WorldWideScience

Sample records for resident operative experience

  1. Variable Operative Experience in Hand Surgery for Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, Lawrence Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    Efforts to standardize hand surgery training during plastic surgery residency remain challenging. We analyze the variability of operative hand experience at U.S. plastic surgery residency programs. Operative case logs of chief residents in accredited U.S. plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Trends in fold differences of hand surgery case volume between the 10th and 90th percentiles of residents were assessed graphically. Percentile data were used to calculate the number of residents achieving case minimums in hand surgery for 2015. Case logs from 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed of which a minority were from integrated (35.7%) versus independent/combined (64.3%) residents. Trend analysis of fold differences in case volume demonstrated decreasing variability among procedure categories over time. By 2015, fold differences for hand reconstruction, tendon cases, nerve cases, arthroplasty/arthrodesis, amputation, arterial repair, Dupuytren release, and neoplasm cases were below 10-fold. Congenital deformity cases among independent/combined residents was the sole category that exceeded 10-fold by 2015. Percentile data suggested that approximately 10% of independent/combined residents did not meet case minimums for arterial repair and congenital deformity in 2015. Variable operative experience during plastic surgery residency may limit adequate exposure to hand surgery for certain residents. Future studies should establish empiric case minimums for plastic surgery residents to ensure hand surgery competency upon graduation. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Variability in Resident Operative Hand Experience by Specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, L Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Recent attention has sought to standardize hand surgery training in the United States. This study analyzes the variability in operative hand experience for orthopedic and general surgery residents. Case logs for orthopedic and general surgery residency graduates were obtained from the American Council of Graduate Medical Education (2006-2007 to 2014-2015). Plastic surgery case logs were not available for comparison. Hand surgery case volumes were compared between specialties with parametric tests. Intraspecialty variation in orthopedic surgery was assessed between the bottom and top 10th percentiles in procedure categories. Case logs for 9605 general surgery residents and 5911 orthopedic surgery residents were analyzed. Orthopedic surgery residents performed a greater number of hand surgery cases than general surgery residents ( P < .001). Mean total hand experience ranged from 2.5 ± 4 to 2.8 ± 5 procedures for general surgery residents with no reported cases of soft tissue repairs, vascular repairs, and replants. Significant intraspecialty variation existed in orthopedic surgery for all hand procedure categories (range, 3.3-15.0). As the model for hand surgery training evolves, general surgeons may represent an underutilized talent pool to meet the critical demand for hand surgeon specialists. Future research is needed to determine acceptable levels of training variability in hand surgery.

  3. Operative time and cost of resident surgical experience: effect of instituting an otolaryngology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollei, Taylor R; Barrs, David M; Hinni, Michael L; Bansberg, Stephen F; Walter, Logan C

    2013-06-01

    Describe the procedure length difference between surgeries performed by an attending surgeon alone compared with the resident surgeon supervised by the same attending surgeon. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care center and residency program. Six common otolaryngologic procedures performed between August 1994 and May 2012 were divided into 2 cohorts: attending surgeon alone or resident surgeon. This division coincided with our July 2006 initiation of an otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency program. Operative duration was compared between cohorts with confounding factors controlled. In addition, the direct result of increased surgical length on operating room cost was calculated and applied to departmental and published resident case log report data. Five of the 6 procedures evaluated showed a statistically significant increase in surgery length with resident involvement. Operative time increased 6.8 minutes for a cricopharyngeal myotomy (P = .0097), 11.3 minutes for a tonsillectomy (P operative time difference. Cost of increased surgical time was calculated per surgery and ranged from $286 (cricopharyngeal myotomy) to $2142 (mastoidectomy). When applied to reported national case log averages for graduating residents, this resulted in a significant increase of direct training-related costs. Resident participation in the operating room results in increased surgical length and additional system cost. Although residency is a necessary part of surgical training, associated costs need to be acknowledged.

  4. Early tracking would improve the operative experience of general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, Steven C; Biester, Thomas W; Hanks, John B; Ashley, Stanley W; Valentine, R James; Bass, Barbara L; Buyske, Jo

    2010-09-01

    High surgical complexity and individual career goals has led most general surgery (GS) residents to pursue fellowship training, resulting in a shortage of surgeons who practice broad-based general surgery. We hypothesize that early tracking of residents would improve operative experience of residents planning to be general surgeons, and could foster greater interest and confidence in this career path. Surgical Operative Log data from GS and fellowship bound residents (FB) applying for the 2008 American Board of Surgery Qualifying Examination (QE) were used to construct a hypothetical training model with 6 months of early specialization (ESP) for FB residents in 4 specialties (cardiac, vascular, colorectal, pediatric); and presumed these cases would be available to GS residents within the same program. A total of 142 training programs had both FB residents (n = 237) and GS residents (n = 402), and represented 70% of all 2008 QE applicants. The mean numbers of operations by FB and GS residents were 1131 and 1091, respectively. There were a mean of 252 cases by FB residents in the chief year, theoretically making 126 cases available for each GS resident. In 9 defined categories, the hypothetical model would result in an increase in the 5-year operative experience of GS residents (mastectomy 6.5%; colectomy 22.8%; gastrectomy 23.4%; antireflux procedures 23.4%; pancreatic resection 37.4%; liver resection 29.3%; endocrine procedures 19.6%; trauma operations 13.3%; GI endoscopy 6.5%). The ESP model improves operative experience of GS residents, particularly for complex gastrointestinal procedures. The expansion of subspecialty ESP should be considered.

  5. 0 + 5 Vascular Surgery Residents' Operative Experience in General Surgery: An Analysis of Operative Logs from 12 Integrated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Kang, P Chulhi; McAninch, Chris; Leverson, Glen; Sullivan, Sarah; Mitchell, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Integrated (0 + 5) vascular surgery (VS) residency programs must include 24 months of training in core general surgery. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education currently does not require specific case numbers in general surgery for 0 + 5 trainees; however, program directors have structured this time to optimize operative experience. The aim of this study is to determine the case volume and type of cases that VS residents are exposed to during their core surgery training. Accreditation council for graduate medical education operative logs for current 0 + 5 VS residents were obtained and retrospectively reviewed to determine general surgery case volume and distribution between open and laparoscopic cases performed. Standard statistical methods were applied. A total of 12 integrated VS residency programs provided operative case logs for current residents. A total of 41 integrated VS residents in clinical years 2 through 5. During the postgraduate year-1 training year, residents participated in significantly more open than laparoscopic general surgery cases (p surgery cases are hernia repair (20%), skin and soft tissue (7.4%), and breast (6.3%). Residents in programs with core surgery over 3 years participated in significantly more general surgery operations compared with residents in programs with core surgery spread out over 4 years (p = 0.035). 0 + 5 VS residents perform significantly more open operations than laparoscopic operations during their core surgery training. The majority of these operations are minor, nonabdominal procedures. The 0 + 5 VS residency program general surgery operative training requirements should be reevaluated and case minimums defined. The general surgery training component of 0 + 5 VS residencies may need to be restructured to meet the needs of current and future trainees. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on the operative experience of surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; van der Laan, Lijckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; Timman, Reinier; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2015-04-01

    In Europe and the United States, work hour restrictions are considered to be particularly burdensome for residents in surgery specialties. The aim of this study was to examine whether reduction of the work week to 48 hours resulting from the implementation of the European Working Time Directive has affected the operative experience of surgery residents. This study was conducted in a general surgery training region in the Netherlands, consisting of 1 university hospital and 6 district training hospitals. Operating records summarizing the surgical procedures performed as "primary surgeon" in the operating theater for different grades of surgeons were retrospectively analyzed for the period 2005-2012 by the use of linear regression models. Operative procedures performed by residents were considered the main outcome measure. In total, 235,357 operative procedures were performed, including 47,458 (20.2%) in the university hospital and 187,899 (79.8%) in the district training hospitals (n = 5). For residents in the university hospital, the mean number of operative procedures performed per 1.0 full-time equivalent increased from 128 operations in 2005 to 204 operations in 2012 (P = .001), whereas for residents in district training hospitals, no substantial differences were found over time. The mean (±SD) operative caseload of 64 residents who completed the 6-year training program between 2005 and 2012 was 1,391 ± 226 (range, 768-1856). A comparison of the operative caseload according to year of board-certification showed no difference. Implementation of the European Working Time Directive has not affected adversely the number of surgical procedures performed by residents within a general surgical training region in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The general surgery chief resident operative experience: 23 years of national ACGME case logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D; Goldin, Adam B; Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-09-01

    The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989-1990 through 2011-2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves.

  8. Attending Surgeons' Leadership Style in the Operating Room: Comparing Junior Residents' Experiences and Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissane-Lee, Nicole A; Yule, Steven; Pozner, Charles N; Smink, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on surgeons' nontechnical skills in the operating room (OR), especially leadership. In an attempt to identify trainee preferences, we explored junior residents' opinions about the OR leadership style of teaching faculty. Overall, 20 interns and 20 mid-level residents completed a previously validated survey on the style of leadership they encountered, the style they preferred to receive, and the style they personally employed in the OR. In all, 4 styles were explored; authoritative: leader makes decisions and communicates them firmly; explanatory: leader makes decisions promptly, but explains them fully; consultative: leader consults with trainees when important decisions are made, and delegative: leader puts the problem before the group and makes decisions by majority opinion. Comparisons were completed using chi-square analysis. Junior resident preference for leadership style of attending surgeons in the OR differed from what they encountered. Overall, 62% of residents encountered an authoritative leadership style; however, only 9% preferred this (p styles (41%). Preferences differed by postgraduate year. Although 40% of interns preferred a consultative style, 50% of mid-level residents preferred explanatory leadership. Junior resident preference of leadership style in the OR differs from what they actually encounter. This has the potential to create unwanted tension and may erode team performance. Awareness of this difference provides an opportunity for an educational intervention directed at both attendings and trainees. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of open operative vascular surgical experience among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafcik, Brianna M; Sachs, Teviah E; Farber, Alik; Eslami, Mohammad H; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Shah, Nishant K; Peacock, Matthew R; Siracuse, Jeffrey J

    2016-04-01

    General surgeons have traditionally performed open vascular operations. However, endovascular interventions, vascular residencies, and work-hour limitations may have had an impact on open vascular surgery training among general surgery residents. We evaluated the temporal trend of open vascular operations performed by general surgery residents to assess any changes that have occurred. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's database was used to evaluate graduating general surgery residents' cases from 1999 to 2013. Mean and median case volumes were analyzed for carotid endarterectomy, open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, and lower extremity bypass. Significance of temporal trends were identified using the R(2) test. The average number of carotid endarterectomies performed by general surgery residents decreased from 23.1 ± 14 (11.6 ± 9 chief, 11.4 + 10 junior) cases per resident in 1999 to 10.7 ± 9 (3.4 ± 5 chief, 7.3 ± 6 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.98). Similarly, elective open aortoiliac aneurysm repairs decreased from 7.4 ± 5 (4 ± 4 chief, 3.4 ± 4 junior) in 1999 to 1.3 ± 2 (0.4 ± 1 chief, 0.8 ± 1 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.98). The number of lower extremity bypasses decreased from 21 ± 12 (9.5 ± 7 chief, 11.8 ± 9 junior) in 1999 to 7.6 ± 2.6 (2.4 ± 1.3 chief, 5.2 + 1.8 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.94). Infrapopliteal bypasses decreased from 8.1 ± 3.8 (3.5 ± 2.2 chief, 4.5 ± 2.9 junior) in 2001 to 3 ± 2.2 (1 ± 1.6 chief, 2 ± 1.6 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.94). General surgery resident exposure to open vascular surgery has significantly decreased. Current and future graduates may not have adequate exposure to open vascular operations to be safely credentialed to perform these procedures in future practice without advanced vascular surgical training. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resident operative experience in general surgery, plastic surgery, and urology 5 years after implementation of the ACGME duty hour policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simien, Christopher; Holt, Kathleen D; Richter, Thomas H; Whalen, Thomas V; Coburn, Michael; Havlik, Robert J; Miller, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Resident duty hour restrictions were implemented in 2002-2003. This study examines changes in resident surgical experience since these restrictions were put into place. Operative log data for 3 specialties were examined: general surgery, urology, and plastic surgery. The academic year immediately preceding the duty hour restrictions, 2002-2003, was used as a baseline for comparison to subsequent academic years. Operative log data for graduating residents through 2007-2008 were the primary focus of the analysis. Examination of associated variables that may moderate the relationship between fewer duty hours and surgical volume was also included. Plastic surgery showed no changes in operative volume following duty hour restrictions. Operative volume increased in urology programs. General surgery showed a decrease in volume in some operative categories but an increase in others. Specifically the procedures in vascular, plastic, and thoracic areas showed a consistent decrease. There was no increase in the percentage of programs' graduates falling below minimum requirements. Procedures in pancreas, endocrine, and laparoscopic areas demonstrated an increase in volume. Graduates in larger surgical programs performed fewer procedures than graduates in smaller programs; this was not the case for urology or plastic surgery programs. The reduction of duty hours has not resulted in an across the board decrease in operative volume. Factors other than duty hour reforms may be responsible for some of the observed findings.

  11. Declining Operative Experience for Junior-Level Residents: Is This an Unintended Consequence of Minimally Invasive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Matthew G; Salerno, Elise P; Michaels, Alex D; Hedrick, Traci L; Sohn, Min-Woong; Smith, Philip W; Schirmer, Bruce D; Friel, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Our group has previously demonstrated an upward shift from junior to senior resident participation in common general surgery operations, traditionally performed by junior-level residents. The objective of this study was to evaluate if this trend would correct over time. We hypothesized that junior resident case volume would improve. A sample of essential laparoscopic and open general surgery procedures (appendectomy, inguinal herniorrhaphy, cholecystectomy, and partial colectomy) was chosen for analysis. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Files were queried for these procedures between 2005 and 2012. Cases were stratified by participating resident post-graduate year with "junior resident" defined as post-graduate year1-3. Logistic regression was performed to determine change in junior resident participation for each type of procedure over time. A total of 185,335 cases were included in the study. For 3 of the operations we considered, the prevalence of laparoscopic surgery increased from 2005-2012 (all p surgeries performed by junior-level residents decreased for appendectomy by 2.6%/y (p surgeries, with appendectomy decreasing by 9.4%/y (p surgery resident education. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, L.P.; Six, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company began operating a first-generation integrated safeguards system in the Plutonium Finishing Plant storage vaults. This Vault Safety and Inventory System is designed to integrate data into a computer-based nuclear material inventory monitoring system. The system gathers, in real time, measured physical parameters that generate nuclear material inventory status data for thousands of stored items and sends tailored report to the appropriate users. These data include canister temperature an bulge data reported to Plant Operations and Material Control and Accountability personnel, item presence and identification data reported to Material Control and Accountability personnel, and unauthorized item movement data reported to Security response forces and Material Control and Accountability personnel. The Westinghouse Hanford Company's experience and operational benefits in using this system for reduce radiation exposure, increase protection against insider threat, and real-time inventory control are discussed in this paper

  13. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  14. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  15. Radiology residents' experience with intussusception reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateni, Cyrus; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-01-01

    Residents should be exposed to adequate procedural volume to act independently upon completion of training. Informal inquiry led us to question whether residents encounter enough intussusception reductions to become comfortable with the procedure. We sought to determine radiology residents' exposure to intussusception reductions, and whether their experiences vary by region or institution. U.S. radiology residency program directors were asked to encourage their residents to complete a 12-question online survey describing characteristics of their pediatric radiology department, experiences with intussusception reduction, and confidence in their own ability to perform the procedure. Six hundred sixty-four residents responded during the study period. Of those, 308 (46.4%) had not experienced an intussusception reduction, and 228 (34%) had experienced only one or two. Twenty-two percent of fourth-year residents had never experienced an intussusception reduction, and 21% had experienced only one. Among second- through fourth-year residents, only 99 (18.3%) felt confident that they could competently reduce an intussusception (P < 0.0001), and 336 (62.2%) thought they would benefit from a computer-assisted training model simulating intussusception reduction (P < 0.0001). Radiology residents have limited opportunity to learn intussusception reduction and therefore lack confidence. Most think they would benefit from additional training with a computer-simulation model. (orig.)

  16. Local and national trends in general surgery residents' operative experience: do work hour limitations negatively affect case volume in small community-based programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelov, Alexey; Sakharpe, Aniket; Kohli, Harjeet; Livert, David

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to analyze the impact of work hour restrictions on the operative case volume at a small community-based general surgery residency training program and compare changes with the national level. Annual national resident case log data from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) website and case logs of graduating Easton Hospital residents (years 2002-2009) were used for analysis. Weighted average change in total number of cases in our institution was -1.20 (P = 0.52) vs 1.78 (P = 0.07) for the national program average with statistically significant difference on comparison (P = 0.027). We also found significant difference in case volume changes at the national level compared with our institution for the following ACGME defined subcategories: alimentary tract [8.19 (P < 0.01) vs -1.08 (P = 0.54)], abdomen [8.48 (P < 0.01) vs -6.29 (P < 0.01)], breast [1.91 (P = 0.89) vs -3.6 (P = 0.02)], and vascular [4.03 (P = 0.02) vs -3.98 (P = 0.01)]. Comparing the national trend to the community hospital we see that there is total increase in cases at the national level whereas there is a decrease in case volume at the community hospital. These trends can also be followed in ACGME defined subcategories which form the major case load for a general surgical training such as alimentary tract, abdominal, breast, and vascular procedures. We hypothesize that work hour restrictions have been favorable for the larger programs, as these programs were able to better integrate the night float system, restructure their call schedule, and implement institutional modifications which are too resource demanding for smaller training programs.

  17. A resident's rotation in consultation psychiatry. A maturational experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granet, R B; Perry, S W; Talbott, J A

    1980-12-01

    The authors emphasize the importance of a consultation psychiatry experience in the maturation of the young psychiatrist by examining some of the processes operational in both community and hospital consultation work, performed by the senior author during his fourth year of residency. Such experiences can provide opportunities for developing psychiatric skills not emphasized elsewhere, including the adoption of an active therapeutic stance, the application of the psychodynamic theory to the consultation system itself, and teaching without the use of jargon. In addition the experience as consultant facilitates the transition from residency to the outside world, not only through attitudinal changes achieved by exposure to less structured settings, a change in the supervisory model, and a solidification of identity as a physician and psychiatrist, but also by providing the resident the opportunity to begin de-cathecting from the training program.

  18. Perceptions, training experiences, and preferences of surgical residents toward laparoscopic simulation training: a resident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shohan; Zevin, Boris; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Roberts, Kurt E; Duffy, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Simulation training for surgical residents can shorten learning curves, improve technical skills, and expedite competency. Several studies have shown that skills learned in the simulated environment are transferable to the operating room. Residency programs are trying to incorporate simulation into the resident training curriculum to supplement the hands-on experience gained in the operating room. Despite the availability and proven utility of surgical simulators and simulation laboratories, they are still widely underutilized by surgical trainees. Studies have shown that voluntary use leads to minimal participation in a training curriculum. Although there are several simulation tools, there is no clear evidence of the superiority of one tool over the other in skill acquisition. The purpose of this study was to explore resident perceptions, training experiences, and preferences regarding laparoscopic simulation training. Our goal was to profile resident participation in surgical skills simulation, recognize potential barriers to voluntary simulator use, and identify simulation tools and tasks preferred by residents. Furthermore, this study may help to inform whether mandatory/protected training time, as part of the residents' curriculum is essential to enhance participation in the simulation laboratory. A cross-sectional study on general surgery residents (postgraduate years 1-5) at Yale University School of Medicine and the University of Toronto via an online questionnaire was conducted. Overall, 67 residents completed the survey. The institutional review board approved the methods of the study. Overall, 95.5% of the participants believed that simulation training improved their laparoscopic skills. Most respondents (92.5%) perceived that skills learned during simulation training were transferrable to the operating room. Overall, 56.7% of participants agreed that proficiency in a simulation curriculum should be mandatory before operating room experience. The

  19. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.; Thurygill, E.W.

    1980-05-01

    The CANDU-PHW program is based upon 38 years of heavy water reactor experience with 35 years of operating experience. Canada has had 72 reactor years of nuclear-electric operations experience with 10 nuclear units in 4 generating stations during a period of 18 years. All objectives have been met with outstanding performance: worker safety, public safety, environmental emissions, reliable electricity production, and low electricity cost. The achievement has been realized through total teamwork involving all scientific disciplines and all project functions (research, design, manufacturing, construction, and operation). (auth)

  20. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations both to the workers and the public

  1. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Operating experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimesa, S.

    2007-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has developed its own system for tracking, screening and evaluating the operating experiences of the nuclear installations. The SNSA staff regularly tracks the operating experiences throughout the world and screens them on the bases of applicability for the Slovenian nuclear facilities. The operating experiences, which pass the screening, are thoroughly evaluated and also recent operational events in these facilities are taken into account. If needed, more information is gathered to evaluate the conditions of the Slovenian facilities and appropriate corrective actions are considered. The result might be the identification of the need for modification at the licensee, the need for modification of internal procedures in the SNSA or even the proposal for the modification of regulations. Information system helps everybody to track the process of evaluation and proper logging of activities. (author)

  3. Psychotherapy Training: Residents' Perceptions and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Jessica G; Dubin, William R; Combs, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    This survey examined actual training hours in psychotherapy modalities as reported by residents, residents' perceptions of training needs, and residents' perceptions of the importance of different aspects of psychotherapy training. A brief, voluntary, anonymous, Internet-based survey was developed. All 14 program directors for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited programs in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware provided email addresses for current categorical residents. The survey inquired about hours of time spent in various aspects of training, value assigned to aspects of training, residents' involvement in their own psychotherapy, and overall resident wellness. The survey was e-mailed to 328 residents. Of the 328 residents contacted, 133 (40.5%) responded. Median reported number of PGY 3 and 4 performed versus perceived ideal hours of supportive therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and psychodynamic therapy did not differ. Answers for clinical time utilizing these modalities ranged from "none or less than 1 h" per month to 20+ h per month. PGY 3 and 4 residents reported a median of "none or less than 1 h" per month performed of interpersonal, dialectical behavior therapy, couples/family/group, and child therapies but preferred more time using these therapies. Residents in all years of training preferred more hours of didactic instruction for all psychotherapies and for medication management. Residents ranked teaching modalities in the following order of importance: supervision, hours of psychotherapy performed, personal psychotherapy, readings, and didactic instruction. Residents engaged in their own psychotherapy were significantly more likely to rank the experiential aspects of psychotherapy training (personal psychotherapy, supervision, and hours performed) higher than residents not in psychotherapy. Current psychotherapy training for psychiatry residents is highly variable, but overall, residents want more

  4. Operating experience with snubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.; Cudlin, R.

    1978-06-01

    Recent operating experience with hydraulic and mechanical snubbers has indicated that there is a need to evaluate current practice in the industry associated with snubber qualification testing programs, design and analysis procedures, selection and specification criteria, and the preservice inspection and inservice surveillance programs. The report provides a summary of operational experiences that represent problems that are generic throughout the industry. Generic Task A-13 is part of the NRC Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants described in NUREG-0410. The report is based upon a rather large amount of data that have become available in the past four years. These data have been evaluated by the Division of Operating Reactors to develop a data base for use in connection with several NRC activities including Category A, Technical Activity A-13 (Snubbers); the Standard Review Plan; future Regulatory Guides; ASME Code Provisions; and various technical specifications of operating nuclear power plants

  5. Operating experience: safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piplani, Vivek; Krishnamurthy, P.R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Upadhyay, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Operating Experience (OE) provides valuable information for improving NPP safety. This may include events, precursors, deviations, deficiencies, problems, new insights to safety, good practices, lessons and corrective actions. As per INSAG-10, an OE program caters as a fundamental means for enhancing the defence-in-depth at NPPs and hence should be viewed as ‘Continuous Safety Performance Improvement Tool’. The ‘Convention on Nuclear Safety’ also recognizes the OE as a tool of high importance for enhancing the NPP safety and its Article 19 mandates each contracting party to establish an effective OE program at operating NPPs. The lessons drawn from major accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi NPPs had prompted nuclear stalwarts to change their safety perspective towards NPPs and to frame sound policies on issues like safety culture, severe accident prevention and mitigation. An effective OE program, besides correcting current/potential problems, help in proactively improving the NPP design, operating and maintenance procedures, practices, training, etc., and thus plays vital role in ensuring safe and efficient operation of NPPs. Further it enhances knowledge with regard to equipment operating characteristics, system performance trends and provides data for quantitative and qualitative safety analysis. Besides all above, an OE program inculcates a learning culture in the organisation and thus helps in continuously enhancing the expertise, technical competency and knowledge base of its staff. Nuclear and Radiation Facilities in India are regulated by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Operating Plants Safety Division (OPSD) of AERB is involved in managing operating experience activities. This paper provides insights about the operating experience program of OPSD, AERB (including its on-line data base namely OPSD STAR) and its utilisation in improving the regulations and safety at Indian NPPs/projects. (author)

  6. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  7. Effect of Resident Involvement on Operative Time and Operating Room Staffing Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert William; Pruitt, Mark; Taaffe, Kevin M

    The operating room (OR) is a major driver of hospital costs; therefore, operative time is an expensive resource. The training of surgical residents must include time spent in the OR, but that experience comes with a cost to the surgeon and hospital. The objective of this article is to determine the effect of surgical resident involvement in the OR on operative time and subsequent hospital labor costs. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test is used to determine whether or not there is a difference in operative times between 2 groups of cases (with residents and without residents). This difference leads to an increased cost in associated hospital labor costs for the group with the longer operative time. Cases were performed at Greenville Memorial Hospital. Greenville Memorial Hospital is part of the larger healthcare system, Greenville Health System, located in Greenville, SC and is a level 1 trauma center with up to 33 staffed ORs. A total of 84,997 cases were performed at the partnering hospital between January 1st, 2011 and July 31st, 2015. Cases were only chosen for analysis if there was only one CPT code associated with the case and there were more than 5 observations for each group being studied. This article presents a comprehensive retrospective analysis of 29,134 cases covering 246 procedures. The analysis shows that 45 procedures took significantly longer with a resident present in the room. The average increase in operative time was 4.8 minutes and the cost per minute of extra operative time was determined to be $9.57 per minute. OR labor costs at the partnering hospital was found to be $2,257,433, or $492,889 per year. Knowing the affect on operative time and OR costs allows managers to make smart decisions when considering alternative educational and training techniques. In addition, knowing the connection between residents in the room and surgical duration could help provide better estimates of surgical time in the future and increase the predictability of

  8. FFTF operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newland, D.J.; Krupar, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    In April 1982, the FFTF began its first nominally 100 day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well with steadily increasing plant capacity factors during its first four cycles. One hundred fifty fuel assemblies (eighty of which are experiments) and over 32,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 100 MWd/Kg burnup. Specialized equipment and systems unique to sodium cooled reactor plants have performed well

  9. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  10. Operating experience in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, reprocessing has accumulated 180 years of operating experience in ten plants, six of them with 41 years of operation in reprocessing oxide fuel from light water reactors. After abortive, premature attempts at what is called commercial reprocessing, which had been oriented towards the market value of recoverable uranium and plutonium, non-military reprocessing technologies have proved their technical feasibility, since 1966 on a pilot scale and since 1976 on an industrial scale. Reprocessing experience obtained on uranium metal fuel with low and medium burnups can now certainly be extrapolated to oxide fuel with high burnup and from pilot plants to industrial scale plants using the same technologies. The perspectives of waste management of the nuclear power plants operated in the Federal Republic of Germany should be viewed realistically. The technical problems still to be solved are in a balanced relationship to the benefit arising to the national economy out of nuclear power generation and can be solved in time, provided there are clearcut political boundary conditions. (orig.) [de

  11. Residents' Experiences of Abuse and Harassment in Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrabad, Akram Zolfaghari; Bidarizerehpoosh, Farahnaz; Farahmand Rad, Reza; Kariman, Hamid; Hatamabadi, Hamidreza; Alimohammadi, Hossein

    2016-04-21

    The widespread epidemic of emerging abuse in Emergency Departments (ED) toward residents generates negative effects on the residents' health and welfare. The purpose of this study was to determine and highlight the high prevalence of abuse and harassment toward Emergency residents. In 2011, a multi-institutional, cross-sectional study was conducted at seven Emergency Residencies of central hospitals in Iran. Residents were asked about their age, marital status, postgraduate year (PGY) levels, and work experiences before residency. Prevalence of abuse in four categories was evaluated: verbal abuse; verbal and physical threat; physical assault and sexual harassment; and by whom. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 17.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Two hundred fifteen of the 296 residents (73%) completed the survey. The prevalence of any type of abuse experienced was 89%; 43% of residents experienced verbal and physical threats, 10% physical assault, and 31% sexual harassment. Verbal abuse and verbal and physical threats without the use of weapons were higher in men in comparison with women (pmen to encounter sexual harassment (31% vs. 7%, psexual harassment categories, sexual jokes (51%) were the most prevalent between residents. Junior residents (PGY-1) were more likely to experience abuse than senior residents (PGY-2 and PGY-3; pharassment during residency in ED are highly prevalent. Educational programs and effective preventive measures against this mistreatment are urgently required. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. GNF2 Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, John

    2007-01-01

    GNF's latest generation fuel product, GNF2, is designed to deliver improved nuclear efficiency, higher bundle and cycle energy capability, and more operational flexibility. But along with high performance, our customers face a growing need for absolute fuel reliability. This is driven by a general sense in the industry that LWR fuel reliability has plateaued. Too many plants are operating with fuel leakers, and the impact on plant operations and operator focus is unacceptable. The industry has responded by implementing an INPO-coordinated program aimed at achieving leaker-free reliability by 2010. One focus area of the program is the relationship between fuel performance (i.e., duty) and reliability. The industry recognizes that the right balance between performance and problem-free fuel reliability is critical. In the development of GNF2, GNF understood the requirement for a balanced solution and utilized a product development and introduction strategy that specifically addressed reliability: evolutionary design features supported by an extensive experience base; thoroughly tested components; and defense-in-depth mitigation of all identified failure mechanisms. The final proof test that the balance has been achieved is the application of the design, initially through lead use assemblies (LUAs), in a variety of plants that reflect the diversity of the BWR fleet. Regular detailed surveillance of these bundles provides the verification that the proper balance between performance and reliability has been achieved. GNF currently has GNF2 lead use assemblies operating in five plants. Included are plants that have implemented extended power up-rates, plants on one and two-year operating cycles, and plants with and without NobleChem TM and zinc injection. The leading plant has undergone three pool-side inspections outages to date. This paper reviews the actions taken to insure GNF2's reliability, and the lead use assembly surveillance data accumulated to date to validate

  13. Family practice residents' maternity leave experiences and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdingen, D K; Chaloner, K M; Vanderscoff, J A

    1995-09-01

    A growing number of residents are having babies during residency training. While many businesses are working to improve maternity conditions and benefits for their employees, residency programs are often not prepared to accommodate pregnant residents. This study was conducted to examine the maternity leave experiences of women who delivered infants during their family practice residency training. Program directors from each of the 394 family practice residency programs listed in the 1993 Directory of Family Practice Residency Programs were asked to distribute surveys to female residents who gave birth during their residency training and had returned to work by the time of the study. Of 199 known eligible residents, 171 (86%) completed surveys; these women represented 127 programs located in 36 states and Puerto Rico. Only 56.8% of women were aware of their program having a written maternity leave policy. The average length of maternity leave was 8 weeks; 76% had leaves of 10 weeks or less. For many, the maternity leave was derived from more than one source, including vacation, sick time, or a mother-child elective. Nearly all (88.3%) the women breast-fed, and the mean duration of breast-feeding was more than 19 weeks. In general, participants believed that having a baby during residency was somewhat difficult. Problems frequently encountered by women after their return to work included sleep deprivation and tiredness, difficulty arranging for child care, guilt about child care, and breast-feeding. Factors that detracted most from the childbirth experience were too little sleep, problems arranging for child care, and lack of support from the partner, residency faculty, and other residents. Having a baby during residency is somewhat difficult for the average female resident. Factors that may ease this difficulty include getting adequate sleep and receiving support from one's partner, faculty, and other residents.

  14. A pharmacogenetics service experience for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Katarzyna; Labinov, Yana; Jiang, Ruixuan; Thomas, Margaret R; Wong, Shan S; Patel, Shitalben; Nutescu, Edith A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2013-10-14

    To utilize a comprehensive, pharmacist-led warfarin pharmacogenetics service to provide pharmacy students, residents, and fellows with clinical and research experiences involving genotype-guided therapy. First-year (P1) through fourth-year (P4) pharmacy students, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy fellows participated in a newly implemented warfarin pharmacogenetics service in a hospital setting. Students, residents, and fellows provided genotype-guided dosing recommendations as part of clinical care, or analyzed samples and data collected from patients on the service for research purposes. Students', residents', and fellows' achievement of learning objectives was assessed using a checklist based on established core competencies in pharmacogenetics. The mean competency score of the students, residents, and fellows who completed a clinical and/or research experience with the service was 97% ±3%. A comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service provided unique experiential and research opportunities for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows and sufficiently addressed a number of core competencies in pharmacogenetics.

  15. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  16. The Value of a Resident Aesthetic Clinic: A 7-Year Institutional Review and Survey of the Chief Resident Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler, Jason M; Carney, Martin J; Yan, Chen; Percec, Ivona

    2017-10-16

    With the evolving plastic surgery training paradigm, there is an increasing emphasis on aesthetic surgery education during residency. In an effort to improve aesthetic education and to encourage preparation for independent practice, our institution has supported a resident-run aesthetic clinic for over two decades. To provide insight into the educational benefits of a resident-run cosmetic clinic through longitudinal resident follow up and institutional experiential review. A retrospective review was conducted to identify all clinic-based aesthetic operations performed between 2009 and 2016. To capture residents' perspectives on the cosmetic resident clinic, questionnaires were distributed to the cohort. Primary outcome measures included: volume and types of cases performed, impact of clinic experience on training, confidence level performing cosmetic procedures, and satisfaction with chief clinic. Unpaired t tests were calculated to compare case volume/type with level of confidence and degree of preparedness to perform cosmetic procedures independently. Overall, 264 operations performed by 18 graduated chief residents were reviewed. Surveys were distributed to 28 chief residents (71.4% completion rate). Performing twenty or more clinic-based procedures was associated with higher levels of preparedness to perform cosmetic procedures independently (P = 0.037). Residents reported the highest confidence when performing cosmetic breast procedures when compared to face/neck (P = 0.005), body/trunk procedures (P = 0.39), and noninvasive facial procedures (P = 0.85). The continued growth of aesthetic surgery highlights the need for comprehensive training and preparation for the new generation of plastic surgeons. Performing cosmetic procedures in clinic is a valuable adjunct to the traditional educational curriculum and increases preparedness and confidence for independent practice. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission

  17. The Resident-Run Minor Surgery Clinic: A Pilot Study to Safely Increase Operative Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Brandon M; Fong, Zhi Ven; Patel, Madhukar S; Chang, David C; Petrusa, Emil; Mullen, John T; Phitayakorn, Roy

    increased operative autonomy as the greatest strength. Implementation of a resident-run minor surgery clinic is a safe and effective method to increase trainee operative autonomy. The rotation is well suited for mid-level residents, as it provides an opportunity for realistic self-evaluation and focused learning that may enhance their operative experience during senior level rotations. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Operating experience at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, R.

    1996-01-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, is a 5-pass, recirculating, superconducting rf linac designed to provide exceptional beam quality at 4 GeV up to 200 μA CW. It is made up of an injector, two 400-MeV linacs, and 9 recirculation arcs having a total beamline length of more than 4.5 km. On Nov. 5, 1995, CEBAF delivered a 4 GeV, 25-μA CW electron beam to the first of 3 experimental halls and the experimental physics program was started 10 days later. Accelerator availability during the first month of the experimental run exceeded 75%. Beam properties measured in the experimental hall to date are a one sigma momentum spread of 5x10 -5 and an rms emittance of 0.2 nanometer-radians, better than design specification. CW beam has been provided from all 5 passes at 800 MeV intervals. Outstanding performance of the superconducting linacs suggests a machine energy upgrade to 6 GeV in the near term with eventual machine operation at 8-10 GeV. Results from commissioning and operations experience since the last conference are presented

  19. A Self-Assessment Guide for Resident Teaching Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Janet P; Franks, Amy M; Ashjian, Emily; Bingham, Angela L; Burke, John M; Erstad, Brian L; Haines, Seena L; Hilaire, Michelle L; Rager, Michelle L; Wienbar, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Educational Affairs Committee was charged with developing a self-assessment guide for residency programs to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the outcomes of resident teaching curricula. After extensively reviewing the literature, the committee developed assessment rubrics modeled after the 2013 ACCP white paper titled "Guidelines for Resident Teaching Experiences" and the revised American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) 2014 accreditation standards for PGY1 residencies, which place greater emphasis on the teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) than the previous accreditation standards. The self-assessment guide developed by the present committee can serve as an assessment tool for both basic and expanded TLCs. It provides the criteria for program goals, mentoring, directed readings with topic discussions, teaching experiences, and assessment methodology. For an expanded TLC, the committee has provided additional guidance on developing a teaching philosophy, becoming involved in interactive seminars, expanding teaching experiences, developing courses, and serving on academic committees. All the guidelines listed in the present paper use the measures "not present," "developing," and "well developed" so that residency program directors can self-assess along the continuum and identify areas of excellence and areas for improvement. Residency program directors should consider using this new assessment tool to measure program quality and outcomes of residency teaching experiences. Results of the assessment will help residency programs focus on areas within the TLC that will potentially benefit from additional attention and possible modification. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. An Investigation of Psychiatry Residents' Important Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jody

    2011-01-01

    This research study was conducted to explore the phenomenon of the third-year experiences of the psychiatry residents. A review of the literature identified themes and subthemes related to the third-year of psychiatry education. The study was conducted at a university health science center. Data were collected from five residents using participant…

  1. Resident Autonomy in the Operating Room: Expectations Versus Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Shari L; Sternbach, Joel M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Bender, Edward M

    2017-09-01

    There is concern about graduating thoracic trainees' independent operative skills due to limited autonomy in training. This study compared faculty and trainee expected levels of autonomy with intraoperative measurements of autonomy for common cardiothoracic operations. Participants underwent frame-of-reference training on the 4-point Zwisch scale of operative autonomy (show and tell → active help → passive help → supervision only) and evaluated autonomy in actual cases using the Zwisch Me!! mobile application. A separate "expected autonomy" survey elicited faculty and resident perceptions of how much autonomy a resident should have for six common operations: decortication, wedge resection, thoracoscopic lobectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, aortic valve replacement, and mitral valve repair. Thirty-three trainees from 7 institutions submitted evaluations of 596 cases over 18 months (March 2015 to September 2016). Thirty attendings subsequently provided their evaluation of 476 of those cases (79.9% response rate). Expected autonomy surveys were completed by 21 attendings and 19 trainees from 5 institutions. The six operations included in the survey constituted 47% (226 of 476) of the cases evaluated. Trainee and attending expectations did not differ significantly for senior trainees. Both groups expected significantly higher levels of autonomy than observed in the operating room for all six types of cases. Although faculty and trainees both expect similar levels of autonomy in the operating room, real-time measurements of autonomy show a gap between expectations and reality. Decreasing this gap will require a concerted effort by both faculty and residents to focus on the development of independent operative skills. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Starting in 2008, emergency ultrasound (EUS was introduced as a core competency to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College emergency medicine (EM training standards. The Royal College accredits postgraduate EM specialty training in Canada through 5-year residency programs. The objective of this study is to describe both the current experience with and the perceptions of EUS by Canadian Royal College EM senior residents. Methods: This was a web-based survey conducted from January to March 2011 of all 39 Canadian Royal College postgraduate fifth-year (PGY-5 EM residents. Main outcome measures were characteristics of EUS training and perceptions of EUS. Results: Survey response rate was 95% (37/39. EUS was part of the formal residency curriculum for 86% of respondents (32/37. Residents most commonly received training in focused assessment with sonography for trauma, intrauterine pregnancy, abdominal aortic aneurysm, cardiac, and procedural guidance. Although the most commonly provided instructional material (86% [32/37] was an ultrasound course, 73% (27/37 of residents used educational resources outside of residency training to supplement their ultrasound knowledge. Most residents (95% [35/37] made clinical decisions and patient dispositions based on their EUS interpretation without a consultative study by radiology. Residents had very favorable perceptions and opinions of EUS. Conclusion: EUS training in Royal College EM programs was prevalent and perceived favorably by residents, but there was heterogeneity in resident training and practice of EUS. This suggests variability in both the level and quality of EUS training in Canadian Royal College EM residency programs.

  3. Tevatron operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1989-02-01

    Fermilabs superconducting accelerator, the Tevatron has been operational for nearly six years. The history of its operation is presented. Several long shutdowns for superconducting dipole repairs are discussed. The dominant factor influencing the repair was conductor motion which fatigued the cable in the magnet ends. Borescoping and x-raying techniques were used to determine which magnet ends required repair. Detailed downtime logs were kept for each of the running periods. A discussion of the sources of downtime and a comparison for different operating modes is presented

  4. Factors associated with resident satisfaction with their continuity experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwint, Janet R; Feigelman, Susan; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn; Collins, Rebecca; Zhan, Min; Kittredge, Diane

    2004-01-01

    To identify factors associated with resident satisfaction concerning residents' continuity experience. Continuity directors distributed questionnaires to residents at their respective institutions. Resident satisfaction was defined as satisfied or very satisfied on a Likert scale. The independent variables included 60 characteristics of the continuity experience from 7 domains: 1) patient attributes, 2) continuity and longitudinal issues, 3) responsibility as primary care provider, 4) preceptor characteristics, 5) educational opportunities, 6) exposure to practice management, and 7) interaction with other clinic and practice staff. A stepwise logistic regression model and the Generalized Estimating Equations approach were used. Thirty-six programs participated. Of 1155 residents (71%) who provided complete data, 67% (n = 775) stated satisfaction with their continuity experience. The following characteristics (adjusted odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI]) were found to be most significant: preceptor as good role model, OR = 7.28 ( CI = 4.2, 12.5); appropriate amount of teaching, OR = 3.25 (CI = 2.1, 5.1); involvement during hospitalization, OR = 2.61 (CI = 1.3, 5.2); exposure to practice management, OR = 2.39 (CI = 1.5, 3.8); good balance of general pediatric patients, OR = 2.34 (CI = 1.5, 3.6); resident as patient advocate, OR = 1.74 (CI = 1.2, 2.4); and appropriate amount of nursing support, OR = 1.65 (CI = 1.1, 2.6). Future career choice, type of continuity site, and level of training were not found to be statistically significant. Pediatric resident satisfaction was significantly associated with 7 variables, the most important of which were the ability of the preceptor to serve as a role model and teacher. The type of continuity site was not significant. Residency programs may use these data to develop interventions to enhance resident satisfaction, which may lead to enhanced work performance and patient satisfaction.

  5. Orthopaedic Resident Practice Management and Health Policy Education: Evaluation of Experience and Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stautberg Iii, Eugene F; Romero, Jose; Bender, Sean; DeHart, Marc

    2018-04-11

    Introduction Practice management and health policy have generally not been considered integral to orthopaedic resident education. Our objective was to evaluate residents' current experience and knowledge, formal training, and desire for further education in practice management and health policy. Methods We developed a 29-question survey that was divided into three sections: practice management, initial employment opportunity, and health policy. Within each section, questions were directed at a resident's current experience and knowledge, formal training, and interest in further education. The survey was distributed at the end of the academic year through an Internet-based survey tool (www.surveymonkey.com) to orthopaedic residents representing multiple programs and all postgraduate years. Results The survey was distributed to 121 residents representing eight residency programs. Of those, 87 residents responded, resulting in a 72% response rate. All postgraduate years were represented. Regarding practice management, 66% had "no confidence" or "some confidence" in coding clinical encounters. When asked if practice models, finance management, and coding should be taught in residency, 95%, 93%, and 97% responded "yes," respectively. When evaluating first employment opportunities, the three most important factors were location, operating room block time, and call. Regarding health policy, 28% were "moderately familiar" or "very familiar" with the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, and 72% were "not familiar" or "somewhat familiar" with bundled payments for arthroplasty. Finally, when asked if yearly lectures in political activities would enhance resident education, 90% responded "yes." Discussion and conclusion Regarding practice management, the survey suggests that current orthopaedic residents are not familiar with basic topics, do not receive formal training, and want further education. The survey suggests that residents also receive minimal training in health policy

  6. Mixed reality ventriculostomy simulation: experience in neurosurgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, Kristopher G; Lister, J Richard; Lombard, Gwen; Lizdas, David E; Lampotang, Samsun; Rajon, Didier A; Bova, Frank; Murad, Gregory J A

    2014-12-01

    Medicine and surgery are turning toward simulation to improve on limited patient interaction during residency training. Many simulators today use virtual reality with augmented haptic feedback with little to no physical elements. In a collaborative effort, the University of Florida Department of Neurosurgery and the Center for Safety, Simulation & Advanced Learning Technologies created a novel "mixed" physical and virtual simulator to mimic the ventriculostomy procedure. The simulator contains all the physical components encountered for the procedure with superimposed 3-D virtual elements for the neuroanatomical structures. To introduce the ventriculostomy simulator and its validation as a necessary training tool in neurosurgical residency. We tested the simulator in more than 260 residents. An algorithm combining time and accuracy was used to grade performance. Voluntary postperformance surveys were used to evaluate the experience. Results demonstrate that more experienced residents have statistically significant better scores and completed the procedure in less time than inexperienced residents. Survey results revealed that most residents agreed that practice on the simulator would help with future ventriculostomies. This mixed reality simulator provides a real-life experience, and will be an instrumental tool in training the next generation of neurosurgeons. We have now implemented a standard where incoming residents must prove efficiency and skill on the simulator before their first interaction with a patient.

  7. Operating experience feedback in TVO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A [Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    TVO is a power company operating with two 710 MW BWR units at Olkiluoto. For operating experience feedback TVO has not established a separate organizational unit but rather relies on a group of persons representing various technical disciplines. The ``Operating Experience Group`` meets at about three-week intervals to handle the reports of events (in plant and external) which have been selected for handling by an engineer responsible for experience feedback. 7 charts.

