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Sample records for resident cns cells

  1. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

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    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  2. Environmental cues from CNS, PNS, and ENS cells regulate CNS progenitor differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännvall, Karin; Corell, Mikael; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Cellular origin and environmental cues regulate stem cell fate determination. Neuroepithelial stem cells form the central nervous system (CNS), whereas neural crest stem cells generate the peripheral (PNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS). CNS neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) fate determination...

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of CNS Injury

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    Azari, Michael F; Mathias, Louisa; Ozturk, Ezgi; Cram, David S; Boyd, Richard L; Petratos, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Brain and spinal cord injuries present significant therapeutic challenges. The treatments available for these conditions are largely ineffective, partly due to limitations in directly targeting the therapeutic agents to sites of pathology within the central nervous system (CNS). The use of stem cells to treat these conditions presents a novel therapeutic strategy. A variety of stem cell treatments have been examined in animal models of CNS trauma. Many of these studies have used stem cells as...

  4. Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 are up-regulated in brain resident cells in response to virus induced inflammation of the CNS via at least two distinctive pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Fenger, Christina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo

    2014-01-01

    underlie a virus induced up-regulation of SOCS in the CNS. We found that i.c. infection with either lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or yellow fever virus (YF) results in gradual up-regulation of SOCS1/3 mRNA expression peaking at day 7 post infection (p.i.). In the LCMV model, SOCS m...

  5. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  6. Adult Neural Stem Cells: Redefining the Physio- and Pathology of the CNS

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    Taupin, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are the “building blocks” of the body; they are self-renewing undifferentiated cells that give rise to the specialized cells of the tissues. In adult, stem cells are multipotent, they contribute to homeostasis of the tissues and regeneration after injury. Until recently, it was believed that the adult brain was devoid of stem cells, hence unable to make new neurons and regenerate. The recent confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain and neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS) suggests that the adult brain has the potential to regenerate and may be amenable to repair. The advent of adult neurogenesis and NSC research will redefine our understanding of the physio- and pathology of the nervous system, and provide new avenues and opportunities to treat a broad range of neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Adult NSC-based therapies will involve cellular therapy, but also pharmacology. PMID:23675059

  7. Contribution of Schwann Cells to Remyelination in a Naturally Occurring Canine Model of CNS Neuroinflammation.

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    Kristel Kegler

    Full Text Available Gliogenesis under pathophysiological conditions is of particular clinical relevance since it may provide evidence for regeneration promoting cells recruitable for therapeutic purposes. There is evidence that neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR-expressing cells emerge in the lesioned CNS. However, the phenotype and identity of these cells, and signals triggering their in situ generation under normal conditions and certain pathological situations has remained enigmatic. In the present study, we used a spontaneous, idiopathic and inflammatory CNS condition in dogs with prominent lympho-histiocytic infiltration as a model to study the phenotype of Schwann cells and their relation to Schwann cell remyelination within the CNS. Furthermore, the phenotype of p75NTR-expressing cells within the injured CNS was compared to their counter-part in control sciatic nerve and after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, organotypic slice cultures were used to further elucidate the origin of p75NTR-positive cells. In cerebral and cerebellar white and grey matter lesions as well as in the brain stem, p75NTR-positive cells co-expressed the transcription factor Sox2, but not GAP-43, GFAP, Egr2/Krox20, periaxin and PDGFR-α. Interestingly, and contrary to the findings in control sciatic nerves, p75NTR-expressing cells only co-localized with Sox2 in degenerative neuropathy, thus suggesting that such cells might represent dedifferentiated Schwann cells both in the injured CNS and PNS. Moreover, effective Schwann cell remyelination represented by periaxin- and P0-positive mature myelinating Schwann cells, was strikingly associated with the presence of p75NTR/Sox2-expressing Schwann cells. Intriguingly, the emergence of dedifferentiated Schwann cells was not affected by astrocytes, and a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response provided an adequate environment for Schwann cells plasticity within the injured CNS. Furthermore, axonal damage was reduced in brain stem areas

  8. Expanded CD8 T-cell sharing between periphery and CNS in multiple sclerosis

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    Salou, Marion; Garcia, Alexandra; Michel, Laure; Gainche-Salmon, Anne; Loussouarn, Delphine; Nicol, Bryan; Guillot, Flora; Hulin, Philippe; Nedellec, Steven; Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie; Nicot, Arnaud B; Degauque, Nicolas; Laplaud, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS), central nervous system (CNS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood display TCR clonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. These clones have been assumed – but never demonstrated – to be similar in the three compartments. Addressing this key question is essential to infer the implication of peripheral clonally expanded CD8+ T cells in the disease. Methods For the first time, TCR Vβ repertoire from paired blood (purified CD8+ and CD4+ T cells), CSF and CNS (22 lesions, various inflammatory and demyelination statuses) samples from three MS patients was studied using complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) spectratyping and high-throughput sequencing. In parallel, blood and CNS clonally expanded CD8+ T cells were characterized by fluorescent staining. Results TCR Vβ repertoire analysis revealed strong sharing of predominant T-cell clones between CNS lesions, CSF, and blood CD8+ T cells. In parallel, we showed that blood oligoclonal CD8+ T cells exhibit characteristics of pathogenic cells, as they displayed a bias toward a memory phenotype in MS patients, with increased expression of CCR5, CD11a and Granzyme B (GZM-B) compared to non oligoclonal counterparts. CNS-infiltrating T cells were mainly CD8 expressing CD11a and GZM-B. Interpretation This study highlights the predominant implication of CD8+ T cells in MS pathophysiology and demonstrates that potentially aggressive CD8+ T cells can be easily identified and characterized from blood and CSF samples. PMID:26125037

  9. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

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    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  10. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

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    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  11. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanrieder, Jørg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    and straightforward methodology for direct characterization of rodent CNS glial cells using MALDI-MS-based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS). This molecular phenotyping approach enables monitoring of cell growth stages, (stem) cell differentiation, as well as probing cellular responses towards different...... tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination...

  12. Pluripotent stem cells for the study of CNS development

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    Timothy J. Petros

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system is a complex neuronal meshwork consisting of a diverse array of cellular subtypes generated in a precise spatial and temporal pattern throughout development. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms that direct a relatively uniform population of neuroepithelial progenitors into the diverse neuronal subtypes remains a significant challenge. A firmer knowledge of the fundamental aspects of developmental neuroscience will allow us to better study the vast array of neurodevelopmental diseases. The advent of stem cell technologies has expedited our ability to generate and isolate populations of distinct interneuron subtypes. To date, researchers have successfully developed protocols to derive many types of neural cells from pluripotent stem cells, with varying degrees of efficiencies and reproducibility. The stem cell field is devoted to the potential of stem cell-derived neurons for the treatment of disease, highlighted by the ability to create patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells. However, another application that is often overlooked is the use of stem cell technology for studying normal neural development. This is especially important for human neurodevelopment, since obtaining embryonic tissue presents numerous technical and ethical challenges. In this review, we will explore the use of pluripotent stem cells for the study of neural development. We will review the different classes of pluripotent stem cells and focus on the types of neurodevelopmental questions that stem cell technologies can help address. In addition to covering the different neural cells derived from stem cells to date, we will detail the derivation and characterization of three of the more thoroughly studied cell groups. We hope that this review encourages researchers to develop innovative strategies for using pluripotent stem cells for the study of mammalian, and specifically human

  13. Ascl1 (Mash1) lineage cells contribute to discrete cell populations in CNS architecture.

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    Kim, Euiseok J; Battiste, James; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Johnson, Jane E

    2008-08-01

    Ascl1 (previously Mash1) is a bHLH transcription factor essential for neuronal differentiation and specification in the nervous system. Although it has been studied for its role in several neural lineages, the full complement of lineages arising from Ascl1 progenitor cells remains unknown. Using an inducible Cre-flox genetic fate-mapping strategy, Ascl1 lineages were determined throughout the brain. Ascl1 is present in proliferating progenitor cells but these cells are actively differentiating as evidenced by rapid migration out of germinal zones. Ascl1 lineage cells contribute to distinct cell types in each major brain division: the forebrain including the cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus, and thalamic nuclei, the midbrain including superior and inferior colliculi, and the hindbrain including Purkinje and deep cerebellar nuclei cells and cells in the trigeminal sensory system. Ascl1 progenitor cells at early stages in each CNS region preferentially become neurons, and at late stages they become oligodendrocytes. In conclusion, Ascl1-expressing progenitor cells in the brain give rise to multiple, but not all, neuronal subtypes and oligodendrocytes depending on the temporal and spatial context, consistent with a broad role in neural differentiation with some subtype specification.

  14. Immune cell entry to the CNS--a focus for immunoregulation of EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Tran, E; Hassan-Zahraee, M

    1999-01-01

    -requirement then to prove such a role. The point that emerges is that cytokine production in the CNS parenchyma is itself dependent on the prior infiltration of immune cells, and that without immune cell entry, EAE does not occur. This identifies events at the BBB, and in particular in the perivascular space, as critical......T-cell-derived cytokines are therefore individually unnecessary and collectively insufficient for microglial response. This somewhat provocative interpretation does not exclude a role for T-cell cytokines in induction of a microglial response in EAE, but it may be easier to show a non...

  15. Beta1 integrins differentially control extravasation of inflammatory cell subsets into the CNS during autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martina; Brakebusch, Cord; Coisne, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Inhibiting the alpha(4) subunit of the integrin heterodimers alpha(4)beta(1) and alpha(4)beta(7) with the monoclonal antibody natalizumab is an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the pharmacological action of natalizumab is not understood conclusively. Previous studies...... to firmly adhere to CNS endothelium in vivo, whereas their priming and expansion remain unaffected. Collectively, these results suggest that the primary action of natalizumab is interference with T cell extravasation via inhibition of alpha(4)beta(1) integrins....

  16. Creatine kinase BB and beta-2-microglobulin as markers of CNS metastases in patients with small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A G; Bach, F W; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1985-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) and its BB isoenzyme (CK-BB) were measured in CSF in 65 evaluable patients suspected of CNS metastases secondary to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). In addition, CSF and plasma levels of beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) were measured in a group of 73 evaluable patients. Of the 65...... patients analysed for CK-BB, 17 had meningeal carcinomatosis (MC), 26 had parenchymal metastases only, and 22 had no CNS disease. Patients with MC had a significantly higher CK-BB concentration in CSF than did patients belonging to the other two groups (P less than .01). Taking 0.4 U/L (upper limit...... in patients without CNS disease) as a cut-off point, 15 patients (88%) with MC had elevated CSF concentrations of CK-BB. Patients without CNS metastases had no CSF levels exceeding this value, whereas five patients with multiple CNS metastases did. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis suggests...

  17. Efficient T-cell surveillance of the CNS requires expression of the CXC chemokine receptor 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline; Moos, Torben

    2004-01-01

    T-cells play an important role in controlling viral infections inside the CNS. To study the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in the migration and positioning of virus-specific effector T-cells within the brain, CXCR3-deficient mice were infected intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis......-cell-mediated immunopathology. Quantitative analysis of the cellular infiltrate in CSF of infected mice revealed modest, if any, decrease in the number of mononuclear cells recruited to the meninges in the absence of CXCR3. However, immunohistological analysis disclosed a striking impairment of CD8+ T-cells from CXCR3......-deficient mice to migrate from the meninges into the outer layers of the brain parenchyma despite similar localization of virus-infected target cells. Reconstitution of CXCR3-deficient mice with wild-type CD8+ T-cells completely restored susceptibility to LCMV-induced meningitis. Thus, taken together, our...

  18. Distinct roles of T-cell lymphopenia and the microbial flora for gastrointestinal and CNS autoimmunity.

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    Fischer, Henrike J; Witte, Ann-Kathrin; Walter, Lutz; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; van den Brandt, Jens; Reichardt, Holger M

    2016-05-01

    T-cell lymphopenia is a major risk factor for autoimmunity. Here we describe congenic Lewis (LEW) rats with a loss-of-function mutation in the Gimap5 gene, leading to a 92% reduction in peripheral T-cell numbers. Gimap5-deficient LEW rats developed eosinophilic autoimmune gastroenteritis accompanied by a 40-fold increase in IgE serum levels. This phenotype was ameliorated by antibiotic treatment, indicating a critical role of the microbial flora in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Interestingly, Gimap5-deficient LEW rats showed strongly aggravated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) after immunization with guinea pig myelin basic protein. This phenotype, however, persisted after antibiosis, confirming that the enhanced CNS autoimmune response in T-cell lymphopenic Gimap5-deficient LEW rats was unrelated to the composition of the microbial flora. Rather, it seems that it was caused by the 7-fold increase in the percentage of activated T cells producing IL-17 and IFN-γ, and the skewed T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, both of which were the result of T-cell lymphopenia and not affected by antibiosis. This notion was supported by the observation that adoptive T-cell transfer corrected the TCR repertoire and improved EAE. Collectively, our findings confirm a critical albeit differential role of T-cell lymphopenia in the susceptibility to organ-specific autoimmune responses.-Fischer, H. J., Witte, A.-K., Walter, L., Gröne, H.-J., van den Brandt, J., Reichardt, H. M. Distinct roles of T-cell lymphopenia and the microbial flora for gastrointestinal and CNS autoimmunity. © FASEB.

  19. Primary CNS anaplastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma mimicking undifferentiated metastatic tumors: a case report.

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    Yang, Tianyu; Belverud, Shawn; Yeh, Albert Y; Bandovic, Jela; Farmer, Peter; Woldenberg, Rona F; Demopoulos, Alexis; Schulder, Michael; Li, Jian Yi

    2010-02-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare intracranial tumor, with an annual incidence of six per million population. Anaplastic variant of primary CNS diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is less common; to our knowledge, there is only one other case report in the world literature. We describe a 71 year old immunocompetent female without significant past medical history who presented with confusion and a homogeneously enhancing midline mass. The patient underwent craniotomy for tumor biopsy, followed by high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy despite a remarkably low performance status. Histologically, this tumor was composed of undifferentiated polymorphic tumor cells, multi-nucleated giant cells, extensive necrosis, and conspicuous mitotic activity, mimicking undifferentiated metastatic tumors. Immunohistochemical stains demonstrated immunopositivity of tumor cells for CD20, MUM-1, and BCL-6, and negative staining for CD3, CD10, and CD30. The clinical course, diagnostic workup, pathologic correlates, and treatment outcomes are described.

  20. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused...... by entorhinodentate lesions. A population of Mac1/CD11b+ CD45high macrophages (distinct from CD45low microglia) was specifically detected within the lesion-reactive hippocampus by 12 hr after injury. Significant infiltration by CD3+ T cells did not occur in the denervated hippocampus until 24 hr after axotomy...... hr after axotomy, whereas MCP-1/CCL2 was significantly induced before leukocyte infiltration occurred. Neither T cells nor macrophages infiltrated the denervated hippocampus of CCR2-deficient mice, arguing for a critical role for the CCR2 ligand MCP-1/CCL2 in leukocyte migration. Both T cells...

  1. Electrical Stimulation Elicit Neural Stem Cells Activation:New Perspectives in CNS Repair

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    Ratrel eHuang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are enthusiastically concerned about neural stem cell (NSC therapy in a wide array of diseases, including stroke, neurodegenerative disease, spinal cord injury (SCI and depression. Although enormous evidences have demonstrated that neurobehavioral improvement may benefit from NSC-supporting regeneration in animal models, approaches to endogenous and transplanted NSCs are blocked by hurdles of migration, proliferation, maturation and integration of NSCs. Electrical stimulation (ES may be a selective nondrug approach for mobilizing NSCs in the central nervous system (CNS. This technique is suitable for clinic application, because it is well established and its potential complications are manageable. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the emerging positive role of different electrical cues in regulating NSC biology in vitro and in vivo, as well as biomaterial-based and chemical stimulation of NSCs. In the future, ES combined with stem cell therapy or other cues probably becomes an approach for promoting brain repair.

  2. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

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    Alejandro Luarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  3. Glial progenitor cell migration promotes CNS axon growth on functionalized electroconducting microfibers.

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    Collazos-Castro, Jorge E; García-Rama, Concepción; Alves-Sampaio, Alexandra

    2016-04-15

    Electroactive systems that promote directional axonal growth and migration of glial progenitor cells (GPC) are needed for the treatment of neurological injuries. We report the functionalization of electroconducting microfibers with multiple biomolecules that synergistically stimulate the proliferation and migration of GPC, which in turn induce axonal elongation from embryonic cerebral cortex neurons. PEDOT doped with poly[(4-styrenesulfonic acid)-co-(maleic acid)] was synthesized on carbon microfibers and used for covalent attachment of molecules to the electroactive surface. The molecular complexes that promoted GPC proliferation and migration, followed by axonal extension, were composed of polylysine, heparin, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and matricellular proteins; the combination of bFGF with vitronectin or fibronectin being indispensable for sustained glial and axonal growth. The rate of glial-induced axonal elongation was about threefold that of axons growing directly on microfibers functionalized with polylysine alone. Electrical stimuli applied through the microfibers released bFGF and fibronectin from the polymer surface, consequently reducing GPC proliferation and promoting their differentiation into astrocytes, without causing cell detachment or toxicity. These results suggest that functionalized electroactive microfibers may provide a multifunctional tool for controlling neuron-glia interactions and enhancing neural repair. We report a multiple surface functionalization strategy for electroconducting microfibers (MFs), in order to promote proliferation and guided migration of glial precursor cells (GPC) and consequently create a permissive substrate for elongation of central nervous system (CNS) axons. GPC divided and migrated extensively on the functionalized MFs, leading to fast elongation of embryonic cerebral cortex axons. The application of electric pulses thorough the MFs controlled glial cell division and differentiation. The

  4. CNS cell-type localization and LPS response of TLR signaling pathways [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Gizelle M. McCarthy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Innate immune signaling in the brain has emerged as a contributor to many central nervous system (CNS pathologies, including mood disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders, and addiction. Toll-like receptors (TLRs, a key component of the innate immune response, are particularly implicated in neuroimmune dysfunction. However, most of our understanding about TLR signaling comes from the peripheral immune response, and it is becoming clear that the CNS immune response is unique. One controversial aspect of neuroimmune signaling is which CNS cell types are involved. While microglia are the CNS cell-type derived from a myeloid lineage, studies suggest that other glial cell types and even neurons express TLRs, although this idea is controversial. Furthermore, recent work suggests a discrepancy between RNA and protein expression within the CNS. Methods: To elucidate the CNS cell-type localization of TLRs and their downstream signaling molecules, we isolated microglia and astrocytes from the brain of adult mice treated with saline or the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Glial mRNA and protein expression was compared to a cellular-admixture to determine cell-type enrichment. Results: Enrichment analysis revealed that most of the TLR pathway genes are localized in microglia and changed in microglia following immune challenge. However, expression of Tlr3 was enriched in astrocytes, where it increased in response to LPS. Furthermore, attempts to determine protein cell-type localization revealed that many antibodies are non-specific and that antibody differences are contributing to conflicting localization results. Conclusions: Together these results highlight the cell types that should be looked at when studying TLR signaling gene expression and suggest that non-antibody approaches need to be used to accurately evaluate protein expression.

  5. Comparing the different response of PNS and CNS injured neurons to mesenchymal stem cell treatment.

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    Monfrini, Marianna; Ravasi, Maddalena; Maggioni, Daniele; Donzelli, Elisabetta; Tredici, Giovanni; Cavaletti, Guido; Scuteri, Arianna

    2018-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult bone marrow-derived stem cells actually proposed indifferently for the therapy of neurological diseases of both the Central (CNS) and the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS), as a panacea able to treat so many different diseases by their immunomodulatory ability and supportive action on neuronal survival. However, the identification of the exact mechanism of MSC action in the different diseases, although mandatory to define their real and concrete utility, is still lacking. Moreover, CNS and PNS neurons present many different biological properties, and it is still unclear if they respond in the same manner not only to MSC treatment, but also to injuries. For these reasons, in this study we compared the susceptibility of cortical and sensory neurons both to toxic drug exposure and to MSC action, in order to verify if these two neuronal populations can respond differently. Our results demonstrated that Cisplatin (CDDP), Glutamate, and Paclitaxel-treated sensory neurons were protected by the co-culture with MSCs, in different manners: through direct contact able to block apoptosis for CDDP- and Glutamate-treated neurons, and by the release of trophic factors for Paclitaxel-treated ones. A possible key soluble factor for MSC protection was Glutathione, spontaneously released by these cells. On the contrary, cortical neurons resulted more sensitive than sensory ones to the toxic action of the drugs, and overall MSCs failed to protect them. All these data identified for the first time a different susceptibility of cortical and sensory neurons, and demonstrated a protective action of MSCs only against drugs in peripheral neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evolving towards a human-cell based and multiscale approach to drug discovery for CNS disorders

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    Eric eSchadt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A disruptive approach to therapeutic discovery and development is required in order to significantly improve the success rate of drug discovery for central nervous system (CNS disorders. In this review, we first assess the key factors contributing to the frequent clinical failures for novel drugs. Second, we discuss cancer translational research paradigms that addressed key issues in drug discovery and development and have resulted in delivering drugs with significantly improved outcomes for patients. Finally, we discuss two emerging technologies that could improve the success rate of CNS therapies: human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-based studies and multiscale biology models. Coincident with advances in cellular technologies that enable the generation of hiPSCs directly from patient blood or skin cells, together with methods to differentiate these hiPSC lines into specific neural cell types relevant to neurological disease, it is also now possible to combine data from large-scale forward genetics and post-mortem global epigenetic and expression studies in order to generate novel predictive models. The application of systems biology approaches to account for the multiscale nature of different data types, from genetic to molecular and cellular to clinical, can lead to new insights into human diseases that are emergent properties of biological networks, not the result of changes to single genes. Such studies have demonstrated the heterogeneity in etiological pathways and the need for studies on model systems that are patient-derived and thereby recapitulate neurological disease pathways with higher fidelity. In the context of two common and presumably representative neurological diseases, the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, and the psychiatric disorder schizophrenia (SZ, we propose the need for, and exemplify the impact of, a multiscale biology approach that can integrate panomic, clinical, imaging, and literature

  7. [Molecular mechanism for the establishment of blood-vessel gateway for immune cells in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masaaki

    We have been studying about the molecular mechanism responsible for the establishment of the blood-vessel gateway through which immune cells enter the CNS. We have discovered three kinds of gateways in a multiple sclerosis model, EAE, based on the neural stimulations and named them the gravity-gateway reflex, electric-gateway reflex, and pain-gateway reflex, respectively. All gateway reflexes are involved in specific crosstalk between sensory-sympathetic pathways. For example, in the gravity-gateway reflex, gravity-mediated sensory stimulation via the soleus muscles activates fifth lumber(L5)dorsal loot ganglions to activate L5 sympathetic ganglions, which express norepinephrine at specific vessels of the L5 cord. We explain these three types of gateway reflexes in this chapter.

  8. Single Cell Electroporation Method for Mammalian CNS Neurons in Organotypic Slice Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesaka, Naofumi; Hayano, Yasufumi; Yamada, Akito; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    Axon tracing is an essential technique to study the projection pattern of neurons in the CNS. Horse radish peroxidase and lectins have contributed to revealing many neural connection patterns in the CNS (Itaya and van Hoesen, 1982; Fabian and Coulter, 1985; Yoshihara, 2002). Moreover, a tracing method with fluorescent dye has enabled the observation of growing axons in living conditions, and demon strated a lot of developmental aspects in axon growth and guidance (Harris et al., 1987; O'Rourke and Fraser, 1990; Kaethner and Stuermer, 1992; Halloran and Kalil, 1994; Yamamoto et al., 1997). More recently, genetically encoded fluores cent proteins can be used as a powerful tool to observe various biological events. Several gene transfer techniques such as microinjection, biolistic gene gun, viral infection, lipofection and transgenic technology have been developed (Feng et al., 2000; Ehrengruber et al., 2001; O'Brien et al., 2001; Ma et al., 2002; Sahly et al., 2003). In particular, the electroporation technique was proved as a valuable tool, since it can be applied to a wide range of tissues and cell types with little toxicity and can be performed with relative technical easiness. Most methods, including a stand ard electroporation technique, are suitable for gene transfer to a large number of cells. However, this is not ideal for axonal tracing, because observation of individ ual axons is occasionally required. To overcome this problem, we have developed an electroporation method using glass micropipettes containing plasmid solutions and small current injection. Here we introduce the method in detail and exemplified results with some example applications and discuss its usefulness.

  9. cells targeting a neuronal paraneoplastic antigen mediate tumor rejection and trigger CNS autoimmunity with humoral activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachère, Nathalie E; Orange, Dana E; Santomasso, Bianca D; Doerner, Jessica; Foo, Patricia K; Herre, Margaret; Fak, John; Monette, Sébastien; Gantman, Emily C; Frank, Mayu O; Darnell, Robert B

    2014-11-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic diseases (PND) involving immune responses directed toward intracellular antigens are poorly understood. Here, we examine immunity to the PND antigen Nova2, which is expressed exclusively in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. We hypothesized that ectopic expression of neuronal antigen in the periphery could incite PND. In our C57BL/6 mouse model, CNS antigen expression limits antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell expansion. Chimera experiments demonstrate that this tolerance is mediated by antigen expression in nonhematopoietic cells. CNS antigen expression does not limit tumor rejection by adoptively transferred transgenic T cells but does limit the generation of a memory population that can be expanded upon secondary challenge in vivo. Despite mediating cancer rejection, adoptively transferred transgenic T cells do not lead to paraneoplastic neuronal targeting. Preliminary experiments suggest an additional requirement for humoral activation to induce CNS autoimmunity. This work provides evidence that the requirements for cancer immunity and neuronal autoimmunity are uncoupled. Since humoral immunity was not required for tumor rejection, B-cell targeting therapy, such as rituximab, may be a rational treatment option for PND that does not hamper tumor immunity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Endogenous GABA controls oligodendrocyte lineage cell number, myelination, and CNS internode length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicola B; Clarke, Laura E; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Kougioumtzidou, Eleni; Matthey, Moritz; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur; Whiteley, Louise; Bergersen, Linda H; Richardson, William D; Attwell, David

    2017-02-01

    Adjusting the thickness and internodal length of the myelin sheath is a mechanism for tuning the conduction velocity of axons to match computational needs. Interactions between oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and developing axons regulate the formation of myelin around axons. We now show, using organotypic cerebral cortex slices from mice expressing eGFP in Sox10-positive oligodendrocytes, that endogenously released GABA, acting on GABA A receptors, greatly reduces the number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells. The decrease in oligodendrocyte number correlates with a reduction in the amount of myelination but also an increase in internode length, a parameter previously thought to be set by the axon diameter or to be a property intrinsic to oligodendrocytes. Importantly, while TTX block of neuronal activity had no effect on oligodendrocyte lineage cell number when applied alone, it was able to completely abolish the effect of blocking GABA A receptors, suggesting that control of myelination by endogenous GABA may require a permissive factor to be released from axons. In contrast, block of AMPA/KA receptors had no effect on oligodendrocyte lineage cell number or myelination. These results imply that, during development, GABA can act as a local environmental cue to control myelination and thus influence the conduction velocity of action potentials within the CNS. GLIA 2017;65:309-321. © 2016 The Authors Glia Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Treatment of splenic marginal zone lymphoma of the CNS with high-dose therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busemann Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapy of indolent lymphomas with involvement of the central nervous system (CNS has not been standardized so far. A 42-year old male patient presented with neurological signs because of leukemic splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL manifested in bone marrow, lymph nodes and CNS. Due to the aggressiveness of the disease and the young age of the patient, an intensive immunochemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy with busulfan, thiotepa and fludarabine and subsequent unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT was performed. The haemopoietic stem cells engrafted in time and the patient is doing well (ECOG 0 without evidence for active lymphoma three years after transplantation. Highly sensitive tests by specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for presence of lymphoma cells in blood and bone marrow indicated also a molecular remission. The reported case shows the feasibility of high-dose therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in high-risk patients with CNS-involvement of indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. In addition, the case supports the hypothesis that the graft-versus lymphoma effect after alloSCT is also active within the CNS.

  12. Creatine kinase BB and beta-2-microglobulin as markers of CNS metastases in patients with small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A G; Bach, F W; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1985-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) and its BB isoenzyme (CK-BB) were measured in CSF in 65 evaluable patients suspected of CNS metastases secondary to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). In addition, CSF and plasma levels of beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) were measured in a group of 73 evaluable patients. Of the 65...

  13. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  14. Protease-Activated Receptor 2: Are Common Functions in Glial and Immune Cells Linked to Inflammation-Related CNS Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushell, Trevor J; Cunningham, Margaret R; McIntosh, Kathryn A; Moudio, Serge; Plevin, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose activation requires the cleavage of the N-terminus by a serine protease. However, recent evidence reveals that alternative routes of activation also occur, that PARs signal via multiple pathways and that pathway activation is activator- dependent. Given our increased understanding of PAR function both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, one aspect that has remained constant is the link between PAR2 and inflammation. PAR2 is expressed in immune cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system and has been shown to play a role in several peripheral inflammatory conditions. PAR2 is similarly expressed on astrocytes and microglia within the CNS and its activation is either protective or detrimental to CNS function depending on the conditions or disease state investigated. With a clear similarity between the function of PAR2 on both immune cells and CNS glial cells, here we have reviewed their roles in both these systems. We suggest that the recent development of novel PAR2 modulators, including those that show biased signalling, will further increase our understanding of PAR2 function and the development of potential therapeutics for CNS disorders in which inflammation is proposed to play a role.

  15. Tissue-resident memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Haina; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2013-09-01

    Tissues such as the genital tract, skin, and lung act as barriers against invading pathogens. To protect the host, incoming microbes must be quickly and efficiently controlled by the immune system at the portal of entry. Memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, which confers long-term protection and is the basis for efficacious vaccines. While the majority of existing vaccines rely on circulating antibody for protection, struggles to develop antibody-based vaccines against infections such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have underscored the need to generate memory T cells for robust antiviral control. The circulating memory T-cell population is generally divided into two subsets: effector memory (TEM ) and central memory (TCM ). These two subsets can be distinguished by their localization, as TCM home to secondary lymphoid organs and TEM circulate through non-lymphoid tissues. More recently, studies have identified a third subset, called tissue-resident memory (TRM ) cells, based on its migratory properties. This subset is found in peripheral tissues that require expression of specific chemoattractants and homing receptors for T-cell recruitment and retention, including barrier sites such as the skin and genital tract. In this review, we categorize different tissues in the body based on patterns of memory T-cell migration and tissue residency. This review also describes the rules for TRM generation and the properties that distinguish them from circulating TEM and TCM cells. Finally, based on the failure of recent T-cell-based vaccines to provide optimal protection, we also discuss the potential role of TRM cells in vaccine design against microbes that invade through the peripheral tissues and highlight new vaccination strategies that take advantage of this newly described memory T-cell subset. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The farnesoid-X-receptor in myeloid cells controls CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucke, Stephanie; Herold, Martin; Liebmann, Marie; Freise, Nicole; Lindner, Maren; Fleck, Ann-Katrin; Zenker, Stefanie; Thiebes, Stephanie; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Buck, Dorothea; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Zipp, Frauke; Hemmer, Bernhard; Engel, Daniel Robert; Roth, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz; Klotz, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Innate immune responses by myeloid cells decisively contribute to perpetuation of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and their pharmacologic modulation represents a promising strategy to prevent disease progression in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Based on our observation that peripheral immune cells from relapsing-remitting and primary progressive MS patients exhibited strongly decreased levels of the bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid-X-receptor, NR1H4), we evaluated its potential relevance as therapeutic target for control of established CNS autoimmunity. Pharmacological FXR activation promoted generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages characterized by arginase-1, increased IL-10 production, and suppression of T cell responses. In mice, FXR activation ameliorated CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion and even suppressed advanced clinical disease upon therapeutic administration. In analogy to rodents, pharmacological FXR activation in human monocytes from healthy controls and MS patients induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype with suppressive properties including control of effector T cell proliferation. We therefore, propose an important role of FXR in control of T cell-mediated autoimmunity by promoting anti-inflammatory macrophage responses.

  17. Classically and alternatively activated bone marrow derived macrophages differ in cytoskeletal functions and migration towards specific CNS cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra Christine D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages play an important role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS and spinal cord injury (SCI, being involved in both damage and repair. The divergent effects of macrophages might be explained by their different activation status: classically activated (CA/M1, pro-inflammatory, macrophages and alternatively activated (AA/M2, growth promoting, macrophages. Little is known about the effect of macrophages with these phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS and how they influence pathogenesis. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the characteristics of these phenotypically different macrophages in the context of the CNS in an in vitro setting. Results Here we show that bone marrow derived CA and AA macrophages have a distinct migratory capacity towards medium conditioned by various cell types of the CNS. AA macrophages were preferentially attracted by the low weight ( Conclusion In conclusion, since AA macrophages are more motile and are attracted by NCM, they are prone to migrate towards neurons in the CNS. CA macrophages have a lower motility and a stronger adhesion to ECM. In neuroinflammatory diseases the restricted migration and motility of CA macrophages might limit lesion size due to bystander damage.

