and the relationship between the recharge system and the aquifer (area affected by the recharge, mixing ratios of recharged and native groundwater, travel times) is essential to achieve this goal. Evaluate the flux distribution is not always simple because the complexity and heterogeneity of natural systems. Indeed, it is not so much regulate by hydraulic conductivity of the different geological units as by their continuity and inter-connectivity particularly in the vertical direction. In summary for an appropriate management of an artificial recharge system it is needed to acknowledge the heterogeneity of the media. Aiming at characterizing the residence time distribution (RTDs) of a pilot artificial recharge system and the extent to which heterogeneity affects RTDs, we performed and evaluated a pulse injection tracer test. The artificial recharge system was simulated as a multilayer model which was used to evaluate the measured breakthrough curves at six monitoring points. Flow and transport parameters were calibrated under two hypotheses. The first

  8. Estimation of Transport Trajectory and Residence Time in Large River–Lake Systems: Application to Poyang Lake (China Using a Combined Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical processes and associated water quality in many lakes mainly depend on their transport behaviors. Most existing methodologies for investigating transport behaviors are based on physically based numerical models. The pollutant transport trajectory and residence time of Poyang Lake are thought to have important implications for the steadily deteriorating water quality and the associated rapid environmental changes during the flood period. This study used a hydrodynamic model (MIKE 21 in conjunction with transport and particle-tracking sub-models to provide comprehensive investigation of transport behaviors in Poyang Lake. Model simulations reveal that the lake’s prevailing water flow patterns cause a unique transport trajectory that primarily develops from the catchment river mouths to the downstream area along the lake’s main flow channels, similar to a river-transport behavior. Particle tracking results show that the mean residence time of the lake is 89 days during July–September. The effect of the Yangtze River (the effluent of the lake on the residence time is stronger than that of the catchment river inflows. The current study represents a first attempt to use a combined model approach to provide insights into the transport behaviors for a large river–lake system, given proposals to manage the pollutant inputs both directly to the lake and catchment rivers.

  9. Career development resource: promotion to associate professor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, Hilary; Hollands, Celeste

    2012-07-01

    This will most likely be the first time through the promotion and tenure process for the faculty member. The faculty member is responsible for meeting with the department chair and/or division chief on a regular basis to determine if she is on the right time line to successfully achieve promotion to associate professor. A physician will begin seriously preparing her portfolio for promotion to associate professor about 5 to 6 years out of training, at which time she will have some considerable experience running a practice and managing her time. However, the planning process for promotion should begin immediately upon starting the first academic position. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Professor Andrzej Nespiak (1921-1981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biography of a professor of the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Botany of the Medical Academy in Wrocław, who was formerly an investigator of the Agricultural Academy in Wrocław. He worked on mycorhiza, the participation of Macromycetes in forest communities and the use of fungi for synthesis of some organic compounds, he was also the author of the Polish flora of the genus Cortinarius (1975,1981 and Inocybe (manuscript.

  11. Professor Andrzej Nespiak (1921-1981)

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Majewski

    2014-01-01

    The biography of a professor of the Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Botany of the Medical Academy in Wrocław, who was formerly an investigator of the Agricultural Academy in Wrocław. He worked on mycorhiza, the participation of Macromycetes in forest communities and the use of fungi for synthesis of some organic compounds, he was also the author of the Polish flora of the genus Cortinarius (1975,1981) and Inocybe (manuscript).

  12. 31 July 2014 - Professor M. Kastner

    CERN Multimedia

    Egli, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    MIT Faculty Member Donner Professor of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States of America, Prof. M. Kastner visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Beams Department M. Solfaroli Camillocci, LHC superconducting magnet assembly hall visit with L. Rossi and R. Principe, LHC Computing Grid Project presentation and computer centre visit with I. Bird and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  13. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  14. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  15. Work process of nursing professors 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Giordano, Denisse; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the work process of nursing professors. Method: descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, developed with a focus on critical epidemiology, carried out at a School of Nursing in Chile. The research subjects consist of 17 nursing professors, with whom individual semi-structured interviews were carried out and nine participated in a focus group. The Ethics Committee approved this study. Results: 88.2% were female, mean age of 42 years, 47% were married, 94% were Chilean, average length of service in the institution of 2.8 years, and 23.5% had a master’s degree. Regarding the work process, the students were the work object, the tools used were the knowledge and the experience as a nurse, and the work environment was considered good. Regarding the form of work organization, 76% have a 44-hour workweek, the wage was considered inadequate and the workload was higher than foreseen in the contract. The dialectic of the nursing work process is evidenced, demonstrating the contradiction between the low wages and labor overload and the narratives reporting a good work environment, personal fulfillment and transcendence that goes far beyond work. Conclusions: the work process allows describing the work components of the nursing professors, which are consistent with the results of the literature and show the dialectic of the nursing work process. PMID:29211193

  16. O professor_: de quem estamos falando mesmo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Fabiane Konowaluk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto procura abordar a temática relacionada à auto-imagem do professor, constatada através de uma enquete e da construção de um website que subsidiou o tensionamento com o real. Segundo Arroyo (2000, p. 124, “carregamos a função que exercemos, que somos e a imagem de professor(a que internalizamos”. Dessa forma, o tema em estudo segue, ainda hoje, sendo altamente significativo, pois não podemos esquecer os momentos históricos, políticos e sociais vivenciados pelos professores, buscando justamente explicações sobre como as questões de auto-imagem, o fazer e suas competências, suas possibilidades e limites e outros tantos fatores que estão a alterar seu comportamento. Arroyo (2000, p. 124 assinala que a auto-imagem docente é apreendida em múltiplos espaços e tempos, em múltiplas vivências, como resultado das condições psicológicas e sociais que afetam sua docência

  17. APOSENTADORIA: como professores vivenciam este momento?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Nervis Conrado Machado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo buscou compreender as implicações que a aposentadoria causa na vida de professores, levando em conta o significado que a aposentadoria representa à estes, considerando os pontos de maior mudança após a aposentadoria, bem como os aspectos positivos e negativos causados pela aposentadoria na percepção dos sujeitos da pesquisa. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa qualitativa caracterizada como exploratória e descritiva com professores aposentados por mais de dois anos, com idade entre 58 e 66 anos, através de entrevistas individuais, com roteiros semiestruturados. A análise dos dados foi por meio da análise de conteúdo de Bardin (2011. Entre os principais resultados, destaca-se o significado de “liberdade” que a aposentadoria representa, a rotina como maior mudança e flexibilidade de horários dentre os pontos positivos e a falta dos alunos como aspecto negativo, contudo, pode-se perceber que a aposentadoria possibilitou e contribuiu para que os professores pudessem desfrutar de momentos de lazer, dedicando cuidado à família e realizando seus anseios e vontades.

  18. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  19. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  20. Stress and alcohol use in rural Chinese residents: A moderated mediation model examining the roles of resilience and negative emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Xinguang

    2015-10-01

    Little research has been done on alcohol use and dependence among rural residents in China, a sub-population that might be under increased stress due to the rapid modernization and urbanization processes. We aimed to assess rural residents' levels of stress, negative emotions, resilience, alcohol use/dependence and the complex relationships among them. Survey data from a large random sample (n=1145, mean age=35.9, SD=7.7, 50.7% male) of rural residents in Wuhan, China were collected using Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview. The sample had high prevalence of frequently perceived stress (47%) and high prevalence of ever (54.4%), past 30-day (40.4%), and binge drinking (13.8%). Approximately 11% met the criterion for intermediate to severe alcohol dependence. Mediation analysis indicated that the association between perceived stress (predictor) and alcohol dependence (outcome) was fully mediated by anxiety (indirect effect=.203, pemotions (mediators) was significantly modified by resilience (moderator); an integrative moderated mediation analysis indicated that the indirect effect from stress to alcohol dependence through negative emotions was also moderated by resilience. Negative emotions play a key role in bridging stress and alcohol dependence, while resilience significantly buffers the impact of stress on depression, reducing the risk of alcohol dependence. Resilience training may be an effective component for alcohol intervention in rural China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Organizational climate and self-efficacy as predictors of staff strain in caring for dementia residents: A mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantzas, Gery C; McCabe, Marita P; Mellor, David; Von Treuer, Kathryn; Davison, Tanya E; O'Connor, Daniel; Haselden, Rachel; Konis, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    To date, no research has investigated how the organizational climate of aged care influences the self-efficacy of staff in caring for residents with dementia, or, how self-efficacy is associated with the strain experienced by staff. This study sought to investigate the extent to which the self-efficacy of aged care staff mediates the association between organizational climate variables (such as autonomy, trusting and supportive workplace relations, and the recognition of competence and ability, and perceptions of workplace pressure) and staff strain. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented in which 255 residential aged care staff recruited across aged care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Staff completed self-report measures of organizational climate, self-efficacy, and strains in caring for residents with dementia. Indirect effects analyses using bootstrapping indicated that self-efficacy of staff mediated the association between the organizational climate variables of autonomy, trust, support, pressure, and staff strain. The findings of this study emphasize that the aged care sector needs to target organizational climate variables that enhance the self-efficacy of staff, and that this in turn, can help ameliorate the strain experienced by staff caring for residents experiencing dementia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. An Interview with Professor Roy Caldwell

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhary, Kuntal; Bhat, Prashant; Rosen, Jared; Naughton, Ida; Wang, Jingyan

    2013-01-01

    Envision the underwater world: vibrant coral, swaying seaweed, and lively creatures abound. However, the postcards and National Geographic covers that try to capture the beauty of this picturesque habitat can only represent it at one moment in time -- in reality, the landscape is hardly static, since many of its animals are capable of body modifications to change their shape and color. To understand the coloration and color vision of sea creatures, UC Berkeley Professor Roy L. Caldwell resear...

  3. Religiosidade em alunos e professores portugueses

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Ana Maria Mendes dos Santos Veríssimo

    2005-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Ciências da Educação na especialidade de Educação Intercultural apresentada à Universidade Aberta Esta tese pretende analisar a religiosidade em alunos e professores, sendo a religiosidade entendida como o grau de ligação ou aceitação que cada indivíduo tem face à instituição religiosa (Alston, 1875) e à forma como põe em prática as crenças e os rituais (Shafranske e Malony, 1990). Para medir a religiosidade foram utilizados diversos instrumentos – a escala de Atitu...

  4. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  5. Impact of technology-infused interactive learning environments on college professors' instructional decisions and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuda Malwathumullage, Chamathca Priyanwada

    Recent advancements in instructional technology and interactive learning space designs have transformed how undergraduate classrooms are envisioned and conducted today. Large number of research studies have documented the impact of instructional technology and interactive learning spaces on elevated student learning gains, positive attitudes, and increased student engagement in undergraduate classrooms across nation. These research findings combined with the movement towards student-centered instructional strategies have motivated college professors to explore the unfamiliar territories of instructional technology and interactive learning spaces. Only a limited number of research studies that explored college professors' perspective on instructional technology and interactive learning space use in undergraduate classrooms exist in the education research literature. Since college professors are an essential factor in undergraduate students' academic success, investigating how college professors perceive and utilize instructional technology and interactive learning environments can provide insights into designing effective professional development programs for college professors across undergraduate institutions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate college professors' pedagogical reasoning behind incorporating different types of instructional technologies and teaching strategies to foster student learning in technology-infused interactive learning environments. Furthermore, this study explored the extent to which college professors' instructional decisions and practices are affected by teaching in an interactive learning space along with their overall perception of instructional technology and interactive learning spaces. Four college professors from a large public Midwestern university who taught undergraduate science courses in a classroom based on the 'SCALE-UP model' participated in this study. Major data sources included classroom

  6. Cognitive-Motivational Determinants of Residents' Civic Engagement and Health (Inequities) in the Context of Noise Action Planning: A Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Natalie; van Kamp, Irene; Köckler, Heike; Scheiner, Joachim; Loerbroks, Adrian; Claßen, Thomas; Bolte, Gabriele

    2017-05-30

    The Environmental Noise Directive expects residents to be actively involved in localising and selecting noise abatement interventions during the noise action planning process. Its intervention impact is meant to be homogeneous across population groups. Against the background of social heterogeneity and environmental disparities, however, the impact of noise action planning on exposure to traffic-related noise and its health effects is unlikely to follow homogenous distributions. Until now, there has been no study evaluating the impact of noise action measures on the social distribution of traffic-related noise exposure and health outcomes. We develop a conceptual (logic) model on cognitive-motivational determinants of residents' civic engagement and health (inequities) by integrating arguments from the Model on household's Vulnerability to the local Environment, the learned helplessness model in environmental psychology, the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress, and the reserve capacity model. Specifically, we derive four hypothetical patterns of cognitive-motivational determinants yielding different levels of sustained physiological activation and expectancies of civic engagement. These patterns may help us understand why health inequities arise in the context of noise action planning and learn how to transform noise action planning into an instrument conducive to health equity. While building on existing frameworks, our conceptual model will be tested empirically in the next stage of our research process.

  7. FORMAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES: OBJECTIVOS, CONTEÚDOS E ESTRATÉGIAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carreiro da Costa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Na perspectiva de que a aprendizagem da profissão docente é um processo que o professor realiza durante toda a vida, analisa-se a formação de professores como um grande continuum que integra quatro períodos críticos fundamentais, pelo potencial de influência que têm na forma como se desenvolvem nos docentes as suas concepções e competências profissionais: a fase anterior à formação inicial, a fase de indução, e a formação em serviço. Quando se pergunta "que tipo de professor se deve formar e preparar?" ou formulando a questão de outro "que OBJECTIVOS, conteúdos e estratégias devem integrar a formação de professores?", a razão de ser da interrogação emana das nossas premissas paradigmáticas, isto é, das nossas concepções de professor, ensino, escola e do que entendemos dever ser o processo de formação. Assim, num primeiro momento, analisam-se as orientações ou alternativas conceptuais que, segundo Feiman-nemser (1990, têm estruturado a formação de professores no contexto geral do ensino: as orientações acadêmicas, prática, pessoal, tecnológica e crítica/social. Num segundo momento, referem-se as posições teóricas existentes na formação de professor de Educação Física, nomeadamente, o paradigma behaviorístico, a teoria da socialização ocupacional, e a teoria crítica; analisa-se ainda a polêmica "pedagogia da performance" versus "pedagogia crítica". Defendendo a idéia de que as várias orientações conceptuais sobre a formação de professores não são mutuamente exclusivas, argumenta-se, num último momento, que o verdadeiro problema na formação de professores em Educação Física reside na necessidade de se conceber o professor como um especialista com um conhecimento científico e pedagógico profundo, um profissional que realiza uma atividade técnica e reflexiva, que atua de uma forma crítica respeitando princípios éticos e morais, e que apresenta a disposição e capacidade

  8. A Tech-Happy Professor Reboots after Hearing His Teaching Advice Isn't Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Wesch has been on the lecture circuit for years touting new models of active teaching with technology. The associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University has given TED talks. "Wired" magazine gave him a Rave Award. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching once named him a national professor…

  9. The Costs and Consequences of Quality at the Air Force Academy: A Professor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David B.

    1994-01-01

    A professor at the Air Force Academy (Colorado) recounts that institution's 3 years of experience with total quality concepts. The model that guided initial quality education and training activities is described and evidence of progress reported. He concludes that the right kind of investment in quality is well worth the cost. (DB)

  10. One Professor's Perspective: Preparing Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments at a Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, L. Penny

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the components of distance education courses and provides examples of activities that one professor used in a program to prepare teachers of children with visual impairments using a combination of live and Internet delivery. The advantages and disadvantages of this combined model are discussed. (Contains references.)…

  11. Entrevista com o professor Salomon Turnowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lima Vilela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Com aproximadamente 50 anos de experiências profissionais variadas em Geografia, o Professor Salomon Turnowski se revela, até hoje, um apaixonado por nosso campo de conhecimento. Em entrevista realizada pela equipe da Revista Giramundo, em junho de 2009, na Unidade Escolar Humaitá II, a disposição de contar sua trajetória parece movida pelos comentários a respeito de nossa ciência, de suas transformações e de sua paixão pelos livros. Atuante no Colégio Pedro II, onde lecionou entre 1984 e 2009, no IBGE e na antiga FIDERJ (Fundação Instituto de Desenvolvimento do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, entre outros, seu depoimento se revela, portanto, uma oportunidade para conhecer um pouco mais sobre sujeitos e instituições voltados à construção da Geografia no Brasil e no Rio de Janeiro, assim como sobre os contrastes entre as vivências de geógrafos e de professor. Fica aqui o registro acerca da experiência valiosa e diversificada desse profissional, assim como uma singela homenagem.

  12. Habitus professoral na sala de aula virtual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Marinho Pimenta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entendendo que a indiferença na ação pedagógica contribui para a reprodução das desigualdades no sistema de ensino, o presente artigo busca captar, a partir de entrevistas semiestruturadas, traços do habitus de professores supervisores de disciplinas do curso de Licenciatura em Pedagogia na modalidade a distância na Universidade de Brasília - UnB no âmbito do Sistema Universidade Aberta do Brasil - UAB. As orientações metodológicas de Bourdieu (2007 foram um dos elementos orientadores na análise das entrevistas, considerando ainda o uso heurístico do conceito de habitus. Conclui-se que o habitus professoral envolve esforços voluntários em busca de uma ação pedagógica diferenciada. No entanto, ele é ambíguo e condescendente frente aos limites do modelo de EaD no âmbito da UAB. Ao fim, os dados analisados permitem fornecer elementos para reorientação político-pedagógica que vise a um novo modelo de EaD nacional.

  13. In Memoriam: Professor Jan M. Hoem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Vaupel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jan Hoem died on Saturday in Stockholm after a long illness. Jan became Director of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR in 1999; he and I jointly led the Institute for almost eight years. During this period he served as Editor of Demographic Research; he took on this responsibility shortly after the journal was launched and built the journal into a respected online source of cutting-edge analysis. Jan was a superb colleague, with very good judgment, a delightful sense of humor, and deep devotion to research quality. A pioneer of event history analysis, he understood the subtleties of the subject better than anyone else. Jan was born and educated in Norway and worked in Oslo before becoming Professor in Copenhagen and then Professor in Stockholm, where he established SUDA, a leading demographic research initiative. His dedication to high-quality, statistically sophisticated population research at SUDA and MPIDR as well as in the journal Demographic Research substantially advanced the discipline of demography. Jan was a warm and generous teacher, a loyal colleague, and a caring friend whom many people will long remember with gratitude and respect. James W. Vaupel Publisher, Demographic Research

  14. When Professors Don't Return Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    Students devote hundreds of hours to writing notes during medical school clerkships but receive very limited feedback on that work. Medical student notes are like college essays-both are persuasive compositions. But attending physicians rarely scrutinize student notes like college professors analyze essays. This is a missed opportunity to teach clinical reasoning. A survey at our institution showed that only 16% of students received written feedback and 31% received oral feedback on their notes from more than 3 attending physicians during the first 8 months of 3rd-year clerkships. Many studies have reported a paucity of feedback across multiple domains and a sense among students that clinical reasoning is not being adequately taught during clerkships. Meanwhile, college professors teach written composition and reasoning through interactive methods that help students to develop structured, well-reasoned arguments. A recent study showed that 85% of Oxford undergraduates favored these demanding and time-intensive tutorials. Attending physicians who adopt a tutorial-based approach toward their students' notes would have a forum to teach clinical reasoning and emphasize the importance of written composition in medical practice.

  15. The Actively Caring for People Movement at Virginia Tech and Beyond: Cultivating Compassion and Relationships in Residence Halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Shane M.; Mullins, Taris G.; Geller, E. Scott; Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    A professor and a group of student leaders initiated the Actively Caring for People (AC4P) Movement to establish a more civil, compassionate, and inclusive culture by inspiring intentional acts of kindness. This article explores the AC4P Movement in a first-year residence hall at Virginia Tech and a second-year residence hall at University of…

  16. Evaluation of internal medicine residents as exercise role models and associations with self-reported counseling behavior, confidence, and perceived success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura Q; Gutin, Bernard; Humphries, Matthew C; Lemmon, Christian R; Waller, Jennifer L; Baranowski, Tom; Saunders, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Patients perceive physicians who practice healthy personal behaviors as more credible and better able to motivate patients to make healthy lifestyle choices. To evaluate internal medicine resident physicians as role models for promoting exercise by an assessment of physician physical activity behavior, cardiovascular fitness, physical activity knowledge, personal use of behavior modification techniques, attitudes toward personal physical activity practice, and confidence (i.e., self-efficacy) in the knowledge and personal utilization of behavior modification techniques and to explore the associations with self-reported patient counseling behavior, confidence, and perceived success. Cross-sectional study of internal medicine resident physicians with a self-administered survey, treadmill fitness testing, and a 7-day physical activity recall. Fifty-one resident physicians agreed to participate (response rate = 81%). Fitness levels were below average for 60%, average for 25%, and above average or excellent for 15%. The mean energy expenditure was 234 kcal/kg/week, with 41% of physicians meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. Few reported high self-efficacy (33%) or perceived success (25%) in the ability to be regularly active. Few demonstrated adequate knowledge useful for patient counseling (e.g., listing 3 ways to integrate physical activity into daily life [27%], calculating target heart rate [29%], and identifying personal exercise stages of change [25%]). Personal use of behavior modification techniques was reported infrequently. Although 88% reported confidence in the knowledge of exercise benefits, less than half reported confidence in the knowledge of local facilities, American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines, and behavior modification techniques. Multiple linear regression demonstrated that a higher level of training (p = .02) and a greater confidence in the knowledge of ACSM guidelines (p = .048, total R2 = .21) independently predicted

  17. Successful self-directed lifelong learning in medicine: a conceptual model derived from qualitative analysis of a national survey of pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Paterniti, Debora A; Co, John Patrick T; West, Daniel C

    2010-07-01

    Self-directed lifelong learning is integral to medical professionalism, yet how best to encourage its development during clinically intensive training is unknown. The authors develop a model for successful self-directed learning by analyzing qualitative data from a national survey of residents. Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents at 46 training programs completed a Web-based survey in 2008-2009. Self-reported barriers to and strategies for achieving self-directed learning goals were systematically analyzed through inductive iterative review. A total of 992 out of 1,739 (57%) residents responded. Barriers to achieving self-directed learning goals were categorized into difficulty with personal reflection, environmental strain, competing demands, difficulty with goal generation, and problems with plan development and implementation. Strategies for achieving learning goals included creating goals that were important (relevant to the learner and prioritized by the learner as important to achieve), specific (with broad goals broken down into incremental steps and a specific plan for each step), measurable, accountable (with reminder and tracking systems and building in internal and external accountability), realistic (achievable goals which utilize existing opportunities and constant self-adjustment), and included a timeline for completing the goal (and incorporating the goal into their daily routine). On the basis of the data, the authors propose a conceptual model for self-directed lifelong learning involving creation of learning goals and plan development based on individual reflection and self-assessment, and continual revision of goals and/or plans based on degree of goal attainment. This model could be broadly applicable throughout medical education.

  18. Professor Gender, Age, and “Hotness” in Influencing College Students’ Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Sohr-Preston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate psychology students rated expectations of a bogus professor (randomly designated a man or woman and hot versus not hot based on an online rating and sample comments as found on RateMyProfessors.com (RMP. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis (PCA: dedication, attractiveness, enhancement, fairness, and clarity. Participants rated current psychology professors on the same qualities. Current professors were divided based on gender (man or woman, age (under 35 or 35 and older, and attractiveness (at or below the median or above the median. Using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, students expected hot professors to be more attractive but lower in clarity. They rated current professors as lowest in clarity when a man and 35 or older. Current professors were rated significantly lower in dedication, enhancement, fairness, and clarity when rated at or below the median on attractiveness. Results, with previous research, suggest numerous factors, largely out of professors’ control, influencing how students interpret and create professor ratings. Caution is therefore warranted in using online ratings to select courses or make hiring and promotion decisions. 

  19. Memorial meeting for professor Abdus Salam's 90th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael; Khoo Phua, Kok; Memorial volume on Abdus Salam's 90th birthday

    2017-01-01

    In honor of one of the most prolific and exciting scientists of the second half of the last century, a memorial meeting was organized by the Institute of Advanced Studies at Nanyang Technological University for Professor Abdus Salam's 90th Birthday in January 2016. Salam believed that "scientific thought is the common heritage of all mankind" and that the developing world should play its part, not merely by importing technology but by being the arbiter of its own scientific destiny. That belief saw him rise from humble beginnings in a village in Pakistan to become one of the world's most original and influential particle physicists, culminating in the 1979 Nobel Prize (shared with Glashow and Weinberg) for contributions to electroweak unification, which forms an integral part of the Standard Model. The book collected the papers presented at this memorable event which saw many distinguished scientists participating as speakers to reflect on Prof Salam's great passion for the science and achievements.

  20. Understanding how residents' preferences for supervisory methods change throughout residency training: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Vega, Francisco; Dolmans, Diana; Donkers, Jeroen; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-10-16

    A major challenge for clinical supervisors is to encourage their residents to be independent without jeopardising patient safety. Residents' preferences according to level of training on this regard have not been completely explored. This study has sought to investigate which teaching methods of the Cognitive Apprenticeship (CA) model junior, intermediate and senior residents preferred and why, and how these preferences differed between groups. We invited 301 residents of all residency programmes of Javeriana University, Bogotá, Colombia, to participate. Each resident was asked to complete a Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire (MCTQ), which, being based on the teaching methods of CA, asked residents to rate the importance to their learning of each teaching method and to indicate which of these they preferred the most and why. A total of 215 residents (71 %) completed the questionnaire. All concurred that all CA teaching methods were important or very important to their learning, regardless of their level of training. However, the reasons for their preferences clearly differed between groups: junior and intermediate residents preferred teaching methods that were more supervisor-directed, such as modelling and coaching, whereas senior residents preferred teaching methods that were more resident-directed, such as exploration and articulation. The results indicate that clinical supervision (CS) should accommodate to residents' varying degrees of development by attuning the configuration of CA teaching methods to each level of residency training. This configuration should initially vest more power in the supervisor, and gradually let the resident take charge, without ever discontinuing CS.

  1. Interview with Professor Dr. Daniel Spreng

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, C.; Kilchmann, A.