  8. TRIGA reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.

    1970-01-01

    The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been in operation 3 years. Last August it was upgraded from 250 kW to 1000 kW. This was accomplished with little difficulty. During the 3 years of operation no major problems have been experienced. Most of the problems have been minor in nature and easily corrected. They came from lazy susan (dry bearing), Westronics Recorder (dead spots in the range), The Reg Rod Magnet Lead-in Circuit (a new type lead-in wire that does not require the lead-in cord to coil during rod withdrawal hss been delivered, much better than the original) and other small corrections

  9. Mixed messages: residents' experiences learning cross-cultural care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elyse R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Kim, Minah K; Maina, Angela W; Blumenthal, David; Weissman, Joel S

    2005-09-01

    An Institute of Medicine report issued in 2002 cited cross-cultural training as a mechanism to address racial and ethnic disparities in health care, but little is known about residents' training and capabilities to provide quality care to diverse populations. This article explores a select group of residents' perceptions of their preparedness to deliver quality care to diverse populations. Seven focus groups and ten individual interviews were conducted with 68 residents in locations nationwide. Qualitative analysis of focus-group and individual interview transcripts was performed to assess residents' perceptions of (1) preparedness to deliver care to diverse patients; (2) educational climate; and (3) training experiences. Most residents in this study noted the importance of cross-cultural care yet reported little formal training in this area. Residents wanted more formal training yet expressed concern that culture-specific training could lead to stereotyping. Most residents had developed ad hoc, informal skills to care for diverse patients. Although residents perceived institutional endorsement, they sensed it was a low priority due to lack of time and resources. Residents in this study reported receiving mixed messages about cross-cultural care. They were told it is important, yet they received little formal training and did not have time to treat diverse patients in a culturally sensitive manner. As a result, many developed coping behaviors rather than skills based on formally taught best practices. Training environments need to increase training to enhance residents' preparedness to deliver high-quality cross-cultural care if the medical profession is to achieve the goals set by the Institute of Medicine.

  10. Operating Experience at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavsek, D.; Bach, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic analysis of operational experience by assessment of internal and industry events and the feedback of lessons learned is one of the essential activities in the improvement of the operational safety and reliability of the nuclear power plant. At NPP Krsko we have developed a document called ''Operating Experience Assessment Program''. Its purpose is to establish administrative guidance for the processing of operating events including on-site and industry events. Assessment of internal events is based on the following methods: Event and Causal Factor Charting, Change Analysis, Barrier Analysis, MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree Analysis) and Human Performance Evaluation. The operating experience group has developed a sophisticated program entitled ''Operating experience tracking system'' (OETS) in response to the need for a more efficient way of processing internal and industry operating experience information. The Operating Experience Tracking System is used to initiate and track operational events including recommended actions follow up. Six screens of the system contain diverse essential information which allows tracking of operational events and enables different kinds of browsing. OETS is a part of the NPP Krsko nuclear network system and can be easily accessed by all plant personnel. (author)

  11. NPD Operating Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, E. P. [Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, Rolphton, ON (Canada)

    1968-04-15

    NPD has demonstrated high-capacity factor operation and for the past three years has achieved an average net capacity factor of 98% for the ''winter-peak'' period. The net capacity factor for the year 1966 was 88% and for the period from the end of commissioning (October 1962) to the end of 1966 was 71%. The output of the station has been stretched from 22 MW(e) gross to 25 MW(e) gross. This was aided by the installation of an internal steam separator in the turbine but no basic modifications to the reactor-boiler systems were required. The turbine has also been modified by the installation of chrome steel diaphragms as a solution to an erosion problem. The station also continues as a test facility to develop new components and techniques. This includes the recent successful replacement of two reactor pressure tubes and the conversion of the reactor vault ventilation system to a ''dry'' atmosphere using a molecular sieve to collect heavy-water leakage and control the concentration of acidic oxides of nitrogen. Fuel performance has been excellent and the average burn-up in the core is now 84 MWh/kg U which is slightly above the equilibrium design value. Only three fuel bundles have been found with sheath failures and none of these was due to a deficiency in the fuel but was as a result of handling problems with the refuelling equipment. In spite of undesirably high maintenance time, the fuelling machines have now inserted over 1000 fuel bundles into the reactor ''on power''. Heavy-water loss rates have been acceptable and are improving. The average loss rate from leaks during 1966 was 210 g/h. A proposal to modify the NPD heavy-water heat transport system to allow boiling is under consideration. (author)

  12. 24 CFR 964.135 - Resident involvement in HA management operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... management operations. 964.135 Section 964.135 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Tenant Participation § 964.135 Resident involvement in HA management operations. Residents shall be... responsibility for management operations, it shall ensure strong resident participation in all issues and facets...

  13. Resident Evaluation of a Required Telepsychiatry Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, John; Hodgins, Michael; Boydell, Katherine M; Pignatiello, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The authors explored resident experiences of telepsychiatry clinical training. This paper describes an analysis of evaluation forms completed by psychiatry residents following a required training experience in telepsychiatry. Retrospective numeric and narrative data were collected from 2005 to 2012. Using a five-point Likert-type scale (1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree), residents ranked the session based on the following characteristics: the overall experience, interest in participating in telepsychiatry in the future, understanding service provision to underserved areas, telepsychiatry as mode of service delivery, and the unique aspects of telepsychiatry work. The authors also conducted a content analysis of narrative comments in response to open-ended questions about the positive and negative aspects of the training experience. In all, 88% of residents completed (n = 335) an anonymous evaluation following their participation in telepsychiatry consultation sessions. Numeric results were mostly positive and indicated that the experience was interesting and enjoyable, enhanced interest in participating in telepsychiatry in the future, and increased understanding of providing psychiatric services to underserved communities. Narrative data demonstrated that the most valuable aspects of training included the knowledge acquired in terms of establishing rapport and engaging with patients, using the technology, working collaboratively, identifying different approaches used, and awareness of the complexity of cases. Resident desire for more training of this nature was prevalent, specifically a wish for more detail, additional time for discussion and debriefing, and further explanation of the unique aspects of telepsychiatry as mode of delivery. More evaluation of telepsychiatry training, elective or required, is needed. The context of this training offered potential side benefits of learning about interprofessional and collaborative care for the

  14. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings.

  15. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1984-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  16. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.W.; Woodhead, L.W.; Horton, E.P.; Nichols, M.J.; Daly, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  17. Characterizing the Relationship Between Surgical Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Autonomy in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Katelyn A; Lane, Samantha M; Widger, John E; Neuhaus, Nina M; Dove, James T; Fluck, Marcus; Hunsinger, Marie A; Blansfield, Joseph A; Shabahang, Mohsen M

    Characterize the concordance among faculty and resident perceptions of surgical case complexity, resident technical performance, and autonomy in a diverse sample of general surgery procedures using case-specific evaluations. A prospective study was conducted in which a faculty surgeon and surgical resident independently completed a postoperative assessment examining case complexity, resident operative performance (Milestone assessment) and autonomy (Zwisch model). Pearson correlation coefficients (r) reaching statistical significance (p autonomy demonstrated a moderate correlation (r = 0.56, p autonomy and operative performance, respectively. General surgery residents generally demonstrated high correlations with faculty perceptions of case complexity, technical performance, and operative autonomy. This generalized accord supports the use of the Milestone and Zwisch assessments in residency programs. However, discordance among perceptions of midlevel resident autonomy and chief resident operative performance suggests that these trainees may need more direct communication from the faculty. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Operating practical experience at Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quihillalt, Oscar

    1997-01-01

    Operating experiences of Atucha-1 and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants were discussed in this work. The technical and economic aspects, such as reliability, availability, personnel training, operating costs, prices and market, which exercise influence upon Argentina nuclear energy policy, mainly on the power electric generation by nuclear power plants were considered. Finally the current status of the nucleoelectric sector in Argentina and forecasting were analysed

  19. Fort Saint Vrain operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain (FSV), on the system of the Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) power reactor in the United States. The plant features a helium-cooled reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The paper describes the experience made during its operation. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Comparing PRAs with operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.; Martz, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment is widely used to estimate the frequencies of rare events, such as nuclear power plant accidents. An obvious question concerns the extent to which PRAs conform to operating experience--that is, do PRAs agree with reality? The authors discuss a formal methodology to address this issue and examine its performance using plant-specific data

  1. ERB-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.N.; Cissel, D.W.; Smith, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    As originally designed and operated, EBR-II successfully demonstrated the concept of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle (mini-nuclear park). Subsequent operation has been as an irradiation facility, a role which will continue into the foreseeable future. Since the beginning of operation in 1961, operating experience of EBR-II has been very satisfactory. Most of the components and systems have performed well. In particular, the mechanical performance of heat-removal systems has been excellent. A review of the operating experience reveals that all the original design objectives have been successfully demonstrated. To date, no failures or incidents resulting in serious in-core or out-of-core consequences have occurred. No water-to-sodium leaks have been detected over the life of the plant. At the present time, the facility is operating very well and continuously except for short shutdowns required by maintenance, refueling, modification, and minor repair. A plant factor of 76.9% was achieved for the calendar year 1976

  2. Emergency planning and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, O.; Breniere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive lessons from operating experience for the planning of emergency measures. This operating experience has two facets: it is obtained not only from the various incidents and accidents which have occurred in countries with nuclear power programmes and from the resulting application of emergency plans but also from the different exercises and simulations carried out in France and in other countries. Experience generally confirms the main approaches selected for emergency plans. The lessons to be derived are of three types: first, it appears necessary to set forth precisely the responsibilities of each person involved in order to prevent a watering-down of decisions in the event of an accident; secondly, considerable improvements need to be made in the different communication networks to be used; and thirdly, small accidents with minor radiological consequences deserve as systematic and thorough an approach as large and more improbable accidents. (author)

  3. Applied Research on Laparoscopic Simulator in the Resident Surgical Laparoscopic Operation Technical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shangxi; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Meisheng; Wang, Liming

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of surgical laparoscopic operation course on laparoscopic operation skills after the simulated training for medical students with relatively objective results via data gained before and after the practice course of laparoscopic simulator of the resident standardized trainees. Experiment 1: 20 resident standardized trainees with no experience in laparoscopic surgery were included in the inexperienced group and finished simulated cholecystectomy according to simulator videos. Simulator data was collected (total operation time, path length, average speed of instrument movement, movement efficiency, number of perforations, the time cautery is applied without appropriate contact with adhesions, number of serious complications). Ten attending doctors were included in the experienced group and conducted the operation of simulated cholecystectomy directly. Data was collected with simulator. Data of two groups was compared. Experiment 2: Participants in inexperienced group were assigned to basic group (receiving 8 items of basic operation training) and special group (receiving 8 items of basic operation training and 4 items of specialized training), and 10 persons for each group. They received training course designed by us respectively. After training level had reached the expected target, simulated cholecystectomy was performed, and data was collected. Experimental data between basic group and special group was compared and then data between special group and experienced group was compared. Results of experiment 1 showed that there is significant difference between data in inexperienced group in which participants operated simulated cholecystectomy only according to instructors' teaching and operation video and data in experienced group. Result of experiment 2 suggested that, total operation time, number of perforations, number of serious complications, number of non-cauterized bleeding and the time cautery is applied

  4. Cadaver-Based Simulation Increases Resident Confidence, Initial Exposure to Fundamental Techniques, and May Augment Operative Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Steven C; Fisher, Jeremy G; Delman, Keith A; Hinman, Johanna M; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K

    Surgical simulation is an important adjunct in surgical education. The majority of operative procedures can be simplified to core components. This study aimed to quantify a cadaver-based simulation course utility in improving exposure to fundamental maneuvers, resident and attending confidence in trainee capability, and if this led to earlier operative independence. A list of fundamental surgical procedures was established by a faculty panel. Residents were assigned to a group led by a chief resident. Residents performed skills on cadavers appropriate for PGY level. A video-recorded examination where they narrated and demonstrated a task independently was then graded by attendings using standardized rubrics. Participants completed surveys regarding improvements in knowledge and confidence. The course was conducted at the Emory University School of Medicine and the T3 Laboratories in Atlanta, GA. A total of 133 residents and 41 attendings participated in the course. 133 (100%) participating residents and 32 (78%) attendings completed surveys. Resident confidence in completing the assigned skill independently increased from 3 (2-3) to 4 (3-4), p 80%), p < 0.04. Attendings were more likely to grant autonomy in the operating room after this exercise (4 [3-5]). A cadaveric skills course focused on fundamental maneuvers with objective confirmation of success is a viable adjunct to clinical operative experience. Residents were formally exposed to fundamental surgical maneuvers earlier as a result of this course. This activity improved both resident and attending confidence in trainee operative skill, resulting in increased attending willingness to grant a higher level of autonomy in the operating room. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-cultural psychiatric residency training: the Oregon experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnlein, James K; Leung, Paul K; Kinzie, John David

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the goals and structure of cross-cultural psychiatric training at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). This training in core knowledge, skills, and attitudes of cultural psychiatry over the past three decades has included medical students, residents, and fellows, along with allied mental health personnel. The curriculum includes both didactic sessions devoted to core topics in the field and varied clinical experiences in community settings and the Intercultural Psychiatric Program under the supervision of experienced academic faculty. The authors review the central elements of the training experiences and include a detailed description of the core clinical settings and experiences. At the conclusion of their clinical experiences, trainees have specialized cross-cultural psychiatric knowledge and skills, including treatment of refugees and immigrants, sociocultural variables that influence the assessment and treatment of a wide range of psychiatric conditions, and comfort with cultural dynamics that influence both the doctor/patient relationship and collaboration with a wide range of mental health professionals. Because of rapid demographic changes in the U.S. population, providing cross-cultural training for students, residents, and fellows is an essential foundation for the education of the next generation of clinicians and health care leaders. OHSU has provided a long-term model for this training in a busy clinical and academic setting that places an emphasis on multidisciplinary and multicultural collaboration.

  6. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  7. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  8. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  9. What factors influence attending surgeon decisions about resident autonomy in the operating room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed G; George, Brian C; Meyerson, Shari L; Bohnen, Jordan D; Dunnington, Gary L; Schuller, Mary C; Torbeck, Laura; Mullen, John T; Auyang, Edward; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Choi, Jennifer; Choti, Michael; Endean, Eric; Foley, Eugene F; Mandell, Samuel; Meier, Andreas; Smink, Douglas S; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul; DaRosa, Debra; Soper, Nathaniel; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    Educating residents in the operating room requires balancing patient safety, operating room efficiency demands, and resident learning needs. This study explores 4 factors that influence the amount of autonomy supervising surgeons afford to residents. We evaluated 7,297 operations performed by 487 general surgery residents and evaluated by 424 supervising surgeons from 14 training programs. The primary outcome measure was supervising surgeon autonomy granted to the resident during the operative procedure. Predictor variables included resident performance on that case, supervising surgeon history with granting autonomy, resident training level, and case difficulty. Resident performance was the strongest predictor of autonomy granted. Typical autonomy by supervising surgeon was the second most important predictor. Each additional factor led to a smaller but still significant improvement in ability to predict the supervising surgeon's autonomy decision. The 4 factors together accounted for 54% of decision variance (r = 0.74). Residents' operative performance in each case was the strongest predictor of how much autonomy was allowed in that case. Typical autonomy granted by the supervising surgeon, the second most important predictor, is unrelated to resident proficiency and warrants efforts to ensure that residents perform each procedure with many different supervisors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Position Paper: Dental General Practice Residency Programs: Financing and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Paul W.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of changeable economic issues that can affect dental general practice residency program planning includes costs and resource allocation, maximizing efficiency and productivity, ambulatory and inpatient revenue sources, management functions, faculty as practitioners, faculty appointments, and marketing. (MSE)

  11. Using GoPro to Give Video-Assisted Operative Feedback for Surgery Residents: A Feasibility and Utility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maureen D; Abelson, Jonathan S; O'Mahoney, Paul; Bagautdinov, Iskander; Yeo, Heather; Watkins, Anthony C

    this tool to include additional procedures. Although there has been progress toward improving operative feedback, room for further improvement remains. The use of a head-mounted GoPro is a dynamic tool that provides high-quality video for operative review and has the potential to augment the training experience of GS residents. Future studies exploring a wide array of open procedures involving a greater number of trainees will be needed to further define the use of this resource. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Impact of adding additional providers to resident workload and the resident experience on a medical consultation rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Michele; Linson, Eric; Suneja, Manish; Kuperman, Ethan F

    2017-02-22

    Excellence in Graduate Medical Education requires the right clinical environment with an appropriate workload where residents have enough patients to gain proficiency in medicine with optimal time for reflection. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has focused more on work hours rather than workload; however, high resident workload has been associated with lower resident participation in education and fatigue-related errors. Recognizing the potential risks associated with high resident workload and being mindful of the costs of reducing resident workload, we sought to reduce residents' workload by adding an advanced practice provider (APP) to the surgical comanagement service (SCM) and study its effect on resident satisfaction and perceived educational value of the rotation. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 and 2015, an additional faculty member was added to the SCM rotation. In FY 2014, the faculty member was a staff physician, and in FY 2015, the faculty member was an APP.. Resident workload was assessed using billing data. We measured residents' perceptions of the rotation using an anonymous electronic survey tool. We compared FY2014-2015 data to the baseline FY2013. The number of patients seen per resident per day decreased from 8.0(SD 3.3) in FY2013 to 5.0(SD 1.9) in FY2014 (p value of the rotation (40.0%, 72.2%, 72.6% in FY2013, 2014, 2015 respectively, p perceived educational value and clinical experience of a medical consultation rotation.

  13. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  14. The Effect of Gender on Resident Autonomy in the Operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Shari L; Sternbach, Joel M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Bender, Edward M

    Discrimination against women training in medicine and surgery has been subjectively described for decades. This study objectively documents gender differences in the degree of autonomy given to thoracic surgery trainees in the operating room. Thoracic surgery residents and faculty underwent frame of reference training on the use of the 4-point Zwisch scale to measure operative autonomy. Residents and faculty then submitted evaluations of their perception of autonomy granted for individual operations as well as operative difficulty on a real-time basis using the "Zwisch Me!!" mobile application. Differences in autonomy given to male and female residents were elucidated using chi-square analysis and ordered logistic regression. Seven academic medical centers with thoracic surgery training programs. Volunteer thoracic surgery residents in both integrated and traditional training pathways and their affiliated cardiothoracic faculty. Residents (n = 33, female 18%) submitted a total of 596 evaluations to faculty (n = 48, female 12%). Faculty gave less autonomy to female residents with only 56 of 184 evaluations (30.3%) showing meaningful autonomy (passive help or supervision only) compared to 107 of 292 evaluations (36.7%) at those levels for male residents (p = 0.02). Resident perceptions of autonomy showed even more pronounced differences with female residents receiving only 38 of 197 evaluations (19.3%) with meaningful autonomy compared to 133 of 399 evaluations (33.3%) for male residents (p autonomy granted to residents. Evaluations of operative autonomy reveal a significant bias against female residents. Faculty education is needed to encourage allowing female residents more operative autonomy. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Residents' experiences of abuse, discrimination and sexual harassment during residency training. McMaster University Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Liutkus, J F; Risdon, C L; Griffith, L E; Guyatt, G H; Walter, S D

    1996-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault, and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation, and to examine the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment in residency training programs. Self-administered questionnaire. McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. Residents in seven residency training programs during the academic year from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents 186 (82.7%) returned a completed questionnaire, and 50% of the respondents were women. Prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation experienced by residents during medical training, prevalence and residents' perceived frequency of sexual harassment. Psychological abuse was reported by 50% of the residents. Some of the respondents reported physical assault, mostly by patients and their family members (14.7% reported assaults by male patients and family members, 9.8% reported assaults by female patients and family members), 5.4% of the female respondents reported assault by male supervising physicians. Discrimination on the basis of gender was reported to be common and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (p sexual orientation. Most of the respondents experienced sexual harassment, especially in the form of sexist jokes, flirtation and unwanted compliments on their dress or figure. On average, 40% of the respondents, especially women (p sexual harassment to someone (p sexual harassment were embarassment (reported by 24.0%), anger (by 23.4%) and frustration (20.8%). Psychological abuse, discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual harassment are commonly experienced by residents in training programs. A direct, progressive, multidisciplinary approach is needed to label and address these problems.

  16. Operation experience at the UWTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Kazuhiro; Inada, Kameji; Ohmori, Kouji; Usui, Kazuya; Irinouchi, Sigenori; Asami, Makoto; Tohchi, Katsunori

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the operation experience on the volume reduction of metal wastes and used air filters contaminated with uranium at the Uranium contaminated Waste Treatment Facility (UWTF) in JNC Tokai Works. The UWTF consists of the metal waste treatment system and the filter-waste treatment system. The former treats metal wastes, the latter treats used air filters. Metal wastes are unpacked from drums, cut, and then compacted. Used air filters are separated into filter media and frames. Then the filter media are compacted and the frames are crushed. The operation of the UWTF was started in June 1998. The following volumes of wastes had been treated at the UWTF from the beginning of the operation to March 2003 (for about 5 years). (1) 1,524 drums of the metal wastes had been reduced to 410 drums. The volume reduction factor was 3.7. (2) 372 drums of the used air filters had been reduced to 39 drums. The volume reduction factor was 9.5. These systems have been operated without trouble for 5 years and have demonstrated to be able to reduce the volumes of the wastes to designed values. The volume reduction technologies for metal wastes and used air filters contaminated with uranium were successfully demonstrated at the UWTF. (author)

  17. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  18. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Surgery Resident Operative Logs: The Last Quarter Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Garland, Brandon T; Huntington, Ciara R; McAteer, Jarod P; Richards, Morgan K; Zern, Nicole Kansier; Gow, Kenneth W

    2017-05-01

    To describe secular trends in operative experience for surgical trainees across an extended period using the most comprehensive data available, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs. Some experts have expressed concern that current trainees are inadequately prepared for independent practice. One frequently mentioned factor is whether duty hours' restrictions (DHR) implemented in 2003 and 2004 contributed by reducing time spent in the operating room. A dataset was generated from annual ACGME reports. Operative volume for total major cases (TMC), defined categories, and four index laparoscopic procedures was evaluated. TMC dropped after implementation of DHR but rebounded after a transition period (949 vs 946 cases, P = nonsignificance). Abdominal cases increased from 22% of overall cases to 31%. Alimentary cases increased from 21% to 26%. Trauma and vascular surgery substantially decreased. For trauma, this drop took place well before DHR. The decrease in vascular surgery also began before DHR but continued afterward as well: 148 cases/resident in the late 1990s to 107 currently. Although total operative volume rebounded after implementation of DHR, diversity of operative experienced narrowed. The combined increase in alimentary and abdominal cases is nearly 13%, over a half-year's worth of operating in 5-year training programs. Bedrock general surgery cases-trauma, vascular, pediatrics, and breast-decreased. Laparoscopic operations have steadily increased. If the competence of current graduates has, in fact, diminished. Our analysis suggests that operative volume is not the problem. Rather, changing disease processes, subspecialization, reductions in resident autonomy, and technical innovation challenge how today's general surgeons are trained.

  19. Stapes surgery in residency: the UFPR clinical hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldart, Adriano Ulisses; Terruel, Igor; Enge, Dair Jocely; Kurogi, Adriana Sayuri; Buschle, Maurício; Mocellin, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    Surgery of the stapedius remains the established treatment for otosclerosis. Recent publications have showed that success in surgeries done by residents have decreased and hearing results are worse than those obtained by experienced otologic surgeons. To evaluate the experience of the otorhinolaryngology unit, Parana University, relative to stapes surgery done in the residency training program. A retrospective study of 114 stapes surgeries done in the past 9 years in 96 patients. Audiometric results were analysed according to the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium guidelines and the Amsterdam Hearing Evaluation Plots. The improvement of the airway postoperative gap and thresholds were taken into account. 96 patients were included, most of them female adults (67.7%) and white (93.7%). Stapedectomy was done in 50.9% of cases, mostly under local anesthesia and sedation (96.5%), using mostly the Teflon prosthesis (37.7%). The surgical success rate was 50.88%, there was an 11.4% complication rate. Postoperative hearing gains considered as surgical success were inferior to published results in the literature, done by experienced surgeons.

  20. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative 'all modes' failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  1. Operation experience with elevated ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankova, Katerina; Kysela, Jan; Malac, Miroslav; Petrecky, Igor; Svarc, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The 10 VVER units in the Czech and Slovak Republics are all in very good water chemistry and radiation condition, yet questions have arisen regarding the optimization of cycle chemistry and improved operation in these units. To address these issues, a comprehensive experimental program for different water chemistries of the primary circuit was carried out at the Rez Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, with the goal of judging the influence of various water chemistries on radiation build-up. Four types of water chemistries were compared: standard VVER water chemistry (in common use), direct hydrogen dosing without ammonia, standard VVER water chemistry with elevated ammonia levels, and zinc dosing to standard VVER water chemistry. The test results showed that the types of water chemistry other than the common one have benefits for the operation of the nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit. Operation experience with elevated ammonia at NPP Dukovany Units 3 and 4 is presented which validates the experimental results, demonstrating improved corrosion product volume activity. (orig.)

  2. The costs and quality of operative training for residents in tympanoplasty type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao-Che; Yu, Eric Chen-Hua; Shiao, An-Suey; Liao, Wen-Huei; Liu, Chia-Yu

    2009-05-01

    A teaching hospital would incur more operation room costs on training surgical residents. To evaluate the increased operation time and the increased operation room costs of operations performed by surgical residents. As a model we used a very common surgical otology procedure -- tympanoplasty type I. From January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004, we included in this study 100 patients who received tympanoplasty type I in Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Fifty-six procedures were performed by a single board-certified surgeon and 44 procedures were performed by residents. We analyzed the operation time and surgical outcomes in these two groups of patients. The operation room cost per minute was obtained by dividing the total operation room expenses by total operation time in the year 2004. The average operation time of residents was 116.47 min, which was significantly longer (pcost USD $40.36 more for each operation performed by residents in terms of operation room costs. The surgical success rate of residents was 81.82%, which was significantly lower (p=0.016) than that of the board-certified surgeon (96.43%).

  3. Impact of podiatry resident experience level in hallux valgus surgery on postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E; Yorath, Martin C; Joseph, Robert M; Baron, Adam; Nordquist, Thomas; Moore, Braden J; Robinson, Richmond C O; Reilly, Charles H

    2014-06-15

    Despite modern advancements in transosseous fixation and operative technique, hallux valgus (i.e., bunion) surgery is still associated with a higher than usual amount of patient dissatisfaction and is generally recognized as a complex and nuanced procedure requiring precise osseous and capsulotendon balancing. It stands to reason then that familiarity and skill level of trainee surgeons might impact surgical outcomes in this surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether podiatry resident experience level influences midterm outcomes in hallux valgus surgery (HVS). Consecutive adults who underwent isolated HVS via distal metatarsal osteotomy at a single US metropolitan teaching hospital from January 2004 to January 2009 were contacted and asked to complete a validated outcome measure of foot health (Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire) regarding their operated foot. Resident experience level was quantified using the surgical logs for the primary resident of record at the time of each case. Associations were assessed using linear and logistic regression analyses. A total of 102 adult patients (n = 102 feet) agreed to participate with a mean age of 46.8 years (standard deviation 13.1, range 18-71) and average length of follow-up 6.2 y (standard deviation 1.4, range 3.6-8.6). Level of trainee experience was not associated with postoperative outcomes in either the univariate (odds ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.01], P = 0.827) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 1.00 [95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.02], P = 0.907). We conclude that podiatry resident level of experience in HVS does not contribute appreciably to postoperative clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Podiatry Resident Experience Level in Hallux Valgus Surgery on Postoperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E.; Yorath, Martin C.; Joseph, Robert; Baron, Adam; Nordquist, Thomas; Moore, Braden; Robinson, Richmond; Reilly, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Background Despite modern advancements in transosseous fixation and operative technique, hallux valgus (i.e., bunion) surgery is still associated with a higher than usual amount of patient dissatisfaction, and is generally recognized as a complex and nuanced procedure requiring precise osseous and capsulotendon balancing. It stands to reason then that familiarity and skill level of trainee surgeons might impact surgical outcomes in this surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether podiatry resident experience level influences mid-term outcomes in hallux valgus surgery. Methods Consecutive adults who underwent isolated hallux valgus surgery via distal metatarsal osteotomy at a single US metropolitan teaching hospital from January 2004 to January 2009 were contacted and asked to complete a validated outcome measure of foot health (Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire) regarding their operated foot. Resident experience level was quantified using the surgical logs for the primary resident of record at the time of each case. Associations were assessed using simple, multiple and logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 102 adult patients (n=102 feet) agreed to participate with a mean age of 46.8 (SD 13.1 years, range 18-71) and average length of follow-up 6.2 years (SD 1.4, range 3.6-8.6). Level of trainee experience was not associated with postoperative outcomes in either the univariate (odds ratio 0.99 [95% CI 0.98-1.01], p = 0.827) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 1.00 [95% CI 0.97-1.02], p = 0.907). Conclusions We conclude that podiatry resident level of experience in hallux valgus surgery does not contribute appreciably to postoperative clinical outcomes. PMID:24726058

  5. Experience of General Surgery Residents in the Creation of Small Bowel and Colon Anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Zoltan H; Lazar, Eric L; Paglinco, Samantha R; Hicks, Addison S; Lei, Jason; Barratt-Stopper, Patricia A; Rolandelli, Rolando H

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of stapling devices (SDs), the proportion of hand-sewn (HS) intestinal anastomoses (IAs) has declined. As more IAs are constructed with SDs, there are fewer opportunities for general surgery residents (GSRs) to acquire the skills for HS techniques during their training. Data for this study were extracted from an existing database of all IAs performed at the Department of Surgery of the Morristown Medical Center since 2003. For the purposes of this study, a 5.5-year timeframe was used between July 2006 and 2011, which contained 1659 IA operations on adult patients with resident involvement. GSRs of the 5-year general surgery residency program were grouped by postgraduate year (PGY) for further analysis. The number of all IAs created by each resident during the 5-year training was 67.2 on average. Most of these operations were done in the last 2 years of the training: 45.1% of all IAs in PGY5 and 37.3% of all IAs in PGY4. Of all, 1659 IAs performed in the study period, 711 (42.9% of total) were done laparoscopically and 948 (57.1% of all IAs) were done as open operations. Laparoscopic operations had a proportionally higher rate of SD use when compared to open cases (90.9% vs 82.4%). On average, each resident constructed 9.4 HS IAs (13.98% of all IAs) and 57.8 SD IAs (86.02% of total). Out of all anastomoses, ostomy reversals (30.7%) had the highest percentage of HS suturing followed by right colectomies (27.5%), ileal pouch-anal anastomoses and total colectomies and proctocolectomies (23.3%), small bowel resection (17.0%), and left colectomies (5.5%). Regardless of the location of the operation, stapled and sutured anastomoses had similar outcomes measured by the rate of anastomotic leaks. Residents used significantly more SDs in the creation of anastomoses than HS suturing in the PGY3, PGY4, and PGY5 years. We also documented that attending surgeons who are older more often used HS suturing than their younger colleagues when creating IAs. The

  6. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    There can be no doubt that the systematic evaluation of operating experience by the operator and the regulator is essential for continued safe operation of nuclear power plants. Recent concerns have been voiced that the operating experience information and insights are not being used effectively to promote safety. If these concerns foreshadow a real trend in OECD countries toward complacency in reporting and analysing operating events and taking corrective actions, then past experience suggests that similar or even more serious events will recur. This report discusses how the regulator can take actions to assure that operators have effective programmes to collect and analyse operating experience and, just as important, for taking steps to follow up with actions to prevent the events and conditions from recurring. These regulatory actions include special inspections of an operator operating experience programme and discussion with senior plant managers to emphasize the importance of having an effective operating experience programme. In addition to overseeing the operator programmes, the regulator has the broader responsibility for assuring that industry-wide trends, both national and international are monitored. To meet these responsibilities, the regulatory body must have its own operating experience programme, and this report discusses the important attributes of such regulatory programmes. It is especially important for the regulator to have the capability for assessing the full scope of operating experience issues, including those that may not be included in an operator operating experience programme, such as new research results, international operating experience, and broad industry trend information. (author)

  7. Assessment of resident operative performance using a real-time mobile Web system: preparing for the milestone age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin P; Chen, David C; Donahue, Timothy R; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    To satisfy trainees' operative competency requirements while improving feedback validity and timeliness using a mobile Web-based platform. The Southern Illinois University Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS) was embedded into a website formatted for mobile devices. From March 2013 to February 2014, faculty members were instructed to complete the OPRS form while providing verbal feedback to the operating resident at the conclusion of each procedure. Submitted data were compiled automatically within a secure Web-based spreadsheet. Conventional end-of-rotation performance (CERP) evaluations filed 2006 to 2013 and OPRS performance scores were compared by year of training using serial and independent-samples t tests. The mean CERP scores and OPRS overall resident operative performance scores were directly compared using a linear regression model. OPRS mobile site analytics were reviewed using a Web-based reporting program. Large university-based general surgery residency program. General Surgery faculty used the mobile Web OPRS system to rate resident performance. Residents and the program director reviewed evaluations semiannually. Over the study period, 18 faculty members and 37 residents logged 176 operations using the mobile OPRS system. There were 334 total OPRS website visits. Median time to complete an evaluation was 45 minutes from the end of the operation, and faculty spent an average of 134 seconds on the site to enter 1 assessment. In the 38,506 CERP evaluations reviewed, mean performance scores showed a positive linear trend of 2% change per year of training (p = 0.001). OPRS overall resident operative performance scores showed a significant linear (p = 0.001), quadratic (p = 0.001), and cubic (p = 0.003) trend of change per year of clinical training, reflecting the resident operative experience in our training program. Differences between postgraduate year-1 and postgraduate year-5 overall performance scores were greater with the OPRS (mean = 0.96, CI

  8. Vascular Trauma Operative Experience is Inadequate in General Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Koopmann, Matthew; Keeley, Jessica; Smith, Brian; Virgilio, Christian de; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular injuries may be challenging, particularly for surgeons who have not received formal vascular surgery fellowship training. Lack of experience and improper technique can result in significant complications. The objective of this study was to examine changes in resident experience with operative vascular trauma over time. A retrospective review was performed using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of general surgery residents graduating between 2004 and 2014 at 2 academic, university-affiliated institutions associated with level 1 trauma centers. The primary outcome was number of reported vascular trauma operations, stratified by year of graduation and institution. A total of 112 residents graduated in the study period with a median 7 (interquartile range 4.5-13.5) vascular trauma cases per resident. Fasciotomy and exposure and/or repair of peripheral vessels constituted the bulk of the operative volume. Linear regression showed no significant trend in cases with respect to year of graduation (P = 0.266). Residents from program A (n = 53) reported a significantly higher number of vascular trauma cases when compared with program B (n = 59): 12.0 vs. 5.0 cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Level 1 trauma center verification does not guarantee sufficient exposure to vascular trauma. The operative exposure in program B is reflective of the national average of 4.0 cases per resident as reported by the ACGME, and this trend is unlikely to change in the near future. Fellowship training may be critical for surgeons who plan to work in a trauma setting, particularly in areas lacking vascular surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Reduced Duty Hours Model for Senior Internal Medicine Residents: A Qualitative Analysis of Residents' Experiences and Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rebecca; Gundy, Serena; Ulic, Diana; Haider, Shariq; Wasi, Parveen

    2016-09-01

    To assess senior internal medicine residents' experience of the implementation of a reduced duty hours model with night float, the transition from the prior 26-hour call system, and the new model's effects on resident quality of life and perceived patient safety in the emergency department and clinical teaching unit at McMaster University. Qualitative data were collected during May 2013-July 2014, through resident focus groups held prior to implementation of a reduced duty hours model and 10 to 12 months postimplementation. Data analysis was guided by a constructivist grounded theory based in a relativist paradigm. Transcripts were coded; codes were collapsed into themes. Thematic analysis revealed five themes. Residents described reduced fatigue in the early morning, counterbalanced with worsened long-term fatigue on night float blocks; anticipation of negative impacts of the loss of distributed on-call experience and on-call shift volume; an urgency to sleep postcall in anticipation of consecutive night float shifts accompanied by conflicting role demands to stay postcall for care continuity; increased handover frequency accompanied by inaccurate/incomplete communication of patients' issues; and improvement in the senior resident experience on the clinical teaching unit, with increased ownership over patient care and improved relationships with junior housestaff. A reduced duty hours model with night float has potential to improve residents' perceived fatigue on call and care continuity on the clinical teaching unit. This must be weighed against increased handover frequency and loss of the postcall day, which may negatively affect patient care and resident quality of life.

  10. How much guidance is given in the operating room? Factors influencing faculty self-reports, resident perceptions, and faculty/resident agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeck, Laura; Williams, Reed G; Choi, Jennifer; Schmitz, Connie C; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Dunnington, Gary L

    2014-10-01

    Guidance in the operating room impacts resident confidence and ability to function independently. The purpose of this study was to explore attending surgeon guidance practices in the operating room as reported by faculty members themselves and by junior and senior residents. This was an exploratory, cross-sectional survey research study involving 91 categorical residents and 82 clinical faculty members at two academic general surgery training programs. A series of analyses of variance along with descriptive statistics were performed to understand the impact of resident training year, program, and surgeon characteristics (sex and type of surgery performed routinely) on guidance practices. Resident level (junior versus senior) significantly impacted the amount of guidance given as reported by faculty and as perceived by residents. Within each program, junior residents perceived less guidance than faculty reported giving. For senior guidance practices, however, the differences between faculty and resident practices varied by program. In terms of the effects of surgeon practice type (mostly general versus mostly complex cases), residents at both institutions felt they were more supervised closely by the faculty who perform mostly complex cases. More autonomy is given to senior than to junior residents. Additionally, faculty report a greater amount of change in their guidance practices over the training period than residents perceive. Faculty and resident agreement about the need for guidance and for autonomy are important for achieving the goals of residency training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The European Working Time Directive and surgical residents' expertise: no effect on the number of operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicherit, Onno R

    2015-01-01

    Residents' working hours in the Netherlands were first capped in the early 1990 s. In 2003, European legislation consolidated restrictions to a 48-hour week. No adverse effects were seen on the number of surgical operations performed either in the first or the second decade following these measures. Either the effect on surgical training is minimal, or the number of operations carried out during a residency is not a meaningful indicator of its quality. Personalized modular rotations in both university and teaching hospitals are needed for residents with sub-specializations. Training activities, in combination with more supervision, have to focus on a broader set of competencies beyond simply mastering surgical procedures.

  12. Use of a formal assessment instrument for evaluation of resident operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Caroline; Lam, Sandi K; Briceño, Valentina; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2015-08-28

    OBJECT Currently there is no standardized tool for assessment of neurosurgical resident performance in the operating room. In light of enhanced requirements issued by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Milestone Project and the Matrix Curriculum Project from the Society of Neurological Surgeons, the implementation of such a tool seems essential for objective evaluation of resident competence. Beyond compliance with governing body guidelines, objective assessment tools may be useful to direct early intervention for trainees performing below the level of their peers so that they may be given more hands-on teaching, while strong residents can be encouraged by faculty members to progress to conducting operations more independently with passive supervision. The aims of this study were to implement a validated assessment tool for evaluation of operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery and determine its feasibility and reliability. METHODS All neurosurgery residents completing their pediatric rotation over a 6-month period from January 1, 2014, to June 30, 2014, at the authors' institution were enrolled in this study. For each procedure, residents were evaluated by means of a form, with one copy being completed by the resident and a separate copy being completed by the attending surgeon. The evaluation form was based on the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills for Surgery (OSATS) and used a 5-point Likert-type scale with 7 categories: respect for tissue; time and motion; instrument handling; knowledge of instruments; flow of operation; use of assistants; and knowledge of specific procedure. Data were then stratified by faculty versus resident (self-) assessment; postgraduate year level; and difficulty of procedure. Descriptive statistics (means and SDs) were calculated, and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Student t-test. A p value assessment scores overall or in any of the 7 domains scores

  13. Operating experience feedback program at Olkiluoto NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosonen, Mikko

    2002-01-01

    Recent review and development of the operating experience feedback program will be described. The development of the program has been based on several reviews by outside organizations. Main conclusions from these review reports and from the self assessment of safety performance, safety problems and safety culture on the basis of the operational events made by ASSET-method will be described. An approach to gather and analyze small events - so-called near misses - will be described. The operating experience program has been divided into internal and external operating experience. ASSET-methodology and a computer program assisting the analysis are used for the internal operating experience events. Noteworthy incidents occurred during outage are analyzed also by ASSET-method. Screening and pre analysis of the external operating experience relies on co-operation with ERFATOM, an organization of Nordic utilities for the exchange of nuclear industry experience. A short presentation on the performance of the Olkiluoto units will conclude the presentation. (author)

  14. Recent U.S. reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative assessment of U.S. and foreign reactor operating experience is provided. Recent operating occurrences having potentially significant safety impacts on power operation are described. An evaluation of the seriousness of each of these issues and the plans for resolution is discussed. A quantitative report on U.S. reactor operational experience is included. The details of the NRC program for evaluating and applying operating reactor experience in the regulatory process is discussed. A review is made of the adequacy of operating reactor safety and environmental margins based on actual operating experience. The Regulatory response philosophy to operating reactor experiences is detailed. This discussion indicates the NRC emphasis on the importance of a balanced action plan to provide for the protection of public safety in the national interest

  15. Nursing home practices following resident death: the experience of Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R

    2015-01-01

    This study examined certified nursing assistants' (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities' practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. BWR and ABWR operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kimio; Takayama, Yoshito; Shimizu, Shunichi

    1998-01-01

    The first commercial operation of a nuclear power plant in Japan was in 1969. At present, there are 52 nuclear power plants operating in the country, accounting for about 35% of the total electricity generated and about 20 % of the total capacity of electricity generation facilities in Japan. Moreover, Japan has had the highest facility utilization rate, which is an indicator of operational safety, among the top four nuclear-generation countries (U.S.A., France, Germany, and Japan) every year since 1993, and has maintained a utilization rate of more than 80% since 1995. Toshiba has supported plant operation and maintenance in 19 nuclear power plants. The overall facility utilization rate of these plants attained a record of 86.4% in fiscal 1996. Furthermore, the averaged rates over the past three fiscal years from 1995 to 1997 have been the highest in the world among plant constructors such as GE, WH, and Siemens. (author)

  17. A phenomenologic investigation of pediatric residents' experiences being parented and giving parenting advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, A C; Shawler, P M; Blackmon, D L; DeGrace, E W; Wolraich, M L

    2016-09-01

    Factors surrounding pediatricians' parenting advice and training on parenting during residency have not been well studied. The primary purpose of this study was to examine pediatric residents' self-reported experiences giving parenting advice and explore the relationship between parenting advice given and types of parenting residents received as children. Thirteen OUHSC pediatric residents were individually interviewed to examine experiences being parented and giving parenting advice. Phenomenological methods were used to explicate themes and secondary analyses explored relationships of findings based upon Baumrind's parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive). While childhood experiences were not specifically correlated to the parenting advice style of pediatric residents interviewed, virtually all reported relying upon childhood experiences to generate their advice. Those describing authoritative parents reported giving more authoritative advice while others reported more variable advice. Core interview themes related to residents' parenting advice included anxiety about not being a parent, varying advice based on families' needs, and emphasis of positive interactions and consistency. Themes related to how residents were parented included discipline being a learning process for their parents and recalling that their parents always had expectations, yet always loved them. Pediatric residents interviewed reported giving family centered parenting advice with elements of positive interactions and consistency, but interviews highlighted many areas of apprehension residents have around giving parenting advice. Our study suggests that pediatric residents may benefit from more general educational opportunities to develop the content of their parenting advice, including reflecting on any impact from their own upbringing.

  18. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  19. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring

  20. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comparisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for the conventional Main Ring

  1. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries

  2. EBR-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-07-01

    Operation of the EBR-2 reactor is presented concerning the performance of the heat removal system; reactor materials; fuel handling system; sodium purification and sampling system; cover-gas purification; plant diagnostics and instrumentation; recent improvements in identifying fission product sources in EBR-2; and EBR-2 safety

  3. Learning Through Experience: Influence of Formal and Informal Training on Medical Error Disclosure Skills in Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian M; Coffey, Maitreya; Nousiainen, Markku T; Brydges, Ryan; McDonald-Blumer, Heather; Atkinson, Adelle; Levinson, Wendy; Stroud, Lynfa

    2017-02-01

    Residents' attitudes toward error disclosure have improved over time. It is unclear whether this has been accompanied by improvements in disclosure skills. To measure the disclosure skills of internal medicine (IM), paediatrics, and orthopaedic surgery residents, and to explore resident perceptions of formal versus informal training in preparing them for disclosure in real-world practice. We assessed residents' error disclosure skills using a structured role play with a standardized patient in 2012-2013. We compared disclosure skills across programs using analysis of variance. We conducted a multiple linear regression, including data from a historical cohort of IM residents from 2005, to investigate the influence of predictor variables on performance: training program, cohort year, and prior disclosure training and experience. We conducted a qualitative descriptive analysis of data from semistructured interviews with residents to explore resident perceptions of formal versus informal disclosure training. In a comparison of disclosure skills for 49 residents, there was no difference in overall performance across specialties (4.1 to 4.4 of 5, P  = .19). In regression analysis, only the current cohort was significantly associated with skill: current residents performed better than a historical cohort of 42 IM residents ( P  formal (workshops, morbidity and mortality rounds) and informal (role modeling, debriefing) activities in preparation for disclosure in real-world practice. Residents across specialties have similar skills in disclosure of errors. Residents identified role modeling and a strong local patient safety culture as key facilitators for disclosure.

  4. Reactor operator screening test experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, W.J.; Penkala, J.L.; Witzig, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    When it became apparent to Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that the throughput of their candidate selection-Phase I training-reactor operator certification sequence was something short of acceptable, the utility decided to ask consultants to make recommendations with respect to candidate selection procedures. The recommendation implemented was to create a Nuclear Training Test that would predict the success of a candidate in completing Phase I training and subsequently qualify for reactor operator certification. The mechanics involved in developing and calibrating the Nuclear Training Test are described. An arbitration decision that resulted when a number of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union employees filed a grievance alleging that the selection examination was unfair, invalid, not job related, inappropriate, and discriminatorily evaluated is also discussed. The arbitration decision favored the use of the Nuclear Training Test

  5. Experiences of an operating association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zefferer, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Austrian Draukraftwerke operate a coal power station with a capacity 110 MW el at St. Andraein Kaernten. In 1989, the first stage of a scheme for supplying the town St. Andraewith long-distance energy was started from this power station. To provide for the intermittent downtimes between the plant's operating times, which total an annual 2000 hours, a substitute aggregate was designed consisting of two biomass (chiefly bark)-fueled grate-firing boilers (4 MW th and 2.5 MW th ). The problems that arose during the first years in the areas of biomass storage, conveyor systems, slagging, emission values, and ash removal have meanwhile been solved satisfactorily. Moreover, the Draukraftwerke intend to use biomass for electricity generation in their coal power stations. (orig.) [de

  6. The Wonderland of Operating the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Augustinus, A; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L; Chochula, P

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 datataking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the HEP experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. Thi...