  18. Utility of MRI versus tumor markers for post-treatment surveillance of marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Victoria; Segal, Devorah; Gardner, Sharon L; Zagzag, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H; Allen, Jeffrey C; Karajannis, Matthias A

    2016-09-01

    Patients with marker-positive central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors are typically monitored for tumor recurrence with both tumor markers (AFP and b-hCG) and MRI. We hypothesize that the recurrence of these tumors will always be accompanied by an elevation in tumor markers, and that surveillance MRI may not be necessary. We retrospectively identified 28 patients with CNS germ cell tumors treated at our institution that presented with an elevated serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tumor marker at the time of diagnosis. We then identified those who had a tumor recurrence after having been in remission and whether each recurrence was detected via MRI changes, elevated tumor markers, or both. Four patients suffered a tumor recurrence. Only one patient had simultaneously elevated tumor markers and MRI evidence of recurrence. Two patients had evidence of recurrence on MRI without corresponding elevations in serum or CSF tumor markers. One patient had abnormal tumor markers with no evidence of recurrence on MRI until 6 months later. We conclude that in patients with marker-positive CNS germ cell tumors who achieve complete remission, continued surveillance imaging in addition to measurement of tumor markers is indicated to detect recurrences.

  19. The Gateway Reflex, which is mediated by the inflammation amplifier, directs pathogenic immune cells into the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Lavannya; Kamimura, Daisuke; Meng, Jie; Bando, Hidenori; Ogura, Hideki; Nakayama, Chiemi; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Kumai, Noriko; Suzuki, Hironao; Atsumi, Toru; Arima, Yasunobu; Murakami, Masaaki

    2014-12-01

    The brain-blood barrier (BBB) tightly limits immune cell migration into the central nervous system (CNS), avoiding unwanted inflammation under the normal state. However, immune cells can traverse the BBB when inflammation occurs within the CNS, suggesting a certain signal that creates a gateway that bypasses the BBB might exist. We revealed the inflammation amplifier as a mechanism of this signal, and identified dorsal vessels of the fifth lumber (L5) spinal cord as the gateway. The inflammation amplifier is driven by a simultaneous activation of NF-κB and STATs in non-immune cells, causing the production of a large amount of inflammatory chemokines to open the gateway at L5 vessels. It was found that the activation of the amplifier can be modulated by neural activation and artificially operated by electric pulses followed by establishment of new gateways, Gateway Reflex, at least in mice. Furthermore, genes required for the inflammation amplifier have been identified and are highly associated with various inflammatory diseases and disorders in the CNS. Thus, physical and/or pharmacological manipulation of the inflammation amplifier holds therapeutic value to control neuro-inflammation. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Ascl1 (Mash1) lineage cells contribute to discrete cell populations in CNS architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Euiseok J.; Battiste, James; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Johnson, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    Ascl1 (previously Mash1) is a bHLH transcription factor essential for neuronal differentiation and specification in the nervous system. Although it has been studied for its role in several neural lineages, the full complement of lineages arising from Ascl1 progenitor cells remains unknown. Using an inducible Cre-flox genetic fate mapping strategy, Ascl1 lineages were determined throughout the brain. Ascl1 is present in proliferating progenitor cells but these cells are actively differentiatin...

  1. Migration, fate and in vivo imaging of stem cells in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.3 (2009), s. 4-4 ISSN 1351-5101. [Congress of the European-Federation-of-Neurological-Societies /13./. 12.09.2009-15.09.2009, Florencie] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : CNS * ESC Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Lentiviral-mediated administration of IL-25 in the CNS induces alternative activation of microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiorino, C; Khorooshi, R; Ruffini, F

    2013-01-01

    was partly inhibited and the CNS protected from immune-mediated damage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of M2 shift (alternative activation) induced in vivo on CNS-resident myeloid cells by gene therapy, and may constitute a promising strategy to investigate the potential role of protective...... immune system, namely macrophages. We used a lentiviral-mediated gene therapy approach to deliver IL-25 to the central nervous system (CNS) in two mouse models of neuroinflammation, entorhinal cortex lesion and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In both, we found that IL-25 gene therapy was able...... to modulate CNS myeloid cells, either infiltrating macrophages or resident microglia, towards an anti-inflammatory, tissue-protective phenotype, as testified by the increase in markers such as Arginase-1 (Arg1), Mannose receptor 1 (CD206) and Chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym1). As a consequence, neuroinflammation...

  3. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z

    2002-01-01

    It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites...... is not sufficient for the trafficking of CD3+T-cells to the CSF. We hypothesize that CXCR3 is the principal inflammatory chemokine receptor involved in intrathecal accumulation of T-cells in MS. Through interactions with its ligands, CXCR3 is proposed to mediate retention of T-cells in the inflamed CNS....

  4. Innate Interferons Regulate CNS Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieu, Ruthe; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Mariboe, Anne

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) whose pathology is characterised by demyelination and axonal damage. This results from interplay between CNS-resident glia, infiltrating leukocytes and a plethora of cytokines and chemokines. Currently......, there is no cure for MS, however a standard first-line therapy is recombinant interferon (IFN)-beta. IFN-beta belongs to the family of type I IFNs, which also include IFN-alpha. These engage to one common receptor, IFNAR. Type I IFNs can be induced by several innate immune receptors, including toll-like receptors...... mass homeostasis. Whether RANK-signaling is capable of inducing type I IFNs within the CNS has not yet been studied. Preliminary data from IFN-beta-luciferase reporter mice already show that RANK-signaling by intrathecally applied RANKL can induce CNS-endogenous IFN-beta. Experiments in IFN...

  5. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z

    2002-01-01

    It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites of inflamma......It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites...

  6. brother of cdo (umleitung) is cell-autonomously required for Hedgehog-mediated ventral CNS patterning in the zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tyurina, Oksana V.; Miller, Emily; Bagas, Andrea; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Brother of Cdo (Boc) has been implicated in Shh-mediated commissural axon guidance, and can both positively and negatively regulate Hedgehog (Hh) target gene transcription, however, little is known about in vivo requirements for Boc during vertebrate embryogenesis. The zebrafish umleitung (umlty54) mutant was identified by defects in retinotectal axon projections. Here, we show that the uml locus encodes Boc and that Boc function is cell-autonomously required for Hh-mediated neural patterning. Our phenotypic analysis suggests that Boc is required as a positive regulator of Hh signaling in the spinal cord, hypothalamus, pituitary, somites and upper jaw, but that Boc might negatively regulate Hh signals in the lower jaw. This study reveals a role for Boc in ventral CNS cells that receive high levels of Hh and uncovers previously unknown roles for Boc in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:21115611

  7. Combined immunoradiotherapy induces long-term remission of CNS relapse of peripheral, diffuse, large-cell lymphoma after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: Case study

    OpenAIRE

    Lotze, Christian; Schüler, Frank; Krüger, William H.; Hirt, Carsten; Kirsch, Michael; Vogelgesang, Silke; Schmidt, Christian A.; Dölken, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    Relapse of peripheral non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) in the central nervous system commonly has a poor prognosis. Graft-versus-leukemia effects (GvL) contribute substantially to eradication of hematological malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Few data are available describing GvL activity within the brain. We report the case of a man allografted for peripheral NHL. On day +83 after transplantation a CNS relapse of the lymphoma occurred. The brain was irradiated with 44 Gy, ...

  8. Adiponectin Suppresses T Helper 17 Cell Differentiation and Limits Autoimmune CNS Inflammation via the SIRT1/PPARγ/RORγt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Guo, Yawei; Ge, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhihui; Da, Yurong; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zimu; Xue, Zhenyi; Li, Yan; Ren, Yinghui; Jia, Long; Chan, Koon-Ho; Yang, Fengrui; Yan, Jun; Yao, Zhi; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Rongxin

    2017-09-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells are vital components of the adaptive immune system involved in the pathogenesis of most autoimmune and inflammatory syndromes, and adiponectin(ADN) is correlated with inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and type II diabetes. However, the regulatory effects of adiponectin on pathogenic Th17 cell and Th17-mediated autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) inflammation are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that ADN could inhibit Th1 and Th17 but not Th2 cells differentiation in vitro. In the in vivo study, we demonstrated that ADN deficiency promoted CNS inflammation and demyelination and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of human MS. Furthermore, ADN deficiency increased the Th1 and Th17 cell cytokines of both the peripheral immune system and CNS in mice suffering from EAE. It is worth mentioning that ADN deficiency predominantly promoted the antigen-specific Th17 cells response in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, ADN upregulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and inhibited retinoid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt); the key transcription factor during Th17 cell differentiation. These results systematically uncovered the role and mechanism of adiponectin on pathogenic Th17 cells and suggested that adiponectin could inhibit Th17 cell-mediated autoimmune CNS inflammation.

  9. Behavior and function of tissue-resident memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariotti, Silvia; Haanen, John B; Schumacher, Ton N

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of memory T cell function in mice and men is to date in large part restricted to the behavior of circulating memory T cells. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that in addition to such systemic memory T cell populations, a separate population of locally confined memory T cells is generated at former sites of antigen encounter. Here, we discuss the potential function of these long-term tissue-resident memory T cells (T(TRM)), how such local T cell memory can be maintained for prolonged periods of time, and how the induction of long-term tissue-resident memory T cells may potentially be exploited during vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mastermind mutations generate a unique constellation of midline cells within the Drosophila CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Notch pathway functions repeatedly during the development of the central nervous system in metazoan organisms to control cell fate and regulate cell proliferation and asymmetric cell divisions. Within the Drosophila midline cell lineage, which bisects the two symmetrical halves of the central nervous system, Notch is required for initial cell specification and subsequent differentiation of many midline lineages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide the first description of the role of the Notch co-factor, mastermind, in the central nervous system midline of Drosophila. Overall, zygotic mastermind mutations cause an increase in midline cell number and decrease in midline cell diversity. Compared to mutations in other components of the Notch signaling pathway, such as Notch itself and Delta, zygotic mutations in mastermind cause the production of a unique constellation of midline cell types. The major difference is that midline glia form normally in zygotic mastermind mutants, but not in Notch and Delta mutants. Moreover, during late embryogenesis, extra anterior midline glia survive in zygotic mastermind mutants compared to wild type embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is an example of a mutation in a signaling pathway cofactor producing a distinct central nervous system phenotype compared to mutations in major components of the pathway.

  11. T-bet expression by Foxp3+ T regulatory cells is not essential for their suppressive function in CNS autoimmune disease or colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhoanne C McPherson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of T regulatory (Treg cells within the central nervous system (CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is essential for the resolution of disease. CNS Treg cells have been shown to uniformly express the Th1-associated molecules T-bet and CXCR3. Here we report that the expression of T-bet is not required for the function of these Treg within the CNS. Using mice that lacked T-bet expression specifically within the Treg compartment, we demonstrate that there was no deficit in Treg recruitment into the CNS during EAE and no difference in the resolution of disease compared to control mice. T-bet deficiency did not impact on the in vitro suppressive capacity of Treg. Transfer of T-bet-deficient Treg was able to suppress clinical signs of either EAE, or colitis. These observations demonstrate that, although Treg can acquire characteristics associated with pathogenic Teff cells, this process is not necessarily required for their suppressive capacity and the resolution of autoimmune inflammation.

  12. Cell division genes promote asymmetric interaction between Numb and Notch in the Drosophila CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, P; Truong, B; Bhat, K M

    1999-06-01

    Cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic factors mediate asymmetric cell divisions during neurogenesis in the Drosophila embryo. In the NB4-2->GMC-1->RP2/sib lineage, one of the well-studied neuronal lineages in the ventral nerve cord, the Notch (N) signaling interacts with the asymmetrically localized Numb (Nb) to specify sibling neuronal fates to daughter cells of GMC-1. In this current study, we have investigated asymmetric cell fate specifications by N and Nb in the context of cell cycle. We have used loss-of-function mutations in N and nb, cell division mutants cyclinA (cycA), regulator of cyclin A1 (rca1) and string/cdc25 phosphatase (stg), and the microtubule destabilizing agent, nocodazole, to investigate this issue. We report that the loss of cycA, rca1 or stg leads to a block in the division of GMC-1, however, this GMC-1 exclusively adopts an RP2 identity. While the loss of N leads to the specification of RP2 fates to both progeny of GMC-1 and loss of nb results in the specification of sib fates to these daughter cells, the GMC-1 in the double mutant between nb and cycA assumes a sib fate. These epistasis results indicate that both N and nb function downstream of cell division genes and that progression through cell cycle is required for the asymmetric localization of Nb. In the absence of entry to metaphase, the Nb protein prevents the N signaling from specifying sib fate to the RP2/sib precursor. These results are also consistent with our finding that the sib cell is specified as RP2 in N; nb double mutants. Finally, our results show that nocodazole-arrested GMC-1 in wild-type embryos randomly assumes either an RP2 fate or a sib fate. This suggests that microtubules are involved in mediating the antagonistic interaction between Nb and N during RP2 and sib fate specification.

  13. Supratentorial CNS malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Clinical suspicion of a developmental anomaly of the central nervous system (CNS) is a frequent indication for performing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the brain. Classification systems for malformation of the CNS are constantly revised according to newer scientific research. Developmental abnormalities can be classified in two main types. The first category consists of disorders of organogenesis in which genetic defects or any ischemic, metabolic, toxic or infectious insult to the developing brain can cause malformation. These malformations result from abnormal neuronal and glial proliferation and from anomalies of neuronal migration and or cortical organization. They are divided into supra- and infratentorial and may involve grey or white matter or both. The second category of congenital brain abnormalities is disorders of histogenesis which result from abnormal cell differentiation with a relatively normal brain appearance. Supratentorial CNS malformations could be divided into anomalies in telencephalic commissure, holoprosencephalies and malformations in cortical development. There are three main telencephalic commissures: the anterior commissure, the hippocampal commissure and the corpus callosum. Their morphology (hypoplasia, hyperplasia, agenesis, dysgenesis, even atrophy) reflects the development of the brain. Their agenesis, complete or partial, is one of the most commonly observed features in the malformations of the brain and is a part of many syndromes. Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are heterogeneous group of disease which result from disruption of 3 main stages of cortical development. The common clinical presentation is refractory epilepsy and or developmental delay. The most common MCD are heterotopias, focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, pachygyria and lizencephaly. The exact knowledge of the brain anatomy and embryology is mandatory to provide a better apprehension of the

  14. Transcriptome-wide survey of mouse CNS-derived cells reveals monoallelic expression within novel gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra M Li

    Full Text Available Monoallelic expression is an integral component of regulation of a number of essential genes and gene families. To probe for allele-specific expression in cells of CNS origin, we used next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq to analyze four clonal neural stem cell (NSC lines derived from Mus musculus C57BL/6 (B6×Mus musculus molossinus (JF1 adult female mice. We established a JF1 cSNP library, then ascertained transcriptome-wide expression from B6 vs. JF1 alleles in the NSC lines. Validating the assay, we found that 262 of 268 X-linked genes evaluable in at least one cell line showed monoallelic expression (at least 85% expression of the predominant allele, p-value<0.05. For autosomal genes 170 of 7,198 genes (2.4% of the total showed monoallelic expression in at least 2 evaluable cell lines. The group included eight known imprinted genes with the expected pattern of allele-specific expression. Among the other autosomal genes with monoallelic expression were five members of the glutathione transferase gene superfamily, which processes xenobiotic compounds as well as carcinogens and cancer therapeutic agents. Monoallelic expression within this superfamily thus may play a functional role in the response to diverse and potentially lethal exogenous factors, as is the case for the immunoglobulin and olfactory receptor superfamilies. Other genes and gene families showing monoallelic expression include the annexin gene family and the Thy1 gene, both linked to inflammation and cancer, as well as genes linked to alcohol dependence (Gabrg1 and epilepsy (Kcnma1. The annotated set of genes will provide a resource for investigation of mechanisms underlying certain cases of these and other major disorders.

  15. Treatment of splenic marginal zone lymphoma of the CNS with high-dose therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Busemann Christoph; Gudzuhn Andrej; Hirt Carsten; Kirsch Michael; Vogelgesang Silke; Schmidt Christian A; Dölken Gottfried; Krüger William H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Therapy of indolent lymphomas with involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) has not been standardized so far. A 42-year old male patient presented with neurological signs because of leukemic splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) manifested in bone marrow, lymph nodes and CNS. Due to the aggressiveness of the disease and the young age of the patient, an intensive immunochemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy with busulfan, thiotepa and fludarabine and subsequent unrelated al...

  16. MR tracking of stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in injured CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Růžičková, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Herynek, V.; Hájek, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 9 (2003), s. 847 ISSN 0391-3988. [World Congress on regenerative Medicine /1./. Lipsko, 22.10.2003-24.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/03/1189; GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : Stem cells * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2003

  17. IL4I1 augments CNS remyelination and axonal protection by modulating T cell driven inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psachoulia, Konstantina; Chamberlain, Kelly A; Heo, Dongeun; Davis, Stephanie E; Paskus, Jeremiah D; Nanescu, Sonia E; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Wynn, Thomas A; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2016-12-01

    SEE PLUCHINO AND PERUZZOTTI-JAMETTI DOI101093/AWW266 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Myelin regeneration (remyelination) is a spontaneous process that occurs following central nervous system demyelination. However, for reasons that remain poorly understood, remyelination fails in the progressive phase of multiple sclerosis. Emerging evidence indicates that alternatively activated macrophages in central nervous system lesions are required for oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. Here, we show that an alternatively activated macrophage secreted enzyme, interleukin-four induced one (IL4I1), is upregulated at the onset of inflammation resolution and remyelination in mouse central nervous system lesions after lysolecithin-induced focal demyelination. Focal demyelination in mice lacking IL4I1 or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL4Rα) results in increased proinflammatory macrophage density, remyelination impairment, and axonal injury in central nervous system lesions. Conversely, recombinant IL4I1 administration into central nervous system lesions reduces proinflammatory macrophage density, enhances remyelination, and rescues remyelination impairment in IL4Rα deficient mice. We find that IL4I1 does not directly affect oligodendrocyte differentiation, but modulates inflammation by reducing interferon gamma and IL17 expression in lesioned central nervous system tissues, and in activated T cells from splenocyte cultures. Remarkably, intravenous injection of IL4I1 into mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at disease onset significantly reversed disease severity, resulting in recovery from hindlimb paralysis. Analysis of post-mortem tissues reveals reduced axonal dystrophy in spinal cord, and decreased CD4 + T cell populations in spinal cord and spleen tissues. These results indicate that IL4I1 modulates inflammation by regulating T cell expansion, thereby permitting the formation of a favourable

  18. Migration, fate and in vivo imaging of adult stem cells in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2007), s. 1336-1342 ISSN 1350-9047 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; EU(DE) 512146; EU(FR) 518233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Mesenchymal stem cells * Contrast agents * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 8.254, year: 2007

  19. CD103+CD8 T Cells in theToxoplasma-Infected Brain Exhibit a Tissue-Resident Memory Transcriptional Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrith, Tyler A; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Rivera, Andrea; Jang, Jessica C; Rais, Maham; Nair, Meera G; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Wilson, Emma H

    2017-01-01

    During chronic infection, memory T cells acquire a unique phenotype and become dependent on different survival signals than those needed for memory T cells generated during an acute infection. The distinction between the role of effector and memory T cells in an environment of persistent antigen remains unclear. Here, in the context of chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection, we demonstrate that a population of CD8 T cells exhibiting a tissue-resident memory (T RM ) phenotype accumulates within the brain. We show that this population is distributed throughout the brain in both parenchymal and extraparenchymal spaces. Furthermore, this population is transcriptionally distinct and exhibits a transcriptional signature consistent with the T RM observed in acute viral infections. Finally, we establish that the CD103 + T RM population has an intrinsic capacity to produce both IFN-γ and TNF-α, cytokines critical for parasite control within the central nervous system (CNS). The contribution of this population to pro-inflammatory cytokine production suggests an important role for T RM in protective and ongoing immune responses in the infected CNS. Accession number:   GSE95105 .

  20. Immune and inflammatory responses in the CNS : Modulation by astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; aschner, michael; hidalgo, juan

    2008-01-01

    the communication between hematogenous cells and resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This review will address (1) the functions of astrocytes in the normal brain and (2) their role in surveying noxious stimuli within the brain, with particular emphasis on astrocytic responses to damage or disease......, a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis/ astrocytosis. In addition, the review will discuss (3) the role of astrocytes as an abundant cellular source for immunoregulatory (cytokines) factors, and their fundamental roles in the type and extent of CNS immune and inflammatory responses. (4) Recent...... experimental evidence on the role of astroglia in the etiology of neurological diseases will be highlighted, along with (5) the role of oxidative stressors generated within astrocytes in this process....

  1. Immune and inflammatory responses in the CNS : Modulation by astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; aschner, michael; hidalgo, juan

    2008-01-01

    , a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis/ astrocytosis. In addition, the review will discuss (3) the role of astrocytes as an abundant cellular source for immunoregulatory (cytokines) factors, and their fundamental roles in the type and extent of CNS immune and inflammatory responses. (4) Recent......Beyond their long-recognized support functions, astrocytes are active partners of neurons in processing information, synaptic integration, and production of trophic factors, just to name a few. Both microglia and astrocytes produce and secrete a number of cytokines, modulating and integrating...... the communication between hematogenous cells and resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This review will address (1) the functions of astrocytes in the normal brain and (2) their role in surveying noxious stimuli within the brain, with particular emphasis on astrocytic responses to damage or disease...

  2. MYC/BCL2 Co-Expression Is a Stronger Prognostic Factor Compared With the Cell-of-Origin Classification in Primary CNS DLBCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian-Yun; Feng, Xiao; Bao, Wei; Ma, Jie; Lv, Jing-Huan; Wang, Xuan; Rao, Qiu; Shi, Qun-Li

    2017-11-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a subtype of DLBCL with an unfavorable prognosis and a poor response to the treatment. As we know, DLBCL is stratified into germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like and activated B-cell (ABC)-like subtypes with different prognosis according to their gene-expression characteristics. In this study, we analyzed a case series of 77 patients with primary CNS DLBCL. A difference in prognosis of GCB-like and ABC-like subtypes was noticed, but no statistical significance was found. However, significant prognostic value of MYC/BCL2 co-expression was shown. The cases with MYC/BCL2 co-expression did not show any predominance of the 2 subtypes in our cases. Furthermore, patients with MYC/BCL2 co-expression had significantly worse overall survival for both cell of origin (COO) subtypes. We conjecture that MYC/BCL2 co-expression is associated with a poorer prognosis and is independent of COO classification. Moreover, the data suggest that MYC/BCL2 co-expression is superior to COO classification assessed by immunohistochemical analysis in patients with primary CNS DLBCL. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluids and barriers of the CNS establish immune privilege by confining immune surveillance to a two-walled castle moat surrounding the CNS castle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Britta; Coisne, Caroline

    2011-01-18

    Neuronal activity within the central nervous system (CNS) strictly depends on homeostasis and therefore does not tolerate uncontrolled entry of blood components. It has been generally believed that under normal conditions, the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) prevent immune cell entry into the CNS. This view has recently changed when it was realized that activated T cells are able to breach the BBB and the BCSFB to perform immune surveillance of the CNS. Here we propose that the immune privilege of the CNS is established by the specific morphological architecture of its borders resembling that of a medieval castle. The BBB and the BCSFB serve as the outer walls of the castle, which can be breached by activated immune cells serving as messengers for outside dangers. Having crossed the BBB or the BCSFB they reach the castle moat, namely the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-drained leptomeningeal and perivascular spaces of the CNS. Next to the CNS parenchyma, the castle moat is bordered by a second wall, the glia limitans, composed of astrocytic foot processes and a parenchymal basement membrane. Inside the castle, that is the CNS parenchyma proper, the royal family of sensitive neurons resides with their servants, the glial cells. Within the CSF-drained castle moat, macrophages serve as guards collecting all the information from within the castle, which they can present to the immune-surveying T cells. If in their communication with the castle moat macrophages, T cells recognize their specific antigen and see that the royal family is in danger, they will become activated and by opening doors in the outer wall of the castle allow the entry of additional immune cells into the castle moat. From there, immune cells may breach the inner castle wall with the aim to defend the castle inhabitants by eliminating the invading enemy. If the immune response by unknown mechanisms turns against self, that is the castle

  4. Fluids and barriers of the CNS establish immune privilege by confining immune surveillance to a two-walled castle moat surrounding the CNS castle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhardt Britta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal activity within the central nervous system (CNS strictly depends on homeostasis and therefore does not tolerate uncontrolled entry of blood components. It has been generally believed that under normal conditions, the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB and the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB prevent immune cell entry into the CNS. This view has recently changed when it was realized that activated T cells are able to breach the BBB and the BCSFB to perform immune surveillance of the CNS. Here we propose that the immune privilege of the CNS is established by the specific morphological architecture of its borders resembling that of a medieval castle. The BBB and the BCSFB serve as the outer walls of the castle, which can be breached by activated immune cells serving as messengers for outside dangers. Having crossed the BBB or the BCSFB they reach the castle moat, namely the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-drained leptomeningeal and perivascular spaces of the CNS. Next to the CNS parenchyma, the castle moat is bordered by a second wall, the glia limitans, composed of astrocytic foot processes and a parenchymal basement membrane. Inside the castle, that is the CNS parenchyma proper, the royal family of sensitive neurons resides with their servants, the glial cells. Within the CSF-drained castle moat, macrophages serve as guards collecting all the information from within the castle, which they can present to the immune-surveying T cells. If in their communication with the castle moat macrophages, T cells recognize their specific antigen and see that the royal family is in danger, they will become activated and by opening doors in the outer wall of the castle allow the entry of additional immune cells into the castle moat. From there, immune cells may breach the inner castle wall with the aim to defend the castle inhabitants by eliminating the invading enemy. If the immune response by unknown mechanisms turns against

  5. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  6. Systemic Central Nervous System (CNS)-targeted Delivery of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Reduces Neurodegeneration and Increases Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brian; Potkar, Rewati; Metcalf, Jeff; Thrin, Ivy; Adame, Anthony; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant protein transmitters in the central nervous system with roles in a variety of biological functions including: food intake, cardiovascular regulation, cognition, seizure activity, circadian rhythms, and neurogenesis. Reduced NPY and NPY receptor expression is associated with numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether replacement of NPY could ameliorate some of the neurodegenerative and behavioral pathology associated with AD, we generated a lentiviral vector expressing NPY fused to a brain transport peptide (apoB) for widespread CNS delivery in an APP-transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD. The recombinant NPY-apoB effectively reversed neurodegenerative pathology and behavioral deficits although it had no effect on accumulation of Aβ. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus showed a significant increase in proliferation of neural precursor cells without further differentiation into neurons. The neuroprotective and neurogenic effects of NPY-apoB appeared to involve signaling via ERK and Akt through the NPY R1 and NPY R2 receptors. Thus, widespread CNS-targeted delivery of NPY appears to be effective at reversing the neuronal and glial pathology associated with Aβ accumulation while also increasing NPC proliferation. Overall, increased delivery of NPY to the CNS for AD might be an effective therapy especially if combined with an anti-Aβ therapeutic. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and CNs/alginate nanocomposite coatings and free standing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; de Larraya, Uxua Pérez; Garmendia, Nere; Lasheras-Zubiate, María; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Virtanen, Sannakaisa; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) and CNs-based alginate composite coatings for biomedical applications. The mechanism of anodic deposition of CNs and co-deposition of CNs/alginate composites was analyzed based on the results of zeta-potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The capability of the EPD technique for manipulating the orientation of CNs and for the preparation of multilayer CNs coatings was demonstrated. The nanotopographic surface roughness and hydrophilicity of the deposited coatings were measured and discussed. Electrochemical testing demonstrated that a significant degree of corrosion protection of stainless steel could be achieved when CNs-containing coatings were present. Additionally, the one-step EPD-based processing of free-standing CNs/alginate membranes was demonstrated confirming the versatility of EPD to fabricate free-standing membrane structures compared to a layer-by-layer deposition technique. CNs and CNs/alginate nanocomposite coatings produced by EPD are potential candidates for biomedical, cell technology and drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ABC transporters in the CNS - an inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, A M S; Bauer, B

    2011-04-01

    In the present review we provide a summary of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our review is focused on transporters of the ABC A, B, C, D, and G families that have been detected in the cells of the neurovascular unit/blood-brain barrier including brain capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons, as well as in other brain cells, such as microglia, oligodendrocytes, and choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this review, we provide an overview, organized by ABC family, of transporter expression, localization, and function. We summarize recent findings on ABC transporter regulation in the CNS and address the role of ABC transporters in CNS diseases including brain cancer, seizures/epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss new therapeutic strategies focused on ABC transporters in CNS disease.

  9. Dendritic cell CNS recruitment correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis at the blood–brain barrier through paracellular transmigration and ERK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Divya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmigration of circulating dendritic cells (DCs into the central nervous system (CNS across the blood–brain barrier (BBB has not thus far been investigated. An increase in immune cell infiltration across the BBB, uncontrolled activation and antigen presentation are influenced by chemokines. Chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 is a potent chemoattractant known to be secreted by the BBB but has not been implicated in the recruitment of DCs specifically at the BBB. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by injection of MOG35–55 peptide and pertussis toxin intraperitoneally. Animals with increasing degree of EAE score were sacrificed and subjected to near-infrared and fluorescence imaging analysis to detect and localize the accumulation of CD11c+-labeled DCs with respect to CCL2 expression. To further characterize the direct effect of CCL2 in DC trafficking at the BBB, we utilized an in vitro BBB model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial cells to compare migratory patterns of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Further, this model was used to image transmigration using fluorescence microcopy and to assess specific molecular signaling pathways involved in transmigration. Results Near-infrared imaging of DC transmigration correlated with the severity of inflammation during EAE. Ex vivo histology confirmed the presence of CCL2 in EAE lesions, with DCs emerging from perivascular spaces. DCs exhibited more efficient transmigration than T cells in BBB model studies. These observations correlated with transwell imaging, which indicated a paracellular versus transcellular pattern of migration by DCs and T cells. Moreover, at the molecular level, CCL2 seems to facilitate DC transmigration in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. Conclusion CNS recruitment of DCs correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis and paracellular transmigration across the BBB

  10. Development of novel Zn2+ loaded nanoparticles designed for cell-type targeted drug release in CNS neurons: in vitro evidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M Grabrucker

    Full Text Available Intact synaptic function and plasticity are fundamental prerequisites to a healthy brain. Therefore, synaptic proteins are one of the major targets for drugs used as neuro-chemical therapeutics. Unfortunately, the majority of drugs is not able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB and is therefore distributed within the CNS parenchyma. Here, we report the development of novel biodegradable Nanoparticles (NPs, made of poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA conjugated with glycopeptides that are able to cross the BBB and deliver for example Zn(2+ ions. We also provide a thorough characterization of loaded and unloaded NPs for their stability, cellular uptake, release properties, toxicity, and impact on cell trafficking. Our data reveal that these NPs are biocompatible, and can be used to elevate intracellular levels of Zn(2+. Importantly, by engineering the surface of NPs with antibodies against NCAM1 and CD44, we were able to selectively target neurons or glial cells, respectively. Our results indicate that these biodegradable NPs provide a potential new venue for the delivery Zn(2+ to the CNS and thus a means to explore the influence of altered zinc levels linked to neuropsychological disorders such as depression.

  11. Profiling the lymphoid-resident T cell pool reveals modulation by age and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Aurélie; Audemard-Verger, Alexandra; Guichard, Vincent; Mattiuz, Raphaël; Delpoux, Arnaud; Hamon, Pauline; Bonilla, Nelly; Rivière, Matthieu; Delon, Jérôme; Martin, Bruno; Auffray, Cédric; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Lucas, Bruno

    2018-01-04

    Despite being implicated in non-lymphoid tissues, non-recirculating T cells may also exist in secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). However, a detailed characterization of this lymphoid-resident T cell pool has not yet been done. Here we show that a substantial proportion of CD4 regulatory (Treg) and memory (Tmem) cells establish long-term residence in the SLOs of specific pathogen-free mice. Of these SLOs, only T cell residence within Peyer's patches is affected by microbiota. Resident CD4 Treg and CD4 Tmem cells from lymph nodes and non-lymphoid tissues share many phenotypic and functional characteristics. The percentage of resident T cells in SLOs increases considerably with age, with S1PR1 downregulation possibly contributing to this altered homeostasis. Our results thus show that T cell residence is not only a hallmark of non-lymphoid tissues, but can be extended to secondary lymphoid organs.