    2004-01-01

    This interview with Professor Dr. Daniel Spreng of the Center for Energy Policy and Economics (CEPE) in Zuerich, Switzerland, deals with questions concerning research in the area of energy economics. In particular, the situation in Switzerland, where mains-connected sources of energy such as electricity and gas play an important role in energy supply, is looked at in the light of market liberalisation. Various approaches to the liberalisation of gas and electricity systems are discussed and the costs of liberalised supply systems are compared with those of the present monopolistic situation. Also, energy reserves and the use of the gas distribution system in a future hydrogen-based energy supply scenario are looked at. Projects currently being worked on at the CEPE are reviewed

  2. Institutional Support for the Virtual Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom JONES

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Academics who hold positions at single-mode, distance education institutions are presently being hampered by an adherence to a long-standing set of protocols (specific office location, face-to-face meetings that were put in place when the conventional post-secondary was the norm. With the advent of a powerful merging of personal computers and the internet, a shift from those protocols to one of support for the virtual professor is in the offing, to the benefit of both the professoriate and the student. A key factor in this shift is the degree and quality of institutional support that will allow these changes to take place. This paper focuses on a number of the key factors that will have to be addressed if this new type of distance education academic is to function effectively.

  3. Teacher Trainers: an analysis of the strategies that make more successful professors from the students' viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Quadros

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Only in the last decades has the performance of teacher trainers who did graduate studies in specific areas of knowledge been object of investigation. With the main goal of analyzing strategies used by higher education professors who work in teacher training, we selected four Chemistry professors who are well accepted by the students, two who classified their own classes as more interactive and the other two, as less interactive. We video recorded a set of classes by each professor and submitted them first to a broad analysis and then to a microanalysis. We later shared the analysis results with the participants to be able to further investigate how they had constructed their strategies. We observed that they presented characteristics common in the broad analysis. The microanalysis revealed differentiated teaching strategies in the more interactive classes and in the less interactive classes. The strategies had been constructed based on the teaching models that the professors had had (less interactive or on their counter-model (more interactive.

  4. Comments on "cyclical swings" by Professor Hannah Decker: The underappreciated "solid center" of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pies, Ronald W

    2016-02-01

    The history of psychiatry is characterized by some deep ideological and conceptual divisions, as adumbrated in Professor Hannah Decker's essay. However, the schism between "biological" and "psychosocial" models of mental illness and its treatment represents extreme positions among some psychiatrists-not the model propounded by academic psychiatry or its affiliated professional organizations. Indeed, the "biopsycho-social model" (BPSM) developed by Dr. George L. Engel has been, and remains, the foundational model for academic psychiatry, notwithstanding malign market forces that have undermined the BPSM's use in clinical practice. The BPSM is integrally related to "centralizing" and integrative trends in American psychiatry that may be traced to Franz Alexander, Karl Jaspers, and Engel himself, among others. This "Alexandrian-Jaspersian-Engelian" tradition is explored in relation to Professor Decker's "cyclical swing" model of psychiatry's history. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Impact on house staff evaluation scores when changing from a Dreyfus- to a Milestone-based evaluation model: one internal medicine residency program's findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Karen A; Balwan, Sandy; Cacace, Frank; Katona, Kyle; Sunday, Suzanne; Chaudhry, Saima

    2014-01-01

    As graduate medical education (GME) moves into the Next Accreditation System (NAS), programs must take a critical look at their current models of evaluation and assess how well they align with reporting outcomes. Our objective was to assess the impact on house staff evaluation scores when transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model of evaluation to a Milestone-based model of evaluation. Milestones are a key component of the NAS. We analyzed all end of rotation evaluations of house staff completed by faculty for academic years 2010-2011 (pre-Dreyfus model) and 2011-2012 (post-Milestone model) in one large university-based internal medicine residency training program. Main measures included change in PGY-level average score; slope, range, and separation of average scores across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. Transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model to a Milestone-based model resulted in a larger separation in the scores between our three post-graduate year classes, a steeper progression of scores in the PGY-1 class, a wider use of the 5-point scale on our global end of rotation evaluation form, and a downward shift in the PGY-1 scores and an upward shift in the PGY-3 scores. For faculty trained in both models of assessment, the Milestone-based model had greater discriminatory ability as evidenced by the larger separation in the scores for all the classes, in particular the PGY-1 class.

  6. Leadership and Strategic Choices: Female Professors in Australia and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkanli, Ozlem; White, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study explores leadership styles and gender in higher education (HE) by examining representation of female professors in Australian and Turkish universities and identifying barriers to achieving seniority. The paper explores factors, including leadership styles, which explain the higher representation of female professors in Turkey, despite…

  7. Psychometric Characteristics of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Rebecca G.; Wilson, Janie H.; Pugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale, the first scale to measure professor-student rapport. The scale was found to have adequate test-retest and internal-consistency reliability. In addition to these findings, measures used to determine convergent validity included the Working…

  8. Professor-Student Rapport Scale Predicts Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.; Pugh, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Rapport traditionally has been measured in therapy or in other one-on-one relationships such as with roommates. As yet, no scale is available to measure professor-student rapport. In this study, 51 undergraduates created items to measure professor-student rapport, and subsequently, 195 different college students rated their agreement with items…

  9. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cross-cultural activities with Americans, and ultimately to share with their countrymen their... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations...

  10. Academic Labor Markets and Assistant Professors' Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Lowell L.

    2012-01-01

    Using data for 638 assistant professors who joined graduate sociology departments between 1975 and 1992, I examine the claim that when the labor market for new doctorates is weak, assistant professors experience less favorable employment outcomes than when that labor market is strong. Surprisingly, I find that those hired during the weak…

  11. Effects of Social Support on Professors' Work Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Christin; Chung-Yan, Greg A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how various types of workplace social support from different support sources interact with occupational stressors to predict the psychological well-being of university professors. Design/method/approach: A total of 99 full-time professors participated via an online or paper questionnaire. Findings:…

  12. Job Satisfaction of Experienced Professors at a Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Susan H.; Brunetti, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined career satisfaction among experienced professors at a moderate-sized liberal arts college and explored their motivations for staying in the profession. Experienced professors were defined as tenure-track faculty who had been teaching in higher education for at least 15 years. Data sources included the Experienced Teacher…

  13. Engaging Undergraduates in Feminist Classrooms: An Exploration of Professors' Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Leland G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of a feminist action research project that sought to ascertain professors' best practices for engaging undergraduates in feminist classrooms. In semi-structured interviews, professors recommended assigning readings from a variety of positionalities; creating a safe space for class discussion; relying on data to…

  14. Student and Professor Gender Effects in Introductory Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M. Ryan; Johnson, Marianne F.; Kuennen, Eric W.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have yielded highly mixed results as to differences in male and female student performance in statistics courses; the role that professors play in these differences is even less clear. In this paper, we consider the impact of professor and student gender on student performance in an introductory business statistics course taught by…

  15. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    In issue 1-2003, Anette Kolmos and Lone Krogh reported on the two-semester study course " University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (DK)". Now, in part 2, they are adressing guidelines for supervison and advising of assistant professors in the university teacher education...

  16. Mental Health Assessment in Professors' Training in Two Chilean Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos J.; Quintana, Ingrid M.; Rodriguez, Felipe F.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the evaluation of professors of pedagogy and directors programs, about the importance of mental health in vocational training, and factors that might influence this valuation. The methodology includes participation of 17 academicians (professors and belonging to the managerial staff) of two universities in southern Chile. A…

  17. The Limited Role of Journalism Professors in Direct Media Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Abraham Z.

    This paper discusses reasons why few journalism professors are personally confronting the news media with criticism or praise. One of the primary reasons for this is that journalism professors may fear retribution or keep inbred ties with the media or be following academic tradition. A survey was conducted in Spring 1975 for this report. The…

  18. Professors' Facebook content affects students' perceptions and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Merry J; Smith, Aimee W; Laboe, Jason

    2013-07-01

    Abstract Facebook users must make choices about level of self-disclosure, and this self-disclosure can influence perceptions of the profile's author. We examined whether the specific type of self-disclosure on a professor's profile would affect students' perceptions of the professor and expectations of his classroom. We created six Facebook profiles for a fictitious male professor, each with a specific emphasis: politically conservative, politically liberal, religious, family oriented, socially oriented, or professional. Undergraduate students randomly viewed one profile and responded to questions that assessed their perceptions and expectations. The social professor was perceived as less skilled but more popular, while his profile was perceived as inappropriate and entertaining. Students reacted more strongly and negatively to the politically focused profiles in comparison to the religious, family, and professional profiles. Students reported being most interested in professional information on a professor's Facebook profile, yet they reported being least influenced by the professional profile. In general, students expressed neutrality about their interest in finding and friending professors on Facebook. These findings suggest that students have the potential to form perceptions about the classroom environment and about their professors based on the specific details disclosed in professors' Facebook profiles.

  19. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  1. Professor I I Glass A Tribute and Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Igra, Ozer

    2013-01-01

    The book provides personal memories along with description of scientific works written by ex-graduate students and research associates of the late Professor Glass. The described research work covers a wide range of shock wave phenomena, resulting from seeds planted by Professor Glass. Professor Glass was born in Poland in 1918. He immigrated together with his parents to Canada at the age of 12 and received all his professional education at the University of Toronto, Canada. He became a world recognized expert in shock wave phenomena, and during his 45 years of active research he supervised more than 125 master and doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting research associates. In this book seven of his past students/research-associates describe their personal memories of Professor Glass and present some of their investigations in shock wave phenomena which sprung from their past work with Professor Glass. Specifically, these investigations include underwater shock waves, shock/bubble interaction, m...

  2. In commemoration of professor V.P. Karpov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semyonova L.S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is about professor Karpov V.P., a prominent scientist, first rector of Yekaterinoslav Medical Academy. Biography of a great investigator, his main achievements in the area of histology, biology, theory and history of medicine was studied. Professor Karpov V.P. always combined his great scientific, organizational and research work with social activity. Monographs of professor Karpov V.P. and conferences organized by him were of great importance in the solution of such new problems as theary of microscope and cell amitosis. Professor Karpov is a founder of a large school of histology. Thanks to his active participation and personal guidance, in 1917 department of histology was founded in Yekaterinoslav Medical Institute. The author of the article has analyzed Hippocrates` works translated into Russian by professor Karpov V.P. and pointed out their significance for modern medical science and practice.

  3. OBITUARY: Professor Jan Evetts in memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Glowacki, Bartek

    2005-11-01

    It is with great sadness that we report the death of Jan Evetts, who lost his second battle with cancer on 18 August 2005. In 1988 he was appointed Founding Editor of this journal where his leadership created the foundation upon which its success rests today. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials, and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the scientific community is incalculable, as is attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' embryonic superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for applications in magnets. Competing theories for the critical current density at that time were fine filaments or `Mendelssohn Sponge' versus the pinning of Abrikosov quantized vortices. The results of the group's work, to which Jan made a major contribution, came down heavily in favour of the latter theory. Jan's outstanding characteristic was his

  4. Impacto vocal de professores Teachers' vocal impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ricarte

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar o impacto vocal nas atividades diárias em professores do ensino médio. Correlacionar os achado da auto-percepção do problema vocal com os aspectos: efeitos no trabalho, na comunicação diária, na comunicação social e na sua emoção. MÉTODOS: a amostra foi constituída por 107 professores, sendo 86 com queixa e 21 sem queixa, selecionados em escolas da rede particular de ensino de Maceió-AL. Cada professor respondeu individualmente o protocolo Perfil Participação em Atividades Vocais na presença da pesquisadora, assinalando suas respostas em uma escala visual que varia de 0 a 10. O protocolo é composto por 28 questões com a presença integrada em cinco aspectos englobados para avaliar a qualidade de vida e o resultado de tratamentos vocais. O protocolo oferece, ainda, dois escores adicionais: pontuação de limitação nas atividades (PLA e de restrição de participação (PRP. RESULTADOS: na comparação dos grupos com e sem queixa vocal foram verificados que todos os resultados foram estatisticamente significantes (pPURPOSE: to analyze the vocal impact in the daily activities on high-school teachers. Correlate the finding of the auto-perception on the vocal problem with the following aspects: effects in the work, daily communication, social communication and, its emotion METHODS: the sample consisted of 107 teachers, 86 with and 21 with no complaint, selected from private teaching schools in Maceió-AL. Each teacher answered individually the Protocol for Voice Activity Participation Profile in the presence of the researcher, noting their responses on a visual scale ranging from 0 to 10. The protocol is composed of 28 questions with the presence integrated in five aspects to evaluate the quality of life and the result of vocal treatments. The protocol offers, still, two additional scores: punctuation of limitation in the activities (PLA and restriction of participation (PRP. RESULTS: comparing the groups with

  5. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  6. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  7. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing, E-mail: jing.zhang2@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  8. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jing; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. Methods: The authors’ algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. Results: The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different

  9. Memories of Professor Sugimoto and isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Usual magnetic isotope-separators select the particles with the same Z/A value which may include different nuclides. Identification of the isotope with the same Z/A value but different Z or A value is an universal requirement for nuclear physics experiments. If one knows, together with the A/Z value, the dE/dx or the range of the isotope in some energy absorber, which are the function of Z 2 /A, its nuclide can be specified. This idea can be realized by arranging proper energy-absorber at the focal point of magnetic analyzer. The author proposes another novel method in which two dipole-magnets are excited with some difference, and an energy absorber corresponding to that energy difference is situated between two magnets. It can also be devised so that the dispersion at the final focal-point depends only on the emission angle of the isotope at production. Professor Sugimoto recognized the significance of this scheme and proposed to employ it in the experiment at BEVATRON. The unbalanced two dipole-magnets method is employed at RIKEN and RCNP, Osaka University. The author's creative idea originated in Sugimoto Laboratory at Osaka University. (author)

  10. Editorial: A dedication to Professor Jan Evetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Harald; Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Barber, Zoe; Somekh, Rob; Glowacki, Bartek

    2006-03-01

    A few days before the beginning of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity we learned that Professor Jan Evetts, a pioneer of superconductor research, a brilliant scientist, a wonderful person and a great personal friend, had passed away. We therefore decided to dedicate the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity to the memory of Jan Evetts. The following citation is based on material provided by his former supervisor (D Dew-Hughes) and his closest co-workers in Cambridge. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan Evetts passed away after losing his second battle with cancer on 24th August 2005. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the superconductivity community is incalculable, as attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He entered the college in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for

  11. Analysis and interpretation of residence time distribution experimental curves in FM01-LC reactor using axial dispersion and plug dispersion exchange models with closed-closed boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, Fernando F. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Diaz, Martin R., E-mail: mcruz@tese.edu.m [Division de Quimica y Bioquimica, Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Av. Tecnologico S/N Esq. Av. Hank Gonzalez, Valle de Anahuac, C.P. 55120, Ecatepec, Edo. de Mex (Mexico); Rivero, Eligio P. [Departamento de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlan, Av. Primero de Mayo, Cuautitlan Izcalli, C.P. 54740, Edo. de Mex (Mexico); Gonzalez, Ignacio [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    The liquid phase mixing flow pattern at low (20 < Re < 120) and intermediate liquid flow rate (120 < Re < 400) was studied by means of residence time distribution (RTD) experimental curve in an up-flow Filter Press electrochemical reactor (FM01-LC) bench scale. For this purpose, a plastic turbulence promoter was used with stainless-steel and platinised titanium structural meshes as electrodes in channel configuration. To visualize and determine the mixing flow pattern in the liquid phase, the stimulus-response technique was employed using dextran blue (D{sub M} = 1.058 x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} s{sup -1}, 25 {sup o}C, in water) as model tracer. A theoretical analysis and approximation RTD experimental curves with axial dispersion model (ADM) and plug dispersion exchange model (PDE), with 'closed-closed vessel' boundary conditions were used in order to establish a better approximation of the axial dispersion, stagnant zones, channelling and by-pass (preference flow) effects present at low and intermediate Re. RTD curves show that the liquid flow pattern in the FM01-LC deviates considerably from axial dispersion model at low Re, where the FM01-LC exhibits large channelling, stagnant zones, and dead zone. The PDE model represents fairly this deviation from ideal flow (less dead zone).

  12. Impact on house staff evaluation scores when changing from a Dreyfus- to a Milestone-based evaluation model: one internal medicine residency program's findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Friedman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As graduate medical education (GME moves into the Next Accreditation System (NAS, programs must take a critical look at their current models of evaluation and assess how well they align with reporting outcomes. Our objective was to assess the impact on house staff evaluation scores when transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model of evaluation to a Milestone-based model of evaluation. Milestones are a key component of the NAS. Method: We analyzed all end of rotation evaluations of house staff completed by faculty for academic years 2010–2011 (pre-Dreyfus model and 2011–2012 (post-Milestone model in one large university-based internal medicine residency training program. Main measures included change in PGY-level average score; slope, range, and separation of average scores across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME competencies. Results: Transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model to a Milestone-based model resulted in a larger separation in the scores between our three post-graduate year classes, a steeper progression of scores in the PGY-1 class, a wider use of the 5-point scale on our global end of rotation evaluation form, and a downward shift in the PGY-1 scores and an upward shift in the PGY-3 scores. Conclusions: For faculty trained in both models of assessment, the Milestone-based model had greater discriminatory ability as evidenced by the larger separation in the scores for all the classes, in particular the PGY-1 class.

  13. Outcomes assessment of a residency program in laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E; Pisciotto, P T; Hopfer, S M; Makowski, G; Ryan, R W; Aslanzadeh, J

    1997-01-01

    During a down-sizing of residency programs at a State University Medical School, hospital based residents' positions were eliminated. It was determined to find out the characteristics of the residents who graduated from the Laboratory Medicine Program, to compare women graduates with men graduates, and to compare IMGs with United States Graduates. An assessment of a 25 year program in laboratory medicine which had graduated 100 residents showed that there was no statistically significant difference by chi 2 analysis in positions (laboratory directors or staff), in certification (American Board of Pathology [and subspecialties], American Board of Medical Microbiology, American Board of Clinical Chemistry) nor in academic appointments (assistant professor to full professor) when the male graduates were compared with the female graduates or when graduates of American medical schools were compared with graduates of foreign medical schools. There were statistically significant associations by chi 2 analysis between directorship positions and board certification and between academic appointments and board certification. Of 100 graduates, there were 57 directors, 52 certified, and 41 with academic appointments. Twenty-two graduates (11 women and 11 men) attained all three.

  14. Introduction to the special issue on the Phanerozoic geology of Egypt in honor of Professor Mohamed El-Bahay Issawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, M. M.; Tewksbury, B.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Tarabees, E.

    2017-12-01

    This issue is dedicated to Professor Mohamed El-Bahay Issawi in recognition of his monumental contributions to an understanding of the Phanerozoic evolution of the northern part of Africa. During his long and productive career in the Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority (EGSMA), he was committed to deciphering the geological history and resources of the Phanerozoic of Egypt. Professor Issawi is widely recognized for his influential stratigraphic-tectonic models that were an inspiration for generations of Egyptian geoscientists from the 1960s onward. His models and expertise helped to attract international interest and involvement in fundamental programs of research on the Phanerozoic geology of Egypt and specifically on geoarchaeology.

  15. The role of the resid solvent in coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the role of petroleum resid in coprocessing of coal and resid. The question being asked is whether the resid is a reactant in the system or whether the resid is a merely a diluent that is being simultaneously upgraded? To fulfill the objective the hydrogen transfer from model compounds, naphthenes that represent petroleum resids to model acceptors is being determined. The specificity of different catalytic systems for promoting the hydrogen transfer from naphthenes to model acceptors and to coal is also being determined. In addition the efficacy of hydrogen transfer from and solvancy of whole and specific resid fractions under coprocessing conditions is being determined.

  16. Professor Pavel Nikolaevich Nikolaev (to the 130-th anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Y.V.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents biography of professor P. N. Nikolaev. It reflects his scientific and practical contribution to the development of the most significant directions in Russian medicine including professional training of Health Service specialists

  17. Afetividade entre professor e aluno no processo ensino-aprendizagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Simone Galdino Schaefer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo analisar as relações de afetividade entre professor e aluno no processo ensino-aprendizagem. Utiliza de metodologia com abordagem qualitativa, observação participante, e entrevistas semi-estruturadas. O lócus da pesquisa foi a Escola Municipal de Educação Básica Lizamara Aparecida Oliva de Almeida em Sinop, entre Fevereiro e Maio de 2014. Enquanto sujeitos, contou-se com professores e alunos do 3º ano do Ensino Fundamental. Dos resultados parciais, verificou-se que mesmo que a afetividade e a aprendizagem sejam reconhecidas teoricamente por Henri Wallon como elos fundamentais para o processo ensino-aprendizagem, ainda não é bem compreendido pelos sujeitos professores. Palavras-chave: psicologia educacional; afetividade; professores e alunos. 

  18. Professor Anne Khademian named National Academy of Public Administration Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2009-01-01

    Anne Khademian, professor with Virginia Tech's Center for Public Administration and Policy, School of Public and International Affairs, at the Alexandria, Va., campus has been elected a National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) Fellow.

  19. Correspondence of Sir Isaac Newton and Professor Cotes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edleston, J; Newton, Isaac; Cotes, Roger

    1969-01-01

    ... of Sir Isaac Newton and Professor Cotes. An index, prepared under the General Editor's supervision, has been added at the end of the volume.This page intentionally left blank Table of ContentsCON...

  20. Special issue dedicated to Professor Johann M. Schepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon P De Bruin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available It is a great pleasure for me to have been associated with this special issue of the SA Journal of Industrial Psychology dedicated to Professor Johann M. Schepers. The purpose of the special issue is to honour Professor Schepers for his contributions to the development of Psychology and Industrial Psychology as empirical fields of study in South Africa. The contributors have worked with Professor Schepers as students or colleagues and share his academic interests. The articles reflect his areas of interest and employ analytic techniques taught and championed by him. We are grateful to Professor Schepers for his cooperation throughout this project. Thanks are due to all the contributors and referees.

  1. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields....

  2. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness On Distance Learning Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students’ perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive professors on business students enrolled in distance learning courses. This study expands on prior studies by testing whether the attractiveness of the professor matters to student learning within the context of online learning environment. A total of 122 online business students were surveyed. Our findings suggest that professor’s attractiveness has a statistically significant effect on student learning, motivation, and satisfaction. In addition, online students perceived attractive professors with more expertise as an instructor. Female students had higher motivation than male students. Furthermore, separate analysis indicated that attractiveness effects were stronger for participants over the age 46 when compared to other groups.

  3. Professor Elio Lugaresi's contributions to neurology and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Tensini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a brief historical review of the most important contributions by Professor Elio Lugaresi, of the University of Bologna, Italy, to neurology and sleep disorders.

  4. Ellen Gleditsch: Professor, radiochemist and mentor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykknes, Annette

    2005-06-01

    This dissertation deals with Ellen Gleditsch and some important aspects of her career, as professor, radiochemist and mentor. As Professor Gleditsch supervised students, gave lectures, disseminated science, did research and administrative work; together with many others she participated in the shaping of a research university which developed during her career. She also experienced the daily life in an institute in which there was competition for both resources and positions, included the professorship she was finally granted after many set-backs. The Radiochemist Ellen Gleditsch worked and researched at Marie Curie's laboratory in Paris, and later at Bertram Boltwood's laboratory in New Haven and Stefan Meyer's Institute for Radium Research in Vienna, furthermore she planned and made efforts to establish a similar laboratory in Oslo. During her time in Paris and U.S.A. Gleditsch participated in important debates in the early period of radioactivity, including those on the determination of the radium-uranium ratio and the half-life of radium. In Norway she devoted her time to atomic weight determinations, age determinations, and radiogeological investigations. Research was all important part of Gleditsch's life and career. Gleditsch was also a Mentor in many respects; in tile international radioactivity community, as one of the first female academics and radiochcmists in Norway, for her many students, and this role seems also to have been hers within her family. In Paris she looked after students from all over the world to help alleviate their home sickness, at the University of Oslo she was known as the scientific mother to many; mentoring was among Gleditsch's main qualities. The story of Ellen Gleditsch opens for several perspectives that are discussed. 3 papers are included. In paper 1, ''Ellen Gleditsch: Pioneer Woman in Radiochemistry'', the story is about the young chemist Ellen Gleditsch, who arrived in Paris in 1907 and started cooperating with Marie Curie

  5. The life and work of Professor Emeritus Marin Buble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Kružić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This collection of papers provides a wide diversity of personal and professional reflections upon the life and work of the late Professor Marin Buble. The authors discuss the contribution of Professor Marin Buble to the development of the science and practices of management, organizational design, entrepreneurship and international management, as well as different aspects of his academic career, including his work committed to development of Faculty of Economics Split and his work as a supervisor with many young scientists.

  6. Seniorforsker Ole Hertel udnævnt til adjungeret professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Christian

    2009-01-01

    Sektionsleder og seniorforsker Ole Hertel, Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) ved Aarhus Universitet, er udnævnt til adjungeret professor ved Institut for Miljø, Samfund og Rumlig Forandring på Roskilde Universitet.......Sektionsleder og seniorforsker Ole Hertel, Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) ved Aarhus Universitet, er udnævnt til adjungeret professor ved Institut for Miljø, Samfund og Rumlig Forandring på Roskilde Universitet....

  7. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness On Distance Learning Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanny Liu; Stella D. Tomasi

    2015-01-01

    Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students’ perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive professors on business students enrolled in distance learning courses. This study expands on prior studies by testing whether the attractiveness of the ...

  8. Determinants of puberty health among female adolescents residing in boarding welfare centers in Tehran: An application of health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadi, Shayesteh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Nadrian, Haidar; Mahmoodi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a critical stage of growth and development. That is associated with changes in body shape and appearance. Issues such as irregular menstrual periods, amenorrhea, and menstrual cycle are major issues in women's health. The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of physical puberty health based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) among female adolescents. Methods: This analytical cross sectional study was conducted in welfare boarding centers in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected in 2011 by a structured and valid questionnaire. Total 61 female adolescents (age range: 12-19 yrs) participated in this study from welfare boarding centers in Iran, Tehran, by using convenience sampling method. The questionnaire consisted of demographic characteristics, health belief model constructs and physical puberty health behaviors gathered by using interview. A series of univariate general linear models were used to assess the relationship between puberty health and health belief model constructs. Results: According to the results of this study there were positive significant relationships between perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action and increased puberty health in female adolescents (p<0.05). Perceived benefits, perceived barriers and cues to action were predictors of physical puberty health behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the results of the study to improve the physical Puberty health behaviors of female adolescents should make them aware of the benefits of health behaviors, and remove or reform the perceived barriers of health behaviors. Also, the appropriate information resources should be introduced for obtaining information about puberty health.

  9. Developing a rich definition of the person/residence to support person-oriented models of consumer product usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person Oriented Models (POMs) provide a basis for simulating aggregate chemical exposures in a population over time (Price and Chaisson, 2005). POMs assign characteristics to simulated individuals that are used to determine the individual’s probability of interacting with e...