  7. Operational experience in underwater photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherdale, John D.; John Turner, D.

    Underwater photogrammetry has become established as a cost-effective technique for inspection and maintenance of platforms and pipelines for the offshore oil industry. A commercial service based in Scotland operates in the North Sea, USA, Brazil, West Africa and Australia. 70 mm cameras and flash units are built for the purpose and analytical plotters and computer graphics systems are used for photogrammetric measurement and analysis of damage, corrosion, weld failures and redesign of underwater structures. Users are seeking simple, low-cost systems for photogrammetric analysis which their engineers can use themselves.

  8. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix K: Resident fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. In this appendix the Resident Fish Work Group (RFWG) has attempted to characterize and evaluate impacts of dam operation on an extremely complex and diverse integrated resource. Not only is this required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for SOR, there are resident fish populations that have status under the Federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) or equivalent state regulations (Kootenai River white sturgeon, Snake River white sturgeon, sandroller, shorthead and torrent sculpins, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, redband trout, and burbot). The RFWG has also attempted to develop operating alternatives that benefit not only resident fish, but anadromous fish, wildlife, and other human interests as well. The authors have recognized the co-evolution of resident fish, anadromous fish, and other integrated resources in the basin

  9. US remote monitoring operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Under international partnerships and bilateral agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, other national laboratories, and international partner organizations have emplaced remote monitoring systems in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world for the purpose of conducting field trials of remote monitoring. The purpose of the present report is to review the results from these field trials and draw general conclusions regarding the trials. Many thousands of hours of sensor and system operation have been logged, and data have been retrieved from many locations. In virtually all cases the system components have functioned as intended and data have been successfully collected and transmitted for review. Comparisons between front-end-triggered video and time-lapse video have shown that the triggered record has captured all relevant monitored operations at the various nuclear facilities included in the field trials. We believe the utility and functional reliability of remote monitoring for international safeguards has been shown. However, it should be kept in mind that openness and transparency, including some form of short-notice inspections, are likely to be prerequisites to the safeguards implementation of remote monitoring in any State

  10. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Declining Otolaryngology Resident Training Experience in Tracheostomies: Case Log Trends from 2005 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, David; Showmaker, Jason; Ukatu, Ceisha; Wu, Qiwei; Chang, C W David

    2017-06-01

    Objective To evaluate recent tracheostomy surgical experience among otolaryngology residents and general surgery residents. Study Design Retrospective database review. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology and general surgery programs. Subjects and Methods Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case log data from 2005 to 2015 for resident graduates in otolaryngology and general surgery were used to obtain mean graduate tracheostomy numbers, mean graduate composite case numbers, and number of graduating residents. Market share for each specialty was estimated through the derived metric of nationwide total tracheostomy graduate experience, calculated by multiplying the number of graduating residents by the mean number of graduate tracheostomies. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate trends. Multiple linear regression analysis was used for pairwise comparison of trends. Results From 2005 to 2015, mean graduate tracheostomy numbers for otolaryngology residents declined 2.3% per year, while those for general surgery residents increased 1.8% per year. Accounting for changes in number of resident graduates, market share of tracheostomy decreased 1.0% per year for otolaryngology and increased 3.0% per year for general surgery. Mean graduate composite case numbers increased significantly by 1.8% and 1.0% per year for otolaryngology and general surgery residents, respectively. Conclusion Tracheostomy case volume in otolaryngology residency has decreased steadily in comparison with general surgery residency. However, current otolaryngology graduates have more experience in tracheostomy when compared with general surgery graduates. While otolaryngology residents have excellent exposure to tracheostomy, otolaryngology programs should be made aware of this declining trend as well as changing procedural trends, which may affect training needs.

  12. Initial resident refractive surgical experience: outcomes of PRK and LASIK for myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Michael D; Wickard, Joseph C; Wandling, George R; Milder, Lisa C; Rauen, Matthew P; Kitzmann, Anna S; Sutphin, John E; Goins, Kenneth M

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the outcome of initial resident surgical experience with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and LASIK. Retrospective review of all cases performed with the VISX Star S4 platform (Abbott Medical Optics) between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2007. Inclusion criteria were spherical equivalent of -0.50 to -10.00 diopters (D), refractive astigmatic error of ≤3.00 D, intention to provide full distance correction, and minimum 3-month postoperative follow-up after initial ablation or retreatment (if performed). A total of 153 cases performed by 20 different residents met the inclusion criteria; 38 eyes underwent PRK and 115 eyes had LASIK. After initial treatment, mean Snellen uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) after PRK was 20/17.3 and after LASIK was 20/19.5. Photorefractive keratectomy was associated with a significantly better approximation between preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and postoperative UDVA (ΔlogMAR 0.009 vs 0.091; P=.004) and a greater percentage of eyes that achieved UDVA of 20/20 or better (94.7% vs 78.3%; P=.02) or 20/30 or better (100% vs 87.8%; P=.02). There was a higher prevalence of retreatment in eyes that underwent LASIK (7.0% vs 0%; P=.20). One (0.9%) eye lost 2 lines of CDVA after LASIK. Supervised refractive surgery residents can achieve excellent visual outcomes in patients operated during their initial refractive experience. Photorefractive keratectomy was associated with better visual outcome than LASIK. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  14. Industry Operating Experience Process at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, B.; Bozin, B.; Cizmek, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experience has shown that number of minor events and near misses, usually without immediate or significant impact to plant safety and reliability, are precursors of significant or severe events due to the same or similar root or apparent cause(s). It is therefore desirable to identify and analyze weaknesses of the precursor problems (events) in order to prevent occurrence of significant events. Theoretically, significant events could be prevented from occurring if the root cause(s) of these precursor problems could be identified and eliminated. The Operating Experience Program identifies such event precursors and by reporting them to the industry, plant specific corrective actions can be taken to prevent events at other operational plants. The intent of the Operating Experience Program is therefore to improve nuclear power plant safety and reliability of the operating nuclear power plants. Each plant develops its own Operating Experience Program in order to learn from the in-house operating experience as well as from the world community of nuclear plants. The effective use of operating experience includes analyzing both plant and industry events in order to identify fundamental weaknesses and then determining appropriate plant-specific actions that will minimize the likelihood of similar events. Learning and applying the lessons from operating experience is an integral part of station safety culture and is encouraged by managers throughout the top plant administrative programs and procedures. Krsko NPP is developed it own Operating Experience Program by using the most relevant INPO/WANO/IAEA guidelines as well as its own knowledge, skills an operating practice. The Operating Experience Program is a part of the Corrective Action Program, which is among top management programs, thus program is strongly encouraged by top management. The purpose of Operating Experience Program is to provide guidance for using, sharing, and evaluating operating experience information

  15. Graduating general surgery resident operative confidence: perspective from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Annabelle L; Reddy, Vikram; Longo, Walter E; Gusberg, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    General surgical training has changed significantly over the last decade with work hour restrictions, increasing subspecialization, the expanding use of minimally invasive techniques, and nonoperative management for solid organ trauma. Given these changes, this study was undertaken to assess the confidence of graduating general surgery residents in performing open surgical operations and to determine factors associated with increased confidence. A survey was developed and sent to general surgery residents nationally. We queried them regarding demographics and program characteristics, asked them to rate their confidence (rated 1-5 on a Likert scale) in performing open surgical procedures and compared those who indicated confidence with those who did not. We received 653 responses from the fifth year (postgraduate year 5) surgical residents: 69% male, 68% from university programs, and 51% from programs affiliated with a Veterans Affairs hospital; 22% from small programs, 34% from medium programs, and 44% from large programs. Anticipated postresidency operative confidence was 72%. More than 25% of residents reported a lack of confidence in performing eight of the 13 operations they were queried about. Training at a university program, a large program, dedicated research years, future fellowship plans, and training at a program that performed a large percentage of operations laparoscopically was associated with decreased confidence in performing a number of open surgical procedures. Increased surgical volume was associated with increased operative confidence. Confidence in performing open surgery also varied regionally. Graduating surgical residents indicated a significant lack of confidence in performing a variety of open surgical procedures. This decreased confidence was associated with age, operative volume as well as type, and location of training program. Analyzing and addressing this confidence deficit merits further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Residents' reluctance to challenge negative hierarchy in the operating room: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bould, M Dylan; Sutherland, Stephanie; Sydor, Devin T; Naik, Viren; Friedman, Zeev

    2015-06-01

    Our aim was to clarify how hierarchy influences residents' reluctance to challenge authority with respect to clearly erroneous medical decision-making. After research ethics approval, we recruited 44 anesthesia residents for a high-fidelity simulation scenario at two Ontario universities. During the scenario, an actor, whom the residents were told was an actual new staff anesthesiologist at their university, asked the trainees to give blood to a Jehovah's Witness in contradiction to the patient's explicitly stated wishes. Following the case, the trainees were debriefed and were interviewed for 30-40 min. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and the text was coded using a qualitative approach informed by grounded theory. Qualitative analysis of the participants' interviews yielded rich descriptive accounts of hierarchical influences often characterized by fear and intimidation. Residents spoke about their coping strategies, which included adaptability, avoiding conflict, using inquiry as a method for patient advocacy, and relying on a diffusion of responsibility within the larger operating room team. Study results showed that hierarchy played a dominant role in the functioning of the operating room. Participants spoke of both the positive and negative effects of such a hierarchical learning environment. The majority of participants described a negative perception of hierarchy as the norm, and they employed many coping strategies. This study provides insight into how a negative hierarchical culture can adversely impact patient safety, resident learning, and team functioning. We propose a theoretical model to describe challenging authority in this context.

  17. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear utilities operate their plants in an acceptably safe manner at all times. Learning from experience has been a key element in meeting this objective. It is therefore very important for nuclear power plant operators to have an active programme for collecting, analysing and acting on the lessons of operating experience that could affect the safety of their plants. NEA experts have noted that almost all of the recent, significant events reported at international meetings have occurred earlier in one form or another. Counteractions are usually well-known, but information does not always seem to reach end users, or corrective action programmes are not always rigorously applied. Thus, one of the challenges that needs to be met in order to maintain good operational safety performance is to ensure that operating experience is promptly reported to established reporting systems, preferably international in order to benefit from a larger base of experience, and that the lessons from operating experience are actually used to promote safety. This report focuses on how regulatory bodies can ensure that operating experience is used effectively to promote the safety of nuclear power plants. While directed at nuclear power plants, the principles in this report may apply to other nuclear facilities as well. (author)

  18. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted on nuclear power plant (NPP) control room training simulators by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, its subcontractor, General Physics Corporation, and participating utilities. The experiments are sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Human Factors and Safeguards Branch, Division of Risk Analysis and Operations, and are a continuation of prior research using simulators, supported by field data collection, to provide a technical basis for NRC human factors regulatory issues concerned with the operational safety of nuclear power plants. During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE boiling water reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of (a) senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, (b) operating crew augmentation with an STA and (c) practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator. Methodology and results to date are reported

  19. Experiences of Scandinavian nurses in discussing sexuality with patients, clients and residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birgitte Schantz; Rasmussen, Philippa; Conroy, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesize, and present the best available evidence to address the question: How do Scandinavian nurses experience discussing sexual issues with patients, residents and clients?......REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesize, and present the best available evidence to address the question: How do Scandinavian nurses experience discussing sexual issues with patients, residents and clients?...

  20. PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF ELDERLY RESIDENTS IN A NURSING HOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alessandra Evangelista

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of the elderly residents of a long-stay nursing home on the process of institutionalization. We interviewed 14 subjects, five women and nine men, aged between 60 and 92 years. Data collection was conducted with a semi-structured sociodemographic interview, which presented the guiding question: “Tell me about how is your life, what do you do and how did you come to live here”. From the analysis, we found topics related to feelings of abandonment, loneliness, anger, ingratitude, living with chronic pain, satisfaction of property in the nursing home, productivity and social relationship. Given the thematic analysis, it was possible to group them into three categories such as: what the elderly feel, what the elderly perceive and what the elderly desire. As a result, we need public policies that addresses to the service provided by institutions regarding elderly expectations.

  1. Resident Physicians Improve Nontechnical Skills When on Operating Room Management and Leadership Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Devon C; Giordano, Christopher R; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Fahy, Brenda G

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiology residency primarily emphasizes the development of medical knowledge and technical skills. Yet, nontechnical skills (NTS) are also vital to successful clinical practice. Elements of NTS are communication, teamwork, situational awareness, and decision making. The first 10 consecutive senior residents who chose to participate in this 2-week elective rotation of operating room (OR) management and leadership training were enrolled in this study, which spanned from March 2013 to March 2015. Each resident served as the anesthesiology officer of the day (AOD) and was tasked with coordinating OR assignments, managing care for 2 to 4 ORs, and being on call for the trauma OR; all residents were supervised by an attending AOD. Leadership and NTS techniques were taught via a standardized curriculum consisting of leadership and team training articles, crisis management text, and daily debriefings. Resident self-ratings and attending AOD and charge nurse raters used the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) scoring system, which involved task management, situational awareness, teamwork, and decision making. For each of the 10 residents in their third year of clinical anesthesiology training (CA-3) who participated in this elective rotation, there were 14 items that required feedback from resident self-assessment and OR raters, including the daily attending AOD and charge nurse. Results for each of the items on the questionnaire were compared between the beginning and the end of the rotation with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched samples. Comparisons were run separately for attending AOD and charge nurse assessments and resident self-assessments. Scaled rankings were analyzed for the Kendall coefficient of concordance (ω) for rater agreement with associated χ and P value. Common themes identified by the residents during debriefings were recurrence of challenging situations and the skills residents needed to instruct and manage clinical teams. For

  2. Operational experience with the Daresbury accelerator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, T.W.; Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.; Leese, J.M.; Tait, N.R.S.; Thorn, R.

    1986-01-01

    Operational experience with the Daresbury MKI accelerator tube is reviewed with particular attention to conditioning and high voltage performance. The effects of surges and transients on the tube are described and lines of future development are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Combining risk analysis and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the systematic utilization of operating experience in the decision making process concerning large industrial facilities. Even before the advent of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), operating experience had always played an important role in such decisions. Of course, operating experience has always been an input to PSA also; however, as PSA becomes more mature and the quality and quantity of operating experience improve, greater emphasis is now being placed on the use of operating experience to update and validate PSA and thereby provide a more rational basis for decision making. This report outlines the ways in which data are collected, processed using mathematical techniques and utilized in decision making. It is not intended to provide details of the methods and procedures to be used in these areas, but is rather intended as an introduction to these topics and some of the relevant literature. The meeting presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: evaluation of nuclear power plants operational experience (5 papers); uncertainties (2 papers); probabilistic safety assessment studies in Member States (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  4. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1963-01-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [fr

  5. MIT January Operational Internship Experience 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLatte, Danielle; Furhmann, Adam; Habib, Manal; Joujon-Roche, Cecily; Opara, Nnaemeka; Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez; Powell, Christina; Wimmer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the 2011 January Operational Internship experience (JOIE) program which allows students to study operational aspects of spaceflight, how design affects operations and systems engineering in practice for 3 weeks. Topics include: (1) Systems Engineering (2) NASA Organization (3) Workforce Core Values (4) Human Factors (5) Safety (6) Lean Engineering (7) NASA Now (8) Press, Media, and Outreach and (9) Future of Spaceflight.

  6. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written

  7. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written.

  8. The significance of meaningful and enjoyable activities for nursing home resident's experiences of dignity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slettebø, Åshild; Saeteren, Berit; Caspari, Synnøve

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Living in a nursing home may be challenging to the residents' experience of dignity. Residents' perception of how their dignity is respected in everyday care is important. AIM: To examine how nursing home residents experience dignity through the provision of activities that foster...... meaning and joy in their daily life. METHOD: A qualitative design was used and 28 individual semistructured interviews conducted with nursing home residents from six nursing homes in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Independent ethical committees in all...... participating countries granted their approval for the study. FINDINGS: The participants highlight two dimensions of the activities that foster experiences of dignity in nursing homes in Scandinavia. These two categories were (i) fostering dignity through meaningful participation and (ii) fostering dignity...

  9. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, operating crew augmentation with an STA and practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. Sixteen two-man crews of licensed operators were employed in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The SROs leading the crews were split into high and low experience groups on the basis of their years of experience as an SRO. One half of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties. A five-variable set of content-referenced performance measures was derived from task analyses of the procedurally correct responses to the four casualties. System parameters and control manipulations were recorded by the computer controlling the simulator. Data on communications and procedure use were obtained from analysis of videotapes of the exercises. Questionnaires were used to collect subject biographical information and data on subjective workload during each simulated casualty. For four of the five performance measures, no significant differences were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have significantly shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. The presence of the STA had no significant effect on overall team performance in responding to the four simulated casualties. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator

  10. Kayenta advanced series compensation operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The world's first three-phase, thyristor-controlled series compensation scheme with continuously variable impedance has been introduced into a transmission system. Energized and dedicated in September 1992, the installation was placed into commercial operation in January 1993 and has provided over one year of operating experience. This paper describes the 230 kV, 330 MVAr (60 Hz) advanced series compensation (ASC) project, located in north-eastern Arizona at Kayenta Substation on the 320 km Glen Canyon-Shiprock transmission line. The paper describes operating experiences, coordination with phase shifting transformer, phase shifter failure, platform power, system disturbances, and future plans.

  11. Understanding Surgical Resident and Fellow Perspectives on Their Operative Performance Feedback Needs: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Ricardo J; Sarmiento, Samuel; Meyer, Meredith L; Rosson, Gedge D; Cooney, Damon S; Lifchez, Scott D; Cooney, Carisa M

    2018-04-20

    Operative performance feedback is essential for surgical training. We aimed to understand surgical trainees' views on their operative performance feedback needs and to characterize feedback to elucidate factors affecting its value from the resident perspective. Using a qualitative research approach, 2 research fellows conducted semistructured, one-on-one interviews with surgical trainees. We analyzed recurring themes generated during interviews related to feedback characteristics, as well as the extent to which performance rating tools can help meet trainees' operative feedback needs. Departments or divisions of general or plastic surgery at 9 US academic institutions. Surgical residents and clinical fellows in general or plastic surgery. We conducted 30 interviews with 9 junior residents, 14 senior residents, and 7 clinical fellows. Eighteen (60%) participants were in plastic and 12 (40%) were in general surgery. Twenty-four participants (80%) reported feedback as very or extremely important during surgical training. All trainees stated that verbal, face-to-face feedback is the most valuable, especially if occurring during (92%) or immediately after (65%) cases. Of those trainees using performance rating tools (74%), most (57%) expressed positive views about them but wanted the tools to complement and not replace verbal feedback in surgical education. Trainees value feedback more if received within 1 week or the case. Verbal, face-to-face feedback is very or extremely important to surgical trainees. Residents and fellows prefer to receive feedback during or immediately after a case and continue to value feedback if received within 1 week of the event. Performance rating tools can be useful for providing formative feedback and documentation but should not replace verbal, face-to-face feedback. Considering trainee views on feedback may help reduce perceived gaps in feedback demand-versus-supply in surgical training, which may be essential to overcoming current

  12. Operating experience and TPA: the Italian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, G.

    1990-01-01

    Collection and analysis of operating experience from the Italian plants and utilization of abroad data both to plants in operation and in construction are presented. Some results are also referred, aimed to evidence the role of the international cooperation to safe operation of nuclear plants. The approach to the Trend and Pattern analyses is described as well, and the use of computerized techniques of analysis on personal computer. Finally on going activities are introduced, specifically application of operating experience of plants in operation to small sized reactors and to ones with more intrinsic safety characteristics; review of the reporting system for future application and comparative analysis of the different realization of selected safety systems

  13. Experience in operation of heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ion; Bilegan, Iosif; Ghitescu, Petre

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the main topics of the CANDU owners group (COG) meeting held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. These meetings are part of the IAEA program for exchange of information related mainly to CANDU reactor operation safety. The first meeting for PHWR reactors took place in Vienna in 1989, followed by those in Argentina (1991), India (1994) and Korea (1996). The topics discussed at the meeting in Romania were: operation experience and recent major events, performances of CANDU reactors and safe operation, nuclear safety and operation procedures of PHWR, programs and strategies of lifetime management of installations and components of NPPs, developments and updates

  14. Resident experience of abuse and harassment in emergency medicine: ten years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siu Fai; Grant, Kelly; Bhoj, Tanuja; Lent, Gretchen; Garrick, Jocelyn Freeman; Greenwald, Peter; Haber, Marc; Singh, Malini; Prodany, Karla; Sanchez, Leon; Dickman, Eitan; Spencer, James; Perera, Tom; Cowan, Ethan

    2010-02-01

    In 1995, a Society for Academic Emergency Medicine in-service survey reported high rates of verbal and physical abuse experienced by Emergency Medicine (EM) residents. We sought to determine the prevalence of abuse and harassment 10 years later to bring attention to these issues and determine if there has been a change in the prevalence of abuse over this time period. To determine the prevalence of abuse and harassment in a sample of EM residencies. We conducted a cross-section survey of EM residents from 10 residencies. EM residents were asked about their experience with verbal abuse, verbal threats, physical threats, physical attacks, sexual harassment, and racial harassment; and by whom. The primary outcome of the study was the prevalence of abuse and harassment as reported by EM residents. There were 196 of 380 residents (52%) who completed the survey. The prevalence of any type of abuse experienced was 91%; 86% of residents experienced verbal abuse, 65% verbal threats, 50% physical threats, 26% physical attacks, 23% sexual harassment, and 26% racial harassment. Women were more likely than men to encounter sexual harassment (37% [38/102] vs. 8% [7/92]; p harassment was not limited to minorities (23% [16/60] for Caucasians vs. 26% [29/126] for non-Caucasians; p = 0.59). Senior residents were more likely to have encountered verbal and physical abuse. Only 12% of residents formally reported the abuse they experienced. Abuse and harassment during EM residency continues to be commonplace and is underreported. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Students' educational experiences and interaction with residents on night shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jocelyn; Sokoloff, Max; Tendhar, Chosang; Schmidt, John; Christner, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to investigate whether increased night shifts for students on paediatric rotations had any negative impact on their overall quality of educational experiences in light of the implementation of duty-hour restrictions. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 30 students on paediatric rotations during the academic year 2011/12. Students completed two questionnaires, one in response to their experiences during the day shifts and another in response to their experiences during the night shifts. Only 25 cases were retained for the final analyses. The non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyse the quantitative data, and constant comparative thematic analyses, as described by Creswell, were used to analyse the qualitative data. [Do] increased nights shifts for students … [have] any negative impact on their overall quality of educational experiences[?] RESULTS: The results indicated that students' perceived quality of experiences during the night shifts was greater, compared with their day shifts. Students reported having more time to socialise during the night shifts. They further reported that informal ways of learning, such as impromptu teaching and spontaneous discussions on clinical problems, were more beneficial, and these often occurred in abundance during the night shifts as opposed to the scheduled didactic teaching sessions that occur during the day shifts. This study documented many unanticipated benefits of night shifts. The feeling of cohesiveness of the night team deserves further exploration, as this can be linked to better performance outcomes. More consideration should be given to implementing night shifts as a regular feature of clerkships. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  16. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, Parul N.; Miller, Karen H.; Ziegler, Craig; Hertz, Rosanna; Hanna, Nevine; Dragun, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.

  17. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Miller, Karen H.; Ziegler, Craig [Department of Graduate Medical Education, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hertz, Rosanna [Departments of Women' s and Gender Studies and Sociology, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts (United States); Hanna, Nevine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Dragun, Anthony E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.

  18. Pregnancy among residents enrolled in general surgery: a nationwide survey of attitudes and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Shaila J; Hameed, S Morad; Melck, Adrienne L

    2013-10-01

    Medical student interest in general surgery has declined, and the lack of adequate accommodation for pregnancy and parenting during residency training may be a deterrent. We explored resident and program director experiences with these issues in general surgery programs across Canada. Using a web-based tool, residents and program directors from 16 Canadian general surgery programs were surveyed regarding their attitudes toward and experiences with pregnancy during residency. One hundred seventy-six of 600 residents and 8 of 16 program directors completed the survey (30% and 50% response rate, respectively). Multiple issues pertaining to pregnancy during surgical residency were reported including the lack of adequate policies for maternity/parenting, the major obstacles to breast-feeding, and the increased workload for fellow resident colleagues. All program directors reported the lack of a program-specific maternity/parenting policy. General surgery programs lack program-specific maternity/parenting policies. Several issues have been highlighted in this study emphasizing the importance of creating and implementing such a policy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lean principles optimize on-time vascular surgery operating room starts and decrease resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Walsh, Daniel B; Horvath, Alexander J; Walsh, Teri R; Herrick, Daniel P; Prentiss, Steven J; Powell, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Lean process improvement techniques are used in industry to improve efficiency and quality while controlling costs. These techniques are less commonly applied in health care. This study assessed the effectiveness of Lean principles on first case on-time operating room starts and quantified effects on resident work hours. Standard process improvement techniques (DMAIC methodology: define, measure, analyze, improve, control) were used to identify causes of delayed vascular surgery first case starts. Value stream maps and process flow diagrams were created. Process data were analyzed with Pareto and control charts. High-yield changes were identified and simulated in computer and live settings prior to implementation. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of on-time first case starts; secondary outcomes included hospital costs, resident rounding time, and work hours. Data were compared with existing benchmarks. Prior to implementation, 39% of first cases started on time. Process mapping identified late resident arrival in preoperative holding as a cause of delayed first case starts. Resident rounding process inefficiencies were identified and changed through the use of checklists, standardization, and elimination of nonvalue-added activity. Following implementation of process improvements, first case on-time starts improved to 71% at 6 weeks (P = .002). Improvement was sustained with an 86% on-time rate at 1 year (P < .001). Resident rounding time was reduced by 33% (from 70 to 47 minutes). At 9 weeks following implementation, these changes generated an opportunity cost potential of $12,582. Use of Lean principles allowed rapid identification and implementation of perioperative process changes that improved efficiency and resulted in significant cost savings. This improvement was sustained at 1 year. Downstream effects included improved resident efficiency with decreased work hours. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  20. Operating experience insights supporting ageing assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Be effective in ageing management means looking at the right aspects, with the right techniques, and one of the most effective tool which could be used for that purpose is the analysis of operating experience. The paper has as objective to perform a review of available operating experience, with the aim to provide a better picture about the impact of ageing effects. The IAEA International Reporting System and NRC Licensee Event Reports were chosen as reference databases, both databases being internationally recognized as important sources of information about events occurrences in the nuclear power plants. The ageing related events identified in the selected time window were analyzed in detail, and the contributions of each major degradation mechanisms that have induced the ageing related events (specific to each defined group of components) was represented and discussed. The paper demonstrates the possibility to use operating experience insights in highlighting the ageing effects. (authors)

  1. The SM and MIR reactors operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprienko, V.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Svyatkin, M.N.; Shamardin, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The SM and MIR operation experience show that continuous work on the problem of ageing, in all its aspects, allows for prolongation of the research plant life cycle by several folds as compared to the initial project. The redesigned SM-3 reactor will operate for another 20 years. The similar result is expected from the MIR planned reconstruction which scope will be the topic of future presentations. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  3. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  4. LOFT instrumented fuel design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A summary description of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) system instrumented core construction details and operating experience through reactor startup and loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) operations performed to date are discussed. The discussion includes details of the test instrumentation attachment to the fuel assembly, the structural response of the fuel modules to the forces generated by a double-ended break of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant pipe at the inlet to the reactor vessel, the durability of the LOFT fuel and test instrumentation, and the plans for incorporation of improved fuel assembly test instrumentation features in the LOFT core

  5. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  6. No Correlation Between Work-Hours and Operative Volumes--A Comparison Between United States and Danish Operative Volumes Achieved During Surgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærgaard, Jane; Sillesen, Martin; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2016-01-01

    Since 2003, United States residents have been limited to an 80-hour workweek. This has prompted concerns of reduced educational quality, especially inadequate operating exposure. In contrast, the Danish surgical specialty-training program mandates a cap on working hours of 37 per week. We hypothesize that there is no direct correlation between work-hours and operative volume achieved during surgical residency. To test the hypothesis, we compare Danish and US operative volumes achieved during surgical residency training. Retrospective comparative study. The data from the US population was extracted from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education database for General Surgery residents from 2012 to 2013. For Danish residents, a questionnaire with case categories matching the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education categories were sent to all Danish surgeons graduating the national surgical residency program in 2012 or 2013, 54 in total. In all, 30 graduated residents (55%) responded to the Danish survey. We found no significant differences in mean total major procedures (1002.4 vs 976.9, p = 0.28) performed during residency training, but comparing average major procedures per year, the US residents achieve significantly more (132.3 vs 195.4, p work-hours and operative volumes achievable. Factors other than work-hours seem to effect on operative volumes achieved during training. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  8. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  9. Explaining the Learning Experiences of Clinical Procedures of the Internal Medicine Residents at Department of Gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Taghavinia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the method and way of learning and teaching are effective in acquiring clinical skills, and identifying the shortcomings of learning and teaching will lead to better planning. The purpose of this study was to explain the experiences of the learning clinical procedures of the internal medicine residents in gastroenterology department. Methods: qualitative study using content thematic analysis was done. Six fourth-year residents were selected and interviewed considering purposive sampling. The data of the interviews were transcribed and analyzed after rereading. Results: the collected data are divided into three categories: learning and experience with the following four categories (learning time and experiencing, leaning and experiencing times, learning and experiencing opportunities, training and the lack of the training of some procedures. These categories are explained by using some quotes derived from the data. Conclusion: the results of this study suggest that the administrative management of internal residency is poor and should get seriously in implementation and application of intended instructions existing in the prepared program of Medical Education and Specialized Council of internal residency period. The attending physicians and residents must be aware of the content of education program at the beginning of the residency periods and the trainers must try to supervise the residents’ education.

  10. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, A.; Convery, M.; Geer, S.; Geesaman, D.; Harris, D.; Johnson, D.; Lang, K.; McFarland, K.; Messier, M.; Moore, C. D.; Newhart, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Plunkett, R.; Rominsky, M.; Sanchez, M.; Schmidt, J. J.; Shanahan, P.; Tate, C.; Thomas, J.; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein

    2016-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  11. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Convery, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Messier, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newhart, D. [Fermilab; Reimer, P. E. [Argonne; Plunkett, R. [Fermilab; Rominsky, M. [Fermilab; Sanchez, M. [Iowa State U.; Schmidt, J. J. [Fermilab; Shanahan, P. [Fermilab; Tate, C. [Fermilab; Thomas, J. [University Coll. London; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta [Fermilab; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein [Iowa State University

    2016-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  12. Do community medicine residency trainees learn through journal club? An experience from a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Muhammad

    2006-08-01

    residency training programs in developing countries. Effective use of online resources to support journal clubs is demonstrated as a successful alternative to excessive expenditure for obtaining print journals. Those trying to start or improve journal clubs can benefit from our experience.

  13. Operational experience with CMS Tier-2 sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Caballero, I

    2010-01-01

    In the CMS computing model, more than one third of the computing resources are located at Tier-2 sites, which are distributed across the countries in the collaboration. These sites are the primary platform for user analyses; they host datasets that are created at Tier-1 sites, and users from all CMS institutes submit analysis jobs that run on those data through grid interfaces. They are also the primary resource for the production of large simulation samples for general use in the experiment. As a result, Tier-2 sites have an interesting mix of organized experiment-controlled activities and chaotic user-controlled activities. CMS currently operates about 40 Tier-2 sites in 22 countries, making the sites a far-flung computational and social network. We describe our operational experience with the sites, touching on our achievements, the lessons learned, and the challenges for the future.

  14. HANARO operation experience in the year 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Kim, Heonil; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2006-01-01

    The experiences of the HANARO operation and maintenance in the year 2004 are presented in this article. The operation of HANARO, a 30 MW research reactor operated by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), aims at a safe and effective operation to enhance its utilization in various fields of scientific research and industry. Regardless of its importance of the routine operation, this article is devoted to rather unusual matters such as irregular maintenance events and incidents. Since the first criticality in 1995, it has been a long-cherished task to reach the designed power level of 30 MW from the temporarily approved 24 MW. By resolving the concern on the fuel integrity, the designed level could be licensed and, eventually, it was achieved last November. On the other hand, after its 9 years of operation, the mechanical integrity of the heavy water reflector tank was checked. The measurement of the vertical straightness of the tank inner shell indicated its integrity. Meanwhile, the HANARO fuel production facility was completed at the KAERI site, and it will begin to supply centrifugally atomized fuels, instead of conventional comminuted fuels, to HANARO shortly. There were several incidents in 2004, which have all been cleared, including a leak of heavy water, melting of a sample in an irradiation hole for the neutron activation analysis, and a condensation problem in a horizontal beam tube. The progress of and lessons from each incident are presented. The utilization of HANARO is expanding every year and the trend will also continue in 2005. The operation mode has been changed from an 18-day continuous operation and 10-day shutdown (18-10 mode) to the 23-12 mode since the end of 2004, and a further extension is planned to the 30-12 mode. Thanks to this extended operation term, an increased power level and, most importantly, a reliable operation, the HANARO is gaining more and more credit from the end users. (author)

  15. Operational experience of the ATLAS accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, P K; Bogaty, J M; Bollinger, L M; Clifft, B E; Craig, S L; Harden, R E; Markovich, P; Munson, F H; Nixon, J M; Pardo, R C; Phillips, D R; Shepard, K W; Tilbrook, I R; Zinkmann, G P [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Physics Div.

    1990-02-01

    The ATLAS accelerator consists of a HVEC model FN tandem accelerator injecting into a linac of independently-phased niobium superconducting resonators. The accelerator provides beams with masses 6 {le} A {le} 127 and with energies ranging up to 20 MeV/A for the lightest ions and 4 MeV/A for the heaviest ions. Portions of the linac have been in operation since 1978 and, over the last decade, more than 35000 h of operating experience have been accumulated. The long-term stability of niobium resonators, and their feasibility for use in heavy-ion accelerators is now well established. (orig.).

  16. Operational experience of extreme wind penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estanqueiro, Ana [INETI/LNEG - National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisbon (Portugal); Mateus, Carlos B. [Instituto de Meteorologia, Lisboa (Portugal); Pestana, Rui [Redes Energeticas Nacionais (REN), Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the operational experience from the Portuguese Power System during the 2009/2010 winter months when record wind penerations were observed: the instantaneous wind power penetration peaked at 70% of consumption during no-load periods and the wind energy accounted for more than 50% of the energy consumed for a large period. The regulation measures taken by the TSO are presented in the paper, together with the additional reserves operated for added system security. Information on the overall power system behavior under such extreme long-term wind power penetrations will also be addressed. (org.)

  17. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-03-20

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility.

  18. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility

  19. Preheat operating experiences at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    The rather extensive test program performed on the FFTF preheat control system resulted in successful sodium fill of one secondary heat transport loop on July 2, 1978. The data obtained during testing and the attendant operating experience gained resulted in some design changes and provided the information necessary to fully characterize system performance. Temperature excursions and deviations from preset limits of only a minor nature were encountered during preheat for sodium fill. The addition of the rate alarm feature was beneficial to operation of the preheat system and allowed early detection and correction of impending excursions

  20. Monitoring stress among internal medicine residents: an experience-driven, practical and short measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myszkowski, Nils; Villoing, Barbara; Zenasni, Franck; Jaury, Philippe; Boujut, Emilie

    2017-07-01

    Residents experience severely high levels of stress, depression and burnout, leading to perceived medical errors, as well as to symptoms of impairment, such as chronic anger, cognitive impairment, suicidal behavior and substance abuse. Because research has not yet provided a psychometrically robust population-specific tool to measure the level of stress of medicine residents, we aimed at building and validating such a measure. Using an inductive scale development approach, a short, pragmatic measure was built, based on the interviews of 17 medicine residents. The Internal Medicine Residency Stress Scale (IMRSS) was then administered in a sample of 259 internal medicine residents (199 females, 60 males, M Age  = 25.6) along with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Satisfaction With Life Scale and Ways of Coping Checklist. The IMRSS showed satisfactory internal reliability (Cronbach's α = .86), adequate structural validity - studied through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (χ 2 /df = 2.51, CFI = .94; SRMR = .037, RMSEA = .076) - and good criterion validity - the IMRSS was notably strongly correlated with emotional exhaustion (r = .64; p is recommended to quickly and frequently assess and monitor stress among internal medicine residents.

  1. Effect of the new standards for case logging on resident operative volume: doing better cases or better numbers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Raghav; Shepard, Alex; Swartz, Andrew; Woodward, Ann; Reickert, Craig; Horst, Mathilda; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) modified the designation of major (index) operative cases to include those previously considered "minor." This study assessed the potential effect of these changes on resident operative experience. With Institutional Review Board approval, we analyzed National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant use files for 2005-2008 for general and vascular surgery cases. Primary CPT case coding was mapped to the ACGME major case category using both the old and new classification schemes. The variables were analyzed using χ(2) analysis in SPSS IBM 19 (IBM, Armonk, New York). A total of 576,019 cases were reviewed. Major cases as defined by the new classification represented an increasing proportion of the cases each year, rising from 88.3% in 2005 to 95% by 2008 (p top procedures to include excision of breast lesion (22,175 [12.7%]), laparoscopic gastric bypass (18,825 [10.8%]), ventral hernia repair (14,732 [8.5%]), and appendectomy (10,190 [5.9%]). Of these newly designated major cases, the proportion not covered by residents increased from 22% in 2005 to 44% in 2007 and 2008 (p quality. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Operational and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.; Gow, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In the last 15 years the CEGB has experienced progressive plant development, integration and changes in operating regime through nine nuclear (gas-cooled reactor) power stations with corresponding instrumentation advances leading towards more refined centralized control. Operation and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation is reported in this paper with reference to the progressive changes related to the early magnox, late magnox and AGR periods. Data on instrumentation reliability in terms of reactor forced outages are presented and show that the instrumentation contributions to loss of generating plant availability are small. Reactor safety circuits, neutron flux and temperature measurements, gas analysis and vibration monitoring are discussed. In reviewing the reactor instrumentation the emphasis is on reporting recent experience, particularly on AGR equipment, but overall performance and changes to magnox equipment are included so that some appreciation can be obtained of instrumentation requirements with respect to plant lifetimes. (author)

  3. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC collider sets new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction because of its higher energy, pileup and luminosity. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector. Therefore, in view of Run 2, the ATLAS collaboration has constructed the first 4-layer pixel detector in Particle Physics by installing a new pixel layer, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Operational experience and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector during Run 2 are presented.

  4. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  5. Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average 'all modes' failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment

  6. Operating experience with the DRAGON High Temperature Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.A.; Capp, P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The Dragon Reactor Experiment in Winfrith/UK was a materials test facility for a number of HTR projects pursued in the sixties and seventies of the last century. It was built and managed as an OECD/NEA international joint undertaking. The reactor operated successfully between 1964 and 1975 to satisfy the growing demand for irradiation testing of fuels and fuel elements as well as for technological tests of components and materials. The paper describes the reactor's main experimental features and presents results of 11 years of reactor operation relevant for future HTRs. (author)

  7. 14 CFR 121.434 - Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating experience, operating cycles, and... Qualifications § 121.434 Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills. (a... position, the operating experience, operating cycles, and the line operating flight time for consolidation...

  8. Operational experience feedback with precursor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, M.; Ferjancic, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Vojnovic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experience of practical operation is a valuable source of information for improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Operational experience feedback (Olef) system manages this aspect of NPP operation. The traditional ways of investigating operational events, such as the root cause analysis (RCA), are predominantly qualitative. RCA as a part of the Olef system provides technical guidance and management expectations in the conduct of assessing the root cause to prevent recurrence, covering the following areas: conditions preceding the event, sequence of events, equipment performance and system response, human performance considerations, equipment failures, precursors to the event, plant response and follow-up, radiological considerations, regulatory process considerations and safety significance. The root cause of event is recognized when there is no known answer on question 'why has it happened?' regarding relevant condition that may have affected the event. At that point the Olef is proceeding by actions taken in response to events, utilization, dissemination and exchange of operating experience information and at the end reviewing the effectiveness of the Olef. Analysis of the event and the selection of recommended corrective/preventive actions for implementation and prioritization can be enhanced by taking into account the information and insights derived from Pasa-based analysis. A Pasa based method, called probabilistic precursor event analysis (PPE A) provides a complement to the RCA approach by focusing on how an event might have developed adversely, and implies the mapping of an operational event on a probabilistic risk model of the plant in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event PSA based event analysis provides, due to its quantitative nature, appropriate prioritization of corrective actions. PPEA defines requirements for PSA model and code, identifies input requirements and elaborates following

  9. Evaluation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents' Operative Skills: Feasibility and Engagement Study Using SIMPL Software for a Mobile Phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B; Cappetta, Alyssa; George, Brian C; Lahey, Edward T; Bohnen, Jordan D; Troulis, Maria J

    2017-10-01

    There are no universally accepted tools to evaluate operative skills of surgical residents in a timely fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a smartphone application, SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning), developed by a multi-institutional research collaborative, to achieve a high rate of timely operative evaluations and resident communication and to collect performance data. The authors hypothesized that these goals would be achieved because the process is convenient and efficient. This was a prospective feasibility and engagement study using SIMPL to evaluate residents' operative skills. SIMPL requires the attending surgeon to answer 3 multiple-choice questions: 1) What level of help (Zwisch Scale) was required by the trainee? 2) What was the level of performance? 3) How complex was the case? The evaluator also can dictate a narrative. The sample was composed of 3 faculty members and 3 volunteer senior residents. Predictor variables were the surgeons, trainees, and procedures performed. Outcome variables included number and percentage of procedures performed by faculty-and-resident pairs assessed, time required to complete assessments, time lapsed to submission, percentage of assessments with narratives, and residents' response rates. From March through June 2016, 151 procedures were performed in the operating room by the faculty-and-resident teams. There were 107 assessments submitted (71%). Resident response (self-assessment) to faculty evaluations was 81%. Recorded time to complete assessments (n = 75 of 107) was shorter than 2 minutes. The time lapsed to submission was shorter than 72 hours (100%). Dictations were submitted for 35 evaluations (33%). Data for the type of help, performance, and complexity of cases were collected for each resident. SIMPL facilitates timely intraoperative evaluations of surgical skills, engagement by faculty and residents, and collection of detailed procedural

  10. Resident training in a teaching hospital: How do attendings teach in the real operative environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glarner, Carly E; Law, Katherine E; Zelenski, Amy B; McDonald, Robert J; Greenberg, Jacob A; Foley, Eugene F; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2017-07-01

    The study aim was to explore the nature of intraoperative education and its interaction with the environment where surgical education occurs. Video and audio recording captured teaching interactions between colorectal surgeons and general surgery residents during laparoscopic segmental colectomies. Cases and collected data were analyzed for teaching behaviors and workflow disruptions. Flow disruptions (FDs) are considered deviations from natural case progression. Across 10 cases (20.4 operative hours), attendings spent 11.2 hours (54.7%) teaching, using directing (M = 250.1), and confirming (M = 236.1) most. FDs occurred 410 times, accounting for 4.4 hours of case time (21.57%). Teaching occurred with FD events for 2.4 hours (22.2%), whereas 77.8% of teaching happened outside FD occurrence. Teaching methods shifted from active to passive during FD events to compensate for patient safety. Understanding how FDs impact operative learning will inform faculty development in managing interruptions and improve its integration into resident education. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Coaching Non-technical Skills Improves Surgical Residents' Performance in a Simulated Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Wilkinson, Jill; McKinley, Aileen; MacDonald, Jamie; Neill, Adrian; McAdam, Tim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of coaching on non-technical skills and performance during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a simulated operating room (OR). Non-technical skills (situation awareness, decision making, teamwork, and leadership) underpin technical ability and are critical to the success of operations and the safety of patients in the OR. The rate of developing assessment tools in this area has outpaced development of workable interventions to improve non-technical skills in surgical training and beyond. A randomized trial was conducted with senior surgical residents (n = 16). Participants were randomized to receive either non-technical skills coaching (intervention) or to self-reflect (control) after each of 5 simulated operations. Coaching was based on the Non-Technical Skills For Surgeons (NOTSS) behavior observation system. Surgeon-coaches trained in this method coached participants in the intervention group for 10 minutes after each simulation. Primary outcome measure was non-technical skills, assessed from video by a surgeon using the NOTSS system. Secondary outcomes were time to call for help during bleeding, operative time, and path length of laparoscopic instruments. Non-technical skills improved in the intervention group from scenario 1 to scenario 5 compared with those in the control group (p = 0.04). The intervention group was faster to call for help when faced with unstoppable bleeding in the final scenario (no. 5; p = 0.03). Coaching improved residents' non-technical skills in the simulated OR compared with those in the control group. Important next steps are to implement non-technical skills coaching in the real OR and assess effect on clinically important process measures and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities.

  13. [Burn-out, commitment, personality and experiences during work and training; survey among psychiatry residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, R; Ewalds, A L; van der Heijden, P T; Penterman, E J M; Grootens, K P

    2017-01-01

    In the last few years international studies have reported on increase in burn-out and depressive symptoms among psychiatry residents. In the field of research, however, commitment and dedication are now being mentioned more frequently as positive factors that counterbalance burn-out. To find out how a group of Dutch psychiatry residents feel about their work, to discover their degree of burn-out and commitment and to clarify the various factors involved. 59 psychiatry residents from four teaching hospitals were asked to complete questionnaires concerning burn-out (U-BOS-C), commitment (UWES-15) and personality (BFI-NL). Respondents were also asked to describe how they felt about their experiences during their work and to give their views on the instruction and training they were receiving. In the U-BOS-C section only four trainees (almost 7%) met the criteria for burn-out. In the BFI-NL section the psychiatry residents obtained significantly lower scores on neuroticism and higher scores on empathy than did a comparable norm group of a similar age. The scores of the psychiatry residents indicated that the term 'being proud of your work' was significantly related to a feeling of commitment and particularly to all subscales that reflected commitment. In our study the percentage of psychiatry residents with burn-out is significantly lower than the percentage reported elsewhere in the literature. In fact, our results demonstrate that the psychiatry residents who were the subject of our study regarded themselves as being emotionally stable, friendly and committed to their work.