  12. Nanotechnology—novel therapeutics for CNS disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Maya; Kessler, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Research into treatments for diseases of the CNS has made impressive strides in the past few decades, but therapeutic options are limited for many patients with CNS disorders. Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting and promising new means of treating neurological disease, with the potential to fundamentally change the way we approach CNS-targeted therapeutics. Molecules can be nanoengineered to cross the blood–brain barrier, target specific cell or signalling systems, respond to endogenous stimuli, or act as vehicles for gene delivery, or as a matrix to promote axon elongation and support cell survival. The wide variety of available nanotechnologies allows the selection of a nanoscale material with the characteristics best suited to the therapeutic challenges posed by an individual CNS disorder. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the development of nanotechnology for the treatment of neurological disorders—in particular, neurodegenerative disease and malignant brain tumours—and for the promotion of neuroregeneration. PMID:22526003

  13. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varani, Stefania; Gelsomino, Francesco; Bartoletti, Michele; Viale, Pierluigi; Mastroianni, Antonio; Briganti, Elisabetta; Ortolani, Patrizia; Albertini, Francesco; Calzetti, Carlo; Prati, Francesca; Cenni, Patrizia; Castellani, Gastone; Morini, Silvia; Rossini, Giada; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS) cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS. PMID:26569288

  14. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Varani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus (TOSV is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  15. Zika (PRVABC59 Infection Is Associated with T cell Infiltration and Neurodegeneration in CNS of Immunocompetent Neonatal C57Bl/6 Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanraj Manangeeswaran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV and its association with increased rates of Guillain Barre and other neurological disorders as well as congenital defects that include microcephaly has created an urgent need to develop animal models to examine the pathogenesis of the disease and explore the efficacy of potential therapeutics and vaccines. Recently developed infection models for ZIKV utilize mice defective in interferon responses. In this study we establish and characterize a new model of peripheral ZIKV infection using immunocompetent neonatal C57BL/6 mice and compare its clinical progression, virus distribution, immune response, and neuropathology with that of C57BL/6-IFNAR KO mice. We show that while ZIKV infected IFNAR KO mice develop bilateral hind limb paralysis and die 5-6 days post-infection (dpi, immunocompetent B6 WT mice develop signs of neurological disease including unsteady gait, kinetic tremors, severe ataxia and seizures by 13 dpi that subside gradually over 2 weeks. Immunohistochemistry show viral antigen predominantly in cerebellum at the peak of the disease in both models. However, whereas IFNAR KO mice showed infiltration by neutrophils and macrophages and higher expression of IL-1, IL-6 and Cox2, B6 WT mice show a cellular infiltration in the CNS composed predominantly of T cells, particularly CD8+ T cells, and increased mRNA expression levels of IFNg, GzmB and Prf1 at peak of disease. Lastly, the CNS of B6 WT mice shows evidence of neurodegeneration predominantly in the cerebellum that are less prominent in mice lacking the IFN response possibly due to the difference in cellular infiltrates and rapid progression of the disease in that model. The development of the B6 WT model of ZIKV infection will provide insight into the immunopathology of the virus and facilitate assessments of possible therapeutics and vaccines.

  16. Ephrin-mediated restriction of ERK1/2 activity delimits the number of pigment cells in the Ciona CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupaix, Nicolas; Abitua, Philip B; Sirour, Cathy; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Levine, Michael; Hudson, Clare

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that ascidian pigment cells are related to neural crest-derived melanocytes of vertebrates. Using live-imaging, we determine a revised cell lineage of the pigment cells in Ciona intestinalis embryos. The neural precursors undergo successive rounds of anterior-posterior (A-P) oriented cell divisions, starting at the blastula 64-cell stage. A previously unrecognized fourth A-P oriented cell division in the pigment cell lineage leads to the generation of the post-mitotic pigment cell precursors. We provide evidence that MEK/ERK signals are required for pigment cell specification until approximately 30min after the final cell division has taken place. Following each of the four A-P oriented cell divisions, ERK1/2 is differentially activated in the posterior sister cells, into which the pigment cell lineage segregates. Eph/ephrin signals are critical during the third A-P oriented cell division to spatially restrict ERK1/2 activation to the posterior daughter cell. Targeted inhibition of Eph/ephrin signals results in, at neurula stages, anterior expansion of both ERK1/2 activation and a pigment cell lineage marker and subsequently, at larval stages, supernumerary pigment cells. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to the evolution of the vertebrate neural crest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CNS and inflammation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    overproduction8. The most intense interest in inflammation in the. CNS has arisen from its potential role in diseases including acute brain injury, stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease, movement disorders, and more recently some psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia.

  18. TCR stimulation strength is inversely associated with establishment of functional brain-resident memory CD8 T cells during persistent viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Maru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Establishing functional tissue-resident memory (TRM cells at sites of infection is a newfound objective of T cell vaccine design. To directly assess the impact of antigen stimulation strength on memory CD8 T cell formation and function during a persistent viral infection, we created a library of mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV variants with substitutions in a subdominant CD8 T cell epitope that exhibit a broad range of efficiency in stimulating TCR transgenic CD8 T cells. By altering a subdominant epitope in a nonstructural viral protein and monitoring memory differentiation of donor monoclonal CD8 T cells in immunocompetent mice, we circumvented potentially confounding changes in viral infection levels, virus-associated inflammation, size of the immunodominant virus-specific CD8 T cell response, and shifts in TCR affinity that may accompany temporal recruitment of endogenous polyclonal cells. Using this strategy, we found that antigen stimulation strength was inversely associated with the function of memory CD8 T cells during a persistent viral infection. We further show that CD8 TRM cells recruited to the brain following systemic infection with viruses expressing epitopes with suboptimal stimulation strength respond more efficiently to challenge CNS infection with virus expressing cognate antigen. These data demonstrate that the strength of antigenic stimulation during recruitment of CD8 T cells influences the functional integrity of TRM cells in a persistent viral infection.

  19. TCR stimulation strength is inversely associated with establishment of functional brain-resident memory CD8 T cells during persistent viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Saumya; Jin, Ge; Schell, Todd D; Lukacher, Aron E

    2017-04-01

    Establishing functional tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells at sites of infection is a newfound objective of T cell vaccine design. To directly assess the impact of antigen stimulation strength on memory CD8 T cell formation and function during a persistent viral infection, we created a library of mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV) variants with substitutions in a subdominant CD8 T cell epitope that exhibit a broad range of efficiency in stimulating TCR transgenic CD8 T cells. By altering a subdominant epitope in a nonstructural viral protein and monitoring memory differentiation of donor monoclonal CD8 T cells in immunocompetent mice, we circumvented potentially confounding changes in viral infection levels, virus-associated inflammation, size of the immunodominant virus-specific CD8 T cell response, and shifts in TCR affinity that may accompany temporal recruitment of endogenous polyclonal cells. Using this strategy, we found that antigen stimulation strength was inversely associated with the function of memory CD8 T cells during a persistent viral infection. We further show that CD8 TRM cells recruited to the brain following systemic infection with viruses expressing epitopes with suboptimal stimulation strength respond more efficiently to challenge CNS infection with virus expressing cognate antigen. These data demonstrate that the strength of antigenic stimulation during recruitment of CD8 T cells influences the functional integrity of TRM cells in a persistent viral infection.

  20. Distinct Upstream Role of Type I IFN Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived and Epithelial Resident Cells for Concerted Recruitment of Ly-6Chi Monocytes and NK Cells via CCL2-CCL3 Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdenebileg Uyangaa

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN-I-dependent orchestrated mobilization of innate cells in inflamed tissues is believed to play a critical role in controlling replication and CNS-invasion of herpes simplex virus (HSV. However, the crucial regulators and cell populations that are affected by IFN-I to establish the early environment of innate cells in HSV-infected mucosal tissues are largely unknown. Here, we found that IFN-I signaling promoted the differentiation of CCL2-producing Ly-6Chi monocytes and IFN-γ/granzyme B-producing NK cells, whereas deficiency of IFN-I signaling induced Ly-6Clo monocytes producing CXCL1 and CXCL2. More interestingly, recruitment of Ly-6Chi monocytes preceded that of NK cells with the levels peaked at 24 h post-infection in IFN-I-dependent manner, which was kinetically associated with the CCL2-CCL3 cascade response. Early Ly-6Chi monocyte recruitment was governed by CCL2 produced from hematopoietic stem cell (HSC-derived leukocytes, whereas NK cell recruitment predominantly depended on CC chemokines produced by resident epithelial cells. Also, IFN-I signaling in HSC-derived leukocytes appeared to suppress Ly-6Ghi neutrophil recruitment to ameliorate immunopathology. Finally, tissue resident CD11bhiF4/80hi macrophages and CD11chiEpCAM+ dendritic cells appeared to produce initial CCL2 for migration-based self-amplification of early infiltrated Ly-6Chi monocytes upon stimulation by IFN-I produced from infected epithelial cells. Ultimately, these results decipher a detailed IFN-I-dependent pathway that establishes orchestrated mobilization of Ly-6Chi monocytes and NK cells through CCL2-CCL3 cascade response of HSC-derived leukocytes and epithelium-resident cells. Therefore, this cascade response of resident-to-hematopoietic-to-resident cells that drives cytokine-to-chemokine-to-cytokine production to recruit orchestrated innate cells is critical for attenuation of HSV replication in inflamed tissues.

  1. Detection of microRNAs in microglia by real-time PCR in normal CNS and during neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veremeyko, Tatiana; Starossom, Sarah-Christine; Weiner, Howard L; Ponomarev, Eugene D

    2012-07-23

    Microglia are cells of the myeloid lineage that reside in the central nervous system (CNS)(1). These cells play an important role in pathologies of many diseases associated with neuroinflammation such as multiple sclerosis (MS)(2). Microglia in a normal CNS express macrophage marker CD11b and exhibit a resting phenotype by expressing low levels of activation markers such as CD45. During pathological events in the CNS, microglia become activated as determined by upregulation of CD45 and other markers(3). The factors that affect microglia phenotype and functions in the CNS are not well studied. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a growing family of conserved molecules (~22 nucleotides long) that are involved in many normal physiological processes such as cell growth and differentiation(4) and pathologies such as inflammation(5). MiRNAs downregulate the expression of certain target genes by binding complementary sequences of their mRNAs and play an important role in the activation of innate immune cells including macrophages(6) and microglia(7). In order to investigate miRNA-mediated pathways that define the microglial phenotype, biological function, and to distinguish microglia from other types of macrophages, it is important to quantitatively assess the expression of particular microRNAs in distinct subsets of CNS-resident microglia. Common methods for measuring the expression of miRNAs in the CNS include quantitative PCR from whole neuronal tissue and in situ hybridization. However, quantitative PCR from whole tissue homogenate does not allow the assessment of the expression of miRNA in microglia, which represent only 5-15% of the cells of neuronal tissue. Hybridization in situ allows the assessment of the expression of microRNA in specific cell types in the tissue sections, but this method is not entirely quantitative. In this report we describe a quantitative and sensitive method for the detection of miRNA by real-time PCR in microglia isolated from normal CNS or during

  2. 70th Birthday symposium of Prof. Dr. Riederer: autologous adult stem cells in ischemic and traumatic CNS disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munter, J.P.J.M.; Wolters, E.C.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic and traumatic insults of the central nervous system both result in definite chronic disability, only to some extent responsive to rehabilitation. Recently, the application of autologous stem cells (fresh bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells including mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem

  3. Inflammation in CNS Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jodie; Nutma, Erik; van der Valk, Paul; Amor, Sandra

    2018-03-07

    Neurodegenerative diseases, the leading cause of morbidity and disability is gaining increased attention as it imposes a considerable socioeconomic impact, due in part to the ageing community. Neuronal damage is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease, spinocerebellar ataxia and multiple sclerosis, although such damage is also observed following neurotropic viral infections, stroke, genetic white matter diseases and paraneoplastic disorders. Despite the different aetiologies e.g. infections, genetic mutations, trauma and protein aggregations, neuronal damage is frequently associated with chronic activation of an innate immune response in the CNS. The growing awareness that the immune system is inextricably involved in shaping the brain during development as well as mediating damage but also regeneration and repair, has stimulated therapeutic approaches to modulate the immune system in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the current understanding of how astrocytes and microglia, as well as neurons and oligodendrocytes, shape the neuroimmune response during development, and how aberrant responses that arise due to genetic or environmental triggers may predispose the CNS to neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss the known interactions between the peripheral immune system and the brain, and review the current concepts on how immune cells enter and leave the CNS. A better understanding of neuroimmune interactions during development and disease will be key to further manipulating these responses and the development of effective therapies to improve quality of life, and reduce the impact of neuroinflammatory and degenerative diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. CNS Tumors in Neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian; Gutmann, David H

    2017-07-20

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) encompasses a group of distinct genetic disorders in which affected children and adults are prone to the development of benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the spectrum of CNS tumors arising in individuals with NF type 1 (NF1) and NF type 2 (NF2), their pathogenic etiologies, and the rational treatment options for people with these neoplasms. This article is a review of preclinical and clinical data focused on the treatment of the most common CNS tumors encountered in children and adults with NF1 and NF2. Although children with NF1 are at risk for developing low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway and brainstem, individuals with NF2 typically manifest low-grade tumors affecting the cranial nerves (vestibular schwannomas), meninges (meningiomas), and spinal cord (ependymomas). With the identification of the NF1 and NF2 genes, molecularly targeted therapies are beginning to emerge, as a result of a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF1 and NF2 protein function. As we enter into an era of precision oncology, a more comprehensive awareness of the factors that increase the risk of developing CNS cancers in affected individuals, coupled with a greater appreciation of the cellular and molecular determinants that maintain tumor growth, will undoubtedly yield more effective therapies for these cancer predisposition syndromes.

  5. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 conditioned CD11c+ dendritic cells are effective initiators of CNS autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eBesusso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play a crucial role in regulating T cell activation. Due to their capacity to shape the immune response, tolerogenic DC have been used to treat autoimmune diseases. In this study we examined whether 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 conditioned bone marrow derived DC (VitD-BMDC were able to limit the development of autoimmune pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. We found that VitD-BMDC had lower expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules and were less effective at priming autoreactive T cells in-vitro. Using our recently described BMDC driven model of EAE, we demonstrated that VitD-BMDC had a significantly reduced ability to initiate EAE. We found that the impaired ability of VitD-BMDC to initiate EAE was not due to T cell tolerisation. Instead, we discovered that the addition of 1,25(OH2D3 to BMDC cultures resulted in a significant reduction in the proportion of CD11c+ cells. Purified CD11c+VitD-BMDC were significantly less effective at priming T cells in-vitro yet were similarly capable of initiating EAE as vehicle treated CD11c+BMDC. This study demonstrates that in-vitro assays of DC function can be a poor predictor of in-vivo behaviour and that CD11c+VitD-BMDC are highly effective initiators of an autopathogenic T cell response.

  6. Spatially fractionated microirradiation of normal CNS and gliosarcomas of the rat with synchrotron photons: Cell and tissue lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laissue, J.A.; Spanne, P.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Nawrocky, M.N.; Slatkin, D.N.; Joel, D.D.; Gebbers, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    Rats were implanted intracerebrally with 9L gliosarcoma cells were used to experimentally determine the curative effectiveness of synchrotron radiation produced by the National Synchrotron Radiation Source. Radiation was delivered in beams with each ray 25 micrometers thick and arranged in an array of 4 mm corners. All experimental animals receiving the gliosarcoma cells and not treated died within four weeks. Treated animals surviving 113 days were sacrificed and their brains were examined histologically

  7. Trigger-happy resident memory CD4(+) T cells inhabit the human lungs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oja, A. E.; Piet, B.; Helbig, C.; Stark, R.; van der Zwan, D.; Blaauwgeers, H.; Remmerswaal, E. B. M.; Amsen, D.; Jonkers, R. E.; Moerland, P. D.; Nolte, M. A.; van Lier, R. A. W.; Hombrink, P.

    2017-01-01

    Resident memory T cells (TRM) reside in the lung epithelium and mediate protective immunity against respiratory pathogens. Although lung CD8(+) TRM have been extensively characterized, the properties of CD4(+) TRM remain unclear. Here we determined the transcriptional signature of CD4(+) TRM,

  8. Getting it right before transplantation: example of a stem cell model with regenerative potential for the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric eViero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurodegenerative disorders in an aging population has become a challenge for the modern world. While the biomarkers available and the methods of diagnosis have improved to detect the onset of these diseases at early stages, the question of adapted and efficient therapies is still a major issue. The prospect of replacing the loss of functional neural cells remains an attractive but still audacious approach. A huge progress has been made in the generation of neurones derived from human stem cell lines and transplantation assays are tested in animals for a wide range of pathologies of the central nervous system. Here we take one step back and examine neuronal differentiation and the characterisation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells. We gather results from our previous studies and present a cell model that was successfully used in functional analyses and engraftment experiments. These neuronal precursors exhibit spontaneous and evoked activity, indicating that their electrophysiological and calcium handling properties are similar to those of matured neurones. Hence this summarised information will serve as a basis to design better stem cell-based therapies to improve neural regeneration.

  9. Getting it right before transplantation: example of a stem cell model with regenerative potential for the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Cedric; Forostyak, Oksana; Sykova, Eva; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2014-01-01

    The burden of neurodegenerative disorders in an aging population has become a challenge for the modern world. While the biomarkers available and the methods of diagnosis have improved to detect the onset of these diseases at early stages, the question of adapted and efficient therapies is still a major issue. The prospect of replacing the loss of functional neural cells remains an attractive but still audacious approach. A huge progress has been made in the generation of neurons derived from human stem cell lines and transplantation assays are tested in animals for a wide range of pathologies of the central nervous system. Here we take one step back and examine neuronal differentiation and the characterization of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells. We gather results from our previous studies and present a cell model that was successfully used in functional analyses and engraftment experiments. These neuronal precursors exhibit spontaneous and evoked activity, indicating that their electrophysiological and calcium handling properties are similar to those of matured neurons. Hence this summarized information will serve as a basis to design better stem cell-based therapies to improve neural regeneration.

  10. Metallothionein expression and roles in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2002-01-01

    -I+II) are regulated and expressed coordinately and are currently the best characterized MT isoforms. This review will focus on the expression and roles of MT-I+II in the CNS. MT-I+II are implicated in diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions, such as metal ion metabolism, regulation of the CNS...... inflammatory response, protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, reduction of apoptotic cell death, and stimulation of neuroregeneration and brain tissue repair in vivo. Accordingly, brain tissue damage and neurodegeneration during pathological conditions and the accompanying...

  11. Meningeal Tertiary Lymphoid Tissues and Multiple Sclerosis: A gathering place for diverse types of Immune Cells during CNS autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia ePikor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collections of leukocytes in the meningeal space have been documented in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. These meningeal aggregates, which in the context of other autoimmune diseases have often been termed Tertiary Lymphoid Tissues (TLT, have been associated with sub-pial cortical damage and disease progression. However, the key molecular and cellular signals required for their formation and maintenance, remain unclear. Herein we review TLT structures in other disease states in order to provide a framework for understanding these structures in the MS meninges. We then assess the evidence that the meningeal compartment serves as an important nexus for immune cells as well as a location for drainage of antigen into the cervical lymph node compartment. Extrapolating what is known about the molecular and cellular cues that initiate the formation of leukocyte aggregates in non-lymphoid tissues, we speculate on what signals lead to the formation and maintenance of meningeal TLT structures. Referring to the animal model of MS (Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis - EAE, we also explore what is known about these structures in supporting B cell and T cell responses during neuroinflammation. Lastly, we examine the evidence that connects these structures to ongoing neuropathology. Collectively, our review points to the meningeal compartment as an important player in neuroinflammatory processes. Moreover, we hypothesize that in order to gain insights into pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of lymphocytes in MS, one must understand the cellular scaffolds that support lymphocyte retention within the meninges, thus highlighting the importance of non-immune cells (stromal cells in the neuroinflammatory process.

  12. Novel therapeutic strategies using nanodrug delivery, stem cells and combination therapy for CNS trauma and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari S; Muresanu, Dafin F; Sharma, Aruna

    2013-10-01

    The 10th Global College of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration Annual Conference in collaboration with the 6th International Association of Neurorestoratology VI Intercontinental Hotel, Bucharest, Romania, 4-7 April 2013 The 10th Global College of Neuroproetction and Neuroregeneration Annual Conference together with the International Association of Neurorestoratology VI was held in Bucharest under the auspicious of the Society for the Study of Neuroprotection and Neuroplasticity during 4-7 April 2013. The focus of these unified societies meeting was on neurorestoration, neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in various clinical neurodegenerative diseases; for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, stroke and brain or spinal cord injuries. The main aim to enhance healthcare was suggested by the use of stem cells, nanodrug delivery of drugs and stem cells, use of multimodal drugs as well as a combination of different approaches. The meeting was attended by more than 500 delegates including researches, policy makers and healthcare professionals along with several representatives from drug industries from Europe and USA. It appears that future of neuroprotection could be achieved by the use of stem cells and nanodrug delivery in chronic neurological disorders.

  13. Rift valley Fever virus encephalitis is associated with an ineffective systemic immune response and activated T cell infiltration into the CNS in an immunocompetent mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Dodd

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV causes outbreaks of severe disease in livestock and humans throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In people, RVFV generally causes a self-limiting febrile illness but in a subset of individuals, it progresses to more serious disease. One manifestation is a delayed-onset encephalitis that can be fatal or leave the afflicted with long-term neurologic sequelae. In order to design targeted interventions, the basic pathogenesis of RVFV encephalitis must be better understood.To characterize the host immune responses and viral kinetics associated with fatal and nonfatal infections, mice were infected with an attenuated RVFV lacking NSs (ΔNSs that causes lethal disease only when administered intranasally (IN. Following IN infection, C57BL/6 mice developed severe neurologic disease and succumbed 7-9 days post-infection. In contrast, inoculation of ΔNSs virus subcutaneously in the footpad (FP resulted in a subclinical infection characterized by a robust immune response with rapid antibody production and strong T cell responses. IN-inoculated mice had delayed antibody responses and failed to clear virus from the periphery. Severe neurological signs and obtundation characterized end stage-disease in IN-inoculated mice, and within the CNS, the development of peak virus RNA loads coincided with strong proinflammatory responses and infiltration of activated T cells. Interestingly, depletion of T cells did not significantly alter survival, suggesting that neurologic disease is not a by-product of an aberrant immune response.Comparison of fatal (IN-inoculated and nonfatal (FP-inoculated ΔNSs RVFV infections in the mouse model highlighted the role of the host immune response in controlling viral replication and therefore determining clinical outcome. There was no evidence to suggest that neurologic disease is immune-mediated in RVFV infection. These results provide important insights for the future design of vaccines and

  14. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  15. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cavaliere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral ischemia.

  16. Circulating endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles mediate the acute phase response and sickness behaviour associated with CNS inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Roodselaar, Jay; Evans, Matthew C; Gardiner, Chris; Sargent, Ian; Romero, Ignacio A; Bristow, Adrian; Buchan, Alastair M; Haughey, Norman; Anthony, Daniel C

    2017-08-29

    Brain injury elicits a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is responsible for co-ordinating the peripheral immunological response to injury. To date, the mechanisms responsible for signalling the presence of injury or disease to selectively activate responses in distant organs were unclear. Circulating endogenous extracellular vesicles (EVs) are increased after brain injury and have the potential to carry targeted injury signals around the body. Here, we examined the potential of EVs, isolated from rats after focal inflammatory brain lesions using IL-1β, to activate a systemic APR in recipient naïve rats, as well as the behavioural consequences of EV transfer. Focal brain lesions increased EV release, and, following isolation and transfer, the EVs were sequestered by the liver where they initiated an APR. Transfer of blood-borne EVs from brain-injured animals was also enough to suppress exploratory behaviours in recipient naïve animals. EVs derived from brain endothelial cell cultures treated with IL-1β also activated an APR and altered behaviour in recipient animals. These experiments reveal that inflammation-induced circulating EVs derived from endothelial cells are able to initiate the APR to brain injury and are sufficient to generate the associated sickness behaviours, and are the first demonstration that EVs are capable of modifying behavioural responses.

  17. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  18. Flavonoids and the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna Katharina; Saaby, Lasse

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are present in almost all terrestrial plants, where they provide UV-protection and colour. Flavonoids have a fused ring system consisting of an aromatic ring and a benzopyran ring with a phenyl substituent. The flavonoids can be divided into several classes depending on their structure....... Flavonoids are present in food and medicinal plants and are thus consumed by humans. They are found in plants as glycosides. Before oral absorption, flavonoids undergo deglycosylation either by lactase phloridzin hydrolase or cytosolic ß-glucocidase. The absorbed aglycone is then conjugated by methylation......, sulphatation or glucuronidation. Both the aglycones and the conjugates can pass the blood-brain barrier. In the CNS several flavones bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABA(A)-receptor resulting in sedation, anxiolytic or anti-convulsive effects. Flavonoids of several classes are inhibitors of monoamine...

  19. Skin-resident stem cells and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yohei; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Hasebe, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Seiji; Sugiura, Kazumitsu

    2017-01-01

    CD271 is common stem cell marker for the epidermis and dermis. We assessed a kinetic movement of epidermal and dermal CD271 + cells in the wound healing process to elucidate the possible involvement with chronic skin ulcers. Epidermal CD271 + cells were proliferated and migrated from 3 days after wounding. Purified epidermal CD271 + cells expressed higher TGFβ2 and VEGFα transcripts than CD271 - cells. Delayed wound healing was observed in the aged mice compared with young mice. During the wound healing process, the peak of dermal CD271 + cell accumulation was delayed in aged mice compared with young mice. The expression levels of collagen-1, -3, -5, F4-80, EGF, FGF2, TGFβ1, and IL-1α were significantly increased in young mice compared with aged mice. Furthermore, purified dermal CD271 + cells expressed higher FGF2, EGF, PDGFB, and TGFβ1 gene transcripts than CD271 - cells. These results suggested that epidermal and dermal CD271 + cells were closely associated with wound healing process by producing various growth factors. Epidermal and dermal CD271 + cells in chronic skin ulcer patients were significantly reduced compared with healthy controls. Thus, both epidermal and dermal stem cells can play an important role in wound healing process.

  20. Tissue-resident natural killer (NK) cells are cell lineages distinct from thymic and conventional splenic NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Yang, Liping; Pak-Wittel, Melissa A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Ivanova, Yulia; Zhong, Chao; Chase, Julie M; Rothman, Paul B; Yu, Jenny; Riley, Joan K; Zhu, Jinfang; Tian, Zhigang; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system; they can control virus infections and developing tumors by cytotoxicity and producing inflammatory cytokines. Most studies of mouse NK cells, however, have focused on conventional NK (cNK) cells in the spleen. Recently, we described two populations of liver NK cells, tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells and those resembling splenic cNK cells. However, their lineage relationship was unclear; trNK cells could be developing cNK cells, related to thymic NK cells, or a lineage distinct from both cNK and thymic NK cells. Herein we used detailed transcriptomic, flow cytometric, and functional analysis and transcription factor-deficient mice to determine that liver trNK cells form a distinct lineage from cNK and thymic NK cells. Taken together with analysis of trNK cells in other tissues, there are at least four distinct lineages of NK cells: cNK, thymic, liver (and skin) trNK, and uterine trNK cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01659.001 PMID:24714492

  1. Isolated vasculitis of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, F.; Reith, W.

    2000-01-01

    Vasculitis is a rare cause for disease of the CNS. The isolated vasculitis of the CNS is restricted to the CNS whereas other forms of vasculitis affect various organs including the CNS. Headache, encephalopathy, focal deficits and epileptic seizures are the major symptoms suggestive for vasculitis. One major criterion of the isolated vasculitis of the CNS is the lack of evidence for other vasculitis forms or for pathology of other organs. Angiography displays multifocal segmental stenosis of intracranial vessels. MRI demonstrates multiple lesions which in part show enhancement after gadolinium. A definite diagnosis can only be made on the grounds of biopsy from leptomeninges and parenchyma. Therapy consists of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid. (orig.) [de

  2. Tissue-resident memory T cells play a key role in the efficacy of cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, C; Blanc, C; Karaki, S; Tran, T; Roussel, H; Tartour, E

    2017-01-01

    Resident memory CD8 + T cells (T RM ) usually defined by the CD103 marker represent a new subset of long-lived memory T cells that remain in the tissues. We directly demonstrate their specific role in cancer vaccine-induced tumor regression. In human, they also seem to play a major role in tumor immunosurveillance.

  3. Resident Memory T Cells as Surrogate Markers of the Efficacy of Cancer Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Roussel, Hélène; Tartour, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Cancer vaccine boost via the cervicovaginal rather than the intramuscular route of immunization appears to be crucial to induce genital CD8(+) T cells and tumor regression. This clinical activity is correlated with the ability of the mucosal boost to elicit resident memory T cells in the genital tract. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. The extent to which melanoma alters tissue-resident dendritic cell function correlates with tumorigenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Hargadon, Kristian Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown that melanoma-derived factors alter the function of differentiated tissue-resident dendritic cells (DC) in a tumorigenicity-dependent manner. Soluble factors, including TGF?1 and VEGF-A, contributed to dendritic cell dysfunction associated with a highly-aggressive melanoma and conferred a phenotype upon DC likely to favor immune escape and tumor outgrowth.

  5. The extent to which melanoma alters tissue-resident dendritic cell function correlates with tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian Michael

    We have shown that melanoma-derived factors alter the function of differentiated tissue-resident dendritic cells (DC) in a tumorigenicity-dependent manner. Soluble factors, including TGFβ1 and VEGF-A, contributed to dendritic cell dysfunction associated with a highly-aggressive melanoma and conferred a phenotype upon DC likely to favor immune escape and tumor outgrowth.

  6. Astrocyte Regulation of CNS Inflammation and Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Crocker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes regulate fundamentally important functions to maintain central nervous system (CNS homeostasis. Altered astrocytic function is now recognized as a primary contributing factor to an increasing number of neurological diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of our rapidly developing understanding of the basal and inflammatory functions of astrocytes as mediators of CNS responsiveness to inflammation and injury. Specifically, we elaborate on ways that astrocytes actively participate in the pathogenesis of demyelinating diseases of the CNS through their immunomodulatory roles as CNS antigen presenting cells, modulators of blood brain barrier function and as a source of chemokines and cytokines. We also outline how changes in the extracellular matrix can modulate astrocytes phenotypically, resulting in dysregulation of astrocytic responses during inflammatory injury. We also relate recent studies describing newly identified roles for astrocytes in leukodystrophies. Finally, we describe recent advances in how adapting this increasing breadth of knowledge on astrocytes has fostered new ways of thinking about human diseases, which offer potential to modulate astrocytic heterogeneity and plasticity towards therapeutic gain. In summary, recent studies have provided improved insight in a wide variety of neuroinflammatory and demyelinating diseases, and future research on astrocyte pathophysiology is expected to provide new perspectives on these diseases, for which new treatment modalities are increasingly necessary.

  7. Potential for Cell-Transplant Therapy with Human Neuronal Precursors to Treat Neuropathic Pain in Models of PNS and CNS Injury: Comparison of hNT2.17 and hNT2.19 Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary J. Eaton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment of sensory neuropathies in peripheral neuropathies and spinal cord injury (SCI is one of the most difficult problems in modern clinical practice. Cell therapy to release antinociceptive agents near the injured spinal cord is a logical next step in the development of treatment modalities. But few clinical trials, especially for chronic pain, have tested the potential of transplant of cells to treat chronic pain. Cell lines derived from the human neuronal NT2 cell line parentage, the hNT2.17 and hNT2.19 lines, which synthesize and release the neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and serotonin (5HT, respectively, have been used to evaluate the potential of cell-based release of antinociceptive agents near the lumbar dorsal (horn spinal sensory cell centers to relieve neuropathic pain after PNS (partial nerve and diabetes-related injury and CNS (spinal cord injury damage in rat models. Both cell lines transplants potently and permanently reverse behavioral hypersensitivity without inducing tumors or other complications after grafting. Functioning as cellular minipumps for antinociception, human neuronal precursors, like these NT2-derived cell lines, would likely provide a useful adjuvant or replacement for current pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain.

  8. Flavonoids and the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Jäger

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are present in almost all terrestrial plants, where they provide UV-protection and colour. Flavonoids have a fused ring system consisting of an aromatic ring and a benzopyran ring with a phenyl substituent. The flavonoids can be divided into several classes depending on their structure. Flavonoids are present in food and medicinal plants and are thus consumed by humans. They are found in plants as glycosides. Before oral absorption, flavonoids undergo deglycosylation either by lactase phloridzin hydrolase or cytosolic β-glucocidase. The absorbed aglycone is then conjugated by methylation, sulphatation or glucuronidation. Both the aglycones and the conjugates can pass the blood-brain barrier. In the CNS several flavones bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in sedation, anxiolytic or anti-convulsive effects. Flavonoids of several classes are inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A or B, thereby working as anti-depressants or to improve the conditions of Parkinson’s patients. Flavanols, flavanones and anthocyanidins have protective effects preventing inflammatory processes leading to nerve injury. Flavonoids seem capable of influencing health and mood.