  10. Exemplary Chinese University Professors: Qualities and Impact on Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene P. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the qualities of Chinese university professors as perceived by their students and the effects of those qualities on student learning and motivation. Specifically, what qualities and personal characteristics do Chinese university students attribute to their favorite and least favorite professors, and how do those qualities and characteristics affect Chinese university students? Out of 280 students surveyed from three different universities, 226 surveys were completed, returned and included in the final analysis (response rate of 80.7%. The research found that Chinese students favored professors who are entertaining, who help them learn more and who provide them with helpful feedback on their assignments. Students disfavor professors who are boring, arrogant and do not provide helpful feedback or help them learn more. Linear regressions revealed a connection between high quality professors and student learning and motivation. Along with other studies, this research provides evidence that effective university professors are those who not only possess expertise in their fields, but in addition are engaging, student-focused and able to build rapport with their students.

  11. The meaning of teaching and learning for professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Aguilar, Luz Carlota; Forero Pulido, Constanza; Ocampo Rivera, Diana Carolina; Madrigal Ramírez, Martha Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    This work sought to comprehend the meaning professors from the Faculty of Nursing at Universidad de Antioquia (Colombia) assign to teaching and learning processes. This was an educational qualitative, evaluative investigation, with ethnographic focus, conducted from 2011 to 2013. The information collection techniques were: semi-structured interview, discussion groups, y el documentary analysis. A total of 70 professors from the undergraduate Nursing program at Universidad de Antioquia participated in the study. Teaching for professors means complexity, transmission of information and knowledge, cooperation with students, interaction, and transformation of reality. This does not merely depend on the vocation or on the will to carry it out; on the contrary, professors must have professional, disciplinary, and pedagogical formation. Learning for the professors means that students understood, comprehended, and were able to put the theory into practice. Also, students must commit to their own learning. The conceptions professors have of teaching and learning processes guide the meaning they assign to said processes and stem from their own experience, culture, professional and disciplinary formation. Assigning new meaning to teaching in nursing opens the possibility of reorienting the teaching practice.

  12. Atitudes do professor em sala de aula – um estudo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Marcelino Bento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A maneira como o professor se comporta, e a maneira do médico podem ser comparadas. Um médico que fica nervoso na frente de seu paciente, que treme ao lidar com agulhas ou, desmaia ao ver sangue, e o professor que não sabe lidar com alunos que choram, alunos que possuem uma cultura muito diferente dos demais e do próprio professor, estão despreparados para a sua profissão. Torna-se pois, questionável se o professor sabe da importância que seus atos têm sobre seus alunos.Têm-se como objetivos: verificar na literatura a importância da linguagem corporal para o processo de aprendizagem; verificar se docentes de uma escola pública percebem a importância dos gestos e/ou atitudes para o processo de aprendizagem dos alunos. Pesquisa de natureza exploratória, com delineamento em estudo de caso e análise qualitativa, foi realizada em uma escola pública do Vale do Paraíba, Estado de São Paulo, com docentes do Ensino Fundamental I. Conclui-se que os professores precisam estar atentos a suas atitudes e sua maneira de agir, pois uma palavra do professor pode resultar tanto em uma ferida para o resto da vida, quanto para um avanço em aprendizagem escolar e desenvolvimento do aluno.

  13. What is an anesthesiology resident worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Marisa H; Beaman, Shawn T; Metro, David G; Handley, Linda J; Walker, James E

    2009-08-01

    To determine the cost of replacing an anesthesiology resident with a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for equal operating room (OR) work. Retrospective financial analysis. Academic anesthesiology department. Clinical anesthesia (CA)-1 through CA-3 residents. Cost of replacing anesthesiology residents with CRNAs for equal OR work was determined. The cost of replacing one anesthesiology resident with a CRNA for the same number of OR hours ranged from $9,940.32 to $43,300 per month ($106,241.68 to $432,937.50 per yr). Numbers varied depending on the CRNA pay scale and whether the calculations were based on the number of OR hours worked at our residency program or OR hours worked in a maximum duty hour model. A CRNA is paid substantially more per OR hour worked, at all pay levels, than an anesthesiology resident.

  14. Local Determinants of Crime: Distinguishing Between Resident and Non-resident Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Spengler, Hannes; Büttner, Thiess

    2003-01-01

    The paper revisits the local determinants of crime using a spatial model distinguishing between resident and non-resident offenders. Employing data for German municipalities, the model is estimated by means of a spatial GMM approach. Focusing on resident offenders legal earnings opportunities and the expected gain from offenses are found to be important determinants of crime. Also the socio-economic background in terms of unemployment, poverty, and inequality proves significant for both prope...

  15. A Flex-Model for long-term assessment of community-residing older adults following disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkoetter, Marlene M; McDonough, JoEllen; McCall, Amber; Smith, Deborah; Looney, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For the rapidly growing older adult population, disaster consequences are frequently life disruptive and even life threatening. By 2050, it is estimated that the global older adult population will reach 22 percent of the total. With declining health, this population poses a particular risk needing to be addressed in emergency preparedness and disaster recovery. The purpose of this article is to describe a Flex-Model (F-M) for the long-term assessment of older adults following a disaster. An F-M is a series of three-dimensional representations of an archetype with flexible components, both linear and parallel, that can be adapted to situations, time, place, and needs. The model incorporates the Life Patterns Model and provides a template that can be adjusted to meet the needs of a local community, healthcare providers, and emergency management officials, regardless of the country or region, during the months after a disaster. The focus is on changes resulting from the disaster including roles, relationships, support systems, use of time, self-esteem, and life structure. Following a baseline assessment, each of these life patterns is assessed through the model with options for interventions over time. A pilot study was conducted in Georgia to gain information that would be helpful in developing a more specific assessment tool following a severe winter storm. While this is a local study, the findings can nevertheless be used to refine and focus the F-M for future implementation. Results indicated that older adults used high-risk heating and lighting sources and many were totally responsible for their own welfare. Findings have implications for emergency preparedness and long-term recovery.

  16. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  17. Tax treaty entitlement issues concerning dual residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanghavi, D.

    2014-01-01

    The question whether a dual resident taxpayer is entitled to tax treaties concluded by each residence state with a third state has been controversial. Since 2008, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Commentary on Article 4(1) of the OECD Model states that such a

  18. Modeling {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation in the salmon–resident killer whale food web of the Northeastern Pacific following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alava, Juan José, E-mail: jalavasa@sfu.ca; Gobas, Frank A.P.C.

    2016-02-15

    To track the long term bioaccumulation of {sup 137}Cs in marine organisms off the Pacific Northwest coast of Canada, we developed a time dependent bioaccumulation model for {sup 137}Cs in a marine mammalian food web that included fish-eating resident killer whales. The model outcomes show that {sup 137}Cs can be expected to gradually bioaccumulate in the food web over time as demonstrated by the increase of the apparent trophic magnification factor of {sup 137}Cs, ranging from 0.76 after 1 month of exposure to 2.0 following 30 years of exposure. {sup 137}Cs bioaccumulation is driven by relatively rapid dietary uptake rates, moderate depuration rates in lower trophic level organisms and slow elimination rates in high trophic level organisms. Model estimates of the {sup 137}Cs activity in species of the food web, based on current measurements and forecasts of {sup 137}Cs activities in oceanic waters and sediments off the Canadian Pacific Northwest, indicate that the long term {sup 137}Cs activities in fish species including Pacific herring, wild Pacific salmon, sablefish and halibut will remain well below the current {sup 137}Cs-Canada Action Level for consumption (1000 Bq/kg) following a nuclear emergency. Killer whales and Pacific salmon are expected to exhibit the largest long term {sup 137}Cs activities and may be good sentinels for monitoring {sup 137}Cs in the region. Assessment of the long term consequences of {sup 137}Cs releases from the Fukushima aftermath should consider the extent of ecological magnification in addition to ocean dilution. - Highlights: • A food web bioaccumulation model to assess the biomagnification of {sup 137}Cs is developed. • Cesium 137 exhibits bioaccumulation over time as simulated by the model. • Predicted activities in marine biota are below {sup 137}Cs-food consumption benchmarks. • Long-term monitoring of {sup 137}Cs in the ocean will improve the model predictions.

  19. Modeling 137Cs bioaccumulation in the salmon–resident killer whale food web of the Northeastern Pacific following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alava, Juan José; Gobas, Frank A.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    To track the long term bioaccumulation of 137 Cs in marine organisms off the Pacific Northwest coast of Canada, we developed a time dependent bioaccumulation model for 137 Cs in a marine mammalian food web that included fish-eating resident killer whales. The model outcomes show that 137 Cs can be expected to gradually bioaccumulate in the food web over time as demonstrated by the increase of the apparent trophic magnification factor of 137 Cs, ranging from 0.76 after 1 month of exposure to 2.0 following 30 years of exposure. 137 Cs bioaccumulation is driven by relatively rapid dietary uptake rates, moderate depuration rates in lower trophic level organisms and slow elimination rates in high trophic level organisms. Model estimates of the 137 Cs activity in species of the food web, based on current measurements and forecasts of 137 Cs activities in oceanic waters and sediments off the Canadian Pacific Northwest, indicate that the long term 137 Cs activities in fish species including Pacific herring, wild Pacific salmon, sablefish and halibut will remain well below the current 137 Cs-Canada Action Level for consumption (1000 Bq/kg) following a nuclear emergency. Killer whales and Pacific salmon are expected to exhibit the largest long term 137 Cs activities and may be good sentinels for monitoring 137 Cs in the region. Assessment of the long term consequences of 137 Cs releases from the Fukushima aftermath should consider the extent of ecological magnification in addition to ocean dilution. - Highlights: • A food web bioaccumulation model to assess the biomagnification of 137 Cs is developed. • Cesium 137 exhibits bioaccumulation over time as simulated by the model. • Predicted activities in marine biota are below 137 Cs-food consumption benchmarks. • Long-term monitoring of 137 Cs in the ocean will improve the model predictions.

  20. Electronic collaboration in dermatology resident training through social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Natalie M; McGuire, April L; Carroll, Bryan T

    2017-04-01

    The use of online educational resources and professional social networking sites is increasing. The field of dermatology is currently under-utilizing online social networking as a means of professional collaboration and sharing of training materials. In this study, we sought to assess the current structure of and satisfaction with dermatology resident education and gauge interest for a professional social networking site for educational collaboration. Two surveys-one for residents and one for faculty-were electronically distributed via the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery and Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserves. The surveys confirmed that there is interest among dermatology residents and faculty in a dermatology professional networking site with the goal to enhance educational collaboration.

  1. Reminiscences regarding Professor R.N. Christiansen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Govind

    2008-11-01

    In this short paper I describe my initiation into the field of radio astronomy fifty years ago, under the guidance of Professor W.N. ('Chris') Christiansen, soon after I joined the C.S.I.R.O.'s Division of Radiophysics (RP) in Sydney, Australia, in 1953 under a 2-year Colombo Plan Fellowship. During the early 1950s Christiansen had developed a remarkable 21 cm interferometric grating array of 32 east-west aligned parabolic dishes and another array of 16 dishes in a north-south direction at Potts Hill. Christiansen and Warburton used these two arrays to scan the Sun strip-wise yielding radio brightness distribution at various position angles. During a three month period I assisted them in making a 2-dimensional map of the Sun by a complex Fourier transform process. In the second year of my Fellowship, Parthasarathy and I converted the 32-antenna east-west grating array to study solar radio emission at 60cm. During this work, I noticed that the procedure adopted by Christiansen for phase adjustment of the grating array was time consuming. Based on this experience, I later developed an innovative technique at Stanford in 1959 for phase adjustment of long transmission lines and paths in space. In a bid to improve on the method used by Christiansen to make a 2-dimensional map of the Sun from strip scans, I suggested to R.N. Bracewell in 1962 a revolutionary method for direct 2-dimensional imaging without Fourier transforms. Bracewell and Riddle developed the method for making a 2-dimensional map of the Moon using strip scans obtained with the 32 element interferometer at Stanford. The method has since revolutionized medical tomography. I describe these developments here to highlight my initial work with Christiansen and to show how new ideas often are developed by necessity and have their origin in prior experience! The 32 Potts Hill solar grating array dishes were eventually donated by the C.S.I.R.0. to India and were set up by me at Kalyan near Mumbai, forming the

  2. Fuzzy logic and information fusion to commemorate the 70th birthday of Professor Gaspar Mayor

    CERN Document Server

    Sastre, Joan

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a timely report on key theories and applications of soft-computing. Written in honour of Professor Gaspar Mayor on his 70th birthday, it primarily focuses on areas related to his research, including fuzzy binary operators, aggregation functions, multi-distances, and fuzzy consensus/decision models. It also discusses a number of interesting applications such as the implementation of fuzzy mathematical morphology based on Mayor-Torrens t-norms. Importantly, the different chapters, authored by leading experts, present novel results and offer new perspectives on different aspects of Mayor’s research. The book also includes an overview of evolutionary fuzzy systems, a topic that is not one of Mayor’s main areas of interest, and a final chapter written by the Spanish pioneer in fuzzy logic, Professor E. Trillas. Computer and decision scientists, knowledge engineers and mathematicians alike will find here an authoritative overview of key soft-computing concepts and techniques.

  3. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  4. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  5. O YouTube e o Cyberbullying de alunos contra professores around the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alvaro Soares Zuin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The teacher, in one way or another, has always been identified as a pedagogical authority. But if there were a society whose technological development determined radical transformations in the production and dissemination of knowledge, to the point of decisively changing the relations between teachers and students? Would the teacher continue to represent a model of identity for the student who could access information online in any time and space? In view of the context of the digital culture society, the objective of this article is to investigate how students practice cyberbullying in relation to their teachers through images recorded by mobile phones, which are posted on the site YouTube. It will be analyzed three videos posted by students from three different countries (Brazil, Portugal and England, whose images refer to situations experienced with their respective teachers. It is also intended to argue that such attitudes are signs of radical transformations that are occurring in relation to the way students identify the teacher as a pedagogical authority. O professor, de uma forma ou de outra, sempre foi identificado como autoridade pedagógica. Mas, e se houvesse uma sociedade cujo desenvolvimento tecnológico determinasse transformações radicais na produção e disseminação do conhecimento, a ponto de se alterar, de forma decisiva, as relações entre professores e alunos? O professor continuaria a representar um modelo de identidade para o aluno que pudesse acessar informações de forma online em quaisquer tempos e espaços? Diante do contexto da sociedade da cultura digital, destaca-se o objetivo deste artigo: investigar o modo como alunos praticam cyberbullying em relação a seus professores por meio de imagens gravadas por telefones celulares, as quais são postadas no sítio de compartilhamentos de imagens e comentários chamado YouTube. Serão analisados três vídeos postados por alunos de três diferentes países (Brasil

  6. Radiology residents' experience with intussusception reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, Cyrus; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-06-01

    Residents should be exposed to adequate procedural volume to act independently upon completion of training. Informal inquiry led us to question whether residents encounter enough intussusception reductions to become comfortable with the procedure. We sought to determine radiology residents' exposure to intussusception reductions, and whether their experiences vary by region or institution. U.S. radiology residency program directors were asked to encourage their residents to complete a 12-question online survey describing characteristics of their pediatric radiology department, experiences with intussusception reduction, and confidence in their own ability to perform the procedure. Six hundred sixty-four residents responded during the study period. Of those, 308 (46.4%) had not experienced an intussusception reduction, and 228 (34%) had experienced only one or two. Twenty-two percent of fourth-year residents had never experienced an intussusception reduction, and 21% had experienced only one. Among second- through fourth-year residents, only 99 (18.3%) felt confident that they could competently reduce an intussusception (P Radiology residents have limited opportunity to learn intussusception reduction and therefore lack confidence. Most think they would benefit from additional training with a computer-simulation model.

  7. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  8. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  9. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein Nejad, Hooman; Bagherabadi, Mehdi; Sistani, Alireza; Dargahi, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents' teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students' perception of the residents' teaching quality. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick's model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents' teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. The results indicated that residents' attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pTeacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick's model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third

  10. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  11. Professor-psicopedagogo: o que este profissional faz na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Andrea Pottker

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo identificar o porquê da presença do professor-psicopedagogo nas escolas e qual a função que este desempenha dentro delas, bem como, suas implicações no processo ensino-aprendizagem. Para tanto, foram entrevistados dez professores-psicopedagogos, pertencentes a cinco escolas localizadas no Estado do Paraná. Os resultados apontaram que o cargo de professor-psicopedagogo foi ocupado por professores que tinham o título de especialista em Psicopedagogia, os quais passaram a realizar avaliações psicopedagógicas dos alunos com dificuldades de aprendizagem. Segundo a maioria desses profissionais, uma de suas funções constitui-se em auxiliar o professor que apresenta em sala de aula alunos com dificuldades de aprendizagem, assim como tentar compreender o porquê de estes alunos não estarem aprendendo, sobretudo, ajudá-los na reversão desta problemática. Concluímos que a atuação deste profissional nestas escolas pouco tem contribuído para resolução das dificuldades de aprendizagem, pois centram-se no indivíduo e não no processo ensino-aprendizagem.

  12. Comparison of Emergency Medicine Malpractice Cases Involving Residents to Non-Resident Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Kiersten L; Grossman, Shamai A; Janes, Margaret; Yu-Moe, C Winnie; Song, Ellen; Tibbles, Carrie D; Shapiro, Nathan I; Rosen, Carlo L

    2018-04-17

    Data are lacking on how emergency medicine (EM) malpractice cases with resident involvement differs from cases that do not name a resident. To compare malpractice case characteristics in cases where a resident is involved (resident case) to cases that do not involve a resident (non-resident case) and to determine factors that contribute to malpractice cases utilizing EM as a model for malpractice claims across other medical specialties. We used data from the Controlled Risk Insurance Company (CRICO) Strategies' division Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS) to analyze open and closed EM cases asserted from 2009-2013. The CBS database is a national repository that contains professional liability data on > 400 hospitals and > 165,000 physicians, representing over 30% of all malpractice cases in the U.S (> 350,000 claims). We compared cases naming residents (either alone or in combination with an attending) to those that did not involve a resident (non-resident cohort). We reported the case statistics, allegation categories, severity scores, procedural data, final diagnoses and contributing factors. Fisher's exact test or t-test was used for comparisons (alpha set at 0.05). Eight hundred and forty-five EM cases were identified of which 732 (87%) did not name a resident (non-resident cases), while 113 (13%) included a resident (resident cases) (Figure 1). There were higher total incurred losses for non-resident cases (Table 1). The most frequent allegation categories in both cohorts were "Failure or Delay in Diagnosis/Misdiagnosis" and "Medical Treatment" (non-surgical procedures or treatment regimens i.e. central line placement). Allegation categories of Safety and Security, Patient Monitoring, Hospital Policy and Procedure and Breach of Confidentiality were found in the non-resident cases. Resident cases incurred lower payments on average ($51,163 vs. $156,212 per case). Sixty six percent (75) of resident vs 57% (415) of non-resident cases were high severity claims

  13. Using computer-extracted image features for modeling of error-making patterns in detection of mammographic masses among radiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lo, Joseph Y; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Ghate, Sujata V; Yoon, Sora C; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2014-09-01

    Mammography is the most widely accepted and utilized screening modality for early breast cancer detection. Providing high quality mammography education to radiology trainees is essential, since excellent interpretation skills are needed to ensure the highest benefit of screening mammography for patients. The authors have previously proposed a computer-aided education system based on trainee models. Those models relate human-assessed image characteristics to trainee error. In this study, the authors propose to build trainee models that utilize features automatically extracted from images using computer vision algorithms to predict likelihood of missing each mass by the trainee. This computer vision-based approach to trainee modeling will allow for automatically searching large databases of mammograms in order to identify challenging cases for each trainee. The authors' algorithm for predicting the likelihood of missing a mass consists of three steps. First, a mammogram is segmented into air, pectoral muscle, fatty tissue, dense tissue, and mass using automated segmentation algorithms. Second, 43 features are extracted using computer vision algorithms for each abnormality identified by experts. Third, error-making models (classifiers) are applied to predict the likelihood of trainees missing the abnormality based on the extracted features. The models are developed individually for each trainee using his/her previous reading data. The authors evaluated the predictive performance of the proposed algorithm using data from a reader study in which 10 subjects (7 residents and 3 novices) and 3 experts read 100 mammographic cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was applied for the evaluation. The average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the error-making models for the task of predicting which masses will be detected and which will be missed was 0.607 (95% CI,0.564-0.650). This value was statistically significantly different from 0.5 (perror

  14. Modeling (137)Cs bioaccumulation in the salmon-resident killer whale food web of the Northeastern Pacific following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alava, Juan José; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2016-02-15

    To track the long term bioaccumulation of (137)Cs in marine organisms off the Pacific Northwest coast of Canada, we developed a time dependent bioaccumulation model for (137)Cs in a marine mammalian food web that included fish-eating resident killer whales. The model outcomes show that (137)Cs can be expected to gradually bioaccumulate in the food web over time as demonstrated by the increase of the apparent trophic magnification factor of (137)Cs, ranging from 0.76 after 1 month of exposure to 2.0 following 30 years of exposure. (137)Cs bioaccumulation is driven by relatively rapid dietary uptake rates, moderate depuration rates in lower trophic level organisms and slow elimination rates in high trophic level organisms. Model estimates of the (137)Cs activity in species of the food web, based on current measurements and forecasts of (137)Cs activities in oceanic waters and sediments off the Canadian Pacific Northwest, indicate that the long term (137)Cs activities in fish species including Pacific herring, wild Pacific salmon, sablefish and halibut will remain well below the current (137)Cs-Canada Action Level for consumption (1000 Bq/kg) following a nuclear emergency. Killer whales and Pacific salmon are expected to exhibit the largest long term (137)Cs activities and may be good sentinels for monitoring (137)Cs in the region. Assessment of the long term consequences of (137)Cs releases from the Fukushima aftermath should consider the extent of ecological magnification in addition to ocean dilution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Compilation of Published PM2.5 Emission Rates for Cooking, Candles and Incense for Use in Modeling of Exposures in Residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tianchao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    recent analysis of health impacts from air pollutant inhalation in homes found that PM2.5 is the most damaging at the population level. Chronic exposure to elevated PM2.5 has the potential to damage human respiratory systems, and may result in premature death. PM2.5 exposures in homes can be mitigated through various approaches including kitchen exhaust ventilation, filtration, indoor pollutant source reduction and designing ventilation systems to reduce the entry of PM2.5 from outdoors. Analysis of the potential benefits and costs of various approaches can be accomplished using computer codes that simulate the key physical processes including emissions, dilution and ventilation. The largest sources of PM2.5 in residences broadly are entry from outdoors and emissions from indoor combustion. The largest indoor sources are tobacco combustion (smoking), cooking and the burning of candles and incense. Data on the magnitude of PM2.5 and other pollutant emissions from these events and processes are required to conduct simulations for analysis. The goal of this study was to produce a database of pollutant emission rates associated with cooking and the burning of candles and incense. The target use of these data is for indoor air quality modeling.

  16. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  17. [Professor Kazimierz Jaegermann--forensic pathologist--scientist--thinker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiłowski, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    Professor Kazimierz Jaegermann, a founder of the theory of medico-legal opinionating, passed away 20 years ago. Numerous specialists in forensic medicine and an ever increasing number of lawyers substantiate the importance and value of the creative thought and the entire research work of Professor Jaegermann that have been an inspiration of progress in forensic medicine and in the science of applied law. His unique ability to perform a scientific synthesis leading to recognizing forensic medicine as an applied bridging knowledge points to the eminently creative role played by Professor Jaegermann in development of forensic medicine. There is an urgent need to recall his research activities and to publish a complete collection of his articles and publications. With this idea in mind, I present below an article based on the text published in No. 1 of the Zeszyty Naukowe Katedry Medycyny Sadowej Slaskiej Akademii Medycznej in 1995.

  18. Dificuldades de aprendizagem na escola: o olhar do professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorca Rufino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo refere-se às dificuldades de aprendizagem no cotidiano escolar. Investigou-se as dificuldades encontradas, estratégias metodológicas, encaminhamentos a especialistas, apoio da escola e família. A pesquisa se desenvolveu com professores de escolas públicas e particular de Sinop-MT. Trata-se de um estudo de caso com abordagem qualitativa. Verificou-se que a presença da família, metodologias adequadas e interesse dos professores, somados ao apoio da instituição são incontestáveis para amenizar as dificuldades escolares. Essa realidade poderá ser até mesmo revertida somada as ações e pessoas comprometidas com o aluno com dificuldade escolar. Palavras-chave: dificuldades de aprendizagem; escola; professor; aluno; metodologia.

  19. [The essence of Professor Wu Lian-Zhong's acupuncture manipulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Yi; Wu, Lian-Zhong

    2014-05-01

    The painless needle insertion technique, summarized by Professor WU Lian-zhong during his decades of acupuncture clinical practice is introduced in this article, which is characterized as soft, flexible, fast, plucking and activating antipathogenic qi. The Sancai (three layers) lifting and thrusting manipulation technique is adopted by Professor WU for getting the qi sensation. And features of 10 kinds of needling sensation such as soreness, numbness, heaviness, distension, pain, cold, hot, radiation, jumping and contracture are summarized. Finger force, amplitude, speed and time length are also taken as the basis of reinforcing and reducing manipulations. Moreover, examples are also given to explain the needling technique on some specific points which further embodies Professor WU's unique experiences and understandings on acupuncture.

  20. [Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD, students at Budapest and Prague Faculties of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlík, M; Derzsiová, K

    2010-11-01

    Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD were contemporaries, both born in 1899, one in Zvolen, the other in Dombovar, at the time of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Prof. Por attended the Faculty of Medicine in Budapest from 1918 to 1920, and Prof. Klopstock studied at the same place between 1917 and 1919. From 1920 until graduation on 6th February 1926, Prof. Por continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague. Prof. Klopstock had to interrupt his studies in Budapest due to pulmonary tuberculosis; he received treatment at Tatranske Matliare where he befriended Franz Kafka. Later, upon Kafka's encouragement, he changed institutions and continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, where he graduated the first great go. It is very likely that, during their studies in Budapest and Prague, both professors met repeatedly, even though their life paths later separated. Following his graduation, Prof. Por practiced as an internist in Prague, later in Slovakia, and from 1945 in Kosice. In 1961, he was awarded the title of university professor of internal medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, where he practiced until his death in 1980. Prof. Klopstock continued his studies in Kiel and Berlin. After his graduation in 1933, he practiced in Berlin as a surgeon and in 1938 left for USA. In 1962, he was awarded the title of university professor of pulmonary surgery in NewYork, where he died in 1972.