  14. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  15. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76 Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76 Ge was set (T- 0ν 1/2 > 2.1 · 10 25 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats. (paper)

  16. Experiences and Opinions Related to End-of-Life Discussion: From Oncologists' and Resident Physicians' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Kim, Shinmi; Kim, JinShil; Keam, Bhumsuk; Heo, Dae Seog; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Bong-Seog; Kim, Jee Hyun; Chang, Hye Jung; Baek, Sun Kyung

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to explore how oncologists and resident physicians practice end-of-life (EOL) discussions and to solicit their opinions on EOL discussions as a means to improve the quality of EOL care. A survey questionnaire was developed to explore the experiences and opinions about EOL discussions among oncologists and residents. Descriptive statistics, the t test, and the chisquare test were performed for the analyses. A total of 147 oncologists and 229 residents participated in this study. The study respondents reported diverse definitions of "terminal state," and mostrespondents tried to disclose the patient's condition to the patient and/or family members. Both groups were involved in EOL care discussions, with a rather low satisfaction level (57.82/100). The best timing to initiate discussionwas consideredwhen metastasis or disease recurrence occurred orwhen withdrawal of chemotherapy was anticipated. Furthermore, the study respondents suggested that patients and their family members should be included in the EOL discussion. Medical, legal, and ethical knowledge and communication difficulties along with practical issues were revealed as barriers and facilitators for EOL discussion. This study explored various perspectives of oncologists and resident physicians for EOL discussion. Since the Life-Sustaining-Treatment Decision-Making Act will be implemented shortly in Korea, now is the time for oncologists and residents to prepare themselves by acquiring legal knowledge and communication skills. To achieve this, education, training, and clinical tools for healthcare professionals are required.

  17. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  18. Operational experience of the ATLAS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, P.K.; Bogaty, J.M.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The ATLAS accelerator consists of a HVEC model FN tandem accelerator injecting into a linac of independently-phased niobium superconducting resonators. The accelerator provides beams with masses from 6≤A≤127 and with energies ranging up to 20 MeV/A for the lightest ions and 4 MeV/A for the heaviest ions. Portions of the linac have been in operation since 1978 and, over the last decade, more than 35,000 hours of operating experience have been accumulated. The long-term stability of niobium resonators, and their feasibility for use in heavy-ion accelerators is now well established. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Operating experiences with 1 MW steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, A; Kanamori, A; Tsuchiya, T

    1975-07-01

    1 MW steam generator, which was planned as the first stage of steam generator development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Corp. (PNC) in Japan, is a single-unit, once-through, integrated shell and tube type with multi-helical coil tubes. It was completed in Oarai Engineering Center of PNC in March of 1971, and the various performance tests were carried out up to April, 1972. After the dismantle of the steam generator for structural inspection and material test, it was restored with some improvements. In this second 1 MW steam generator, small leak occurred twice during normal operation. After repairing the failure, the same kind of performance tests as the first steam generator were conducted in order to verify the thermal insulation effect of argon gas in downcomer zone from March to June, 1974. In this paper the above operating experiences were presented including the outline of some performance test results. (author)

  20. Selection of operations staff, qualifications and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements and suggestions have been made by authorities and various organisations in a number of countries which define necessary experience and training for the various groups of nuclear power plant personnel. For two countries, the USA and the FRG, a comparison has been made which shows that there is only a slight deviation, taking into account the different education systems. With the example of the Biblis nuclear power plant the training on the job is described. Especially the production or operation department is looked at in more detail. The training is split up into several parts: a general part, such as nuclear physics, reactor physics and engineering, reactor safety, radiation protection and so on and a plant related part, such as arrangement and mode of operation of the plant under normal and accident conditions, license conditions and so on. (orig.) [de

  1. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost element of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  2. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  3. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marcisovsky, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  4. The LHC test string first operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Casas-Cubillos, J; Coull, L; Cruikshank, P; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Faugeras, Paul E; Flemsæter, B; Guinaudeau, H; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Hilbert, B; Krainz, G; Kos, N; Lavielle, D; Lebrun, P; Leo, G; Mathewson, A G; Missiaen, D; Momal, F; Parma, Vittorio; Quesnel, Jean Pierre; Richter, D; Riddone, G; Rijllart, A; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Rohmig, P; Saban, R I; Schmidt, R; Serio, L; Skiadelli, M; Suraci, A; Tavian, L; Walckiers, L; Wallén, E; Van Weelderen, R; Williams, L; McInturff, A

    1996-01-01

    CERN operates the first version of the LHC Test String which consists of one quadrupole and three 10-m twin aperture dipole magnets. An experimental programme aiming at the validation of the LHC systems started in February 1995. During this programme the string has been powered 100 times 35 of which at 12.4 kA or above. The experiments have yielded a number of results some of which, like quench recovery for cryogenics, have modified the design of subsystems of LHC. Others, like controlled helium leaks in the cold bore and quench propagation bewteen magnets, have given a better understanding on the evolution of the phenomena inside a string of superconducting magnets cooled at superfluid helium temperatures. Following the experimental programme, the string will be powered up and powered down in one hour cycles as a fatigue test of the structure thus simulating 20 years of operation of LHC.

  5. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGough, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    The United States Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program (LMFBR) includes an extensive program devoted to the development of small sodium valves. This program is now focused on the development and production of valves for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) now under construction near Richland, Washington. Other AEC support facilities, such as various test loops located at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC), Los Angeles, California, and at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), Richland, Washington, also have significant requirements for small sodium valves, and valves similar in design to the FFTF valves are being supplied to these AEC laboratories for use in their critical test installations. A principal motivation for these valve programs, beyond the immediate need to provide high-reliability valves for FFTF and the support facilities, is the necessity to develop small valve technology for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). FFTF small sodium valve design and development experience will be directly applied to the CRBRP program. Various test programs have been, and are being, conducted to verify the performance and integrity of the FFTF valves, and to uncover any potential problems so that they can be corrected before the valves are placed in service in FFTF. The principal small sodium valve designs being utilized in current U.S. programs, the test and operational experience obtained to date on them, problems uncovered, and future development and testing efforts being planned are reviewed. The standards and requirements to which the valves are being designed and fabricated, the valve designs in current use, valve operators, test and operating experience, and future valve development plans are summarized. (U.S.)

  6. Certified nursing assistants' perspectives of nursing home residents' pain experience: communication patterns, cultural context, and the role of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Debra; Baker, Tamara; Carrion, Iraida V; Vongxaiburana, Elizabeth; Hyer, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the following issues related to pain management among nursing home (NH) residents: 1) communication patterns between NH residents and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) about pain; 2) how race and ethnicity influence NH residents' pain experiences; and 3) CNAs' personal experiences with pain that may affect their empathy toward the resident's pain experience. The study consisted of a convenience sample of four focus groups (n = 28) from a NH in central Florida. A content analysis approach was used. Data were analyzed with the use of Atlas.ti version 6.2. The content analysis identified four main themes: 1) attitudes as barriers to communication about resident pain care; 2) cultural, religious, and gender influences of resident pain care by CNAs; 3) the role of empathy in CNAs care of residents with pain; and 4) worker strategies to detect pain. Attitudes among CNAs about resident cognitive status and perceived resident burden need to be recognized as barriers to the detection and reporting of pain by CNAs and should be addressed. In addition, NHs should consider a person-centered approach to pain that is culturally competent given the cultural influences of both residents and staff. Finally, educational programs for CNAs that include empathy-inducing scenarios could potentially improve the care provided by CNAs when dealing with residents' pain. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Operating experience with BWR nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonsdorf, Magnus von.

    1986-01-01

    The two-unit nuclear power station in Olkiluoto on the western coast of Finland produces about 20 per cent of the electricity consumption of the country. The first unit, TVO-I was first connected to the national grid in September 1978 and TVO-II in February 1980. The original rated power output of each unit was 660 MWe, corresponding to the thermal power of 2000 MW from the reactor. Technical modifications allowed the power to be uprated by 8%. The operating statistics (load factors etc.) are given and the outage experience discussed. The radiological history shows very low radioactivity and dose levels have been maintained at the plant. (UK)

  8. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  9. Operating experience with gamma ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.; Ouwerkerk, T.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) with radioisotopes dates back to the mid-1940s when radium was marketed for medical purposes. Cobalt-60 came on the scene in 1949 and within a few years a thriving business in cancer teletherapy machines and research irradiators was developed. AECL's first full-scale cobalt-60 gamma ray sterilizer for medical products was installed in 1964. AECL now has over 50 plants and 30 million curies in service around the world. Sixteen years of design experience in cobalt-60 sources, radiation shielding, safety interlock systems, and source pass mechanisms have made gamma irradiators safe, reliable, and easy to operate. This proven technology is being applied in promising new fields such as sludge treatment and food preservation. Cesium-137 is expected to be extensively utilized as the gamma radiation source for these applications

  10. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector, therefore, in view of Run-2 of LHC, the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and an additional optical link per module was added to overcome in some layers the readout bandwidth limitation when LHC will exceed the nominal peak luminosity by almost a factor of 3. The key features and challenges met during the IBL project will be presented, as well as its operational experience and Pixel Detector performance in LHC.

  11. The National Flood Interoperability Experiment: Bridging Resesarch and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service's new National Water Center, located on the University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa, will become the nation's hub for comprehensive water resources forecasting. In conjunction with its federal partners the US Geological Survey, Army Corps of Engineers and Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Weather Service will operationally support both short term flood prediction and long term seasonal forecasting of water resource conditions. By summer 2016, the National Water Center will begin evaluating four streamflow data products at the scale of the NHDPlus river reaches (approximately 2.67 million). In preparation for the release of these products, from September 2014 to August 2015, the National Weather Service partnered with the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. to support the National Flood Interoperability Experiment which included a seven week in-residence Summer Institute in Tuscaloosa for university students interested in learning about operational hydrology and flood forecasting. As part of the experiment, 15 hour forecasts from the operational High Resolution Rapid Refresh atmospheric model were used to drive a three kilometer Noah-MP land surface model loosely coupled to a RAPID river routing model operating on the NHDPlus dataset. This workflow was run every three hours during the Summer Institute and the results were made available to those engaged to pursue a range of research topics focused on flood forecasting (e.g. reservoir operations, ensemble forecasting, probabilistic flood inundation mapping, rainfall product evaluation etc.) Although the National Flood Interoperability Experiment was finite in length, it provided a platform through which the academic community could engage federal agencies and vice versa to narrow the gap between research and operations and demonstrate how state of the art research infrastructure, models, services, datasets etc. could be utilized

  12. Operating experience of steam generator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureshkumar, V.A.; Madhusoodhanan, G.; Noushad, I.B.; Ellappan, T.R.; Nashine, B.K.; Sylvia, J.I.; Rajan, K.K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2006-01-01

    Steam Generator (SG) is the vital component of a Fast Reactor. It houses both water at high pressure and sodium at low pressure separated by a tube wall. Any damage to this barrier initiates sodium water reaction that could badly affect the plant availability. Steam Generator Test Facility (SGTF) has been set up in Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) to test sodium heated once through steam generator of 19 tubes similar to the PFBR SG dimension and operating conditions. The facility is also planned as a test bed to assess improved designs of the auxiliary equipments used in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR). The maximum power of the facility is 5.7 MWt. This rating is arrived at based on techno economic consideration. This paper covers the performance of various equipments in the system such as Electro magnetic pumps, Centrifugal sodium pump, in-sodium hydrogen meters, immersion heaters, and instrumentation and control systems. Experience in the system operation, minor modifications, overall safety performance, and highlights of the experiments carried out etc. are also brought out. (author)

  13. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  14. More Learning in Less Time: Optimizing the Resident Educational Experience with Limited Clinical and Educational Work Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedney, Cara L; Spirou, Eleni; Voelker, Joseph L; Rosen, Charles L

    2017-11-01

    Resident education in the United States and elsewhere has undergone significant changes in recent years owing to work hour restrictions, requiring didactics to fit within a limited schedule, while being increasingly effective at accomplishing educational goals. A single small program experience in improving the didactic experience of residents is described. Focused mentorship, curricula for intangibles, asynchronous education, and independent curricula all are useful tools in resident education. Residents can be exposed to both clinical material and specialty-specific mores using focused and intentional educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vital correspondence: Exploring tactile experience with resident-focused mandalas in long-term care (Innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Megan E; Fabricius, Andréa

    2018-01-01

    The materiality of long-term care and its relationship to a resident's identity is often overlooked. In response to the call for more attention to the meaningful aspects of doing art, the tactile experience of residents with dementia is considered in the context of a mandala project at a Canadian seniors' long-term care facility. The significance of making mandalas for residents is explored through three key themes: identity integration through gesture, the importance of artistic discernment and decision-making, and the value of corresponding with recalcitrant materials. Residents' experiences are analysed through a phenomenological lens.

  16. Attitudes and experiences with secondhand smoke and smoke-free policies among subsidised and market-rate multiunit housing residents living in six diverse communities in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzke, Andrea S; Hyland, Andrew; Kiviniemi, Marc; Travers, Mark J

    2018-03-01

    Given that higher smoking rates persist among lower socioeconomic populations, multiunit housing (MUH) environments may result in higher secondhand smoke (SHS) exposures among subsidised MUH residents. This cross-sectional assessment compares experiences with SHS and smoke-free policies among subsidised and market-rate MUH residents living in six US communities. MUH residents (n=1565) were surveyed regarding their smoke-free rules (home and building), SHS exposures and preferences towards smoke-free policies. Binary logistic regression identified predictors of each outcome, focusing on differences by subsidised housing status (subsidised vs market rate). Among residents enforcing smoke-free home rules (76%, overall), 50% reported SHS incursions into their unit. Only 23% reported living in a smoke-free building; 56% of those living in smoking-allowable buildings reported preferences towards smoke-free building policies. Among market-rate housing residents, smoke-free home (OR=4.18) and building (OR=2.26) rules were significantly higher when children were present. Smoke-free building rules reduced the odds of SHS incursions among market-rate housing residents (OR=0.50), but no association was observed among subsidised housing residents. Non-smoking subsidised housing residents exhibited stronger preferences for smoke-free policies compared with those in market-rate housing. Smoke-free home rules may not protect MUH residents from SHS exposures, particularly in subsidised MUH. Although strong preferences towards smoke-free policies were present overall, subsidised MUH residents may have fewer alternative smoke-free housing options available. Therefore, all publicly funded housing should be smoke free to protect these vulnerable populations. However, continued efforts to encourage privately owned MUH operators to adopt smoke-free policies are also necessary. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights

  17. Anesthesia preparation time is not affected by the experience level of the resident involved during his/her first month of adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, David M; Couch, Michael C

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to answer the question of whether the experience level of the resident on his/her first month of adult cardiothoracic anesthesiology has an impact on operating room efficiency in a large academic medical center. Traditionally, the resident's 1st month of cardiac anesthesia had been reserved for the clinical anesthesia (CA)-2 year of training. This study analyzed the impact on operating room efficiency of moving the 1st month of cardiac anesthesia into the CA-1 year. The authors hypothesized that there would be no difference in anesthesia preparation times (defined as the interval between "in-room" and "anesthesia-ready" times) between CA-1 and CA-2 residents on their 1st month of cardiac anesthesia. This study was retrospective and used an electronic anesthesia information management system database. This study was conducted on care provided at a single 450-bed academic medical center. This study included 12 residents in their 1st month of cardiac anesthesia. The anesthesia preparation time (defined as the interval between "in-room" and "anesthesia-ready" times) was measured for cases involving residents on their first month of cardiac anesthesia. Anesthesia preparation times for 6 CA-1 resident months and 6 CA-2 resident months (100 adult cardiac procedures in total) were analyzed (49 for the CA-1 residents and 51 for the CA-2s). There were no differences in preparation time between CA-1 and CA-2 residents as a group (p = 0.8169). The CA-1 residents had an unadjusted mean (±standard error) of 51.1 ± 3.18 minutes, whereas the CA-2 residents' unadjusted mean was 50.2 ± 2.41 minutes. Adjusting for case mix (valves v coronary artery bypass graft surgery), the CA-1 mean was 49.1 ± 5.22 minutes, whereas the CA-2 mean was 49.1 ± 4.54 minutes. These findings suggest that operating room efficiency as measured by the anesthesia preparation time may not be affected by the level of the resident on his/her 1st month of adult cardiac anesthesia

  18. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, R.; Elie, X.; Vercasson, M.; Nedelec, J.

    1974-01-01

    Conventionally, valves for sodium pipes smaller than 125 mm in diameter are called ''small sodium valves''. However, this limit should rather be considered as the lower limit o ''large sodium valves''. In fact, both the largest sizes of small valves and the smallest of large valves can be found in the range of 125-300 mm in diameter. Thus what is said about small valves also applies, for a few valve types, above the 125 mm limit. Sodium valves are described here in a general manner, with no manufacturing details except when necessary for understanding valve behavior. Operating experience is pointed out wherever possible. Finally, some information is given about ongoing or proposed development plans. (U.S.)

  19. Decision support using anesthesia information management system records and accreditation council for graduate medical education case logs for resident operating room assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Charnin, Jonathan; Driscoll, William D; Bailin, Michael T; Baker, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop decision support systems for resident operating room (OR) assignments using anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs and evaluate the implementations. We developed 2 Web-based systems: an ACGME case-log visualization tool, and Residents Helping in Navigating OR Scheduling (Rhinos), an interactive system that solicits OR assignment requests from residents and creates resident profiles. Resident profiles are snapshots of the cases and procedures each resident has done and were derived from AIMS records and ACGME case logs. A Rhinos pilot was performed for 6 weeks on 2 clinical services. One hundred sixty-five requests were entered and used in OR assignment decisions by a single attending anesthesiologist. Each request consisted of a rank ordered list of up to 3 ORs. Residents had access to detailed information about these cases including surgeon and patient name, age, procedure type, and admission status. Success rates at matching resident requests were determined by comparing requests with AIMS records. Of the 165 requests, 87 first-choice matches (52.7%), 27 second-choice matches (16.4%), and 8 third-choice matches (4.8%) were made. Forty-three requests were unmatched (26.1%). Thirty-nine first-choice requests overlapped (23.6%). Full implementation followed on 8 clinical services for 8 weeks. Seven hundred fifty-four requests were reviewed by 15 attending anesthesiologists, with 339 first-choice matches (45.0%), 122 second-choice matches (16.2%), 55 third-choice matches (7.3%), and 238 unmatched (31.5%). There were 279 overlapping first-choice requests (37.0%). The overall combined match success rate was 69.4%. Separately, we developed an ACGME case-log visualization tool that allows individual resident experiences to be compared against case minimums as well as resident peer groups. We conclude that it is feasible to use ACGME case

  20. Effect of Experience of Internal Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future Infectious Disease Fellowship Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Experience of !ntcrnal Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future lntCctious Di~casc Fcllo\\vship Application Sb. GRANT N_UMBER...undefined. Since 2008 at our institution. internal medicine (!!vi) residents have been required to do a four-\\\\’eek inpatient !D rotation as an intern... Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Fut ure Infectious Disease Fellowship Application ~ Poeter# 1440 .,...._,: OVfil"S~ ti

  1. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations.

  2. Operating experience feedback report - Solenoid-operated valve problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1991-02-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential common-mode failures of solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) in US plants. These events resulted in degradation or malfunction of multiple trains of safety systems as well as of multiple safety systems. On the basis of the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concludes that the problems with solenoid-operated valves are an important issue that needs additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for actions to reduce the occurrence of SOV common-mode failures. 115 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Work-related subjective experiences among community residents with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Geoff; Chant, David; King, Robert

    2005-04-01

    To develop a self-report scale of subjective experiences of illness perceived to impact on employment functioning, as an alternative to a diagnostic perspective, for anticipating the vocational assistance needs of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders. A repeated measures pilot study (n(1) = 26, n(2) = 21) of community residents with schizophrenia identified a set of work-related subjective experiences perceived to impact on employment functioning. Items with the best psychometric properties were applied in a 12 month longitudinal survey of urban residents with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n(1) = 104; n(2) = 94; n(3) = 94). Construct validity, factor structure, responsiveness, internal consistency, stability, and criterion validity investigations produced favourable results. Work-related subjective experiences provide information about the intersection of the person, the disorder, and expectations of employment functioning, which suggest new opportunities for vocational professionals to explore and discuss individual assistance needs. Further psychometric investigations of test-retest reliability, discriminant and predictive validity, and research applications in supported employment and vocational rehabilitation, are recommended. Subject to adequate psychometric properties, the new measure promises to facilitate exploring: individuals' specific subjective experiences; how each is perceived to contribute to employment restrictions; and the corresponding implications for specialized treatment, vocational interventions and workplace accommodations.

  4. Synthetic vision systems: operational considerations simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-04-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents / accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  5. Synthetic Vision Systems - Operational Considerations Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents/accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  6. Correlation of Objective Assessment Data With General Surgery Resident In-Training Evaluation Reports and Operative Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsattar, Jad M; AlJamal, Yazan N; Ruparel, Raaj K; Rowse, Phillip G; Heller, Stephanie F; Farley, David R

    2018-05-14

    Faculty evaluations, ABSITE scores, and operative case volumes often tell little about true resident performance. We developed an objective structured clinical examination called the Surgical X-Games (5 rooms, 15 minutes each, 12-15 tests total, different for each postgraduate [PGY] level). We hypothesized that performance in X-Games will prove more useful in identifying areas of strength or weakness among general surgery (GS) residents than faculty evaluations, ABSITE scores, or operative cases volumes. PGY 2 to 5 GS residents (n = 35) were tested in a semiannual X-Games assessment using multiple simulation tasks: laparoscopic skills, bowel anastomosis, CT/CXR analysis, chest tube placement, etc. over 1 academic year. Resident scores were compared to their ABSITE, in-training evaluation reports, and operating room case numbers. Academic medical center. PGY-2, 3, 4, and 5 GS residents at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Results varied greatly within each class except for staff evaluations: in-training evaluation reports medians for PGY-2s were 5.3 (range: 5.0-6.0), PGY-3s 5.9 (5.5-6.3), PGY-4s 5.6 (5.0-6.0), and PGY-5s were 6.1 (5.6-6.9). Although ABSITE and operating room case volumes fluctated greatly with each PGY class, only X-Games scores (median: PGY-2 = 82, PGY-3 = 61, PGY-4 = 76, and PGY-5 = 60) correlated positively (p < 0.05) with operative case volume and negatively (p < 0.05) with staff evaluations. X-Games assessment generated wide differentiation of resident performance quickly, inexpensively, and objectively. Although "Minnesota-nice" surgical staff may feel all GS trainees are "above average," objective assessment tells us otherwise. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. USA/FBR program status FFTF operations startup experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, W.C.; Izatt, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    This paper gives highlights of the major Operations evaluations and operational results of the startup acceptance testing program and initiation of normal operating cycles for experiment irradiation in the FFTF. 33 figures

  8. Evaluation of German and international operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueck, Reinhard; Verstegen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The systematic analysis of safety-relevant events in nuclear power plants and their causes is a key driver for the further development of nuclear safety. The findings obtained from the evaluation of operating experience in this respect form the basis for both technical and organisational improvements in the plants as well as for adaptations of technical rules and standards. In its role as Technical Safety Organisation advising the German federal government, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) has been concerned with the detection and analysis of failure mechanisms that underlie events in nuclear power plants at home and abroad since its foundation in 1977. This article provides an overview of the different objectives which are pursued in this context by order of or funded by the Federal Environment Ministry. Here, the focus is on the evaluation of reportable events for the preparation of so-called Information Notices and generic reports as well as for the acquisition of data that can be used for in-depth probabilistic analyses.

  9. Proposed Reactor Operating Experience Feedback System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Lee, Durk Hun; Bae, Koo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Most events occurring in nuclear power plants are not individually significant, and prevented from progressing to accident conditions by a series of barriers against core damage and radioactive releases. Significant events, if occur, are almost always a breach of these multiple barriers. As illustrated in the 'Swiss cheese' model, the individual layers of defense or 'cheese slices' have weakness or 'holes.' These weaknesses are inconstant, i.e., the holes are open or close at random. When by chance all the holes are aligned, a hazard causes the significant event of concern. Elements of low significant events, inattention to detail, time or economic pressure, uncorrected poor practices/habits, marginal maintenance and equipment care, etc., make holes in the layers of defense; some elements may make more holes in different layers, incurring more chances to be aligned. An effective reduction of the holes, therefore, is gained through better knowledge or awareness of increasing trends of the event elements, followed by appropriate actions. According to the Swiss cheese metaphor, attention to the Operating Experience (OE) feedback system, as opposed to the individual and to randomness, is drawn from a viewpoint of reactor safety

  10. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  11. Correlates of domestic violence experience among recently-married women residing in slums in Pune, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Iyer, Sandhya R; Kolhe, Ambika R; Dhayarkar, Sampada; Paranjape, Anuradha; Del Rio, Carlos; Stephenson, Rob; Sahay, Seema

    2018-01-01

    The high risk of experiencing domestic violence (DV) among married women in India who reside in slum communities underscores the need for effective, evidence-based, and culturally-tailored primary prevention. To inform such DV primary prevention strategies for this population, we herein aimed to identify correlates of DV experience in early marriage. Utilizing a cross-sectional design, potential correlates of DV experience were explored among a geographically-clustered random sample of 100 recently-married women residing in slums in Pune, India. In multivariable regression, DV experience was associated with less educational attainment by the participant's spouse (standardized β = -0.281, p = 0.004), less satisfaction of the spouse's family with the maanpaan (wedding-related gifts provided by the bride's family) they received at the time of marriage (standardized β = -0.298, p<0.001), poorer conflict negotiation skills (standardized β = -0.308, p<0.001), and greater acknowledgement of DV occurrence in family and friends (standardized β = 0.436, p<0.001). These correlates suggest strategies that could be incorporated into future DV primary prevention interventions for this vulnerable population (i.e. promoting completion of formal education of boys alongside girls, mitigating causes of familial dowry harassment, improving conflict negotiation skills, and challenging norms surrounding DV).

  12. The multiple mini-interview for selecting medical residents: first experience in the Middle East region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf; Qayed, Khalil Ibrahim; Abdulrahman, Mahera; Tavares, Walter; Rosenfeld, Jack

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that multiple mini-interviews (MMI) provides a standard, fair, and more reliable method for assessing applicants. This article presents the first MMI experience for selection of medical residents in the Middle East culture and an Arab country. In 2012, we started using the MMI in interviewing applicants to the residency program of Dubai Health Authority. This interview process consisted of eight, eight-minute structured interview scenarios. Applicants rotated through the stations, each with its own interviewer and scenario. They read the scenario and were requested to discuss the issues with the interviewers. Sociodemographic and station assessment data provided for each applicant were analyzed to determine whether the MMI was a reliable assessment of the non-clinical attributes in the present setting of an Arab country. One hundred and eighty-seven candidates from 27 different countries were interviewed for Dubai Residency Training Program using MMI. They were graduates of 5 medical universities within United Arab Emirates (UAE) and 60 different universities outside UAE. With this applicant's pool, a MMI with eight stations, produced absolute and relative reliability of 0.8 and 0.81, respectively. The person × station interaction contributed 63% of the variance components, the person contributed 34% of the variance components, and the station contributed 2% of the variance components. The MMI has been used in numerous universities in English speaking countries. The MMI evaluates non-clinical attributes and this study provides further evidence for its reliability but in a different country and culture. The MMI offers a fair and more reliable assessment of applicants to medical residency programs. The present data show that this assessment technique applied in a non-western country and Arab culture still produced reliable results.

  13. Intern as Patient: A Patient Experience Simulation to Cultivate Empathy in Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara W. Nelson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Prior work links empathy and positive physician-patient relationships to improved healthcare outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze a patient experience simulation for emergency medicine (EM interns as a way to teach empathy and conscientious patient care. Methods We conducted a qualitative descriptive study on an in situ, patient experience simulation held during EM residency orientation. Half the interns were patients brought into the emergency department (ED by ambulance and half were family members. Interns then took part in focus groups that discussed the experience. Data collected during these focus groups were coded by two investigators using a grounded theory approach and constant comparative methodology. Results We identified 10 major themes and 28 subthemes in the resulting qualitative data. Themes were in three broad categories: the experience as a patient or family member in the ED; application to current clinical practice; and evaluation of the exercise itself. Interns experienced firsthand the physical discomfort, emotional stress and confusion patients and families endure during the ED care process. They reflected on lessons learned, including the importance of good communication skills, frequent updates on care and timing, and being responsive to the needs and concerns of patients and families. All interns felt this was a valuable orientation experience. Conclusion Conducting a patient experience simulation may be a practical and effective way to develop empathy in EM resident physicians. Additional research evaluating the effect of participation in the simulation over a longer time period and assessing the effects on residents’ actual clinical care is warranted.

  14. Effect of a Community-Based Service Learning Experience in Geriatrics on Internal Medicine Residents and Community Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel K; Michener, Jennifer; Yang, Phyllis; Goldstein, Karen; Groce-Martin, Jennine; True, Gala; Johnson, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Community-based service learning (CBSL) provides an opportunity to teach internal medicine residents the social context of aging and clinical concepts. The objectives of the current study were to demonstrate the feasibility of a CBSL program targeting internal medicine residents and to assess its effect on medical residents and community participants. internal medicine residents participated in a CBSL experience for half a day during ambulatory blocks from 2011 to 2014. Residents attended a senior housing unit or center, delivered a presentation about a geriatric health topic, toured the facility, and received information about local older adult resources. Residents evaluated the experience. Postgraduate Year 3 internal medicine residents (n = 71) delivered 64 sessions. Residents felt that the experience increased their ability to communicate effectively with older adults (mean 3.91 ± 0.73 on a Likert scale with 5 = strongly agree), increased their knowledge of resources (4.09 ± 1.01), expanded their knowledge of a health topic pertinent to aging (3.48 ± 1.09), and contributed to their capacity to evaluate and care for older adults (3.84 ± 0.67). Free-text responses demonstrated that residents thought that this program would change their practice. Of 815 older adults surveyed from 36 discrete teaching sessions, 461 (56%) thought that the medical residents delivered health information clearly (4.55 ± 0.88) and that the health topics were relevant (4.26 ± 0.92). Free-text responses showed that the program helped them understand their health concerns. This CBSL program is a feasible and effective tool for teaching internal medicine residents and older adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Operating experience with existing light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1985-01-01

    It is instructive to consider what an explosive growth there has been in the development of light sources using synchrotron radiation. This is well illustrated by the list of facilities given in Table I. In many cases, synchrotron light facilities have been obtained by tacking on parasitic beam lines to rings that were built for high energy physics. Of the twenty-three facilities in this table, however, eleven were built explicitely for this synchrotron radiation. Another seven have by now been converted for use as dedicated facilities leaving only five that share time with high energy physics. These five parasitically operated facilities are still among our best sources of hard x-rays, however, and their importance to the fields of science where these x-rays are needed must be emphasized. While the number of facilities in this table is impressive, it is even more impressive to add up the total number of user beam lines. Most of these rings are absolutely surrounded by beam lines and finding real estate on the experimental floor of one of these facilities for adding a new experiment looks about as practical as adding a farm in the middle of Manhattan. Nonetheless, the managers of these rings seem to have an attitude of ''always room for one more'' and new experimental beam lines do appear. This situation is necessary because the demand for beam time has exploded at an even faster rate than the development of the facilities. The field is not only growing, it can be expected to continue to grow for some time. Some of the explicit plans for future development will be discussed in the companion paper by Lee Teng

  16. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and the world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge trademark level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs

  17. Operating experience review for the AP1000 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, T. E.; Lipner, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    Westinghouse is performing an update to the Operating Experience Review (OER) Report for the AP1000 project to account for operating experience since December 1996. Significant Operating Experience Reports, Significant Event Reports, Significant Event Notifications, Operations and Maintenance Reminders, Topical Reports, Event Analysis Reports and Licensee Event Reports were researched for pertinent input to the update. As a part of the OER, Westinghouse has also conducted operator interviews and observations during simulated plant operations and after operating events. The main purpose of the OER is to identify Human Factors Engineering (HFE) related safety issues from existing operating plant experience and to ensure that these issues are addressed in the new design. The issues and lessons learned regarding operating experience provide a basis for improving the plant design. (authors)

  18. Perception, experience and the use of public urban spaces by residents of urban neighbourhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bratina Jurkovič

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In cities, public green open spaces offer residents a potentially better quality of life. The behavioural patterns by which people experience and use these spaces is therefore a valuable source of information for spatial planning. Indeed, studying how these spaces are used has also shown a significant difference between the intentions of planners and users. Only the frequency of visits to these public green spaces ultimately testifies to their appropriate and successful planning. Based on empirical research conducted in a residential area of Ljubljana, this article addresses the significance and methods of obtaining information on the experience and use of urban open spaces by residents of that neighbourhood. The article identifies factors (that could also be used by planners that significantly impact satisfaction levels among the intended users of the neighbourhood. The focus group method and socio spatial schema method were used, based on the assumption that a multi method approach provides more accurate and reliable information that is verifiable, and therefore more useful in developing planning policies. According to the research findings, residents perceive their “neighbourhood” to be the area around their home in which they know each other and socialise with neighbours. The factors that trigger a sense of satisfaction with their neighbourhood are well maintained green areas in the vicinity of their home, parks with trees that provide spaces for a variety of activities, tree lined streets, green areas connected into a system, the opportunity to use these areas for recreation and sports, and street furniture for rest or play. The spatial elements that hinder the use of such open spaces are, in particular, busy streets, unprotected pedestrian crossings, large garage areas and car parking.

  19. Treatment of operational experience of nuclear power plants in WANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, M.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the activities associated to the Operating Experience Programme of the World Association of Nuclear Operators. The programme manages the event reports submitted by the nuclear power plants to the WANO database for the preparation by the Operating Experience Central Team of some documents like the significant Operating Experience Reports and Significant Event Reports that help the stations to avoid similar events. (Author)

  20. Operational Art and the ADF Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Joint operations; 9. Distributed free maneuver; 10. The continuous front; 11. The empty battlefield; and 12. Commanders exercising operational vision...and purpose. The value of this analogy is that it demonstrates that operational art involves both sides of the issue, strategy and tactics...Objectives.” Speech , The International Conference on the Afghanistan Conflict and Australia’s Role, October 22-23, 2009, accessed December 06, 2016, http

  1. Web-based objective structured clinical examination with remote standardized patients and Skype: resident experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik; Kachur, Elizabeth; Horber, Dot

    2014-07-01

    Using Skype and remote standardized patients (RSPs), investigators sought to evaluate user acceptance of a web-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) among resident physicians. After participating in four web-based clinical encounters addressing pain with RSPs, 59 residents from different training programs, disciplines and geographic locations completed a 52-item questionnaire regarding their experience with Skype and RSPs. Open-ended responses were solicited as well. The majority of participants (97%) agreed or strongly agreed the web-based format was convenient and a practical learning exercise, and 90% agreed or strongly agreed the format was effective in teaching communication skills. Although 93% agreed or strongly agreed they could communicate easily with RSPs using Skype, 80% preferred traditional face-to-face clinical encounters, and 58% reported technical difficulties during the encounters. Open-ended written responses supported survey results. Findings from this study expose challenges with technology and human factors, but positive experiences support the continued investigation of web-based OSCEs as a synchronous e-learning initiative for teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication. Such educational programs are valuable but unlikely to replace face-to-face encounters with patients. This web-based OSCE program provides physician learners with additional opportunity to improve doctor-patient communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experience in operation and maintenance of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broecker, H.; Schomer, E.

    1987-01-01

    At present there are 10 PWRs in operation, most of them built on turnkey basis by KWU. The availability of West German PWRs amounted to 84.7% on average for the period from 1982-86. The good operating results are attributable to the following: 1. Sophiticated design and layout of the plant with good accessibility to the primary system even during operation. 2. Reliable performance of plant and components as result of extensive quality assurance. 3. Well-organized and highly qualified operating personnel. 4. Inservice inspection and preventive maintenance. 5. Good information feedback system. (Liu)

  3. The tritium operations experience on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halle, A. von; Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.; Grisham, L.; Hosea, J.; Kamperschroer, J.; LaMarche, P.; Oldaker, M.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Stevenson, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium gas system is administratively limited to 5 grams of tritium and provides the feedstock gas for the neutral beam and torus injection systems. Tritium operations on TFTR began with leak checking of gas handling systems, qualification of the gas injection systems, and high power plasma operations using trace amounts of tritium in deuterium feedstock gas. Full tritium operation commenced with four highly diagnosed neutral beam pulses into a beamline calorimeter to verify planned tritium beam operating routines and to demonstrate the deuterium to tritium beam isotope exchange. Since that time, TFTR has successfully operated each of the twelve neutral beam ion sources in tritium during hundreds of tritium beam pulses and torus gas injections. This paper describes the TFTR tritium gas handling systems and TFTR tritium operations of the gas injection systems and the neutral beam ion sources. Tritium accounting and accountability is discussed, including tritium retention issues of the torus limiters and beam impinged surfaces of the beamline components. Also included is tritium beam velocity analysis that compares the neutral beam extracted ion species composition for deuterium and tritium and that determines the extent of beam isotope exchange on subsequent deuterium and tritium beam pulses. The required modifications to TFTR operating routines to meet the U.S. Department of Energy regulations for a low hazard nuclear facility and the problems encountered during initial tritium operations are described. (orig.)

  4. The tritium operations experience on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Halle, A.; Gentile, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium gas system is administratively limited to 5 grains of tritium and provides the feedstock gas for the neutral beam and torus injection systems. Tritium operations on TFTR began with leak checking of gas handling systems, qualification of the gas injection systems, and high power plasma operations using using trace amounts of tritium in deuterium feedstock gas. Full tritium operation commenced with four highly diagnosed neutral beam pulses into a beamline calorimeter to verify planned tritium beam operating routines and to demonstrate the deuterium to tritium beam isotope exchange. Since that time, TFTR has successfully operated each of the twelve neutral beam ion sources in tritium during hundreds of tritium beam pulses and torus gas injections. This paper describes- the TFTR tritium gas handling systems and TFTR tritium operations of the gas injection systems and the neutral beam ion sources. Tritium accounting and accountability is discussed, including tritium retention issues of the torus limiters and beam impinged surfaces of the beamline components. Also included is tritium beam velocity analysis that compares the neutral beam extracted ion species composition for deuterium and tritium and that determines the extent of beam isotope exchange on subsequent deuterium and tritium beam pulses. The required modifications to TFTR operating routines to meet the US Department of Energy regulations for a low hazard nuclear facility and the problems encountered during initial tritium operations are described

  5. Recent operational experiments at the LANSCE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) consists of a pulsed 800-MeV room-temperature linear accelerator and an 800-MeV accumulator ring. It simultaneously provides H{sup +} and H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have their own distinctive requirements, e.g. intensity, chopping pattern, duty factor, etc.. This multibeam operation presents challenges both from the standpoint of meeting the individual requirements but also achieving good overall performance for the integrated operation. Various aspects of more recent operations including the some of these challenges will be discussed.

  6. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remoundou, K.; Brennan, M. [Food and Society Group, Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE19 1AA (United Kingdom); Sacchettini, G. [Opera Research Centre, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Panzone, L. [Food and Society Group, Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE19 1AA (United Kingdom); Butler-Ellis, M.C. [Silsoe Spray Applications Unit, NIAB, Building 42, Wrest Park, Silsoe, Bedford MK45 4HP (United Kingdom); Capri, E. [Opera Research Centre, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Charistou, A.; Chaideftou, E. [Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 8 Stefanou Delta Street, Kifissia, Athens 14561 (Greece); Gerritsen-Ebben, M.G. [TNO Innovation for Life, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands); Machera, K. [Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 8 Stefanou Delta Street, Kifissia, Athens 14561 (Greece); Spanoghe, P. [Department of Crop Protection, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Glass, R. [Food and Environmental Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York Y0411LZ (United Kingdom); Marchis, A. [Opera Research Centre, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Doanngoc, K. [Department of Crop Protection, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Hart, A. [Food and Environmental Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York Y0411LZ (United Kingdom); Frewer, L.J., E-mail: Lynn.Frewer@newcastle.ac.uk [Food and Society Group, Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE19 1AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with passive and occupational exposure to pesticide potentially influence the extent to which different stakeholders adopt self-protective behaviour. A methodology for assessing the link between attitudes, adoption of self-protective behaviours and exposure was developed and tested. A survey was implemented in the Greece, Italy and the UK, and targeted stakeholders associated with pesticide exposure linked to orchards, greenhouse crops and arable crops respectively. The results indicated that the adoption of protective measures is low for residents and bystanders, with the exception of residents in Greece, when compared to operators and workers, who tend to follow recommended safety practices. A regression analysis was used to examine the factors affecting the probability of adopting protective measures as well the as the level of exposure in the case of operators and workers where data are available. The results indicate that the likelihood of engaging in self-protective behaviour is not significantly affected by perceptions of own health being affected by pesticides for residents and bystanders. However, operators who perceive that their heath has been negatively affected by the use of pesticides are found to be more likely to adopt self-protective behaviours. Gender and country differences, in perceptions, attitudes and self-protection are also observed. Recommendations for improved communication, in particular for vulnerable groups, are provided. - Highlights: • Perceptions of risks associated with pesticide exposure were assessed • Surveys were conducted in Greece, Italy and the UK targeting vulnerable stakeholders • Perceptions of risk were associated with

  7. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remoundou, K.; Brennan, M.; Sacchettini, G.; Panzone, L.; Butler-Ellis, M.C.; Capri, E.; Charistou, A.; Chaideftou, E.; Gerritsen-Ebben, M.G.; Machera, K.; Spanoghe, P.; Glass, R.; Marchis, A.; Doanngoc, K.; Hart, A.; Frewer, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with passive and occupational exposure to pesticide potentially influence the extent to which different stakeholders adopt self-protective behaviour. A methodology for assessing the link between attitudes, adoption of self-protective behaviours and exposure was developed and tested. A survey was implemented in the Greece, Italy and the UK, and targeted stakeholders associated with pesticide exposure linked to orchards, greenhouse crops and arable crops respectively. The results indicated that the adoption of protective measures is low for residents and bystanders, with the exception of residents in Greece, when compared to operators and workers, who tend to follow recommended safety practices. A regression analysis was used to examine the factors affecting the probability of adopting protective measures as well the as the level of exposure in the case of operators and workers where data are available. The results indicate that the likelihood of engaging in self-protective behaviour is not significantly affected by perceptions of own health being affected by pesticides for residents and bystanders. However, operators who perceive that their heath has been negatively affected by the use of pesticides are found to be more likely to adopt self-protective behaviours. Gender and country differences, in perceptions, attitudes and self-protection are also observed. Recommendations for improved communication, in particular for vulnerable groups, are provided. - Highlights: • Perceptions of risks associated with pesticide exposure were assessed • Surveys were conducted in Greece, Italy and the UK targeting vulnerable stakeholders • Perceptions of risk were associated with

  8. Operating experience at Scottish Nuclear's power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, P.

    1991-01-01

    A brief history is presented of the design and operation of the four Scottish nuclear power stations currently run by Scottish Nuclear, namely Hunterston 'A' and 'B' and the Torness reactors. A design flaw in the Magnox reactor at Hunterston 'A' led to it being operated at lower than optimal temperature and hence producing less power. For Hunterston 'B' reactor the Advanced Gas Cooled design prototype was used. Operating setbacks and successes are noted. The design chosen for Torness embraced all the good points of Hunterston 'B' but sought to eliminate its faults. After 26 years of successful operation Hunterston 'A' is now being decommissioned, while the other three stations continue to generate electricity successfully. (UK)

  9. Phobos L1 Operational Tether Experiment (PHLOTE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A sensor package that “floats” just above the surface of Phobos, suspended by a tether from a small spacecraft operating at the Mars/Phobos Lagrange 1 (L1) Point...

  10. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  11. Determination of the hydraulic residence time of trickling filters using radiotracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debien, Bruno R.; Ferreira, Ladislau M.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Pinto, Amenonia M.F., E-mail: brunordebien@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Geografia. Lab. de Geomorfologia; Moreira, Rubens M., E-mail: aab@cdtn.br, E-mail: amfp@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Trickling filters (TF) are bioreactors fulfilled with inert materials working as support for biofilm development, and have been used in a large scale in wastewater treatment for organic matter, ammonia nitrogen and nitrate removal. TF's can be widely used in Brazil, especially because of its simplicity and operational low cost. The efficiency of pollutants removal processes depends on the water flow dynamics inside the reactor. For this reason, in the present work the mean residence time of two TF's containing different support materials were determined by means of tracer testes. The radioisotope 82Br - a gamma radiation emitter, produced from soluble potassium bromide irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at the Centre for the Development of Nuclear Energy (CDTN) - was used as a pseudo-conservative tracer for the comparative study of aqueous phase flow dynamics in both TF's. Mean residence time for the first TF (containing a single support material) was 0,3 hours, much smaller than the value obtained for the second TF (containing two alternated support materials), around 2 hours. These results were already expected, once the alternated material is denser than the single one, and are very important for numerical modeling studies aiming to determine the kinetic constant for removal of the pollutants cited above. (author)

  12. Operating experience of Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohteru, Shigeru; Kaneko, Jun; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Mitsuo

    1987-01-01

    The prototype ATR 'Fugen' developed as one of the national project has verified the performance and reliability of the advanced thermal reactor system through the operation for about eight years since 1979, and the elucidation of the characteristics in plutonium utilization and the development and verification of the tuilizing techniques have been advanced. Besides, the operational results and the achievement of the technical development are successively reflected to the design of a demonstration reactor. In this paper, the outline of Fugan and the operational results are reported. The ATR Fugen Power Station is that of the prototype reactor of heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled, pressure tube type, having the electric output of 165 MW. It started the full scale operation on March 20, 1979, and as of January, 1987, the total generated electric power reached about 7 billion kWh, the time of power generation was about 43,000 h, and the average capacity factor was 60.6 %. Plutonium utilization techniques, the flow characteristics and the dynamic plant characteristics of a pressure tube type reactor, the operational characteristics of a heavy water system and the techniques of handling heavy water containing tritium, and the operational reliability and maintainability of the machinery and equipment installed have been studied. (Kako, I.)