  9. Resident memory T cells in the skin mediate durable immunity to melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Brian T; Byrne, Katelyn T; Vella, Jennifer L; Zhang, Peisheng; Shabaneh, Tamer B; Steinberg, Shannon M; Molodtsov, Aleksey K; Bowers, Jacob S; Angeles, Christina V; Paulos, Chrystal M; Huang, Yina H; Turk, Mary Jo

    2017-04-14

    Tissue-resident memory T (T RM ) cells have been widely characterized in infectious disease settings; however, their role in mediating immunity to cancer remains unknown. We report that skin-resident memory T cell responses to melanoma are generated naturally as a result of autoimmune vitiligo. Melanoma antigen-specific T RM cells resided predominantly in melanocyte-depleted hair follicles and were maintained without recirculation or replenishment from the lymphoid compartment. These cells expressed CD103, CD69, and CLA (cutaneous lymphocyte antigen), but lacked PD-1 (programmed cell death protein-1) or LAG-3 (lymphocyte activation gene-3), and were capable of making IFN-γ (interferon-γ). CD103 expression on CD8 T cells was required for the establishment of T RM cells in the skin but was dispensable for vitiligo development. CD103 + CD8 T RM cells were critical for protection against melanoma rechallenge. This work establishes that CD103-dependent T RM cells play a key role in perpetuating antitumor immunity. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Analysis of perfusion weighted image of CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It is difficult to differentiate CNS lymphoma from other tumors such as malignant gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas with conventional MR imaging, because the imaging findings are overlapped between these tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the perfusion weighted MR imaging findings of CNS lymphomas and to compare the relative cerebral blood volume ratios between CNS lymphomas and other tumors such as high grade gliomas, metastases, or meningiomas. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed MRI findings and clinical records in 13 patients with pathologically proven CNS lymphoma between January 2006 and November 2008. We evaluated the relative cerebral blood volume ratios of tumor, which were obtained by dividing the values obtained from the normal white matter on MRI. Results: Total 13 patients (M:F = 8:5; age range 46-67 years, mean age 52.3 years) were included. The CNS lymphomas showed relatively low values of maximum relative CBV ratio in most patients regardless of primary or secondary CNS lymphoma. Conclusion: Perfusion weighted image may be helpful in the diagnosis of CNS lymphoma in spite of primary or secondary or B cell or T cell.

  11. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Scott, Laura L.; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher P.; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin of an adult human contains about 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice, but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in

  12. Real-World Treatment Patterns, Survival, and Prediction of CNS Progression in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with First-Line Crizotinib in Latin America Oncology Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Claudio; Cardona, Andrés F; Zatarain-Barrón, Zyanya Lucia; Ruiz-Patiño, Alejandro; Castillo, Omar; Oblitas, George; Corrales, Luis; Lupinacci, Lorena; Pérez, María Angelina; Rojas, Leonardo; González, Lisde; Chirinos, Luis; Ortíz, Carlos; Lema, Mauricio; Vargas, Carlos; Puparelli, Carmen; Carranza, Hernán; Otero, Jorge; Arrieta, Oscar

    2018-03-06

    This study describes the real-world characteristics, treatment sequencing, and outcomes among Hispanic patients with locally advanced/metastatic ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with crizotinib. A retrospective patient review was conducted for several centers in Latin America. Clinicians identified ALK-positive NSCLC patients who received crizotinib and reported their clinical characteristics, treatments, and survival. Overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were described. A Random Forest Tree (RFT) model was constructed to predict brain progression. A total of 73 patients were included; median age at diagnosis was 58 years, 60.3% were female, and 93.2% had adenocarcinoma. Eighty-nine percent of patients were never smokers/former smokers, 71.1% had ≥2 sites of metastasis, and 20.5% had brain metastases at diagnosis. The median PFS on first-line crizotinib was 7.07 months (95% CI 3.77-12.37) and the overall response rate was 52%. Of those who discontinued crizotinib, 55.9% progressed in the central nervous system (CNS). The RFT model reached a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 88% for prediction of CNS progression. The overall response rate and the PFS observed in Hispanic patients with ALK-positive NSCLC treated with first-line crizotinib were similar to those in previous reports. An RFT model is helpful in predicting CNS progression and can help clinicians tailor treatments in a resource-limited practice. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Native joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonagle, Dennis; Baboolal, Thomas G; Jones, Elena

    2017-12-01

    The role of native (not culture-expanded) joint-resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the repair of joint damage in osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly understood. MSCs differ from bone marrow-residing haematopoietic stem cells in that they are present in multiple niches in the joint, including subchondral bone, cartilage, synovial fluid, synovium and adipose tissue. Research in experimental models suggests that the migration of MSCs adjacent to the joint cavity is crucial for chonodrogenesis during embryogenesis, and also shows that synovium-derived MSCs might be the primary drivers of cartilage repair in adulthood. In this Review, the available data is synthesized to produce a proposed model in which joint-resident MSCs with access to superficial cartilage are key cells in adult cartilage repair and represent important targets for manipulation in 'chondrogenic' OA, especially in the context of biomechanical correction of joints in early disease. Growing evidence links the expression of CD271, a nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor by native bone marrow-resident MSCs to a wider role for neurotrophins in OA pathobiology, the implications of which require exploration since anti-NGF therapy might worsen OA. Recognizing that joint-resident MSCs are comparatively abundant in vivo and occupy multiple niches will enable the optimization of single-stage therapeutic interventions for OA.

  14. Epicardial Origin of Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naisana S. Asli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian heart has added a vital dimension to the field of cardiac regeneration. Cardiac-resident stem cells are likely sequestered as reserve cells within myocardial niches during the course of embryonic cardiogenesis, although they may also be recruited from external sources, such as bone marrow. As we begin to understand the nature of cardiac-resident stem and progenitor cells using a variety of approaches, it is evident that they possess an identity embedded within their gene regulatory networks that favours cardiovascular lineage potential. In addition to contributing lineage descendants, cardiac stem cells may also be stress sensors, offering trophic cues to other cell types, including cardiomyocytes and vasculature cells, and likely other stem cells and immune cells, during adaptation and repair. This presents numerous possibilities for endogenous cardiac stem and progenitor cells to be used in cell therapies or as targets in heart rejuvenation. In this review, we focus on the epicardium as an endogenous source of multi-potential mesenchymal progenitor cells in development and as a latent source of such progenitors in the adult. We track the origin and plasticity of the epicardium in embryos and adults in both homeostasis and disease. In this context, we ask whether directed activation of epicardium-derived progenitor cells might have therapeutic application.

  15. Interneuron progenitor transplantation to treat CNS dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad O Chohan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field.

  16. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem

  17. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Chikahisa

    Full Text Available Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS. Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v mice and their wild-type littermates (WT, although W/W(v mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v mice. W/W(v mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  18. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v)) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/W(v) mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v) mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v) mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v) mice. W/W(v) mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  19. Application of empowerment theory for CNS practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Catalano, J M

    1993-11-01

    Power is necessary for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) to successfully conduct objectives of practice in bureaucratic hospital settings. To obtain power, the CNS could use strategies of an empowerment theory to fully operationalize roles in hospitals. This article will discuss how the CNS may be empowered utilizing strategies in four empowering categories. In addition, the many benefits of empowering the CNS are reviewed.

  20. Immune regulation and CNS autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antel, J P; Owens, T

    1999-01-01

    The central nervous system is a demonstrated target of both clinical and experimental immune mediated disorders. Immune regulatory mechanisms operative at the levels of the systemic immune system, the blood brain barrier, and within the CNS parenchyma are important determinants of the intensity...... and duration of the tissue directed injury. Convergence of research, involving direct manipulation of specific cells and molecular mediators in animal models and in vitro analysis of human immune and neural cells and tissues, is providing increasing insight into the role of these immune regulatory functions...

  1. Autoantibodies and Resident Renal Cells in the Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis: Getting to Know the Unknown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Yung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance and production of autoantibodies. Kidney involvement (i.e., lupus nephritis is both common and severe and can result in permanent damage within the glomerular, vascular, and tubulo-interstitial compartments of the kidney, leading to acute or chronic renal failure. Accumulating evidence shows that anti-dsDNA antibodies play a critical role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis through their binding to cell surface proteins of resident kidney cells, thereby triggering the downstream activation of signaling pathways and the release of mediators of inflammation and fibrosis. This paper describes the mechanisms through which autoantibodies interact with resident renal cells and how this interaction plays a part in disease pathogenesis that ultimately leads to structural and functional alterations in lupus nephritis.

  2. Role of the Vasa Vasorum and Vascular Resident Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an “inside-out” response, that begins with the dysfunction of intimal endothelial cells and leads to neointimal plaque formation. The adventitia of large blood vessels has been recognized as an active part of the vessel wall that is involved in the process of atherosclerosis. There are characteristic changes in the adventitial vasa vasorum that are associated with the development of atheromatous plaques. However, whether vasa vasorum plays a causative or merely reactive role in the atherosclerotic process is not completely clear. Recent studies report that the vascular wall contains a number of stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to vascular remodeling. Microvessels serve as the vascular niche that maintains the resident stem/progenitor cells of the tissue. Therefore, the vasa vasorum may contribute to vascular remodeling through not only its conventional function as a blood conducting tube, but also its new conceptual function as a stem cell reservoir. This brief review highlights the recent advances contributing to our understanding of the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum in the atherosclerosis and discusses new concept that involves vascular-resident factors, the vasa vasorum and its associated vascular-resident stem cells, in the atherosclerotic process.

  3. Spreading the load: Antigen transfer between migratory and lymph node-resident dendritic cells promotes T-cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Scott N

    2017-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized in the processing and presentation of antigen for the activation of lymphocytes. Multiple subsets of DCs exist with distinct functions and roles in the initiation of immune responses. DCs found within tissues acquire antigens or become infected by pathogens and migrate to local draining lymph nodes (LN) where they can directly stimulate T cells. These migratory DCs can also transfer antigens to LN-resident DCs and may indirectly enhance T cell priming. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Gurevich et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2017. 47: 1802-1818] elegantly demonstrate the influence of the transfer of antigen from migratory DCs to resident DCs on the dynamics of CD8 T-cell priming in mice. Using both in vitro imaging to visualise antigen dissemination and intravital 2-photon microscopy to track T cell clustering with migratory and resident DCs, antigen-donor DC were found to efficiently distribute antigen to recipient DC. This process, which involved LFA-1, enhanced the recruitment of CD8 + T cells into the response and rescued priming when DCs were impaired in presentation capacity. Together, these findings shed light on the dynamics of the transfer of antigens between DCs in vivo for the efficient priming of cytotoxic T cell responses. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Targeted Intra-arterial Transplantation of Stem Cells to the Injured CNS is More Effective than Intravenous Administration - Engraftment is Dependent on Cell Type and Adhesion Molecule Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Johan; Södersten, Erik; Sundström, Erik

    2011-01-01

    with inflammation, such as traumatic brain injury, there is a transient up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which might provide enviromental cues for migration of stem cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this study was to i) analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment, ii...

  5. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D.; Cameron, David R.; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A.; Qu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of “persister cells” were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics. PMID:26687035

  6. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  7. Resident corneal c-fms(+) macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45(+) cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resident corneal c-fms+ macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45+ cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. PMID:27185163

  9. Thoracic aortas from multiorgan donors are suitable for obtaining resident angiogenic mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Vaselli, Cristiana; Foroni, Laura; Buzzi, Marina; Storci, Gianluca; Alviano, Francesco; Ricci, Francesca; Bonafè, Massimiliano; Orrico, Catia; Bagnara, Gian Paolo; Stella, Andrea; Conte, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    The clinical use of endothelial progenitor cells is hampered by difficulties in obtaining an adequate number of functional progenitors. This study aimed to establish whether human thoracic aortas harvested from healthy multiorgan donors can be a valuable source of angiogenic progenitors. Immunohistochemical tissue studies showed that two distinct cell populations with putative stem cell capabilities, one composed of CD34+ cells and the other of c-kit+ cells, are present in between the media and adventitia of human thoracic aortas. Ki-67+ cells with high growth potential were located in an area corresponding to the site of CD34+ and c-kit+ cell residence. We thus isolated cells (0.5 approximately 2.0 x 10(4) aortic progenitors per 25 cm2) which, upon culturing, coexpressed molecules of mesenchymal stromal cells (i.e., CD44+, CD90+, CD105+) and showed a transcript expression of stem cell markers (e.g., OCT4, c-kit, BCRP-1, Interleukin-6) and BMI-1. Cell expansion was adequate for use in a clinical setting. A subset of cultured cells acquired the phenotype of endothelial cells in the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor (e.g., increased expression of KDR and von Willebrand factor positivity), as documented by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. An in vitro angiogenesis test kit revealed that cells were able to form capillary-like structures within 6 hours of seeding. This study demonstrates that thoracic aortas from multiorgan donors yield mesenchymal stromal cells with the ability to differentiate in vitro into endothelial cells. These cells can be used for the creation of an allogenic bank of angiogenic progenitors, thus providing new options for restoring vascularization at ischemic sites. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  10. Neuroinflammation: a need to understand microglia as resident cells of the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, G Jean

    2012-06-01

    Neuroinflammation and microglia as the resident immune cells of the brain has garnered a significant amount of interest with regards to brain injury and neurotoxicology. Much of this interest and research has been focused on responses in the adult brain with little attention paid to the role of these cells during development. The available data suggests that one must view microglia and their processes during development somewhat differently. In addition, modification to microglia during development may lay a framework for subtle to significant changes in the susceptibility of the mature brain to secondary insults. A number of these point are now being raised for consideration. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Programs for the persistence, vigilance and control of human CD8+lung-resident memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombrink, Pleun; Helbig, Christina; Backer, Ronald A; Piet, Berber; Oja, Anna E; Stark, Regina; Brasser, Giso; Jongejan, Aldo; Jonkers, René E; Nota, Benjamin; Basak, Onur; Clevers, Hans C; Moerland, Perry D; Amsen, Derk; van Lier, René A W

    2016-12-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (T RM cells) in the airways mediate protection against respiratory infection. We characterized T RM cells expressing integrin α E (CD103) that reside within the epithelial barrier of human lungs. These cells had specialized profiles of chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules, consistent with their unique localization. Lung T RM cells were poised for rapid responsiveness by constitutive expression of deployment-ready mRNA encoding effector molecules, but they also expressed many inhibitory regulators, suggestive of programmed restraint. A distinct set of transcription factors was active in CD103 + T RM cells, including Notch. Genetic and pharmacological experiments with mice revealed that Notch activity was required for the maintenance of CD103 + T RM cells. We have thus identified specialized programs underlying the residence, persistence, vigilance and tight control of human lung T RM cells.

  12. Inflammation in the CNS and Th17 Responses Are Inhibited by IFN-{gamma}-Induced IL-18 Binding Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Wheeler, Rachel D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for immune protection but may also cause pathology and must be regulated. Both Th1 and Th17 cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. We show in this study that IL-18-binding protein (IL-18bp......), the endogenous inhibitor of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-18, is upregulated by IFN-gamma in resident microglial cells in the CNS during multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. Test of function by overexpression of IL-18bp in the CNS using a viral vector led to marked reduction in Th17 responses and robust...... inhibition of incidence, severity, and histopathology of disease, independently of IFN-gamma. The disease-limiting action of IL-18bp included suppression of APC-derived Th17-polarizing cytokines. IL-18bp thus acts as a sensor for IFN-gamma and can regulate both Th1 and Th17 responses in the CNS....

  13. Metallothionein Expression and Roles During Neuropathology in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    and apoptotic cell death after brain injury, while astroglia is stimulated. This indicates that MT-I+II function independently of species of origin. Previously, we showed that MT-I+II also ameliorate autoimmune, excitotoxic and inflammatory CNS disorders, and independent groups have confirmed this and have...... and apoptotic cell death, whereby the delayed (secondary) tissue damage was inhibited after brain injury and 6-AN-toxicity. MT-I+II also diminish the primary CNS toxicity caused directly by 6-AN and the clinical outcome (mortality). Additionally, MT-I+II stimulate astrogliosis; expression of growth factors......, their receptors and neurotrophins (TGFb, TGFb-Receptor, bFGF, bFGF-Receptor, VEGF, NT-3, NT-4/5, NGF); angiogenesis; and growth cone formation. Hence, MT-I+II enhance CNS tissue repair as seen clearly after the cryogenic injury, after which MT-I+II promote substitution of the necrotic lesion cavity with a glial...

  14. Genetic models for CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Wekerle, H; Antel, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of transgenic technology to over-express or prevent expression of genes encoding molecules related to inflammation has allowed direct examination of their role in experimental disease. This article reviews transgenic and knockout models of CNS demyelinating disease, focusing primarily...... on the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis, as well as conditions in which an inflammatory response makes a secondary contribution to tissue injury or repair, such as neurodegeneration, ischemia and trauma....

  15. Lens stem cells may reside outside the lens capsule: an hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Rita A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider the ocular lens in the context of contemporary developments in biological ideas. We attempt to reconcile lens biology with stem cell concepts and a dearth of lens tumors. Historically, the lens has been viewed as a closed system, in which cells at the periphery of the lens epithelium differentiate into fiber cells. Theoretical considerations led us to question whether the intracapsular lens is indeed self-contained. Since stem cells generate tumors and the lens does not naturally develop tumors, we reasoned that lens stem cells may not be present within the capsule. We hypothesize that lens stem cells reside outside the lens capsule, in the nearby ciliary body. Our ideas challenge the existing lens biology paradigm. We begin our discussion with lens background information, in order to describe our lens stem cell hypothesis in the context of published data. Then we present the ciliary body as a possible source for lens stem cells, and conclude by comparing the ocular lens with the corneal epithelium.

  16. Aging of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells and their pathological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimeault, M; Batra, S K

    2009-06-01

    The fascinating discovery of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in recent years led to an explosion of interest in the development of novel stem cell-based therapies for improving the regenerative capacity of these endogenous immature cells or transplanted cells for the repair of damaged and diseased tissues. In counterbalance, a growing body of evidence has revealed that the changes in phenotypic and functional properties of human adult stem/progenitor cells may occur during chronological aging and have severe pathological consequences. Especially, intense oxidative and metabolic stress and chronic inflammation, enhanced telomere attrition and defects in DNA repair mechanisms may lead to severe DNA damages and genomic instability in adult stem/progenitor cells with advancing age that may in turn trigger their replicative senescence and/or programmed cell death. Moreover, the changes in the intrinsic and extrinsic factors involved in the stringent control of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacities of these regenerative cells, including deregulated signals from the aged niche, may also contribute to their dysfunctions or loss during chronological aging. This age-associated decline in the regenerative capacity and number of functional adult stem/progenitor cells may increase the risk to develop certain diseases. At opposed end, the telomerase reactivation and accumulation of genetic alterations leading to a down-regulation of numerous tumor suppressor genes concomitant with the enhanced expression of diverse oncogenic products may result in their malignant transformation into cancer-initiating cells. Therefore, the rescue or replacement of aged and dysfunctional endogenous adult stem/progenitor cells or molecular targeting of their malignant counterpart, cancer stem/progenitor cells may constitute potential anti-aging and cancer therapies. These therapeutic strategies could be used for treating diverse devastating premature aging and age

  17. CD157 Marks Tissue-Resident Endothelial Stem Cells with Homeostatic and Regenerative Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Taku; Naito, Hisamichi; Suehiro, Jun-Ichi; Lin, Yang; Kawaji, Hideya; Iba, Tomohiro; Kouno, Tsukasa; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Furuno, Masaaki; Takara, Kazuhiro; Muramatsu, Fumitaka; Weizhen, Jia; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Katsuhiko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Nishida, Kohji; Yoder, Mervin C; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2018-02-01

    The generation of new blood vessels via angiogenesis is critical for meeting tissue oxygen demands. A role for adult stem cells in this process remains unclear. Here, we identified CD157 (bst1, bone marrow stromal antigen 1) as a marker of tissue-resident vascular endothelial stem cells (VESCs) in large arteries and veins of numerous mouse organs. Single CD157 + VESCs form colonies in vitro and generate donor-derived portal vein, sinusoids, and central vein endothelial cells upon transplantation in the liver. In response to injury, VESCs expand and regenerate entire vasculature structures, supporting the existence of an endothelial hierarchy within blood vessels. Genetic lineage tracing revealed that VESCs maintain large vessels and sinusoids in the normal liver for more than a year, and transplantation of VESCs rescued bleeding phenotypes in a mouse model of hemophilia. Our findings show that tissue-resident VESCs display self-renewal capacity and that vascular regeneration potential exists in peripheral blood vessels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F.; Cambridge Univ.

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author)

  19. Bovine-associated CNS species resist phagocytosis differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause usually subclinical or mild clinical bovine mastitis, which often remains persistent. Symptoms are usually mild, mostly only comprising slight changes in the appearance of milk and possibly slight swelling. However, clinical mastitis with severe signs has also been reported. The reasons for the differences in clinical expression are largely unknown. Macrophages play an important role in the innate immunity of the udder. This study examined phagocytosis and killing by mouse macrophage cells of three CNS species: Staphylococcus chromogenes (15 isolates), Staphylococcus agnetis (6 isolates) and Staphylococcus simulans (15 isolates). Staphylococcus aureus (7 isolates) was also included as a control. Results All the studied CNS species were phagocytosed by macrophages, but S. simulans resisted phagocytosis more effectively than the other CNS species. Only S. chromogenes was substantially killed by macrophages. Significant variations between isolates were seen in both phagocytosis and killing by macrophages and were more common in the killing assays. Significant differences between single CNS species and S. aureus were observed in both assays. Conclusion This study demonstrated that differences in the phagocytosis and killing of mastitis-causing staphylococci by macrophages exist at both the species and isolate level. PMID:24207012

  20. CNS Macrophages Control Neurovascular Development via CD95L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of neurons and vessels shares striking anatomical and molecular features, and it is presumably orchestrated by an overlapping repertoire of extracellular signals. CNS macrophages have been implicated in various developmental functions, including the morphogenesis of neurons and vessels. However, whether CNS macrophages can coordinately influence neurovascular development and the identity of the signals involved therein is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that activity of the cell surface receptor CD95 regulates neuronal and vascular morphogenesis in the post-natal brain and retina. Furthermore, we identify CNS macrophages as the main source of CD95L, and macrophage-specific deletion thereof reduces both neurovascular complexity and synaptic activity in the brain. CD95L-induced neuronal and vascular growth is mediated through src-family kinase (SFK and PI3K signaling. Together, our study highlights a coordinated neurovascular development instructed by CNS macrophage-derived CD95L, and it underlines the importance of macrophages for the establishment of the neurovascular network during CNS development.

  1. Lineage tracing of resident tendon progenitor cells during growth and natural healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel A Dyment

    Full Text Available Unlike during embryogenesis, the identity of tissue resident progenitor cells that contribute to postnatal tendon growth and natural healing is poorly characterized. Therefore, we utilized 1 an inducible Cre driven by alpha smooth muscle actin (SMACreERT2, that identifies mesenchymal progenitors, 2 a constitutively active Cre driven by growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5Cre, a critical regulator of joint condensation, in combination with 3 an Ai9 Cre reporter to permanently label SMA9 and GDF5-9 populations and their progeny. In growing mice, SMA9+ cells were found in peritendinous structures and scleraxis-positive (ScxGFP+ cells within the tendon midsubstance and myotendinous junction. The progenitors within the tendon midsubstance were transiently labeled as they displayed a 4-fold expansion from day 2 to day 21 but reduced to baseline levels by day 70. SMA9+ cells were not found within tendon entheses or ligaments in the knee, suggesting a different origin. In contrast to the SMA9 population, GDF5-9+ cells extended from the bone through the enthesis and into a portion of the tendon midsubstance. GDF5-9+ cells were also found throughout the length of the ligaments, indicating a significant variation in the progenitors that contribute to tendons and ligaments. Following tendon injury, SMA9+ paratenon cells were the main contributors to the healing response. SMA9+ cells extended over the defect space at 1 week and differentiated into ScxGFP+ cells at 2 weeks, which coincided with increased collagen signal in the paratenon bridge. Thus, SMA9-labeled cells represent a unique progenitor source that contributes to the tendon midsubstance, paratenon, and myotendinous junction during growth and natural healing, while GDF5 progenitors contribute to tendon enthesis and ligament development. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the expansion and differentiation of these progenitors may prove crucial to improving future repair strategies.

  2. Characterization of a resident population of adventitial macrophage progenitor cells in postnatal vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Spoon, Daniel B; Chue, Colin D; Hoffman, Scott J; Witt, Tyra A; Delacroix, Sinny; Kleppe, Laurel S; Mueske, Cheryl S; Pan, Shuchong; Gulati, Rajiv; Simari, Robert D

    2014-07-18

    Macrophages regulate blood vessel structure and function in health and disease. The origins of tissue macrophages are diverse, with evidence for local production and circulatory renewal. We identified a vascular adventitial population containing macrophage progenitor cells and investigated their origins and fate. Single-cell disaggregates from adult C57BL/6 mice were prepared from different tissues and tested for their capacity to form hematopoietic colony-forming units. Aorta showed a unique predilection for generating macrophage colony-forming units. Aortic macrophage colony-forming unit progenitors coexpressed stem cell antigen-1 and CD45 and were adventitially located, where they were the predominant source of proliferating cells in the aortic wall. Aortic Sca-1(+)CD45(+) cells were transcriptionally and phenotypically distinct from neighboring cells lacking stem cell antigen-1 or CD45 and contained a proliferative (Ki67(+)) Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD135(-)CD115(+)CX3CR1(+)Ly6C(+)CD11b(-) subpopulation, consistent with the immunophenotypic profile of macrophage progenitors. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that Sca-1(+)CD45(+) adventitial macrophage progenitor cells were not replenished via the circulation from bone marrow or spleen, nor was their prevalence diminished by depletion of monocytes or macrophages by liposomal clodronate treatment or genetic deficiency of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Rather adventitial macrophage progenitor cells were upregulated in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) and LDL-R(-/-) mice, with adventitial transfer experiments demonstrating their durable contribution to macrophage progeny particularly in the adventitia, and to a lesser extent the atheroma, of atherosclerotic carotid arteries. The discovery and characterization of resident vascular adventitial macrophage progenitor cells provides new insight into adventitial biology and its participation in atherosclerosis and provokes consideration of the broader existence of local macrophage

  3. Role of purinergic receptors in CNS function and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic receptor family contains some of the most abundant receptors in living organisms. A growing body of evidence indicates that extracellular nucleotides play important roles in the regulation of neuronal and glial functions in the nervous system through purinergic receptors. Nucleotides are released from or leaked through nonexcitable cells and neurons during normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), participate in the synaptic processes, and mediate intercellular communications between neuron and gila and between glia and other glia. Glial cells in the CNS are classified into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. Astrocytes express many types of purinergic receptors, which are integral to their activation. Astrocytes release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a "gliotransmitter" that allows communication with neurons, the vascular walls of capillaries, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. Oligodendrocytes are myelin-forming cells that construct insulating layers of myelin sheets around axons, and using purinergic receptor signaling for their development and for myelination. Microglia also express many types of purinergic receptors and are known to function as immunocompetent cells in the CNS. ATP and other nucleotides work as "warning molecules" especially by activating microglia in pathophysiological conditions. Studies on purinergic signaling could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for disorder of the CNS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of new therapeutic targets for prevention of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2002-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of complex pathologies, which involves infiltration by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells of and response within the central nervous system. Expression in the CNS of cytokines, reactive nitrogen species and costimulator molecules have all been described in MS. Notably,...

  5. Highly encephalitogenic aquaporin 4-specific T cells and NMO-IgG jointly orchestrate lesion location and tissue damage in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeka, Bleranda; Hastermann, Maria; Hochmeister, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    NMO lesions contain activated CD4(+) T cells, the question arose whether AQP4-specific T cells might not only provide T cell help for antibody production, but also play an important role in the induction of NMO lesions. We show here that highly pathogenic, AQP4-peptide-specific T cells exist in Lewis...... remarkably, together with NMO-IgG, they initiate large astrocyte-destructive lesions which are located predominantly in spinal cord gray matter. We conclude that the processing of AQP4 by antigen presenting cells in Lewis rats produces a highly encephalitogenic AQP4 epitope (AQP4268-285), that T cells...

  6. Poised Regeneration of Zebrafish Melanocytes Involves Direct Differentiation and Concurrent Replenishment of Tissue-Resident Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sharanya; Kasheta, Melissa; Ceol, Craig J

    2015-06-22

    Efficient regeneration following injury is critical for maintaining tissue function and enabling organismal survival. Cells reconstituting damaged tissue are often generated from resident stem or progenitor cells or from cells that have dedifferentiated and become proliferative. While lineage-tracing studies have defined cellular sources of regeneration in many tissues, the process by which these cells execute the regenerative process is largely obscure. Here, we have identified tissue-resident progenitor cells that mediate regeneration of zebrafish stripe melanocytes and defined how these cells reconstitute pigmentation. Nearly all regeneration melanocytes arise through direct differentiation of progenitor cells. Wnt signaling is activated prior to differentiation, and inhibition of Wnt signaling impairs regeneration. Additional progenitors divide symmetrically to sustain the pool of progenitor cells. Combining direct differentiation with symmetric progenitor divisions may serve as a means to rapidly repair injured tissue while preserving the capacity to regenerate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. M tuberculosis in the adjuvant modulates time of appearance of CNS-specific effector T cells in the spleen through a polymorphic site of TLR2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Nicolò

    Full Text Available DC deliver information regulating trafficking of effector T cells along T-cell priming. However, the role of pathogen-derived motives in the regulation of movement of T cells has not been studied. We hereinafter report that amount of M tuberculosis in the adjuvant modulates relocation of PLP139-151 specific T cells. In the presence of a low dose of M tuberculosis in the adjuvant, T cells (detected by CDR3 BV-BJ spectratyping, the so-called "immunoscope" mostly reach the spleen by day 28 after immunization ("late relocation" in the SJL strain, whereas T cells reach the spleen by d 14 with a high dose of M tuberculosis ("early relocation". The C57Bl/6 background confers a dominant "early relocation" phenotype to F1 (SJL×C57Bl/6 mice, allowing early relocation of T cells in the presence of low dose M tuberculosis. A single non-synonymous polymorphism of TLR2 is responsible for "early/late" relocation phenotype. Egress of T lymphocytes is regulated by TLR2 expressed on T cells. Thus, pathogens engaging TLR2 on T cells regulate directly T-cell trafficking, and polymorphisms of TLR2 condition T-cell trafficking upon a limiting concentration of ligand.

  8. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    OpenAIRE

    Heng Giap Woon; Asolina Braun; Jane Li; Corey Smith; Jarem Edwards; Frederic Sierro; Carl G Feng; Rajiv Khanna; Michael Elliot; Andrew Bell; Andrew D Hislop; Stuart G Tangye; Alan B Rickinson; Thomas Gebhardt; Warwick J Britton

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that...