  1. Eating disorder training and attitudes among primary care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, David A; Redfern, Roberta; Wanjiku, Stephen; Lazebnik, Rina; Rome, Ellen S

    2013-04-01

    The ability to diagnose eating disorders (ED) is important and difficult for primary care physicians (PCPs). Previous reports suggest that PCPs feel their training is inadequate. To explore residents' interest and comfort diagnosing and treating ED. An internet survey was sent to primary care residencies. Logistic regression models were fitted to identify factors correlated with residents' interest and comfort in diagnosing and treating ED. Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents had higher interest in ED than Pediatric residents, as did female residents and residents exposed to teenagers with unexplained weight loss. Residents in programs with an ED program and faculty interested in ED were more comfortable diagnosing ED. Interest in, and comfort diagnosing and treating ED are associated with specialty type, presence of an ED program, presence of faculty interested in ED, and resident exposure to ED outpatients and teenagers with unexplained weight loss.

  2. Cognitive-Motivational Determinants of Residents' Civic Engagement and Health (Inequities) in the Context of Noise Action Planning: A Conceptual Model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedel, Natalie; van Kamp, Irene; Köckler, Heike; Scheiner, Joachim; Loerbroks, Adrian; Claßen, Thomas; Bolte, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    The Environmental Noise Directive expects residents to be actively involved in localising and selecting noise abatement interventions during the noise action planning process. Its intervention impact is meant to be homogeneous across population groups. Against the background of social heterogeneity

  3. Forecasting the student–professor matches that result in unusually effective teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L; LaCross, Ryan; R Plotkowski, Andrea; Winegard, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some professors are more effective than others, on average across students. Aims We attempted to forecast students' evaluations of live lectures from brief, video-recorded teaching trailers. Sample Participants were 145 college students (74% female) enrolled in introductory psychology courses at a public university in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Methods Students viewed trailers early in the semester and attended live lectures months later. Because subgroups of students viewed the same professors, statistical analyses could isolate professor and relationship effects. Results Evaluations were influenced strongly by relationship and professor effects, and students' evaluations of live lectures could be forecasted from students' evaluations of teaching trailers. That is, we could forecast the individual students who would respond unusually well to a specific professor (relationship effects). We could also forecast which professors elicited better evaluations in live lectures, on average across students (professor effects). Professors who elicited unusually good evaluations in some students also elicited better memory for lectures in those students. Conclusions It appears possible to forecast relationship and professor effects on teaching evaluations by presenting brief teaching trailers to students. Thus, it might be possible to develop online recommender systems to help match students and professors so that unusually effective teaching emerges. PMID:24953773

  4. Aspectos gerais da formação de professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson do Carmo Inforsato

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo, ancorado em estudos recentes e antigos, mostra o afastamento dos cursos de formação de professores em relação aos elementos que compõem a prática profissional docente. Favorável a uma aproximação efetiva com o contexto das práticas de sala de aula, o autor defende a idéia de uma formação de professores atrelada aos problemas e necessidades da prática docente no ensino formal de 1º e 2º graus.

  5. Preditores da Síndrome de Burnout em professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Sandra Carlotto

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar os preditores da Síndrome de Burnout em 563 professores de instituições educacionais particulares da região metropolitana de Porto Alegre - RS. Foram utilizados um questionário elaborado para levantamento de variáveis demográficas e profissionais, o Maslach Burnout Inventory, o Job Diagnostic Survey e o Questionário de Satisfação no Trabalho S20/23. Os resultados evidenciam que variáveis relacionadas ao contexto laboral predominam no modelo explicativo de Burnout em professores em ambos os grupos.

  6. A formação do professor de biologia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlichting, Maria Cristina Rodrigues Maranhão

    1997-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciencias da Educação O estudo evidencia o tratamento dicotômico mantido na estrutura curricular dos cursos de formação do professor de biologia considerando ser essa prática responsável pelos preconceitos que levam à desvalorização da prática pedagógica. O estudo parte da análise da estrutura curricular e aprofunda-se com entrevistas que buscam levantar o posicionamento dos professores dos cursos de Ciências Biológi...

  7. Professor Adler-Nissen i Radio 27syv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Professor Adler-Nissen var fredag den 9. juni i radio 24syv (program 24syv Morgen) i forlængelse af den britiske valg. Her blev Adler-Nissen blandet andet spurgt ind til, hvilken betydning valget vil have for de kommende Brexit-forhandlinger. Adler-Nissen vurderede, at en udskydelse af forhandlin......Professor Adler-Nissen var fredag den 9. juni i radio 24syv (program 24syv Morgen) i forlængelse af den britiske valg. Her blev Adler-Nissen blandet andet spurgt ind til, hvilken betydning valget vil have for de kommende Brexit-forhandlinger. Adler-Nissen vurderede, at en udskydelse af...

  8. [Competency-based Neurosurgery Residency Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Jiménez Roldan, Luis; Alen, José F; Castaño, Ana M; Munarriz, Pablo M; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A programme proposal for competency-based Neurosurgery training adapted to the specialization project is presented. This proposal has been developed by a group of neurosurgeons commissioned by the SENEC (Spanish Society of Neurosurgery) and could be modified to generate a final version that could come into force coinciding with the implementation of the specialization programme. This document aims to facilitate the test of the new programme included in the online version of our journal. Total training period is 6 years; initial 2 years belong to the surgery specialization and remaining 4 years belong to core specialty period. It is a competency-based programmed based on the map used by the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) including the following domains of clinical competency: Medical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, health systems, interprofessional collaboration and professional and personal development. Subcompetencies map in the domains of Knowledge and Patient care (including surgical competencies) was adapted to the one proposed by AANS and CNS (annex 1 of the programme). A subcompetency map was also used for the specialization rotations. Resident's training is based on personal study (self-learning) supported by efficient use of information sources and supervised clinical practice, including bioethical instruction, clinical management, research and learning techniques. Resident evaluation proposal includes, among other instruments, theoretical knowledge tests, objective and structured evaluation of the level of clinical competency with real or standardised patients, global competency scales, 360-degree evaluation, clinical record audits, milestones for residents progress and self-assessment (annex 2). Besides, residents periodically assess the teaching commitment of the department's neurosurgeons and other professors participating in rotations, and annually

  9. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  10. Perda da voz em professores e não professores Voice loss in teachers and non-teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Park

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a percepção de professores e não-professores sobre as implicações de uma eventual perda de voz. MÉTODOS: Participaram 205 indivíduos sendo 105 professores e 100 não professores entre 23 a 65 anos, 106 mulheres e 99 homens. Foi aplicado um questionário contendo quatro perguntas referentes a uma eventual perda de visão, audição, voz e deambulação e o grau de impacto inferido (de 0 a 4. RESULTADOS: Para o grupo de professores, não enxergar gerou o maior impacto negativo (média de 3,8, seguido por não andar (média de 3,7, não ter voz (média de 3,7 e não ouvir (média de 3,6. Para o grupo de não-professores, não enxergar também gerou o maior impacto negativo (média de 3,4, seguido por não andar (média de 3,0; não ouvir (média de 2,2 e não ter voz (média de 2,0. Em relação ao maior impacto de uma eventual perda da voz, professores indicaram prejuízos no trabalho, relacionamento social e atividades rotineiras e, no grupo de não professores, nas atividades rotineiras, trabalho, relacionamento social e manifestações das emoções. CONCLUSÕES: Os professores valorizam sua voz de modo diverso dos não-professores e ambos os grupos avaliam a perda da voz como algo que não acarreta consequências negativas. Apesar de o professor perceber mais o impacto de um eventual problema de voz do que o não-professor, os sentimentos em relação à perda da voz foram muito semelhantes nos dois grupos.PURPOSE: To investigate teachers' and non-teachers' perception regarding the implications of an eventual loss of voice. METHODS: Participated in the study 205 individuals (106 women and 99 men, 105 teachers and 100 non-teachers, with ages varying from 23 to 65 years old. The participants were asked to answer a questionnaire with four questions regarding an eventual loss of vision, hearing, voice and deambulation, and the inferred impact degree (from 0 to 4. RESULTS: For the teachers group, not being able to see

  11. Driving down the road toll : videos of lectures given as Adelaide Thinker in Residence 2011-2012.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, F.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Professor Fred Wegman is one of the world’s most respected road safety experts. Fred’s residency has focused on making our roads safer, looking at our roads, the vehicles, road users and travel speeds. This record contains his final lecture, completing his third and final visit to South Australia

  12. Identifying Gaps and Launching Resident Wellness Initiatives: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Battaglioli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus for the medical education community, especially among learners in graduate medical education. In 2017 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME updated the Common Program Requirements to focus more on resident wellbeing. To address this issue, one working group from the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS focused on wellness program innovations and initiatives in emergency medicine (EM residency programs. Methods: Over a seven-month period leading up to the RWCS event, the Programmatic Initiatives workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online, resident community consisting of 142 residents from 100 EM residencies in North America. A 15-person subgroup (13 residents, two faculty facilitators met at the RWCS to develop a public, central repository of initiatives for programs, as well as tools to assist programs in identifying gaps in their overarching wellness programs. Results: An online submission form and central database of wellness initiatives were created and accessible to the public. Wellness Think Tank members collected an initial 36 submissions for the database by the time of the RWCS event. Based on general workplace, needs-assessment tools on employee wellbeing and Kern’s model for curriculum development, a resident-based needs-assessment survey and an implementation worksheet were created to assist residency programs in wellness program development. Conclusion: The Programmatic Initiatives workgroup from the resident-driven RWCS event created tools to assist EM residency programs in identifying existing initiatives and gaps in their wellness programs to meet the ACGME’s expanded focus on resident wellbeing.

  13. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  14. An Innovative Approach to Resident Scheduling: Use of a Point-Based System to Account for Resident Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Robert Tao-Ping; Tamhane, Shrikant; Zhang, Manling; Fisher, Lori-Ann; Yoon, Jenni; Sehgal, Sameep; Lumbres, Madel; Han, Ma Ai Thanda; Win, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Background The scheduling of residents for rotation assignments and on-call responsibilities is a time-consuming process that challenges the resources of residency programs. Assignment of schedules is traditionally done by chief residents or program administration with variable input from the residents involved. Intervention We introduced an innovative point-based scheduling system to increase transparency in the scheduling process, foster a sense of fairness and equality in scheduling, and increase resident ownership for making judicious scheduling choices. Methods We devised a point-based system in which each resident in our 40-member program was allocated an equal number of points. The residents assigned these points to their preferred choices of rotations. Residents were then surveyed anonymously on their perceptions of this new scheduling system and were asked to compare it with their traditional scheduling system. Results The schedule was successfully implemented, and it allowed residents to express their scheduling preferences using an innovative point-based approach. Residents were generally satisfied with the new system, would recommend it to other programs, and perceived a greater sense of involvement. However, resident satisfaction with the new system was not significantly greater compared with the previous approach to scheduling (P = .20). Chief residents expressed satisfaction with the new scheduling model. Conclusions Residents were equally satisfied with the traditional preference-based scheduling approach and the new point-based system. Chief residents' feedback on the new system reflected reduced stress and time commitment in the new point-based system. PMID:26457154

  15. The rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Vortex theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Wood, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles with the main, and largely self-explanatory, title "Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky". This article considers rotors with finite number of blades and is subtitled "Vortex theories". The first article with subtitle "Momentum theories", assessed the starring ...

  16. Kant as a Professor: Some Lessons for Today's Intellectuals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thoughts of every great philosopher is measured and represented by the history of his social background. It is indeed, more appropriate particularly in the case of a great philosopher like Immanuel Kant to single out for special recognition the outstanding characteristics of his early life on his career as a professor of ...

  17. Os Impedimentos da Atividade de Trabalho do Professor na EAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alda Karoline Lima da Silva

    Full Text Available Resumo O estudo apresenta uma análise clínica dos impedimentos da atividade de trabalho do professor na Educação a Distância (EAD sob a ótica da abordagem teórico-metodológica da Clínica da Atividade (CA. Ser professor na EAD é uma atividade recente, comparada à modalidade presencial, na qual as atividades de trabalho são reconfiguradas tanto do ponto de vista técnico-instrumental quanto didático-pedagógico. A fim de estudar os impedimentos dessas atividades utilizamos a técnica da Instrução ao Sósia (IaS para uma coanálise da atividade de trabalho. A análise da atividade de trabalho apontou diferentes formas de vivenciar os espaços de docência. As mudanças que a EAD produziu na atividade dos professores os convocaram a um acesso mais profundo das orientações genéricas da profissão, de modo a contribuir para revitalizações do fazer docente, não necessariamente atrelado ao uso do modelo presencial como um guia, pois replicar o modelo presencial para EAD não seria garantia do sucesso da atividade do professor na EAD.

  18. [Two hundred years from the birth of Professor Josef Skoda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, J

    2005-01-01

    The article deals with the life and work of the eminent professor of internal medicine Josef Skoda, a native of Plzen, who especially deserved of the introduction of examination by percussion and auscultation. He supported materially his nephew Emil and so he contributed to the expansion of Skoda's factory in Plzen.

  19. Tribute to the legend Mr. Veterinary Public Health, Professor James ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author was also destined during his Sabbatical Leave to have an interactive interview session with Prof James Steele after attending the 20th Annual James Steele lecture/ 99th birthday Dinner of Professor James Steele 4th and 6th April 2012 at the Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, USA. The interview ...

  20. Professor G N Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    crystallography with particular reference to structure-reactivity correlations in the crystalline state. K Venkatesan. This article presents briefly the original contributions of. Professor G N Ramachandran to the methods of the struc- ture determination by X-ray diffraction of crystals. Introduction. Crystals are composed of groups ...

  1. Burnout Syndrome and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Padilla, Arlington Antonio; Escorcia Bonivento, Carla Vanessa; Perez Suarez, Blinis Sat

    2017-01-01

    The presence of the Burnout syndrome in professors may be regarded as a deterioration of their mental health with negative impacts on their job performance. It is known that teachers develop different activities in the areas of teaching, outreach and research. This study aims to analyze the relationship between the Burnout syndrome and…

  2. Ten Things Every Professor Should Know about Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kenneth; Dunlap, Joanna; Stevens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ten key assessment practices for advancing student learning that all professors should be familiar with and strategically incorporate in their classrooms and programs. Each practice or concept is explained with examples and guidance for putting it into practice. The ten are: learning outcomes, performance assessments,…

  3. "Women in Science" with Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are happy to present. Prof. Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell is currently a visiting Professor at the. University of Oxford UK and a Fellow of Mansfield College. In a career spanning over four decades, she has made outstanding contributions to Astronomy and the public understanding of Science. As a Ph.D student in Cambridge.

  4. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Six Items Predict Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapport between students and teachers leads to numerous positive student outcomes, including attitudes toward the teacher and course, student motivation, and perceived learning. The recent development of a Professor-Student Rapport scale offers assessment of this construct. However, a Cronbach's [alpha] of 0.96 indicated item redundancy, and the…

  5. [Professor TIAN Cong-huo's experience on clinical acupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shi-Yun; Wang, Yin

    2008-10-01

    Professor TIAN's experiences on acupuncture treatment of various difficult diseases with different acupuncture methods based on syndrome differentiation of different patients, for example, para-acupuncture for treatment of migraine, triple puncture at Dazhui (GV 14) for recurrent depression, lifting and thrusting point Shexiaxue for treatment of aphasia, electroacupuncture at Shuigou (GV 26) and Baihui (GV 20) for treatment of schizophrenia, etc. are introduced.

  6. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  7. The Professor at Risk: Alcohol Abuse in Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreson, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    The academic environment, trends in higher education, and issues in adult development create an ideal environment for alcohol misuse. A typology for the professors at risk, the impact of alcohol misuse upon their performance, and means of dealing with the problem are proposed. (Author/MLW)

  8. Can Virtual Patients Help Real Professors Teach Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debolt, David

    2008-01-01

    This article reports MyCaseSpace, a Web-based program used to present clinical cases to students in health-related professions to test their critical thinking skills. The creator of MyCaseSpace, David Segal, an assistant professor in the College of Health and Public Affairs at the University of Central Florida, has created various characters to…

  9. Understanding Professors of Practice: Leveraging Expertise, Empowering Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Crystal M.; Brua, Chas

    2017-01-01

    Contingent faculty are an increasingly common response to rising costs and growing enrollments (AAUP, 2014). Our research focuses on the small subset of contingent faculty whose institutions label them "Professors of Practice." They come to academia with deep professional/industry experience and leverage their unique knowledge, networks,…

  10. "Friending" Professors, Parents and Bosses: A Facebook Connection Conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Katherine A.; Peluchette, Joy V.

    2011-01-01

    The ever-growing popularity of Facebook has led some educators to ponder what role social networking might have in education. The authors examined student reactions to friend requests from people outside their regular network of friends including professors, parents, and employers. We found students have the most positive reactions to friend…

  11. Teaching the College "Nones": Christian Privilege and the Religion Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riswold, Caryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Working with undergraduate students invites teachers into relationship and conversation with young people at a time when they are emerging as adults and forming their identities. Faith is one area of identity formation often attended to by scholars, college professors, and their institutions. But within that, little attention has been paid to…

  12. Häbi, professor, teil on Gefilus kapis / Eve Kruuse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kruuse, Eve,d1959-

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli professor Marika Mikelsaar võitis läinud kuul koos kolleegidega (Tiiu Kullisaar, Epp Songisepp, Hedi Annuk ja Mihkel Zilmer) Soulis ülemaailmse naisleiutajate konkursil ME-3 bakteri avastamise ja probiootikuks arendamise eest kuldmedali

  13. University Professors and Teaching Ethics: Conceptualizations and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kathy Lund; Beggs, Jeri Mullins

    2006-01-01

    After the spectacular ethical breaches in corporate America emerged, business school professors were singled out as having been negligent in teaching ethical standards. This exploratory study asked business school faculty about teaching ethics, including conceptualizations of ethics in a teaching context and opinions of the extent to which…

  14. An ethnographic account of a snapshot in Professor Graham ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article takes the form of a meta-reflection on the educational contribution to the wider community of the University of Pretoria made by Professor Graham Duncan. It is but a snapshot of the academic life of a scholar of note. The epicentre of the article revolves around his educational professionalism that emanated from ...

  15. Does Gender and Professional Experience Influence Students' Perceptions of Professors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, Natalie T. J.; Waters, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Grounded in literature stemming from higher education research, this study examines how students evaluate public relations educators by gauging their perceptions of the professors' professional competency, professorial warmth, course difficulty, and industry connectivity. Using an experimental design, students (N = 303) from four U.S. universities…

  16. Communication professor examines media bias in president's speeches

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Jim A. Kuypers, assistant professor of communication in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech, reveals a disturbing world of media bias in his new book Bush's War: Media Bias and Justifications for War in a Terrorist Age (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. 2006).

  17. Professor GN Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 10. Professor G. N. Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography. K Venkatesan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 10 October 2001 pp 8-15. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Professor Hans A Bethe–A Brief Homage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 10. Professor Hans A Bethe – A Brief Homage. R Rajaraman. Article-in-a-Box Volume 10 Issue 10 October 2005 pp 3-5 ... Author Affiliations. R Rajaraman1. School of Physical' Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India.

  19. Dilemmas of a Newly Recruited Academic Qualified Professor: A Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the situation of a newly recruited academic professor who volunteered to teach a course on Research Methods to first-term MBA students in a practitioner-oriented case method Business School. Research Methods is a unique course due to its relevance not only in business but also across all graduate programs. Instructional and…

  20. How Not to Lose Face on Facebook, for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    For years college administrators have warned students to watch their step in online social realms, noting that sharing too much could hurt them later on if future employees saw their drunken party pictures or boorish writings. Now that professors and administrators are catching Facebook fever, they should heed their own advice. The author…

  1. Humor and the Emeritus Professor: An Interview with Gene Roth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a compilation of several conversations with Dr. Gene Roth, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. Dr. Roth is past President of the Academy of Human Resource Development, and although he is well known for his efforts in bringing humor into the field of HRD, he is not the same Gene Roth that played…

  2. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness on Distance Learning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jeanny; Tomasi, Stella D.

    2015-01-01

    Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students' perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive…

  3. For Professors' Children, the Case for Home Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannapacker, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The number of families who home school their children is growing between five and 15% per year and it is believed that home schoolers outperform their public-educated peers, though critics believe that home schooling is a form of religious fanaticism and a means of avoiding diversity. A professor explains how he and his wife, home school their…

  4. Finding Our Stride: Young Women Professors of Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewcomb, Whitney Sherman; Beaty, Danna M.; Sanzo, Karen; Peters-Hawkins, April

    2013-01-01

    This work is grounded in the literature on women in the academy and offers glimpses into four young women professors' experiences in the field of educational leadership. We utilized reflective practice and interpersonal communication to create a dialogue centered on three qualitative research questions that allows a window into our lives. We…

  5. The Education of an English Professor: The Biographical Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Valencia, Heriberto; Enríquez, Jakeline Amparo Villota; Ramos Acosta, Lizeth

    2018-01-01

    This article is the result of a qualitative research following the characteristics of hermeneutical research aims to understand the training process of the English university professor, taking into account factors that affect and surround the social, economic, and cultural environment; in which the experience and the story of life, shape the…

  6. Protocol for a process-oriented qualitative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme using the Researcher-in-Residence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Laura; George, Bethan; Marshall, Martin

    2015-11-06

    The integration of health and social care in England is widely accepted as the answer to fragmentation, financial concerns and system inefficiencies, in the context of growing and ageing populations with increasingly complex needs. Despite an expanding body of literature, there is little evidence yet to suggest that integrated care can achieve the benefits that its advocates claim for it. Researchers have often adopted rationalist and technocratic approaches to evaluation, treating integration as an intervention rather than a process. Results have usually been of limited use to practitioners responsible for health and social care integration. There is, therefore, a need to broaden the evidence base, exploring not only what works but also how integrated care can most successfully be implemented and delivered. For this reason, we are carrying out a formative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme. Our expectation is that this will add value to the literature by focusing on the processes by which the vision and objectives of integrated care are translated through phases of development, implementation and delivery from a central to a local perspective, and from a strategic to an operational perspective. The qualitative and process-oriented evaluation uses an innovative participative approach-the Researcher-in-Residence model. The evaluation is underpinned by a critical ontology, an interpretive epistemology and a critical discourse analysis methodology. Data will be generated using interviews, observations and documentary gathering. Emerging findings will be interpreted and disseminated collaboratively with stakeholders, to enable the research to influence and optimise the effective implementation of integrated care across WELC. Presentations and publications will ensure that learning is shared as widely as possible. The study has received ethical approval from University College London's Research Ethics

  7. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  8. The "resident's dilemma"? Values and strategies of medical residents for education interactions: a cellular automata simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckerling, P S; Gerber, B S; Weiner, S J

    2006-01-01

    Medical residents engage in formal and informal education interactions with fellow residents during the working day, and can choose whether to spend time and effort on such interactions. Time and effort spent on such interactions can bring learning and personal satisfaction to residents, but may also delay completion of clinical work. Using hypothetical cases, we assessed the values and strategies of internal medicine residents at one hospital for both cooperative and non-cooperative education interactions with fellow residents. We then used these data and cellular automata models of two-person games to simulate repeated interactions between residents, and to determine which strategies resulted in greatest accrued value. We conducted sensitivity analyses on several model parameters, to test the robustness of dominant strategies to model assumptions. Twenty-nine of the 57 residents (50.9%) valued cooperation more than non-cooperation no matter what the other resident did during the current interaction. Similarly, thirty-six residents (63.2%) endorsed an unconditional always-cooperate strategy no matter what the other resident had done during their previous interaction. In simulations, an always-cooperate strategy accrued more value (776.42 value units) than an aggregate of strategies containing non-cooperation components (675.0 value units, p = 0.052). Only when the probability of strategy errors reached 50%, or when values were re-ordered to match those of a Prisoner's Dilemma, did non-cooperation-based strategies accrue the most value. Cooperation-based values and strategies were most frequent among our residents, and dominated in simulations of repeated education interactions between them.

  9. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  10. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  11. Perceptions of a continuing professional development portfolio model to enhance the scholarship of teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofade, Toyin; Abate, Marie; Fu, Yunting

    2014-04-01

    To obtain feedback about the potential usefulness of a continuing professional development (CPD) portfolio for enhancing a faculty or practitioner's scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). A CPD portfolio approach to the SoTL was distributed in advance to registrants of the 2011 Annual AACP Teacher's Seminar. In an interactive workshop, faculty facilitators described a model for a CPD process applied to the development of an individual's SoTL. During the workshop, participants were asked to complete the initial sections of the portfolio to develop a personal plan for success in the SoTL. Post workshop, an evaluation form was distributed to the participants to obtain feedback about the CPD approach. Completed evaluation forms were collected, collated, and summarized. A total of 53 (14.1%) workshop participants completed the evaluation form of the 375 attendees. In all, 25 assistant professors, 14 associate professors, 4 full professors, 10 residents/students, 22 clinical, and 2 research faculty submitted evaluations. The proposed uses for the portfolio model selected most often by the responders were for personal development, faculty evaluation, increasing the SoTL, new faculty development, preceptor development, and residency training. A structured CPD portfolio model might be useful for the professional development of the SoTL.

  12. Refletindo sobre a relação professor-aluno em um grupo de professores do Esino Fundamental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio dos Santos Andrade

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir das concepções de Donald Schön sobre a formação do professor como prático reflexivo, os princípios de trabalho com pequenos grupos, baseados nas concepções de J. L Moreno, foram utilizados com o objetivo de facilitar o processo de reflexão sobre suas práticas de sala de aula, com seis professores do Ensino Fundamental. Foram realizados nove encontros de 90 a 120 minutos de duração. Nas discussões, os casos dos alunos mais problemáticos quanto ao seu comportamento foram trazidos pelos professores e analisados pelo grupo a luz das concepções da Pragmática da Comunicação Humana. Como resultado destas discussões, os professores foram levados a considerar os aspectos mais latentes, e portanto significantes, de suas relações com os alunos. Estas reflexões conduziram a uma "resignificação" das mesmas, com efeitos surpreendentes sobre os comportamentos dos alunos.

  13. Yue Joseph Wang named Grant A. Dove Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Yue Joseph Wang, professor of electrical and computer engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named the Grant A. Dove Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  14. Brian M. Kleiner receives Ralph H. Bogle Professor Fellowship in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Brian M. Kleiner, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named the Ralph H. Bogle Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  15. Maury Nussbaum reappointed as Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maury Nussbaum, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been reappointed as the Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  16. Implementation of a "Flipped Classroom" for Neurosurgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P

    2018-01-01

    Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A "flipped classroom" model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly, each resident was randomly assigned to research a specific aspect of an assigned topic appropriate to his or her level of experience: junior residents about what characterizes each clinical entity, midlevel residents about when to intervene, and chief residents about how to administer treatment. Residents completed an anonymous survey 6 months after implementation. Board examination performance was assessed before and after implementation. A total of 12 residents participated in the program. Weekly, 1.75±0.40 hours were spent in preparation, with senior residents reporting less time than junior residents. All residents indicated that the accumulation of experience across 7 years of residency was a major advantage of this program, and all preferred it to lectures. Performance on the board examination significantly increased after implementation (from 316±36 to 468±45, pflipped classroom is a viable approach to resident education and is associated with increased engagement and improved performance using validated knowledge-assessment tools.