  13. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  14. Opinion and Special Articles: Amateur fundus photography with various new devices: Our experience as neurology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saman; Cardenas, Ylec Mariana; Leishangthem, Lakshmi; Yaddanapudi, Sridhara

    2018-05-08

    Times are changing in the way we secure and share patient fundus photographs to enhance our diagnostic skills in neurology. At the recent American Academy of Neurology meeting, the use of a fundus camera and smartphones to secure good-quality fundus photographs of patients presenting with headache to the emergency department (ED) was presented. We were enthusiastic to replicate the success of the Fundus Photography vs Ophthalmoscopy Trial Outcomes in the Emergency Department (FOTO-ED) study in our neurology department, but encountered problems in terms of cost, setup, feasibility, and portability of the device. As neurology residents, we came up with 3 easier options. We present these 3 options as our personal experience, and hope to reignite enthusiasm among neurology trainees to find their own means of performing ophthalmoscopy routinely in the hospital, as it appears that the Internet market is now thriving with many other devices to make this examination easier and more rewarding. Of the options explored above, the Handheld Fundus Camera was a clear favorite among the residents, and we have placed one in our call room for routine use. It travels to the clinic, floor, intensive care unit, and ED when needed. It has enhanced the way we approach the fundus examination and been a fun skill to acquire. We look forward to further advances that will make it possible to carry such a device in a physician's pocket. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Afraid of being "witchy with a 'b'": a qualitative study of how gender influences residents' experiences leading cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Christine; Brennan, Meghan; Filut, Amarette; Isaac, Carol; Carnes, Molly

    2014-09-01

    Ineffective leadership during cardiopulmonary resuscitation ("code") can negatively affect a patient's likelihood of survival. In most teaching hospitals, internal medicine residents lead codes. In this study, the authors explored internal medicine residents' experiences leading codes, with a particular focus on how gender influences the code leadership experience. The authors conducted individual, semistructured telephone or in-person interviews with 25 residents (May 2012 to February 2013) from 9 U.S. internal medicine residency programs. They audio recorded and transcribed the interviews and then thematically analyzed the transcribed text. Participants viewed a successful code as one with effective leadership. They agreed that the ideal code leader was an authoritative presence; spoke with a deep, loud voice; used clear, direct communication; and appeared calm. Although equally able to lead codes as their male colleagues, female participants described feeling stress from having to violate gender behavioral norms in the role of code leader. In response, some female participants adopted rituals to signal the suspension of gender norms while leading a code. Others apologized afterwards for their counternormative behavior. Ideal code leadership embodies highly agentic, stereotypical male behaviors. Female residents employed strategies to better integrate the competing identities of code leader and female gender. In the future, residency training should acknowledge how female gender stereotypes may conflict with the behaviors required to enact code leadership and offer some strategies, such as those used by the female residents in this study, to help women integrate these dual identities.

  16. Five years of operating experience with Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of Phenix began at the end of 1968; the unit first went critical on August 31 st, 1973, and it was first connected to the grid of Electricite de France on 31st December 1973. It started operating industrially on July 14th, 1974. The balance sheet after five years of operations is as follows: Gross thermal capacity: 590 MW; Grosss electric capacity: 264 MW; Gross capacity factor of the power station: 45%; Gross electrical power produced by 30th september 1979: more than six billion kWh. In 1976 and 1977 the operation of the plant was affected by modifications made to the intermediate heat exchangers following leaks discovered in October 1976. Since 1976 the plants has been working at full capacity and the availability rate during the period July 1978 - July 1979 was more than 80% [fr

  17. Vapour trap development and operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansing, W.; Kirchner, G.; Menck, J.

    1977-01-01

    Sodium aerosols have the unpleasant characteristic that they deposit at places with low temperature level. This effect can be utilized when sodium aerosols are to be trapped at places which are determined beforehand. Thus vapour traps were developed which can filter sodium vapour from the cover gas. By this means the necessity was eliminated to heat all gas lines and gas systems with trace heaters just as all sodium lines are heated. It was of special interest for the INTERATOM to develop vapour traps which must not be changed or cleaned after a certain limited operating period. The vapour traps were supposed to enable maintenance free operation, i.e. they were to operate 'self cleaning'

  18. Commonwealth Edison operating experience: the people factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soth, L.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1955, Commonwealth Edison's nuclear commitment has evolved into three operating stations, another in startup, and two more under construction. Paralleling this evolution has been the investment in the personnel resources to operate, maintain, and manage these facilities. The personnel resource, its training and development, is the foundation for safe operation at any nuclear plant - the people factor. The personnel requirement at Edison has expanded and evolved with each station to meet ever increasing regulatory requirements. An extensive training organization has been developed to emphasize the importance of the man side of the human factors man/machine interface. Personnel errors are investigated to identify and correct the root causes, and outstanding personnel performance is recognized by the Company

  19. How does it feel to be a pathology resident? Results of a survey on experiences and job satisfaction during pathology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivanoglu, Burcin; Hassoy, Hur; Calle, Catarina; Dendooven, Amelie; Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Reshchikova, Lidiya; Gul, Gulen; Doganavsargil, Basak

    2017-09-01

    Residents' career choices and professional motivation can be affected from perception of their role and recognition within a medical team as well as their educational and workplace experiences. To evaluate pathology trainees' perceptions of their pathology residency, we conducted a 42-item survey via a web-based link questioning respondents' personal and institutional background, workplace, training conditions, and job satisfaction level. For the 208 residents from different European countries who responded, personal expectations in terms of quality of life (53%) and scientific excitement (52%) were the most common reasons why they chose and enjoy pathology. Sixty-six percent were satisfied about their relationship with other people working in their department, although excessive time spent on gross examination appeared less satisfactory. A set residency training program (core curriculum), a set annual scientific curriculum, and a residency program director existed in the program of 58, 60, and 69% respondents, respectively. Most respondents (76%) considered that pathologists have a direct and high impact on patient management, but only 32% agreed that pathologists cooperate with clinicians/surgeons adequately. Most (95%) found that patients barely know what pathologists do. Only 22% considered pathology and pathologists to be adequately positioned in their country's health care system. Almost 84% were happy to have chosen pathology, describing it as "puzzle solving," "a different fascinating world," and "challenging while being crucial for patient management." More than two thirds (72%) considered pathology and pathologists to face a bright future. However, a noticeable number of respondents commented on the need for better physical working conditions, a better organized training program, more interaction with experienced pathologists, and deeper knowledge on molecular pathology.

  20. Impact of LMFBR operating experience on PFBR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoje, S.B.; Chetal, S.C.; Chellapandi, P.; Govindarajan, S.; Lee, S.M.; Kameswara Rao, A.S.L.; Prabhakar, R.; Raghupathy, S.; Sodhi, B.S.; Sundaramoorthy, T.R.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2000-01-01

    PFBR is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type, fast breeder reactor currently under detailed design. It is essential to reduce the capital cost of PFBR in order to make it competitive with thermal reactors. Operating experience of LMFBRs provides a vital input towards simplification of the design, improving its reliability, enhancing safety and achieving overall cost reduction. This paper includes a summary of LMFBR operating experience and details the design features of PFBR as influenced by operating experience of LMFBRs. (author)

  1. Operating experience feedback report - Air systems problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1987-12-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential failures of safety-related systems in U.S. plants that resulted from degraded or malfunctioning non-safety grade air systems. Based upon the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) concludes that the issue of air systems problems is an important one which requires additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for corrective actions to deal with the issue. (author)

  2. Operating experience with KRAFTWERK UNION cementation line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podmaka, L.; Tomik, L.

    1988-01-01

    A facility is described designed for fixation in a cement matrix of the radioactive concentrate produced by thickening waste water from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. The cementation line output is 0.6 m 3 concentrate/h. The concentrate is put in 200 l drums. The individual operating units, cement management, air conditioning, dosimetric monitoring and the building part are described. The requirements for the operators and the assessment of the quality of raw materials and the product are discussed. (M.D.). 3 figs., 4 refs

  3. Operational Experience with the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00205212

    2015-05-15

    In the first LHC running period the CMS-pixel detector had to face various operational challenges and had to adapt to the rapidly changing beam conditions. In order to maximize the physics potential and the quality of the data, online and offline calibrations were performed on a regular basis. The detector performed excellently with an average hit efficiency above 99\\% for all layers and disks. In this contribution the operational challenges of the silicon pixel detector in the first LHC run and the current long shutdown are summarized and the expectations for 2015 are discussed.

  4. Annual meeting on nuclear technology 1980. Technical meeting: Operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In addition to general experiences, experiences in reactor operation with relation to the Phenix reactor, KNK-2 reactor, the AVR reactor, the BWR-type KKI-reactor, the Philippsburg-1 reactor and the Obrigheim reactor are described. (DG) [de

  5. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  6. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, Emma B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Kusano, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  7. Operational experiences feedback in Bohunice NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betak, A [NPP Bohunice (Slovakia)

    1997-10-01

    The presentation reviews the following issues: OEF team in Bohunice NPP - structure; training and qualification: ASSET seminars on Prevention of incidents - INES manual handling, NRA-NRC the training on event investigation methods, NU - the training on HPES; legislation - documentation prepared in the frame of QA programme; results of OEF team activities; ASSET mission Dukovany - Experiences; the perspective activities.

  8. Operational experience in water chemistry of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Rao, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    The chemistry related problems encountered in the moderator, primary heat transport systems, chemical control in the steam generators and the experience gained in the decontamination campaigns carried out in the primary heat transport systems of Indian PHWRs are highlighted in this paper. (author)

  9. Operational experience with the CERN hadron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmot, H.; Dutriat, C.; Hill, C.E.; Langbein, K.; Lombardi, A.M.; O'Neil, M.; Tanke, E.; Vretenar, M.

    1996-01-01

    The present CERN proton linac (Linac2) was commissioned in 1978 and since that date has been the primary source of protons to the CERN accelerator complex. During the past 18 years, the machine has had a very good reliability record in spite of the demands made upon it. Modifications have been made with the view of maintaining this reliability with reduced resources and new requirements from the users. Further demands will be made in the future for LHC operation. In 1994, a new linac for heavy ion production was put into service replacing the original CERN proton linac. As this machine was built within an international collaboration, operation had to take into account the novelty of the techniques used and the variety of equipment supplied by outside collaborators. Even so, the new machine has also had very good reliability. (author)

  10. Overview - Defense Waste Processing Facility Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility. Radioactive operations began in March 1996 and over 1,000 canisters have been produced. This paper presents an overview of the DWPF process and a summary of recent facility operations and process improvements. These process improvements include efforts to extend the life of the DWPF melter, projects to increase facility throughput, initiatives to reduce the quantity of wastewater generated, improved remote decontamination capabilities, and improvements to remote canyon equipment to extend equipment life span. This paper also includes a review of a melt rate improvement program conducted by Savannah River Technology Center personnel. This program involved identifying the factors that impacted melt rate, conducting small scale testing of proposed process changes and developing a cost effective implementation plan

  11. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES).

  12. Three years operational experience with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.

    2008-01-01

    TSI Terminal Systems Inc. is the largest container terminal operator in Canada, and has an annual payroll exceeding $150 million. The company started a biodiesel test program with the Canadian Bioenergy Corporation in order to assess the emission reduction impacts of using biodiesel. The pilot was tested with 6 different pieces of equipment used at the terminal over an initial period of 3 weeks. Emissions testing was then conducted for different biodiesel blend levels and compared with baseline data in relation to particulate matter, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nitrous oxides (NO x ). Results of the tests confirmed that the biodiesel blends significantly reduced emissions at the terminal and confirmed the operability of biodiesel. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fuel is now being used in all the company's equipment. The use of the biodiesel has not resulted in any engine failures or power losses. tabs., figs

  13. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES)

  14. FFTF operating experience, 1982-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, J.B.; Franz, G.R.; Loika, E.F.; Krupar, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mwt sodium-cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Startup and initial power testing included a comprehensive series of nonnuclear and nuclear tests to verify the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic characteristics of the plant. A specially designed series of natural circulation tests were then performed to demonstrate the inherent safety features of the plant. Early in 1982, the FFTF began its first 100-day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well, achieving a cycle capacity factor of 94% in the most recent irradiation cycle. Seventy-five specific test assemblies and 25,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 80 MWd/Kg

  15. Operational experience with the Fermilab Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.J.; Lennox, A.J.; Schmidt, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Fermilab 200-MeV Linac has been in operation for nearly 22 years as a proton injector to the Booster synchrotron. It presently accelerates H - ions to 200 MeV for charge-exchange injection into the Booster and to 66 MeV for the production of neutrons at the Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). The beam intensity is typically 35 mA with pulse widths of 30 μsec for the Booster for high energy physics and 57 μsec for NTF at a maximum of 15 pulses per sec. During a typical physics run of nine to twelve months, beam is available for greater than 98% of the scheduled time. The Linac history, operation, tuning, stability and reliability will be discussed. (Author) 15 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Operational experience with propulsion nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polunichev, V.

    2000-01-01

    Russia possesses a powerful icebreaker transport fleet which offers a solution for important socio-economic tasks of the country's northern regions by maintaining a year-round navigation along the Arctic Sea route. The total operating record of the propulsion nuclear reactors till now exceeds 150 reactor-years, their main equipment items operating life amounted to 120,000 h. Progressive design-constructional solutions being perfected continuously during 40 years of nuclear-powered ships creation in Russia and well proven technology of all components used in the marine nuclear reactors give grounds to recommend marine Nuclear Steam Supply Systems (NSSSs) of KLT-40 type as energy sources for heat and power cogeneration plants and sea water desalination complexes, particularly as floating installations. Co-generation stations are considered for deployment in the extreme north of Russia. Nuclear floating desalination complexes can be used for drinkable water production in coastal regions of Northern Africa, the Near East, India etc. (author)

  17. Operational experience in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1977-01-01

    In the UK there are 26 Magnox reactors and 4 AGRs operating on 11 licensed sites; a further 6 AGRs are under construction on 2 additional and one of the existing sites. The arrangements by which the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive, carries out its regulatory functions at operating nuclear power plants are described. The range of activities undertaken is described with special reference being made to the biennial shutdowns for approved maintenance and inspections which are required by conditions attached to the site licence. The other means by which the continuing safety of these power reactors is assured are explained and include the relationship with the licensee's own Nuclear Safety Committee, approved arrangements for modifications to plant systems or components which have importance for safety and long term reviews of safety aspects. (author)

  18. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  19. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramblett, G.C.; Fisher, C.R.; Swart, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection. Later in the year, a scheduled shutdown was undertaken for surveillance tests, insertion of core region constraint devices (RCDs), and other maintenance. Fort St. Vrain has encountered problems of the type that would be expected in a first-of-a-kind system. The plant is currently restricted to 70% of design power by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pending resolution of the core region gas outlet temperature fluctuation problem. Even so, the basic performance of the HTGR concept and all of the unique design features have been successfully demonstrated. The system has been characterized by low personnel radiation exposures, operational flexibility, and long time afforded for status evaluation and response. (author)

  20. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brey, H. L.

    1988-08-15

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs.

  1. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Operational experience with the CEBAF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Chowdhary, M.; Karn, J.; Tiefenback, M.; Zeijts, J. van; Watson, W.

    1996-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) successfully began its experimental nuclear physics program in November of 1995 and has since surpassed predicted machine availability. Part of this success can be attributed to using the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) control system toolkit. The CEBAF control system is one of the largest accelerator control system now operating. It controls approximately 338 SRF cavities, 2,300 magnets, 500 beam position monitors and other accelerator devices, such as gun hardware and other beam monitoring devices. All told, the system must be able to access over 125,000 database records. The system has been well received by both operators and the hardware designers. The EPICS utilities have made the task of troubleshooting systems easier. The graphical and test-based creation tools have allowed operators to custom build control screens. In addition, the ability to integrate EPICS with other software packages, such as Tcl/Tk, has allowed physicists to quickly prototype high-level application programs, and to provide GUI front ends for command line driven tools. Specific examples of the control system applications are presented in the areas of energy and orbit control, cavity tuning and accelerator tune up diagnostics

  3. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramblett, G. C.; Fisher, C. R.; Swart, F. E. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)

    1981-01-15

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection.

  4. Nursing home nurses' experiences of resident transfers to the emergency department: no empathy for our work environment difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Li

    2016-03-01

    To explore the experiences of nursing home nurses when they transfer residents from nursing homes to the emergency department in Taiwan. The transfer of residents between nursing homes and emergency departments challenges continuity of care. Understanding nursing home nurses' experiences during these transfers may help to improve residents' continuity of care. However, few empirical data are available on these nurses' transfer experiences worldwide, and none could be found in Asian countries. Qualitative descriptive study. Data were collected from August 2012-June 2013 in audiotaped, individual, in-depth interviews with 25 nurses at five nursing homes in Taiwan. Interview transcripts were analysed by constant comparative analysis. Analysis of interview transcripts revealed that the core theme of nursing home nurses' transfer experience was discontinuity in nursing home to emergency department transitions. This core theme comprised three themes: discontinuity in family involvement, discontinuity in medical resources and expectations, and discontinuity in nurses' professional role. Nursing home nurses need a working environment that is better connected to residents' family members and more immediate and/or easier access to acute care for residents. Communication between nurses and residents' family could be improved by using text messages or social media by mobile phones, which are widely used in Taiwan and worldwide. To improve access to acute care, we suggest developing a real-time telehealth transfer system tailored to the medical culture and policies of each country. This system should facilitate communication among nursing home staff, family members and hospital staff. Our findings on nurses' experiences during transfer of nursing home residents to the emergency department can be used to design more effective transfer policies such as telemedicine systems in Taiwan and other Asian countries or in those with large populations of Chinese immigrants. © 2016 John

  5. International Experience with Fast Reactor Operation & Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, John I.; Grandy, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • Worldwide experience with fast reactors has demonstrated the robustness of the technology and it stands ready for worldwide deployment. • The lessons learned are many and there is danger that what has been learned will be forgotten given that there is little activity in fast reactor development at the present time. • For this reason it is essential that knowledge of fast reactor technology be preserved, an activity supported in the U.S. as well as other countries

  6. Operational experiences of INES in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Japan has introduced IAEA's INES in August, 1992. As of September, 1997, the total number of domestic nuclear events which have evaluated by using the INES system has amounted 119. In Japan, when a nuclear event occurs at a nuclear power plant, a provisional evaluation is performed immediately by Nuclear Power Operation Administration Office, MITI. The final evaluation of events is implemented a few months after event occurrence by the Evaluation Committee on Incidents and Failures of Nuclear Power Plant which holds a neutral position. The results of the evaluation are transmitted to IAEA according to the INES reporting criteria

  7. Operating experiences at the Finnish TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenhaara, Seppo

    1988-01-01

    The Finnish TRIGA reactor has been in operation since March 1962. There are still 57 original Al-clad fuel elements in the core. So far we have had only two fuel cladding failures in 1981 and 1988. The first one was an Al-clad element and the second one a SS-clad. The low rate of fuel cladding failures has made it possible to use continuously also the Al-clad fuel elements. Although some conventional irradiations of certain type have been repeated successfully tens of times, new and unexpected incidents can still take place. As an example an event of a leaking irradiation capsule is described

  8. Operating experience with the ALS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selph, F.; Massoletti, D.

    1991-05-01

    The linac injector for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL was recently put into operation. Energy is 50 MeV, frequency 3 GHz. The electron gun delivers up to 6nC in a 3.0-ns bunch at 120 kV. A train of bunches is injected into a 1-Hz booster and accelerated to 1.5 GHz for storage ring injection. A magnetic analysis system is used for optimizing the linac. Measured beam properties from the gun and after acceleration in the linac are described. 9 refs., 3 figs

  9. Operating experience with 600 MW steam turbosets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinapp, J.

    1978-01-01

    The turbosets of the 600 MW line are machines with 4 casing, with a single-flow high-pressure turbine, a double-flow MD part, and two double-flow low-pressure turbines. The common design of all BBC turbosets of this size is explained, with a few remarks on the typical constructional features of BBC technology. The plant has a mean availability of 96% and a mean forced shutdown rate of 1.2%. A table gives a survey of the start-up procedure and the operating results so far. (GL) [de

  10. Evaluation of operating experience with safety values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bung, W.; Hoemke, P.; Oberender, W.; Paul, H.; Rueter, W.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes statistical investigations of 2076 functional tests carried out on power operated safety valves in conventional power plants in 1972 until 1983 with special regard to Common Mode-Failures. The results clearly show that Common Mode-Failures play an important part of non-availability for the controlled safety valves, especially in the control system. The 'Deutsche Risikostudie' does not consider any Common Mode-Failures of the primary safety valves. However there is no significant increase of the risk resulted by the primary safety valves in the 'Referenzanlage' if the calculated Common Mode-Failures probabilities are considered. (orig.) [de

  11. Striving for work-life balance: effect of marriage and children on the experience of 4402 US general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael C; Yeo, Heather; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-03-01

    To determine how marital status and having children impact US general surgical residents' attitudes toward training and personal life. There is a paucity of research describing how family and children affect the experience of general surgery residents. Cross-sectional survey involving all US categorical general surgery residents. Responses were evaluated by resident/program characteristics. Statistical analysis included the χ test and hierarchical logistic regression modeling. A total of 4402 residents were included (82.4% response rate) and categorized as married, single, or other (separated/divorced/widowed). Men were more likely to be married (57.8% vs 37.9%, P work (P work (P work hours caused strain on family life (P work (P = 0.001), were happy at work (P = 0.001), and reported a good program fit (P = 0.034), but had strain on family life (P work [odds ratio (OR): 1.22, P = 0.035], yet feeling that work caused family strain (OR: 1.66, P work (OR: 0.81, P = 0.007). Residents who were married or parents reported greater satisfaction and work-life conflict. The complex effects of family on surgical residents should inform programs to target support mechanisms for their trainees.

  12. MOX use in PWRs. EDF operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2011-01-01

    From the origin, EDF back-end fuel cycle strategy has focused on 'closing the fuel cycle', in other words integrating fuel reprocessing, with vitrification of high level waste concentrated within small volumes, and the recycling of valuable materials. The implementation of this policy was marked in 1987 by the first loading of sixteen MOX. By December 2010, 20 reactors have been loaded with 1750 tHM of MOX. EDF current strategy is to match the reprocessing program with MOX manufacturing capacity to limit the quantity of separated plutonium. This is routinely called the 'flow ad-equation' strategy. Currently, the MOX Parity core management achieves balance of MOX and UOX performance with a significant increase of the MOX discharge burn-up. Globally, the behavior under irradiation of MOX fuel assemblies has been satisfactory. So far, from the beginning of MOX use in EDF PWRs, only 6 MOX FAs with rod leakage have been identified, which gives a very satisfactory level of reliability. The industrial maturity of MOX fuel, with increased performances, allows the improvement of nuclear KWh competitiveness and of the plant operation performance, while maintaining in operation the same safety level, without significant impact on environment and radiological protection. (author)

  13. Operational experience acquired in radioactive waste compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, S.; Mohr, P.; Hempelmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    The low-level radioactive waste scrapping facility in the KfK decontamination division was commissioned in 1983. Non-combustible residues and removed system components of low activity, but which are to be handled and disposed of as radioactive waste are in drums, casks or containers delivered to the facility. The waste usually undergoes pretreatment in a crusher, with the volume being definitively reduced at a pressure of 690 bar in the high-pressure compactor. In 1990, the overhead-crane was refurbished for remote control handling in the scrapping caisson. The parts to undergo scrapping are unpacked in the material lock, and then go into the scrapping caisson. It is possible to use here various mechanical and thermal methods to dismantle the respective parts. But most of the parts to undergo scrapping are such as that it is possible to directly pretreat them in the crusher. The obtained scrap is loaded into 180-liter drums. Most of the machinery in the caisson is manually operated. The operating crew enters the caisson in fully ventilated protective overalls. The drums filled with the scrap then go to the high-pressure compactor in the caisson. The compacts are temporarily stored, until recalled depending on their height and filled into drums such as that optimal drum filling is guaranteed

  14. BN-600 power unit 15-year operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraev, O.M.; Oshkanov, N.N.; Vylomov, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Comprehensive experience has been gained with the operating fast reactor BN-600 with a power out of 600 MWe. This paper includes important performance results and gives also an overview of the experience gained from BN-600 NPP commercial operation during 15 years. (author). 2 figs, 1 tab

  15. Physics experiments with the operating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullington, G R; King, D C

    1973-09-27

    Experimental techniques have been developed and used on Dragon to give consistent information on excess reactivity and shut down margin. The reactivity measurements have been correlated with the theoretical calculations and have led to improvements in the calculations. The methods used and the results obtained are accepted by the Safety Committee as sufficient evidence for compliance with the fuel loading safety rules. Although the reactor was not designed as an experimental facility, flux and dose measurements experiments have been successfully carried out. Mass flow and negative reactivity transient measurements have been carried out. These are valuable for demonstration of the flexibility of the reactor system and for giving confidence in theoretical calculations.

  16. RAS III - concept and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, U.; Wander, J.

    1990-01-01

    A new noise analysis system RAS III is being employed at the Greifswald NPP 'Bruno Leuschner' units 5 and 6 which differs from its forerunner types by an extended number of measuring points and a higher degree of automation. Substantial prerequisite of the system's full efficiency is implementation of efficient signal monitoring techniques that free the power plant engineer from routine work as well. The system has therefore been completed by algorithms established for automatic noise signal spectra control and for monitoring the pressure vessel vibrations. Moreover, a number of special techniques have been developed, such as for recording velocity-time plots during control element drop experiments. (author)

  17. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents: Five-Year Experience at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Arvind; Hoda, Syed T; Crawford, James M

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  18. LIVED EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH PROBLEMS OF ELDERLY RESIDING IN URBAN AREAS, KATHMANDU: PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bista Archana, Joshi Sarala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Globally, number of old age population is increasing with advancement of biomedical technology. Old age is the time associated with biological, psychological and social changes which situate elderly to acquire different health related problems. Objectives: To find out lived experiences of elderly regarding their health problems residing in homes of Kathmandu city. Methods: Qualitative hermeneutic phenomenology approach was adopted. Researcher selected purposively four elderly residing in an urban area of Kathmandu Valley as the study participants. In-depth interview was conducted by using in-depth interview guideline, as well as medical records, field notes and observation clues were recorded. Interview was conducted in Nepali Language and was audio taped. The recording was transcribed by the researcher herself, and the data were analyzed thematically. Finally, different sources of data were triangulated. Results: The four main themes identified were physical health problems, impaired functional abilities, psychological and social problems. Experienced physical health problems were joint pain, hearing and vision deficit, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, gastritis and fall injury. Impaired Functional abilities in performing activities of daily living was commonly experienced problems. Loneliness and decreased recent memory power were the psychological problems. Being neglected by family members, financial constraints for treatment and improper care during illness were the discerned social problems. Conclusion: Elderly are suffering from different physical health problems, impaired functional abilities, as well as various psycho-social problems. Thus, health promotional activities need to be promoted for decreasing morbidity of elderly. Family members need to be focused in the care of elderly through national policy.

  19. Operating experience in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany kept their portion of power supply into the public grid system constant in 1983, compared to 1982. The generation had an absolute increase of 3.6% and amounts now to 65.9 TWh. Particularly mentioned should be the generation of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Plant which is holding the 'World Record' with 9.969 TWh. The availability of the plants was generally satisfactory, as far as long-term retrofit measures with long outage periods were not necessary, as it was the case in Brunsbuettel and Wuergassen. The planned retrofit phases have been completed in all power plants. As far as safety is concerned, there was no reason to recommended a change of the present fundamental planning- and operation aspects. (orig.) [de

  20. Operational experience of gamma radiation processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Nilesh

    2014-01-01

    Universal lSO-MED is now proud to announce an extension of its irradiation service for low-dose applications specifically in agriculture commodities, food and healthcare applications with the start of Gujarat Agro Radiation Processing Facility at Village: Bavla, Ahmedabad (A Government Enterprise) Operated, Maintained and Managed by Universal Medicap Ltd. Availability of hygienic, safe and nutritious food commodities is essential for any sustainable human development. Food stability is an important element of economic stability and self-reliance of a nation. Though the need to preserve food has been felt by the mankind since the time immemorial, it is even stronger in today's context. The rising population and increasing gap between demand and supply, agro-climatic conditions, in adequate post-harvest practices, seasonal nature of produce and long distances between production and consumption centers underscore the need to device improved conservation and preservation strategies

  1. Incorporating operational experience and design changes in availability forecasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.

    1988-01-01

    Reliability or availability forecasts which are based solely on past operating experience will be precise if the sample is large enough, and unbiased if nothing in the future design, environment, operating region or anything else changes. Unfortunately, life is never like that. This paper considers the methodology and philosophy of modifying forecasts based on past experience to take account also of changes in design, construction methods, operating philosophy, environments, operator training and so on, between the plants which provided the operating experience and the plant for which the forecast is being made. This emphasises the importance of collecting, assessing, and learning from past data and of a thorough knowledge of future designs, and procurement, operation, and maintenance policies. The difference between targets and central estimates is also discussed. The paper concludes that improvements in future availability can be made by learning from past experience, but that certain conditions must be fulfilled in order to do so. (author)

  2. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.5 TWh during 1998, which is the second highest yearly production ever. Production losses due to low demand totaled 5.1 TWh combined for all twelve units and production losses due to coastdown operation totaled an additional 0.5 TWh. The reason for this low power demand was a very good supply of water to the hydropower system. Hydroelectric power production was 73.6 TWh, an increase by roughly 5 TWh since 1997. Hence, the hydroelectric power production substantially exceeded the 64 TWh expected during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Remaining production sources, mainly fossil fuel electricity production combined with district heating, contributed with 10 TWh. The total electricity production was 154.2 TWh, the highest yearly production ever. The total electricity consumption including transmission losses was 143.5 TWh. This is also the highest consumption ever and an increase by one percent compared to 1997. The preliminary net result of the electric power trade shows a net export by 10.7 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production results. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is given in the 1998 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. Besides Oskarshamn 1, all plants have periodically been operated in load-following mode, mostly because of the abundant supply of hydropower. The energy availability for the three boiling water reactors at Forsmark averaged 93.3 % and for the three pressure water reactors at Ringhals 91.0 %, both figures are the highest ever noted. In the section `Special Reports` three events of importance to safety that occurred during 1998 are reported. The events were all rated as level 1 according to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) Figs, tabs.; Also available in Swedish

  3. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.5 TWh during 1998, which is the second highest yearly production ever. Production losses due to low demand totaled 5.1 TWh combined for all twelve units and production losses due to coastdown operation totaled an additional 0.5 TWh. The reason for this low power demand was a very good supply of water to the hydropower system. Hydroelectric power production was 73.6 TWh, an increase by roughly 5 TWh since 1997. Hence, the hydroelectric power production substantially exceeded the 64 TWh expected during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Remaining production sources, mainly fossil fuel electricity production combined with district heating, contributed with 10 TWh. The total electricity production was 154.2 TWh, the highest yearly production ever. The total electricity consumption including transmission losses was 143.5 TWh. This is also the highest consumption ever and an increase by one percent compared to 1997. The preliminary net result of the electric power trade shows a net export by 10.7 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production results. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is given in the 1998 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. Besides Oskarshamn 1, all plants have periodically been operated in load-following mode, mostly because of the abundant supply of hydropower. The energy availability for the three boiling water reactors at Forsmark averaged 93.3 % and for the three pressure water reactors at Ringhals 91.0 %, both figures are the highest ever noted. In the section 'Special Reports' three events of importance to safety that occurred during 1998 are reported. The events were all rated as level 1 according to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES)

  4. A two-year experience of an integrated simulation residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittels, Kathleen A; Takayesu, James K; Nadel, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) is increasingly used in medical education, but its role in Emergency Medicine (EM) residency education is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of HPS when fully integrated into an EM residency didactic curriculum. The study design was a cross-sectional survey performed in 2006, 2 years after the implementation of an integrated simulation curriculum. Fifty-four residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-4) of a 4-year EM residency were surveyed with demographic and curricular questions on the perceived value of simulation relative to other teaching formats. Survey items were rated on a bipolar linear numeric scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 9 (strongly agree), with 5 being neutral. Data were analyzed using Student t-tests. Forty residents responded to the survey (74% response rate). The perceived effectiveness of HPS was higher for junior residents than senior residents (8.0 vs. 6.2, respectively, peffectiveness of lectures (7.8 vs. 7.9, respectively, p=0.1), morbidity and mortality conference (8.5 vs. 8.7, respectively, p=0.3), and trauma conference (8.4 vs. 8.8, respectively, p=0.2) between junior and senior residents. Scores for perceptions of improvement in residency training (knowledge acquisition and clinical decision-making) after the integration of HPS into the curriculum were positive for all residents. Residents' perceptions of HPS integration into an EM residency curriculum are positive for both improving knowledge acquisition and learning clinical decision-making. HPS was rated as more effective during junior years than senior years, while the perceived efficacy of more traditional educational modalities remained constant throughout residency training. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Perceptions of pesticides exposure risks by operators, workers, residents and bystanders in Greece, Italy and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remoundou, K; Brennan, M; Sacchettini, G; Panzone, L; Butler-Ellis, M C; Capri, E; Charistou, A; Chaideftou, E; Gerritsen-Ebben, M G; Machera, K; Spanoghe, P; Glass, R; Marchis, A; Doanngoc, K; Hart, A; Frewer, L J

    2015-02-01

    The EU Directive on the sustainable use of pesticides (EU128/2009/EC) requires European Member States to develop training activities targeting occupational exposure to pesticides, and communication material aimed at residents and bystanders. Risk perceptions, knowledge and attitudes associated with passive and occupational exposure to pesticide potentially influence the extent to which different stakeholders adopt self-protective behaviour. A methodology for assessing the link between attitudes, adoption of self-protective behaviours and exposure was developed and tested. A survey was implemented in the Greece, Italy and the UK, and targeted stakeholders associated with pesticide exposure linked to orchards, greenhouse crops and arable crops respectively. The results indicated that the adoption of protective measures is low for residents and bystanders, with the exception of residents in Greece, when compared to operators and workers, who tend to follow recommended safety practices. A regression analysis was used to examine the factors affecting the probability of adopting protective measures as well the as the level of exposure in the case of operators and workers where data are available. The results indicate that the likelihood of engaging in self-protective behaviour is not significantly affected by perceptions of own health being affected by pesticides for residents and bystanders. However, operators who perceive that their heath has been negatively affected by the use of pesticides are found to be more likely to adopt self-protective behaviours. Gender and country differences, in perceptions, attitudes and self-protection are also observed. Recommendations for improved communication, in particular for vulnerable groups, are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experience in startup and operation of fast flux facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The testing program was structured to perform all testing under formal testing procedures with a test engineer as the test director and the plant operators operating the systems and equipment. This provided excellent training and experience for the operators in preparation for eventual reactor operation. Operations preparations for the testing and operation activities has consisted of academic training, formal on-the-job training including systems operation and examinations by persons with an expert knowledge on that portion of the plant, training at EBR-II and the High Temperature Sodium Facility for selected senior operators, operating procedure preparation, training on an FFTF Control Room operator training simulator, and formal written, oral and operating examinations

  7. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage.

  8. Operating experience with high beta superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The number of installed and operational β=1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the U.S. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  9. Natural uranium metallic fuel elements: fabrication and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, F.H.; Abou-Zahra, A.A.; Sharkawy, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The main reactor types based on natural uranium metallic fuel element, particularly the early types, are reviewed in this report. The reactor types are: graphite moderated air cooled, graphite moderated gas cooled and heavy water moderated reactors. The design features, fabrication technology of these reactor fuel elements and the operating experience gained during reactor operation are described and discussed. The interrelation between operating experience, fuel design and fabrication was also discussed with emphasis on improving fuel performance. (author)

  10. Large remote manipulator operating and maintenance experience at IEM cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.F.; McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has two large Electro-Mechanical Manipulators (EMM's). These manipulators are used for cell operations (processing of reactor core components) as well as general cell maintenance. From our eleven years of operation and maintenance experience with these large EMM's, we have learned many lessons concerning manipulator design. This paper describes the IEM Cell EMM design features and discusses operating and maintenance experience at the IEM Cell

  11. Operating experience with high beta superconducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    The number of installed and operational β = 1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the US. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  12. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage

  13. ETSON proposal on the European operational experience feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqua, Michael; Bertrand, Remy; Gelder, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The new IAEA Safety Fundamentals states regarding the operating experience feedback: The feedback of operating experience from facilities and activities - and, where relevant, from elsewhere - is a key means of enhancing safety. Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience, including initiating events, accident precursors, near misses, accidents and unauthorized acts, so that lessons may be learned, shared and acted upon. This presentation deals with the proposal of the ETSON (European TSO Network) to optimize the European operating experiences feedback (OEF). It is generally recognized that the efficiency of nuclear safety supervision by public authorities is based on two key requirements: - the existence of a competent authority at national level, benefiting from an appropriate legislative and regulatory basis, from adequate (quantitatively and qualitatively) human resources, particularly for inspection purposes, - the availability of resources devoted to highly specialised independent technical expertise, in order to provide competent authorities with pertinent technical opinions on: -- the safety files provided by operators, for the purpose of licensing corresponding activities, -- the exploitation for regulatory purposes of the operating experience feed back from licensed nuclear installations. There are two worldwide systems intended to learn lessons from experience: the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) system established by the licensees with access restricted to operating organizations and the IRS system jointly operated by IAEA and OECD/NEA accessible to regulators and to some other users nominated by the regulators in their countries. The IRS itself is dedicated to the analysis of safety significant operating events. NEA/CNRA runs a permanent working group on operating experience (WGOE). WGOE provides among other things also generic reports on safety concerns related to operating experiences and

  14. Operating experience and construction status of ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.C.; DenHartog, P.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.

    1984-01-01

    The present Argonne Tandem-Linac accelerator has operated in a reliable manner during the past year. The accelerator system provided 4402 hours of experimental beam time with a wide variety of heavy-ions. Figure 1 shows the beams which have been provided during the past year. New beams accelerated by the linac include 300 MeV 82 Se and 390 MeV 109 Ag. In tests, the tandem accelerated 102 MeV 127 I. This is the heaviest beam ever accelerated by the Argonne tandem. The long-term performance of the niobium resonators appears to be good. No significant degradation of performance has been observed for most resonators over many years of use with the exceptions of problems caused by catastrophic vacuum accidents. Resonators whose performance has deteriorated after vacuum accidents have recently been restored to their original performance state by a simple technique. The technique used is to rinse the interior of the resonator with a sequence of baths of solvents and water

  15. HDS unit revamp and operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, J. [Veba Oel Verarbeitungs-GmbH, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Balfanz, U. [Aral Forschung, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Dimmig, T. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Ruhr Oel GmbH, a joint venture between BP and PDVSA, operates a HDS unit at its Gelsenkirchen-Scholven site. The unit produces a major blend component for diesel fuel. Driven by ambitious German environmental policy and by an agreement between the German car and oil industries on the one hand and the government on the other, more stringent low sulphur fuel specifications will be enforced in Germany much earlier than in the rest of the European Union. In view of this situation a project was developed to fulfill the new product specifications with minimum investment. In a joint effort involving the refinery, the company research facilities and the catalyst supplier (AKZO NOBEL), pilot plant tests were performed to develop the best catalyst system and the new process conditions. Based on these results, an existing HDS unit was accordingly revamped. After the revamp, the unit produced diesel fuel with 50 ppm sulphur content and furthermore test runs at 10 ppm were carried out successfully. These results are displayed in this article. (orig.)

  16. Operational experience at the Sludge Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Sludge Treatment Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been in operation since April 1987. The facility was designed to encapsulate hazardous sludge wastes in a cement matrix. Fixation will allow the waste to meet or exceed applicable compressive strength and leachability requirements. Thus, the grout mixture complies with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) guidelines as a nonhazardous waste. The grout mixture is based upon a recipe formulation developed after several years of waste stream characterization and formulation studies. The wastes to be treated at the STF are wastes impounded in two ponds. The ponds have a combined capacity of 4.5 million gallons of sludge. The sludge is transferred from the ponds to a 15,000-gallon capacity storage tank by the use of a dredge. The grout mixture recipe dictates the amount of sludge, cement, fly ash, and admixture required for weighing per batch. All ingredients are weighed and then transferred to a tilt or high energy mixer for mixing. The grout mixture is then transferred to 89- or 96-gallon steel drums. The drums are placed in a storage yard designed for a point source discharge from the yard

  17. Why Do Emergency Medicine Residents Experience Burn Out? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefe Kamaloo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emergency medicine residents are a high–risk group for burnout syndrome. This was a qualitative study with content analysis on emergency medical residents with 2 aims: evaluating the incidence of occupational burnout syndrome and identifying the points of view and attitudes of emergency medical residents about factors related to occupational burnout syndrome.Method: For this study, 2 sessions of focus group discussions were set up at Imam Khomeini hospital affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Each session took 90 minutes, and 20 emergency medicine residents in their first or second year of emergency medicine residency participated in the sessions. Data were coded   by MAXQDA10 software.Results: Data were categorized in 4 themes as follow: (1 the characteristics of emergency medicine; (2 ambiguity in residents’ duties; (3 educational planning; and (4 careers.Data on the proposed solutions by residents were analyzed and coded in 3 groups including (1 changes in personal life; (2 arrangement in shifts; and  (3 educational issues.Conclusion: According to findings of this qualitative study, most of emergency medicine residents have experienced exhaustion sometime during the course of their residency. Psychological supports may help the residents to cope with their career difficulties and probable burn out.

  18. Operating experience with nuclear power plants 2015. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2016-07-01

    The VGB Technical Committee ''Nuclear Plant Operation'' has been exchanging operating experience about nuclear power plants for more than 30 years. Plant operators from several European countries are participating in the exchange. A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2015, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from Germany. The second part of this report will focus on nuclear power plant in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain.

  19. Remote maintenance of an operational fusion experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiptily, V.G.; Jarvis, O.N.; Popovichev, S. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    Optimisation of auxiliary plasma heating by means of Ion Cyclotron Radio-Frequency (ICRF) and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) as envisaged for the future fusion reactors is one of the main priorities in present research at today's tokamaks. Therefore, investigation of the production of fast ions during heating and of the subsequent fast ion behaviour in magnetically confined plasmas, together with an evaluation of the resulting bulk ion heating efficiency, are of essential importance for fusion reactor development. Gamma-ray diagnostics, based on the measurement of the gamma-ray emission from nuclear reactions between fast ions and the main plasma impurities, is a valuable technique for studying the fast particle energy distributions. Gamma-ray spectrometry provides information on the energy distribution, and the measurement of emission profiles supplies information on the spatial distribution of the reaction sites. Since 1987, the {gamma}-ray emission from JET plasmas has been systematically monitored and used successfully in the analysis of heating effects during ICRF and NBI heating in the JET tokamak. The classical character of the fast ion slowing down behaviour has been demonstrated and estimates have been obtained of the fast particle confinement time. The study of sawtooth crashes has demonstrated dramatic spatial redistribution of fast particles and other effects. In recent JET experiments to study the ITER-relevant ICRH scenarios ({sup 3}He)D and ({sup 3}He){sup 4}He, {gamma}-ray measurements provided information on the fast ion population, with the effective temperature of the energetic tail ions being deduced with the help of a {gamma}-ray spectrum simulation code, GAMMOD. In this paper, the main y-ray results are presented and the capabilities of gamma diagnostics are discussed in the light of the ITER-project programme.

  20. [Operating Room Nurses' Experiences of Securing for Patient Safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang Ok; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2015-10-01

    This study was done to evaluate the experience of securing patient safety in hospital operating rooms. Experiential data were collected from 15 operating room nurses through in-depth interviews. The main question was "Could you describe your experience with patient safety in the operating room?". Qualitative data from the field and transcribed notes were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory methodology. The core category of experience with patient safety in the operating room was 'trying to maintain principles of patient safety during high-risk surgical procedures'. The participants used two interactional strategies: 'attempt continuous improvement', 'immersion in operation with sharing issues of patient safety'. The results indicate that the important factors for ensuring the safety of patients in the operating room are manpower, education, and a system for patient safety. Successful and safe surgery requires communication, teamwork and recognition of the importance of patient safety by the surgical team.

  1. TSTA Piping and Flame Arrestor Operating Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; Willms, R. Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium handling technology and experiment research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility operated from 1984 to 2001, running a prototype fusion fuel processing loop with ~100 grams of tritium as well as small experiments. There have been several operating experience reports written on this facility’s operation and maintenance experience. This paper describes analysis of two additional components from TSTA, small diameter gas piping that handled small amounts of tritium in a nitrogen carrier gas, and the flame arrestor used in this piping system. The operating experiences and the component failure rates for these components are discussed in this paper. Comparison data from other applications are also presented.

  2. Children's Perspectives on Everyday Experiences of Shared Residence: Time, Emotions and Agency Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Gry Mette D.

    2010-01-01

    Shared residence is often presented as an arrangement that is in the best interests of the child following the divorce of its parents. Based on in-depth interviews with Norwegian children who have experienced shared residence, this article seeks to explore some dilemmas concerning time, agency and the children's emotions. Three characteristics of…

  3. Teaching Residents Practice-Management Knowledge and Skills: An "in Vivo" Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laurel Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the relevant data regarding teaching psychiatric residents practice management knowledge and skills. This article also introduces a unique program for teaching practice management to residents. Methods: A literature search was conducted through PubMed and "Academic Psychiatry". Additionally residents…

  4. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  5. Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  6. Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  7. Dry cooling tower operating experience in the LOFT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A dry cooling tower has been uniquely utilized to dissipate heat generated in a small experimental pressurized water nuclear reactor. Operational experience revealed that dry cooling towers can be intermittently operated with minimal wind susceptibility and water hammer occurrences by cooling potential steam sources after a reactor scram, by isolating idle tubes from the external atmosphere, and by operating at relatively high pressures. Operating experience has also revealed that tube freezing can be minimized by incorporating the proper heating and heat loss prevention features

  8. Unlicensed Boarding House Managers' Experiences and Perceptions of Need in Residents with Mental Health and Substance Use Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Frank P.; Tweedie, Rosemarie; van der Weyden, Chantelle; Cowlin, Feona

    2012-01-01

    Unlicensed boarding houses provide low cost accommodation for many people who have mental health and/or alcohol or other drug problems. The present study explored the needs and experiences of owners and managers of unlicensed boarding houses who have residents with MH and AOD problems. Twenty-three boarding house managers (BHMs) from Illawarra and…

  9. Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

  10. Steam generator operating experience update, 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.

    1984-06-01

    This report is a continuation of earlier reports by the staff addressing pressurized water reactor steam generator operating experience. NUREG-0886, Steam Generator Tube Experience, published in February 1982 summarized experience in domestic and foreign plants through December 1981. This report summarizes steam generator operating experience in domestic plants for the years 1982 and 1983. Included are new problems encountered with secondary-side loose parts, sulfur-induced stress-assisted corrosion cracking, and flow-induced vibrational wear in the new preheater design steam generators. The status of Unresolved Safety Issues A3, A4, and A5 is also discussed

  11. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues.