  9. Interleukin-27 induces the endothelial differentiation in Sca-1+ cardiac resident stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Obana, Masanori; Mohri, Tomomi; Ebara, Masaki; Otani, Yuta; Maeda, Makiko; Fujio, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines play important roles in cardiac repair and regeneration. Recently, we demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-6 family cytokines induce the endothelial differentiation of Sca-1+ cardiac resident stem cells through STAT3/Pim-1 signaling pathway. In contrast, the biological functions of IL-12 family cytokines in heart remain to be elucidated, though they show structural homology with IL-6. In the present study, we examined the effects of IL-12 family cytokines on the transdifferentiation of cardiac Sca-1+ cells into cardiac cells. RT-PCR analyses revealed that IL-27 receptor α (IL-27Rα), but not IL-12R or IL-23R, was expressed in cardiac Sca-1+ cells. The transcript expression of IL-27 was elevated in murine hearts in cardiac injury models. Intriguingly, IL-27 stimulation for 14 days induced the endothelial cell (EC) marker genes, such as CD-31 and VE-cadherin. Immunoblot analyses clarified that IL-27 treatment rapidly phosphorylated STAT3. IL-27 upregulated the expression of Pim-1, but the overexpression of dominant negative STAT3 abrogated the induction of Pim-1 by IL-27. Finally, adenoviral transfection of dominant negative Pim-1 inhibited IL-27-induced EC differentiation of cardiac Sca-1+ cells. These findings demonstrated that IL-27 promoted the commitment of cardiac stem cells into the EC lineage, possibly leading to neovascularization as a novel biological function. IL-27 could not only regulate the inflammation but also contribute to the maintenance of the tissue homeostasis through stem cell differentiation at inflammatory sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Gas Diffusion in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Grande, Beatriz; Konsman, Jan-Pieter

    2018-02-01

    Gases have been long known to have essential physiological functions in the CNS such as respiration or regulation of vascular tone. Since gases have been classically considered to freely diffuse, research in gas biology has so far focused on mechanisms of gas synthesis and gas reactivity, rather than gas diffusion and transport. However, the discovery of gas pores during the last two decades and the characterization of diverse diffusion patterns through different membranes has raised the possibility that modulation of gas diffusion is also a physiologically relevant parameter. Here we review the means of gas movement into and within the brain through "free" diffusion and gas pores, notably aquaporins, discussing the role that gas diffusion may play in the modulation of gas function. We highlight how diffusion is relevant to neuronal signaling, volume transmission, and cerebrovascular control in the case of NO, one of the most extensively studied gases. We point out how facilitated transport can be especially relevant for gases with low permeability in lipid membranes like NH 3 and discuss the possible implications of NH 3 -permeable channels in physiology and hyperammonemic encephalopathy. We identify novel research questions about how modulation of gas diffusion could intervene in CNS pathologies. This emerging area of research can provide novel and interesting insights in the field of gas biology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. IL-15-Independent Maintenance of Tissue-Resident and Boosted Effector Memory CD8 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Jason M; Fraser, Kathryn A; Casey, Kerry A; Beura, Lalit K; Pauken, Kristen E; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2016-05-01

    IL-15 regulates central and effector memory CD8 T cell (TCM and TEM, respectively) homeostatic proliferation, maintenance, and longevity. Consequently, IL-15 availability hypothetically defines the carrying capacity for total memory CD8 T cells within the host. In conflict with this hypothesis, previous observations demonstrated that boosting generates preternaturally abundant TEM that increases the total quantity of memory CD8 T cells in mice. In this article, we provide a potential mechanistic explanation by reporting that boosted circulating TEM do not require IL-15 for maintenance. We also investigated tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells (TRM), which protect nonlymphoid tissues from reinfection. We observed up to a 50-fold increase in the total magnitude of TRM in mouse mucosal tissues after boosting, suggesting that the memory T cell capacity in tissues is flexible and that TRM may not be under the same homeostatic regulation as primary central memory CD8 T cells and TEM Further analysis identified distinct TRM populations that depended on IL-15 for homeostatic proliferation and survival, depended on IL-15 for homeostatic proliferation but not for survival, or did not depend on IL-15 for either process. These observations on the numerical regulation of T cell memory indicate that there may be significant heterogeneity among distinct TRM populations and also argue against the common perception that developing vaccines that confer protection by establishing abundant TEM and TRM will necessarily erode immunity to previously encountered pathogens as the result of competition for IL-15. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Residency and Activation of Myeloid Cells During Remodeling of the Prepartum Murine Cervix1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kimberly J.; Clyde, Lindsey A.; Weldon, Abby J.; Milford, Terry-Ann; Yellon, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remodeling of the cervix is a critical early component of parturition and resembles an inflammatory process. Infiltration and activation of myeloid immune cells along with production of proinflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes are hypothesized to regulate cervical remodeling as pregnancy nears term. The present study standardized an approach to assess resident populations of immune cells and phenotypic markers of functional activities related to the mechanism of extracellular matrix degradation in the cervix in preparation for birth. Analysis of cells from the dispersed cervix of mice that were nonpregnant or pregnant (Days 15 and 18 postbreeding) by multicolor flow cytometry indicated increased total cell numbers with pregnancy as well as increased numbers of macrophages, the predominant myeloid cell, by Day 18, the day before birth. The number of activated macrophages involved in matrix metalloproteinase induction (CD147) and signaling for matrix adhesion (CD169) significantly increased by the day before birth. Expression of the adhesion markers CD54 and CD11b by macrophages decreased in the cervix by Day 18 versus that on Day 15 or in nonpregnant mice. The census of cells that expressed the migration marker CD62L was unaffected by pregnancy. The data suggest that remodeling of the cervix at term in mice is associated with recruitment and selective activation of macrophages that promote extracellular matrix degradation. Indices of immigration and activities by macrophages may thus serve as markers for local immune cell activity that is critical for ripening of the cervix in the final common mechanism for parturition at term. PMID:22914314

  13. The meninges as barriers and facilitators for the movement of fluid, cells and pathogens related to the rodent and human CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Roy O.; Sharp, Matthew M.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2018-01-01

    but also allows attachment of bacteria such as Neisseria meningitidis and of tumour cells as CSF metastases. Single layers of leptomeningeal cells extend into the brain closely associated with the walls of arteries so that there are no perivascular spaces around arteries in the cerebral cortex...

  14. T Cell Zone Resident Macrophages Silently Dispose of Apoptotic Cells in the Lymph Node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, Myriam; Simon, Léa; Jorquera, Audrey; Ghigo, Clément; Dembele, Doulaye; Nowak, Jonathan; Gentek, Rebecca; Wienert, Stephan; Klauschen, Frederick; Malissen, Bernard; Dalod, Marc; Bajénoff, Marc

    2017-08-15

    In lymph nodes (LNs), dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to dispose of apoptotic cells, a function pertaining to macrophages in other tissues. We found that a population of CX3CR1 + MERTK + cells located in the T cell zone of LNs, previously identified as DCs, are efferocytic macrophages. Lineage-tracing experiments and shield chimeras indicated that these T zone macrophages (TZM) are long-lived macrophages seeded in utero and slowly replaced by blood monocytes after birth. Imaging the LNs of mice in which TZM and DCs express different fluorescent proteins revealed that TZM-and not DCs-act as the only professional scavengers, clearing apoptotic cells in the LN T cell zone in a CX3CR1-dependent manner. Furthermore, similar to other macrophages, TZM appear inefficient in priming CD4 T cells. Thus, efferocytosis and T cell activation in the LN are uncoupled processes designated to macrophages and DCs, respectively, with implications to the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, Lymphoma, or T-Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Gonadotroph Adenoma; Pituitary Basophilic Adenoma; Pituitary Chromophobe Adenoma; Pituitary Eosinophilic Adenoma; Prolactin Secreting Adenoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Pituitary Tumor; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; TSH Secreting Adenoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. On the resemblance of synapse formation and CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R G; Lyons, D A

    2014-09-12

    The myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS) is essential for nervous system formation, function and health. CNS myelination continues well into adulthood, but not all axons become myelinated. Unlike the peripheral nervous system, where we know of numerous axon-glial signals required for myelination, we have a poor understanding of the nature or identity of such molecules that regulate which axons are myelinated in the CNS. Recent studies have started to elucidate cell behavior during myelination in vivo and indicate that the choice of which axons are myelinated is made prior to myelin sheath generation. Here we propose that interactions between axons and the exploratory processes of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) lead to myelination and may be similar to those between dendrites and axons that prefigure and lead to synapse formation. Indeed axons and OPCs form synapses with striking resemblance to those of neurons, suggesting a similar mode of formation. We discuss families of molecules with specific functions at different stages of synapse formation and address studies that implicate the same factors during axon-OPC synapse formation and myelination. We also address the possibility that the function of such synapses might directly regulate the myelinating behavior of oligodendrocyte processes in vivo. In the future it may be of benefit to consider these similarities when taking a candidate-based approach to dissect mechanisms of CNS myelination. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Melanoma-derived factors alter the maturation and activation of differentiated tissue-resident dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M; Bishop, Johnathan D; Brandt, John P; Hand, Zachary C; Ararso, Yonathan T; Forrest, Osric A

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of host immunity that are capable of inducing either immune tolerance or activation. In addition to their well-characterized role in shaping immune responses to foreign pathogens, DCs are also known to be critical for the induction and maintenance of anti-tumor immune responses. Therefore, it is important to understand how tumors influence the function of DCs and the quality of immune responses they elicit. Although the majority of studies in this field to date have utilized either immortalized DC lines or DC populations that have been generated under artificial conditions from hematopoietic precursors in vitro, we wished to investigate how tumors impact the function of already differentiated, tissue-resident DCs. Therefore, we used both an ex vivo and in vivo model system to assess the influence of melanoma-derived factors on DC maturation and activation. In ex vivo studies with freshly isolated splenic DCs, we demonstrate that the extent to which DC maturation and activation are altered by these factors correlates with melanoma tumorigenicity, and we identify partial roles for tumor-derived transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in the altered functionality of DCs. In vivo studies using a lung metastasis model of melanoma also demonstrate tumorigenicity-dependent alterations to the function of lung-resident DCs, and skewed production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by these tumor-altered cells is associated with recruitment of an immune infiltrate that may ultimately favor tumor immune escape and outgrowth.

  18. Peripheral blood cells among community residents living near nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yuan-Teh; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Yang, Chi-Yu; Chen, Wen Jone [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, No. 7 Chungshan South Road, 10020 Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Sung, Fung C. [Institute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lin, Ruey S. [Institute of Epidemiology, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    2001-12-03

    Information about hematopoieses as a result of exposure to very low levels of radiation is scarce. To investigate the human hematopoietic effect of very low level radiation exposure, measurements of peripheral blood components were performed among 3602 men and women, aged 35 and above, living in a community near two nuclear power installations in Chinshan, Taiwan. The radiation level that each individual was exposed to was represented by a surrogate level, '+', a transformed distance from each individual's residence to the two power plants D{sub 1} and D{sub 2}. In addition to comparing average hematology measurements, multiple regression analyses were done to include age, gender, smoking, drinking status and the surrogate radiation exposure level as independent variables. Univariate and bivariate analyses showed that the hematology measurements had significant associations with age, gender, smoking or drinking. The multiple regression analyses revealed that significant positive associations with '+' were found for hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet, white blood cell and red blood cell. The platelet count might increase for 208.7x10{sup 3}/{mu}l if the exposure from the nuclear plants increased by one exposure unit. This type of association implies that those who lived closer to the nuclear power installation had a higher blood cell count; we suspect that this could be a type of radiation hormesis.

  19. Human amnion mesenchymal cells negative co-stimulatory molecules PD-L1 expression and its capacity of modulating microglial activation of CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weijiang; Lan, Qing; Lu, Hua; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Aihua; Fang, Wenfeng; Ge, Feng; Hui, Guozhen

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the negative immunomodulatory capacity of human amniotic mesenchymal cells (AMSCs) and their possible intrinsic mechanism, by which we can confirm that they modulate microglial activation of central nervous system from multiple perspectives at the molecular level. The identification of the immune phenotype of AMSCs and microglial cells was executed by immunohistochemical methods and flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the influence and mechanism of amniotic mesenchymal cells in vitro on proliferation, cell cycle, and cytokine release of activated microglia (MI) would be detected by ELISA, β-liquid scintillation counting method, and flow cytometry. Human amnion mesenchymal cells highly expressed negative co-stimulatory molecules PD-L1, while its ligand PD1 was expressed with high level by activated MI. When adding the PD-L1mAb to the mixed culture system composed of AMSCs and activated MI, the proliferation inhibitory effect and the cycle-blocking effect produced by the former on the latter would be partially reversed; at the same time, the impact of the latter cytokine secretion would be adjusted. As a conclusion, AMSCs play inhibitory effects on microglial activation, proliferation, and immune effects partially through the PD-L1-PD1 signaling pathways.

  20. Oral-resident natural Th17 cells and γδ T cells control opportunistic Candida albicans infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R; Peterson, Alanna C; Brane, Lucas; Huppler, Anna R; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Whibley, Natasha; Garg, Abhishek V; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Gibson, Gregory A; Mamo, Anna J; Osborne, Lisa C; Bishu, Shrinivas; Ghilardi, Nico; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Watkins, Simon C; Artis, David; McGeachy, Mandy J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-09-22

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans. OPC is frequent in HIV/AIDS, implicating adaptive immunity. Mice are naive to Candida, yet IL-17 is induced within 24 h of infection, and susceptibility is strongly dependent on IL-17R signaling. We sought to identify the source of IL-17 during the early innate response to candidiasis. We show that innate responses to Candida require an intact TCR, as SCID, IL-7Rα(-/-), and Rag1(-/-) mice were susceptible to OPC, and blockade of TCR signaling by cyclosporine induced susceptibility. Using fate-tracking IL-17 reporter mice, we found that IL-17 is produced within 1-2 d by tongue-resident populations of γδ T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD44(hi)TCRβ(+)CCR6(+) natural Th17 (nTh17) cells, but not by TCR-deficient innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) or NK cells. These cells function redundantly, as TCR-β(-/-) and TCR-δ(-/-) mice were both resistant to OPC. Whereas γδ T cells were previously shown to produce IL-17 during dermal candidiasis and are known to mediate host defense at mucosal surfaces, nTh17 cells are poorly understood. The oral nTh17 population expanded rapidly after OPC, exhibited high TCR-β clonal diversity, and was absent in Rag1(-/-), IL-7Rα(-/-), and germ-free mice. These findings indicate that nTh17 and γδ T cells, but not ILCs, are key mucosal sentinels that control oral pathogens. © 2014 Conti et al.

  1. Platelet-biased stem cells reside at the apex of the haematopoietic stem-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Macaulay, Iain C; Jensen, Christina T; Woll, Petter S; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Moore, Susan; Carella, Cintia; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Bouriez Jones, Tiphaine; Chowdhury, Onima; Stenson, Laura; Lutteropp, Michael; Green, Joanna C A; Facchini, Raffaella; Boukarabila, Hanane; Grover, Amit; Gambardella, Adriana; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Tarrant, Paul; Atkinson, Deborah; Clark, Sally-Ann; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W

    2013-10-10

    The blood system is maintained by a small pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are required and sufficient for replenishing all human blood cell lineages at millions of cells per second throughout life. Megakaryocytes in the bone marrow are responsible for the continuous production of platelets in the blood, crucial for preventing bleeding--a common and life-threatening side effect of many cancer therapies--and major efforts are focused at identifying the most suitable cellular and molecular targets to enhance platelet production after bone marrow transplantation or chemotherapy. Although it has become clear that distinct HSC subsets exist that are stably biased towards the generation of lymphoid or myeloid blood cells, we are yet to learn whether other types of lineage-biased HSC exist or understand their inter-relationships and how differently lineage-biased HSCs are generated and maintained. The functional relevance of notable phenotypic and molecular similarities between megakaryocytes and bone marrow cells with an HSC cell-surface phenotype remains unclear. Here we identify and prospectively isolate a molecularly and functionally distinct mouse HSC subset primed for platelet-specific gene expression, with enhanced propensity for short- and long-term reconstitution of platelets. Maintenance of platelet-biased HSCs crucially depends on thrombopoietin, the primary extrinsic regulator of platelet development. Platelet-primed HSCs also frequently have a long-term myeloid lineage bias, can self-renew and give rise to lymphoid-biased HSCs. These findings show that HSC subtypes can be organized into a cellular hierarchy, with platelet-primed HSCs at the apex. They also demonstrate that molecular and functional priming for platelet development initiates already in a distinct HSC population. The identification of a platelet-primed HSC population should enable the rational design of therapies enhancing platelet output.

  2. Myelin Damage and Repair in Pathologic CNS: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsalan eAlizadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the central nervous system (CNS results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs and neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: 1 the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; 2 underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; 3 the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; 4 the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and 5 the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of

  3. Detection of choline transporter-like 1 protein CTL1 in neuroblastoma × glioma cells and in the CNS, and its role in choline uptake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; O´Regan, S.; Newcombe, J.; Meunier, F. M.; Prentice, J.; Dove, R.; Lisá, Věra; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 4 (2009), s. 1297-1309 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : CTL1 * choline * cell growth Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.999, year: 2009

  4. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  5. Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells: From Phenotype to Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Topham

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells are an important first line of defense from infection in peripheral non-lymphoid tissues, such as the mucosal tissues of the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital tracts. This memory T cell subset is established late during resolution of primary infection of those tissues, has a distinct genetic signature, and is often defined by the cell surface expression of CD69, CD103, CD49a, and CD44 in both mouse and human studies. The stimuli that program or imprint the unique gene expression and cell surface phenotypes on TRM are beginning to be defined, but much work remains to be done. It is not clear, for example, when and where the TRM precursors receive these signals, and there is evidence that supports imprinting in both the lymph node and the peripheral tissue sites. In most studies, expression of CD49a, CD103, and CD69 on T cells in the tissues appears relatively late in the response, suggesting there are precise environmental cues that are not present at the height of the acute response. CD49a and CD103 are not merely biomarkers of TRM, they confer substrate specificities for cell adhesion to collagen and E-cadherin, respectively. Yet, little attention has been paid to how expression affects the positioning of TRM in the peripheral tissues. CD103 and CD49a are not mutually exclusive, and not always co-expressed, although whether they can compensate for one another is unknown. In fact, they may define different subsets of TRM in certain tissues. For instance, while CD49a+CD8+ memory T cells can be found in almost all peripheral tissues, CD103 appears to be more restricted. In this review, we discuss the evidence for how these hallmarks of TRM affect positioning of T cells in peripheral sites, how CD49a and CD103 differ in expression and function, and why they are important for immune protection conferred by TRM in mucosal tissues such as the respiratory tract.

  6. HB-GAM (pleiotrophin) reverses inhibition of neural regeneration by the CNS extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveliev, Mikhail; Fenrich, Keith K.; Kislin, Mikhail; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Varjosalo, Markku; Kajander, Tommi; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Ahonen-Bishopp, Anni; Khiroug, Leonard; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Rougon, Geneviève; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans inhibit regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We report here that HB-GAM (heparin-binding growth-associated molecule; also known as pleiotrophin), a CS-binding protein expressed at high levels in the developing CNS, reverses the role of the CS chains in neurite growth of CNS neurons in vitro from inhibition to activation. The CS-bound HB-GAM promotes neurite growth through binding to the cell surface proteoglycan glypican-2; furthermore, HB-GAM abrogates the CS ligand binding to the inhibitory receptor PTPσ (protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma). Our in vivo studies using two-photon imaging of CNS injuries support the in vitro studies and show that HB-GAM increases dendrite regeneration in the adult cerebral cortex and axonal regeneration in the adult spinal cord. Our findings may enable the development of novel therapies for CNS injuries. PMID:27671118

  7. PEG minocycline-liposomes ameliorate CNS autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS. Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circulating polyethylene glycol (PEG minocycline liposomes are effective in treating EAE.Performing in vitro time kinetic studies of PEG minocycline-liposomes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, we determined that PEG minocycline-liposome preparations stabilized with CaCl(2 are effective in diminishing MMP-9 activity. Intravenous injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes every five days were as effective in ameliorating clinical EAE as daily intraperitoneal injections of minocycline. Treatment of animals with PEG minocycline-liposomes significantly reduced the number of CNS-infiltrating leukocytes, and the overall expression of MMP-9 in the CNS. There was also a significant suppression of MMP-9 expression and proteolytic activity in splenocytes of treated animals, but not in CNS-infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, leukocytes gaining access to the brain and spinal cord require the same absolute amount of MMP-9 in all treatment groups, but minocycline decreases the absolute cell number.Our data indicate that less frequent injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes are an effective alternative pharmacotherapy to daily minocycline injections for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases. Also, inhibition of MMP-9 remains a promising treatment target in EAE and patients with MS.

  8. Arylsulfatase A Overexpressing Human iPSC-derived Neural Cells Reduce CNS Sulfatide Storage in a Mouse Model of Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Doerr, Jonas; Böckenhoff, Annika; Ewald, Benjamin; Ladewig, Julia; Eckhardt, Matthias; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a functional deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ARSA), an enzyme that catalyzes desulfation of 3-O-sulfogalactosylceramide (sulfatide). Lack of active ARSA leads to the accumulation of sulfatide in oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells and some neurons and triggers progressive demyelination, the neuropathological hallmark of MLD. Several therapeutic approaches have been explored, including enzyme replacement, a...

  9. Induction of resident memory T cells enhances the efficacy of cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Roussel, Hélène; Diniz, Mariana O; Karaki, Soumaya; Tran, Thi; Voron, Thibault; Dransart, Estelle; Sandoval, Federico; Riquet, Marc; Rance, Bastien; Marcheteau, Elie; Fabre, Elizabeth; Mandavit, Marion; Terme, Magali; Blanc, Charlotte; Escudie, Jean-Baptiste; Gibault, Laure; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Granier, Clemence; Ferreira, Luis C S; Badoual, Cecile; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2017-05-24

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) represent a new subset of long-lived memory T cells that remain in tissue and do not recirculate. Although they are considered as early immune effectors in infectious diseases, their role in cancer immunosurveillance remains unknown. In a preclinical model of head and neck cancer, we show that intranasal vaccination with a mucosal vector, the B subunit of Shiga toxin, induces local Trm and inhibits tumour growth. As Trm do not recirculate, we demonstrate their crucial role in the efficacy of cancer vaccine with parabiosis experiments. Blockade of TFGβ decreases the induction of Trm after mucosal vaccine immunization, resulting in the lower efficacy of cancer vaccine. In order to extrapolate this role of Trm in humans, we show that the number of Trm correlates with a better overall survival in lung cancer in multivariate analysis. The induction of Trm may represent a new surrogate biomarker for the efficacy of cancer vaccine. This study also argues for the development of vaccine strategies designed to elicit them.

  10. Glucocorticoid treatment of MCMV infected newborn mice attenuates CNS inflammation and limits deficits in cerebellar development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kosmac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV.

  11. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages Share Ontogeny with MYB-Independent Tissue-Resident Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Buchrieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident macrophages, such as microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells, derive from Myb-independent yolk sac (YS progenitors generated before the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Myb-independent YS-derived resident macrophages self-renew locally, independently of circulating monocytes and HSCs. In contrast, adult blood monocytes, as well as infiltrating, gut, and dermal macrophages, derive from Myb-dependent HSCs. These findings are derived from the mouse, using gene knockouts and lineage tracing, but their applicability to human development has not been formally demonstrated. Here, we use human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs as a tool to model human hematopoietic development. By using a CRISPR-Cas9 knockout strategy, we show that human iPSC-derived monocytes/macrophages develop in an MYB-independent, RUNX1-, and SPI1 (PU.1-dependent fashion. This result makes human iPSC-derived macrophages developmentally related to and a good model for MYB-independent tissue-resident macrophages, such as alveolar and kidney macrophages, microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells.

  12. The retina as a window to the brain-from eye research to CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Anat; Benhar, Inbal; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Philosophers defined the eye as a window to the soul long before scientists addressed this cliché to determine its scientific basis and clinical relevance. Anatomically and developmentally, the retina is known as an extension of the CNS; it consists of retinal ganglion cells, the axons of which form the optic nerve, whose fibres are, in effect, CNS axons. The eye has unique physical structures and a local array of surface molecules and cytokines, and is host to specialized immune responses similar to those in the brain and spinal cord. Several well-defined neurodegenerative conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord have manifestations in the eye, and ocular symptoms often precede conventional diagnosis of such CNS disorders. Furthermore, various eye-specific pathologies share characteristics of other CNS pathologies. In this Review, we summarize data that support examination of the eye as a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis of select CNS diseases, and the use of the eye as a valuable model to study the CNS. Translation of eye research to CNS disease, and deciphering the role of immune cells in these two systems, could improve our understanding and, potentially, the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. MenTORing Immunity: mTOR Signaling in the Development and Function of Tissue-Resident Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell G; Pearce, Edward J

    2017-05-16

    Tissue-resident immune cells must balance survival in peripheral tissues with the capacity to respond rapidly upon infection or tissue damage, and in turn couple these responses with intrinsic metabolic control and conditions in the tissue microenvironment. The serine/threonine kinase mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central integrator of extracellular and intracellular growth signals and cellular metabolism and plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review discusses the function of mTOR signaling in the differentiation and function of tissue-resident immune cells, with focus on the role of mTOR as a metabolic sensor and its impact on metabolic regulation in innate and adaptive immune cells. We also discuss the impact of metabolic constraints in tissues on immune homeostasis and disease, and how manipulating mTOR activity with drugs such as rapamycin can modulate immunity in these contexts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. INS/CNS/GNSS integrated navigation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Quan, Wei; Gong, Xiaolin; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-01-01

    This book not only introduces the principles of INS, CNS and GNSS, the related filters and semi-physical simulation, but also systematically discusses the key technologies needed for integrated navigations of INS/GNSS, INS/CNS, and INS/CNS/GNSS, respectively. INS/CNS/GNSS integrated navigation technology has established itself as an effective tool for precise positioning navigation, which can make full use of the complementary characteristics of different navigation sub-systems and greatly improve the accuracy and reliability of the integrated navigation system. The book offers a valuable reference guide for graduate students, engineers and researchers in the fields of navigation and its control. Dr. Wei Quan, Dr. Jianli Li, Dr. Xiaolin Gong and Dr. Jiancheng Fang are all researchers at the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  15. CD49a Expression Defines Tissue-Resident CD8+ T Cells Poised for Cytotoxic Function in Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheuk, Stanley; Schlums, Heinrich; Sérézal, Irène Gallais

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells form a heterogeneous population that provides localized protection against pathogens. Here, we identify CD49a as a marker that differentiates CD8+ Trm cells on a compartmental and functional basis. In human skin epithelia, CD8+CD49a+ Trm cells produced...... interferon-γ, whereas CD8+CD49a− Trm cells produced interleukin-17 (IL-17). In addition, CD8+CD49a+ Trm cells from healthy skin rapidly induced the expression of the effector molecules perforin and granzyme B when stimulated with IL-15, thereby promoting a strong cytotoxic response. In skin from patients...... in this skin disease. Overall, CD49a expression delineates CD8+ Trm cell specialization in human epithelial barriers and correlates with the effector cell balance found in distinct inflammatory skin diseases....

  16. Air Pollution: Mechanisms of Neuroinflammation & CNS Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Michelle L.; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates air pollution as a chronic source of neuroinflammation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and neuropathology instigating central nervous system (CNS) disease. Stroke incidence, and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease pathology are linked to air pollution. Recent reports reveal that air pollution components reach the brain. Further, systemic effects known to impact lung and cardiovascular disease also impinge upon CNS health. While mechanisms driving air pollution-ind...

  17. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Conditional ablation of raptor or rictor has differential impact on oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercury, Kathryn K; Dai, JinXiang; Sachs, Hilary H; Ahrendsen, Jared T; Wood, Teresa L; Macklin, Wendy B

    2014-03-26

    During CNS development, oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glia of the CNS, progress through multiple transitory stages before terminating into fully mature cells. Oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination is a tightly regulated process requiring extracellular signals to converge to elicit specific translational and transcriptional changes. Our lab has previously shown that the protein kinases, Akt and mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), are important regulators of CNS myelination in vivo. mTOR functions through two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, by binding to either Raptor or Rictor, respectively. To establish whether the impact of mTOR on CNS myelination results from unique functions of mTORC1 or mTORC2 during CNS myelination, we conditionally ablated either Raptor or Rictor in the oligodendrocyte lineage, in vivo. We show that Raptor (mTORC1) is a positive regulator of developmental CNS mouse myelination when mTORC2 is functional, whereas Rictor (mTORC2) ablation has a modest positive effect on oligodendrocyte differentiation, and very little effect on myelination, when mTORC1 is functional. Also, we show that loss of Raptor in oligodendrocytes results in differential dysmyelination in specific areas of the CNS, with the greatest impact on spinal cord myelination.

  19. Persistence in Temporary Lung Niches: A Survival Strategy of Lung-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory virus infections, such as those mediated by influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), rhinovirus, and adenovirus, are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality, especially in children and older adults. Furthermore, the potential emergence of highly pathogenic strains of influenza virus poses a significant public health threat. Thus, the development of vaccines capable of eliciting long-lasting protective immunity to those pathogens is a major public health priority. CD8+ Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells are a newly defined population that resides permanently in the nonlymphoid tissues including the lung. These cells are capable of providing local protection immediately after infection, thereby promoting rapid host recovery. Recent studies have offered new insights into the anatomical niches that harbor lung CD8+ TRM cells, and also identified the requirement and limitations of TRM maintenance. However, it remains controversial whether lung CD8+ TRM cells are continuously replenished by new cells from the circulation or permanently lodged in this site. A better understanding of how lung CD8+ TRM cells are generated and maintained and the tissue-specific factors that drive local TRM formation is required for optimal vaccine development. This review focuses on recent advance in our understanding of CD8+ TRM cell establishment and maintenance in the lung, and describes how those processes are uniquely regulated in this tissue. PMID:28418771

  20. Brain derived neurotrophic factor contributes to the cardiogenic potential of adult resident progenitor cells in failing murine heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmita Samal

    Full Text Available Resident cardiac progenitor cells show homing properties when injected into the injured but not to the healthy myocardium. The molecular background behind this difference in behavior needs to be studied to elucidate how adult progenitor cells can restore cardiac function of the damaged myocardium. Since the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF moderates cardioprotection in injured hearts, we focused on delineating its regulatory role in the damaged myocardium.Comparative gene expression profiling of freshly isolated undifferentiated Sca-1 progenitor cells derived either from heart failure transgenic αMHC-CyclinT1/Gαq overexpressing mice or wildtype littermates revealed transcriptional variations. Bdnf expression was up regulated 5-fold during heart failure which was verified by qRT-PCR and confirmed at protein level. The migratory capacity of Sca-1 cells from transgenic hearts was improved by 15% in the presence of 25 ng/ml BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-mediated effects on Sca-1 cells were studied via pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC proteomics approach. After BDNF treatment significant differences between newly synthesized proteins in Sca-1 cells from control and transgenic hearts were observed for CDK1, SRRT, HDGF, and MAP2K3 which are known to regulate cell cycle, survival and differentiation. Moreover BDNF repressed the proliferation of Sca-1 cells from transgenic hearts.Comparative profiling of resident Sca-1 cells revealed elevated BDNF levels in the failing heart. Exogenous BDNF (i stimulated migration, which might improve the homing ability of Sca-1 cells derived from the failing heart and (ii repressed the cell cycle progression suggesting its potency to ameliorate heart failure.

  1. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

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    Heng Giap Woon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV and Cytomegalovirus (CMV. How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2. Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (P<.05). There is a lack of consensus on the appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in SCD children undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  3. Multidimensional fractionation is a requirement for quantitation of Golgi-resident glycosylation enzymes from cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hung; Chik, Jenny H L; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2015-02-06

    Glycosylation results from the concerted action of glycosylation enzymes in the secretory pathway. In general, gene expression serves as the primary control mechanism, but post-translational fine-tuning of glycosylation enzyme functions is often necessary for efficient synthesis of specific glycan epitopes. While the field of glycomics has rapidly advanced, there lacks routine proteomic methods to measure expression of specific glycosylation enzymes needed to fill the gap between mRNA expression and the glycomic profile in a "reverse genomics" workflow. Toward developing this workflow we enriched Golgi membranes from two human colon cancer cell lines by sucrose density centrifugation and further mass-based fractionation by SDS-PAGE. We then applied mass spectrometry to demonstrate a doubling in the number of Golgi resident proteins identified, compared to the unenriched, low speed centrifuged supernatant of lysed cells. A total of 35 Golgi-resident glycosylation enzymes, of which 23 were glycosyltransferases, were identified making this the largest protein database so far of Golgi resident glycosylation enzymes experimentally identified in cultured human cells. We developed targeted mass spectrometry assays for specific quantitation of many of these glycosylation enzymes. Our results show that alterations in abundance of glycosylation enzymes at the protein level were generally consistent with the resultant glycomic profiles, but not necessarily with the corresponding glycosyltransferase mRNA expression as exemplified by the case of O-glycan core 1 T synthase.

  4. Incomplete Memories: The Natural Suppression of Tissue-Resident Memory CD8 T Cells in the Lung

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    Katie L. Reagin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The yearly, cyclic impact of viruses like influenza on human health and the economy is due to the high rates of mutation of traditional antibody targets, which negate any preexisting humoral immunity. However, the seasonality of influenza infections can equally be attributed to an absent or defective memory CD8 T cell response since the epitopes recognized by these cells are derived from essential virus proteins that mutate infrequently. Experiments in mouse models show that protection from heterologous influenza infection is temporally limited and conferred by a population of tissue-resident memory (TRM cells residing in the lung and lung airways. TRM are elicited by a diverse set of pathogens penetrating mucosal barriers and broadly identified by extravascular staining and expression of the activation and adhesion molecules CD69 and CD103. Interestingly, lung TRM fail to express these molecules, which could limit tissue retention, resulting in airway expulsion or death with concomitant loss of heterologous protection. Here, we make the case that respiratory infections uniquely evoke a form of natural immunosuppression whereby specific cytokines and cell–cell interactions negatively impact memory cell programming and differentiation. Respiratory memory is not only short-lived but most of the memory cells in the lung parenchyma may not be bona fide TRM. Given the quantity of microbes humans inhale over a lifetime, limiting cellular residence could be a mechanism employed by the respiratory tract to preserve organismal vitality. Therefore, successful efforts to improve respiratory immunity must carefully and selectively breach these inherent tissue barriers.

  5. Incorporation of resident macrophages in engineered tissues: Multiple cell type response to microenvironment controlled macrophage-laden gelatine hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Camille; Ciftci, Sait; Knopf-Marques, Helena; Guner, Rabia; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Debry, Christian; Barthes, Julien; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2018-02-01

    The success of tissue engineering strategy is strongly related to the inflammatory response, mainly through the activity of macrophages that are key cells in initial immune response to implants. For engineered tissues, the presence of resident macrophages can be beneficial for maintenance of homeostasis and healing. Thus, incorporation of macrophages in engineered tissues can facilitate the integration upon implantation. In this study, an in-vitro model of interaction was developed between encapsulated naive monocytes, macrophages induced with M1/M2 stimulation and incoming cells for immune assisted tissue engineering applications. To mimic the wound healing cascade, naive THP-1 monocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts were seeded on the gels as incoming cells. The interaction was first monitored in the absence of the gels. To mimic resident macrophages, THP-1 cells were encapsulated in the presence or absence of IL-4 to control their phenotype and then these hydrogels were seeded with incoming cells. Without encapsulation, activated macrophages induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. Once encapsulated no adverse effects were seen. Macrophage-laden hydrogels attracted more endothelial cells and fibroblasts compared to monocytes-laden hydrogels. The induction (M2 stimulation) of encapsulated macrophages did not change the overall number of attracted cells; but significantly affected their morphology. M1 stimulation by a defined media resulted in more secretion of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to M2 stimulation. It was demonstrated that there is a distinct effect of encapsulated macrophages on the behaviour of the incoming cells; this effect can be harnessed to establish a microenvironment more prone to regeneration upon implantation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Cell Origin Dictates Programming of Resident versus Recruited Macrophages during Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Kara J; Barthel, Lea; Mohning, Michael P; Thomas, Stacey M; McCubbrey, Alexandra L; Danhorn, Thomas; Leach, Sonia M; Fingerlin, Tasha E; O'Connor, Brian P; Reisz, Julie A; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Bratton, Donna L; Jakubzick, Claudia V; Janssen, William J

    2017-09-01

    Two populations of alveolar macrophages (AMs) coexist in the inflamed lung: resident AMs that arise during embryogenesis, and recruited AMs that originate postnatally from circulating monocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether origin or environment dictates the transcriptional, metabolic, and functional programming of these two ontologically distinct populations over the time course of acute inflammation. RNA sequencing demonstrated marked transcriptional differences between resident and recruited AMs affecting three main areas: proliferation, inflammatory signaling, and metabolism. Functional assays and metabolomic studies confirmed these differences and demonstrated that resident AMs proliferate locally and are governed by increased tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acid metabolism. Conversely, recruited AMs produce inflammatory cytokines in association with increased glycolytic and arginine metabolism. Collectively, the data show that even though they coexist in the same environment, inflammatory macrophage subsets have distinct immunometabolic programs and perform specialized functions during inflammation that are associated with their cellular origin.