  17. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  18. The Practice of Research of a Basic Education Teacher Involving Mental Models of the Phases of the Moon and Eclipses. (Spanish Title: La Práctica de Investigación de un Maestro de Educación BÁsica con El Uso de los Modelos Mentales de Las Fases de la Luna Y Eclipses.) A Prática de Pesquisa de um Professor do Ensino Fundamental Envolvendo Modelos Mentais de Fases da Lua e Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessôa Queiroz, Glória; Jubitipan Borges de Sousa, Carlos; Auxiliadora Delgado Machado, Maria

    2009-12-01

    The inclusion of basic education teachers in the survey domain is a controversial issue and fully debated in the academy. The opportunity for a collective work that incorporated school teachers from a public school to a university's group of physics teaching at university allowed us to glimpse the redefinition of the function of a science teacher (a coauthor of this paper) by himself, such that now he includes research on the knowledge construction by students in his teacher practice. The formation of inter-institutional groups for action planning and research in these areas has proved productive for the task of knowledge construction to support educational processes in school, while the university enriches its collection of experiences critically validated, and can consider the results in teachers initial and continued education. The active participation of the teacher in a research group at the university led him to reflect on the possible didactical ways to be described, analyzed and communicated to other teachers. The construction of a pedagogy that took into account the mental models of students on the basic topics of astronomy, and the changes developed resulting from the lessons taught, led to far-reaching consequences on the pedagogy adopted by the teacher, who incorporates now a new vision of science and alternative forms to dialogue with students, essential components for a researcher in Science Education. La inclusión de los maestros de la escuela básica en el universo de la investigación es polémica y está en amplio debate en el mundo académico. La oportunidad de trabajo colectivo de los maestros de una escuela pública en Río de Janeiro con un grupo universitario de enseñanza de la física nos ha permitido vislumbrar la redefinición de la función de un maestro de ciencias (uno de los coautores de este documento) por él mismo, ahora para incluir la investigación sobre la construcción del conocimiento por los alumnos en su práctica como

  19. Investigating the Status of Training Quality of Ophthalmologic Residents in Khatam-Ol-Anbia Hospital in Mashhad, Based on the Standards of EFQM Organizational Excellence Model in the Academic Year 2012-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Derakhshan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available  Background and Purpose: As the leaders of educational organizations, universities use various models and approaches in evaluating their activities. However, excellence model for evaluation of educational services can demonstrate the distinction of this evaluation procedure. The aim of this study is to investigate the status of training quality of ophthalmologic residents in Khatam-Ol-Anbia Hospital in Mashhad based on the standards of organizational excellence model EFQM in the educational year of 2012-2013.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study has been conducted in the second half of 2013 in the educational, research, and therapeutic hospital of Khatam-Ol-Anbia, among the hospitals affiliated with Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. All students in the stage of residency in Ophthalmology entered this study. In this research, 18 men and 6 women participated. Moreover, in the statistical population of this research, 14 of the residents were non-native and 10 were native. Using standardized questionnaire of organizational excellence model in higher education sector and the degree of achievement of the educational services outcomes presented to learners was investigated. This questionnaire was first adapted from the main booklet published by Sheffield University, England. Following the extraction of the preliminary questionnaire, normalization of the instrument for validity was done by expert judgment, to examine the internal consistency of the various sections of the instrument and the reliability, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.96 was obtained. The questionnaire consists of 4 main sections, each of which questions contain certain indices of educational services. Using SPSS 16 and congruent with the background and research questions, the results were obtained.Results: The mean value of general status of the training quality of Ophthalmology residents has been obtained as 6.66 (of a max of 10. The mean value for the indices of

  20. Highly Relevant Mentoring (HRM as a Faculty Development Model for Web-Based Instruction / Highly Relevant Mentoring (HRM (mentorat haute efficacité, un modèle de formation du corps professoral à l’enseignement en réseau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Carter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a faculty development model called the highly relevant mentoring (HRM model; the model includes a framework as well as some practical strategies for meeting the professional development needs of faculty who teach web-based courses. The paper further emphasizes the need for faculty and administrative buy-in for HRM and examines relevant theories that may be used to guide HRM in web-based teaching environments. Of note is that HRM was conceived by the instructional design staff who contributed to this paper before the concept of high impact mentoring appeared in the recent literature (2009. While the model is appropriate in various disciplines and professions, the examples and scenarios provided are drawn from a Canadian university’s experience of using HRM, in conjunction with a pedagogical approach called ICARE, in a variety of nursing courses and programs. Cet article décrit un modèle de formation du personnel enseignant intitulé « highly relevant mentoring (HRM » (mentorat haute efficacité; ce modèle comprend une structure et des stratégies pratiques visant à combler les besoins en formation du corps professoral d’une faculté offrant des cours en réseau. L’article souligne la nécessité d’un appui facultaire et administratif au HRM et étudie les théories pertinentes pouvant servir à guider le HRM dans des milieux d’enseignement en réseau. On notera que le HRM a été conçu par l’équipe de conception de matériel pédagogique qui a contribué à cet article avant l’apparition, dans les publications récentes (2009, du concept de « high impact mentoring » (mentorat à haut rendement. Bien que ce dernier modèle convienne à diverses disciplines et professions, les exemples et les scénarios fournis ici sont tirés de l’expérience d’utilisation du HRM dans une université canadienne, conjointement à une approche pédagogique appelée ICARE, dans une variété de cours et de programmes

  1. Uncertainty modeling dedicated to professor Boris Kovalerchuk on his anniversary

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book commemorates the 65th birthday of Dr. Boris Kovalerchuk, and reflects many of the research areas covered by his work. It focuses on data processing under uncertainty, especially fuzzy data processing, when uncertainty comes from the imprecision of expert opinions. The book includes 17 authoritative contributions by leading experts.

  2. A Changing Role for University Professors? Professorial Academic Leadership as It Is Perceived by "The Led"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the academic leadership role of university professors in the UK (a grade title which in that national context generally refers only to the most distinguished, senior academics, who equate to the North American full professor). Drawing on theoretical interpretations of professionalism and applying these to professors, it…

  3. An Interview with Professor Ohtomo: The Founding Father of Language Testing in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Miyoko; Negishi, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor Kenji Ohtomo who retired in March 2006 from the post of Dean, College of Applied International Studies, Tokiwa University, Mito, in Japan. Professor Ohtomo is currently a Professor Emeritus at the University of Tsukuba and Honorary President of the Japan Language Testing Association, of which he…

  4. Exploring Professors' Engaging Instructional Practices: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghode, Vishal; Wang, Jia; Lathan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Professors use various strategies to improve learning. To explore what professors perceived as critical aspects of engaging instruction, we conducted a qualitative case study with seven professors in the United States. Data was collected through individual face-to-face interviews. The conversations were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The…

  5. Partners in Learning: A Grounded Theory Study of Relational Practice between Master's Students and Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Harriet L.; Holloway, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful academic relationships between adult master's students and their professors can both deepen students' learning and serve as a regenerating force for professors. This study employed grounded theory methods to explore the question, "What goes on in relational practice between master's students and professors?" I interviewed 10…

  6. Higher Education Institutional Affiliation and Satisfaction among Feminist Professors: Is There an Advantage to Women's Colleges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Rachel; Kmeic, Julie; Worell, Judith; Crosby, Faye

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether feminist professors of psychology at women's colleges derived more job satisfaction than feminist professors at coed colleges. Surveys and interviews indicated that feminist professors were generally satisfied with their pedagogical situations and generally dedicated to and successful at teaching. Institutional affiliation…

  7. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  8. Professor of English, Linguistics, and Religion

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    Dr. Sherrise Truesdale-Moore

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reexamines cultural curriculum and marginalized youth at-risk for gang involvement. While the literature expresses various approaches to addressing the gang problem in the United States, including comprehensive gang initiative models, get tough policies, and comprehensive peace campaigns to stop the violence. All of these initiatives have seemingly done little to stop gang membership among school age youth. Education has proven to be the most significant means to improve an individual’s life chances, but African American students, in particular, are performing worse than Whites on an average. If society is to reach these youth through education, we argue that a new classroom pedagogy is needed. To this aim, creating a culturally responsive classroom through hip hop may be the answer to engage troubled youth in the classroom.

  9. RENDEZVOUS WITH A PIONEER: PROFESSOR KUPPAMUTHU DHARMALINGAM

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    Subhoshree Ghose

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article enlightens the influential role of a great Indian scientist and teacher, Prof. K Dharmalingam in the field of bacteriophage genetics, microbiology, biotechnology and clinical proteomics. He is a role model to all those young investigators who are extremely impelled to try novel things in Science. His journey originating from yeast mitochondriogenesis to Mycobacterium leprae biomarkers shows how passionate he is to ameliorate his intellectual abilities and endeavor his ideas. Not only a great achiever, he is also a modest human being who always acknowledges his school teachers, PhD mentor as well as graduate students for his immense success in scientific career. He has tried to explore the cross talk between microorganisms, proteins and nucleic acids to understand the molecular machinery inside a cell

  10. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

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    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  11. The "hidden curriculum" and residents' attitudes about medical error disclosure: comparison of surgical and nonsurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, William; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani

    2013-12-01

    The "hidden curriculum" and role models for responding to medical errors might play a central role in influencing residents' attitudes about disclosure. We sought to compare surgical and nonsurgical residents' exposure to role modeling for responding to medical errors and their attitudes about error disclosure. We conducted a cross-sectional, electronic survey of surgical and nonsurgical residents at 2 large academic medical centers. The questionnaire asked respondents about personal experience with medical errors; training for responding to errors; frequency of exposure to role modeling related to disclosure; and attitudes about disclosure. Descriptive statistics were used to describe frequencies. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were used to compare proportions between surgical and nonsurgical trainees. The response rate was 58% (253 of 435). Surgical residents reported more frequently observing a colleague be treated harshly (eg, humiliated or verbally abused) for an error than nonsurgical residents (sometimes or often, 39% [26 of 66] vs 20% [37 of 187]; p = 0.002). Surgical residents were more likely than nonsurgical residents to believe they would be treated harshly by others if they acknowledged making a medical error (35% [23 of 66] vs 12% [23 of 187]; p medical errors at their institution (11% [7 of 66] vs 2% [4 of 187]; p = 0.008). Surgical residents were less likely than nonsurgical residents to feel free to express concerns to other members of the team about medical errors in patient care (70% [46 of 66] vs 83% [115 of 187]; p = 0.02). The punitive response to error by senior members of the health care team might be an impediment to the transparent disclosure of errors among residents that might disproportionally affect surgical training programs. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing a curriculum for emergency medicine residency orientation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Raymond; Choudhri, Tina; Roche, Colleen; Ranniger, Claudia; Greenberg, Larrie

    2014-05-01

    New residents enter emergency medicine (EM) residency programs with varying EM experiences, which makes residency orientation programs challenging to design. There is a paucity of literature to support best practices. We report on a curriculum development project for EM residency orientation using the Kern Model. Components of the revised curriculum include administrative inculcation into the program; delivering skills and knowledge training to ensure an entering level of competence; setting expectations for learning in the overall residency curriculum; performing an introductory performance evaluation; and socialization into the program. Post-implementation resident surveys found the new curriculum to be helpful in preparing them for the first year of training. The Kern Model was a relevant and useful method for redesigning a new-resident orientation curriculum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A call for self-reflection as professors engage the issues of science education reform: An ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Miguel M.

    Science becomes distorted and undemocratic when it is categorized into disciplines that, in turn, perpetuate borders creating conditions of inequality for the general population. Science education reform represents a starting point from which to approach notions of exclusion and inaccessibility. Students not intending to major in science often encounter environments as well as professors that serve to limit their potential and thereby exclude them from greater exposure and participation in the sciences. This qualitative study considers professional practices of professors who hold key positions for the success of science teaching and learning. Through classroom observation, in-depth interviewing and a survey questionnaire, this study sheds fight on the process of science education reform. Participants included six university professors who taught a reformed science course developed under the guidance of a National Science Foundation initiative known as the Collaborative for Excellence in Teacher Preparation. The purpose of this study is to understand the nature of faculty beliefs concerning teaching and learning science for students not intending to major in science, most of whom are elementary education majors. In this study, professors' espoused belief systems were elicited while their mental models that drive behavior were observed in the classroom setting. Incongruencies between theories in practice and theories in use were uncovered and explored. Major implications for who can and cannot learn science within the context of a system that currently serves to pre-select who will succeed are uncovered as a result of this study. The constant comparative method developed by Glaser and Strauss was used to analyze the words of each individual participant as she/he worked to consider the incongruencies in her/his theory and practice (as cited in Maykut & Morehouse, 1994). Self-reflection is identified as key in the process of praxis that will aid professors in their

  15. Professor Antonio Branco Lefèvre: the forefather of child neurology in Brazil Professor Antonio Branco Lefèvre o pai da neurologia infantil no Brasil

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    Rubens Reimão

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on the life and works of Prof. Antonio Branco Lefèvre and the relevance that led him to be considered the Forefather of Child Neurology in Brazil. METHOD: The method utilized was the historical documents research; bibliographical. RESULTS: Antonio Branco Lefèvre (1916-1981 was born in São Paulo city; graduated in 1941 from the São Paulo Medical School. The date - 1950 - can be considered when Child Neurology took shape for a fully specialty, when Lefèvre presented his two internationally acclaimed thesis. Lefèvre was recognized as he founder of Child Neurology in Brazil since the early years of his brilliant academic activities. In 1967 achieved the title of professor in the Child Neurology Clinic. His numerous trainees and Residents - from -1950 to 1981 - held today key positions in Brazilian Child Neurology. CONCLUSION: The extension and importance of the Child Neurology School of which he is the legitimate founder is recognized.OBJETIVO: Relatar a vida e obra do Prof. Antonio Branco Lefèvre e a relevância que leva a ser denominado o Pai da Neurologia Infantil no Brasil. MÉTODO: Pesquisa de documentos históricos e bibliográfica. RESULTADOS: Antonio Branco Lefèvre (1916-1981 nascido em São Paulo; formou-se na Faculdade de Medicina de São Paulo em 1941. A data de 1950 pode ser considerada quando a Neurologia Infantil tornou-se uma especialidade completa quando Lefèvre defendeu suas duas teses aclamadas internacionalmente. Lefévre foi reconhecido como o Pai da Neurologia Infantil no Brasil desde os primeiros anos de sua carreira acadêmica brilhante. Em 1967 atingiu o título de Professor de Neurologia Clínica Infantil. Seus numerosos estagiários e Residentes - de 1950 a 1981 - têm hoje posições de destaque na Neurologia Infantil brasileira. CONCLUSÃO: É reconhecida a extensão e a relevância da escola de Neurologia Infantil da qual Lefèvre é o legítimo fundador.

  16. The University Professor View from the Communitarian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Del Valle López

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The task of the university professor is a mission and not simply a profession and that is why higher education should be impregnated with values. Nowadays education is articulated into three areas: the State, the Market and the Volunteering, but no one of these three sectors by themselves has covered the needs of all the citizens, there have always been losers, therefore the conjunction of the three sectors became necessary. Communitarianism promotes an ethical-social pact that favors the progress of society without nullifying the individual dimension. It believes that the university is the space where a communitarian consciousness should be promoted to generate a social capital by means of education and it is a privilege place to substantiate the moral identity of the person beginning with the commitment of the professor with the university student.

  17. Revelando e compreendendo o relacionamento professor-aluno em marketing.

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    Ana Akemi Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching profession challenges are huge and plentiful bringing pressure camefrom many sources. The aim of this study, exploratory and qualitative, is to raise theperspective of Marketing professors regarding the way they face their students atdifferent levels: undergraduate and graduated students. The method of data collectionwas individual in-depth interviews and the method for works conduction anddata analysis was the grounded theory. The study concludes that those who teachto all levels tend to prefer master/doctoral students followed by students of collegelevel. At the same time, there is a negative reaction to the way professor evaluationsare made and presented to students, although the practice itself is approved by theinterviewees. Finally, grounded from interviewees’ reports, the implementation ofMarketing philosophy and concepts into the classroom is suggested.

  18. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EATING HABITS IN UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS: LITERATURE REVIEW

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    Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, university professors engage in academic tasks often stressful and sedentary behaviors, making the practice of physical activity and healthier eating habits. The aim of this study was to review the literature Brazilian studies on physical activity and eating habits of university professors .The search was conducted between March and May 2013, in electronic databases. For the delimitation of the study, was used as descriptors: Physical Activity, University Teachers and Eating Habits. At the end of the article selection process, remaining 06 studies that have been described and discussed in the text. And all of a descriptive nature, with small samples with some robust and consistent methodology. The selected studies, regardless of their qualities, point to the need of this population to engage in more physical activity and healthy eating habits programs.

  19. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EATING HABITS IN UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, university professors engage in academic tasks often stressful and sedentary behaviors, making the practice of physical activity and healthier eating habits. The aim of this study was to review the literature Brazilian studies on physical activity and eating habits of university professors .The search was conducted between March and May 2013, in electronic databases. For the delimitation of the study, was used as descriptors: Physical Activity, University Teachers and Eating Habits. At the end of the article selection process, remaining 06 studies that have been described and discussed in the text. And all of a descriptive nature, with small samples with some robust and consistent methodology. The selected studies, regardless of their qualities, point to the need of this population to engage in more physical activity and healthy eating habits programs

  20. An Outstanding Career: Professor Emeritus Iacob Cătoiu

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    Octavian Oprică

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the duration of his commissions of Deputy Dean (1981-1989 and, respectively, Dean (1992-2003, and also by the manner of approaching the managerial problems and his scientific extension, Professor Iacob Cătoiu left and indelible trace on the evolution of the former Department of Commerce in the Bucharest University of Economic Studies (ASE – now the Department of Business and Tourism. He is author or co-author of an important number of books (57 and articles (105 and book presentations. Thus, after he made the personal acquaintance with Philip Kotler, the guru of international marketing, in 1997, Professor Iacob Cătoiu wrote the Forward to the Romanian version of Philip Kotler's volume Managementul marketingului (Marketing Management a fundamental book in its field. (Nicolae Lupu

  1. Professores e agentes de letramento: identidade e posicionamento social

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    Angela B. Kleiman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contrasts the concepts of literacy teacher and literacy agent, in relation to the literacy acquisition modes of the two groups. Based on interaction and dialogic theory of language, we present data from a large project involving five universities, that show how teachers and popular educators represent and position themselves in their interaction with academic professors and researchers and we argue that the differences point towards the construction of differently situated relational identities.

  2. Professores e agentes de letramento: identidade e posicionamento social

    OpenAIRE

    Angela B. Kleiman

    2006-01-01

    This paper contrasts the concepts of literacy teacher and literacy agent, in relation to the literacy acquisition modes of the two groups. Based on interaction and dialogic theory of language, we present data from a large project involving five universities, that show how teachers and popular educators represent and position themselves in their interaction with academic professors and researchers and we argue that the differences point towards the construction of differently situated relation...

  3. [Surgical intervention against overpopulation: Professor Weinhold's foreskin infibulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörgeli, C

    1993-01-01

    One of the most bizarre and forgotten suggestions to have developed from the discussion of pauperism in the 19th century was the infibulation of the impoverished men. A communication in 1827 from the Halle professor of surgery, Carl August Weinhold (1782-1829), raised indignation and caused ironic as well as angry reactions. Despite such a heated response, Weinhold's proposed method of population control soon fell into oblivion, a fate considered by this contemporaries as "highly desirable".

  4. Professor Created On-line Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Arthur W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will share the creation, implementation, and modification of an online college level general biology laboratory course offered for non-science majors as a part of a General Education Curriculum. The ability of professors to develop quality online laboratories will address a growing need in Higher Education as more institutions combine course sections and look for suitable alternative course delivery formats due to declining departmental budgets requiring reductions in staffing, equipment, and supplies. Also, there is an equal or greater need for more professors to develop the ability to create online laboratory experiences because many of the currently available online laboratory course packages from publishers do not always adequately parallel on-campus laboratory courses, or are not as aligned with the companion lecture sections. From a variety of scientific simulation and animation web sites, professors can easily identify material that closely fit the specific needs of their courses, instructional environment, and students that they serve. All too often, on-campus laboratory courses in the sciences provide what are termed confirmation experiences that do NOT allow students to experience science as would be carried out by scientists. Creatively developed online laboratory experiences can often provide the type of authentic investigative experiences that are not possible on-campus due to the time constraints of a typical two-hour, once-per-week-meeting laboratory course. In addition, online laboratory courses can address issues related to the need for students to more easily complete missing laboratory assignments, and to have opportunities to extend introductory exercises into more advanced undertakings where a greater sense of scientific discovery can be experienced. Professors are strongly encourages to begin creating online laboratory exercises for their courses, and to consider issues regarding assessment, copyrights, and Intellectual Property

  5. Professor V. Weisskopf, CERN Director General (1961-1965)

    CERN Multimedia

    1962-01-01

    Well known theoretical physicist Victor Weisskopf has died aged 93. Born in Austria, he later worked with Schrodinger in Berlin before emigrating to the US in 1937, where he joined the Manhattan project in 1944, and was witness to the Trinity Test in July 1945. In 1946 he became professor of physics at MIT. He took leave of absence to be Director General of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Physics, from 1961-1965.

  6. The United Kingdom's First Woman Law Professor: An Archerian Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cownie, FC

    2015-01-01

    In 1970, at Queen's University Belfast, Claire Palley became the first woman to hold a Chair in Law at a United Kingdom university. However, little is known about the circumstances surrounding this event, or Claire Palley herself. This article (part of an extended project exploring her life history) seeks to address the question ‘Was there something about Claire Palley herself that made it more likely she would become the United Kingdom's first female law professor?’ Initially focusing on met...

  7. IN MEMORIAM: PROFESSOR STELIAN PETRESCU (1951 – 2011

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    Ioan Mămăligă

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, I want to believe in the old saying that the soul, the spirit of the departed lingers on for a while among the living. I like to believe our homage here today will somehow reach Stelian Petrescu, our professor, colleague, mentor and coworker, who put his passion, talent, love and devotion into serving the chemical engineering school in Iaşi. His life and work have been closely related to our Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection. In 1975, he graduated from the Faculty of Industrial Chemistry of the Polytechnic Institute with a degree in the Technology of Inorganic Substances, and in 1980, he went on to teach at the “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University in Iaşi, where he gradually built an exceptional career. In 1987, he earned a PhD in chemical engineering, and he became a full professor in 1996. A hard worker and brilliant researcher, Professor Petrescu has published over 15 books and textbooks and over 150 valuable scientific articles. He was also the author of over 40 patents, many of which received awards at international invention fairs. An outstanding member of the group of teachers with the Chemical Engineering Department, which he has run and coordinated for a long time, he has contributed to the education of over 30 generations of engineers and the development of a new generation of doctors in chemical engineering. He was beloved and held in high regard both by his students and his colleagues. Professor Petrescu has left this world prematurely, unexpectedly and unjustly. We will all miss him and will surely remember all the wonderful times we spent together. On behalf of his colleagues and students, I would like to extend my deepest condolences to his family.

  8. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  9. A percepção dos professores sobre a violência no contexto escolar

    OpenAIRE

    Girão, Alyson Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Este trabalho foi produzido com o objetivo de descrever a percepção dos professores em relação à violência no contexto escolar em duas escolas da rede de ensino público do Distrito. A metodologia elegida foi qualitativa por análise categorial de entrevistas. Foram entrevistados quatro professores de escolas públicas sendo estes, um professor readaptado de função de Taguatinga, o segundo professor em atividade plena de Taguatinga, o terceiro professor readaptado no Plano Piloto e o ultimo prof...

  10. Comunidades em processos formativos de professores de ciências

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    Willian Rubira da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos compreensões sobre as diferentes concepções de comunidade dentro do contexto da formação de professores de Ciências. Termos relacionados a comunidades no contexto de ensino e aprendizagem vem se tornando genéricos, dificultando compreensões de trabalhos da área no Brasil. Visualizamos a necessidade de significar concepções do termo em questão no contexto da sociologia e psicologia para então avançar nas compreensões mais abrangentes dentro da educação. Ampliamos o estudo com uma revisão dos trabalhos publicados nos anais do Encontro Nacional de Pesquisa em Educação em Ciências correlacionando a formação de professores com as perspectivas teórico-práticas de comunidades em contexto educacional. Escolhemos os anais deste evento por ser um ponto de debate entre os pesquisadores na área de Educação em Ciências e que, desta maneira, nos possibilitou sistematizar diferentes concepções de comunidades. Essas foram agrupadas em 7 categorias emergentes distintas por aspectos teórico-práticos utilizados nos processos formativos de professores de Ciências.

  11. [Notebooks on health and work: diaries of public university professors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Katia Reis de; Fernandez, Verônica Silva; Teixeira, Liliane Reis; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Mendonça, André Luis de Oliveira; Felix, Eliana Guimarães; Santos, Maria Blandina Marques Dos; Rodrigues, Andrea Maria Dos Santos; Moura, Marisa; Simões-Barbosa, Regina Helena; Barros, Walcyr de Oliveira; Almeida, Mariza Gomes de

    2018-03-08

    The main objective of this article is to present and analyze the research instrument called "health and work notebooks", focusing on the production of knowledge concerning professors' work at a public university. The notebooks serve as a qualitative and participant research technique that is appropriate for the in-depth study of relations between health and work, viewing workplaces as privileged spaces for exercising effective action in the defense of health and the work experience as the principal material for analysis. The notebooks' special quality as a research technique lies in worker's role as protagonist in the research, as the diary's author and co-participant in the study. Eight professors participated, all from the same institute in a federal university (IFES) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As for analysis of the empirical materials from the notebooks and consistent with the workers, the thematic analysis technique was adopted, producing four main discussion categories: time on the job and professors' multiple work activities; precarization of working conditions at universities; faculty health at limits; and the notebooks viewed from the authors' perspective. As for the results, the theme that stood out was work overload and time pressure to meet targets. Finally, the health and work notebooks proved to be a potential research tool for generating knowledge from a collective perspective.