  12. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues

  13. The Gerbil Jar: A Basic Home Experience in Operant Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, L.

    1980-01-01

    Explains how a teaching method such as allowing students to raise gerbils at home can encourage students to gain experience with the fundamental techniques of operant conditioning which are otherwise generally unavailable to students in large introductory psychology courses. (DB)

  14. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  15. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-01-01

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed

  16. Duke staff tap into a fund of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The benefits of the Operating Experience Database (OEDB) allows employees of the nuclear industry to access a fund of operating experience data on-line in order to help them make appropriate management decisions concerning problem solving for various plant-based problems. Recent successful uses include fire protection system design, improving compliance with technical specifications, and reducing unnecessary trips in turbines. It is anticipated that OEDB may well be used in the Ukraine and Russia in the future. (UK)

  17. A retrospective review of required projects in systems-based practice in a single anesthesiology residency: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Emerick, Trent D; Patel, Rita M

    2015-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has emphasized in its core competencies and more recently, in its Milestones Project, that residents understand the importance of systems-based practice (SBP). The objectives of the study are to evaluate the quality of residents' SBP projects and to determine the degrees that were subsequently implemented. A retrospective educational observational study. A university-based anesthesiology training institution. One hundred forty-nine anesthesiology residents in their final (postgraduate year 4) year of training who completed SBP projects for the last 10 years (2004-2013). A structured SBP course was provided for postgraduate year 4 anesthesiology residents with deadlines set such as project identification, data collection, and proposal draft. Each resident's written SBP proposal received inputs by 2 members of the department executive steering committee. The SBP projects concluded with oral presentations by each resident to the department executive steering committee, who provided overall scores. All SBP projects were categorized into 7 categories: safety initiatives, economic analysis, process analysis, policy change recommendations, education initiatives, teamwork/communication, and operating room efficiency. Evaluation scores using a Likert scale (1-9, where 9 is the best) were analyzed. The rate of implementation of project ideas within the department based on the presentations to the executive committee was examined. Of 149 projects, policy change recommendations was the most frequently chosen category (46 projects; 30.9%), followed by process analysis (36 projects; 24.2%). The overall evaluation score was 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD). A total of 53 projects (35.6%) were implemented in the department. There was no statistical difference between SBPs with implementation vs SBPs without implementation in terms of evaluation scores, year of the presentation, or categories. This SBP project has given residents the

  18. Spacelab operations planning. [ground handling, launch, flight and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA planning in the fields of ground, launch and flight operations and experiment integration to effectively operate Spacelab. Payload mission planning is discussed taking consideration of orbital analysis and the mission of a multiuser payload which may be either single or multidiscipline. Payload analytical integration - as active process of analyses to ensure that the experiment payload is compatible to the mission objectives and profile ground and flight operations and that the resource demands upon Spacelab can be satisfied - is considered. Software integration is touched upon and the major integration levels in ground operational processing of Spacelab and its experimental payloads are examined. Flight operations, encompassing the operation of the Space Transportation System and the payload, are discussed as are the initial Spacelab missions. Charts and diagrams are presented illustrating the various planning areas.

  19. Lessons from feedback of safety operating experience for reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, J.; Rapavy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of events in WWER operations as a part of safety experience feedback provide a valuable source of lessons for reactor physics. Examples of events from Bohunice operation will be shown such as events with inadequate approach to criticality, positive reactivity insertions, expulsion of a control rod from shut-down reactor, problems with reactor protection system and control rods. (Authors)

  20. Precision operation of the Nova laser for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caird, J.A.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Hermes, G.L.; Landen, O.L.; Laumann, C.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Miller, J.L.; Murray, J.E.; Nielsen, N.D.; Powell, H.T.; Rushford, M.C.; Saunders, R.L.; Thompson, C.E.; VanArsdall, P.J.; Vann, C.S.; Weiland, T.L.

    1994-01-01

    The operation of a Neodymium glass laser of a special design for fusion experiments is improved by a better pulse synchronization, the gain stabilization, and the laser diagnostics. We used sensor upgrading and antifriction coating of focusing lenses. The pointing accuracy of the Nova laser meets now our goal for precision operation. (AIP) copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  1. The VEPP-2000 Collider Control System: Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Senchenko, A I; Lysenko, A P; Rogovsky, Yu A; Shatunov, P Yu

    2017-01-01

    The VEPP-2000 collider was commissioned and operated successfully in 2010-2013. During the operation the facility underwent continuous updates and experience in maintenance was acquired. Strong cooperation between the staff of the accelerator complex and the developers of the control system proved effective for implementing the necessary changes in a short time.

  2. 14th Biennial conference on reactor operating experience plant operations: The human element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the following areas of interest: enhancing operator performance; structured approaches to maintenance standards and reliability-centered maintenance; human issues in plant operations and management; test, research, and training reactor utilization; methods and applications of root-cause analysis; emergency operating procedure enhancement programs; test, research, and training reactor upgrades; valve maintenance and diagnostics; recent operating experiences; and current maintenance issues

  3. Feedback of operating experience in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The feedback of operating experience of nuclear facilities to the designers, manufacturers, operators and regulators is one important means of maintaining and improving safety. The Atomic Energy Control Board`s Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety examined the means for feedback currently being employed, how effective they are and what improvements are advisable. The review found that the need for feedback of operating experience is well recognized within those institutions contributing to the safety of CANDU power reactors, and that the existing procedures are generally effective. Some recommendations, however, are submitted for improvement in the process.

  4. The experience of five years operation of Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.; Lacroix, A.

    1980-01-01

    Two long periods of exceptional operation have satisfied the hopes of the designers and all parameters, power, efficiency, load factor, fuel behaviour, were better than was expected. The experience resulting from the only major incident provided a series of complementary data. Modern technology has need of sanction by experiment. The Phenix type reactor is a tool which is convenient to operate and to maintain. The two aspects of the demonstration, correct operation and ease of maintenance, take a concrete form in the harmlessness of Phenix on men and on the environment. There is no irradiation and few releases. (orig./DG)

  5. Feedback of operating experience in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The feedback of operating experience of nuclear facilities to the designers, manufacturers, operators and regulators is one important means of maintaining and improving safety. The Atomic Energy Control Board's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety examined the means for feedback currently being employed, how effective they are and what improvements are advisable. The review found that the need for feedback of operating experience is well recognized within those institutions contributing to the safety of CANDU power reactors, and that the existing procedures are generally effective. Some recommendations, however, are submitted for improvement in the process

  6. Operational safety experience feedback by means of unusual event reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Operational experience of nuclear power plants can be used to great advantage to enhance safety performance provided adequate measures are in place to collect and analyse it and to ensure that the conclusions drawn are acted upon. Feedback of operating experience is thus an extremely important tool to ensure high standards of safety in operational nuclear power plants and to improve the capability to prevent serious accidents and to learn from minor deviations and equipment failures - which can serve as early warnings -to prevent even minor events from occurring. Mechanisms also need to be developed to ensure that operating experience is shared both nationally as well as internationally. The operating experience feedback process needs to be fully and effectively established within the nuclear power plant, the utility, the regulatory organization as well as in other institutions such as technical support organizations and designers. The main purpose of this publication is to reflect the international consensus as to the general principles and practices in the operational safety experience feedback process. The examples of national practices for the whole or for particular parts of the process are given in annexes. The publication complements the IAEA Safety Series No.93 ''Systems for Reporting Unusual Events in Nuclear Power Plants'' (1989) and may also give a general guidance for Member States in fulfilling their obligations stipulated in the Nuclear Safety Convention. Figs, tabs

  7. Operational safety experience feedback by means of unusual event reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Operational experience of nuclear power plants can be used to great advantage to enhance safety performance provided adequate measures are in place to collect and analyse it and to ensure that the conclusions drawn are acted upon. Feedback of operating experience is thus an extremely important tool to ensure high standards of safety in operational nuclear power plants and to improve the capability to prevent serious accidents and to learn from minor deviations and equipment failures - which can serve as early warnings -to prevent even minor events from occurring. Mechanisms also need to be developed to ensure that operating experience is shared both nationally as well as internationally. The operating experience feedback process needs to be fully and effectively established within the nuclear power plant, the utility, the regulatory organization as well as in other institutions such as technical support organizations and designers. The main purpose of this publication is to reflect the international consensus as to the general principles and practices in the operational safety experience feedback process. The examples of national practices for the whole or for particular parts of the process are given in annexes. The publication complements the IAEA Safety Series No.93 ``Systems for Reporting Unusual Events in Nuclear Power Plants`` (1989) and may also give a general guidance for Member States in fulfilling their obligations stipulated in the Nuclear Safety Convention. Figs, tabs.

  8. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design

  9. Operational safety experience reporting in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Licensees of nuclear power plants in the United States have many reporting requirements included in their technical specifications and the code of federal regulations, title 10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commisson receives these reports and utilizes them in its regulatory program. Part of this usage includes collecting and publishing this operating experience data in various reports and storing information in various data systems. This paper will discuss the data systems and reports on operating experience published and used by the NRC. In addition, some observations on operating experience will be made. Subjects included will be the Licensee Event Report (LER) Data File, the Operating Unit Status Report (Gray Book), Radiation Exposure Reports, Effluents Reports, the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, Current Events, Bulletin Wrapups and Annual Summaries. Some of the uses of the reports and systems will be discussed. The Abnormal Occurence Report to the US Congress will also be described and discussed. (author)

  10. Flooding PSA with Plant Specific Operating Experiences of Korean PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Yang, Joon Yull

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to update the flooding PSA with Korean plant specific operating experience data and the appropriate estimation method for the flooding frequency to improve the PSA quality. The existing flooding PSA used the NPE (Nuclear Power Experience) database up to 1985 for the flooding frequency. They are all USA plant operating experiences. So an upgraded flooding frequency with Korean specific plant operation experience is required. We also propose a method of only using the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) data for the flooding frequency estimation in the case of the flooding area in the primary building even though the existing flooding PSA used both PWR and BWR (Boiled Water Reactor) data for all kinds of plant areas. We evaluate the CDF (Core Damage Frequency) with the modified flooding frequency and compare the results with that of the existing flooding PSA method

  11. Operations experience with the NAC-1 legal weight truck cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Hoffman, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    The first three years of operation of Nuclear Assurance Corporation's (NAC) four (4) NAC-1 Casks have demonstrated that shipments of spent fuel, fuel rods and other highly irradiated reactor components can be moved routinely by legal weight truck transport. Shipments of these materials have involved some 800,000 miles of highway travel and cask handling at some fifteen different nuclear facilities. This paper presents details on NAC's operations experience with these casks including cask description, cask handling (loading and unloading), pre-shipment testing, facility turnaround and transit times, operator exposure, transport vehicles and shipper/carrier/cask owner responsibilities, actual experience with regard to facility interfacing requirements and operational procedures. Cask and equipment utilization is discussed together with the methods used to control operation costs and to improve the economics of truck transport

  12. Nuclear power plant operation experience - a feedback programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banica, I.; Sociu, F.; Margaritescu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An effective high quality maintenance programme is required for the safe reliable operation of a nuclear power plant. To achieve the objectives of such a programme, both plant management and staff must be highly dedicated and motivated to perform high quality work at all levels. Operating and maintenance experience data collections and analysis are necessary in order to enhance the safety of the plant and reliability of the structures systems and components throughout their operating life. Significant events, but also minor incident, may reveal important deficiencies or negative trends adverse to safety. Therefore, a computer processing system for collecting, classifying and evaluating abnormal events or findings concerning operating-maintenance and for feeding back the results of the lessons learned from experience into the design and the operation of our nuclear power plant is considered to be of paramount importance. (Author)

  13. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.; Buschman, H.W.; Smith, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Recent operating experiences and programs at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) is a pool-type, unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt and an electrical generation capability of 20 MW. It has been operated by Argonne National Laboratory for the US government for almost 20 years. During that time, it has operated safely and has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, high availability, and excellent performance of its sodium components. The 20 years of operating experience of EBR-II is a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future LMFBR's. Since past operating experience has been extensively reported, this report will focus on recent programs and events

  15. Radiological operating experience at FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, W.L.; Prevo, P.R.

    1986-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility has been in operation for approximately five years, including about one thousand days of full power operation of the Fast Test Reactor. During that time the collective dose equivalents received by operating personnel have been about two orders of magnitude lower than those typically received at commercial light water reactors. No major contamination problems have been encountered in operating and maintaining the plant, and release of radioactive gas to the environment has been minimal and well below acceptable limits. All shields have performed satisfactorily. Experience to date indicates an apparent radiological superiority of liquid metal reactor systems over current light water plants

  16. Risk management for operations of the LANL Critical Experiments Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Butterfield, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) currently operates two burst reactors (Godiva-IV and Skua), one solution assembly [the Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA)], two fast-spectrum benchmark assemblies (Flattop and Big Ten), and five general-purpose remote assembly machines that may be configured with nuclear materials and assembled by remote control. Special nuclear materials storage vaults support these and other operations at the site. With this diverse set of operations, several approaches are possible in the analysis and management of risk. The most conservative approach would be to write a safety analysis report (SAR) for each assembly and experiment. A more cost-effective approach is to analyze the probability and consequences of several classes of operations representative of operations on each critical assembly machine and envelope the bounding case accidents. Although the neutron physics of these machines varies widely, the operations performed at LACEF fall into four operational modes: steady-state mode, approach-to-critical mode, prompt burst mode, and nuclear material operations, which can include critical assembly fuel loading. The operational sequences of each mode are very nearly identical, whether operated on one assembly machine or another. The use of an envelope approach to accident analysis is facilitated by the use of classes of operations and the use of bounding case consequence analysis. A simple fault tree analysis of operational modes helps resolve which operations are sensitive to human error and which are initiated by hardware of software failures. Where possible, these errors and failures are blocked by TSR LCOs. Future work will determine the probability of accidents with various initiators

  17. Safety review of experiments at Albuquerque Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, K.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office is responsible for the safety overview of nuclear reactor and critical assembly facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Rocky Flats Plant. The important safety concerns with these facilities involve the complex experiments that are performed, and that is the area emphasized. A determination is made by the Albuquerque Office (AL) with assistance from DOE/OMA whether or not a proposed experiment is an unreviewed safety question. Meetings are held with the contractor to resolve and clarify questions that are generated during the review of the proposed experiment. The AL safety evaluation report is completed and any recommendations are discussed. Prior to the experiment a preoperational appraisal is performed to assure that personnel, procedures, and equipment are in readiness for operations. During the experiment, any abnormal condition is reviewed in detail to determine any safety concerns

  18. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience from the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience 2012-2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is an essential element of the international operating experience feedback system for nuclear power plants. Its fundamental objective is to contribute to improving safety of commercial nuclear power plants which are operated worldwide. IRS reports contain information on events of safety significance with important lessons learned which assist in reducing recurrence of events at other plants. This sixth publication, covering the period 2012 - 2014, follows the structure of the previous editions. It highlights important lessons based on a review of the approximately 240 event reports received from the participating countries over this period.

  19. The Clearing House on Operating Experience Feedback (CH-OEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro Colodron, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Clearing House on Operating Experience Feedback (CH-OEF) is an online information system that contains three technical databases available only to registered users: 1) Operating Experience Feedback (OEF) records, containing information about events occurred at Nuclear Power Plants; 2) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) records, containing technical details about NPPs; 3) Documents about operating experience, such as the Topical Operating Experience Reports (TOERs) and the quarterly reports on nuclear power plant events. The main objective of the information system is to develop communication, cooperation and sharing of operating experience amongst the national nuclear regulatory authorities participating in EU Clearinghouse network. The CH-OEF is essential for the preparation and dissemination of the quarterly reports on NPP events. These reports are published every three months and are intended to be complementary to other international reporting systems, containing mainly recent information publicly available. Only events that are considered to be likely to have lessons applicable to EU NPPs or with a real or potential impact on nuclear safety are addressed in the reports. The CH-OEF is a fundamental tool for their preparation, providing specific features for a more efficient sharing of information as well as for facilitating the related discussion and decision making. (author

  20. Concluding from operating experience to instrumentation and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleger, H.; Heinsohn, H.

    1997-01-01

    Where conclusions are drawn from operating experience to instrumentation and control systems, two general statements should be made. First: There have been braekdowns, there have also been deficiencies, but in principle operating experience with the instrumentation and control systems of German nuclear power plants has been good. With respect to the debates about the use of modern digital instrumentation and control systems it is safe to say, secondly, that the instrumentation and control systems currently in use are working reliably. Hence, there is no need at present to replace existing systems for reasons of technical safety. However, that time will come. It is a good thing, therefore, that the use of modern digital instrumentation and control systems is to begin in the field of limiting devices. The operating experience which will thus be accumulated will benefit digital instrumentation and control systems in their qualification process for more demanding applications. This makes proper logging of operating experience an important function, even if it cannot be transferred in every respect. All parties involved therefore should see to it that this operating experience is collected in accordance with criteria agreed upon so as to prevent unwanted surprises later on. (orig.) [de

  1. European Clearinghouse for Nuclear Power Plants Operational Experience Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Ramos, M.; Noel, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the European Union, in order to support the Community activities on operational experience, a centralized regional network on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback (European Clearinghouse on Operational Experience Feedback for Nuclear Power Plants) was established in 2008 at the EC JRC-IE, Petten (The Netherlands) on request of nuclear Safety Authorities of several Member States. Its main goal is to improve the communication and information sharing on OEF, to promote regional collaboration on analyses of operational experience and dissemination of the lessons learned. The enlarged EU Clearinghouse was launched in April 2010, and it is currently gathering the Regulatory Authorities of Finland, Hungary, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovenia, Switzerland, Bulgaria, Czec Republic, France, Germany, Slovak Republic, and Spain (these last six countries as observers). The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the IAEA, the EC Directorates General of the JRC and ENER are also part of the network. Recently, collaboration between some European Technical Support Organizations (such IRSN and GRS) and the EU Clearinghouse has been initiated. This paper explains in detail the objectives and organization of the EU Clearinghouse, as well as the most relevant activities carried out, like research work in trend analysis of events ocurred in NPP, topical reports on particular events, dissemination of the results, quarterly reports on events reported publicly and operational experience support to the members of the EU Clearinghouse. (Author)

  2. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov)

  3. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  4. Prevalence of burnout syndrome among medical residents: experience of a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkar, Khalil; Romani, Maya; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Chaaya, Monique

    2010-05-01

    It has been well established that burnout, defined as emotional exhaustion (EE), de-personalisation (DP), and a 'decreased sense of personal accomplishment (PA) due to work related stress', is prevalent to a great extent among medical residents. This has been implicated in the delivery of suboptimal patient care. Residents in developing countries work under difficult working and social conditions and therefore examining burnout is important when addressing quality of care and working conditions. The objectives of the study were to assess the point prevalence of burnout among residents in Lebanon and investigate some of the work and non-work related factors associated with burnout. A cross sectional study of all medical residents was carried out in two major hospitals in the capital city. A total of 155 residents responded, representing all specialities. Maslach Burnout Inventory for Health Services Workers (MBI-HSS) was used. Burnout in three domains was dichotomised into high versus not high burnout. The prevalence of burnout was high in all the domains with the highest in the domain of emotional exhaustion (67.7%). 80% of the sample had a high level of burnout in at least one domain. Being female, experiencing a major stress, working for more than 80 h per week, and having more than eight calls per month increased the odds of burnout in at least one domain. The high burnout level calls for action. This could be addressed by re-examining workload and other working conditions of residents as well as attending to their psychological wellbeing. The limitations of the study are also discussed.

  5. The Bridge: Experiments in Science and Art, Experiences from the 2017 SciArt Center Cross-Disciplinary Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Chalmers, R.; Buntaine, J.

    2017-12-01

    Cross-disciplinary programs create the opportunity to explore new realms for scientists and artists alike. Through the collaborative process, artistic insights enable innovative approaches to emotionally connect to and visualize the world around us. Likewise, engagement across the art-science spectrum can lead to shifts in scientific thinking that create new connections in data and drive discoveries in research. The SciArt Center "The Bridge Residency Program" is a four-month long virtual residency open internationally for professionals in the arts and sciences to facilitate cross-disciplinary work and to bring together like-minded participants. The SciArt Center provides a virtual space to record and showcase the process and products of each collaboration. The work is facilitated with biweekly Skype calls and documented with weekly blog posts. Residents create either digital or physical products and share via video, images, or direct mailing with their collaborators. Past projects have produced call and response discussion, websites, skills and conference presentations, science-art studies, virtual exhibits, art shows, dance performances, and research exchange. Here we present the creative process and outcomes of one of the four collaborative teams selected for the 2017 residency. Jill Shipman, a Ph.D. Candidate in Volcanology who is also active in filmmaking and theatrical productions and Rosemary Chalmers, a UK-based lecturer, concept artist, and illustrator with a specialty in creature design. They were paired together for their shared interest in storytelling, illustration, and unique geological and environmental habitats and the life that occupies them. We will discuss the collaborative project developed by this team during their recent residency and illustrate how a virtual program can bridge the distance between geographical location to foster science and art collaboration. To follow the progress of the residency please visit: http://www.sciartcenter.org/the-bridge.html

  6. Differential experiences of Mexican policing by people who inject drugs residing in Tijuana and San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Emily F; Werb, Dan; Beletsky, Leo; Rangel, Gudelia; Cuevas Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Wagner, Karla D

    2017-03-01

    powerlessness. This was less common among San Diego-based participants, who mostly attempted to avoid contact with LEOs in Mexico while engaging in risky injection behavior. Experiences of discrimination and stigma were reported by a larger proportion of PWIDs living in Mexico, suggesting that they may be subject to greater health harms related to policing practices compared with those residing in the USA. Our findings reinforce the importance of efforts to curb abuse and align policing practices with public health goals in both the US and Mexico. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential experiences of Mexican policing by people who inject drugs residing in Tijuana and San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Emily F.; Werb, Dan; Beletsky, Leo; Rangel, Gudelia; Mota, Jazmine Cuevas; Garfein, Richard S.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Wagner, Karla D.

    2017-01-01

    feelings of stress, anxiety, and powerlessness. This was less common among San Diego-based participants, who mostly attempted to avoid contact with LEOs in Mexico while engaging in risky injection behavior. Conclusion Experiences of discrimination and stigma were reported by a larger proportion of PWIDs living in Mexico, suggesting that they may be subject to greater health harms related to policing practices compared with those residing in the USA. Our findings reinforce the importance of efforts to curb abuse and align policing practices with public health goals in both the US and Mexico. PMID:28111221

  8. Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection

  9. Design and operating experiences with 50MW steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawara, M.; Yamaki, H.; Kanamori, A.; Tanaka, K.; Takahashi, T.

    1975-01-01

    The main purpose of the 50 MW steam generator is to have experiences of manufacturing and operation with large scale steam generator including necessary research and development works which can be reflected on the design and fabrication of 'Monju' (Japan 300 MWe prototype LMFBR). The detailed design of the 50 MW steam, generator was begun on March, 1972 and succeeded in the demonstration of 72 hours continuous operation with full power on June, 1974. It has been successfully operated since then, the performances of which have been evaluated through various kinds of tests. In this paper, the following items are mainly discussed system design, thermal and hydraulic design, structure and fabrication and some experiences on testing operation including cleaning and sodium flushing of equipment, sodium level control system, the behavior of hydrogen detection system and general outlook of the performance. (author)

  10. Telescience testbed: Operational support functions for biomedical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Watanabe, Satoru; Shoji, Takatoshi; Clarke, Andrew H.; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yanagihara, Dai

    A telescience testbed was conducted to study the methodology of space biomedicine with simulated constraints imposed on space experiments. An experimental subject selected for this testbedding was an elaborate surgery of animals and electrophysiological measurements conducted by an operator onboard. The standing potential in the ampulla of the pigeon's semicircular canal was measured during gravitational and caloric stimulation. A principal investigator, isolated from the operation site, participated in the experiment interactively by telecommunication links. Reliability analysis was applied to the whole layers of experimentation, including design of experimental objectives and operational procedures. Engineering and technological aspects of telescience are discussed in terms of reliability to assure quality of science. Feasibility of robotics was examined for supportive functions to reduce the workload of the onboard operator.

  11. Design and operating experiences with 50MW steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawara, M; Yamaki, H; Kanamori, A; Tanaka, K; Takahashi, T

    1975-07-01

    The main purpose of the 50 MW steam generator is to have experiences of manufacturing and operation with large scale steam generator including necessary research and development works which can be reflected on the design and fabrication of 'Monju' (Japan 300 MWe prototype LMFBR). The detailed design of the 50 MW steam, generator was begun on March, 1972 and succeeded in the demonstration of 72 hours continuous operation with full power on June, 1974. It has been successfully operated since then, the performances of which have been evaluated through various kinds of tests. In this paper, the following items are mainly discussed system design, thermal and hydraulic design, structure and fabrication and some experiences on testing operation including cleaning and sodium flushing of equipment, sodium level control system, the behavior of hydrogen detection system and general outlook of the performance. (author)

  12. From USA operation experience of industrial uranium-graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdakov, N.S.

    1996-01-01

    The review on materials, presented by a group of the USA specialists at the seminar in Moscow on October 9-11, 1995 is considered. The above specialists shared their experience in operation of the Hanford industrial reactors, aimed at plutonium production for atomic bombs. The purpose of the above visit consisted in providing assistance to the Russian specialists by evaluation and modernization of operational conditions safety improvement of the RBMK type reactors. Special attention is paid to the behaviour of the graphite lining and channel tubes with an account of possible channel power interaction with the reactor structural units. The information on the experience of the Hanford reactor operation may be useful for specialists, operating the RBMK type reactors

  13. LMFBR operational safety: the EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Allen, N.L.; Dean, E.M.; Fryer, R.M.; Larson, H.A.; Lehto, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has evolved from that of a small LMFBR demonstration plant to a major irradiation-test facility. Because of that evolution, many operational-safety issues have been encountered. The paper describes the EBR-II operational-safety experience in four areas: protection-system design, safety-document preparation, tests of off-normal reactor conditions, and tests of elements with breached cladding

  14. Current operations and experiments at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) has continued to move toward operation of a fully-integrated, full-sized, computer-controlled fusion fuel processing loop. Concurrent, nonloop experiments have answered important questions on new components and issues such as palladium diffusion membranes, ceramic electrolysis cells, regenerable tritium getters, laser Raman spectroscopy, unregenerable tritium inventory on molecular sieves, tritium contamination problems and decontamination methods, and operating data on reliability, emissions, doses, and wastes generated. 4 refs., 2 figs

  15. Simulator experiments on operator reliability and training effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A. Spurgin, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects of the Operator Reliability Experiments project sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute. The paper deals with modifications to the HCR correlation which have resulted from the study of operators in responding to nuclear accident scenarios using emergency procedures. The interpretation of time response data and how insights in crew performance can lead to improvements in not only crew performance but also in training effectiveness are discussed

  16. Urology Residents' Experience and Attitude Toward Surgical Simulation: Presenting our 4-Year Experience With a Multi-institutional, Multi-modality Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Alexander K; Sherer, Benjamin A; Yura, Emily; Kielb, Stephanie; Kocjancic, Ervin; Eggener, Scott; Turk, Thomas; Park, Sangtae; Psutka, Sarah; Abern, Michael; Latchamsetty, Kalyan C; Coogan, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the Urological resident's attitude and experience with surgical simulation in residency education using a multi-institutional, multi-modality model. Residents from 6 area urology training programs rotated through simulation stations in 4 consecutive sessions from 2014 to 2017. Workshops included GreenLight photovaporization of the prostate, ureteroscopic stone extraction, laparoscopic peg transfer, 3-dimensional laparoscopy rope pass, transobturator sling placement, intravesical injection, high definition video system trainer, vasectomy, and Urolift. Faculty members provided teaching assistance, objective scoring, and verbal feedback. Participants completed a nonvalidated questionnaire evaluating utility of the workshop and soliciting suggestions for improvement. Sixty-three of 75 participants (84%) (postgraduate years 1-6) completed the exit questionnaire. Median rating of exercise usefulness on a scale of 1-10 ranged from 7.5 to 9. On a scale of 0-10, cumulative median scores of the course remained high over 4 years: time limit per station (9; interquartile range [IQR] 2), faculty instruction (9, IQR 2), ease of use (9, IQR 2), face validity (8, IQR 3), and overall course (9, IQR 2). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in rating of domains between postgraduate years. Sixty-seven percent (42/63) believe that simulation training should be a requirement of Urology residency. Ninety-seven percent (63/65) viewed the laboratory as beneficial to their education. This workshop model is a valuable training experience for residents. Most participants believe that surgical simulation is beneficial and should be a requirement for Urology residency. High ratings of usefulness for each exercise demonstrated excellent face validity provided by the course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of new HRA methods based upon operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, S.E.; Luckas, W.J.; Barriere, M.T.; Wreathall, J.

    2004-01-01

    Under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), previously unaddressed human reliability issues are being investigated in order to support the development of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods for both low power and shutdown (LP and S) and full-power conditions. Actual operational experience, such as that reported in Licensee Event Reports (LERs), have been used to gain insights and provide a basis for the requirements of new HRA methods. In particular, operational experience has shown that new HRA methods for LP and S must address human-induced initiators, errors of commission, mistakes (vs. slips), dependencies, and the effects of multiple performance shaping factors (PSFs). (author)

  18. Development and Testing of Screen-Based and Psychometric Instruments for Assessing Resident Performance in an Operating Room Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. McNeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical simulators are used for assessing clinical skills and increasingly for testing hypotheses. We developed and tested an approach for assessing performance in anesthesia residents using screen-based simulation that ensures expert raters remain blinded to subject identity and experimental condition. Methods. Twenty anesthesia residents managed emergencies in an operating room simulator by logging actions through a custom graphical user interface. Two expert raters rated performance based on these entries using custom Global Rating Scale (GRS and Crisis Management Checklist (CMC instruments. Interrater reliability was measured by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, and internal consistency of the instruments was assessed with Cronbach’s alpha. Agreement between GRS and CMC was measured using Spearman rank correlation (SRC. Results. Interrater agreement (GRS: ICC = 0.825, CMC: ICC = 0.878 and internal consistency (GRS: alpha = 0.838, CMC: alpha = 0.886 were good for both instruments. Subscale analysis indicated that several instrument items can be discarded. GRS and CMC scores were highly correlated (SRC = 0.948. Conclusions. In this pilot study, we demonstrated that screen-based simulation can allow blinded assessment of performance. GRS and CMC instruments demonstrated good rater agreement and internal consistency. We plan to further test construct validity of our instruments by measuring performance in our simulator as a function of training level.

  19. Factors influencing the residence time of catchment waters : A virtual experiment approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunn, S.M.; McDonnell, J.J.; Vaché, K.B.

    Estimates of mean residence time (MRT) are increasingly used as simple summary descriptors of the hydrological processes involving storage and mixing of water within catchment systems. Current understanding of the physical controls on MRT remains limited, and various hypotheses have been proposed to

  20. Living through gentrification: subjective experiences of local, non-gentrifying residents in Leith, Edinburgh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doucet, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    The process of gentrification is often seen as having winners and losers; the debate frequently is centred on the gentrifiers and those being displaced by them. However, the process appears to be more complex, and in many gentrifying neighbourhoods, there are residents who do not fit into these

  1. Operating experience on radiation reduction in the latest BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, K.; Uchida, S.; Aizawa, M.; Takagi, K.; Amano, O.; Yamashita, K.

    1988-01-01

    In Japan, BWR plants have been operated commercially since 1970, and the reduction of radiation exposure has been an important concern. The application of the procedure for reducing occupational exposure is incorporated in Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program for LWRs. No.2 and No.4 plants in Fukushima No.2 Nuclear Power Station were designed and constructed as the latest 1,100 MWe BWRs in conformity with the Improvement and Standardization Program. No.2 plant began the commercial operation in February, 1984, and experienced three times of the scheduled annual maintenance outage. No.4 plant began the commercial operation in September, 1987, and the first annual maintenance is scheduled from September, 1988. In this paper, discussion is focused on recent radiation reduction measures, that is the control of iron and nickel in primary coolant for reducing the radiation dose rate in primary systems, based on the experience with No.2 and No.4 plants. The design concept of a low radiation dose rate nuclear power plant, the experience on water chemistry in No.2 plant, the control of iron and nickel in No.4 plant operation and so on are reported. It is believed that these operation experiences contribute to the reduction of occupational exposure in BWR plants currently in operation and in future. (Kako, I.)

  2. Teaching the Healthcare Economics Milestones to Radiology Residents: Our Pilot Curriculum Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prober, Allen S; Mehan, William A; Bedi, Harprit S

    2016-07-01

    Since July 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has required radiology residency programs to implement a set of educational milestones to track residents' educational advancement in six core competencies, including Systems-based Practice. The healthcare economics subcompetency of Systems-based Practice has traditionally been relatively neglected, and given the new increased ACGME oversight, will specifically require greater focused attention. A multi-institutional health-care economics pilot curriculum combining didactic and practical components was implemented across five residency programs. The didactic portion included a package of online recorded presentations, reading, and testing materials developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR's) Radiology Leadership Institute. The practical component involved a series of local meetings led by program faculty with the production of a deliverable based on research of local reimbursement for a noncontrast head computed tomography. The capstone entailed the presentation of each program's deliverable during a live teleconference webcast with a Radiology Leadership Institute content expert acting as moderator and discussion leader. The pilot curriculum was well received by residents and faculty moderators, with 100% of survey respondents agreeing that the pilot met its objective of introducing how reimbursement works in American radiology in 2015 and how business terminology applies to their particular institutions. A health-care economics curriculum in the style of a Massive Open Online Course has strong potential to serve as many residency programs' method of choice in meeting the health-care economics milestones. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  4. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  5. Spanish Power Exchange Market Concepts and Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. J.; Gamito, C.

    2000-01-01

    On January, 1st, 1998, the Spanish Electricity Market started operations. All generators, distributors, commercialization companies, and final consumers negotiate al power exchanges either through the spot market or using bilateral contracts. The Spanish Power Exchange Market Operator (Compania Operadora del Mercado Espanol de electricidad, OMEL) is responsible for the management of the market and for the economic settlement and billing of a transactions on the Power Exchange market, and the technical operational process handled by the System Operator. This paper describes in detail the Spanish market principles and the experience gathered through the design, installation and first two years of market operation. The paper presents also the Spanish market results from January 1998 up to December 1999 indicating each specific market results and aggregate statistics. (Author)

  6. New risk indicator approach for Operators, Workers, Bystanders and Residents for a sustainable use of plant protection products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchettini, Gabriele; Calliera, Maura; Marchis, Alexandru; Glass, Richard; Ellis, Clare Butler; Machera, Kyriaki; Gerritsen-Ebben, Rianda; Spanoghe, Pieter; Capri, Ettore

    2015-11-01

    In 2009, the European Union adopted the Directive on Sustainable Use of pesticides (SUD, Directive 2009/128/EC) establishing a framework for achieving a sustainable use of Plant Protection Products (PPPs) through reducing the risks and impacts of PPP use on human health and the environment, promoting integrated pest management and stimulating effective non-chemical alternatives. The core idea of the SUD is that it is necessary to monitor the use of PPPs through the implementation of an appropriate set of risk indicators to monitor progress and trends in risk reduction within the Member States. To contribute to this direction, following a comprehensive analysis of the risk (including procedures of risk assessment and risk management) and involving stakeholders in the decision process, specific toolboxes of practical indirect risk indicators of exposure of Operators, Workers, Bystanders and Residents were developed and are now available to be used by Member States (MSs) based on their specific context.

  7. Design improvements, construction and operating experience with BWRs in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchigasaki, G.; Yokomi, M.; Sasaki, M.; Aoki, R.; Hashimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    (1) The first domestic-made 1100-MW(e) BWR in Japan commenced commercial operation in April 1982. The unit is the leading one of the subsequent three in Fukushima Daini nuclear power station owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company Inc. (Tepco). Based on the accumulated construction and operation experience of 500-MW(e) and 800-MW(e) class BWRs, improvements in various aspects during both the design and construction stages were introduced in core and fuel design with advanced gadolinia distribution, reactor feedwater treatment technology for crud reduction, a radwaste island, control and instrumentation to cope with the lessons learned through Three Mile Island assessment etc. (2) Based on many operating experiences with BWRs, an improved BWR core, which has easier operability and higher load factor than the conventional core, has been developed. The characteristic of the improved core is ''axially two-zoned uranium enrichment distribution''; the enrichment of the upper part of the fuel is slightly higher than that of the lower part. Through the improved core it became possible to optimize the axial power flattening and core reactivity control separately by axial enrichment distribution and burnable poison content. The improved fuels were loaded into operating BWRs and successfully proved the performance by this experience. (3) To shorten annual outage time, to reduce radiation exposure, to save manpower, and to achieve high reliability and safety of inspection operation, the remote automatic service and inspection equipment were developed in Japan. This paper presents the concept, distinctive features, and actual operation experience of the automatic refuelling machine, control-rod drive (CRD) remote-handling machine, improved main steam line isolation plug, and the automated ultrasonic inspection system with a computerized data processing unit, which have been developed by Hitachi, Ltd. with excellent results. (author)

  8. Has the creation of a urology residency programme translated in to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Surgical residency programmes are supposed to enhance resident operative experience. The impact of urology residency was assessed at our institution before and after establishing a structured urology training programme in 2006. MATERIALS /METHODS: Log books of final year Urological residents ...

  9. EBO feed water distribution system, experience gained from operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O. [Energovyzkum, Brno (Switzerland); Schmidt, S.; Mihalik, M. [Atomove Elektrarne Bohunice, Jaslovske Bohunice (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    Advanced feed water distribution systems of the EBO design have been installed into steam generators at Units 3 and 4 of the NPP Jaslovske Bohunice (VVER 440). Experiences gained from the operation of steam generators with the advanced feed water distribution systems are discussed in the paper. (orig.). 4 refs.

  10. EBO feed water distribution system, experience gained from operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O [Energovyzkum, Brno (Switzerland); Schmidt, S; Mihalik, M [Atomove Elektrarne Bohunice, Jaslovske Bohunice (Switzerland)

    1998-12-31

    Advanced feed water distribution systems of the EBO design have been installed into steam generators at Units 3 and 4 of the NPP Jaslovske Bohunice (VVER 440). Experiences gained from the operation of steam generators with the advanced feed water distribution systems are discussed in the paper. (orig.). 4 refs.

  11. Operating experience and corrective action program at Ontario Hydro Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingwood, Barry; Turner, David

    1998-01-01

    This is a slide-based talk given at the COG/IAEA: 5. Technical Committee Meeting on 'Exchange of operating experience of pressurized heavy water reactors'. In the introduction there are presented the operating experience (OPEX) program of OHN, and the OPEX Program Mission, ensuring that the right information gets to the right staff at the right time. The OPEX Processes are analysed. These are: - Internal Corrective Action; - Inter-site Lesson Transfer; - External Lesson Transfer; - External Posting of OHN Events; - Internalizing Operating Experience. Steps in solving the Corrective Action Program are described: - Identify the Problem; - Notify Immediate Supervision/Manager; - Evaluate the Problem; - Correct the Problem; Monitor/Report Status. The Internal Corrective Action is then presented as a flowchart. The internalizing operating experience is presented under three aspects: - Communication; - Interface; - Training. The following items are discussed, respectively: peer meetings, department/section meetings, safety meetings, e-mail folders, newsletters and bulletin boards; work planning, pre-job briefings, supervisors' briefing cards; classroom initial and refresher (case studies), simulator, management courses. A diagram is presented showing the flow and treatment of information within OHN, centered on the weekly screening meetings. Finally, the corrective action processes are depicted in a flowchart and analysed in details

  12. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  13. PFR experience of bellows operating in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, D.

    1980-01-01

    Although there was little operating experience with bellows in sodium systems available during the design phase of the UK 250 MWe prototype fast reactor, bellows were extensively utilised to seal valves and to overcome the problems of differential thermal movements in several important applications. However, because of this lack of operational experience in sodium and the non-availability of design codes it was considered prudent not to install bellows in situations where failure could possibly initiate events of unpredictable proportions, or in positions where replacement following failure would be extremely difficult i.e. involving complete shutdown of the reactor over an extended period (in excess of six months) and/or necessitate removal of large quantities of primary sodium from the reactor vessel. This paper describes some of the bellows units installed in the PFR and the performance achieved during six years of reactor operation

  14. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  15. TSTA piping and flame arrestor operating experience data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee C., E-mail: Lee.Cadwallader@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Willms, R. Scott [ITER International Organization, Cadarache (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Experiences from the Tritium Systems Test Assembly were examined. • Failure rates of copper piping and a flame arrestor were calculated. • The calculated failure rates compared well to similar data from the literature. • Tritium component failure rate data support fusion safety assessment. - Abstract: The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium handling technology and experiment research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility was operated with tritium for its research and development program from 1984 to 2001, running a prototype fusion fuel processing loop with ∼100 g of tritium as well as small experiments. There have been several operating experience reports written on this facility's operation and maintenance experience. This paper describes reliability analysis of two additional components from TSTA, small diameter copper gas piping that handled tritium in a nitrogen carrier gas, and the flame arrestor used in this piping system. The component failure rates for these components are discussed in this paper. Comparison data from other applications are also presented.

  16. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  17. Configuration control during plant outages. A review of operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinador Veira, Miguel; El Kanbi, Semir [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport; Stephan, Jean-Luc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Martens, Johannes [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    After the occurrence of several significant events in nuclear power plants during shut-down modes of operation in the eighties, and from the results of probabilistic safety assessments completed in the nineties, it was clear that risk from low power and shutdown operational modes could not be neglected and had to be addressed by appropriate safety programs. A comprehensive review of operating experience from the last ten years has been conducted by the Joint Research Centre with the objective of deriving lessons learned and recommendations useful for nuclear regulatory bodies and utilities alike. This paper is focused on one particular challenge that any nuclear plant faces whenever it plans its next outage period: how to manage the configuration of all systems under a complex environment involving numerous concurrent activities, and how to make sure that systems are returned to their valid configuration before the plant resumes power operation. This study highlights the importance of conveying accurate but synthesized information on the status of the plant to the operators in the main control room. Many of the lessons learned are related to the alarm display in the control room and to the use of check lists to control the status of systems. Members of the industry and safety authorities may now use these recommendations and lessons learned to feed their own operating experience feedback programs, and check their applicability for specific sites.

  18. Recent operating experiences with steam generators in Japanese NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Seiji

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, the Genkai-3 of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. and the Ikata-3 of Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. started commercial operation, and now 22 PWR plants are being operated in Japan. Since the first PWR plant now 22 PWR plants are being operated in was started to operate, Japanese PWR plants have had an operating experience of approx. 280 reactor-years. During that period, many tube degradations have been experienced in steam generators (SGs). And, in 1991, the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) occurred in the Mihama-2 of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. However, the occurrence of tube degradation of SGs has been decreased by the instructions of the MITI as regulatory authorities, efforts of Electric Utilities, and technical support from the SG manufacturers. Here the author describes the recent SGs in Japan about the following points. (1) Recent Operating Experiences (2) Lessons learned from Mihama-2 SGTR (3) SG replacement (4) Safety Regulations on SG (5) Research and development on SG

  19. Vacuum system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents a review of vacuum system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space simulation chamber, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of vacuum system component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with vacuum systems are discussed, including personnel safety, foreign material intrusion, and factors relevant to vacuum systems being the primary confinement boundary for tritium and activated dusts. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  20. Fast reactor operating experience gained in Russia: Analysis of anomalies and abnormal operation cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurko, Y.M.; Baklushin, R.P.; Zagorulko, Y.I.; Ivanenko, V.N.; Matveyev, V.P.; Vasilyev, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Review of various anomalous events and abnormal operation experience gained in the process of Russian fast reactors operation is given in the paper. The main information refers to the BN-600 demonstration reactor operation. Statistical data on sodium leaks and steam generator failures are presented, and sources of these events and countermeasures taken to avoid their appearance on the operating reactors as well as related changes made in the BN-800 reactor design are considered. In the paper, some features of impurities behaviour are considered in various modes of the BN-600 reactor operation. Information is given on the impurities ingress into the circuits, on abnormal situation emerged in the process of the BN-600 reactor operation and its probable cause. Information is presented on the event related to the increased torque of the BN-600 reactor central rotating column and repair works performed. (author)

  1. Increased self-efficacy: the experience of high-intensity exercise of nursing home residents with dementia - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Cecilie Fromholt; Telenius, Elisabeth Wiken; Engedal, Knut; Bergland, Astrid

    2015-09-14

    There has been increasing interest in the use of non-pharmacological interventions, such as physical exercise, to improve the well-being of nursing home residents with dementia. For reasons regarding disease symptoms, persons with dementia might find it difficult to participate in exercise programs. Therefore, it is important to find ways to successfully promote regular exercise for patients in residential care. Several quantitative studies have established the positive effects of exercise on biopsychosocial factors, such as self-efficacy in older people; however, little is known regarding the qualitative aspects of participating in an exercise program among older people with dementia. From the perspective of residents, we explored the experiences of participating in a high-intensity functional exercise program among nursing home residents with dementia. The participants were eight elderly people with mild-to-moderate dementia. We conducted semi-structured interviews one week after they had finished a 10-week supervised high-intensity exercise program. We analyzed the data using an inductive content analysis. Five overreaching and interrelated themes emerged from the interviews: "Pushing the limits," "Being invested in," "Relationships facilitate exercise participation," "Exercise revives the body, increases independence and improves self-esteem" and "Physical activity is a basic human necessity--use it or lose it!" The results were interpreted in light of Bandura's self-efficacy theory. The exercise program seemed to improve self-efficacy through several mechanisms. By being involved, "being invested in" and having something expected of them, the participants gained a sense of empowerment in their everyday lives. The importance of social influences related to the exercise instructor and the exercise group was accentuated by the participants. The nursing home residents had, for the most part, positive experiences with regard to participating in the exercise program

  2. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, F.

    1991-01-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology

  3. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, F [Reactor Regulation Division, Nuclear Safety Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-04-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology.