  7. In vivo transfer of intracellular labels from locally implanted bone marrow stromal cells to resident tissue macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Pawelczyk

    Full Text Available Intracellular labels such as dextran coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU or green fluorescent protein (GFP are frequently used to study the fate of transplanted cells by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescent microscopy. Bystander uptake of labeled cells by resident tissue macrophages (TM can confound the interpretation of the presence of intracellular labels especially during direct implantation of cells, which can result in more than 70% cell death. In this study we determined the percentages of TM that took up SPION, BrdU or GFP from labeled bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that were placed into areas of angiogenesis and inflammation in a mouse model known as Matrigel plaque perfusion assay. Cells recovered from digested plaques at various time points were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The analysis of harvested plaques revealed 5% of BrdU(+, 5-10% of GFP(+ and 5-15% of dextran(+ macrophages. The transfer of the label was not dependent on cell dose or viability. Collectively, this study suggests that care should be taken to validate donor origin of cells using an independent marker by histology and to assess transplanted cells for TM markers prior to drawing conclusions about the in vivo behavior of transplanted cells.

  8. Flaviviruses are neurotropic, but how do they invade the CNS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J W

    2014-09-01

    Flaviruses (FV) are RNA viruses carried by mosquitoes. Neurological signs including acute encephalitis, meningitis and acute flaccid paralysis develop in a small percentage of infected individuals; long term sequlae are, Parkinsonism, dystonias and cognitive changes. FV neuroinfection is neurotropic involving subcortical nuclei (substantia nigra and thalamus) anterior horn neurons and neocortex. Glycosylation of the FV E envelope protein is one determinant of neuroinvasion, increasing both axonal and trans-epithelial transportation. Neutralizing antibodies against the E and NS proteins prevents FV uptake into several cell types, including axons. CD8+ T cells are vital for clearance of WNF infected cells from the CNS, whereas TLR-3 and TLR-7 mediated anti-virus response through increased serum inflammatory cytokines to disrupt the BBB providing infected leucocytes and free virus access to the CNS (so called Trojan horse) Cellular virus attachment factors, promoting FV cell entry are widely distributed and include DC-SIGN (that detects complex carbohydrate molecules); Glycosamino glycans (GAG), Heparan sulphate(HSPG) Semaphorin 7A, Low Density Lipid receptors (LDLR); these are not FV specific virus entry receptors. The FV also crosses epithelial and endothelial barriers by disrupting Tight Junction complexes to increase BBB permeability. This review describes the multiple pathways responsible for the neuroinvasive properties of the Flaviviruses. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Cardiac-Resident Progenitor Cells Expressing High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity

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    Marc-Estienne Roehrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity has been associated with stem and progenitor cells in various tissues. Human cord blood and bone marrow ALDH-bright (ALDHbr cells have displayed angiogenic activity in preclinical studies and have been shown to be safe in clinical trials in patients with ischemic cardiovascular disease. The presence of ALDHbr cells in the heart has not been evaluated so far. We have characterized ALDHbr cells isolated from mouse hearts. One percent of nonmyocytic cells from neonatal and adult hearts were ALDHbr. ALDHvery-br cells were more frequent in neonatal hearts than adult. ALDHbr cells were more frequent in atria than ventricles. Expression of ALDH1A1 isozyme transcripts was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHbr cells, and lowest in ALDHdim cells. ALDH1A2 expression was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHdim cells, and lowest in ALDHbr cells. ALDH1A3 and ALDH2 expression was detectable in ALDHvery-br and ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, albeit at lower levels compared with ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A2. Freshly isolated ALDHbr cells were enriched for cells expressing stem cell antigen-1, CD34, CD90, CD44, and CD106. ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, could be grown in culture for more than 40 passages. They expressed sarcomeric α-actinin and could be differentiated along multiple mesenchymal lineages. However, the proportion of ALDHbr cells declined with cell passage. In conclusion, the cardiac-derived ALDHbr population is enriched for progenitor cells that exhibit mesenchymal progenitor-like characteristics and can be expanded in culture. The regenerative potential of cardiac-derived ALDHbr cells remains to be evaluated.

  10. Liver-Resident Memory CD8+T Cells Form a Front-Line Defense against Malaria Liver-Stage Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Ng, Wei Yi; Holz, Lauren E; Ma, Joel Z; Zaid, Ali; Wong, Yik Chun; Lau, Lei Shong; Mollard, Vanessa; Cozijnsen, Anton; Collins, Nicholas; Li, Jessica; Davey, Gayle M; Kato, Yu; Devi, Sapna; Skandari, Roghieh; Pauley, Michael; Manton, Jonathan H; Godfrey, Dale I; Braun, Asolina; Tay, Szun Szun; Tan, Peck Szee; Bowen, David G; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Rissiek, Björn; Carbone, Francis R; Crabb, Brendan S; Lahoud, Mireille; Cockburn, Ian A; Mueller, Scott N; Bertolino, Patrick; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Caminschi, Irina; Heath, William R

    2016-10-18

    In recent years, various intervention strategies have reduced malaria morbidity and mortality, but further improvements probably depend upon development of a broadly protective vaccine. To better understand immune requirement for protection, we examined liver-stage immunity after vaccination with irradiated sporozoites, an effective though logistically difficult vaccine. We identified a population of memory CD8 + T cells that expressed the gene signature of tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells and remained permanently within the liver, where they patrolled the sinusoids. Exploring the requirements for liver Trm cell induction, we showed that by combining dendritic cell-targeted priming with liver inflammation and antigen recognition on hepatocytes, high frequencies of Trm cells could be induced and these cells were essential for protection against malaria sporozoite challenge. Our study highlights the immune potential of liver Trm cells and provides approaches for their selective transfer, expansion, or depletion, which may be harnessed to control liver infections or autoimmunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Diversity of CNS Cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, J M; Mohan, S; Deodhar, D; John, M; Oberoi, A; Pannu, A

    2017-10-01

    Though cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is recognized as a disease of the immunocompromised, studies have implicated that it also affect immunocompetent patients. This was a cross sectional study conducted in the Department of Medicine of a tertiary teaching institution in North India. All the patients diagnosed with CM on the basis of detection of cryptococcal antigen or the presence of capsulated budding yeast cells on India ink preparation, from April 2009 to March2015 were included in the study. Demographical profile, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, CSFcharacteristics, imaging abnormalities and in patient outcome were noted and analyzed. Among the 40 patients diagnosed with CM, 62.5% of them were males. Patients who were immunocompetent constituted 20%, those with predisposing factors other than HIV were 25% and55% had HIV infection (initial presentation in 59%). Mean age of presentation was 44.75 ± 15.58 years. Mean duration of symptoms in all three groups varied from few days to 4-5 weeks. Clinical presentations included fever (16), headache (14), altered sensorium (16), seizures (5), paraparesis (4), hemiparesis (2), lateral rectus palsy (3), VII nerve palsy (2), bilateral vision loss with ptosis (1) and ataxia (1). Neck stiffness was present in 50% patients of immunocompetent group, 45.45% of HIV patients and none in the 3rd group. Acellular CSF (37.5%) was not unusual. Mean CSF white cell count in HIV patients, in other immunocompromised patients and immunocompetent patients were 100± 158.53, 36.88 ± 92.43 and 32.5 ± 62.05 /mm3 respectively which was predominantly lymphocytic. Mean CSF protein were 136.73 ± 139.82, 62.67 ± 51.11 and 152.29 ± 218.24 g/dl in these groups. Abnormalities detected on imaging included, meningeal enhancement, encephalomalacia, infarct, cerebellitis, hydrocephalus, cord hyper intensities and cervical spine intramedullary lesion. Mortality rate in CM patients was 20%. On mortality analysis, death was mostly

  12. GNSS real time performance monitoring and CNS/ATM implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The global transition to communications, navigation, surveillance / air traffic management (CNS/ATM) technology is moving forward at an increasing pace. A critical part of the CNS/ATM concept is the ability to monitor, analyze, and distribute aeronau...

  13. CNS recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes specific for a peripheral virus infection triggers neuropathogenesis during polymicrobial challenge.

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    Christine M Matullo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although viruses have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS diseases of unknown etiology, including multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the reproducible identification of viral triggers in such diseases has been largely unsuccessful. Here, we explore the hypothesis that viruses need not replicate in the tissue in which they cause disease; specifically, that a peripheral infection might trigger CNS pathology. To test this idea, we utilized a transgenic mouse model in which we found that immune cells responding to a peripheral infection are recruited to the CNS, where they trigger neurological damage. In this model, mice are infected with both CNS-restricted measles virus (MV and peripherally restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. While infection with either virus alone resulted in no illness, infection with both viruses caused disease in all mice, with ∼50% dying following seizures. Co-infection resulted in a 12-fold increase in the number of CD8+ T cells in the brain as compared to MV infection alone. Tetramer analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (>35% of these infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes were LCMV-specific, despite no detectable LCMV in CNS tissues. Mechanistically, CNS disease was due to edema, induced in a CD8-dependent but perforin-independent manner, and brain herniation, similar to that observed in mice challenged intracerebrally with LCMV. These results indicate that T cell trafficking can be influenced by other ongoing immune challenges, and that CD8+ T cell recruitment to the brain can trigger CNS disease in the apparent absence of cognate antigen. By extrapolation, human CNS diseases of unknown etiology need not be associated with infection with any particular agent; rather, a condition that compromises and activates the blood-brain barrier and adjacent brain parenchyma can render the CNS susceptible to pathogen-independent immune attack.

  14. Intravascular CNS lymphoma: Successful therapy using high-dose methotrexate-based polychemotherapy

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    Kebir Sied

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma limited to the CNS (cIVL is a very rare malignant disorder characterized by a selective accumulation of neoplastic lymphocytes (usually B cells within the lumen of CNS blood vessels but not in the brain parenchyma. In the past, treatment of cIVL with anthracycline-based regimens was unsatisfactory with very short survival times. In the case of cIVL presented here, high-dose methotrexate-based polychemotherapy according to the Bonn protocol plus rituximab therapy was successful and led to a complete clinical and MRI remission which is ongoing 29 months after diagnosis.

  15. Characterization and functional properties of gastric tissue-resident memory T cells from children, adults and the elderly

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    Jayaum S. Booth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are the main orchestrators of protective immunity in the stomach; however, limited information on the presence and function of the gastric T subsets is available mainly due to the difficulty in recovering high numbers of viable cells from human gastric biopsies. To overcome this shortcoming we optimized a cell isolation method that yielded high numbers of viable lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC from gastric biopsies. Classic memory T (TM subsets were identified in gastric LPMC and compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC obtained from children, adults and the elderly using an optimized 14 color flow cytometry panel. A dominant effector memory (TEM phenotype was observed in gastric LPMC CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in all age groups. We then evaluated whether these cells represented a population of gastric tissue-resident memory T (TRM cells by assessing expression of CD103 and CD69. The vast majority of gastric LPMC CD8+ T cells either co-expressed CD103/CD69 (>70% or expressed CD103 alone (~20%. Gastric LPMC CD4+ T cells also either co-expressed CD103/CD69 (>35% or expressed at least one of these markers. Thus, gastric LPMC CD8+ and CD4+ T cells had the characteristics of TRM cells. Gastric CD8+ and CD4+ TRM cells produced multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A, MIP-1β and up-regulated CD107a upon stimulation. However, marked differences were observed in their cytokine and multi-cytokine profiles when compared to their PBMC TEM counterparts. Furthermore, gastric CD8+ TRM and CD4+ TRM cells demonstrated differences in the frequency, susceptibility to activation and cytokine/multi-cytokine production profiles among the age groups. Most notably, children’s gastric TRM cells responded differently to stimuli than gastric TRM cells from adults or the elderly. In conclusion, we demonstrate the presence of gastric TRM which exhibit diverse functional characteristics in children, adults and the elderly.

  16. In vivo generation of decidual natural killer cells from resident hematopoietic progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiossone, Laura; Vacca, Paola; Orecchia, Paola; Croxatto, Daniele; Damonte, Patrizia; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Bottino, Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer cells accumulate at the fetal-maternal interface and play a key role in a successful pregnancy. However, their origin is still unknown. Do they derive from peripheral natural killer cells recruited in decidua or do they represent a distinct population that originates in situ? Here, we identified natural killer precursors in decidua and uterus of pregnant mice. These precursors underwent rapid in situ differentiation and large proportions of proliferating immature natural killer cells were present in decidua and uterus as early as gestation day 4.5. Here, we investigated the origin of decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells by performing transfer experiments of peripheral mature natural killer cells or precursors from EGFP+ mice. Results showed that mature natural killer cells did not migrate into decidua and uterus, while precursors were recruited in these organs and differentiated towards natural killer cells. Moreover, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells displayed unique phenotypic and functional features. They expressed high levels of the activating Ly49D receptor in spite of their immature phenotype. In addition, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells were poorly cytolytic and produced low amounts of IFN-γ, while they released factors (GM-CSF, VEGF, IP-10) involved in neo-angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Our data reveal in situ generation of decidual natural killer cells and provide an important correlation between mouse and human decidual natural killer cells, allowing further studies to be carried out on their role in pregnancy-related diseases. PMID:24179150

  17. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

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    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases.

  18. CNS adverse events associated with antimalarial agents. Fact or fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips-Howard, P. A.; ter Kuile, F. O.

    1995-01-01

    CNS adverse drug events are dramatic, and case reports have influenced clinical opinion on the use of antimalarials. Malaria also causes CNS symptoms, thus establishing causality is difficult. CNS events are associated with the quinoline and artemisinin derivatives. Chloroquine, once considered too

  19. VIIP: Central Nervous System (CNS) Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Jerry; Mulugeta, Lealem; Nelson, Emily; Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Current long-duration missions to the International Space Station and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit expose astronauts to increased risk of Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It has been hypothesized that the headward shift of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood in microgravity may cause significant elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP), which in turn may then induce VIIP syndrome through interaction with various biomechanical pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm this hypothesis. In this light, we are developing lumped-parameter models of fluid transport in the central nervous system (CNS) as a means to simulate the influence of microgravity on ICP. The CNS models will also be used in concert with the lumped parameter and finite element models of the eye described in the related IWS works submitted by Nelson et al., Feola et al. and Ethier et al.

  20. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  1. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  2. Resident microglia, and not peripheral macrophages, are the main source of brain tumor mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Annett; Brandenburg, Susan; Turkowski, Kati; Müller, Susanne; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-07-15

    Gliomas consist of multiple cell types, including an abundant number of microglia and macrophages, whereby their impact on tumor progression is controversially discussed. To understand their unique functions and consequently manipulate either microglia or macrophages in therapeutic approaches, it is essential to discriminate between both cell populations. Because of the lack of specific markers, generally total body irradiated chimeras with labeled bone marrow cells were used to identify infiltrated cells within the brain. However, total body irradiation (TBI) affects the blood-brain barrier integrity, which in turn potentially facilitates immune cell infiltration. In this study, changes on the blood-brain barrier were avoided using head-protected irradiation (HPI). Head protection and total body irradiated chimeras exhibited similar reconstitution levels of the myeloid cell lineage in the blood, enabling the comparable analyses of brain infiltrates. We demonstrate that the HPI model impeded a massive unspecific influx of donor-derived myeloid cells into naive as well as tumor-bearing brains. Moreover, experimental artifacts such as an enlarged distribution of infiltrated cells and fourfold increased tumor volumes are prevented in head-protected chimeras. In addition, our data evidenced for the first time that microglia are able to up-regulate CD45 and represent an inherent part of the CD45(high) population in the tumor context. All in all, HPI allowed for the unequivocal distinction between microglia and macrophages without alterations of tumor biology and consequently permits a detailed and realistic description of the myeloid cell composition in gliomas. © 2014 UICC.

  3. Engineering progress of CNS concept in Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.O.; Park, K.N.; Park, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy research Institute (KAERI) strives to provide utilizing facilities on and around the Hanaro reactor in order to activate advanced researches by neutron application. As one of the facilities to be installed, the conceptual design work of CNS was started in 1996 with a project schedule of 5 years so that its installation work can be finished by the year 2000. And the major engineering targets of this CNS facility are established for a minimum physical interference with the present facilities of the Hanaro, a reach-out of very-high-gain factors in the cold neutron flux, a simplicity of the maintenance of the facility, and a safety in the operation of the facility as well as the reactor. For the conceptual design of Hanaro CNS, the experience of utilization and production of cold neutron at WWR-M reactor Gatchina, Russia has been used with that of elaborations for PIK reactor in design for neutron guide systems and instruments. (author)

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells in human placental chorionic villi reside in a vascular Niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castrechini, N. M.; Murthi, P.; Gude, N. M.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Gronthos, S.; Zannettino, A.; Brennecke, S. R.; Kalionis, B.; Brennecke, S.P.

    The chorionic villi of human term placentae are a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) The stem cell "niche" within the chorionic villi regulates how PMSCs participate in placental tissue generation, maintenance and repair, but the anatomic location of the niche has not been defined A

  5. Depletion of Gut-Resident CCR5+Cells for HIV Cure Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, David; Chen, Connie; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Rogers, Kenneth A; Michaels, Anthony J; Yan, Jiangli; Casaz, Paul; Reimann, Keith A; Villinger, François; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J

    2017-11-01

    The HIV reservoir forming at the earliest stages of infection is likely composed of CCR5 + cells, because these cells are the targets of transmissible virus. Restriction of the CCR5 + reservoir, particularly in the gut, may be needed for subsequent cure attempts. Strategies for killing or depleting CCR5 + cells have been described, but none have been tested in vivo in nonhuman primates, and the extent of achievable depletion from tissues is not known. In this study we investigate the efficacy of two novel cytotoxic treatments for targeting and eliminating CCR5 + cells in young rhesus macaques. The first, an immunotoxin consisting of the endogenous CCR5 ligand RANTES fused with Pseudomonas exotoxin (RANTES-PE38), killed CCR5 + lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) ex vivo, but had no detectable effect on CCR5 + LPLs in vivo. The second, a primatized bispecific antibody for CCR5 and CD3, depleted all CCR5 + cells from blood and the vast majority of such cells from the colonic mucosa (up to 96% of CD4 + CCR5 + ). Absence of CCR5-expressing cells from blood endured for at least 1 week, while CCR5 + cells in colon were substantially replenished over the same time span. These data open an avenue to investigation of combined early ART treatment and CCR5 + reservoir depletion for cure of HIV-infected infants.

  6. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  7. Prophylactic CNS therapy in childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiko; Fujimoto, Takeo

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose methotrexate (MTX). Seventy children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) entered to this study between July 1978 and December 1980. According to initial white blood count (WBC), they were stratified to induce remission with; vincristine and prednine in low initial WBC ( lt 25,000/mm 3 ) group and these two agents plus adriamycin in high initial WBC ( gt 25,000/mm 3 ) group. After inducing remission, 62 children who achieved CR, received different CNS-prophlaxis; using a regimen of three doses of weekly high-dose MTX (1,000 mg/m 2 ) 6-hour infusion, which was repeated every 12 weeks-Group A (n = 14); high-dose MTX followed by 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MT X-Group B (n = 15), 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX-Group C (n = 16), and in 17 patients with high initial WBC, same as in Group A-Group D (n = 17). During an intravenous 6-h infusion of MTX at a dose of 1,000 mg/m 2 , the CSF concentration of MTX rose to 2.3 +- 2.4 x 10 -6 M after initiation of infusion and remained in 10 -7 M level for 48 hours. CNS-leukemia terminated complete remission in one of 14 children in Group A, two of 15 in Group B, two of 16 in Group C and two of 17 in Group D. The cumulative incidence of CNS-leukemia at 20 months calculated by the technique of Kaplan and Meier was 0% i n Group A, 18.1% in Group B, 7.1% in Group C and 50.8% in Group D. There was no statistical difference among Groups A, B and C. These data suggested that CNS-prophylaxis with high-dose intravenous MTX was effective as well as 2400 rad cranial irradiation plus three doses of i.t. MTX in childhood ALL with low initial WBC. (author)

  8. Human Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells Are Defined by Core Transcriptional and Functional Signatures in Lymphoid and Mucosal Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahma V. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRMs in mice mediate optimal protective immunity to infection and vaccination, while in humans, the existence and properties of TRMs remain unclear. Here, we use a unique human tissue resource to determine whether human tissue memory T cells constitute a distinct subset in diverse mucosal and lymphoid tissues. We identify a core transcriptional profile within the CD69+ subset of memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in lung and spleen that is distinct from that of CD69− TEM cells in tissues and circulation and defines human TRMs based on homology to the transcriptional profile of mouse CD8+ TRMs. Human TRMs in diverse sites exhibit increased expression of adhesion and inhibitory molecules, produce both pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, and have reduced turnover compared with circulating TEM, suggesting unique adaptations for in situ immunity. Together, our results provide a unifying signature for human TRM and a blueprint for designing tissue-targeted immunotherapies.

  9. SINS/CNS Nonlinear Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celestial Navigation System (CNS has characteristics of accurate orientation and strong autonomy and has been widely used in Hypersonic Vehicle. Since the CNS location and orientation mainly depend upon the inertial reference that contains errors caused by gyro drifts and other error factors, traditional Strap-down Inertial Navigation System (SINS/CNS positioning algorithm setting the position error between SINS and CNS as measurement is not effective. The model of altitude azimuth, platform error angles, and horizontal position is designed, and the SINS/CNS tightly integrated algorithm is designed, in which CNS altitude azimuth is set as measurement information. GPF (Gaussian particle filter is introduced to solve the problem of nonlinear filtering. The results of simulation show that the precision of SINS/CNS algorithm which reaches 130 m using three stars is improved effectively.

  10. Central Nervous System (CNS Disease Triggering Takotsubo Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is usually triggered by psychological or physical stress. One of the many physical sources of stress are central nervous system (CNS disorders. CNS disorders most frequently triggering TTS include subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, migraine, and intracerebral bleeding. More rare CNS-triggers of TTS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encephalitis, or traumatic brain or spinal cord injury. TTS triggered by any of the CNS disorders needs to be recognized since adequate treatment of TTS may improve the general outcome from the CNS disorder as well. Neurologists need to be aware of TTS as a complication of specific CNS disorders but TTS may be triggered also by CNS disorders so far not recognised as causes of TTS.

  11. Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature within the Process of Vascular Remodeling: Cellular Basis, Clinical Relevance, and Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Klein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Until some years ago, the bone marrow and the endothelial cell compartment lining the vessel lumen (subendothelial space were thought to be the only sources providing vascular progenitor cells. Now, the vessel wall, in particular, the vascular adventitia, has been established as a niche for different types of stem and progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into both vascular and nonvascular cells. Herein, vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells of mesenchymal nature (VW-MPSCs have gained importance because of their large range of differentiation in combination with their distribution throughout the postnatal organism which is related to their existence in the adventitial niche, respectively. In general, mesenchymal stem cells, also designated as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, contribute to the maintenance of organ integrity by their ability to replace defunct cells or secrete cytokines locally and thus support repair and healing processes of the affected tissues. This review will focus on the central role of VW-MPSCs within vascular reconstructing processes (vascular remodeling which are absolute prerequisite to preserve the sensitive relationship between resilience and stability of the vessel wall. Further, a particular advantage for the therapeutic application of VW-MPSCs for improving vascular function or preventing vascular damage will be discussed.

  12. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    , it is not known what cell type mediates the role of TLR3 in the immunological control of HSV, and it is not known whether TLR3 sensing occurs prior to or after CNS entry. Here, we show that in mice TLR3 provides early control of HSV-2 infection immediately after entry into the CNS by mediating type I IFN...... responses to HSV, but astrocytes were defective in HSV-induced type I IFN production. Thus, TLR3 acts in astrocytes to sense HSV-2 infection immediately after entry into the CNS, possibly preventing HSV from spreading beyond the neurons mediating entry into the CNS.......Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation...

  13. Primary CNS Lymphoma vs. Tumefactive Multiple Sclerosis: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Sameen Bin; Niazi, Farheen; Baig, Atif; Sadiq, Hina; Sattar, Mubbasher

    2018-01-01

    Primary CNS (central nervous system) lymphoma is a rare condition with the incidence of less than 1% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and approximately 2% of all primary brain tumours. Diagnosis can be challenging and necessitates brain biopsy for definitive diagnosis. A 41-year male presented with history of impaired cognition, facial asymmetry, visual impairment and left sided body weakness. MRI brain demonstrated multiple enhancing lesions with one larger lesion in right basal ganglia with surrounding oedema and mass effect. These findings suggested the differential diagnoses of tumefactive multiple sclerosis (MS), primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) and tuberculosis. The patient had normal CT chest, abdomen and pelvis, normal CSF examination and cytology, negative CSF oligoclonal bands (OCBs) and negative HIV screening. It was impossible to differentiate between tumefactive MS and PCNSL without undertaking brain biopsy. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was the final diagnosis. Diagnosing PCNSL can be challenging and brain biopsy should not be delayed for definitive diagnosis and targeted treatment.

  14. Nicotinic ACh receptors as therapeutic targets in CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Pandya, Anshul A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2015-02-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) channels. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however, the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer's disease, AD), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. CNS syndromes associated with antibodies against metabotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to Central nervous system (CNS) metabotropic receptors are associated with a growing family of autoimmune brain diseases, including encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Ophelia syndrome, and cerebellitis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the target receptors, the neurological autoimmune disorders, and the pathogenic mechanisms. Antibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor are associate with limbic encephalitis and severe seizures, often with small cell lung cancers. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antibodies associate with Ophelia syndrome, a relatively mild form of encephalitis linked to Hodgkin lymphoma. mGluR1 antibodies associate with a form of cerebellar degeneration, and also Hodgkin lymphoma. Antibodies to Homer 3, a protein associated with mGluR1, have also been reported in two patients with cerebellar syndromes. Dopamine-2 receptor antibodies have been reported by one group in children with basal ganglia encephalitis and other disorders. CNS metabotropic receptor antibodies may exert direct inhibitory effects on their target receptors, but the evidence is more limited than with autoantibodies to ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the future, improved recognition of these patients may lead to better outcomes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the diseases may uncover novel treatment strategies.

  16. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  17. IFN regulatory factor 8 is a key constitutive determinant of the morphological and molecular properties of microglia in the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Minten

    Full Text Available IFN regulatory factor (IRF 8 is a transcription factor that has a key role in the cellular response to IFN-γ and is pivotal in myeloid cell differentiation. Whether IRF8 plays a role in the development and function of microglia, the tissue-resident myeloid cells of the brain, is unknown. Here, we show IRF8 is a constitutively produced nuclear factor in microglia, which suggested that IRF8 might also be a key homeostatic transcriptional determinant of the microglial cell phenotype. In support of this, in mice with a targeted disruption of the IRF8 gene, microglia were increased in number and showed gross alterations in morphology and surface area. In situ analysis of some key myeloid markers revealed that IRF8-deficient microglia had significantly reduced levels of Iba1, but increased levels of CD206 (mannose receptor and F4/80 as well as increased tomato lectin binding. Analysis of microglia ex vivo revealed IRF8-deficient microglia had significantly increased levels of CD45, CD11b and F4/80, but significantly decreased levels of the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CX3CR1. The known involvement of some of these molecular markers in membrane dynamics and phagocytosis led us to examine the phagocytic capacity of cultured IRF8-deficient microglia, however, this was found to be similar to wild type microglia. We conclude IRF8 is a constitutively produced nuclear factor in resident microglia of the CNS being a crucial transcriptional determinant of the phenotype of these cells in the healthy brain.

  18. Identification of resident and inflammatory bone marrow derived cells in the sclera by bone marrow and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Toshio; Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Qiao, Hong; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Toru; Noda, Kousuke; Miyahara, Shinsuke; Harada, Mine; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W

    2007-04-01

    To characterise bone marrow derived cells in the sclera under normal and inflammatory conditions, we examined their differentiation after transplantation from two different sources, bone marrow and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Bone marrow and HSC from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were transplanted into irradiated wild-type mice. At 1 month after transplantation, mice were sacrificed and their sclera examined by histology, immunohistochemistry (CD11b, CD11c, CD45), and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. To investigate bone marrow derived cell recruitment under inflammatory conditions, experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) was induced in transplanted mice. GFP positive cells were distributed in the entire sclera and comprised 22.4 (2.8)% (bone marrow) and 28.4 (10.9)% (HSC) of the total cells in the limbal zone and 18.1 (6.7)% (bone marrow) and 26.3 (3.4)% (HSC) in the peripapillary zone. Immunohistochemistry showed that GFP (+) CD11c (+), GFP (+) CD11b (+) cells migrated in the sclera after bone marrow and HSC transplantation. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed antigen presenting cells among the scleral fibroblasts. In EAU mice, vast infiltration of GFP (+) cells developed into the sclera. We have provided direct and novel evidence for the migration of bone marrow and HSC cells into the sclera differentiating into macrophages and dendritic cells. Vast infiltration of bone marrow and HSC cells was found to be part of the inflammatory process in EAU.

  19. Oval cell response is attenuated by depletion of liver resident macrophages in the 2-AAF/partial hepatectomy rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Macrophages are known to play an important role in hepatocyte mediated liver regeneration by secreting inflammatory mediators. However, there is little information available on the role of resident macrophages in oval cell mediated liver regeneration. In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of macrophages in oval cell expansion induced by 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We depleted macrophages in the liver of 2-AAF/PH treated rats by injecting liposome encapsulated clodronate 48 hours before PH. Regeneration of remnant liver mass, as well as proliferation and differentiation of oval cells were measured. We found that macrophage-depleted rats suffered higher mortality and liver transaminase levels. We also showed that depletion of macrophages yielded a significant decrease of EPCAM and PCK positive oval cells in immunohistochemical stained liver sections 9 days after PH. Meanwhile, oval cell differentiation was also attenuated as a result of macrophage depletion, as large foci of small basophilic hepatocytes were observed by day 9 following hepatectomy in control rats whereas they were almost absent in macrophage depleted rats. Accordingly, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed lower expression of albumin mRNA in macrophage depleted livers. Then we assessed whether macrophage depletion may affect hepatic production of stimulating cytokines for liver regeneration. We showed that macrophage-depletion significantly inhibited hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, along with a lack of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation during the early period following hepatectomy. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that macrophages play an important role in oval cell mediated liver regeneration in the 2-AAF/PH model.

  20. The rostral migratory stream plays a key role in intranasal delivery of drugs into the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Scranton

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The blood brain barrier (BBB is impermeable to most drugs, impeding the establishment of novel neuroprotective therapies and strategies for many neurological diseases. Intranasal administration offers an alternative path for efficient drug delivery into the CNS. So far, the anatomical structures discussed to be involved in the transport of intranasally administered drugs into the CNS include the trigeminal nerve, olfactory nerve and the rostral migratory stream (RMS, but the relative contributions are debated.In the present study we demonstrate that surgical transection, and the resulting structural disruption of the RMS, in mice effectively obstructs the uptake of intranasally administered radioligands into the CNS. Furthermore, using a fluorescent cell tracer, we demonstrate that intranasal administration in mice allows agents to be distributed throughout the entire brain, including olfactory bulb, hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum.This study provides evidence of the vital role the RMS has in the CNS delivery of intranasally administered agents. The identification of the RMS as the major access path for intranasally administered drugs into the CNS may contribute to the development of treatments that are tailored for efficient transport within this structure. Research into the RMS needs to continue to elucidate its limitations, capabilities, mechanisms of transport and potential hazards before we are able to advance this technique into human research.