  12. Docência na universidade: professores inovadores na USP

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    Chamlian Helena Coharik

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata de pesquisa realizada com um grupo de professores inovadores da Universidade de São Paulo tendo como objetivo procurar subsídios para a formação do professor universitário. Esses docentes foram entrevistados, solicitando que detalhassem melhor suas experiências inovadoras; explicassem as razões pelas quais haviam introduzido modificações em sua forma de trabalho; explicitassem as relações entre sua atividade de docência e de pesquisa, expressassem o papel que atribuíam ao ensino na universidade, bem como a forma pela qual sua trajetória acadêmica havia se cumprido até então. A diversidade de experiências relatadas e, ao mesmo tempo, a convergência de visões a respeito de suas funções de ensino e de pesquisa na universidade permitem-nos afirmar que, mais do que uma formação pedagógica específica, a sensibilização para as dificuldades do ensino e a valorização institucional dessa atividade consistiriam em grande avanço para a formação do professor.

  13. [The tutor-professor, transformer of professional practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardallo Porras, Lola; March i Vila, Gemma

    2007-01-01

    The emerging conceptualization of the teaching-learning process brings with it a modification in the teaching role of a university professor. To think of the function of a tutor-professor from a complex perspective will help professors to develop underneath this paradigm, facilitating the construction of thinking in integrated networks having different types of knowledge which substitute fragmented and lineal knowledge characteristic to positivist thinking. From a complex paradigm, learning acquires a new sense. The complex viewpoint is rich in matrixes, complacent with diversity capable to integrate difficulties. The final objective of teaching is to accompany a student as he/she discovers and interprets reality. The most important function of a tutor is to permit a student to construct himself/herself by means of reflexive dialogue with the student's own learning experience. The tutor's role should enable a student to make use of his/her own speech, offering secure places where a student can find his/her appropriate spot, and where the pressure of an exam becomes more a stimulus to learn than a difficulty for his/her development.

  14. Gender Differences in Problematic Alcohol Consumption in University Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisoto, Pablo; Vaca, Silvia L; López-Goñi, José J; Cacho, Raúl; Fernández-Suárez, Iván

    2017-09-15

    The role of job satisfaction and other psychosocial variables in problematic alcohol consumption within professional settings remains understudied. The aim of this study is to assess the level of problematic alcohol consumption among male and female university professors and associated psychosocial variables. A total of 360 professors (183 men and 177 women) of a large private university in Ecuador were surveyed using standardized instruments for the following psychosocial measures: alcohol consumption, job satisfaction, psychological stress, psychological flexibility, social support and resilience. Problematic alcohol consumption was found in 13.1% of participants, although this was significantly higher (χ² = 15.6; d.f. = 2, p job satisfaction. However, 83.3% of women with problematic alcohol use reported lower job satisfaction and higher psychological inflexibility. Results suggest that job satisfaction itself did not prevent problematic alcohol consumption in men; stress was associated with problematic consumption in men and psychological inflexibility in women. Findings from this study support the need to assess aspects of alcohol consumption and problematic behavior differently among men and women. Intervention strategies aimed at preventing or reducing problematic alcohol consumption in university professors must be different for men and women.

  15. LIFE AND SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY OF PROFESSOR ALEXANDER A. VERIGO

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    V. V. Veduta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Imperial University (now – I.I.Mechnikov Odessa National University is reviewed. Alexander A. Verigo was born in Vitebsk region on November 23 (December 5, 1837. He studied in St. Petersburg, first at the commercial college, then – on physics and mathematics department of St. Petersburg University, where he studied chemistry under the supervision of N. Sokolov. He started his scientific career at laboratory of Prof. A. Strecker in Tübingen and Prof. J. Wislicenus in Zurich. In 1865 he was invited to work in Novorossiyski University, where he defended his master’s (in 1866 and doctoral (in 1871 theses and where he worked as a Professor of chemistry until 1896. A fruitful pedagogical and research activity of Professor A. Verigo in organic chemistry is described. Many famous scientists and chemists were his students. An important contribution has been done by Professor A.A. Verigo to the promotion of chemistry and to improvement of Odessa: he is among the first investigated the composition of brine and mud of Kuyalnik Estuary; he grounded water intake of the Dniester for the Odessa water pipeline; developed a scheme of water disposal and irrigation; organized the first in the Russian Empire laboratory for analysis of food products. A.A.Verigo died on March 13, 1905.

  16. Ser professor de liceu no Estado Novo português: o discurso dos professores na imprensa pedagógica

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim Pintassilgo

    2012-01-01

    A presente comunicação tem por objectivo analisar as representações dos professores de liceu sobre eles próprios e sobre a profissão, tal como são veiculadas pela imprensa pedagógica. Utilizaremos como fontes as duas principais revistas de educação dirigidas para o ensino liceal e escritas por professores – Labor (1926-1973) e Palestra (1958-1973). O período em análise abrange, no essencial, o chamado Estado Novo português, um período difícil e contraditório, por via dos constrangimentos polí...

  17. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  18. Forecasting the student-professor matches that result in unusually effective teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L; LaCross, Ryan; Plotkowski, Andrea R; Winegard, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some professors are more effective than others, on average across students. We attempted to forecast students' evaluations of live lectures from brief, video-recorded teaching trailers. Participants were 145 college students (74% female) enrolled in introductory psychology courses at a public university in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Students viewed trailers early in the semester and attended live lectures months later. Because subgroups of students viewed the same professors, statistical analyses could isolate professor and relationship effects. Evaluations were influenced strongly by relationship and professor effects, and students' evaluations of live lectures could be forecasted from students' evaluations of teaching trailers. That is, we could forecast the individual students who would respond unusually well to a specific professor (relationship effects). We could also forecast which professors elicited better evaluations in live lectures, on average across students (professor effects). Professors who elicited unusually good evaluations in some students also elicited better memory for lectures in those students. It appears possible to forecast relationship and professor effects on teaching evaluations by presenting brief teaching trailers to students. Thus, it might be possible to develop online recommender systems to help match students and professors so that unusually effective teaching emerges. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Educational Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the British Psychological Society.

  19. Inspeção técnica como dispositivo de formação de professores: estratégia de produção de um modelo escolar em Minas Gerais - Technical inspection as a teachers’ formation device: production strategy of a school model in the state of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogéria Moreira Rezende Isobe, Brasil

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa o serviço da inspeção técnica do ensino como estratégia de produção de um modelo escolar em Minas Gerais no âmbito da Reforma João Pinheiro. No processo de constituição de um sistema educacional pautado no referencial da pedagogia moderna, os inspetores técnicos se configuraram como modeladores do ensino e buscaram capacitar os professores para o adequado exercício de novos métodos, dando-lhes a ver, por meio de aulas exemplares, modos de praticá-los. Nessa conjuntura, o inspetor técnico atuava sobre a prática docente, a partir de um lugar de poder determinado, o lugar de um intérprete autorizado cuja ação visava a aproximar as práticas dos professores das regras estabelecidas na conformação de um determinado modelo escolar de educação em Minas Gerais.Palavras-chave: inspeção técnica do ensino, estratégias, modelo escolar.  Technical inspection as a teachers’ formation device: production strategy of a school model in the state of Minas Gerais AbstractThis article analyses the service of technical inspection as a production strategy of a school model in the State of Minas Gerais under the João Pinheiro Reform. Within the process of constitution of an educational system guided by the reference of modern pedagogy, the technical inspectors were education shapers, enabling teachers to the proper exercise of new methods, making visible through exemplar classes the correct way to practice these new methods. Under this perspective, the technical inspector acted on the teaching practice, from an established place of power, the place of an authorized interpreter whose action intended to harmonize the teachers’ practices with the rules determined in shaping of a certain school model in the State of Minas Gerais.Key-words: technical inspection of education, strategies, school model. Dispositivo de inspección técnica como la formación del profesorado: una estrategia para la producción de una

  20. Adverse Event Reporting: Harnessing Residents to Improve Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevis, Sarah E; Schmocker, Ryan K; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2017-10-13

    Reporting of adverse and near miss events are essential to identify system level targets to improve patient safety. Resident physicians historically report few events despite their role as front-line patient care providers. We sought to evaluate barriers to adverse event reporting in an effort to improve reporting. Our main outcomes were as follows: resident attitudes about event reporting and the frequency of event reporting before and after interventions to address reporting barriers. We surveyed first year residents regarding barriers to adverse event reporting and used this input to construct a fishbone diagram listing barriers to reporting. Barriers were addressed, and resident event reporting was compared before and after efforts were made to reduce obstacles to reporting. First year residents (97%) recognized the importance of submitting event reports; however, the majority (85%) had not submitted an event report in the first 6 months of residency. Only 7% of residents specified that they had not witnessed an adverse event in 6 months, whereas one third had witnessed 10 or more events. The main barriers were as follows: lack of knowledge about how to submit events (38%) and lack of time to submit reports (35%). After improving resident education around event reporting and simplifying the reporting process, resident event reporting increased 230% (68 to 154 annual reports, P = 0.025). We were able to significantly increase resident event reporting by educating residents about adverse events and near misses and addressing the primary barriers to event reporting. Moving forward, we will continue annual resident education about patient safety, focus on improving feedback to residents who submit reports, and empower senior residents to act as role models to junior residents in patient safety initiatives.

  1. Graduate Student Attitudes toward Professor Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Transformational Teaching Practices, Student-Professor Engagement in Learning, and Student Deep Learning in Worldwide Business and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, Jennifer Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Some professors are expected to remain competitive research scholars, as well as teach, particularly in research-intensive universities. It has been argued that some professors spend too much time on research to obtain institutional incentives or promotion, and not enough time on teaching. Consequently, some adjuncts assume the responsibility for…

  2. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  3. EDITORIAL: 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucklum, Ralf

    2009-12-01

    The papers in this special feature have been contributed by scientific partners in international research projects and from former PhD students of the Editor-in-Chief of this journal, Professor Dr Peter Hauptmann. The motivation for this feature is the occasion of Peter Hauptmann's 65th birthday on 24 July 2009 and his retirement from his chair at the Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany this autumn. Peter graduated in Physics at the Technical University Dresden and received his PhD from the Technical University Leuna-Merseburg in 1973. He habilitated in 1979. With his appointment at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology in 1985 the Chair of Measurement Science extended its profile to the fast growing area of sensors. Peter was one of the very early developers of ultrasonic sensor systems for process monitoring and quality assurance. The working style here was characteristic of all his future activities. He combined his background in theory and experiment on ultrasonic wave propagation and its application to material science with the advantages of rapidly developing capabilities in microelectronics and data processing. The results have meanwhile found their way into products that are now on the market worldwide. Germany's reunification opened the door to the international sensor community and the most challenging sensor research areas. Peter Hauptmann very soon became a well respected colleague and was consequently appointed as member of the Technical Program Committee of the most important sensor conferences, elected member and head of expert groups of research associations and funding organizations, and of course reviewer of many scientific journals. Nowadays Peter Hauptmann can rightly be called one of the key players in the area of sensors. Professor Hauptmann's research interests combine fundamental aspects of the sensor transduction scheme with application issues up to the use of the sensor system in the industrial world

  4. Surgical resident learning styles: faculty and resident accuracy at identification of preferences and impact on ABSITE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Gilbert, Timothy; Ristig, Kyle; Chu, Quyen D

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of surgical resident duty hour restrictions, there is a need for faculty to utilize novel teaching methods to convey information in a more efficient manner. The current paradigm of surgical training, which has not changed significantly since the time of Halsted, assumes that all residents assimilate information in a similar fashion. However, recent data has shown that learners have preferences for the ways in which they receive and process information. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), and kinesthetic (K). The VARK learning style preferences of surgical residents have not been previously evaluated. In this study, the preferred learning styles of general surgery residents were determined, along with faculty and resident perception of resident learning styles. In addition, we hypothesized that American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam (ABSITE) scores are associated with preference for a read/write (R) learning style. The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was administered to all general surgery residents at a university hospital-based program. Responses on the inventory were scored to determine the preferred learning style for each resident. Faculty members were surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying the preferred learning style of each resident. All residents were also surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying their peers' VARK preferences. Resident ABSITE scores were examined for association with preferred learning styles. Twenty-nine residents completed the inventory. Most (18 of 29, 62%) had a multimodal preference, although more than a third (11 of 29, 38%) demonstrated a single-modality preference. Seventy-six percent of all residents (22 of 29) had some degree of kinesthetic (K) learning, while under 50% (14 of 29) were aural (A) learners. Although not significant, dominant (R) learners had the highest mean ABSITE scores. Faculty identified residents' learning styles

  5. A questão da formação de professores de Educação Física e a concepção de professor enquanto intelectual - reflexivo - transformador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A idéia central deste artigo é discutir a questão da formação de professores de Educação Física a partir de uma concepção de professor enquanto intelectual – reflexivo – transformador. Em primeiro lugar, tentarei discutir o atual modelo de formação docente em Educação Física e abordar a importância da prática como instrumento de análise e a reflexão do professor como alternativa ao paradigma dominante da raciona-idade técnica. Em segundo lugar, tratarei da necessidade de se construir uma nova concepção da prática docente que eleja a dimensão reflexiva como componente fundamental da atividade do professor. E, finalmente, abordarei a questão da função social do professor como intelectual transformador no interior da escola e da universidade. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Formação de professores – Educação Física – Educação The main idea of this article is to discuss the Physical Education teachers’ formation from a teacher’ s conception as an intelectual – reflective – transformer. First I will try to discuss the current model of the Physical Education teachers’ formation and to approach the importance of the pratice as a teacher’s instrument of analysis and reflection as an alternative to the dominant paradigm of the technic rationality. Second, I will discuss the necessity of construction of a new conception of the teacher’s pratice which selects the reflective dimension as an essencial component of the teacher’s pratice. And finally, I will present the teacher’s social function as a transformer intelectual inside the school and the university. KEY WORDS: Teacher’s formation – physical education – education

  6. The Forgetful Professor and the Space Biology Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Jones, Wanda; Munoz, Angela; Santora, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This video was created as one of the products of the 2013 ISS Faculty Fellows Summer Program. Our High School science teacher faculty fellows developed this video as an elementary/middle school education component. The video shows a forgetful professor who is trying to remember something, and along the journey she learns more about the space station, space station related plant science, and the Kennedy Space Center. She learns about the Veggie hardware, LED lighting for plant growth, the rotating garden concept, and generally about space exploration and the space station. Lastly she learns about the space shuttle Atlantis.

  7. Fatores associados a patologias de pregas vocais em professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Lima de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar fatores associados à prevalência do diagnóstico médico referido de patologias das pregas vocais em professores. MÉTODOS: Estudo epidemiológico transversal, censitário, com 4.495 professores da rede pública municipal de ensino elementar e fundamental de Salvador, BA, de março a abril de 2006. A variável dependente foi o diagnóstico médico referido de patologias das pregas vocais e as independentes, características sociodemográficas, atividade profissional, organização do trabalho/relações interpessoais, características físicas do ambiente de trabalho, freqüência de transtornos mentais comuns, medida pelo Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20 >7 e condições de saúde geral. Foram aplicadas técnicas de análise estatística descritiva, bivariada e regressão logística múltipla. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de diagnóstico médico referido de patologias das pregas vocais foi de 18,9%. Na análise de regressão logística, as variáveis que permaneceram associadas ao diagnóstico médico de patologia das pregas vocais foram: sexo feminino, trabalhar como professor por mais de sete anos, uso intensivo da voz, referir mais de cinco características desfavoráveis do ambiente físico de trabalho, uma ou mais doenças do trato respiratório, perda auditiva e apresentar transtornos mentais comuns. CONCLUSÕES: A presença de patologias das pregas vocais referidas associou-se a fatores que indicam a necessidade de ações de promoção da saúde vocal do professor e modificações na organização e estrutura do trabalho docente.

  8. Preditores da Síndrome de Burnout em professores

    OpenAIRE

    Carlotto, Mary Sandra; Câmara, Sheila Gonçalves

    2007-01-01

    O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar os preditores da Síndrome de Burnout em 563 professores de instituições educacionais particulares da região metropolitana de Porto Alegre - RS. Foram utilizados um questionário elaborado para levantamento de variáveis demográficas e profissionais, o Maslach Burnout Inventory, o Job Diagnostic Survey e o Questionário de Satisfação no Trabalho S20/23. Os resultados evidenciam que variáveis relacionadas ao contexto laboral predominam no modelo explicativo ...

  9. [Preliminary study on Professor SUN Liu-he's academic thought].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Sheng; Zhang, Jing-Feng

    2005-07-01

    Professor SUN Liu-he has been engaged in scientific research, clinical and teaching works for tens years and he is a meticulous scholar with great learning, rich clinical experience and great theoretical attainments. In clinical practice of many years, he summarizes and develops Kangai Plaster, Kangai Fushui Plaster, Ai tong Ling Plaster, and so on for acupoint sticking to treat tumors, and establishes Nu-needle hot-reinforcing method and Ti-Yun reducing method, enriching contents of needling methods, and he is good at application of specific points, established points and channel acupoints to treat refractory diseases with good results.

  10. An Outstanding Career: Professor Emeritus Iacob Cătoiu

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian Oprică

    2016-01-01

    Through the duration of his commissions of Deputy Dean (1981-1989) and, respectively, Dean (1992-2003), and also by the manner of approaching the managerial problems and his scientific extension, Professor Iacob Cătoiu left and indelible trace on the evolution of the former Department of Commerce in the Bucharest University of Economic Studies (ASE) – now the Department of Business and Tourism. He is author or co-author of an important number of books (57) and articles (105) and book presenta...

  11. 100. professor Gerhard Rägo nimeline medal / Tiit Lepmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lepmann, Tiit

    2002-01-01

    Alates 1990. a annavad TÜ matemaatika-informaatikateaduskond ja Eesti Matemaatika Selts välja professor Gerhard Rägo nimelist mälestusmedalit, vastavalt statuudile võivad medali omanikeks saada üksikisikud ja kollektiivid, kel on silmapaistvaid teeneid õpetaja- või õppejõutöös, õppe- ja metoodilise kirjanduse, õppeplaanide ja programmide, õppetehnika, metoodiliste töötluste jms väljatöötamisel ning kes on osutanud tõhusat kaasabi matemaatika õpetamise täiustamisele eesti koolis

  12. The Hog Cycle of Law Professors: An Econometric Time Series Analysis of the Entry-Level Job Market in Legal Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Christoph; Hamann, Hanjo

    2016-01-01

    The (German) market for law professors fulfils the conditions for a hog cycle: In the short run, supply cannot be extended or limited; future law professors must be hired soon after they first present themselves, or leave the market; demand is inelastic. Using a comprehensive German dataset, we show that the number of market entries today is negatively correlated with the number of market entries eight years ago. This suggests short-sighted behavior of young scholars at the time when they decide to prepare for the market. Using our statistical model, we make out-of-sample predictions for the German academic market in law until 2020.

  13. DETERMINANTS OF SPECIALTY CHOICE OF RESIDENT DOCTORS; CASE STUDY--AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuoji, Roland I; Adebanji, Atinuke; Abdulsalam, Moruf A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Abolarinwa, Abimbola A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined medical specialty selection by Nigerian resident doctors using a marketing research approach to determine the selection criteria and the role of perceptions, expected remuneration, and job placement prospects of various specialties in the selection process. Data were from the Community of residents from April 2014 to July 2014. The cohort included 200 residents, but only 171 had complete information. Data were obtained from a cross section of resident doctors in the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital and at the 2014 Ordinary General Meeting of the National Association of Resident Doctors(NARD) where representatives from over 50 Teaching hospitals in Nigeria attended. Using a client behaviour model as a framework, a tripartite questionnaire was designed and administered to residents to deduce information on their knowledge about and interests in various specialties, their opinions of sixteen specialties, and the criteria they used in specialty selection. A total of 171 (85.5%) questionnaires were returned. ln many instances, consistency between selection criteria and perceptions of a specialty were accompanied by interest in pursuing the specialty. Job security, job availability on completion of programme, duration of training and qualifying examinations were highly correlated with p value job security and financial remuneration related variables. Using marketing research concepts for medical specialty selection (Weissmanet al 2012) stipulates that choice of speciality is influenced by criteria and perception. This study shows that job security expected financial remuneration, and examination requirements for qualification are major determinants of the choice of speciality for residents.

  14. Granular, soft and fuzzy approaches for intelligent systems dedicated to professor Ronald R. Yager

    CERN Document Server

    Filev, Dimitar; Beliakov, Gleb

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive report on the state-of-the art in the broadly-intended field of “intelligent systems”. After introducing key theoretical issues, it describes a number of promising models for data and system analysis, decision making, and control. It discusses important theories, including possibility theory, the Dempster-Shafer theory, the theory of approximate reasoning, as well as computing with words, together with novel applications in various areas, such as information aggregation and fusion, linguistic data summarization, participatory learning, systems modeling, and many others. By presenting the methods in their application contexts, the book shows how granular computing, soft computing and fuzzy logic techniques can provide novel, efficient solutions to real-world problems. It is dedicated to Professor Ronald R. Yager for his great scientific and scholarly achievements, and for his long-lasting service to the fuzzy logic, and the artificial and computational intelligence communit...

  15. Science of Casting and Solidification: ASM Handbook Contributions — Honoring Professor Doru Michael Stefanescu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupulescu, Afina; Henry, Scott; Marken, Karen; Lampman, Steven

    Many of the metal casting processes are still empirical in nature. Many others are deeply rooted in mathematics and therefore, suitable for modeling. Science of casting and solidification is a major technical asset for foundry operations and of extreme importance in understanding different length scales microstructural changes and evolution as well as developing new processes and materials. In his attempt to describe combinations of solidification theory, research results and industrial practice, Professor Doru Michael Stefanescu (ASM Fellow, 1997) has made tremendous contributions to the field. Many of his views on casting and solidification are valued as important impacts within professional environments such as TMS and ASM International. He has written many articles for the ASM Handbook series on subjects including basic metallurgy of cast iron, compacted graphite irons, solidification, thermodynamic properties of iron-base alloys, and computational modeling. He was also Volume Chair for Volume 15: Casting, of the 9th Edition Metals Handbook.

  16. Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

  17. Professor José Rodeghiero: trajetória docente e envolvimento comunitário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Brião de Castro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at teacher José Rodeghiero’s career path during the time when he was a teacher at the Garibaldi School in the municipality of Pelotas (RS, Brazil, from 1929 to 1950. In addition to his role as a teacher, Mr. Rodeghiero performed different duties in the community, having done different assignments besides teaching. The study sources included a manuscript written by the teacher, newspapers of the time, besides interviews based on oral history methodology with local residents and former students of the teacher. The theoretical support of the research is mainly based on the concept of identity, with specific reflections on ethnic identity, since this community was originated by Italian immigrants that settled in the area at the end of the XIX century. Reflections on the field of memory are also relevant to the text, as one of the main sources comes from interviews. The research also relies on written documents which emphasize the teacher’s intention to preserve the manuscript, thus perpetuating and preserving memory until the present day. Mr. José Rodeghiero had a special bond with the school community and was participative in the local life, in addition to being a resident of the area and belonging to the same ethnic group. Este artigo tem como objetivo abordar a trajetória de José Rodeghiero no período em que foi professor da Escola Garibaldi, município de Pelotas (RS, Brasil, durante os anos de 1929 a 1950. Para além da atuação do professor como docente exerceu diferentes funções na localidade, cumprindo outras designações além do exercício da docência. Utilizam-se como fontes um manuscrito escrito pelo professor, jornais da época, além do uso de entrevistas ancoradas na metodologia da história oral com os moradores do entorno e ex-alunos do professor. Para amparar teoricamente as pesquisas, apoia-se principalmente no conceito de identidade, fazendo reflexões sobre a identidade étnica, uma vez que esse

  18. Transactional sex and sexual harassment between professors and students at an urban university in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    This paper adds to discussion of transactional sex relationships in Africa by examining the distinction between transactional sex and sexual harassment in the context of professor-student relationships and their inherent power dynamics. By exploring the ways in which female university students in urban Benin toe the line between empowered agent and victim, I show how the power differential between professor and student obstructs the professor's ability to objectively determine consent, and examine why, in spite of this differential, male professors are frequently perceived as the victims of these relationships. Ethnographic data were gathered through participant observation on a public university campus in Benin and in-depth interviews and focus groups with 34 students and 5 professors from that university. Findings suggest that the problem of sexual harassment on campus will be difficult to address so long as transactional sex relationships between professors and students are permitted to continue.

  19. Translation and Creative Writing: An Interview with Professor Margaret Rogers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzbeh Babaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This interview was conducted with Emerita Professor Margaret Rogers with the aim of providing a brief but informative summary of the relationship between translation and creative writing. Emerita Professor Rogers is in the Centre for Translation Studies, School of English and Languages, University of Surrey, UK. She is also the founder of Terminology Network at the Institute of Translation and Interpreting in the UK. Professor Rogers introduced creative writing into the translation curriculum some 10 years ago at her own university.   The Interview   RB[1]: Do you believe in a theory of translation? MR[2]: There are many ways of trying to understand and, where we can, explain translation in all its guises, loci and times. To talk about ‘a theory’ in this context doesn’t help much. There are many different approaches to the academic study of translation: rather simply put, the particular approach which we choose to adopt may depend on our object of study (e.g. literary translation or specialised translation, what we want to find out about this (e.g. are we interested in product or process, in a historical or contemporary perspective, what resources we have available (e.g. a fully funded research team or a solo effort and so on. Many projects are interdisciplinary—this has long been recognised—and translation scholars are becoming much more resourceful in identifying, adopting and adapting relevant approaches from intersecting disciplines such as comparative literature, cultural studies, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and sociology. Some scholars are now advocating a problem-based approach. In any research project it is important to establish how the problem/phenomenon/issue which has been identified as the focus of the study can be tackled. For this, in an empirical study a method is crucial: in translation studies this is rarely something that can be picked off the shelf and is often a contribution to the

  20. An Analysis of Business Professors' and Their Students' Perceptions of Excellence in Teaching at a Business School-Empirical Evidence from New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anim, Stephen Kwasi

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study used evidence gleaned from business professors and their students and compared it with the Measure of Effective Teaching model (MET, 2013). The research is based on a qualitative research design with the aim of collecting data from multiple sources such as interviews, focus group, document analysis and observation to develop…

  1. Ser professor de liceu no Estado Novo português: o discurso dos professores na imprensa pedagógica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Pintassilgo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  O presente artigo tem por objectivo analisar as representações dos professores de liceu sobre eles próprios e sobre a profissão, tal como são veiculadas pela imprensa pedagógica. Utilizaremos como fonte uma das principais revistas pedagógicas do século 20 português - a Labor (1926-1973 -, escrita por professores de liceu e dirigida a esses mesmos professores. O período em análise abrange o chamado Estado Novo português, um período difícil e contraditório, por via dos constrangimentos político-ideológicos, no que se refere à afirmação de uma profissionalidade docente. Será utilizada a literatura recente sobre a profissão docente no sentido de esclarecer o percurso passado da profissão e no pressuposto de que a (reconstrução da sua memória é uma condição importante da afirmação da identidade profissional dos professores.Palavras-chave: profissional, artesão, intelectual.   Abstract This paper intends to analyze high school teacher’s representations about themselves and their profession, just as these representations are conveyed by the pedagogical press. Our source is one of the main journals of education directed toward high school teaching and written by teachers - Labor (1926-1973. The period under analysis essentially includes the so-called portuguese New State, a difficult and contradictory period in terms of assertion of teaching professionalism, due to the political and ideological constraints. We shall use recent Iiterature about the teaching profession in terms of clarifying the profession's past direction and under the supposition that the (reconstruction of its memory is an important condition in the assertion of teacher’s professional identity. keywords: professional, artisan, intellectual. 