  4. Operating experience with superconducting cavities at the TESLA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich

    2003-01-01

    A description of the TESLA Test Facility, which has been set up at DESY by the TeV Energy Superconducting Accelerator (TESLA) collaboration, will be given as it is now after five years of installation and operation. The experience with the first three modules, each containing 8 superconducting 9-cell cavities, installed and operated in the TTF-linac will be described. The measurements in the vertical and horizontal cryostats as well as in the modules will be compared. Recent results of the operation at the TESLA design current, macropulses of 800 μsec with bunches of 3.2 nC at a rate of 2.25 MHz are given. New measurement results of the higher order modes (HOM) will be presented. The operation and optimisation of the TTF Free Electron Laser (TTF-FEL) will also be covered in this paper. (author)

  5. European clearinghouse on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranguelova, Vesselina; Bruynooghe, Christiane; Noel, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Learning from operational experience and applying this knowledge promptly and intelligently is one of the ways to improve the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Recent reviews of the effectiveness of Operational Experience Feedback (OEF) systems have pointed to the need for further improvement, with importance being placed on tailoring the information to the needs of the regulators. In 2007, at the request of a number of nuclear safety regulatory authorities in Europe, the Institute for Energy of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EC JRC) initiated a project on Nuclear Power Plant operational experience feedback, which adopts an integrated approach to the research needed to strengthen the European capabilities for assessment of NPP operational events and to promote the development of tools and mechanisms for the improved application of the lessons learned. Consequently, a so-called ''European Clearinghouse'' on NPP OEF was established, which includes scientific officers from the EC JRC, a number of European nuclear safety regulatory authorities and some of their Technical Support Organizations (TSOs). The paper discusses the activities implemented in 2008 within the framework of the European Clearinghouse on NPP OEF (hereinafter called the European NPP Clearinghouse) and provides an overview of the main conclusions drawn from the safety studies performed. Outlook of the activities carried out in 2009 are given. (orig.)

  6. Experiences of operation for Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimoto, Shigeyuki

    1979-01-01

    No. 1 plant in the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., is a two-loop PWR unit with electric output of 566 MW, and it began the commercial operation on September 30, 1977, as the first nuclear power station in Shikoku. It is the 13th LWR and 7th PWR in Japan. The period of construction was 52 months since it had been started in June, 1973. During the period, it became the object of the first administrative litigation to seek the cancellation of permission to install the reactor, and it was subjected to the influence of the violent economical variation due to the oil shock, but it was completed as scheduled. After the start of operation, it continued the satisfactory operation, and generated about 2.35 billion KWh for 4300 operation hours. It achieved the rate of utilization of 96.7%. Since March 28, 1978, the first periodical inspection was carried out, and abnormality was not found in the reactor, the steam generator and the fuel at all. The period of inspection was 79 days and shorter than expected. The commercial operation was started again on June 14. The outline of the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, its state of operation, and the periodical inspection are reported. Very good results were able to be reported on the operation for one year, thanks to the valuable experiences offered by other electric power companies. (Kako, I.)

  7. Operating experience with superconducting cavities at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    The CEBAF recirculating superconducting electron linac at Jefferson Lab is now in full operation supporting nuclear physics experiments in three target halls at up to 4.4 GeV. The 330 SRF cavities, operating at 2.0 K, continue to perform well above design specifications, and have accumulated over 8,000,000 operating cavity hours. The authors have to date no evidence of degradation of cavity performance. The SRF cavities have demonstrated excellent reliability. The one klystron per cavity design provides CEBAF with flexibility and redundancy for normal operations. Several techniques have been developed for establishing optimum operating conditions for the 330 independent systems. Operation of the cavities and control systems at the full design current of 1 mA has recently been achieved. The principal constraints on usable gradient for low current operations are (1) discharge at the cold ceramic rf window induced by electron field emission in cavities, (2) tuner controls, and (3) stability of the waveguide vacuum in the region between the warm and cold windows. Several cryomodules have been improved by application of rf helium processing while installed on the beamline

  8. Experiences on operation, maintenance and utilization in JRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Japan Research Reactor No.2 (JRR-2) is a high performance 10 MW multi purpose research reactor, heavy water moderated and cooled enriched uranium fuel used. Since the first criticality was attained in October, 1960, JRR-2 has been operated to satisfy the utilization demands, such as irradiation of fuel and materials, neutron beam experiments, radio isotope production and B.N.C.T (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). During the operation, various kinds of troubles mainly caused by the old design concept had been occurred at the JRR-2 systems and components. Those troubles were solved with adequate countermeasures of timely repairs and large scale modifications with newest techniques. The works above were completely carried out by the staff of JRR-2 and related divisions. As a result, JRR-2 became one of the oldest research reactors which are still under operation in the world. Since JRR-2 has been utilized for more than 30 years, the operation mode was changed from 12 days-one cycle to 3 days-one cycle in April, 1994, taking into consideration aging of the reactor systems. In this paper, the experiences of JRR-2 for more than 30 years such as operation, maintenance, repair, modifications and utilization on JRR-2 are described. (author)

  9. Vitrification operational experiences and lessons learned at the WVDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.F. Jr.; Sheridan, M.J.; Valenti, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) commenced full, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) processing activities in July 1996. The HLW consists of a blend of washed plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) sludge, neutralized thorium extraction (THOREX) waste, and cesium-loaded zeolite. The waste product is borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, sealed for eventual disposal in a federal repository. This paper discusses the WVDP vitrification process, focusing on operational experience and lessons learned during the first year of continuous, remote operation

  10. Procedure for following external nuclear power plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has developed computer database and the procedure for following-up and investigating external nuclear operating experience and administrative requirements. The SNSA's primary goal is to investigate safety significant events in due time, to analyze them from the regulatory point of view and to ensure that meaningful lessons be learned and used for improvement of the safe operation of Slovenian Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. Moreover, we intend to make uniform format and method for reporting broader spectrum of events analyzed including low level event reporting. (author)

  11. Operational experience of ATLAS SCT and Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kocian, Martin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector based on silicon sensors is consisting of a strip detector (SCT) and a pixel detector. It is the crucial component for vertexing and tracking in the ATLAS experiment. With the excellent performance of the LHC well beyond the original specification the silicon tracking detectors are facing substantial challenges in terms of data acquisition, radiation damage to the sensors, and SEUs in the readout ASICs. The approaches on how the detector systems cope with the demands of high luminosity operation while maintaining excellent performance through hardware upgrades, software and firmware algorithms, and operational settings, are presented.

  12. Nuclear power plant operating experience. Annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, M.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports issued annually that summarizes the operating experience of US nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1978 data from 65 plants - 25 boiling water reactor plants and 40 pressurized water reactor plants. Discussion of radioactive effluents which has been a part of this report in previous years, has not been included in this issue because of late acquisition of data

  13. Analysis of operating experience of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volta, G.; Amesz, J.; Mancini, G.

    1981-01-01

    The power reactors operating experience has been matter for studies at the Joint Research Centre of the C.E.C. with the aim of validating probabilistic analysis models and of setting up data banks concerning reliability, availability of components and systems and safety related events. The report shows problems encountered and solutions given to attain the goal. For what concerns validation, the need of more satisfactory models that could handle both the technical and the organizational aspects of an operating plant is shown. For what concerns the data banks the possibilities opened by a coherent international system of classification are underlined. (author)

  14. Impact of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform on hospital patient experience and processes-of-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Saadat, Lily; Chung, Jeanette; Dahlke, Allison; Yang, Anthony D; Odell, David D; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2016-12-01

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) expanded restrictions on resident duty hours. While studies have shown no association between these restrictions and improved outcomes, process-of-care and patient experience measures may be more sensitive to resident performance, and thus may be impacted by duty hour policies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the 2011 resident duty hour reform and measures of processes-of-care and patient experience. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data and process-of-care scores were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare website for 1 year prior to (1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011) and 1 year after (1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012) duty hour reform implementation. Using a difference-in-differences model, non-teaching and teaching hospitals were compared before and after the 2011 reform to test the association of this policy with changes in process-of-care and patient experience measure scores. Duty hour reform was not associated with a change in the five patient experience measures evaluated, including patients rating a hospital 9 or 10 (coefficient -0.003, 95% CI -0.79 to 0.79) or stating they would 'definitely recommend' a hospital (coefficient -0.28, 95% CI -1.01 to 0.44). For all 10 process-of-care measures examined, such as antibiotic timing (coefficient -0.462, 95% CI -1.502 to 0.579) and discontinuation (0.188, 95% CI -0.529 to 0.904), duty hour reform was not associated with a change in scores. The 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was not associated with improvements in process-of-care and patient experience measures. These data should be considered when considering reform of resident duty hour policies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Christopher Blake; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of $1.3\\times10^{34}\\text{cm}^{{-2}}\\text{s}^{{-1}}$ recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarized, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  16. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Christopher Blake; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 1.3 x 10^34 cm-2 s-1 recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  17. Clinical Education Environment Experiences of Operating Room Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh khazaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The objective of medical education is to train competent and qualified workforce in order to provide services in various health environments. One of the important objectives of Operating Room students is to train workforce who can involve in patient’s health and recovery. Training these students should cause clinical ability and independent decision making during surgery. Since students during internship face with many problems, this study has been conducted to explore and describe the challenges and experiences.Methods: This qualitative study is a phenomenology that was conducted based on 20 students in the last semester of Operating Room associate’s degree with purposive sampling. Deep and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data and data were analyzed by content analysis method.Results: The findings in 5 main themes: (1 Physical space and equipment in the operating room, (2 The student’s position in operating room, (3 Integrating knowledge and action, (4 Managing education environment and 5- Student’s viewpoint about operating room and working in it.Conclusions: Interviews with students revealed the educational environment challenges with which they are faced during their study. Teachers can provide solutions to overcome the challenges and create a positive atmosphere for students' learning using results of this study and students may continue their interest in education and improve the quality of their education.Keywords: CLINICAL EDUCATION, OPERATING ROOM STUDENTS, CHALLENGE

  18. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Yoshioka, T.; Toyota, M.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    To develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on safety assurance and to endeavour to devise measures to improve plant availability, based on the careful analysis of causes that reduce plant availability. The paper discusses the results of studies on the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and operating experience of LWR nuclear power plants in Japan: operating experience with LWRs; improvements in LWR design during the past ten years; analysis of the factors affecting plant availability; (2) Assurance of safety and measures to increase availability: measures for safety and environmental protection; measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees; appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work; measures to increase plant availability; measures to improve reliability of equipment and components; (3) Future technical problems. (author)

  19. ATLAS Operations: Experience and Evolution in the Data Taking Era

    CERN Document Server

    Ueda, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Goossens, L; Stewart, G; Jezequel, S; Nairz, A; Negri, G; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarises the operational experience and improvements of the ATLAS hierarchical multi-tier computing infrastructure in the past year leading to taking and processing of the first collisions in 2009 and 2010. Special focus will be given to Tier-0 which is responsible, among other things, for a prompt processing of the raw data coming from the online DAQ system and is thus critical part of the chain. We will give an overview of the Tier-0 architecture, and improvements based on the operational experience. Emphasis will be put on the new developments, namely the Task Management System opening Tier-0 to expert users and Web 2.0 monitoring and management suite. We then overview the achieved performances with the distributed computing system, discuss observed data access patterns over the grid and describe how we used this information to improve analysis rates.

  20. Operating Experiences of a Loss of Voltage Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Loss of voltage (LOV) events continue to occur due to inadequate work management and random human errors. On February 26, 2015, regulators analyzed the root causes of LOV events and presented the results for the nuclear industry. Currently, KHNP uses a risk monitoring program, which is named 'LOV Monitor', for LOV prevention during pilot plant outages. This review introduces the operation experiences of LOV Monitor based on the evaluation results of a real event. The operation experiences of LOV Monitor in the pilot plants confirmed that this program could detect and reduce LOV possibilities from scheduling errors such as the simultaneous maintenance of energized trains and de-energized trains considering the physical conditions of the power circuit breakers. However, a maintenance culture that heeds the risk monitoring result must be strengthened in order to obtain substantial effects through applying LOV Monitor to the outage.

  1. ATLAS Operations: Experience and Evolution in the Data Taking Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, I

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarises the operational experience and improvements of the ATLAS hierarchical multi-tier computing infrastructure in the past year leading to taking and processing of the first collisions in 2009 and 2010. Special focus will be given to the Tier-0 which is responsible, among other things, for a prompt processing of the raw data coming from the online DAQ system and is thus a critical part of the chain. We will give an overview of the Tier-0 architecture, and improvements based on the operational experience. Emphasis will be put on the new developments, namely the Task Management System opening Tier-0 to expert users and Web 2.0 monitoring and management suite. We then overview the achieved performances with the distributed computing system, discuss observed data access patterns over the grid and describe how we used this information to improve analysis rates.

  2. Machine utilisation and operation experience with Jet from 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.J.; Chuilon, P.; Noble, B.; Saunders, R.; Webberley, D.

    1989-01-01

    The operation of JET commenced in June 1983 and is scheduled until the end of 1992. This seemingly long period is actually quite limited when compared with the time needed to implement and commission the planned machine enhancements, and pursue research and developments which result from the experiments. There is an ever-present urgency to make the best use of the machine. 1983-84 was a learning period and only in 1985 was it felt worthwhile to adopt double-shift day working. Data has been compiled and analysed for utilisation of the machine, delays in terms of time lost and systems involved, and number and frequency of machine pulses. This paper presents an overall picture of machine availability and utilisation. It describes the JET operational arrangements and the experience of system faults. Finally, it draws conclusions and identifies lessons learned which may be relevant to the next stage of fusion power development

  3. Machine utilisation and operation experience with JET from 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.J.; Chuilon, P.; Noble, B.; Saunders, R.; Webberley, D.

    1989-01-01

    The operation of JET commenced in June 1983 and is scheduled until the end of 1992. This seemingly long period is actually quite limited when compared with the time needed to implement and commission the planned machine enhancements, and pursue research and developments which result from the experiments. There is an ever-present urgency to make the use of the machine. 1983-84 was a learning period and only in 1985 was it felt worthwhile to adopt double-shift day working. Data has been compiled and analysed for utilisation of the machine, delays in terms of time lost and system involved, and number and frequency of machine pulses. This paper presents an overall picture of machine availability and utilisation. It describes the JET operational arrangements and the experience of system faults. Finally, it draws conclusions and identifies lessons learned which may be relevant to the next stage of fusion power development. (author). 9 figs

  4. Research on the NPP human factors engineering operating experience review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiangchen; Miao Hongxing; Ning Zhonghe

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the importance of the human factors engineering (HFE) for the design of nuclear power plant (NPP), especially for the design of human-machine interface in the NPP. It also summarizes the scope and content of the NPP HFE. The function, scope, content and process of the NPP human factors engineering operating experience review (OER) are mainly focused on, and significantly discussed. Finally, it briefly introduces the situation of the studies on the OER in China. (authors)

  5. Estimation of fire frequency from PWR operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, R.; Bonneval, F.; Barrachin, G.; Bonino, F.

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of a fire probabilistic safety assessment (Fire PSA), the French Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) has developed a method for estimating the frequency of fire in a nuclear power plant room. This method is based on the analysis of French Pressurized Water Reactors operating experience. The method adopted consists is carrying out an in-depth analysis of fire-related incidents. A database has been created including 202 fire events reported in 900 MWe and 1300 MWe reactors from the start of their commercial operation up to the first of March 1994, which represents a cumulated service life of 508 reactor-years. For each reported fire, several data were recorded among which: The operating state of the reactor in the stage preceding the fire, the building in which the fire broke out, the piece of equipment or the human intervention which caused the fire. Operating experience shows that most fires are initiated by electrical problems (short-circuits, arcing, faulty contacts, etc.) and that human intervention also plays an important role (grinding, cutting, welding, cleaning, etc.). A list of equipment and of human interventions which proved to be possible fire sources was therefore drawn up. the items of this list were distributed in 19 reference groups defined by taking into account the nature of the potential ignition source (transformers, electrical cabinets, pumps, fans, etc.). The fire frequency assigned to each reference group was figured out using the operating experience information of the database. The fire frequency in a room is considered to be made out of two contributions: one due to equipment which is proportional to the number of pieces of equipment from each reference group contained in the room, and a second one which is due to human interventions and assumed to be uniform throughout the reactor. Formulas to assess the fire frequencies in a room, the reactor being in a shutdown state or at power, are then proposed

  6. Applying operating experience to design the CANDU 3 process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.S.; Hinchley, E.M.; Pauksens, J.; Snell, V.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The CANDU 3 is an advanced, smaller (450 MWe), standardized version of the CANDU now being designed for service later in the decade and beyond. The design of this evolutionary nuclear power plant has been carefully planned and organized to gain maximum benefits from new technologies and from world experience to date in designing, building, commissioning and operating nuclear power stations. The good performance record of existing CANDU reactors makes consideration of operating experience from these plants a particularly vital component of the design process. Since the completion of the first four CANDU 6 stations in the early 1980s, and with the continuing evolution of the multi-unit CANDU station designs since then, AECL CANDU has devised several processes to ensure that such feedback is made available to designers. An important step was made in 1986 when a task force was set up to review and process ideas arising from the commissioning and early operation of the CANDU 6 reactors which were, by that time, operating successfully in Argentina and Korea, as well as the Canadian provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick. The task force issued a comprehensive report which, although aimed at the design of an improved CANDU 6 station, was made available to the CANDU 3 team. By that time also, the Institute of Power Operations (INPO) in the U.S., of which AECL is a Supplier Participant member, was starting to publish Good Practices and Guidelines related to the review and the use of operating experiences. In addition, details of significant events were being made available via the INPO SEE-IN (Significant Event Evaluation and Information Network) Program, and subsequently the CANNET network of the CANDU Owners' Group (COG). Systematic review was thus possible by designers of operations reports, significant event reports, and related documents in a continuing program of design improvement. Another method of incorporating operations feedback is to involve experienced utility

  7. Applying operating experience to design the CANDU 3 process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D S; Hinchley, E M; Pauksens, J; Snell, V; Yu, S K.W. [AECL-CANDU, Ontario (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    The CANDU 3 is an advanced, smaller (450 MWe), standardized version of the CANDU now being designed for service later in the decade and beyond. The design of this evolutionary nuclear power plant has been carefully planned and organized to gain maximum benefits from new technologies and from world experience to date in designing, building, commissioning and operating nuclear power stations. The good performance record of existing CANDU reactors makes consideration of operating experience from these plants a particularly vital component of the design process. Since the completion of the first four CANDU 6 stations in the early 1980s, and with the continuing evolution of the multi-unit CANDU station designs since then, AECL CANDU has devised several processes to ensure that such feedback is made available to designers. An important step was made in 1986 when a task force was set up to review and process ideas arising from the commissioning and early operation of the CANDU 6 reactors which were, by that time, operating successfully in Argentina and Korea, as well as the Canadian provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick. The task force issued a comprehensive report which, although aimed at the design of an improved CANDU 6 station, was made available to the CANDU 3 team. By that time also, the Institute of Power Operations (INPO) in the U.S., of which AECL is a Supplier Participant member, was starting to publish Good Practices and Guidelines related to the review and the use of operating experiences. In addition, details of significant events were being made available via the INPO SEE-IN (Significant Event Evaluation and Information Network) Program, and subsequently the CANNET network of the CANDU Owners' Group (COG). Systematic review was thus possible by designers of operations reports, significant event reports, and related documents in a continuing program of design improvement. Another method of incorporating operations feedback is to involve experienced utility

  8. Evaluation of operating experience for service life of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.; Sunder, R.

    1987-01-01

    The evaluation of the operating experience of German light-water reactor components based on licensee event reports indicates that a large part of the defects and failures are caused by fatigue and/or corrosion type mechanisms. Actions have been taken to eliminate the causes by redesigning systems, replacement of components and change of operating procedures. The interaction of fatigue and corrosion mechanisms are not understood in all details today, further research is still necessary. To establish a more realistic data base of the local loading and water chemistry condition for all loading conditions the application of advanced monitoring systems is proposed. The benefits of these systems are that the operating procedures can be further optimized, the actual used life time fraction can be calculated regularly and the data base can be used for life time extension. (orig.) [de

  9. Operational experience gained from the Central Brae subsea field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapp, S.J.; Gomersall, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The size of the field discoveries made in the North Sea in recent years has declined dramatically. With the low oil price many small fields are not viable stand alone developments. The North Sea has a large, well developed infrastructure of production facilities and pipelines. With many platforms now operating below optimum production rate, subsea tieback of these small fields utilizing the available processing capacity is the most economically attractive means of development. This paper presents a history of such a field development. The Central Brae field is located within the Brae complex of fields, 155 miles north east of Aberdeen, and has been developed by means of a subsea facility tied back to the Brae Alpha platform. A great deal of experience has been gained through the field development, not only in subsea operations but also in completion and template design and operating philosophy

  10. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented, including calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency e...

  11. Wabash River coal gasification repowering project -- first year operation experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxclair, E.J. [Destec Energy, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Stultz, J. [PSI Energy, Inc., West Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (WRCGRP), a joint venture between Destec Energy, Inc. and PSI Energy, Inc., began commercial operation in November of 1995. The Project, selected by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Clean Coal Program (Round IV) represents the largest operating coal gasification combined cycle plant in the world. This Demonstration Project has allowed PSI Energy to repower a 1950`s vintage steam turbine and install a new syngas fired combustion turbine to provide 262 MW (net) of electricity in a clean, efficient manner in a commercial utility setting while utilizing locally mined high sulfur Indiana bituminous coal. In doing so, the Project is also demonstrating some novel technology while advancing the commercialization of integrated coal gasification combined cycle technology. This paper discusses the first year operation experience of the Wabash Project, focusing on the progress towards achievement of the demonstration objectives.

  12. Experience building and operating the CMS Tier-1 computing centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, M.; Bakken, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Brew, C.; Charlot, C.; Huang, Chih-Hao; Colling, D.; Dumitrescu, C.; Fagan, D.; Fassi, F.; Fisk, I.; Flix, J.; Giacchetti, L.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gowdy, S.; Grandi, C.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, K.; Holzman, B.; Jackson, J.; Kreuzer, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Mason, D.; Pukhaeva, N.; Qin, G.; Quast, G.; Rossman, P.; Sartirana, A.; Scheurer, A.; Schott, G.; Shih, J.; Tader, P.; Thompson, R.; Tiradani, A.; Trunov, A.

    2010-04-01

    The CMS Collaboration relies on 7 globally distributed Tier-1 computing centres located at large universities and national laboratories for a second custodial copy of the CMS RAW data and primary copy of the simulated data, data serving capacity to Tier-2 centres for analysis, and the bulk of the reprocessing and event selection capacity in the experiment. The Tier-1 sites have a challenging role in CMS because they are expected to ingest and archive data from both CERN and regional Tier-2 centres, while they export data to a global mesh of Tier-2s at rates comparable to the raw export data rate from CERN. The combined capacity of the Tier-1 centres is more than twice the resources located at CERN and efficiently utilizing this large distributed resources represents a challenge. In this article we will discuss the experience building, operating, and utilizing the CMS Tier-1 computing centres. We will summarize the facility challenges at the Tier-1s including the stable operations of CMS services, the ability to scale to large numbers of processing requests and large volumes of data, and the ability to provide custodial storage and high performance data serving. We will also present the operations experience utilizing the distributed Tier-1 centres from a distance: transferring data, submitting data serving requests, and submitting batch processing requests.

  13. Experience building and operating the CMS Tier-1 computing centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M; Bakken, J; Huang, Chih-Hao; Dumitrescu, C; Fagan, D; Fisk, I; Giacchetti, L; Gutsche, O; Holzman, B; Bonacorsi, D; Grandi, C; Brew, C; Jackson, J; Charlot, C; Colling, D; Fassi, F; Flix, J; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Hahn, K; Gowdy, S

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration relies on 7 globally distributed Tier-1 computing centres located at large universities and national laboratories for a second custodial copy of the CMS RAW data and primary copy of the simulated data, data serving capacity to Tier-2 centres for analysis, and the bulk of the reprocessing and event selection capacity in the experiment. The Tier-1 sites have a challenging role in CMS because they are expected to ingest and archive data from both CERN and regional Tier-2 centres, while they export data to a global mesh of Tier-2s at rates comparable to the raw export data rate from CERN. The combined capacity of the Tier-1 centres is more than twice the resources located at CERN and efficiently utilizing this large distributed resources represents a challenge. In this article we will discuss the experience building, operating, and utilizing the CMS Tier-1 computing centres. We will summarize the facility challenges at the Tier-1s including the stable operations of CMS services, the ability to scale to large numbers of processing requests and large volumes of data, and the ability to provide custodial storage and high performance data serving. We will also present the operations experience utilizing the distributed Tier-1 centres from a distance: transferring data, submitting data serving requests, and submitting batch processing requests.

  14. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, S.

    1966-09-01

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW t ) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965

  15. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S [ed.

    1966-09-15

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW{sub t}) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965.

  16. Canadian fuel development program and recent operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Kohn, E.; Lau, J.H.K.; Dicke, G.J.; Macici, N.N.; Sancton, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current Canadian CANDU fuel R and D programs and operational experience. The details of operational experience for fuel in Canadian reactors are summarized for the period 1991-1994; excellent fuel performance has been sustained, with steady-state bundle defect rates currently as low as 0.02%. The status of introducing long 37-element bundles, and bundles with rounded bearing pads is reviewed. These minor changes in fuel design have been selectively introduced in response to operational constraints (end-plate cracking and pressure-tube fretting) at Ontario Hydro's Bruce-B and Darlington stations. The R and D programs are generating a more complete understanding of CANDU fuel behaviour, while the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Fuel Technology Program is being re-aligned to a more exclusive focus on the needs of operating stations. Technical highlights and realized benefits from the COG program are summarized. Re-organization of AECL to provide a one-company focus, with an outward looking view to new CANDU markets, has strengthened R and D in advanced fuel cycles. Progress in AECL's key fuel cycle programs is also summarized. (author)

  17. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S. (ed.)

    1966-09-15

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW{sub t}) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965.

  18. Operating results and experience and operating regimes in changing demands of energy world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobza, L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, there are stated some operating results and experience obtained from trial operation of Temelin NPP. In Europe, Temelin NPP is presently one of the latest implemented projects of the series of VVER 1000 nuclear units with proven V-320 pressurized water reactor. The distinction between Temelin NPP and original project lays mainly in supply of nuclear fuel and in I and C systems delivered by Westinghouse Company. Temelin NPP has passed through commissioning period and trial operation. The main goal of the trial operation was to meet the requirements of section 2, par. 4, point b) of Decree No. 106/98 Sb. and verification of project parameters and stability of operation, and the situation leading to violation of safety functions fulfilment according to Pre-operational Safety Report should not occur. The integral part of trial operation assessment was also successful performing of determined monitoring programmes, first refuelling and performing of prescribed tests and operational inspections. Simultaneously, first experience was obtained with nuclear fuel; providing of ancillary services; reliability of important components; operation of turbine-generator 1000 MW; chemical regime; influence to environment; and quality of contractors. As safety is the most important indicator, it can be stated that: no facts which would lead to decreasing of safety systems operability have been detected; no facts which would lead to negative affecting of barriers against fading the radioactivity into both working areas and environment, have been detected; good condition of fire safety has been continuously documented; requirements of limits for releasing waste water into environment have been continuously complied with; requirements of limits for releasing radioactive substances (in gaseous and/or liquid state) into environment have been continuously complied with. From the operation regimes point of view is clear, that it would be suitable for the power plant if the

  19. Experience on operational safety improvement of control and operation support systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, N.; Nakagawa, T.; Mano, K.

    1988-01-01

    Japanese nuclear industry started in 1956 and about 30 years have passed since that time. Through these years, we have made a lot of efforts and developments in the field of Control and Instrumentation (C and I) system. The above 30 years and following years can be divided into four major periods. The first one is the period of research, the second of domestic production, the third of improvement, and the fourth of advancement. Improvements of C and I system, which we have made in those periods have made a great contribution to enhancement of reliability, availability and operability of nuclear power plants. Fig. 1 shows TEPCO's nuclear power plant (BWR) construction experience and technical trend of C and I system in Japan. This paper is to introduce the efforts and operational experience on control and operation support systems

  20. Installation and first operation of the negative ion optimization experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Muri, Michela; Cavenago, Marco; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Bigi, Marco; Pasqualotto, Roberto; Barbisan, Marco; Recchia, Mauro; Zaniol, Barbara; Kulevoy, Timour; Petrenko, Sergey; Baseggio, Lucio; Cervaro, Vannino; Agostini, Fabio Degli; Franchin, Luca; Laterza, Bruno; Minarello, Alessandro; Rossetto, Federico; Sattin, Manuele; Zucchetti, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Negative ion sources are key components of the neutral beam injectors. • The NIO1 experiment is a RF ion source, 60 kV–135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam. • NIO1 can contribute to beam extraction and optics thanks to quick replacement and upgrading of parts. • This work presents installation, status and first experiments results of NIO1. - Abstract: Negative ion sources are key components of the neutral beam injectors for thermonuclear fusion experiments. The NIO1 experiment is a radio frequency ion source generating a 60 kV–135 mA hydrogen negative ion beam. The beam is composed of nine beamlets over an area of about 40 × 40 mm"2. This experiment is jointly developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL, with the purpose of providing and optimizing a test ion source, capable of working in continuous mode and in conditions similar to those foreseen for the larger ion sources of the ITER neutral beam injectors. At present research and development activities on these ion sources still address several important issues related to beam extraction and optics optimization, to which the NIO1 test facility can contribute thanks to its modular design, which allows for quick replacement and upgrading of components. This contribution presents the installation phases, the status of the test facility and the results of the first experiments, which have demonstrated that the source can operate in continuous mode.

  1. Application of operating experience in environmental qualification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Wise, R.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental qualification (EQ) of equipment related to nuclear safety has been carried out in the nuclear community since the 70's. It started with electrical equipment and then expanded to include mechanical equipment. During this evolutionary process, the methods used for EQ have gone through a long period of refinement and clarification. Prior to 1971, qualification for equipment in licensed nuclear power plants was based on the use of electrical components of commonly accepted high industrial quality without the benefit of specific environmental qualification standards. Between 1971 and 1974, most plants used the criteria of IEEE Standard 323-1971 as the basis for demonstrating qualification. Also during this period related 'daughter' standards, mainly by IEEE, became available which addressed qualification for specific equipment items. After July 1974, plants were required to meet the more comprehensive guidelines specified in IEEE Standard 323-1974 and the related 'daughter' standards. IEEE Standard 323-1974 later evolved into IEEE Standard 323-1983. For nuclear power plants built in Ontario during the 70's, i.e. Pickering B and Bruce B, has included the environmental qualification requirements in their respective nuclear safety design guides. It is now recognized that they are not up to the current EQ standards. Darlington, constructed during the 80's, implemented the environmental qualification program in its project. An Environmental Qualification (EQ) Program is now under way in Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to formally implement the Environmental Qualification for Bruce B, Pickering B, and Pickering A and to preserve the Qualification for Darlington G.S. This paper makes a thorough a review of the standard methods used in the past by utilities for environmental qualification. These methods include type testing, analysis, and operating experience. Both type testing and analysis have been clearly defined in standards listed in References [2] to [6] and

  2. Psychiatric patients' satisfaction in the therapeutic residence services: A positive experience of psychiatric deinstitutionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Gustavo Maluf

    Full Text Available This study investigated the satisfaction level of psychiatric patients in the therapeutic residential services of Barbacena-MG. Total population comprised 154 individuals, of which 45 were sampled. Subjects were interviewed with the SATIS-BR scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results showed a high degree of satisfaction with the service for the global score and its three dimensions staff competence and understanding, help received, infrastructure. Results were not related to sociodemographic and clinical variables analyzed individually. Multivariate analysis indicated higher satisfaction for literate patients and for those that underwent some other form of treatment (e.g., hydrogymnastics and fitness activities besides medications or occupational therapy. We conclude that the therapeutic residence services appear to be a viable alternative for mental health public policy, from the patients' perspective.

  3. Experience with dose limitation during preparations for sea dumping operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieuw, G.; Voorde, N. van de; Baekelandt, L.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1967 low-level radioactive wastes from operational nuclear facilities in Belgium have been dumped into the sea. The dumping is carried out in accordance with the recommendations issued by the IAEA under the London Convention. All these dumping operations have taken place under the surveillance of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD. To limit the doses received by workers and the public during the various phases leading up to sea dumping, appropriate measures are required in connection with waste treatment and packaging, limitation of radiation levels, storage and handling, organization and selection of the means of transport and organization and means of monitoring. Although treatment and handling at the nuclear sites are entrusted to occupationally exposed workers, temporary labour is used for the transport and handling operations. Effective treatment and packaging reduce the risk of internal exposure to a negligible value. Meticulous planning and permanent personnel monitoring reduce the doses received by the workers to acceptable values not exceeding the statutory dose limits. The doses received by personnel involved in the preparations for sea dumping operations from 1967 to 1980 are given and a relationship is established between these doses and the activities handled. Experience shows that sea dumping operations do not entail unacceptable risks either for the workers concerned or for the population and allows us to optimize the methods used for loading, handling and transport. (author)

  4. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  5. Evolution of PHWR fuel transfer system based on operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvatikar, R.S.; Singh, Jaipal; Chaturvedi, P.C.; Bhambra, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel Transfer System facilitates loading of new fuel into Fuelling Machine, receipt of spent fuel from Fuelling Machine and its further transportation to Storage Bay. To overcome the limitations of transferring a pair of bundles in the single tube Airlock and Transfer Arm in RAPS-1 and 2/MAPS, a new concept of six tube Transfer Magazine was introduced in NAPS. This resulted in simultaneous loading of new fuel from Transfer Magazine into the Fuelling Machine and unloading of spent fuel from the Fuelling Machine through the exchange mode. It further facilitated the parallel/simultaneous operation of refuelling by Fuelling Machines on the reactor and transferring of spent fuel bundles from the Transfer Magazine to the bay. This new design of Fuel Transfer System was adopted for all standardised 220 MWe PHWRs. Based on the experience gained in 220 MWe PHWRs in the area of operation and maintenance, a number of improvements have been carried out over the years. These aspects have been further strengthened and refined in the Fuel Transfer System of 540 MWe units. The operating experience of the system indicates that the presence of heavy water in the Transfer Magazine poses limitations in its maintenance in the Fuel Transfer room. Further, Surveillance and maintenance of large number of under water equipment and associated valves, rams and underwater sensors is putting extra burden on the O and M efforts. A new concept of mobile light water filled Transfer Machine has been evolved for proposed 700 MWe PHWR units to simplify Fuel Transfer System. This has been made possible by adopting snout level control in the Fuelling Machine, elimination of Shuttle Transport System and locating the Storage Bay adjacent to the Reactor Building. This paper describes the evolution of Fuel Transfer System concepts and various improvements based on the experience gained in the operation and maintenance of the system. (author)

  6. Labor market integration, immigration experience, and psychological distress in a multi-ethnic sample of immigrants residing in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana F; Dias, Sónia F

    2018-01-01

    This study aims at examining how factors relating to immigrants' experience in the host country affect psychological distress (PD). Specifically, we analyzed the association among socio-economic status (SES), integration in the labor market, specific immigration experience characteristics, and PD in a multi-ethnic sample of immigrant individuals residing in Lisbon, Portugal. Using a sample (n = 1375) consisting of all main immigrant groups residing in Portugal's metropolitan area of Lisbon, we estimated multivariable linear regression models of PD regressed on selected sets of socio-economic independent variables. A psychological distress scale was constructed based on five items (feeling physically tired, feeling psychologically tired, feeling happy, feeling full of energy, and feeling lonely). Variables associated with a decrease in PD are being a male (demographic), being satisfied with their income level (SES), living with the core family and having higher number of children (social isolation), planning to remain for longer periods of time in Portugal (migration project), and whether respondents considered themselves to be in good health condition (subjective health status). Study variables negatively associated with immigrants' PD were job insecurity (labor market), and the perception that health professionals were not willing to understand immigrants during a clinical interaction. The study findings emphasized the importance of labor market integration and access to good quality jobs for immigrants' psychological well-being, as well as the existence of family ties in the host country, intention to reside long term in the host country, and high subjective (physical) health. Our research suggests the need to foster cross-national studies of immigrant populations in order to understand the social mechanisms that transverse all migrant groups and contribute to lower psychological well-being.

  7. Ethical challenges in nursing homes--staff's opinions and experiences with systematic ethics meetings with participation of residents' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg; Schmidt, Gerda; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Heller, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Many ethical problems exist in nursing homes. These include, for example, decision-making in end-of-life care, use of restraints and a lack of resources. The aim of the present study was to investigate nursing home staffs' opinions and experiences with ethical challenges and to find out which types of ethical challenges and dilemmas occur and are being discussed in nursing homes. The study used a two-tiered approach, using a questionnaire on ethical challenges and systematic ethics work, given to all employees of a Norwegian nursing home including nonmedical personnel, and a registration of systematic ethics discussions from an Austrian model of good clinical practice. Ninety-one per cent of the nursing home staff described ethical problems as a burden. Ninety per cent experienced ethical problems in their daily work. The top three ethical challenges reported by the nursing home staff were as follows: lack of resources (79%), end-of-life issues (39%) and coercion (33%). To improve systematic ethics work, most employees suggested ethics education (86%) and time for ethics discussion (82%). Of 33 documented ethics meetings from Austria during a 1-year period, 29 were prospective resident ethics meetings where decisions for a resident had to be made. Agreement about a solution was reached in all 29 cases, and this consensus was put into practice in all cases. Residents did not participate in the meetings, while relatives participated in a majority of case discussions. In many cases, the main topic was end-of-life care and life-prolonging treatment. Lack of resources, end-of-life issues and coercion were ethical challenges most often reported by nursing home staff. The staff would appreciate systematic ethics work to aid decision-making. Resident ethics meetings can help to reach consensus in decision-making for nursing home patients. In the future, residents' participation should be encouraged whenever possible. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring

  8. Review of BNFL's operational experience of wet type flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliam, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL International Transport's operational experience includes shipping 6000te of spent fuel from Japan to Sellafield, through its dedicated terminal at Barrow, and to Cogema La Hague. This fuel was shipped under the PNTL (Pacific Nuclear Transport Ltd) banner for which BNFL is responsible. PNTL owned and operated a fleet of 5 ships for Japanese business and a fleet of 80 wet and 58 dry flasks, for the transport of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel, from both Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). ''Wet'' or ''dry'' flask is the common terminology used to distinguish between spent fuel flasks transporting fuel where the fuel is immersed in water, or spent fuel flasks that have been drained of water and dried. This paper concentrates on the wet type of flask utilised to transport fuel to Sellafield, that is the Excellox type (including similar type NTL derivatives). It aims to provide a summary of operational experience during handling at power stations, shipment, unloading at reprocessors and from scheduled maintenance

  9. Physics operating experience and fuel management of RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakra, A.N.; Purandare, H.D.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 achieved criticality on August 11, 1972. Thereafter the reactor was brought to power, in November, 1972. Due to non-availability of the depleted fuel, the loading of which was necessary to obtain full power to begin with, the core was loaded with all natural uranium fuel and only 70% of the full power could be achieved. During the reactor operation for the last three years, the reactor has seen more than one effective full power year and about 1400 fresh fuel bundles have been loaded in the core. The reactor was subjected to about 150 power cycles resulting in more than 30% variation in operating power level and about 10 fuel bundles have failed. For satisfactory fuel management and refuelling decisions, a three dimensional simulator TRIVENI was developed. This was extensively tested during the start-up experiments and was found to be a satisfactory tool for day to day operation of the plant. In this paper, a brief account of analysis of the start-up experiments, approach to full power, power distortions and flux peaking, fuel management service and analysis of the failed fuel data has been given. (author)

  10. Recent operating experience and improvement of commercial IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    IGCC has today reached a status where experience is available from first and second generation plants, built in the 1970s/1980s and in the 1990s respectively, as commercial-scale demonstration plants for coal-based applications. These plants feature variations on gasification technology and subsequent environmental controls and in operating them a number of technical and commercial lessons have been learned that will help to improve the next generation of IGCC projects. The report reviews and summarises the state-of-the-art and operating experience of several commercial IGCC plants worldwide, setting out the lessons learned and plans for future development embracing such issues as the changes or modifications to plant made to overcome the operational problems and to improve the reliability and availability of the plant. Since IGCC is considered a 'capture ready' technology for CO2 abatement, the current status with regard to the incorporation of carbon capture and storage systems (CCS) has been reviewed. Finally, the report outlines the issues associated with assessing the risks in commercialising IGCC plant.

  11. Communication received from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation to the IAEA on the establishment, structure and operation of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 7 June 2007 from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation, with an attachment entitled 'Establishment, Structure and Operation of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre'. As requested in that communication, the letter and its attachment are circulated for the information of Member States

  12. Uniting Evidence-Based Evaluation with the ACGME Plastic Surgery Milestones: A Simple and Reliable Assessment of Resident Operative Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobraei, Edward M; Bohnen, Jordan D; George, Brian C; Mullen, John T; Lillemoe, Keith D; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    Milestones evaluations in plastic surgery reflect a shift toward competency-based training but have created a number of challenges. The authors have incorporated the smartphone application evaluation tool, System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning (SIMPL), that was recently developed by a multi-institutional research collaborative. In this pilot study, the authors hypothesize that SIMPL can improve resident evaluation and also collect granular performance data to simplify compliance with the plastic surgery Milestones. SIMPL was prospectively piloted with a plastic surgery resident and faculty surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital in this institutional review board-approved study. The study period was a 2-month interval corresponding to the resident's rotation. The resident-faculty combination performed 20 cases together. All cases were evaluated with SIMPL. SIMPL evaluations uniformly took under 1 minute to submit. The average time to completed evaluation from surgery completion was 5 hours (technology will support a shared vocabulary between residents and faculty to enhance intraoperative education.

  13. Plant operator performance evaluation based on cognitive process analysis experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Fukuda, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to clarify plant operators' cognitive processes that has been performed, to improve the man-machine interface which supports their diagnoses and decisions. The cognitive processes under abnormal conditions were evaluated by protocol analyses interviews, etc. in the experiment using a plant training simulator. A cognitive process model is represented by a stochastic network, based on Rasmussen's decision making model. Each node of the network corresponds to an element of the cognitive process, such as observation, interpretation, execution, etc. Some observations were obtained as follows, by comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with the experiment results: A process to reconfirm the plant parameters after execution of a task and feedback paths from this process to the observation and the task definition of next task were observed. The feedback probability average and standard deviation should be determined for each incident type to explain correctly the individual differences in the cognitive processes. The tendency for the operator's cognitive level to change from skill-based to knowledge-based via rule-based behavior was observed during the feedback process

  14. Exploitation of the in-seam miner and operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, W I.S.; Morris, A H

    1977-12-01

    The In-seam Miner started as an investigatory project at MRDE in 1969. Since that time it has passed through the classic development stages of design of prototype, surface trials, underground trials, modification, production of more machines, assessment of experience and then wider exploitation. At the present time well over 100 machines have been supplied to the National Coal Board. The original machine was hydraulically driven and all but five of the machines supplied to date are of this type. The variety of applications that the machine has found in the mining industry has caused derivative development to embrace machines of length varying from 12-ft centers to 44-ft centers, to work in seams ranging from 40 in. up to 68 in. The range of applications has included face drivages, stablehole operations, in-seam retreat roadways and dirt-absorbing headings. Five electrically driven machines are now coming onto the market and experience with them, though limited, is very encouraging. The paper concentrates on two major aspects of the overall development process: first, the management of exploitation; and second, some operational experience of the In-seam Miner in South Midlands area.

  15. Adding insult to brain injury: young adults' experiences of residing in nursing homes following acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Aoife; Heary, Caroline; Ward, Marcia; MacNeela, Pádraig

    2017-08-28

    There is general consensus that adults under age 65 with acquired brain injury residing in nursing homes is inappropriate, however there is a limited evidence base on the issue. Previous research has relied heavily on third-party informants and qualitative studies have been of questionable methodological quality, with no known study adopting a phenomenological approach. This study explored the lived experiences of young adults with brain injury residing in aged care facilities. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was employed to collect and analyze data from six semi-structured interviews with participants regarding their experiences of living in nursing homes. Two themes were identified, including "Corporeal prison of acquired brain injury: broken selves" and "Existential prison of the nursing home: stagnated lives". Results illustrated that young adults with acquired brain injury can experience aged care as an existential prison in which their lives feel at a standstill. This experience was characterized by feelings of not belonging in a terminal environment, confinement, disempowerment, emptiness and hope for greater autonomy through rehabilitation. It is hoped that this study will provide relevant professionals, services and policy-makers with insight into the challenges and needs of young adults with brain injury facing these circumstances. Implications for rehabilitation This study supports the contention that more home-like and age-appropriate residential rehabilitation services for young adults with acquired brain injury are needed. As development of alternative accommodation is a lengthy process, the study findings suggest that the interim implementation of rehabilitative care in nursing homes should be considered. Taken together with existing research, it is proposed that nursing home staff may require training to deliver evidence-based rehabilitative interventions to those with brain injury. The present findings add support to the call for systemic

  16. Effects of childhood experience with nature on tolerance of urban residents toward hornets and wild boars in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Hosaka

    Full Text Available Urban biodiversity conservation often aims to promote the quality of life for urban residents by providing ecosystem services as well as habitats for diverse wildlife. However, biodiversity inevitably brings some disadvantages, including problems and nuisances caused by wildlife. Although some studies have reported that enhancement of nature interaction among urban children promotes their affective attitude toward of favorable animals, its effect on tolerance toward problem-causing wildlife is unknown. In this study, we assessed the tolerance of 1,030 urban residents in Japan toward hornets and wild boar, and analyzed the effects of childhood experience with nature on tolerance using a structural equation model. The model used sociodemographic factors and childhood nature experience as explanatory variables, affective attitude toward these animals as a mediator, and tolerance as a response variable. The public tolerance toward hornets and boars was low; over 60% of the respondents would request the removal of hornets and wild boar from nearby green spaces by government services, even when the animals had not caused any damage. Tolerance was lower in females and elderly respondents. Childhood experience with nature had a greater influence on tolerance than did sociodemographic factors in the scenario where animals have not caused any problems; however, its effect was only indirect via promoting positive affective attitude toward wildlife when the animals have caused problems. Our results suggest that increasing people's direct experience with nature is important to raise public tolerance, but its effect is limited to cases where wildlife does not cause any problems. To obtain wider support for conservation in urban areas, conservationists, working together with municipal officials, educators and the media, should provide relevant information on the ecological functions performed by problem-causing wildlife and strategies for avoiding the problems

  17. Effects of childhood experience with nature on tolerance of urban residents toward hornets and wild boars in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Koun; Numata, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    Urban biodiversity conservation often aims to promote the quality of life for urban residents by providing ecosystem services as well as habitats for diverse wildlife. However, biodiversity inevitably brings some disadvantages, including problems and nuisances caused by wildlife. Although some studies have reported that enhancement of nature interaction among urban children promotes their affective attitude toward of favorable animals, its effect on tolerance toward problem-causing wildlife is unknown. In this study, we assessed the tolerance of 1,030 urban residents in Japan toward hornets and wild boar, and analyzed the effects of childhood experience with nature on tolerance using a structural equation model. The model used sociodemographic factors and childhood nature experience as explanatory variables, affective attitude toward these animals as a mediator, and tolerance as a response variable. The public tolerance toward hornets and boars was low; over 60% of the respondents would request the removal of hornets and wild boar from nearby green spaces by government services, even when the animals had not caused any damage. Tolerance was lower in females and elderly respondents. Childhood experience with nature had a greater influence on tolerance than did sociodemographic factors in the scenario where animals have not caused any problems; however, its effect was only indirect via promoting positive affective attitude toward wildlife when the animals have caused problems. Our results suggest that increasing people’s direct experience with nature is important to raise public tolerance, but its effect is limited to cases where wildlife does not cause any problems. To obtain wider support for conservation in urban areas, conservationists, working together with municipal officials, educators and the media, should provide relevant information on the ecological functions performed by problem-causing wildlife and strategies for avoiding the problems that wildlife can

  18. Laparoscopic myotomy in achalasia cardia treatment: Experience after 36 operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Laparoscopic Heller­Dor operation, a standard method in the treatment of achalasia, has been performed at the Center for Esophageal Surgery of the First Surgical Clinic since April 2006. Objective. The aim of this study was to present this surgical procedure and initial experiences after 36 consecutive laparoscopic Heller­Dor operations. Methods. This partly retrospective, partly prospective study presented our results after laparoscopic Heller­Dor operation (presentation of the treatment method. We performed a standard anterior esophagocardioymiotomy, without releasing the posterior aspect of the cardia, and anterior partial fundoplication. The type and severity of symptoms and their duration were evaluated based on questionnaires fulfilled by patients. The diagnosis was made based on radiological, endoscopic and manometric findings. Laparoscopic surgery as the method of treatment was evaluated based on the duration of surgery, intra­ and postoperative complications, time interval until the initiation of oral feeding, length of hospital stay, need for additional therapeutic measures after the operation and effect of surgery on the severity of symptoms. Results. Preopereratively, dysphagia was the predominant symptom in all patients, while regurgitation was much lower (44%. The average duration of operation was 127 minutes. Postoperative hospitalization lasted on the average 5.7 days. From 36 treated patients, 34 (94.4% considered that the effect of treatment was good or excellent. Postoperative dysphagia was present in two patients (5.6% and was successfully solved by balloon dilatation. Conclusion. Laparoscopic Heller­Dor operation is an effective and safe surgical procedure in resolving symptoms of achalasia and today presents the method of the first choice in the treatment of this disease.