  1. Proliferating resident microglia express the stem cell antigen CD34 in response to acute neural injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladeby, Rune; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Dalmau, Ishar

    2005-01-01

    Reactive microgliosis is a highly characteristic response to neural injury and disease, which may influence neurodegenerative processes and neural plasticity. We have investigated the origin and characteristics of reactive microglia in the acute phase of their activation in the dentate gyrus...... CD34(+) cells co-expressed Mac-1, and decreased sharply toward day 5, unlike Mac-1, which was maximally expressed at day 5. Approximately 80% of the CD34(+) cells in the denervated dentate gyrus had incorporated BrdU into their nuclei at day 3. We also showed that CD34 is upregulated on early...... following transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection. To investigate the possible link between microglia and hematopoietic precursors, we analyzed the expression of the stem cell marker CD34 by lesion-reactive microglia in conjunction with the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (Brd...

  2. TACE/ADAM17 is essential for oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazuelos, Javier; Crawford, Howard C; Klingener, Michael; Sun, Bingru; Karelis, Jason; Raines, Elaine W; Aguirre, Adan

    2014-09-03

    Several studies have elucidated the significance of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase proteins (ADAMs) in PNS myelination, but there is no evidence if they also play a role in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Our study identifies ADAM17, also called tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE), as a novel key modulator of oligodendrocyte (OL) development and CNS myelination. Genetic deletion of TACE in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPs) induces premature cell cycle exit and reduces OL cell survival during postnatal myelination of the subcortical white matter (SCWM). These cellular and molecular changes lead to deficits in SCWM myelination and motor behavior. Mechanistically, TACE regulates oligodendrogenesis by modulating the shedding of EGFR ligands TGFα and HB-EGF and, consequently, EGFR signaling activation in OL lineage cells. Constitutive TACE depletion in OPs in vivo leads to similar alterations in CNS myelination and motor behavior as to what is observed in the EGFR hypofunctional mouse line EgfrWa2. EGFR overexpression in TACE-deficient OPs restores OL survival and development. Our study reveals an essential function of TACE in oligodendrogenesis, and demonstrates how this molecule modulates EGFR signaling activation to regulate postnatal CNS myelination. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411884-13$15.00/0.

  3. CNS Damage Classification in Newborn Infants by Neural Network Based Cry Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Ekkel, T.

    2002-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of the human body is the whole system of brain, spinal marrow and nerve cells throughout the body that correlates and regulates the internal reactions of the body and controls its adjustment to the environment. It controls muscles and processes sensory information

  4. Astrocyte Depletion Impairs Redox Homeostasis and Triggers Neuronal Loss in the Adult CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Schreiner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the importance of reactive astrocytes during CNS pathology is well established, the function of astroglia in adult CNS homeostasis is less well understood. With the use of conditional, astrocyte-restricted protein synthesis termination, we found that selective paralysis of GFAP+ astrocytes in vivo led to rapid neuronal cell loss and severe motor deficits. This occurred while structural astroglial support still persisted and in the absence of any major microvascular damage. Whereas loss of astrocyte function did lead to microglial activation, this had no impact on the neuronal loss and clinical decline. Neuronal injury was caused by oxidative stress resulting from the reduced redox scavenging capability of dysfunctional astrocytes and could be prevented by the in vivo treatment with scavengers of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. Our results suggest that the subpopulation of GFAP+ astrocytes maintain neuronal health by controlling redox homeostasis in the adult CNS.

  5. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acquired CNS lesions in fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Pogledic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Acquired central nervous system (CNS) lesions are often subtle; therefore, the prenatal diagnosis of these lesions is extremely important. The fetal ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are two important imaging methods that give an insight into these types lesions. The method of choice during pregnancy is still fetal ultrasound; however, fetal MRI is important when there are certain pathologies, e.g. periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) or malformations of the vein of Galen. In this manner clinicians can plan further therapy after childbirth in advance (e.g. cerebral angiography or embolization). (orig.) [de

  7. Clearance of an immunosuppressive virus from the CNS coincides with immune reanimation and diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGavern Dorian B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Once a virus infection establishes persistence in the central nervous system (CNS, it is especially difficult to eliminate from this specialized compartment. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to fully understand scenarios during which a persisting virus is ultimately purged from the CNS by the adaptive immune system. Such a scenario can be found following infection of adult mice with an immunosuppressive variant of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV referred to as clone 13. In this study we demonstrate that following intravenous inoculation, clone 13 rapidly infected peripheral tissues within one week, but more slowly inundated the entire brain parenchyma over the course of a month. During the establishment of persistence, we observed that genetically tagged LCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL progressively lost function; however, the severity of this loss in the CNS was never as substantial as that observed in the periphery. One of the most impressive features of this model system is that the peripheral T cell response eventually regains functionality at ~60–80 days post-infection, and this was associated with a rapid decline in virus from the periphery. Coincident with this "reanimation phase" was a massive influx of CD4 T and B cells into the CNS and a dramatic reduction in viral distribution. In fact, olfactory bulb neurons served as the last refuge for the persisting virus, which was ultimately purged from the CNS within 200 days post-infection. These data indicate that a functionally revived immune response can prevail over a virus that establishes widespread presence both in the periphery and brain parenchyma, and that therapeutic enhancement of an existing response could serve as an effective means to thwart long term CNS persistence.

  8. The Role of Tissue-Resident Donor T Cells in Rejection of Clinical Face Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    quantify the number and diversity of donor vs. recipient T cells within face transplants over time using cutting edge high throughput TCR sequencing (HTS...area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Nothing listed TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. 1. Introduction 4 2. Keywords...use cutting- edge single nucleus RNA sequencing (which only recently became available) of the banked skin biopsies from face transplant patients

  9. pDC therapy induces recovery from EAE by recruiting endogenous pDC to sites of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duraes, Fernanda V; Lippens, Carla; Steinbach, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) exhibit both innate and adaptive functions. In particular they are the main source of type I IFNs and directly impact T cell responses through antigen presentation. We have previously demonstrated that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE...... pave the way for novel pDC-based cell therapies in autoimmune diseases, aiming at specifically modulating pathogenic cells that induce and sustain autoimmune inflammation....... and is dependent on the subsequent and selective chemerin-mediated recruitment of endogenous pDCs to the CNS. The protective effect requires pDC pre-loading with myelin antigen, and is associated with the modulation of CNS-infiltrating pDC phenotype and inhibition of CNS encephalitogenic T cells. This study may...

  10. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  11. Structural Remodeling of Astrocytes in the Injured CNS

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    Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes respond to all forms of CNS insult and disease by becoming reactive, a nonspecific but highly characteristic response that involves various morphological and molecular changes. Probably the most recognized aspect of reactive astrocytes is the formation of a glial scar that impedes axon regeneration. Although the reactive phenotype was first suggested more than 100 years ago based on morphological changes, the remodeling process is not well understood. We know little about the actual structure of a reactive astrocyte, how an astrocyte remodels during the progression of an insult, and how populations of these cells reorganize to form the glial scar. New methods of labeling astrocytes, along with transgenic mice, allow the complete morphology of reactive astrocytes to be visualized. Recent studies show that reactivity can induce a remarkable change in the shape of a single astrocyte, that not all astrocytes react in the same way, and that there is plasticity in the reactive response. PMID:21982954

  12. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

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    Zhijun Jiao

    Full Text Available Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  13. Preliminary Results of Management for Primary CNS Lymphoma

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    Ahn, Seung Do; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-06-15

    From October 1989 to March 1992, ten patients diagnosed as primary central nervous system(CNS) lymphoma were treated with radiation therapy at Asan Medical Center. To obtain pathologic diagnosis, five patients had stereotactic biopsy and the others underwent craniotomy and tumor removal. According to the classification by International Working Formulation, seven of 10 patients showed diffuse large cell types and the remaining 3 had diffuse mixed cell types. Computed tomographic scans of the brain disclosed solitary (6 cases) or multiple (4 cases) intracranial lesions. All patients received 4000cGy/20 fx to the whole brain followed by an additional 2000cGy/10 fx boost to the primary lesion. Six patients with initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) involvement were treated with whole brain irradiation and intrathecal Methotrexate(IT-MTX) chemotherapy. One of them received an additional spinal irradiation after 3 cycles of IT-MTX chemotherapy because of MTX induced arachnoiditis. One patient received 3 cycles of systemic chemotherapy prior to radiation therapy and one received 5 cycles of salvage chemotherapy for recurrence. With a median follow up time of 8 months, all patients were followed from 7 to 26 months. Radiologically seven patients showed complete remission and the remaining three showed partial remission at one month after radiotherapy. The 1 and 2 year survival rate was 86% and 69% respectively. Until now, two patients expired at 7 and 14 months. These patients developed extensive CSF seeding followed by local failure. Considering initial good response to radiation therapy and low incidence of extraneural dissemination in primary CNS lymphoma, we propose to increase total tumor dose to the primary lesion by hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery. For the patients with CSF involvement at diagnosis, we propose craniospinal irradiation with IT MTX chemotherapy.

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology 2011 CNS tumors update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2011-10-01

    A number of important studies were presented at the CNS tumors section of the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. There was particular interest in RTOG 0525, a Phase III study of newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with different schedules of temozolomide. Prognostic factors for response, survival and chemotherapy-related toxicity in primary CNS lymphoma from the German randomized Phase III trial in newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma were also presented.

  15. Specific niches for lung-resident memory CD8+ T cells at the site of tissue regeneration enable CD69-independent maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakata, Yoshiyuki; Motozono, Chihiro; McMaster, Sean R.; Masumoto, Tomoko; Fujisawa, Makoto; Chikaishi, Tomomi; Komeda, Junko; Itoh, Jun; Umemura, Miki; Kyusai, Ami; Woodland, David L.; Kohlmeier, Jacob E.; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM cells) reside permanently in nonlymphoid tissues and provide a first line of protection against invading pathogens. However, the precise localization of CD8+ TRM cells in the lung, which physiologically consists of a markedly scant interstitium compared with other mucosa, remains unclear. In this study, we show that lung CD8+ TRM cells localize predominantly in specific niches created at the site of regeneration after tissue injury, whereas peripheral tissue-circulating CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM cells) are widely but sparsely distributed in unaffected areas. Although CD69 inhibited sphingosine 1–phosphate receptor 1–mediated egress of CD8+ T cells immediately after their recruitment into lung tissues, such inhibition was not required for the retention of cells in the TRM niches. Furthermore, despite rigid segregation of TEM cells from the TRM niche, prime-pull strategy with cognate antigen enabled the conversion from TEM cells to TRM cells by creating de novo TRM niches. Such damage site–specific localization of CD8+ TRM cells may be important for efficient protection against secondary infections by respiratory pathogens. PMID:27815325

  16. Vaccine-induced Th17 cells are established as resident memory cells in the lung and promote local IgA responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, D; Mortensen, R; Rosenkrands, I; Dietrich, J; Andersen, P

    2017-01-01

    The ability to mount accelerated and efficient mucosal immune responses is critically important to prevent the establishment of many infections. Secretion of immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a key component in this first line of defense, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are still not completely understood. We have evaluated different routes of immunization and examined the requirements for IgA induction in the airway mucosa. We demonstrate that subcutaneous priming with a recombinant antigen in a T helper (Th)17-inducing adjuvant followed by airway boosting promotes high and sustained levels of IgA in the lungs. This response is associated with germinal center formation in the lung-draining lymph nodes. The lung IgA response is dependent on Th17 cells and absent if interleukin (IL)-17 is depleted or when priming with vaccines inducing only Th1 or Th2 responses. We used intravascular staining to demonstrate that IgA+ B cells and chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6)+Th17 cells are recruited to the lung parenchyma after the airway booster immunization. Once recruited to the lung parenchyma, the Th17 cells transform into resident lymphocytes that persist in the lung tissue for at least 10 weeks. Here, they facilitate the accelerated recruitment of T and B cells resulting in an accelerated IgA recall response to a second airway booster immunization.

  17. Pathologic and protective roles for microglial subsets and bone marrow- and blood-derived myeloid cells in central nervous system inflammation.

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    Agnieszka eWlodarczyk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a series of processes designed for eventual clearance of pathogens and repair of damaged tissue. In the context of autoimmune recognition inflammatory processes are usually considered to be pathological. This is also true for inflammatory responses in the central nervous system (CNS. However, as in other tissues, neuroinflammation can have beneficial as well as pathological outcomes. The complex role of encephalitogenic T cells in multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE may derive from heterogeneity of the myeloid cells with which these T cells interact within the CNS. Myeloid cells, including resident microglia and infiltrating bone marrow-derived cells such as dendritic cells (DC and monocytes/macrophages (BMDM, are highly heterogeneous populations that may be involved in neurotoxicity but also immunoregulation and regenerative processes. Better understanding and characterization of myeloid cell heterogeneity is essential for future development of treatments controlling inflammation and inducing neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in diseased CNS. Here we describe and compare three populations of myeloid cells: CD11c+ microglia, CD11c- microglia and CD11c+ blood-derived cells in terms of their pathological versus protective functions in the CNS of mice with EAE. Our data show that CNS-resident microglia include functionally distinct subsets that can be distinguished by their expression of CD11c. These subsets differ in their expression of Arg-1, YM1, iNOS, IL-10 and IGF-1. Moreover, in contrast to BMDM/DC both subsets of microglia express protective interferon-beta (IFNβ, high levels of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor and do not express the Th1-associated transcription factor T-bet. Taken together, our data suggest that CD11c+ microglia, CD11c- microglia and infiltrating BMDM/DC represent separate and distinct populations and illustrate the heterogeneity of the CNS

  18. Cug2 is essential for normal mitotic control and CNS development in zebrafish

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    Kim Nam-Soon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently identified a novel oncogene, Cancer-upregulated gene 2 (CUG2, which is essential for kinetochore formation and promotes tumorigenesis in mammalian cells. However, the in vivo function of CUG2 has not been studied in animal models. Results To study the function of CUG2 in vivo, we isolated a zebrafish homologue that is expressed specifically in the proliferating cells of the central nervous system (CNS. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of cug2 resulted in apoptosis throughout the CNS and the development of neurodegenerative phenotypes. In addition, cug2-deficient embryos contained mitotically arrested cells displaying abnormal spindle formation and chromosome misalignment in the neural plate. Conclusions Therefore, our findings suggest that Cug2 is required for normal mitosis during early neurogenesis and has functions in neuronal cell maintenance, thus demonstrating that the cug2 deficient embryos may provide a model system for human neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Syndecans reside in sphingomyelin-enriched low-density fractions of the plasma membrane isolated from a parathyroid cell line.

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    Katarzyna A Podyma-Inoue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs are one of the basic constituents of plasma membranes. Specific molecular interactions between HSPGs and a number of extracellular ligands have been reported. Mechanisms involved in controlling the localization and abundance of HSPG on specific domains on the cell surface, such as membrane rafts, could play important regulatory roles in signal transduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using metabolic radiolabeling and sucrose-density gradient ultracentrifugation techniques, we identified [(35S]sulfate-labeled macromolecules associated with detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs isolated from a rat parathyroid cell line. DRM fractions showed high specific radioactivity ([(35S]sulfate/mg protein, implying the specific recruitment of HSPGs to the membrane rafts. Identity of DRM-associated [(35S]sulfate-labeled molecules as HSPGs was confirmed by Western blotting with antibodies that recognize heparan sulfate (HS-derived epitope. Analyses of core proteins by SDS-PAGE revealed bands with an apparent MW of syndecan-4 (30-33 kDa and syndecan-1 (70 kDa suggesting the presence of rafts with various HSPG species. DRM fractions enriched with HSPGs were characterized by high sphingomyelin content and found to only partially overlap with the fractions enriched in ganglioside GM1. HSPGs could be also detected in DRMs even after prior treatment of cells with heparitinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both syndecan-1 and syndecan-4 have been found to specifically associate with membrane rafts and their association seemed independent of intact HS chains. Membrane rafts in which HSPGs reside were also enriched with sphingomyelin, suggesting their possible involvement in FGF signaling. Further studies, involving proteomic characterization of membrane domains containing HSPGs might improve our knowledge on the nature of HSPG-ligand interactions and their role in different signaling platforms.

  20. Short-chain ubiquitination is associated with the degradation rate of a cell-surface-resident bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11).

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    Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    The reduced expression of the bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) at the canalicular membrane is associated with cholestasis-induced hepatotoxicity due to the accumulation of bile acids in hepatocytes. We demonstrated previously that 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) treatment, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the treatment of urea cycle disorders, induces the cell-surface expression of BSEP by prolonging the degradation rate of cell-surface-resident BSEP. On the other hand, BSEP mutations, E297G and D482G, found in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), reduced it by shortening the degradation rate of cell-surface-resident BSEP. Therefore, to help the development of the medical treatment of cholestasis, we investigated the underlying mechanism by which 4PBA and PFIC2-type mutations affect the BSEP degradation from cell surface, focusing on short-chain ubiquitination. In Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCK II) cells expressing BSEP and rat canalicular membrane vesicles, the molecular mass of the mature form of BSEP/Bsep shifted from 170 to 190 kDa after ubiquitin modification (molecular mass, 8 kDa). Ubiquitination susceptibility of BSEP/Bsep was reduced in vitro and in vivo by 4PBA treatment and, conversely, was enhanced by BSEP mutations E297G and D482G. Moreover, biotin-labeling studies using MDCK II cells demonstrated that the degradation of cell-surface-resident chimeric protein fusing ubiquitin to BSEP was faster than that of BSEP itself. In conclusion, BSEP/Bsep is modified with two to three ubiquitins, and its ubiquitination is modulated by 4PBA treatment and PFIC2-type mutations. Modulation of short-chain ubiquitination can regulate the change in the degradation rate of cell-surface-resident BSEP by 4PBA treatment and PFIC2-type mutations.

  1. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  2. Sodium chloride promotes pro-inflammatory macrophage polarization thereby aggravating CNS autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucke, Stephanie; Eschborn, Melanie; Liebmann, Marie; Herold, Martin; Freise, Nicole; Engbers, Annika; Ehling, Petra; Meuth, Sven G; Roth, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz; Klotz, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    The increasing incidence in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) during the last decades in industrialized countries might be linked to a change in dietary habits. Nowadays, enhanced salt content is an important characteristic of Western diet and increased dietary salt (NaCl) intake promotes pathogenic T cell responses contributing to central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity. Given the importance of macrophage responses for CNS disease propagation, we addressed the influence of salt consumption on macrophage responses in CNS autoimmunity. We observed that EAE-diseased mice receiving a NaCl-high diet showed strongly enhanced macrophage infiltration and activation within the CNS accompanied by disease aggravation during the effector phase of EAE. NaCl treatment of macrophages elicited a strong pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production, increased expression of immune-stimulatory molecules, and an antigen-independent boost of T cell proliferation. This NaCl-induced pro-inflammatory macrophage phenotype was accompanied by increased activation of NF-kB and MAPK signaling pathways. The pathogenic relevance of NaCl-conditioned macrophages is illustrated by the finding that transfer into EAE-diseased animals resulted in significant disease aggravation compared to untreated macrophages. Importantly, also in human monocytes, NaCl promoted a pro-inflammatory phenotype that enhanced human T cell proliferation. Taken together, high dietary salt intake promotes pro-inflammatory macrophages that aggravate CNS autoimmunity. Together with other studies, these results underline the need to further determine the relevance of increased dietary salt intake for MS disease severity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Accumulation of 14C-5,6-dihydroxytryptamine-melanin in intrathecal and subependymal phagocytes of the rat CNS and possible routes of their elimination from brain

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    Baumgarten, H.G.; Moritz, F.; Schlossberger, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    14C-5,6-DHT-Melanin, a labelled synthetic polymer resembling the naturally occurring melanin formed in brain by autoxidation of dopamine, was injected into the left lateral ventricle of adult rats, and its fate followed by autoradiography and by transmission electron microscopy of structures identified as labelled in preceding light micrographs, and by EM-autoradiography. Shortly after injection, melanin particles (easily identified in the em because of their size, structure and electron opacity) were seen ingested by supraependymal and epiplexus cells, by cells residing in the piaarachnoid, i.e. free subarachnoidal cells and perivascular cells, and by subependymally located microglia-like cells with intraventricular processes. Up to day four, an increase in the number of labelled phagocytes in the CSF was noted which transformed into typical reactive macrophages. Beyond this time, many intraventricular melanin-loaded phagocytes formed rounded clusters; cells of such clusters were subsequently found to invade the brain parenchyma by penetrating the ependymal lining and to accumulate in the perivascular space of brain vessels. 14C-Melanin-storing macrophages were found in the marginal sinus of the deep jugular lymph nodes suggesting emigration of CNS-derived phagocytes via lymphatics or prelymphatics that contact the subarachnoidal space compartment. This does not exclude the possibility that some of the macrophages leave the brain via the systemic circulation by penetrating the vascular endothelium; these may be disposed of in peripheral organs other than the lymph nodes.

  4. Polymicrobial sepsis impairs bystander recruitment of effector cells to infected skin despite optimal sensing and alarming function of skin resident memory CD8 T cells.

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    Derek B Danahy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic infection that enhances host vulnerability to secondary infections normally controlled by T cells. Using CLP sepsis model, we observed that sepsis induces apoptosis of circulating memory CD8 T-cells (TCIRCM and diminishes their effector functions, leading to impaired CD8 T-cell mediated protection to systemic pathogen re-infection. In the context of localized re-infections, tissue resident memory CD8 T-cells (TRM provide robust protection in a variety of infectious models. TRM rapidly 'sense' infection in non-lymphoid tissues and 'alarm' the host by enhancing immune cell recruitment to the site of the infection to accelerate pathogen clearance. Here, we show that compared to pathogen-specific TCIRCM, sepsis does not invoke significant numerical decline of Vaccinia virus induced skin-TRM keeping their effector functions (e.g., Ag-dependent IFN-γ production intact. IFN-γ-mediated recruitment of immune cells to the site of localized infection was, however, reduced in CLP hosts despite TRM maintaining their 'sensing and alarming' functions. The capacity of memory CD8 T-cells in the septic environment to respond to inflammatory cues and arrive to the site of secondary infection/antigen exposure remained normal suggesting T-cell-extrinsic factors contributed to the observed lesion. Mechanistically, we showed that IFN-γ produced rapidly during sepsis-induced cytokine storm leads to reduced IFN-γR1 expression on vascular endothelium. As a consequence, decreased expression of adhesion molecules and/or chemokines (VCAM1 and CXCL9 on skin endothelial cells in response to TRM-derived IFN-γ was observed, leading to sub-optimal bystander-recruitment of effector cells and increased susceptibility to pathogen re-encounter. Importantly, as visualized by intravital 2-photon microscopy, exogenous administration of CXCL9/10 was sufficient to correct sepsis-induced impairments in recruitment of effector cells at the localized site of TRM

  5. Polymicrobial sepsis impairs bystander recruitment of effector cells to infected skin despite optimal sensing and alarming function of skin resident memory CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic infection that enhances host vulnerability to secondary infections normally controlled by T cells. Using CLP sepsis model, we observed that sepsis induces apoptosis of circulating memory CD8 T-cells (TCIRCM) and diminishes their effector functions, leading to impaired CD8 T-cell mediated protection to systemic pathogen re-infection. In the context of localized re-infections, tissue resident memory CD8 T-cells (TRM) provide robust protection in a variety of infectious models. TRM rapidly ‘sense’ infection in non-lymphoid tissues and ‘alarm’ the host by enhancing immune cell recruitment to the site of the infection to accelerate pathogen clearance. Here, we show that compared to pathogen-specific TCIRCM, sepsis does not invoke significant numerical decline of Vaccinia virus induced skin-TRM keeping their effector functions (e.g., Ag-dependent IFN-γ production) intact. IFN-γ-mediated recruitment of immune cells to the site of localized infection was, however, reduced in CLP hosts despite TRM maintaining their ‘sensing and alarming’ functions. The capacity of memory CD8 T-cells in the septic environment to respond to inflammatory cues and arrive to the site of secondary infection/antigen exposure remained normal suggesting T-cell-extrinsic factors contributed to the observed lesion. Mechanistically, we showed that IFN-γ produced rapidly during sepsis-induced cytokine storm leads to reduced IFN-γR1 expression on vascular endothelium. As a consequence, decreased expression of adhesion molecules and/or chemokines (VCAM1 and CXCL9) on skin endothelial cells in response to TRM-derived IFN-γ was observed, leading to sub-optimal bystander-recruitment of effector cells and increased susceptibility to pathogen re-encounter. Importantly, as visualized by intravital 2-photon microscopy, exogenous administration of CXCL9/10 was sufficient to correct sepsis-induced impairments in recruitment of effector cells at the localized site of TRM

  6. Retention of Ag-specific memory CD4+ T cells in the draining lymph node indicates lymphoid tissue resident memory populations.

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    Marriott, Clare L; Dutton, Emma E; Tomura, Michio; Withers, David R

    2017-05-01

    Several different memory T-cell populations have now been described based upon surface receptor expression and migratory capabilities. Here we have assessed murine endogenous memory CD4 + T cells generated within a draining lymph node and their subsequent migration to other secondary lymphoid tissues. Having established a model response targeting a specific peripheral lymph node, we temporally labelled all the cells within draining lymph node using photoconversion. Tracking of photoconverted and non-photoconverted Ag-specific CD4 + T cells revealed the rapid establishment of a circulating memory population in all lymph nodes within days of immunisation. Strikingly, a resident memory CD4 + T cell population became established in the draining lymph node and persisted for several months in the absence of detectable migration to other lymphoid tissue. These cells most closely resembled effector memory T cells, usually associated with circulation through non-lymphoid tissue, but here, these cells were retained in the draining lymph node. These data indicate that lymphoid tissue resident memory CD4 + T-cell populations are generated in peripheral lymph nodes following immunisation. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Breaking peripheral immune tolerance to CNS antigens in neurodegenerative diseases: boosting autoimmunity to fight-off chronic neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michal; Baruch, Kuti

    2014-11-01

    Immune cell infiltration to the brain's territory was considered for decades to reflect a pathological process in which immune cells attack the central nervous system (CNS); such a process is observed in the inflammatory autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). As neuroinflammatory processes within the CNS parenchyma are also common to other CNS pathologies, regardless of their etiology, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), these pathologies have often been compared to MS, a disease that benefits from immunosuppressive therapy. Yet, over the last decade, it became clear that autoimmunity has a bright side, and that it plays a pivotal role in CNS repair following damage. Specifically, autoimmune T cells were found to facilitate CNS healing processes, such as in the case of sterile mechanical injuries to the brain or the spinal cord, mental stress, or biochemical insults. Even more intriguingly, autoimmune T cells were found to be involved in supporting fundamental processes of brain functional integrity, such as in the maintenance of life-long brain plasticity, including spatial learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Importantly, autoimmune T cells are part of a cellular network which, to operate efficiently and safely, requires tight regulation by other immune cell populations, such as regulatory T cells, which are indispensable for maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. Here, we suggest that dysregulation of the balance between peripheral immune suppression, on one hand, and protective autoimmunity, on the other, is an underlying mechanism in the emergence and progression of the neuroinflammatory response associated with chronic neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging. Mitigating chronic neuroinflammation under these conditions necessitates activation, rather than suppression, of the peripheral immune response directed against self. Accordingly, we propose that

  8. A novel marker for terminal Schwann cells, homocysteine-responsive ER-resident protein, as isolated by a single cell PCR-differential display.

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    Oda, Ryo; Yaoi, Takeshi; Okajima, Seiichiro; Kobashi, Hiroaki; Kubo, Toshikazu; Fushiki, Shinji

    2003-09-05

    Terminal Schwann cells (TSCs) that cover motor neuron terminals are known to play important roles in maintaining neuromuscular junctions, as well as in the repair process after nerve injury. However, molecular characteristics of TSCs remain unknown, because of the difficulties in analyzing them due to their paucity. We have established a method of selectively and efficiently collecting TSCs so that cDNA analysis can be done properly. The expression of 1-2% of whole mRNAs was compared between myelinating Schwann cells (MSCs) and TSCs, and it turned out that approximately one-third of the bands could be categorized as cell-type-specific bands. TSCs thus constitute a distinct entity from the viewpoint of gene expression. As one of the cDNA clones belonging to TSC-specific bands was identified homocysteine-responsive ER-resident protein (Herp), and in situ hybridization confirmed that Herp mRNA is expressed in TSCs on motor nerve terminals but not in MSCs, both in developing and adult rats. In conclusion, we have been able to identify Herp as a novel molecular marker for TSCs.

  9. Primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent: a review of literature and our experience from Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoomi, Rumana; Nayil, Khursheed; Rayees, Ahmad; Kirmani, Altaf; Ramzan, Altaf; Khalil, Muhammad Baba; Dhar, Anil; Besina, Syed; Chanda, Nasima; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Qadiri, Sumaira; Maqbool, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    To study the clinicopathological aspects of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients. Sixteen patients with primary CNS lymphoma were analyzed for their clinico-pathological characteristics and followed-up for the treatment and subsequent management in Neurosurgery, and Medical and Radiation Oncology. The fronto-parietal region was the commonest location of CNS lymphoma; four cases of cerebellar lymphoma were seen. Our patients were relatively young with a mean age of 48 years and an age range of 35-60 years. Females outnumbered males with a ratio of 2.7:1. The commonest presentation was focal neurological-deficits and features of raised intracranial pressure. All the patients histologically had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Radiologically, most presented as disc-enhancing lesions. Two patients had multiple lesions. Most of the patients (10) died within a mean of 4.4 months (range 2 weeks-16 months). Primary CNS lymphoma is seen in immunocompetent patients as well. Relapse is common after treatment and the overall prognosis is unfavorable.

  10. A philosophy for CNS radiotracer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Ricq, Emily L; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-10-21

    Decades after its discovery, positron emission tomography (PET) remains the premier tool for imaging neurochemistry in living humans. Technological improvements in radiolabeling methods, camera design, and image analysis have kept PET in the forefront. In addition, the use of PET imaging has expanded because researchers have developed new radiotracers that visualize receptors, transporters, enzymes, and other molecular targets within the human brain. However, of the thousands of proteins in the central nervous system (CNS), researchers have successfully imaged fewer than 40 human proteins. To address the critical need for new radiotracers, this Account expounds on the decisions, strategies, and pitfalls of CNS radiotracer development based on our current experience in this area. We discuss the five key components of radiotracer development for human imaging: choosing a biomedical question, selection of a biological target, design of the radiotracer chemical structure, evaluation of candidate radiotracers, and analysis of preclinical imaging. It is particularly important to analyze the market of scientists or companies who might use a new radiotracer and carefully select a relevant biomedical question(s) for that audience. In the selection of a specific biological target, we emphasize how target localization and identity can constrain this process and discuss the optimal target density and affinity ratios needed for binding-based radiotracers. In addition, we discuss various PET test-retest variability requirements for monitoring changes in density, occupancy, or functionality for new radiotracers. In the synthesis of new radiotracer structures, high-throughput, modular syntheses have proved valuable, and these processes provide compounds with sites for late-stage radioisotope installation. As a result, researchers can manage the time constraints associated with the limited half-lives of isotopes. In order to evaluate brain uptake, a number of methods are available

  11. Permanent resident

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    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  12. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  13. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS-STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    -induced type I IFN expression in CNS cells and these cytokines are induced in a cGAS-STING-dependent manner. Consistently, mice defective in cGAS or STING are highly susceptible to acute HSE. Although STING is redundant for cell-autonomous antiviral resistance in astrocytes and neurons, viral replication...... is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS-STING pathway...

  14. Associations between arsenic species in exfoliated urothelial cells and prevalence of diabetes among residents of Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Jenna M; Ishida, María C; González-Horta, Carmen; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela S; Cerón, Roberto Hernández; Morales, Damián Viniegra; Terrazas, Francisco A Baeza; Del Razo, Luz M; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Saunders, R Jesse; Drobná, Zuzana; Fry, Rebecca C; Matoušek, Tomáš; Buse, John B; Mendez, Michelle A; Loomis, Dana; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    A growing number of studies link chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) with the risk of diabetes. Many of these studies assessed iAs exposure by measuring arsenic (As) species in urine. However, this approach has been criticized because of uncertainties associated with renal function and urine dilution in diabetic individuals. Our goal was to examine associations between the prevalence of diabetes and concentrations of As species in exfoliated urothelial cells (EUC) as an alternative to the measures of As in urine. We measured concentrations of trivalent and pentavalent iAs methyl-As (MAs) and dimethyl-As (DMAs) species in EUC from 374 residents of Chihuahua, Mexico, who were exposed to iAs in drinking water. We used fasting plasma glucose, glucose tolerance tests, and self-reported diabetes diagnoses or medication to identify diabetic participants. Associations between As species in EUC and diabetes were estimated using logistic and linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index. Interquartile-range increases in trivalent, but not pentavalent, As species in EUC were positively and significantly associated with diabetes, with ORs of 1.57 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.07) for iAsIII, 1.63 (1.24, 2.15) for MAsIII, and 1.31 (0.96, 1.84) for DMAsIII. DMAs/MAs and DMAs/iAs ratios were negatively associated with diabetes (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.83 and OR = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.96, respectively). Our data suggest that uncertainties associated with measures of As species in urine may be avoided by using As species in EUC as markers of iAs exposure and metabolism. Our results provide additional support to previous findings suggesting that trivalent As species may be responsible for associations between diabetes and chronic iAs exposure.