  2. Surdez, políticas inclusivas e professores turistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Camargo Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo provém de uma pesquisa que teve como foco as políticas públicas com acento na formação de professores de surdos no regime inclusivo. A analítica aproxima-se no arcabouço teórico-metodológico dos Estudos da Governamentalidade, propostos por Michel Foucault, tomando as noções de "dispositivo" e "governamentalidade" como alavancas para a compreensão do papel e atuação do docente de surdos nas políticas inclusivas. Os documentos selecionados para a investigação são materiais/cartilhas/coleções destinadas aos professores da Educação Infantil e Ensino Fundamental das escolas comuns, no sentido de orientá-los quanto à inclusão educacional de surdos. Este empreendimento analítico apontou a utilização de técnicas que produzem no docente de surdos um perfil profissional conveniente aos anseios neoliberais, de controle e produtividade.

  3. Burnout Syndrome and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlington Antonio García Padilla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the Burnout syndrome in professors may be regarded as a deterioration of their mental health with negative impacts on their job performance. It is known that teachers develop different activities in the areas of teaching, outreach and research. This study aims to analyze the relationship between the Burnout syndrome and self-efficacy beliefs and the academic performance in professors of the psychology and dentistry programs at a private university in the city of Barranquilla. This study is empirical and analytical with a descriptive-correlational design. The study population consisted of 93 teachers of the psychology and dentistry programs. To choose the sample, a non-probabilistic sample was used according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria that allowed selecting a total of 36 teachers who met the criteria for the study. The instruments that were used in this study was the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, 1981 adapted by Seisdedos (1997, and the Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk (2001 adapted by Covarrubias and Mendoza (2016. According to the results, it was observed that there is no significant relationship between Burnout, Self-efficacy Belief and the academic performance.

  4. The Gresham Professors of Astronomy 1597-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimplin, V.

    2016-01-01

    Gresham College is named after Sir Thomas Gresham (1519-1579), an English merchant and financier who worked for the four key Tudor monarchs, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I. He studied at Cambridge before going to Antwerp where he was a merchant as well as the financial agent of the crown—negotiating loans, and procuring funds and goods. Gresham also acted as ambassador and was well rewarded with a salary, lands, and a knighthood in 1559, becoming one of the richest men in England. Sadly, Sir Thomas's only son and legitimate heir died in 1564. As a result he left his vast fortune to the Corporation of London and the Mercers' Company for the purpose of founding a College in London. Seven professors were to be appointed to read lectures daily—in various subjects including astronomy. The first Gresham professor of astronomy (predating chairs in astronomy at Oxford and Cambridge) was appointed in 1597 and a continuous line of professors—and their lectures—has taken place ever since, up to the present day when lectures are both free and open to the public in London as well as being recorded and available globally via the internet.

  5. Homage to Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    It was with deep sadness that we learned of the death of Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson, an internationally recognized scientist, beloved colleague and friend. He passed away on Wednesday January 13th at the Lund University Hospital, surrounded by his loved ones, after a short battle against cancer. This is a great loss for all of us in ALICE and the whole heavy ion community. Hans-Åke, Professor at Lund University, was one of the pioneers of heavy ion physics with relativistic beams since its very beginning. He started his research at CERN, as a fellow at the ISOLDE ion beam facility, and immediately after, in the early 1980 joined the Plastic Ball collaboration at the Bevalac. One of the seminal papers of the field on the discovery of collective flow in relativistic nuclear collisions, co-authored by Hans-Åke, Hans Gutbrod and colleagues, stems from this period. From that point on he was always at the forefront of research with relativistic nuclear beams, being for three de...

  6. Local and distant residence times of contaminants in multi-compartment models. Part II: application to assessing environmental mobility and long-range atmospheric transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Liisa; Mackay, Don

    2008-12-01

    In Part I, the concepts of inherent, local and distant residence times (DRTs) were reviewed as metrics of the extent to which chemical discharges or emissions in one region or box are transported to distant regions. In this second part, the concepts are applied to geographically relevant systems to illustrate their applicability to the assessment of chemicals for long-range transport potential (LRTP). It is shown that the relative ranking of chemicals as characterized by the DRT method is similar to that of the characteristic travel distance concept. A DRT source-receptor matrix is developed that can express the chemical-specific potential of source regions to contaminate a specific receptor region of concern such as the Arctic. The matrix can be modified to identify for a specific source region the likely destinations of emissions as well as to assess the relative vulnerability of regions in the global environment to contaminants of concern.

  7. Professores homossexuais: suas vivências frente à comunidade escolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Molina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo apresentar uma discussão referente à problemática da vivência diária do professor/professora homossexual frente à instituição escolar, cujo pressuposto inicial parte da premissa que estes professores sofreram e vem sofrendo, algum tipo de preconceito devido sua orientação sexual. No desenvolvimento, partimos para uma abordagem qualitativa e fundamentando-se na análise de discurso, ou seja, conhecendo as experiências de professores e professoras por meio de suas narrativas. Para isso foram entrevistados dois professores gays e uma professora lésbica, todos com ensino superior, que atuam ou atuaram no Ensino Fundamental II e no Ensino Médio. Nossa estratégia metodológica acontece em duas situações: A primeira, por meio de um questionário prévio composto de dez questões de identificação pessoal no intuito de traçar um perfil dos entrevistados. No segundo momento, entrevistas semi – estruturadas, com perguntas que focaram mais especificamente a percepção dos professores/professoras sobre a homofobia na escola. Nosso resultado é composto por relatos onde pudemos identificar a escola como um ambiente que reflete o sexismo que perpassa toda a sociedade, reproduzindo com frequência, as estruturas sociais, reforçando os preconceitos e privilégios de um sexo sobre o outro. Desta forma, percebemos que o heterossexismo está tão arraigado na cultura, que se torna invisível em muitas de suas atitudes quase sutis, como por exemplo, em brincadeiras e piadas. O universo escolar reproduz os preconceitos da sociedade e, na tentativa de evitar o convívio dos alunos heterossexuais, com pessoas homossexuais, faz da homossexualidade o maior alvo da discriminação. Concluímos, portanto, que as desigualdades entre os sexos e a marginalização dos homossexuais acabam gerando vítimas de uma sociedade inacabada, de repressão, opressão e desinformação. Por fim, está sociedade esta em constante

  8. Disparities in Aesthetic Procedures Performed by Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model. The number of residents not achieving case minimums was also calculated. Case logs of 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed. There was marked variability in craniofacial (range, 6.0-15.0), breast (range, 2.4-5.9), trunk/extremity (range, 3.0-16.0), and miscellaneous (range, 2.7-22.0) procedure categories. In 2015, the bottom 10th percentile of integrated and independent/combined residents did not achieve case minimums for botulinum toxin and dermal fillers. Case minimums were achieved for the other aesthetic procedure categories for all graduating years. Significant variability persists for many aesthetic procedure categories during plastic surgery residency training. Greater efforts may be needed to improve the aesthetic surgery experience of plastic surgery residents. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. O conceito epistemológico de passado para professores de história

    OpenAIRE

    Rita de Cássia G. Pacheco dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1984644418704O texto apresenta parte dos resultados da investigação de doutorado intitulado “A Significância do Passado para Professores de História”.Os sujeitos são dezessete professores de História de dez colégios de Ensino Médio na cidade de Curitiba-PR, atuantes no quadro próprio do Magistério. O objetivo foi identificar como os professores entendem o conceito epistemológico de passado. Apresenta e categoriza as respostas dos professores sobre as ideias de p...

  10. An exploratory examination of student to professor disclosures of crime victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tara N; Branch, Kathryn A; Hayes, Rebecca M

    2013-11-01

    Prior qualitative research has demonstrated that female college students may utilize their professors as support providers when they experience sexual assault and intimate partner violence victimization. To further explore this phenomenon, the present study used a random sampling design on two college campuses to examine the following questions: (a) Are student disclosures of crime victimization a common occurrence for college professors? (b) What is the nature of college professors' most recent disclosure of crime victimization? and (c) Do professor characteristics predict receiving a student disclosure of victimization? Implications of these findings as well as directions for future research will be discussed.

  11. A survey of dermatology resident education in cosmetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Joslyn S; Adgerson, Cheri N; Anderson, Bryan E

    2013-02-01

    The demands for cosmetic procedures are increasing. Dermatologists perform many of these procedures, therefore adequate education and training during residency is important. Surveys demonstrate dermatology residents desire more training even while faculty members believe this has already become a more prominent feature of resident education. We sought to assess the time and methods dedicated to education and training of cosmetic procedures in dermatology residency. A 26-question survey was developed and electronically distributed in May 2010 to dermatology program directors via the Association of Professors of Dermatology list-serve with their approval. Program directors were asked to forward the e-mail to their instructors of cosmetic/procedural dermatology, and chief residents. Responses were anonymous. A total of 86 responses were collected. In all, 67% (n = 54) of respondents had formal lectures focusing on cosmetic dermatology. Lecture topics reported by more than 50% of respondents included botulinum toxin injection, lasers, soft tissue augmentation, chemical peels, and sclerotherapy. Topics such as dermabrasion, liposuction, and scar revision were less commonly taught. The most commonly encountered and performed procedures were botulinum toxin injection and lasers (100%, n = 86); 98.8% (n = 85) encounter soft tissue augmentation and 95.4% (n = 82) encounter both chemical peels and sclerotherapy. Resident experience performing procedures as the first assistant or as the first surgeon varied widely. The limitations of this study are that the data were subjectively reported so results may differ from the true amount of time spent in any activity. The data may be biased by the population that responded as they may have strong opinions supporting or opposing training in cosmetic procedures. The data also may have been skewed by the small percentage of participants who were instructors of cosmetic dermatology (21%), chief residents (20%), and others respondents (8

  12. Tourism practices of Chinese residents in South Africa | Potgieter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chinese consumers are different due to their cultural background and way of life and this necessitates a conversion of the business model and products offered by leisure and tourism service providers. Very little is known about tourism practices of resident Chinese in South Africa. Research was conducted amongst resident ...

  13. WORK OF FORMER PROFESSOR: THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIONAL DIMENSION IN THE CONSTITUTION OF TEACHING PROFESSIONALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jully Fortunato Buendgens

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses how relational dimension is present and is constituted by former professors of graduation degrees and their academic students, as well as their influence in teaching and learning processes in teacher professionalism formation. Semi-structured interview was used to gather data among 40 egress students of eight graduation courses from a university of a southern state of Brazil. The research was theoretically substantiated by the following authors: Almeida e Biajone (2007, Roldão (2007, Placco (2002 e Imbernon (2004. The data indicated that the relational aspect is influencing the teaching profession constitution, but that cannot unlink the didactic and pedagogical issues. The graduates also revealed that resort to practices and teaching models of teacher trainer for carrying out their teaching work.

  14. Memorial Meeting for Nobel Laureate Professor Abdus Salam's 90th Birthday

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Abdus Salam was one of the most prolific and exciting scientists of the second half of the last century. From humble beginnings in a village in Pakistan, he rose to become one of the world's most original and influential particle physicists. He shared the 1979 Nobel Prize with Glashow and Weinberg for contributions to electroweak unification, which forms an integral part of the Standard Model. He was the first Pakistani Nobel Laureate and the second only Muslim after Anwar Sadat. After gaining his doctorate in Cambridge, he moved to Imperial College in 1957 where he founded the very successful Theoretical High Energy Physics Group. He remained there as Professor of Physics until his death in 1996.

  15. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  16. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Jauregui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees’ perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine’s “Project Professionalism” and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Results: Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88% completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the “respect for others” and “honor and integrity” valued significantly higher (p<0.001. Significant differences were found between interns and seniors for five attributes primarily in the “duty and service” domain (p<0.05. Among different residencies, significant differences were found with attributes within the “altruism” and “duty and service” domains (p<0.05. Conclusion: Residents perceive differences in

  17. Effect of occupational mobility and health status on life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations: logistic diagonal mobility models analysis of cross-sectional data on eight Chinese provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Life satisfaction research in China is in development, requiring new perspectives for enrichment. In China, occupational mobility is accompanied by changes in economic liberalization and the emergence of occupational stratification. On the whole, however, occupational mobility has rarely been used as an independent variable. Health status is always used as the observed or dependent variable in studies of the phenomenon and its influencing factors. A research gap still exists for enriching this field. Methods The data used in this study were obtained from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). The study included nine provinces in China. The survey was conducted from 1989 to 2009.Every survey involved approximately 4400 families or 19,000 individual samples and parts of community data. Results First, we built a 5 × 5 social mobility table and calculated life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations in each table. Second, gender, age, marital status, education level, annual income and hukou, health status, occupational mobility were used as independent variables. Lastly, we used logistic diagonal mobility models to analyze the relationship between life satisfaction and the variables. Model 1 was the basic model, which consisted of the standard model and controlled variables and excluded drift variables. Model 2 was the total model, which consisted of all variables of interest in this study. Model 3 was the screening model, which excluded the insignificant drift effect index in Model 2. Conclusion From the perspective of the analysis of controlled variables, health conditions, direction, and distance of occupational mobility significantly affected life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations. (1) From the perspective of health status, respondents who have not been sick or injured had better life satisfaction than those who had been sick or injured. (2) From the perspective of occupational mobility direction

  18. Competency-Based Medical Education: Can Both Junior Residents and Senior Residents Achieve Competence After a Sports Medicine Training Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Wright, Sara; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Theodoropoulos, John; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2015-12-02

    Competency-based medical education as a resident-training format will move postgraduate training away from time-based training, to a model based on observable outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether junior residents and senior residents could demonstrate clinical skills to a similar level, after a sports medicine rotation. All residents undertaking a three-month sports medicine rotation had to pass an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. The stations tested the fundamentals of history-taking, examination, image interpretation, differential diagnosis, informed consent, and clinical decision-making. Performance at each station was assessed with a binary station-specific checklist and an overall global rating scale, in which 1 indicated novice, 2 indicated advanced beginner, 3 indicated competent, 4 indicated proficient, and 5 indicated expert. A global rating scale was also given for each domain of knowledge. Over eighteen months, thirty-nine residents (twenty-one junior residents and eighteen senior residents) and six fellows (for a total of forty-five participants) completed the examination. With regard to junior residents and senior residents, analysis using a two-tailed t test demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in both total checklist score and overall global rating scale; the mean total checklist score (and standard deviation) was 56.15% ± 10.99% for junior residents and 71.87% ± 8.94% for senior residents, and the mean global rating scale was 2.44 ± 0.55 for junior residents and 3.79 ± 0.49 for senior residents. There was a significant difference between junior residents and senior residents for each knowledge domain, with a significance of p < 0.05 for history-taking and p < 0.01 for the remainder of the domains. Despite intensive teaching within a competency-based medical education model, junior residents were not able to demonstrate knowledge as well as senior residents, suggesting that overall clinical experience

  19. Resident-to-resident relational aggression and subjective well-being in assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompetter, Hester; Scholte, Ron; Westerhof, Gerben

    2011-01-01

    Research in settings similar to assisted living facilities suggests that relational aggression, an indirect and mature form of aggression, might occur in assisted living facilities. This empirical study investigates the existence of relational aggression in a sample of residents and the relationship between relational aggression and resident's subjective well-being. 121 residents from six assisted living facilities completed questionnaires assessing personal experiences as victims of relational aggression and subjective well-being. Also nurses reported on victimization of relational aggression for every participant. Linear regression models were used to examine the association between both reports of relational aggression and subjective well-being. Relational aggression was shown to exist in assisted living facilities according to both residents (prevalence: 19%) and nurses (prevalence: 41%). Chi-square testing revealed no association between ratings by nurses and residents. Self-reports of victimization of relational aggression were related to depression, anxiety, satisfaction with life and social loneliness, but not to emotional loneliness. Nurse-reports of victimization of relational aggression were not related to subjective well-being. Self-reports of relational aggression seem to be better predictors of resident's well-being than nurse-reports of relational aggression. Awareness of these findings and the discrepancy between nurse-reports and self-reports are important for practice and for future research regarding social dynamics and living arrangements in elderly care settings.

  20. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  1. Quality of life research: interview with Professor Robert Cummins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cummins

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQOL is a fundamental concept in the field of clinical medicine and has been studied during the last years by psychologists, sociologists, economists and managers. The concept of HRQOL includes those aspects of overall QOL that can be indicated to have an impact on patients’ health, either physical or psychological. Concerning the individuals, this incorporates physical and mental health cognitions, including sociodemographic factors, sexual functioning, fatigue, sleep disorders and functional status. One of the most eminent experts in the world in the field of QOL is Prof. Robert Cummins [Professor of Psychology at Deakin University in Australia (School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Victoria 3125 Melbourne, Australia. E-mail: robert.cummins@deakin.edu.au] who kindly accepted to answer our questions in the con- text of this special edition.

  2. Students’ Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Bedoya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to investigate professors’ needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy for contractual and academic reasons. Additionally, data revealed their desire to learn English to communicate in both academic and non-academic settings. Moreover, the lack of time and effective learning strategies were reported as comprising the main constraints for learning. Finally, the authors present the strengths and weaknesses of the program as well as the participants’ suggestions for curriculum restructuring.

  3. Tribute to Professor Anthony J. McMichael

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Swaminathan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Emeritus Professor A. J. “Tony” McMichael (1942–2014 was an internationally renowned and pioneering Australian academic and advocate in epidemiology, who was passionate about understanding the influences of the environment on human health. In an illustrious career spanning more than four decades, he made significant contributions to the scientific community and policy discourse—including ground-breaking research related to the health of children. McMichael was a prolific academic writer with over 300 peer-reviewed papers; 160 book chapters and two sole-authored books. However, his outstanding talent was for integrating complex and seemingly unrelated strands from the environmental and health sciences into a cohesive narrative—and highlighting its relevance to lay persons, scientists and governments alike. He was instrumental in validating this nascent field of research and inspiring many others to follow his lead.

  4. Professor Lesley Parker: a science educator writ large

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Jane Butler

    2011-09-01

    Professor Lesley Parker's career has moved from teaching and advising graduate students at Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia to leadership roles and advocacy positions in state and national governments and in international organizations. Throughout her distinguished career, she has been committed to social justice, particularly in gender equity. Indeed, that commitment infuses her professional contributions as teacher, advisor, administrator, and policy maker. In this Key Contribution, many of her colleagues describe their admiration for her as well as provide information that helps the reader place her work in a national and an international perspective. She has received many of Australia's highest honors, and she continues to contribute to her university, her state, and her nation. Her contributions form a lasting legacy in social justice, particularly in gender equity and in educational leadership.

  5. Upgrade with a sociocultural focus of the process of teaching-learning of the nuclear physics for the formation and professors' excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez Conde, Julio P.

    2003-01-01

    When modernizing the teaching-learning procces of the nuclear physics, to put it in better correspondence with the current sociocultural context and to overcome the limitations presented in the professors formation, It have kept in mind a nucleus of ideas in those that it is synthesized the theoretical and practice experience in the field of the science didactics during the last decades. The idea defend in the investigation is that in correspondence with a sociocultural focus the process teaching-learning of the nuclear physics for the formation and professors should be structured around the most general problems that face the science, the technology and the society. The theoretical contribution of the work resides in the establishment of essential relationships among the teaching-learning of the nuclear physics, the sociocultural focus of the scientific education, the distinctive characteristics of the human psychic activity and of the activity scientist contemporary investigator, The practical contribution of the carried out work resides in the following results. a) strategy for the bring up to date of the process of teaching-learning of the nuclear physics, b) it programs of the subject the nuclear physics in the science, the technology and the society, c) systems of educational tasks, d) it structures basic of a place Web Science and nuclear Technology'', d) it programs computer of simulation of the dispersion of nuclear particles and and) I study on-line Nuclear Physics and the situation of the world'' (Author)

  6. H.E. Professor Wang Liheng, Minister of Aviation of the People's Republic of China, President, China Aerospace Science & Technology Corporation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    H. E. Professor Wang Liheng, Minister of Aviation, and President, China Aerospace Science & Technology Corporation, People's Republic of China (2nd from left) with (from left to right) Professor Hans Hofer, Professor Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes, Professor Samuel C. C. Ting, CERN and Professor Lei Gang, Secretary to the Minister, September 2001.

  7. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  8. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  9. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  10. Supervisors' and residents' patient-education competency in challenging outpatient consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    Objectives: We compared supervisors' and residents' patient-education competency in challenging consultations in order to establish whether supervisors demonstrate sufficient patient-education competency to act credibly as role models and coaches for residents. Methods: All consultations conducted

  11. As interações professor-professor na co-construção dos projetos pedagógicos na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian Raposo

    Full Text Available A qualidade das interações entre professores é uma realidade da cultura escolar de fundamental importância para o desenvolvimento do seu projeto pedagógico e do currículo vivido pelo aluno. Arquitetado nos pressupostos teóricos da abordagem sociocultural construtivista, este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar os processos co-construtivos presentes nas interações professor-professor, fundamentais para a elaboração e execução dos projetos vividos em uma escola pública de formação de professores do Distrito Federal. Participaram do estudo os 23 professores do curso normal, a coordenadora e o diretor. Procedimentos de observação participante das atividades pedagógicas de planejamento e execução de projetos e entrevista semi-estruturada com 10 desses participantes foram realizados em um período de três meses. A análise dos resultados focalizou (1 relações de confiança (2 interdependência indivíduo-grupo e (3 liderança. Estas categorias foram cruciais para o alcance dos objetivos estabelecidos na escola. Considera-se que estas são contribuições importantes da Psicologia aos cursos de formação inicial e continuada de professores.

  12. Promotion beyond Tenure: Unpacking Racism and Sexism in the Experiences of Black Womyn Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croom, Natasha N.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined seven Black womyn full professors' experiences of promotion beyond tenure. Using a critical race feminist theoretical framework, findings suggest that a meritocratic ideology undergirds a dominant narrative about the Professor rank. However, racism and sexism mediated the participants' opportunities to access the status and…

  13. H.E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic, Ambassador to Switzerland of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    H. E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to Switzerland, visiting the ATLAS cavern. From left to right: Dr Torsten Akesson, Deputy Spokesman of the ATLAS experiment; H. E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic; Mrs Simone Hajos, Project Engineer, LHC civil engineering; Dr Peter Adzic, Chairman of the Committee of the Republic of Serbia for relations with CERN.

  14. Analysis of Job Satisfaction of University Professors from Nine Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ping; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Research on work life and job satisfaction of university professors is becoming an important research issue in the field of higher education. This study used questionnaires administered to 1 770 teachers from different levels, types, and academic fields of Chinese universities to investigate job satisfaction among university professors and the…

  15. New Assistant Professors of Counselor Education: Their Preparation and Their Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Sandy; Norem, Ken; Haberstroh, Shane

    2001-01-01

    Features a profile of assistant professors who accepted their first counselor education positions in 1999 as well as their comments regarding their experience as applicants. Includes recommendations derived from the data for counselor educators, professors-in-training, and search committees. (GCP)

  16. The Coaching and Mentoring Process: The Obvious Knowledge and Skill Set for Organizational Communication Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Robert H.; Barker, Randolph T.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the uses of coaching and mentoring as they apply to organizational communication professors. The authors contend that these professors already are proficient at coaching and mentoring and the coaching and mentoring processes are routinely undertaken as part of their standard university teaching responsibilities. As coaches,…

  17. The Relationships among Teacher Immediacy, Professor/Student Rapport, and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepp, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among teacher immediacy, professor/student rapport, and student self-regulated learning among selected undergraduate students in a college of agriculture. The independent variables for this study were verbal and nonverbal immediacy and professor/student rapport. The dependent variable in…

  18. Use of RateMyProfessors.com Data as a Supplemental Tool for the

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Adam; Sharp, Kevan; Gatlin, Todd A.; Villalta-Cerdas, Adrian; Gower, Austin; Sandi-Urena, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Commercial online instructor evaluations have gained traction in influencing students' decisions on professor and course selections at universities. RateMyProfessors.com (RMP) is the most popular of such evaluation tools and houses a wealth of information from the students' viewpoint. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RMP data…

  19. Perception and Experience of Transformative Learning and Faculty Authenticity among North American Professors of Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hokyung Paul

    2012-01-01

    Through convenient purposeful sampling, 16 professors from North American Professors of Christian Education were recruited for this study. Through consulting key personnel in NAPCE a pool of participants were attained (n = 16). The findings from the research study revealed the elements contributing to the way that participants experienced and…

  20. University Professors as Academic Leaders: Professorial Leadership Development Needs and Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In the UK the title "professor" is generally applied only to the most senior academics--equivalent to North American full professors--and whom anecdotal evidence indicates to be often unprepared for the increasingly expansive academic leadership roles that they are expected to fulfil. The study reported in this paper was directed at…

  1. Strategies for Professors Who Service the University to Earn Tenure and Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Ruben; Stokes, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Tenure and promotion are great aspirations for college professors. They are indicators of success in the professions. Universities stipulate in their official documents and numerous higher education publications specify what professors must achieve in order to earn tenure and promotion; which almost always cite effectiveness in teaching, research,…

  2. "Simply the Best": Professors Nominated by Students for Their Exemplary Technology Practices in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Mary; Havel, Alice; Fichten, Catherine; King, Laura; Marcil, Evelyne; Lussier, Alex; Budd, Jillian; Vitouchanskaia, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Our goal was to explore the technology related pedagogical practices of college professors deemed by their students to be excellent in using technology in their teaching. We explored the views of 114 community/junior college professors who were nominated by their students as excellent in using technology in their teaching using both questionnaires…

  3. Identities of Special Needs Education in the Discourse of Finnish Professors of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehkakoski, Tanja; Sume, Helena; Puro, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This article examines both the discourses upon which Finnish special needs education professors draw when speaking about their field, and the consequent identities for it. The research material consists of theme interviews with 10 professors of special needs education and is analysed from a socio-constructionist, discourse analytical perspective.…

  4. Professor: Polens reformer er værre for EU end brexit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Marlene

    2017-01-01

    Professor Marlene Wind var den 8. december i Jyllands-Posten, hvor hun kommenterede på udviklingen i Polen med deres retsreformer, som professor Wind vurderer er mere alvorlig end Brexit for EU. Sagen om Polen handler om, hvordan EU kan få dets medlemslande til at overholde de regler og værdier...