  19. Recent experience of Almaraz NPP in operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Cabanero, J.G.; Gomez de la Torre, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the nuclear industry has been paying special attention to boosting nuclear power plant operation. To this end, it has optimized its maintenance, engineering, safety, management and other systems, using the appropriate resources to achieve its target. Optimization of these systems required the allocation of new resources for training plant personnel. The activity of training, which hitherto dedicated most of its attention and resources to the operating area, now extends them to schooling required in other areas of the plant, with the aim of updating the skills and knowledge of personnel to deal with new needs which have arisen. Regulations at present cover the training and qualification of only personnel responsible for handling reactor or for directing plant operation activities and capable of evaluating the nature and magnitude of possible incidents, especially those causing radioactive emissions, and of personnel requiring knowledge and experience to guarantee effective protection of individuals, ie, operators, supervisors, and qualified radiological protection experts. However, it should be borne in mind that, in the future, the training of other plant personnel could also be subject to regulations. (Author)

  20. Operating experience and aging-seismic assessment of electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Burns, E.L.; Taylor, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify concerns related to the aging and service wear of equipment operating in nuclear power plants, to assess their possible impact on plant safety, to identify effective inspection surveillance and monitoring methods and to recommend suitable maintenance practices for mitigating aging related concerns and diminish the rate of degradation due to aging and service wear. Motor design and materials of construction are reviewed to identify age-sensitive components. Operational and accidental stressors are determined, and their effect on promoting aging degradation is assessed. Failure modes, mechanisms, and causes have been reviewed from operating experiences and existing data banks. The study has also included consideration for the seismic correlation of age-degraded motor components. The aforementioned reviews and assessments were assimilated to characterize the dielectric, rotational, and mechanical hazards on motor performance and operational readiness. The functional indicators which can be monitored to assess motor component deterioration due to aging or other accidental stressors are identified. Conforming with the NPAR strategy as outlined in the program plan, the study also includes a preliminary discussion of current standards and guides, maintenance programs, and research activities pertaining to nuclear power plant safety-related electric motors

  1. Facebook and user experience: Evaluating brand equity of Purdue University residences

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Jackelyn

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how brand equity was perceived on the Purdue University Residences’ Facebook page by applying a user experience method. From a review of previous literature, Website Experience Analysis was identified and performed to evaluate brand equity. This study addressed and explored various themes throughout the data. The results showed how page content and user interactions within a Facebook page influence participants’ perceptions of brand equity.

  2. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  3. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.7% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  4. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  5. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lapoire, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as B-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification.

  6. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: approximately 97% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  7. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.8% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  8. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deluca, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5\\% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, ...

  9. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump- bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, a...

  10. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deluca, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING RADIO-FREQUENCY MODULES TEST FACILITY OPERATING EXPERIENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R and D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service the SRF R and D needs. The project's first stage has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single-cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at Meson Detector Building (MDB) results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project

  12. Operating experience with the new TRIUMF RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.; Fang, S.

    1995-06-01

    The 23 MHz rf control of the TRIUMF cyclotron has been replaced by a new VXI control system based on digital signal processing. It provides amplitude and phase regulation of the cyclotron dee voltage, as well as other functions such as power-up sequencing, spark and high VSWR protection. Modularity of the hardware is achieved by the VXI architecture, and in the software by Object Oriented Programming. It is expected that this will result in a considerably longer MTBF, and shorter fault diagnosis and repair times, than the equipment it replaces. The new system has now been in operation for over two months. The results of commissioning, testing, and early operating experience are presented. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs

  13. Operational experience with Seibersdorf low-level incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupa, G.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains information about an excess air incinerator which burned low level β and γ wastes (also α up to determined limits). The incinerator was started up in 1980 and it is clear that in a technical plant of such magnitude, some changes and alterations will be needed to be overcome according to the experiences of operation. This paper - after a short description of the incinerator plant itself - gives a summary of some of the operation and the changes which are made in the plant according to these facts. A partial redesign of the incinerator plant in the first half of 1985 resulted in a very satisfying new design, which proved its superiority during the runs in 1985 and 1986

  14. Operational experience, availability and reliability of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture - presents a survey on nuclear power production and plant performance in the Western World covering all reactor types and light-water reactors in particular and discusses key parameters such as load factors and non-availability analysis. - outlines the main reasons for the reliable performance of Swiss nuclear power plants - quality equipment - operator qualification and training - engineering know how on site - maintenance philosophy and outage planning - information system and feedback of experience - explains the management functions as applied at the Beznau Nuclear Power Station to ensure high power productivity and reliability - improvement - a feedback control system - analysis of production losses - optimization in shut-down planning - minimizing disturbances during plant operation - optimizing personnel qualification and efficiency. (orig.)

  15. Survey of operating experience from LERs to identify aging trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Nuclear Operations Analysis Center computer files of operating experience reports [licensee event reports (LERs), abnormal occurrences, etc.] are summarized in this study, specific time-related degradation mechanisms are identified as possible causes of a reportable occurrence. Data collected on domestic commercial nuclear power plants covering 1969 to 1982 yielded over 5800 events attributable to possible age related failures. Of these events, 2795 were attributable to instrument drift and are addressed separately in the report. The remaining events (3098) were reviewed, and data were collected for each event, which identified the specific system, component, and subpart: the information included the age-related mechanism, severity of the failure, and method of detection of the failure. About two-thirds of the failures were judged to be degraded, with one-third listed as catastrophic

  16. Operational Experience with a Cryogenic Axial-Centrifugal Compressor

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, L; Löhlein, K; Purtschert, W; Ziegler, B L; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Brunovsky, I; Tucek, L

    1998-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, requires large refrigeration capacity at 1.8 K. Compression of gaseous helium at cryogenic temperatures is therefore inevitable. Together with subcontractors, Linde Kryotechnik has developed a prototype machine. This unit is based on a cryogenic axial-centrifugal compressor, running on ceramic ball bearings and driven by a variable-frequency electrical motor operating at ambient temperature. Integrated in a test facility for superconducting magnets the machine has been commissioned without major problems and successfully gone through the acceptance test in autumn 1995. Subsequent steps were initiated to improve efficiency of this prototype. This paper describes operating experience gained so far and reports on measured performance prior to and after constructional modifications.

  17. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    From the outset of nuclear power development in Japan, major emphasis has been placed on the safety of the nuclear power plants. There are now twelve nuclear power plants in operation with a total output of 6600 MWe. Their operating records were generally satisfactory, but in the 1974 to 1975 period, they experienced somewhat declined availability due to the repair work under the specific circumstances. After investigation of causes of troubles and the countermeasures thereof were made to ensure safety, they are now keeping good performance. In Japan, nuclear power plants are strictly subject to sufficient and careful inspection in compliance with the safety regulation, and are placed under stringent radiation control of employees. Under the various circumstances, however, the period of annual inspection tends to be prolonged more than originally planned, and this consequently is considered to be one of the causes of reduced availability. In order to develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on the assurance of safety and to endeavor to devise measures to improve availability of the plants, based on the careful analysis of causes which reduce plant availability. This paper discusses the results of studies made for the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and Operating Experience of LWR Nuclear Power Plants in Japan; a) Operating experience with light water reactors b) Improvements in design of light water reactors during the past ten years c) Analysis of the factors which affect plant availability; 2) Assurance of Safety and Measures to Increase Availability a) Measures for safety and environmental protection b) Measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees c) Appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work d) Measures to increase plant availability e) Measures to improve reliability of equipments and components; and 3) Future Technical Problems

  18. Lessons Learned from Missing Flooding Barriers Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Veira, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Flooding hazard is highly significant for nuclear power plant safety because of its potential for common cause impact on safety related systems, and because operating experience reviews regularly identify flooding as a cause of concern. Source of the flooding could be external (location) or internal (plant design). The amount of flooding water could vary but even small amount might suffice to affect redundant trains of safety related systems for power supply and cooling. The protection from the flooding is related to the design-basis flood level (DBFL) and it consists of three elements: structural, organizational and accessibility. Determination of the DBFL is critical, as Fukushima Daiichi accident terribly proved. However, as the topic of flooding is very broad, the scope of this paper is focused only on the issues related to the missing flood barriers. Structural measures are physically preventing flooding water to reach or damage safety related system, and they could be permanent or temporary. For temporary measures it is important to have necessary material, equipment and organizational capacity for the timely implementation. Maintenance is important for permanent protection and periodical review is important for assuring readiness and feasibility of temporary flooding protection. Final flooding protection element is assured accessibility to safety related systems during the flooding. Appropriate flooding protection is based on the right implementation of design requirements, proper maintenance and periodic reviews. Operating experience is constantly proving how numerous water sources and systems interactions make flooding protection challenging. This paper is presenting recent related operating experience feedback involving equipment, procedures and analysis. Most frequent deficiencies are: inadequate, degraded or missing seals that would allow floodwaters into safety related spaces. Procedures are inadequate typically because they underestimate necessary

  19. Operational experience with two tritium-effluent-monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynie, J.S.; Gutierrez, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two new tritium stack monitoring systems were designed and built. The operational experience of a wide-range detector with a useful range of a few μCi/m 3 to 10 8 μCi/m 3 , and a second monitoring system using an improved Kanne chamber and a new electrometer, called a Model 39 Electrometer-Chargemeter are discussed. Both tritium chambers have been designed to have a reduced sensitivity to tritium contamination, a fast response, and an integrating chargemeter with digital readout for easy conversion to microcuries. The calibration of these monitors and advantages of using these chambers over conventional systems are discussed

  20. BR3/Vulcain Nuclear Power Station. Construction and Operational Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrer, J. [Belgonucleaire, S.A., Brussels (Belgium)

    1968-04-15

    A full-scale reactor experiment was set out as the main objective of the Vulcain research and development programme agreed in May 1962 between the UKAEA and BelgoNucleaire, manager of ''Syndicat Vulcain''. Vulcain uses variable moderation as the long-term method to control reactivity: the reactor is cooled and moderated by a mixture of heavy and light water, the D{sub 2}O content being stepwise reduced to permit power operation with all control rods completely out of the core. To carry out the Vulcain power experiment it was decided to modify the BR3 nuclear power plant located at Mol, Belgium, which had operated from 1962 to 1964 as a conventional PWR with outputs of 40.9 MW(th) and 11.45 MW(e). The BR3/Vulcain plant was started in December 1966 and since then is running with a load factor around 90%. It is the first time that such a reactor type has been built and operated and the experience gained by its design, construction, commissioning and operation has proven to be most valuable. D{sub 2}O is being used at a pressure (2000 lb/in{sup 2} abs.) never before achieved in a heavy-water reactor and the leak rate from the HP primary systems to the atmosphere has been kept to a negligible value, around 1 to 2 grams/h. Commissioning of the primary plant had been carried out with light water first without fuel, and thereafter with fuel, at which time the water was poisoned with boric acid. The reactor vessel contains experimental devices such as 65 in-pile instrumentation detectors and four hydraulically operated Zircaloy control rods. They required the interposition of a collar between the vessel and its lid. Refuelling is performed under boronated light water, the interchange between the primary water and the H{sub 2}O being carried out by means of a draining and spraying system. The reactor had been operated for two years before its modifications for Vulcain: many lessons have therefore been learned about working on irradiated systems. The BR3/Vulcain core has a

  1. Fabrication and operational experience with the interim storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the fabrication and operational experience of the Interim Storage Cask (ISC). The ISC is a dry storage cask which is used to safely store a Core Component Container (CCC) containing up to seven Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel assemblies at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Under contract to B and W Hanford Company (BWHC), General Atomics (GA) designed and fabricated thirty ISC casks which BWHC is remotely loading at the FFTF facility. BWHC designed and fabricated the CCCS. As of December 1997, thirty ISCs have been fabricated, of which eighteen have been loaded and moved to a storage site adjacent to the FFTF facility. Fabrication consisted of three sets of casks. The first unit was completed and acceptance tested before any other units were fabricated. After the first unit passed all acceptance tests, nine more units were fabricated in the first production run. Before those nine units were completed, GA began a production run of twenty more units. The paper provides an overview of the cask design and discusses the problems encountered in fabrication, their resolution, and changes made in the fabrication processes to improve the quality of the casks. The paper also discusses the loading process and operational experiences with loading and handling of the casks. Information on loading times, worker dose exposure, and total dose for loading are presented

  2. An overview of KANUPP operating experience in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, T.

    2010-01-01

    KANUPP is a small CANDU® type PHWR (137MWe), commissioned in 1972 and now operating after life extension (PLEX) since 2004. This paper contains an overview of the plant operating experience in chemistry control over the past year including life extension period. Emphasis is on: Success story; Practices; Future improvements in chemistry programs. Considerable efforts are underway to maintain plant equipment and systems to mitigate the effect of plant ageing. The improvements that have been made at the station are as under: Heat transport system (HTS) chemistry, its effects on construction material; Feed water chemistry on secondary side (considering the condenser leaks). Strict chemistry control is being exercised for the heat transport system (HTS) for its better chemistry control. For short term, the changes are limited to pH adjustments of HTS. This change decreases the rate of thinning of outlet feeders as noted in some CANDUs® due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). Water Treatment Plant has been refurbished to get very low total dissolved solids (TDS) de-mineralized water for secondary side systems of the plant. Experience of steam generators flushing before startup, sludge pile analyses mapping, verification of pH from different sampling points of SGs, are the short term mitigating actions to address sludge pile problem in steam generators (SGs). The R and D on HTS and SGs is multifaceted and is aimed at achieving optimum chemistry control. Study is being conducted for improving chemistry control for the material, equipment and systems of the plant. (author)

  3. Halden fuel and material experiments beyond operational and safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Boris; Wiesenack, Wolfgang; McGrath, M.; Tverberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of any research reactor is to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel and materials prior to their introduction into the market. For commercial NPPs, it is important both to test nuclear fuels at a fuel burn-up exceeding current limits and to investigate reactor materials for higher irradiation dose. For fuel vendors such tests enable verification of fuel reliability or for the safety limits to be found under different operational conditions and accident situations. For the latter, in-pile experiments have to be performed beyond some normal limits. The program of fuel tests performed in the Halden reactor is aimed mainly at determining: The thermal FGR threshold, which may limit fuel operational power with burn-up increase, the “lift-off effect” when rod internal pressure exceeds coolant pressure, the effects of high burn-up on fuel behavior under power ramps, fuel relocation under LOCA simulation at higher burn-up, the effect of dry-out on high burn-up fuel rod integrity. This paper reviews some of the experiments performed in the Halden reactor for understanding some of the limits for standard fuel utilization with the aim of contributing to the development of innovative fuels and cladding materials that could be used beyond these limits. (author)

  4. Operating Experience of MACSTOR Modules at CANDU 6 Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoin, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three decades, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has contributed to the technology development and implementation of dry spent fuel management facilities in Canada, Korea and Romania During that period, AECL has developed a number of concrete canister models and the MACSTOR200 module, a medium size air-cooled vault with a 228 MgU (Mega grams of Uranium) capacity. AECL's dry storage technologies were used for the construction of eight large-scale above ground dry storage facilities for CANDU spent fuel. As of 2005, those facilities have an installed capacity in excess of 5,000 MgU. Since 1995, the two newest dry storage installations built for CANDU 6 reactors at Gentilly 2 (Canada) and Cernavoda (Romania) used the MACSTOR 200 module. Seven such modules have been built at Gentilly 2 during the 1995 to 2004 period and one at Cernavoda in 2003. The construction and operating experience of those modules is reviewed in this paper. The MACSTOR 200 modules were initially designed for a 50-year service life, with recent units at Gentilly 2 licensed for a 100-year service life in a rural (non-maritime) climate. During the 1995-2005 period, six of the eight modules were loaded with fuel. Their operation has brought a significant amount of experience on loading operations, performance of fuel handling equipment, radiation shielding, heat transfer, monitoring of the two confinement boundaries and radiation dose to personnel. Heat dissipation performance of the MACSTOR 200 was initially licensed using values derived from full scale tests made at AECL's Whiteshell Research Laboratories, that were backed-up by temperature measurements made on the first two modules. Results and computer models developed for the MACSTOR 200 module are described. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) and its subsidiary Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), in collaboration with Hyundai Engineering Company Ltd. (HEC) and AECL, are developing a new dry storage module to

  5. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors; Experience d'exploitation des reacteurs de Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [French] Les resultats atteints apres trois ans de fonctionnement des reacteurs G-2/G-3 permettent une accumulation considerable de l'experience d'exploitation de ces reacteurs. Les principales originalites: - caisson en beton precontraint - chargement en marche - surveillance automatique des temperatures sont largement justifiees par l'exploitation actuelle. L'auteur confirme l'interet de ces solutions d'avant-garde et en tire des conclusions pour les etudes de futures centrales nucleaires. (auteur)

  6. Review and updates of the risk assessment for advanced test reactor operations for operating events and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Annual or biannual reviews of the operating history of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been conducted for the purpose of reviewing and updating the ATR probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for operating events and operating experience since the first compilation of plant- specific experience data for the ATR PSA which included data for operation from initial power operation in 1969 through 1988. This technical paper briefly discusses the means and some results of these periodic reviews of operating experience and their influence on the ATR PSA

  7. Operating experience and design criteria of sodium valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markford, D.

    1974-01-01

    The information presented refers to sodium valve development for KNK and SNR-300 as well as for sodium test facilities on the INTERATOM site at Bensberg. Well in advance of KNK-I a number of sodium test facilities have been operated containing small and medium size valves of different design and manufacturer. The more stringent requirements for long range safe and reliable operation in KNK-I put forth a development program for the main primary and secondary circuit sodium valves. Operational experience gave rise to modification of the stem seal arrangement mainly, so KNK-II (which is the fast core for KNK reactor) will be run with modified sodium valves. Main pipe diameters in SNR-300 are in the range of 600 mm. Valve designs with rising shafts would require excessive space in the primary circuit cavities, therefore efforts have been directed towards introduction of different type valves. Due to the requirements of after-heat-removal a valve type with control capability had to be chosen. A special design of butterfly valves was selected for the primary and secondary circuits of SNR-300. The development and tests performed with this type of valve are described. In the field of small sodium valves, tests with a 50 mm diameter freeze-seal valve are reported, and the current status of bellows-seal-valves to be inserted into SNR-300 is discussed. (U.S.)

  8. Highly active vitrification plant remote handling operational experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgate, I.

    1996-01-01

    All the main process plant and equipment at the Sellafield Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP) is enclosed in heavily shielded concrete walled cells. There is a large quantity of relatively complex plant and equipment which must be remotely operated, maintained or replaced in-cell in a severe environment. The WVP has five in-cell polar cranes which are of modular construction to aid replacement of failed components. Each can be withdrawn into a shielded cell extension for decontamination and hands-on maintenance. The cells have a total of 80 through wall tube positions to receive Master Slave Manipulators (MSMs). The MSMs are used where possible for ''pick and place'' purposes but are often called upon to position substantial pieces of mechanical equipment and thus are subject to heavy loading and high failure rates. An inward flow of air is maintained in the active cells. The discharged air passes through a filter cell where remote damper operation filter changing and maintenance is carried out by means of a PAR3000 manipulator. A Nuclear Engineered Advanced Teleoperated Robot (Neater) swabs the vitrified product container to ensure cleanliness before storage. There is a significant arising of solid radioactive waste from replaced in-cell items which undergoes sorting and size reduction in a breakdown cell equipped with a large reciprocating saw and a hydraulic shear. Improvements to the remote handling facilities made in the light of operational experience are described. (UK)

  9. Operational experience - Lessons learned from IRS-reports in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, N.; Maqua, M.

    2005-01-01

    The international Incident Reporting System (IRS), jointly operated by IAEA and OECD-NEA, is a main source of safety significant findings and lessons learned of nuclear operating experience. GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH) is a scientific-technical expert and research organisation. On Behalf of the Federal Minister of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (BMU), GRS provides the IRS officer. The evaluation of IRS-Reports and the dissemination of the main findings including the assessment of the relevance for German NPPs is task of GRS. The value of IRS is among experts undoubted. But nevertheless, the reporting to IRS decreases since some years. This presentation is aimed to show the support of IRS in strengthening the safety of German NPPs. The evaluation of IRS-Reports at GRS is three-fold. It comprises initial screening, quarterly and yearly reporting and the development of specific German Information Notices on safety significant events with direct applicability to German NPPs. Some examples of lessons learned from recent international events are discussed below. These examples shall demonstrate that the use of the IRS enhances significantly the knowledge on operational events. (author)

  10. OECD/NEA component operational experience, degradation and ageing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.; Nevander, O.; Riznic, J.; Lydell, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several OECD Member Countries have agreed to establish the OECD/NEA 'Component Operational Experience, Degradation and Ageing Programme' (CODAP) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to degradation and failure of metallic piping and non-piping metallic passive components in commercial nuclear power plants. The scope of the data collection includes service-induced wall thinning, part through-wall cracks, through-wall cracks with and without active leakage, and instances of significant degradation of metallic passive components, including piping pressure boundary integrity. CODAP is the continuation of the 2002-2011 'OECD/NEA Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) and the Stress Corrosion Cracking Working Group of the 2006-2010 - OECD/NEA SCC and Cable Ageing project - (SCAP). OPDE was formally launched in May 2002. Upon completion of the 3. Term (May 2011), the OPDE project was officially closed to be succeeded by CODAP. In May 2011, 13 countries signed the CODAP first Term agreement. The first Term (2011-2014) work plan includes the development of a web-based relational event database on passive, metallic components in commercial nuclear power plants, a web-based knowledge base on material degradation, codes and standards relating to structural integrity and national practices for managing material degradation. The work plan also addresses the preparation of Topical Reports to foster technical cooperation and to deepen the understanding of national differences in ageing management. These Topical Reports are in the public domain and available for download on the NEA web site. Published in 2014, a first Topical Report addressed flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel and low alloy steel piping. A second Topical Report addresses operating experience with electro-hydraulic control (EHC) and instrument air (IA) system piping

  11. [Interdisciplinary training opportunities for residents in occupational medicine: the experience of the ERC Tour 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toninelli, E; Fostinelli, J; Rosen, M A; Lucchini, R; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of the School of Occupational Medicine of the University of Brescia at the current edition of the New York and New Jersey Education and Research Center--Historical Perspectives Tour on Occupational Safety and Health, that involved 5 different industrial and environmental sites, appropriate for understanding the complex occupational health and safety problems. In every site, the participants have interacted with workers and professionals and discussed about the specific work processes, to better understand the risk faced by the workers, occupational pathologies that can occur, personal protective equipment used and preventive measures adopted. This experience has been successful in provide interdisciplinary educations to occupational safety and health professionals in training in order to prepare them for the collaboration and cooperation required to solve the complex occupational health and safety problems they will face in their future careers.

  12. EDF/EPRI collaborative program on operator reliability experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villemeur, A.; Meslin, T.; Mosneron, F.; Worledge, D.H.; Joksimovich, V.; Spurgin, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Electricite de France (EDF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have been involved in human reliability studies over the last few years, in the context of improvements in human reliability assessment (HRA) methodologies, and have been following a systematic process since 1982 which consists of addressing the following five ingredients: - First, classify human interactions into a limited number of classes. - Second, introduce an acceptable framework to organize the application of HRA to PRA studies. - Third, select approach(es) to quantification. - Fourth, test promising models. - Fifth, establish an appropriate data base for tested model(s) with regard to specific applications. EPRI has just recently completed Phase I of the fourth topic. This primarily focused on testing the fundamental hypotheses behing the human cognitive reliability (HCR) correlation, using power plant simulators. EDF has been carrying out simulator studies since 1980, both for man-machine interface validation and HRA data collection. This background of experience provided a stepping stone for the EPRI project. On the other hand, before 1986, EDF had mainly been concentrating on getting qualitative insights from the tests and lacked experience in quantitative analysis and modeling, while EPRI had made advances in this latter area. Before the EPRI Operator Reliability Experiments (ORE) project was initiated, it was abundantly clear to EPRI and EDF that cooperation between the two could be useful and that both parties could gain from the cooperation

  13. Operating experiences in fuel handling system at KGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.P.; Nagabhushanam

    2006-01-01

    Refuelling operations were started at KGS in August, 2000. Rich and varied experience was gained during this period through internal discussion/Quality circles/Procedural reviews and analysis of various incidents that have taken place in KGS and other units of NPCIL Some of the unique jobs carried out at KGS include-Development of tools for in-situ replacement of FM front end cover in FM service area (which was done for the first time in NPCIL history), Modification of FM magazine rear end plate mounting screws to avoid the possibility of magazine rotation stalling, The incident of Stalling of B-Ram during installation of upstream shield plug in KGS - 1 has brought out many weakness that were existing in the system in a dormant manner. Review of maintenance procedures was carried out and a special underwater operated sensor was developed and installed in Transfer Magazine to sense the presence and proper positioning of fuel bundles in the Transfer magazine tube during fuel loading operation. Numerous modifications were carried out in the system to increase equipment reliability, ease of operation and maintenance, to reduce man-rem consumption. Most notable among these modifications include -zig saw panel modification, EFCV O-ring modification, Ram BF switch modification, provision for increase in SFSB level provision, snout clamp oil circuit modification, ball valve actuator modification, installation of additional switch for sensing STS carriage UP position etc, This paper focuses on the challenges tackled in achieving near perfect performance, innovations and improvements carried out in the system to strive for this goal and development of procedures for reducing man-rem consumption and life extension of critical components. (author)

  14. Nuclear power operating experience and technical improvement in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, M.

    1983-01-01

    LWR technology in Japan, originally introduced from the United States of America, is now almost entirely supplied domestically. During the initial stage of plant operation, electric power companies experienced various troubles such as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the piping in BWRs and steam generator (S/G) tube leaks in PWRs, which once reduced the capacity factor to about 40%. As a result of efforts to investigate the causes of the troubles and to establish countermeasures, which were applied to the plants in operation and under construction for improvement, as well as to shorten the period of regular inspection and to extend the operation cycle, the capacity factor has been improved to 60% since 1980. In 1975 an LWR improvement and standardization programme was launched to aim at improvement of reliability and availability factor and reduction of occupational radiation exposure with the development of domestic technology based on construction and operating experience. The First Phase Programme, which ran from 1975 to 1977, established countermeasures to preclude these troubles and improved workability by enlargement of the containment vessel. The Second Phase Programme followed and ran until 1981. The major steps taken during this period include the adoption of new IGSCC-resistant material and improved core design for BWRs and the improvement of fuels and S/Gs for PWRs. With these improvements, the capacity factor is now expected to reach a 75% level and occupational radiation exposure should be reduced by 50%. A Third Phase Programme will centre on the test and development programme for advanced BWRs and PWRs now under way to further improve the availability factor and reliability while also minimizing radiation exposure. (author)

  15. Integrating Renewable Generation into Grid Operations: Four International Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mylrea, Michael E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levin, Todd [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Botterud, Audun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); O' Shaughnessy, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-22

    International experiences with power sector restructuring and the resultant impacts on bulk power grid operations and planning may provide insight into policy questions for the evolving United States power grid as resource mixes are changing in response to fuel prices, an aging generation fleet and to meet climate goals. Australia, Germany, Japan and the UK were selected to represent a range in the level and attributes of electricity industry liberalization in order to draw comparisons across a variety of regions in the United States such as California, ERCOT, the Southwest Power Pool and the Southeast Reliability Region. The study draws conclusions through a literature review of the four case study countries with regards to the changing resource mix and the electricity industry sector structure and their impact on grid operations and planning. This paper derives lessons learned and synthesizes implications for the United States based on answers to the above questions and the challenges faced by the four selected countries. Each country was examined to determine the challenges to their bulk power sector based on their changing resource mix, market structure, policies driving the changing resource mix, and policies driving restructuring. Each countries’ approach to solving those changes was examined, as well as how each country’s market structure either exacerbated or mitigated the approaches to solving the challenges to their bulk power grid operations and planning. All countries’ policies encourage renewable energy generation. One significant finding included the low- to zero-marginal cost of intermittent renewables and its potential negative impact on long-term resource adequacy. No dominant solution has emerged although a capacity market was introduced in the UK and is being contemplated in Japan. Germany has proposed the Energy Market 2.0 to encourage flexible generation investment. The grid operator in Australia proposed several approaches to maintaining

  16. Lessons learned from operating experience, maintenance procedures and training measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttner, K.; Gronau, D.

    2003-01-01

    Training programmes for nuclear facility personnel as a result of the developing phase of SAT have to be approved in the subsequent implementation and evaluation phases with the consequence of several feedback activities in the whole training process. The effectiveness of this procedure has to be evaluated especially with respect to an improvement of safety culture, shorter outage times or better plant performance, resulting in a smaller number of incidents due to human failures. The first two arguments are directly connected with all types of maintenance work in a nuclear power plant and the related preparatory training measures. The reduction of incidents due to human failures is the result of different influences, i.e. training of the operational as well as of the maintenance personnel together with changes of the operating procedures or system design. Though an evaluation of the training process should always be based on a clear definition of criteria by which the fulfilment of the learning objectives can be measured directly, the real effectiveness of training is proven by the behaviour and attitude of the personnel which can only be taken from indirect indicators. This is discussed in more detail for some examples being partly related to the above mentioned arguments. An excellent plant performance, representing a general objective of all activities, can be analysed by the changed number and reasons of incidents in a plant during its operation time. Two further examples are taken from the reactor service field where there is a tendency to reduce the individual dose rates by changed devices and/or procedures as an output from training experience with mockups. Finally the rationalisation of refresher training for operational personnel by the use of interactive teaching programs (Computer Based Training - CBT) is presented which integrate learning objectives together with a test module. (author)

  17. Sonography of the painful shoulder: role of the operator's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corroller, Thomas Le; Cohen, Michel; Champsaur, Pierre; Aswad, Richard; Pauly, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the role of the operator's experience in the sonographic evaluation of the painful shoulder and to validate assumptions about its technical performance in routine practice. Two radiologists, respectively standard and expert sonographic operators, independently and prospectively scanned 65 patients with clinical suspicion of rotator cuff lesion. Magnetic resonance arthrography was the reference standard. The sensitivity of the expert ultrasound operator was 95.3% for full-thickness rotator cuff tears (41/43), 70.6% for partial-thickness tears (12/17), 64.3% for intratendinous tears (9/14), 100% for abnormality of the long head of biceps tendon (seven of seven), 88.9% for supraspinatus tendinosis (16/18), 96.4% for subacromial bursa abnormalities (53/55), and 91.7%for acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis (33/36). The two sonographic operators were in very good agreement about full-thickness rotator cuff tears (κ=0.90), supraspinatus tendinosis (κ =0.80), abnormalities of the long head of biceps tendon (κ=0.84), subacromial bursa abnormalities (κ=0.89), and acromioclavicular osteoarthritis (κ=0.81). The agreement was only moderate for partial-thickness tears (κ=0.63) and intratendinous tears (κ=0.57). Our results show that in moderately experienced hands as in experts' hands, sonography has a low level of interobserver variability for full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Considering partial-thickness and intratendinous rotator cuff tears, our data suggest that interobserver variability is higher. (orig.)

  18. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  19. LANL operating experience with the WAND and HERCULES prototype systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetzmacher, K. M.; Foxx, C. L.; MYERS, S. C.

    2000-01-01

    The Waste Assay for Nonradioactive Disposal (WAND) and the High Efficiency Radiation Counters for Ultimate Low Emission Sensitivity (HERCULES) prototype systems have been operating at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Solid Waste Operation's (SWO'S) non-destructive assay (NDA) building since 1997 and 1998, respectively. These systems are the cornerstone of the verification program for low-density Green is Clean (GIC) waste at the Laboratory. GIC waste includes all non-regulated waste generated in radiological controlled areas (RCAS) that has been actively segregated as clean (i.e., nonradioactive) through the use of waste generator acceptable knowledge (AK). The use of this methodology alters LANL's past practice of disposing of all room trash generated in nuclear facilities in radioactive waste landfills. Waste that is verified clean can be disposed of at the Los Alamos County Landfill. It is estimated that 50-90% of the low-density room trash from radioactive material handling areas at Los Alamos might be free of contamination. This approach avoids the high cost of disposal of clean waste at a radioactive waste landfill. It also reduces consumption of precious space in the radioactive waste landfill where disposal of this waste provides no benefit to the public or the environment. Preserving low level waste (LLW) disposal capacity for truly radioactive waste is critical in this era when expanding existing radioactive waste landfills or permitting new ones is resisted by regulators and stakeholders. This paper describes the operating experience with the WAND and HERCULES since they began operation at SWO. Waste for verification by the WAND system has been limited so far to waste from the Plutonium Facility and the Solid Waste Operations Facility. A total of461 ft3 (13.1 m3) of low-density shredded waste and paper have been verified clean by the WAND system. The HERCULES system has been used to verify waste from four Laboratory facilities. These are the

  20. The reliability of structural systems operating at high temperature: Replacing engineering judgement with operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, M.J.; Smith, D.J.; Dean, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic assessments are used to assess the integrity of structural systems operating at high temperature by providing a lower bound lifetime prediction, requiring considerable engineering judgement. However such a result may not satisfy the structural integrity assessment purpose if the results are overly conservative or conversely plant observations (such as failures) could undermine the assessment result if observed before the lower bound lifetime. This paper develops a reliability methodology for high temperature assessments and illustrates the impact and importance of managing the uncertainties within such an analysis. This is done by separating uncertainties into three classifications; aleatory uncertainty, quantifiable epistemic uncertainty and unquantifiable epistemic uncertainty. The result is a reliability model that can predict the behaviour of a structural system based upon plant observations, including failure and survival data. This can be used to reduce the over reliance upon engineering judgement which is prevalent in deterministic assessments. Highlights: ► Deterministic assessments are shown to be heavily reliant upon engineering judgment. ► Based upon the R5 procedure, a reliability model for a structural system is developed. ► Variables must be classified as either aleatory or epistemic to model their impact on reliability. ► Operation experience is then used to reduce reliance upon engineering judgment. ► This results in a model which can predict system behaviour and learn from operational experience.

  1. Experience from construction and operation of Karachi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, S.M.N.

    1977-01-01

    Pakistan's first nuclear power plant (KANUPP) is owned and operated by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). It uses a heavy water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled reactor. Total installed capacity is 137 MW(e). It was designed, constructed and commissioned by Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd. (CGE) as Prime Contractor. Construction started in mid-1966 and was completed in mid 1970; commissioning started in early 1970 and was completed at the end of 1972. Intensive on-the-job training for 20 engineers and 15 operators was provided by CGE in Canada. Ten engineers also worked in CGE's design offices. With this key group of engineers and technicians PAEC had no difficulty in taking over the plant from CGE after completion. The construction of the plant in a developing country presented special problems to CGE. The relatively small local construction firms had limited experience and equipment. Construction plant, equipment and tools were scarce. Fabrication and workshop facilities of limited scope were available but their quotations were relatively high. A scarcity of engineering, technical and skilled manpower for the construction of the project left as the only alternative on-site training for carefully recruited technicians. The results were most gratifying and compared favourably with CGE's Canadian experience. Welding, pipe fitting, tubing work and electrical connections were excellent. The local staff's productivity and dedication were very good. In the commissioning period, PAEC and CGE engineers and technicians worked as one team, testing and debugging the equipment and systems and demonstrating the contractual performance warranties. This period extended to approximately three years due to many technical problems resulting from equipment failures, environmental problems, system problems, plant loading limitations in view of the relatively small size of the grid system and special requirement of fuel conditioning to avoid premature fuel

  2. Role of WhatsApp-based discussions in improving residents' knowledge of post-operative pain management: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Sumitra G; Bhawalkar, Pranay

    2017-10-01

    To provide a platform for the dissemination of basic knowledge of pain management, a WhatsApp group was created by residents and consultants. Common clinical scenarios, resident queries, and important instructions to be followed by residents with respect to running the Acute Pain Service were discussed in the group. This study evaluates the benefits of this interaction. This study was approved by the hospital ethics board and was registered with the Clinical Trial Registry of India. Second- and third-year anesthesia residents were included in a WhatsApp group, along with consultants (board certified anesthesiologists with a special interest in pain). Pain knowledge assessment was performed pre- and post-discussion using a standard 22-point questionnaire. A feedback form, which included self-rated confidence scores (1-10, 10-most confident) and opinions about the 3-month WhatsApp discussion, was collected. Improvements in the documentation in clinical sheets post-discussion were also analyzed. A total of 38 residents were included in the WhatsApp group. An improvement in the percentage of correct answers from 69.1% (pre-discussion) to 73.6% (post-discussion) was observed (P = 0.031). Improvements in the self-rated residents' confidence levels were also noted (P WhatsApp-based discussion was useful. Documentation of the details of epidural blockade in clinical sheets improved from 30% to 100%. The WhatsApp discussion improved residents' knowledge and confidence levels, and also resulted in improved documentation of essential details in the clinical notes. This form of education is promising and should be explored in future studies.

  3. Operational experience with Dragon reactor experiment of relevance to commercial reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.; Simon, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    An important part of the experience gained during the first ten years of successful power operation of the Dragon Reactor is relevant to the design and operation of future High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The aspects presented in this paper have been chosen as being particularly applicable to larger HTR systems. Core performance under a variety of conditions is surveyed with particular emphasis on a technique developed for the identification and location of unpurged releasing fuel and the presence of activation and fission products in the core area. The lessons learned during the reflector block replacement are presented. Operating experience with the primary circuit identifies the lack of mixing of gas streams within the hot plenum and the problems of gas streaming in ducts. Helium leakage from the circuit is often greater than the optimum 0.1%/d. Virtually all the leakage problems are associated with the small bore instrument pipework essential for the many experiments associated with the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE). Primary circuit maintenance work confirms the generally clean state of the DRE circuit but identifies 137 Cs and 110 Agsup(m) as possible hazards if fuel emitting these isotopes is irradiated. (author)

  4. Operational experience feedback in the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revuelta, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Operators in high-risk industries need to be learning organisations, learning from themselves and from the others. This presentation will describe how the nuclear industry is dealing in an integrated manner with the feedback of operating experience (OE), both internal and external, to increase the safety and reliability of power plants; it will describe how it: - investigates events; - reports events and analyses trends; - shares information to prevent recurrence; - performs corrective action and training; - performs assessments to verify effectiveness. The plants have achieved great improvements in performance overall, and to improve further, the industry is evolving. Instead of just learning from past events (reactive) it is now focusing on lower level indications of problems (precursors) through low level events reporting, trending and analysis. A hallmark of the industry is its desire to be self-critical. Emphasis is placed on improving the bottom quartile performing plants

  5. Mechanic- and hydraulic shock-absorbers - layout, construction, operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, M.

    1981-01-01

    The problem lies in the protection of the flexible supported power plant components against undesired sudden movements. Various shock absorbing systems are at disposal in this case: Mechanical and hydraulic shock absorbers, whose functioning systems are shown in figures. The operation experience showed a series of deficiencies, as demonstrated on various figures. In order to avoid them, some important recommendations are given. Requirements and layout are demonstrated according to todays' state-of-the-art. The admissible stresses, resulting from the summary of various specifications for the analytical evidence will be described. Development and construction will be explained in detail by means of pictures with cross sections of original shock absorbers. Todays' construction characteristics will be summarized. The final remark includes a request for generally valid guidelines. (orig.) [de

  6. Operating experience with ion exchanger beds in CIRUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, V.N.; Hajra, P.

    1977-01-01

    Operating experience with the ion exchanger beds in CIRUS reactor is narrated. Ion exchangers are provided for demineralisation of make up water and purification of closed loop water circuits. Exhaustion of resin is assessed on the basis of CO 2 concentration in the helium vent gas of the heavy water system. It is recommended that valves in the resin columns for rod handling bays be located outside the enclosure and each bed to reduce man-rem consumption during maintenance. Repeated backwash of the bed reduces chocking of water space with resin fines. Preventive maintenance avoids leakage past valves. Active resin from the resin beds is removed by hydraulic transfer method. (M.G.B.)

  7. Operating experience of the EBR-II steam generating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschman, H.W.; Penney, W.H.; Quilici, M.D.; Radtke, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) with integrated power producing capability. Superheated steam is produced by eight natural circulation evaporators, two superheaters, and a conventional steam drum. Steam throttle conditions are 438 C (820 F) and 8.62 MPa (1250 psi). The designs of the evaporators and superheaters are essentially identical; both are counterflow units with low pressure nonradioactive sodium on the shell side. Safety and reliability are maximized by using duplex tubes and tubesheets. The performance of the system has been excellent and essentially trouble free. The operating experience of EBR-II provides confidence that the technology can be applied to commercial LMFBR's for an abundant supply of energy for the future. 5 refs

  8. Operational experience of the fuel cleaning facility of Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaibo, R.; Matsuno, Y.; Sato, I.; Yoneda, Y.; Ito, H.

    1978-01-01

    Spent fuel assemblies in 'Joyo', after they are taken out of the core, are taken to the Fuel Cleaning Facility in the reactor service building and sodium removal is done. The cleaning process is done by cooling the assembly with argon gas, steam charging and rinsing by demineralized water. Deposited sodium was 50 ∼ 60 g per assembly. The sodium and steam reaction takes about 15 minutes to end and the total time the fuel is placed in the pot is about an hour. The total number of assemblies cleaned in the facility was 95 as of November 1977. In this report the operational experience together with discussions of future improvements are given. (author)

  9. Operational Experience from LCLS-II Cryomodule Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renzhuo [Fermilab; Hansen, Benjamin [Fermilab; White, Michael [Fermilab; Hurd, Joseph [Fermilab; Atassi, Omar Al [Fermilab; Bossert, Richard [Fermilab; Pei, Liujin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Makara, Jerry [Fermilab; Theilacker, Jay [Fermilab; Kaluzny, Joshua [Fermilab; Wu, Genfa [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the initial operational experience gained from testing Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) cryomodules at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Strategies for a controlled slow cooldown to 100 K and a fast cooldown past the niobium superconducting transition temperature of 9.2 K will be described. The test stand for the cryomodules at CMTF is sloped to match gradient in the LCLS-II tunnel at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) laboratory, which adds an additional challenge to stable liquid level control. Control valve regulation, Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) power compensation, and other methods of stabilizing liquid level and pressure in the cryomodule 2.0 K SRF cavity circuit will be discussed. Several different pumping configurations using cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps have been used on the cryomodule 2.0 K return line and the associated results will be described.

  10. Operational experience from LCLS-II cryomodule testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Hansen, B.; White, M.; Hurd, J.; Atassi, O. Al; Bossert, R.; Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Makara, J.; Theilacker, J.; Kaluzny, J.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the initial operational experience gained from testing Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) cryomodules at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Strategies for a controlled slow cooldown to 100 K and a fast cooldown past the niobium superconducting transition temperature of 9.2 K will be described. The test stand for the cryomodules at CMTF is sloped to match gradient in the LCLS-II tunnel at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) laboratory, which adds an additional challenge to stable liquid level control. Control valve regulation, Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) power compensation, and other methods of stabilizing liquid level and pressure in the cryomodule 2.0 K SRF cavity circuit will be discussed. Several different pumping configurations using cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps have been used on the cryomodule 2.0 K return line and the associated results will be described.

  11. Experiments simulation and design to set traffic lights operation rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Garcia, J.A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper it is used the experimental design to minimize the travel time of motor vehicles, in one of the most important avenues of Celaya City in Guanajuato, Mexico, by means of optimal synchronization of existing traffic lights. In the optimization process three factors are considered: the traffic lights’ cycle times, the synchrony defined as stepped, parallel and actual, and speed limit, each one with 3 evaluation levels. The response variables to consider are: motor vehicles’ travel time, fuel consumption and greenhouse effect gas (CO2) emissions. The different experiments are performed using the simulation model developed in the PTV-VISSIM software, which represents the vehicle traffic system. The obtained results for the different proposed scen