  5. Online Student Evaluation of Teaching: Will Professor "Hot and Easy" Win the Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A.; Fleck, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative content analysis of student comments on RateMyProfessors.com (RMP) identified the characteristics of professors rated as "good," "average," and "poor." Comments contained instructor characteristics consistent with prior research on the qualities of effective and ineffective college teachers. To better understand how students might…

  6. Acculturative Stress, Parental and Professor Attachment, and College Adjustment in Asian International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suejung; Pistole, M. Carole; Caldwell, Jarred M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined parental and professor attachment as buffers against acculturative stress and as predictors of college adjustment of 210 Asian international students (AISs). Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed that acculturative stress negatively and secure parental and professor attachment positively predicted academic…

  7. A Comparison of Mathematics Teachers' and Professors' Views on Secondary Preparation for Tertiary Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Carol; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Hazari, Zahra; Watson, Charity

    2016-01-01

    This article compares the views of teachers and professors about the transition from secondary mathematics to tertiary calculus. Quantitative analysis revealed five categories where teachers and professors differed significantly in the relative frequency of addressing them. Using the rite of passage theory, the separation and incorporation phases…

  8. Exploring Cultural Effects on Teaching Styles of Chinese and American Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ginny Q.; Moodie, Douglas R.; Wang, Bailing

    2015-01-01

    The current study examines cultural effects on college professors' teaching styles. Ninety-four Chinese university instructors participated in the study. A 40-item teaching style inventory was used in the study. The responses were compared with American professors' teaching styles reported by Grasha (2006). Results show that the Chinese…

  9. A Narrative Inquiry Exploring How College Communication Professors Engage Students with Public Speaking Apprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how communication professors at four-year private universities help students who exhibit public speaking apprehension (PSA) learn to cope with their anxiety. The research was framed in the narrative inquiry paradigm, interviewing eight college communication professors about their experiences…

  10. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  11. Surgical residency: A tenant's view

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'To sleep: perchance to dream', is the frequent mantra of the surgical resident. However, unlike. Hamlet, there is no ensuing speculation as to what dreams may come as there are seldom any!! Surgical residency has been both vilified and immortalized, but the fact remains that it is one of the most challenging, provocative ...

  12. Discurso da autoajuda na formação do professor de língua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Rodrigues SILVA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho investiga a interferência do discurso de autoajuda nas representações de professor, construídas por alunos-mestres no contexto de formação de professores de língua. O embasamento teórico ancora-se no conceito de transdisciplinaridade como um fator central para a prática científica pós-moderna em Linguística Aplicada. Os resultados mostram que os discursos da autoajuda responsabilizam os professores tanto pelo sucesso quanto pelo fracasso de seus aprendizes. Consequentemente, o uso desse tipo de linguagem, durante os cursos de treinamento de professores, pode camuflar o empoderamento do professor, o que, por sua vez, pode comprometer a sua formação

  13. Impact on house staff evaluation scores when changing from a Dreyfus- to a Milestone-based evaluation model: one internal medicine residency program's findings

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Karen A.; Balwan, Sandy; Cacace, Frank; Katona, Kyle; Sunday, Suzanne; Chaudhry, Saima

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: As graduate medical education (GME) moves into the Next Accreditation System (NAS), programs must take a critical look at their current models of evaluation and assess how well they align with reporting outcomes. Our objective was to assess the impact on house staff evaluation scores when transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model of evaluation to a Milestone-based model of evaluation. Milestones are a key component of the NAS.Method: We analyzed all end of rotation evaluations of hous...

  14. 26 CFR 521.114 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the convention, an alien who is a resident of Denmark but who is temporarily present within the United... other educational institution, situated within the United States, is, for a period not exceeding two... that such alien coming to the United States for the purposes indicated has, for a period of not more...

  15. visit of Members of the ETH Foundation, accompanied by Professor Heidi Wunderli-Allenspach, Rektorin, ETH Zürich and Professor Roman Boutellier, Vizepräsident Personal und Ressourcen, Switzerland, on Tuesday, 24th February 2009.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    visit of Members of the ETH Foundation, accompanied by Professor Heidi Wunderli-Allenspach, Rektorin, ETH Zürich and Professor Roman Boutellier, Vizepräsident Personal und Ressourcen, Switzerland, on Tuesday, 24th February 2009.

  16. Summer students and professor from the United Arab Emirates - from left to right : Alya Ali Binghurair, Shaikha Al Kalbani, Professor Chafia Hejase de Trad, Mariam Al Hassani, Aminah Al Abdouli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Summer students and professor from the United Arab Emirates - from left to right : Alya Ali Binghurair, Shaikha Al Kalbani, Professor Chafia Hejase de Trad, Mariam Al Hassani, Aminah Al Abdouli.

  17. CERN 50th Anniversary Official Celebration : keynote speech from Professor Federico Mayor Zaragoza, Professor in the Molecular Biology at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, Former Director-General of UNESCO

    CERN Multimedia

    Blanc

    2004-01-01

    CERN 50th Anniversary Official Celebration : keynote speech from Professor Federico Mayor Zaragoza, Professor in the Molecular Biology at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, Former Director-General of UNESCO

  18. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve the Success of Women Assistant Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisso, Jeane Ann; Sammel, Mary Dupuis; Rubenstein, Arthur H; Speck, Rebecca M; Conant, Emily F; Scott, Patricia; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Westring, Alyssa Friede; Friedman, Stewart; Abbuhl, Stephanie B

    2017-05-01

    Given the persistent disparity in the advancement of women compared with men faculty in academic medicine, it is critical to develop effective interventions to enhance women's careers. We carried out a cluster-randomized, multifaceted intervention to improve the success of women assistant professors at a research-intensive medical school. Twenty-seven departments/divisions were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The three-tiered intervention included components that were aimed at (1) the professional development of women assistant professors, (2) changes at the department/division level through faculty-led task forces, and (3) engagement of institutional leaders. Generalized linear models were used to test associations between assignment and outcomes, adjusting for correlations induced by the clustered design. Academic productivity and work self-efficacy improved significantly over the 3-year trial in both intervention and control groups, but the improvements did not differ between the groups. Average hours worked per week declined significantly more for faculty in the intervention group as compared with the control group (-3.82 vs. -1.39 hours, respectively, p = 0.006). The PhD faculty in the intervention group published significantly more than PhD controls; however, no differences were observed between MDs in the intervention group and MDs in the control group. Significant improvements in academic productivity and work self-efficacy occurred in both intervention and control groups, potentially due to school-wide intervention effects. A greater decline in work hours in the intervention group despite similar increases in academic productivity may reflect learning to "work smarter" or reveal efficiencies brought about as a result of the multifaceted intervention. The intervention appeared to benefit the academic productivity of faculty with PhDs, but not MDs, suggesting that interventions should be more intense or tailored to specific faculty

  20. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  1. Analysis and interpretation of residence time distribution experimental curves in FM01-LC reactor using axial dispersion and plug dispersion exchange models with closed-closed boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Fernando F.; Cruz-Diaz, Martin R.; Rivero, Eligio P.; Gonzalez, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    The liquid phase mixing flow pattern at low (20 M = 1.058 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 , 25 o C, in water) as model tracer. A theoretical analysis and approximation RTD experimental curves with axial dispersion model (ADM) and plug dispersion exchange model (PDE), with 'closed-closed vessel' boundary conditions were used in order to establish a better approximation of the axial dispersion, stagnant zones, channelling and by-pass (preference flow) effects present at low and intermediate Re. RTD curves show that the liquid flow pattern in the FM01-LC deviates considerably from axial dispersion model at low Re, where the FM01-LC exhibits large channelling, stagnant zones, and dead zone. The PDE model represents fairly this deviation from ideal flow (less dead zone).

  2. Opportunities to Create New General Surgery Residency Programs to Alleviate the Shortage of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Ashley D; Beadles, Christopher A; Sheldon, George F; Charles, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    To estimate the capacity for supporting new general surgery residency programs among U.S. hospitals that currently do not have such programs. The authors compiled 2011 American Hospital Association data regarding the characteristics of hospitals with and without a general surgery residency program and 2012 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education data regarding existing general surgery residencies. They performed an ordinary least squares regression to model the number of residents who could be trained at existing programs on the basis of residency program-level variables. They identified candidate hospitals on the basis of a priori defined criteria for new general surgery residency programs and an out-of-sample prediction of resident capacity among the candidate hospitals. The authors found that 153 hospitals in 39 states could support a general surgery residency program. The characteristics of these hospitals closely resembled the characteristics of hospitals with existing programs. They identified 435 new residency positions: 40 hospitals could support 2 residents per year, 99 hospitals could support 3 residents, 12 hospitals could support 4 residents, and 2 hospitals could support 5 residents. Accounting for progressive specialization, new residency programs could add 287 additional general surgeons to the workforce annually (after an initial five- to seven-year lead time). By creating new general surgery residency programs, hospitals could increase the number of general surgeons entering the workforce each year by 25%. A challenge to achieving this growth remains finding new funding mechanisms within and outside Medicare. Such changes are needed to mitigate projected workforce shortages.

  3. DIRECTORS, PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS: A TRIPLE TO STRENGHEN LEADERSHIP / DIRECTIVOS, DOCENTES Y ESTUDIANTES UNA TRIADA PARA FORTALECER EL LIDERAZGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Estrada Mejía

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at strengthening the leadership of the students of the Mastership in Administration of Organizational and Human Development of the Technological University from Pereira, Colombia. It begins with an objective vision of the reality of the academic syllabus, it establishes objectives for directors, professors and students in order to potencialize each and every phase of the leadership model AMCO. The system of knowledge and the themes are defined. The strategies are determined as well as the actions to be accomplished in short, medium and long terms. Hence, the indicator to evaluate this process are established.

  4. Do Plastic Surgery Programs with Integrated Residencies or Subspecialty Fellowships Have Increased Academic Productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Stephen P.; Valsangkar, Nakul P.; Sood, Rajiv; Socas, Juan; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surgical training pathways on the academic performance of plastic surgical divisions. Methods: Eighty-two academic parameters for 338 plastic surgeons (PS), 1737 general surgeons (GS), and 1689 specialist surgeons (SS) from the top 55 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded academic departments of surgery were examined using data gathered from websites, SCOPUS, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. Results: The median size of a PS division was 7 faculty members. PS faculty had lower median publications (P)/citations (C) (ie, P/C) than GS and SS (PS: 25/328, GS: 35/607, and SS: 40/713, P < 0.05). Publication and citation differences were observed at all ranks: assistant professor (PS: 11/101, GS: 13/169, and SS: 19/249), associate professor (PS: 33/342, GS: 40/691, and SS: 44/780), and professor (PS: 57/968, GS: 97/2451, and SS: 101/2376). PS had a lower percentage of faculty with current/former NIH funding (PS: 13.5%, GS: 22.8%, and SS: 25.1%, P < 0.05). Academic productivity for PS faculty was improved in integrated programs. P/C for PS faculty from divisions with traditional 3-year fellowships was 19/153, integrated 6-year residency was 25/329, and both traditional and 6-year programs were 27/344, P < 0.05. Craniofacial and hand fellowships increased productivity within the integrated residency programs. P/C for programs with a craniofacial fellowship were 32/364 and for those that additionally had a hand fellowship were 45/536. PS faculty at divisions with integrated training programs also had a higher frequency of NIH funding. Conclusions: PS divisions vary in degree of academic productivity. Dramatically improved scholarly output is observed with integrated residency training programs and advanced specialty fellowships. PMID:27014543

  5. REDES SOCIAIS E FORMAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Teixeira Barcelos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Os desafios estabelecidos pelas inovações tecnológicas ao processo educativo são muitos e diversas são as alternativas de práticas pedagógicas que envolvem o uso das mesmas. Nessa perspectiva, esta conferência visa a apresentar uma pesquisa que discute a prática pedagógica alicerçada nas tecnologias digitais (TD como instrumentos mediadores. Considerando que a formação de professores é um processo contínuo, foi elaborada uma proposta de formação, para os egressos da licenciatura em Matemática de um Instituto Federal, no início de sua prática docente . A proposta foi denominada T-PROIM – Tecnologias na Prática docente de pROfessores Iniciantes de Matemática. Uma rede social na Internet (RSI foi implementada por meio da plataforma Elgg para apoiar a referida formação. Essa visou a possibilitar a integração das TD à prática docente e fundamentou-se na teoria sócio-histórica. A pesquisa foi descritiva e explicativa, por meio de um estudo de caso e a abordagem foi, predominantemente, qualitativa. As técnicas de coleta de dados foram questionário, entrevistas, observação e registro dos conteúdos postados na RSI. Para tanto, inicialmente, caracterizam-se redes sociais na internet. A seguir, são apresentados os aspectos metodológicos, as características da formação T-PROIM e a análise macro da experimentação da referida formação. Finalizando, são tecidas algumas considerações sobre a pesquisa. A flexibilidade da formação e da configuração de recursos RSI foi considerada importante para o contexto educacional. Além disso, a análise possibilitou identificar que a confiança no uso pedagógico das TD aumentou e que a formação contribuiu para o desenvolvimento pessoal, social e cognitivo.

  6. Roles of Communication Problems and Communication Strategies on Resident-Related Role Demand and Role Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Lee, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of dementia-related communication difficulties and communication strategies used by staff on resident-related indicators of role demand and role satisfaction. Formal/paid long-term care staff caregivers (N = 109) of residents with dementia completed questionnaires on dementia-related communication difficulties, communication strategies, role demand (ie, residents make unreasonable demands), and role satisfaction (measured by relationship closeness and influence over residents). Three types of communication strategies were included: (a) effective repair strategies, (b) completing actions by oneself, and (c) tuning out or ignoring the resident. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that communication problems were positively linked with role demand. Repair strategies were positively linked with relationship closeness and influence over residents. Completing actions by oneself was positively linked to role demand and influence over residents, whereas tuning out was negatively linked with influence over residents. The findings underscore that effective caregiver communication skills are essential in enhancing staff-resident relationships.

  7. The neighborhood health exchange: developing a community partnership in residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Press, Valerie G; Freed, Benjamin H; Baker, Timothy; Tang, Joyce W; Cohen, Julie C; Laiteerapong, Neda; Alvarez, Kimberly; Schwartz, Mindy; Arora, Vineet M

    2010-09-01

    The current system of residency training focuses on the hospital setting, and resident exposure to the surrounding community is often limited. However, community interaction can play an important role in ambulatory training and in learning systems-based practice, a residency core competency. The goal of the Neighborhood Health Exchange was to develop a community partnership to provide internal medicine residents with an opportunity to interface with community members through a mutually beneficial educational experience. Internal medicine residents received training during their ambulatory block and participated in a voluntary field practicum designed to engage community members in discussions about their health. Community members participated in education sessions led by resident volunteers. Resident volunteers completed a survey on their experiences. All residents stated that the opportunity to lead an exchange was very useful to their overall residency training. Eight exchanges were held with a total of 61 community participants, who completed a 3-question survey following the session. This survey asked about the level of material, the helpfulness of the exchanges, and opportunities for improvement. We received 46 completed surveys from community members: 91% stated that the material was presented "at the right level" and 93% stated that the presentations were somewhat or very helpful. Eighty percent gave positive and encouraging comments about the exchange. Effective community partnerships involve assessing needs of the stakeholders, anticipating leadership turnover, and adapting the Neighborhood Health Exchange model to different groups. Community outreach can also enhance internal medicine ambulatory training experience, provide residents with patient counseling opportunities, and offer a novel method to enhance resident understanding of systems-based practice, especially within the larger community in which their patients live.

  8. Sharing Tacit Knowledge among Expert Teaching Professors and Mentees: Considerations for Career and Technical Education Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Han Sik; Roth, Gene L.

    2007-01-01

    This case study provides viewpoints of knowledge sharing by expert teaching professors and their mentees. Professors who were recognized as expert teachers with an annual award at a mid-western USA university were the units of analysis of this study. Expert teaching professors had difficulty articulating much of their teaching expertise. The…

  9. His Excellency Professor Dr Che-Ho Wei, Chairman, National Science Council Executive Yuan, Republic of China

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Professor Dr. Che-Ho Wei signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General, L. Maiani. Photo 02: Professor Dr. Che-Ho Wei. Photo 03::Professor Dr. Che-Ho Wei shaking hands with CERN Director-General, L. Maiani.

  10. Factors associated with primary care residents' satisfaction with their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, C S; Bergus, G R; Schlechte, J A; McGuinness, G; Mueller, C W

    1997-01-01

    Satisfaction is known to impact work performance, learning, recruitment, and retention. This study identifies the factors associated with primary care residents' satisfaction with their training. We used a cross-sectional survey based on the Price-Mueller model of job satisfaction. The model included 14 job characteristics, four personal characteristics, and four demographic factors. Data were collected in February and March 1996 from residents in three primary care training programs (family practice, pediatrics, and internal medicine) at a large academic medical center. The same standardized, self-administered questionnaires were used in all three departments. Seventy-five percent (n = 119) of the residents returned questionnaires. Five job characteristics were positively associated with resident satisfaction: continuity of care, autonomy, collegiality, work that encourages professional growth, and work group loyalty. Role conflict, a sixth job characteristic, was negatively associated with satisfaction. The personal characteristic of having an optimistic outlook on life was also positively associated with satisfaction. The model explained 66% of the variation in self-reported satisfaction. The satisfaction of the residents was significantly associated with six job characteristics and one personal factor. Interventions based on these job characteristics may increase resident satisfaction and may lead to better patient outcomes, better work performance, greater patient satisfaction, and more success in recruiting top students into a residency.

  11. Nursing home resident quality of life: testing for measurement equivalence across resident, family, and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Judith; Keefe, Janice; Kelloway, E Kevin; Hirdes, John P

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the factor structure of the interRAI self-report nursing home quality of life survey and develops a measure that will allow researchers to compare predictors of quality of life (QOL) across resident, family, and staff perspectives. Nursing home residents (N = 319), family members (N = 397), and staff (N = 862) were surveyed about their perceptions of resident QOL. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted on a random half of the staff data. Subsequently, confirmatory factor analysis was used to test for measurement equivalence across the three perspectives. The final model had a four-factor structure (i.e., care and support, food, autonomy, and activities) across all three perspectives. Each factor had at least two items that were equivalent across all three perspectives, which suggests at least partial measurement equivalence. The finding of partial measurement equivalence acknowledges there are important differences between perspectives and provides a tool that researchers can use to compare predictors of QOL, but not levels of agreement across perspectives. Targeting these four aspects is likely to have the additional benefit of improving family and staff perceptions of resident QOL in addition to the resident's own QOL.

  12. Applying the Job Demands--Resources Model to the Work--Home Interface: A Study among Medical Residents and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B.; ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Prins, Jelle T.; van der Heijden, Frank M. M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Work-home interference (WHI) is a prevalent problem because most employees have substantial family responsibilities on top of their work demands. The present study hypothesized that high job demands in combination with low job resources contribute to WHI. The job demands-resources (JD-R) model was used as a theoretical framework. Using a sample of…

  13. Risk Information Seeking among U.S. and Dutch Residents. An Application of the model of Risk Information Seeking and Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Huurne, E.F.J.; Griffin, Robert J.; Gutteling, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The model of risk information seeking and processing (RISP) proposes characteristics of individuals that might predispose them to seek risk information. The intent of this study is to test the model’s robustness across two independent samples in different nations. Based on data from the United

  14. Knowledge and views of professors of nutrition about food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Kelly Daiane; Braga, Vilma de Oliveira; Quintaes, Kesia Diego

    2010-01-01

    Food irradiation is an efficient technology that can be used in the conservation of foods. However, consumers' knowledge about irradiated foods has proved insufficient resulting in low acceptance of such foods. Considering that dietitians and nutritionists are the qualified health professionals to guide patients and consumers towards the ingestion and selection of foods, this study aims to evaluate the knowledge and views about radiated foods of professors of nutrition working in higher education institutions in the city of Belo Horizonte - MG, Brazil. A total of 86.4% out of the 66 participants had general knowledge about irradiated foods. However, 71.2% were not familiar with the process, 75.8% were totally unaware of the specific legislation, 21.2% were not sure of the purposes of irradiation, 12.1% considered irradiated foods radioactive, and 31.8% believed that food irradiation results in the reduction of the nutritional value of foods. Irradiated foods would not be rejected by professionals with Ph.D. degree, but they would be rejected by five masters and six experts questioned. The study concluded that the current higher education of future dietitians and nutritionists has been provided without the minimum necessary knowledge regarding irradiated foods corroborating the negative view of consumers about this kind of food. (author)

  15. Internet Teaching By Style: Profiling the On-line Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Strand

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to offer the results of a pilot study which examined the personality type and teaching style preferences of faculty who elected to teach an on-line course. The article will present a description of personality assessments, including the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI and Anthony Gregorc's Transaction Ability Inventory used to determine teaching tendencies and styles. In addition, a structured written questionnaire developed by the researchers was used to assess teacher satisfaction with worldwide web-based instruction. Utilizing the results of these psychological assessments, a preliminary analysis of the personal characteristics of college professors who chose to teach on line will be presented. This pilot study found that some preferred teaching styles may be more compatible with the dynamics of distance learning formats. By determining successful teaching styles for on-line courses, we can develop more effective faculty development programs to assist others in successfully transitioning into the cyber-teaching and learning environment.

  16. Professor John Scott, folate and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffbrand, A Victor

    2014-02-01

    John Scott (1940-2013) was born in Dublin where he was to spend the rest of his career, both as an undergraduate and subsequently Professor of Biochemistry and Nutrition at Trinity College. His research with the talented group of scientists and clinicians that he led has had a substantial impact on our understanding of folate metabolism, mechanisms of its catabolism and deficiency. His research established the leading theory of folate involvement with vitamin B12 in the pathogenesis of vitamin B12 neuropathy. He helped to establish the normal daily intake of folate and the increased requirements needed either in food or as a supplement before and during pregnancy to prevent neural tube defects. He also suggested a dietary supplement of vitamin B12 before and during pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. It would be an appropriate epitaph if fortification of food with folic acid became mandatory in the UK and Ireland, as it is in over 70 other countries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Length and content of family practice residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Marguerite; Green, Larry A; Dovey, Susan; Lai, Sandy; Graham, Robert; Fryer, George E

    2002-01-01

    Family practice residency programs are based largely on a model implemented more than 30 years ago. Substantial changes in medical practice, technology, and knowledge necessitate reassessment of how family physicians are prepared for practice. We simultaneously surveyed samples of family practice residency directors, first-year residents, and family physicians due for their first board recertification examination to determine, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, their opinions about the length and content of family practice residencies in the United States. Twenty-seven percent of residency directors, 32% of residents, and 28% of family physicians favored extending family practice residency to 4 years; very few favored 2- or 5-year programs. There was dispersion of opinions about possible changes within each group and among the three groups. Most in all three groups would be willing to extend residency for more training in office-based procedures and sports medicine, but many were unwilling to extend residency for more training in surgery or hospital-based care. Residents expressed more willingness than program directors or family physicians to change training. Barriers to change included disagreement about the need to change; program financing and opportunity costs, such as loss of income and delay in debt repayment; and potential negative impact on student recruitment. Most respondents support the current 3-year model of training. There is considerable interest in changing both the length and content of family practice training. Lack of consensus suggests that a period of elective experimentation might be needed to assure family physicians are prepared to meet the needs and expectations of their patients.

  18. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  19. A Self-Assessment Guide for Resident Teaching Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Janet P; Franks, Amy M; Ashjian, Emily; Bingham, Angela L; Burke, John M; Erstad, Brian L; Haines, Seena L; Hilaire, Michelle L; Rager, Michelle L; Wienbar, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Educational Affairs Committee was charged with developing a self-assessment guide for residency programs to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the outcomes of resident teaching curricula. After extensively reviewing the literature, the committee developed assessment rubrics modeled after the 2013 ACCP white paper titled "Guidelines for Resident Teaching Experiences" and the revised American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) 2014 accreditation standards for PGY1 residencies, which place greater emphasis on the teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) than the previous accreditation standards. The self-assessment guide developed by the present committee can serve as an assessment tool for both basic and expanded TLCs. It provides the criteria for program goals, mentoring, directed readings with topic discussions, teaching experiences, and assessment methodology. For an expanded TLC, the committee has provided additional guidance on developing a teaching philosophy, becoming involved in interactive seminars, expanding teaching experiences, developing courses, and serving on academic committees. All the guidelines listed in the present paper use the measures "not present," "developing," and "well developed" so that residency program directors can self-assess along the continuum and identify areas of excellence and areas for improvement. Residency program directors should consider using this new assessment tool to measure program quality and outcomes of residency teaching experiences. Results of the assessment will help residency programs focus on areas within the TLC that will potentially benefit from additional attention and possible modification. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. Practical Interventions to Enhance Resident Ownership of Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeprono, Thomas; Markman, Jesse; Grodesky, Michael; Cowley, Deborah

    2017-06-19

    In the modern training environment, some question whether trainees have the opportunity to develop ownership of patient care, which includes concepts such as advocacy, autonomy, commitment, communication, follow-through, knowledge about the patient, responsibility, and teamwork. Despite descriptions of what ownership is, there is little discussion of how to foster ownership during residency. The objective of this study was to solicit psychiatry resident and faculty perspectives on ways to enhance resident ownership in training. Twenty-nine of 74 (39.2%) residents and 31 of 68 (45.6%) faculty members surveyed provided narrative responses to a voluntary, anonymous, electronic survey asking two structured, open-ended questions about what factors make it more or less likely that a resident will take "ownership" of patient care. The coding process produced four overarching categories of themes (attending, resident, educational program, and environment) that reflect domains for possible interventions to increase ownership, with conceptual guidance from the Theory of Planned Behavior. From these factors, the authors propose a number of practical yet theory-based interventions which include setting expectations, modeling, promoting autonomy, countertransference supervision, changing residency culture, and longer rotations. These interventions address subjective norms, attitudes, perceived ability and control, environment, and actual resident abilities, all of which, according to the Theory of Planned Behavior, would be likely to influence patient care ownership. Future studies could develop curricula and examine the effectiveness of the interventions proposed here in reinforcing or developing ownership in physicians.