  15. Fifth CNS international steam generator conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Fifth CNS International Steam Generator Conference was held on November 26-29, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. In contrast with other conferences which focus on specific aspects, this conference provided a wide ranging forum on nuclear steam generator technology from life-cycle management to inspection and maintenance, functional and structural performance characteristics to design architecture. The 5th conference has adopted the theme: 'Management of Real-Life Equipment Conditions and Solutions for the Future'. This theme is appropriate at a time of transition in the industry when plants are looking to optimize the performance of existing assets, prevent costly degradation and unavailability, while looking ahead for new steam generator investments in life-extension, replacements and new-build. More than 50 technical papers were presented in sessions that gave an insight to the scope: life management strategies; fouling, cleaning and chemistry; replacement strategies and new build design; materials degradation; condition assessment/fitness for service; inspection advancements and experience; and thermal hydraulic performance

  16. Different IgM+B cell subpopulations residing within the peritoneal cavity of vaccinated rainbow trout are differently regulated by BAFF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Aitor G; Tafalla, Carolina

    2017-10-05

    In teleost fish, IgM + B cells are one of the main responders against inflammatory stimuli in the peritoneal cavity, as IgM + B cells dominate the peritoneum after intraperitoneal stimulation, also increasing the levels of secreted IgM. BAFF, a cytokine known to play a major role in B cell biology, has been shown to be up-regulated along with its receptors in the peritoneum of rainbow trout upon antigenic exposure, however, the regulatory mechanisms underneath this response remain unclear. In this study, we have identified two different IgM + B cell types residing in the peritoneal cavity of previously vaccinated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): IgD + IgM hi MHCII hi cells, resembling naïve B cells, and IgD - IgM lo MHCII lo cells, resembling antibody-secreting cells. Based on their membrane IgM levels, these cell types were named IgM hi and IgM lo B cells, respectively. As each of these B cell populations showed a distinct expression pattern for the different BAFF receptors, we studied the effect of BAFF individually on each cell subset. Recombinant BAFF promoted the survival of IgM lo but not IgM hi B cells in vitro, resulting in increased levels of IgM-secreting cells. In contrast, BAFF increased the levels of membrane MHC II only on IgM hi B cells, suggesting different functions on these B cell subsets. Moreover, we also showed that peritoneal IgM hi B cells expressed BAFF at levels comparable to those seen on myeloid cells. These results point to BAFF as a main regulator of B cell homeostasis in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting that this cytokine can trigger different signals on different peritoneal B cell subsets in a specific manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Local tissue interactions across the dorsal midline of the forebrain establish CNS laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Miguel L; Russell, Claire; Regan, Jennifer C; Tawk, Marcel; Sidi, Samuel; Gilmour, Darren T; Kapsimali, Marika; Sumoy, Lauro; Goldstone, Kim; Amaya, Enrique; Kimelman, David; Nicolson, Teresa; Gründer, Stefan; Gomperts, Miranda; Clarke, Jonathan D W; Wilson, Stephen W

    2003-07-31

    The mechanisms that establish behavioral, cognitive, and neuroanatomical asymmetries are poorly understood. In this study, we analyze the events that regulate development of asymmetric nuclei in the dorsal forebrain. The unilateral parapineal organ has a bilateral origin, and some parapineal precursors migrate across the midline to form this left-sided nucleus. The parapineal subsequently innervates the left habenula, which derives from ventral epithalamic cells adjacent to the parapineal precursors. Ablation of cells in the left ventral epithalamus can reverse laterality in wild-type embryos and impose the direction of CNS asymmetry in embryos in which laterality is usually randomized. Unilateral modulation of Nodal activity by Lefty1 can also impose the direction of CNS laterality in embryos with bilateral expression of Nodal pathway genes. From these data, we propose that laterality is determined by a competitive interaction between the left and right epithalamus and that Nodal signaling biases the outcome of this competition.

  18. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R., E-mail: bvuillemenot@bmrn.com [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Kennedy, Derek [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B. [Northern Biomedical Research, Inc., Muskegon, MI (United States); Butt, Mark T. [Tox Path Specialists, LLC, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O' Neill, Charles A. [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  19. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  20. Autoimmune process in CNS under Cs-137 inner irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisyany, N.I.; Liubich, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothesis as to the development of radiation-induced brain injuries stands high among the concepts of the CNS post-radiation damage pathogenesis. To study the changes occurring in a living organism affected by a small-dose radiation due to incorporated radionuclides as well as to create adequate models are of critical importance in the post-Chernobyl period. The effects of chronic small-dose inner radiation on the development of autoimmune responses were evaluated by determining the level of the CNS proteins and protein-induced antibodies to the CNS components. (author)

  1. 3rd ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Electronic Navigation Research Institute (ENRI) held its third International Workshop on ATM / CNS in 2013 with the theme of "Drafting the future sky". There is worldwide activity taking place in the research and development of modern air traffic management (ATM) and its enabling technologies in Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS). Pioneering work is necessary to contribute to the global harmonization of air traffic management and control. At this workshop, leading experts in  research, industry and academia from around the world met to share their ideas and approaches on ATM/CNS related topics.

  2. Sox2 Is Essential for Oligodendroglial Proliferation and Differentiation during Postnatal Brain Myelination and CNS Remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Gui, Xuehong; Croteau, Christopher; Song, Lanying; Xu, Jie; Wang, Aijun; Bannerman, Peter; Guo, Fuzheng

    2018-02-14

    In the CNS, myelination and remyelination depend on the successful progression and maturation of oligodendroglial lineage cells, including proliferation and differentiation of oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs). Previous studies have reported that Sox2 transiently regulates oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation in the embryonic and perinatal spinal cord and appears dispensable for myelination in the postnatal spinal cord. However, the role of Sox2 in OL development in the brain has yet to be defined. We now report that Sox2 is an essential positive regulator of developmental myelination in the postnatal murine brain of both sexes. Stage-specific paradigms of genetic disruption demonstrated that Sox2 regulated brain myelination by coordinating upstream OPC population supply and downstream OL differentiation. Transcriptomic analyses further supported a crucial role of Sox2 in brain developmental myelination. Consistently, oligodendroglial Sox2-deficient mice developed severe tremors and ataxia, typical phenotypes indicative of hypomyelination, and displayed severe impairment of motor function and prominent deficits of brain OL differentiation and myelination persisting into the later CNS developmental stages. We also found that Sox2 was required for efficient OPC proliferation and expansion and OL regeneration during remyelination in the adult brain and spinal cord. Together, our genetic evidence reveals an essential role of Sox2 in brain myelination and CNS remyelination, and suggests that manipulation of Sox2 and/or Sox2-mediated downstream pathways may be therapeutic in promoting CNS myelin repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Promoting myelin formation and repair has translational significance in treating myelin-related neurological disorders, such as periventricular leukomalacia and multiple sclerosis in which brain developmental myelin formation and myelin repair are severely affected, respectively. In this report, analyses of a series of genetic conditional

  3. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseda, Roberta; Guerrero-Valero, Marta; Alberizzi, Valeria; Previtali, Stefano C; Sherman, Diane L; Palmisano, Marilena; Huganir, Richard L; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Cuenda, Ana; Feltri, Maria Laura; Brophy, Peter J; Bolino, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1), a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS.

  4. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Pepinsky, R. Blake [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Fishman, Paul S. [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Brown, Robert H. [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Francis, Jonathan W., E-mail: jwfrancisby@gmail.com [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  5. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-01-01

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFRα-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  6. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Noseda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS and central nervous system (CNS myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1, a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS.

  7. Resident Corneal Cells Communicate with Neutrophils Leading to the Production of IP-10 during the Primary Inflammatory Response to HSV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesworth-Kenyon, S. J.; Popham, N.; Milam, A.; Oakes, J. E.; Lausch, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we show that murine and human neutrophils are capable of secreting IP-10 in response to communication from the HSV-1 infected cornea and that they do so in a time frame associated with the recruitment of CD8+ T cells and CXCR3-expressing cells. Cellular markers were used to establish that neutrophil influx corresponded in time to peak IP-10 production, and cellular depletion confirmed neutrophils to be a significant source of IP-10 during HSV-1 corneal infection in mice. A novel ex vivo model for human corneal tissue infection with HSV-1 was used to confirm that cells resident in the cornea are also capable of stimulating neutrophils to secrete IP-10. Our results support the hypothesis that neutrophils play a key role in T-cell recruitment and control of viral replication during HSV-1 corneal infection through the production of the T-cell recruiting chemokine IP-10. PMID:22518343

  8. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  9. Oral administration of visceral adipose tissue antigens ameliorates metabolic disorders in mice and elevates visceral adipose tissue-resident CD4+CD25+Foxp3+regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Zhang, Dali; Chen, Xiaoling; Meng, Gang; Zheng, Qian; Mai, Wenli; Wu, Yuzhang; Ye, Lilin; Wang, Li

    2017-08-16

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are linked with chronic, low-grade inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT). A unique population of VAT-resident CD4 + Foxp3 + Tregs plays a crucial role in regulating VAT inflammation and metabolic homeostasis. VAT-resident Tregs display a highly restricted TCR repertoire, suggesting they recognize certain autoantigen(s) in VAT. A dramatic reduction of VAT-resident Tregs has been shown to closely correlate with obesity-related VAT chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders. Oral tolerance strategy may modulate inflammatory response to autoantigens by several mechanisms including induction of autoantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we explored the effects and cellular mechanism of oral administration of VAT pooled antigens on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic disorders in mice. Indeed, we found that oral treatment of VAT mixture antigens effectively inhibited gain in body weight and fat mass, ameliorated serum lipid parameters, and improved insulin sensitivity in HFD mice. This strategy was shown to significantly restore HFD-induced decrease of VAT-resident Tregs, accompanied by a hampered M2-type to M1-type macrophages phenotypic switch as well as decreased CD8 + T cells infiltration in VAT. Thus, oral administration of VAT antigens may be a novel and safe strategy against obesity and its related metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bone Marrow Chimeras and c-fms Conditional Ablation (Mafia) Mice Reveal an Essential Role for Resident Myeloid Cells in Lipopolysaccharide/TLR4-Induced Corneal Inflammation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Holly R.; Carlson, Eric C.; Sun, Yan; Lin, Michelle; Burnett, Sandra H.; Perez, Victor L.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Pearlman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian cornea contains an extensive network of resident macrophages and dendritic cells. To determine the role of these cells in LPS-induced corneal inflammation, TLR4−/− mice were sublethally irradiated and reconstituted with bone marrow cells from either enhanced GFP (eGFP)+/C57BL/6 or eGFP+/TLR4−/− mice. The corneal epithelium was abraded, LPS was added topically, and cellular infiltration to the corneal stroma and development of corneal haze were examined after 24 h. TLR4−/− mice reconstituted with C57BL/6, but not TLR4−/− bone marrow cells donor cells were found to cause infiltration of eGFP+ cells to the cornea, including neutrophils, and also increased corneal haze compared with saline-treated corneas. In a second experimental approach, corneas of transgenic macrophage Fas induced apoptosis (Mafia) mice were stimulated with LPS. These mice express eGFP and a suicide gene under control of the c-fms promoter, and systemic treatment with the FK506 dimerizer (AP20187) causes Fas-mediated apoptosis of monocytic cells. AP20187-treated mice had significantly fewer eGFP+ cells in the cornea than untreated mice. After stimulation with LPS neutrophil recruitment and development of corneal haze were impaired in AP20187-treated mice compared with untreated controls. Furthermore, LPS induced CXCL1/KC and IL-1α production within 4 h in corneas of untreated Mafia mice, which is before cellular infiltration; however, cytokine production was impaired after AP20187 treatment. Together, results from both experimental approaches demonstrate an essential role for resident corneal monocytic lineage cells (macrophages and dendritic cells) in development of corneal inflammation. PMID:19234168

  11. Bone marrow chimeras and c-fms conditional ablation (Mafia) mice reveal an essential role for resident myeloid cells in lipopolysaccharide/TLR4-induced corneal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Holly R; Carlson, Eric C; Sun, Yan; Lin, Michelle; Burnett, Sandra H; Perez, Victor L; McMenamin, Paul G; Pearlman, Eric

    2009-03-01

    The mammalian cornea contains an extensive network of resident macrophages and dendritic cells. To determine the role of these cells in LPS-induced corneal inflammation, TLR4(-/-) mice were sublethally irradiated and reconstituted with bone marrow cells from either enhanced GFP (eGFP)(+)/C57BL/6 or eGFP(+)/TLR4(-/-) mice. The corneal epithelium was abraded, LPS was added topically, and cellular infiltration to the corneal stroma and development of corneal haze were examined after 24 h. TLR4(-/-) mice reconstituted with C57BL/6, but not TLR4(-/-) bone marrow cells donor cells were found to cause infiltration of eGFP(+) cells to the cornea, including neutrophils, and also increased corneal haze compared with saline-treated corneas. In a second experimental approach, corneas of transgenic macrophage Fas induced apoptosis (Mafia) mice were stimulated with LPS. These mice express eGFP and a suicide gene under control of the c-fms promoter, and systemic treatment with the FK506 dimerizer (AP20187) causes Fas-mediated apoptosis of monocytic cells. AP20187-treated mice had significantly fewer eGFP(+) cells in the cornea than untreated mice. After stimulation with LPS neutrophil recruitment and development of corneal haze were impaired in AP20187-treated mice compared with untreated controls. Furthermore, LPS induced CXCL1/KC and IL-1alpha production within 4 h in corneas of untreated Mafia mice, which is before cellular infiltration; however, cytokine production was impaired after AP20187 treatment. Together, results from both experimental approaches demonstrate an essential role for resident corneal monocytic lineage cells (macrophages and dendritic cells) in development of corneal inflammation.

  12. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Nwamaka Nwogu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow. In this review, we provide an overview of the various factors influencing CNS penetration of ARV drugs with an emphasis on those commonly used in sub-Saharan Africa. We also summarize some key associations between ARV drug penetration, CNS efficacy, and neurotoxicity.

  13. Positron emission tomography in patients with primary CNS lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, KL

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with CNS lymphomas. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry in vivo. Therefore, it provides different information about tumors when compared to

  14. Brain abscess with an unexpected finding: Actinomyces meyeri CNS infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Wejse, Christian

    Background: CNS infection caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare and the subtype Actinomyces meyeri even rarer. Risk factors include periodontal disease and alcohol overuse. We present a case report of a 54-year-old female with dental and lung foci. Case history: A female was hospitalised with tonic...... antibiotics. The optimal treatment of A. meyeri CNS infection has not yet been established – case reports are important in reaching this goal....

  15. Nanotechnology for CNS Delivery of Bio-Therapeutic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Lipa; Yadav, Sunita; Amiji, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    The current therapeutic strategies are not efficient in treating disorders related to the central nervous system (CNS) and have only shown partial alleviation of symptoms, as opposed to, disease modifying effects. With change in population demographics, the incidence of CNS disorders, especially neurodegenerative diseases, is expected to rise dramatically. Current treatment regimens are associated with severe side-effects, especially given that most of these are chronic therapies and involve ...

  16. CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantina Vasilatou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

  17. Epidermis–dermis junction as a novel location for bone marrow-derived cells to reside in response to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Junko, E-mail: jokano@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Division of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako [Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Nakae, Yuki [Department of Internal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Terashima, Tomoya [Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Nakagawa, Takahiko [TMK Project, Medical Innovation Center, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kurakane, Takeshi; Okamoto, Naoki; Morohashi, Keita [Division of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Maegawa, Hiroshi [Department of Internal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Udagawa, Jun [Division of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan)

    2015-06-12

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) can migrate into the various organs in the mice irradiated by ionizing radiation (IR). However, it may not be the case in the skin. While IR is used for bone marrow (BM) transplantation, studying with the epidermal sheets demonstrated that the BMDC recruitment is extraordinarily rare in epidermis in the mouse. Herein, using the chimera mice with BM from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, we simply examined if BMDCs migrate into any layers in the total skin, as opposed to the epidermal sheets, in response to IR. Interestingly, we identified the presence of GFP-positive (GFP{sup +}) cells in the epidermis-dermis junction in the total skin sections although the epidermal cell sheets failed to have any GFP cells. To examine a possibility that the cells in the junction could be mechanically dissociated during separating epidermal sheets, we then salvaged such dissociated cells and examined its characteristics. Surprisingly, some GFP{sup +} cells were found in the salvaged cells, indicating that these cells could be derived from BM. In addition, such BMDCs were also associated with inflammation in the junction. In conclusion, BMDCs can migrate to and reside in the epidermis-dermis junction after IR. - Highlights: • Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) migrate in the epidermis due to ionizing radiation (IR). • BMDCs dissociate from the epidermis-dermis junction in preparing epidermal sheets. • The doses of IR determine the location and the number of migrating BMDCs in the skin.

  18. Epidermis–dermis junction as a novel location for bone marrow-derived cells to reside in response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Kurakane, Takeshi; Okamoto, Naoki; Morohashi, Keita; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) can migrate into the various organs in the mice irradiated by ionizing radiation (IR). However, it may not be the case in the skin. While IR is used for bone marrow (BM) transplantation, studying with the epidermal sheets demonstrated that the BMDC recruitment is extraordinarily rare in epidermis in the mouse. Herein, using the chimera mice with BM from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, we simply examined if BMDCs migrate into any layers in the total skin, as opposed to the epidermal sheets, in response to IR. Interestingly, we identified the presence of GFP-positive (GFP + ) cells in the epidermis-dermis junction in the total skin sections although the epidermal cell sheets failed to have any GFP cells. To examine a possibility that the cells in the junction could be mechanically dissociated during separating epidermal sheets, we then salvaged such dissociated cells and examined its characteristics. Surprisingly, some GFP + cells were found in the salvaged cells, indicating that these cells could be derived from BM. In addition, such BMDCs were also associated with inflammation in the junction. In conclusion, BMDCs can migrate to and reside in the epidermis-dermis junction after IR. - Highlights: • Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) migrate in the epidermis due to ionizing radiation (IR). • BMDCs dissociate from the epidermis-dermis junction in preparing epidermal sheets. • The doses of IR determine the location and the number of migrating BMDCs in the skin

  19. Sleep disorders in children after treatment for a CNS tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Van Santen, Hanneke M; Schouten-Van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N

    2012-08-01

    The long-term survival of children with a central nervous system (CNS) tumour is improving. However, they experience late effects, including altered habits and patterns of sleep. We evaluated the presence and type of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness in these children, and its associations with clinical characteristics and daily performance (fatigue and psychosocial functioning). In a cross-sectional study at the outpatient clinic of the Emma Children's Hospital AMC (February-June 2010), sleep, fatigue and psychosocial functioning were analysed in 31 CNS tumour patients (mean age: 11.8years; 20 boys) and compared with 78 patients treated for a non-CNS malignancy (mean age: 9.7years; 41 boys) and norm data. Questionnaires applied were the Sleep Disorder Scale for Children, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Sleeping habits and endocrine deficiencies were assessed with a self-developed questionnaire. Increased somnolence was found in CNS tumour patients compared with those with a non-CNS malignancy (8.8±2.8 versus 7.5±2.7; Psleep. No specific risk factors were identified for a sleep disorder in CNS tumour patients, but their excessive somnolence was correlated with lower fatigue related quality of life (QoL) (r=-0.78, Psleep quality and diminish fatigue. © 2011 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. MOG extracellular domain (p1-125) triggers elevated frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ Th1 cells in the CNS of mice and induces greater incidence of severe EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyagabhavan Mony, Jyothi; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Myelin-specific T cells are implicated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and drive experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is commonly induced with short peptides, whereas in MS, whole myelin proteins are available for immune response. We asked whether immunization with the immunoglobulin-l...

  1. Successful Treatment of Posttransplant EBV-Associated Lymphoma and Plasmacytoma Solely Localized to the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Boye; Nielsen, Signe Ledou

    2012-01-01

    Two patients with diabetic nephropathy were diagnosed with primary central nervous system posttransplant Epstein-Barr-virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) 3 years after renal transplantation. The histological diagnoses of the isolated brain tumors were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma....... After 4 weeks of treatment a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated complete regression of the CNS lesion. The patient continues to receive rituximab (every second month), valgangciclovir and low-dose prednisolone. Twenty-two months after initiation of therapy, she is still in complete remission....... The second patient was only treated with craniospinal irradiation involving the medulla to the second cervical vertebra and valgangciclovir. Moreover, the posttransplant immune suppression was reduced. A new MRI two months after initiation of therapy showed a complete regression of the lesions in the CNS...

  2. Host microbiota constantly control maturation and function of microglia in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erny, Daniel; Hrabě de Angelis, Anna Lena; Jaitin, Diego; Wieghofer, Peter; Staszewski, Ori; David, Eyal; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Mahlakoiv, Tanel; Jakobshagen, Kristin; Buch, Thorsten; Schwierzeck, Vera; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Chun, Eunyoung; Garrett, Wendy S; McCoy, Kathy D; Diefenbach, Andreas; Staeheli, Peter; Stecher, Bärbel; Amit, Ido; Prinz, Marco

    2015-07-01

    As the tissue macrophages of the CNS, microglia are critically involved in diseases of the CNS. However, it remains unknown what controls their maturation and activation under homeostatic conditions. We observed substantial contributions of the host microbiota to microglia homeostasis, as germ-free (GF) mice displayed global defects in microglia with altered cell proportions and an immature phenotype, leading to impaired innate immune responses. Temporal eradication of host microbiota severely changed microglia properties. Limited microbiota complexity also resulted in defective microglia. In contrast, recolonization with a complex microbiota partially restored microglia features. We determined that short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), microbiota-derived bacterial fermentation products, regulated microglia homeostasis. Accordingly, mice deficient for the SCFA receptor FFAR2 mirrored microglia defects found under GF conditions. These findings suggest that host bacteria vitally regulate microglia maturation and function, whereas microglia impairment can be rectified to some extent by complex microbiota.

  3. Analgesic and CNS Depressant Activities of Sea Anemone Heteractis aurora Nematocyst Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraj, Sengapillai; Bragadeeswaran, Subramanian; Srikumaran, Natarajah; Suguna, Anbukkarasu

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms are the excellent sources for biologically active compounds. Cnidarian venoms are potentially valuable materials used for biomedical research and drug development. The present work was carried out to analyse haemolytic, analgesic and CNS depressant activity of sea anemone Heteractis aurora. In haemolytic assay, among the five different RBC blood cells, the chicken blood exhibited maximum hemolytic activity of 64 Hemolytic Unit (HU). The maximum Analgesic Ratio (AR) of 5 recorded at 15 and 30 min interval and minimum was recorded after 45, 60 and 120 min time intervals. In jumping response activity, the maximum of 5 AR recorded at 15, 30 & 45 min and minimum was recorded at 90 & 120 min time intervals. The maximum decrease of depressant activity of 45.07% was determined in CNS depressant activity. Anti-inflammatory activity showed significant inhibition by crude extract of Heteractis aurora.

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs as Potential Inducers of Antineoplastic Effects in CNS Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tatenhorst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-inducible transcription factors which belong to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. In recent years it turned out that natural as well as synthetic PPAR agonists exhibit profound antineoplastic as well as redifferentiation effects in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. The molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still emerging, with partially controverse findings reported by a number of studies dealing with the influence of PPARs on treatment of tumor cells in vitro. Remarkably, studies examining the effects of these drugs in vivo are just beginning to emerge. However, the agonists of PPARs, in particular the thiazolidinediones, seem to be promising candidates for new approaches in human CNS tumor therapy.

  5. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Neuropathogenesis: A Model for HIV-Induced CNS Inflammation and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Rick B; Hudson, Lola

    2017-03-06

    Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV), similar to its human analog human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), enters the central nervous system (CNS) soon after infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. The ensuing inflammation and damage give rise to varying degrees of cognitive decline collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Because of the similarities to HIV infection and disease, FIV has provided a useful model for both in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS infection, inflammation and pathology. This mini review summarizes insights gained from studies of early infection, immune cell trafficking, inflammation and the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis. Advances in our understanding of these processes have contributed to the development of therapeutic interventions designed to protect neurons and regulate inflammatory activity.

  6. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Neuropathogenesis: A Model for HIV-Induced CNS Inflammation and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Rick B.; Hudson, Lola

    2017-01-01

    Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV), similar to its human analog human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), enters the central nervous system (CNS) soon after infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. The ensuing inflammation and damage give rise to varying degrees of cognitive decline collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Because of the similarities to HIV infection and disease, FIV has provided a useful model for both in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS infection, inflammation and pathology. This mini review summarizes insights gained from studies of early infection, immune cell trafficking, inflammation and the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis. Advances in our understanding of these processes have contributed to the development of therapeutic interventions designed to protect neurons and regulate inflammatory activity. PMID:29056673

  7. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Neuropathogenesis: A Model for HIV-Induced CNS Inflammation and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick B. Meeker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV, similar to its human analog human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, enters the central nervous system (CNS soon after infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. The ensuing inflammation and damage give rise to varying degrees of cognitive decline collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. Because of the similarities to HIV infection and disease, FIV has provided a useful model for both in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS infection, inflammation and pathology. This mini review summarizes insights gained from studies of early infection, immune cell trafficking, inflammation and the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis. Advances in our understanding of these processes have contributed to the development of therapeutic interventions designed to protect neurons and regulate inflammatory activity.

  8. HIV-infected women have high numbers of CD103-CD8+ T cells residing close to the basal membrane of the ectocervical epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Anna; Buggert, Marcus; Edfeldt, Gabriella; Ranefall, Petter; Introini, Andrea; Cheuk, Stanley; Martini, Elisa; Eidsmo, Liv; Ball, Terry B; Kimani, Joshua; Kaul, Rupert; Karlsson, Annika C; Wählby, Carolina; Broliden, Kristina; Tjernlund, Annelie

    2017-12-20

    Genital mucosa is the main portal of entry for various incoming pathogens, including HIV, hence an important site for host immune defenses. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells defend tissue barriers against infections and are characterized by expression of CD103 and CD69. Here we describe the composition of CD8+ TRM cells in the ectocervix of healthy and HIV-infected women. Study samples were collected from healthy Swedish and Kenyan HIV-infected and uninfected women. Customized computerized image-based in situ analysis was developed to assess the ectocervical biopsies. Genital mucosa and blood samples were assessed by flow cytometry. While ectocervical epithelium of healthy women was populated with bona fide CD8+ TRM cells (CD103+CD69+), HIV-infected women displayed high frequency of CD103-CD8+ cells residing close to their epithelial basal membrane. Accumulation of CD103-CD8+ cells was associated with chemokine expression in the ectocervix and HIV viral load. CD103+CD8+ and CD103-CD8+ T cells expressed cytotoxic effector molecules in the ectocervical epithelium of healthy and HIV-infected women. Additionally, HIV-infected women had decreased frequencies of circulating CD103+CD8+ T cells. Our data provide insight into the distribution of CD8+ TRM cells in human genital mucosa, a critically important location for immune defense against pathogens, including HIV. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Localization and production of peptide endocannabinoids in the rodent CNS and adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefanie C; Ralvenius, William T; Gachet, M Salomé; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Gertsch, Jürg

    2015-11-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 and their endogenous arachidonic acid-derived agonists 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and anandamide, which play important neuromodulatory roles. Recently, a novel class of negative allosteric CB1 receptor peptide ligands, hemopressin-like peptides derived from alpha hemoglobin, has been described, with yet unknown origin and function in the CNS. Using monoclonal antibodies we now identified the localization of RVD-hemopressin (pepcan-12) and N-terminally extended peptide endocannabinoids (pepcans) in the CNS and determined their neuronal origin. Immunohistochemical analyses in rodents revealed distinctive and specific staining in major groups of noradrenergic neurons, including the locus coeruleus (LC), A1, A5 and A7 neurons, which appear to be major sites of production/release in the CNS. No staining was detected in dopaminergic neurons. Peptidergic axons were seen throughout the brain (notably hippocampus and cerebral cortex) and spinal cord, indicative of anterograde axonal transport of pepcans. Intriguingly, the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla were also strongly stained for pepcans. We found specific co-expression of pepcans with galanin, both in the LC and adrenal gland. Using LC-MS/MS, pepcan-12 was only detected in non-perfused brain (∼ 40 pmol/g), suggesting that in the CNS it is secreted and present in extracellular compartments. In adrenal glands, significantly more pepcan-12 (400-700 pmol/g) was measured in both non-perfused and perfused tissues. Thus, chromaffin cells may be a major production site of pepcan-12 found in blood. These data uncover important areas of peptide endocannabinoid occurrence with exclusive noradrenergic immunohistochemical staining, opening new doors to investigate their potential physiological function in the ECS. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Epidermis-dermis junction as a novel location for bone marrow-derived cells to reside in response to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Kurakane, Takeshi; Okamoto, Naoki; Morohashi, Keita; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2015-06-12

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) can migrate into the various organs in the mice irradiated by ionizing radiation (IR). However, it may not be the case in the skin. While IR is used for bone marrow (BM) transplantation, studying with the epidermal sheets demonstrated that the BMDC recruitment is extraordinarily rare in epidermis in the mouse. Herein, using the chimera mice with BM from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, we simply examined if BMDCs migrate into any layers in the total skin, as opposed to the epidermal sheets, in response to IR. Interestingly, we identified the presence of GFP-positive (GFP(+)) cells in the epidermis-dermis junction in the total skin sections although the epidermal cell sheets failed to have any GFP cells. To examine a possibility that the cells in the junction could be mechanically dissociated during separating epidermal sheets, we then salvaged such dissociated cells and examined its characteristics. Surprisingly, some GFP(+) cells were found in the salvaged cells, indicating that these cells could be derived from BM. In addition, such BMDCs were also associated with inflammation in the junction. In conclusion, BMDCs can migrate to and reside in the epidermis-dermis junction after IR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  12. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  13. Lung CD4 Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity Induced by Previous Infection of Mice withBordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Mieszko M; Misiak, Alicja; McManus, Róisín M; Allen, Aideen C; Lynch, Marina A; Mills, Kingston H G

    2017-07-01

    Th1 and Th17 cells have an established role in protective immunity to Bordetella pertussis , but this evidence is based largely on peripheral T cells. There is emerging evidence that local tissue-resident memory T (T RM ) cells that accumulate in tissue following mucosal infection may be crucial for long-term immunity. In this study, we examined the role of respiratory CD4 T RM cells in immunity to B. pertussis Natural immunity to B. pertussis induced by infection is considered long lasting and effective at preventing reinfection. Consistent with this, we found that convalescent mice rapidly cleared the bacteria after reinfection. Furthermore, CD4 T cells with a T RM cell phenotype (CD44 + CD62L - CD69 + or CD44 + CD62L - CD69 + CD103 + ) accumulated in the lungs of mice during infection with B. pertussis and significantly expanded through local proliferation following reinfection. These CD4 T RM cells were B. pertussis specific and secreted IL-17 or IL-17 and IFN-γ. Treatment of mice with FTY720, which prevented migration of T and B cells from lymph nodes to the circulation, significantly exacerbated B. pertussis infection. This was associated with significantly reduced infiltration of central memory T cells and B cells into the lungs. However, the local expansion of T RM cells and the associated rapid clearance of the secondary infection were not affected by treatment with FTY720 before rechallenge. Moreover, adoptive transfer of lung CD4 T RM cells conferred protection in naive mice. Our findings reveal that Ag-specific CD4 T RM cells play a critical role in adaptive immunity against reinfection and memory induced by natural infection with B. pertussis . Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A; Toprak, Umut H

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally...... diagnosed CNS-PNETs display molecular profiles indistinguishable from those of various other well-defined CNS tumor entities, facilitating diagnosis and appropriate therapy for patients with these tumors. From the remaining fraction of CNS-PNETs, we identify four new CNS tumor entities, each associated...... with a recurrent genetic alteration and distinct histopathological and clinical features. These new molecular entities, designated "CNS neuroblastoma with FOXR2 activation (CNS NB-FOXR2)," "CNS Ewing sarcoma family tumor with CIC alteration (CNS EFT-CIC)," "CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with MN1 alteration...

  15. Peripheral dendritic cells are essential for both the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Christina D.; Hahto, Suzanne M.; Ciavarra, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Intranasal application of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes acute infection of the central nervous system (CNS). However, VSV encephalitis is not invariably fatal, suggesting that the CNS may contain a professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) capable of inducing or propagating a protective antiviral immune response. To examine this possibility, we first characterized the cellular elements that infiltrate the brain as well as the activation status of resident microglia in the brains of normal and transgenic mice acutely ablated of peripheral dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. VSV encephalitis was characterized by a pronounced infiltrate of myeloid cells (CD45 high CD11b + ) and CD8 + T cells containing a subset that was specific for the immunodominant VSV nuclear protein epitope. This T cell response correlated temporally with a rapid and sustained upregulation of MHC class I expression on microglia, whereas class II expression was markedly delayed. Ablation of peripheral DCs profoundly inhibited the inflammatory response as well as infiltration of virus-specific CD8 + T cells. Unexpectedly, the VSV-induced interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response in the CNS remained intact in DC-deficient mice. Thus, both the inflammatory and certain components of the adaptive primary antiviral immune response in the CNS are dependent on peripheral DCs in vivo.

  16. A novel vaccination strategy mediating the induction of lung-resident memory CD8 T cells confers heterosubtypic immunity against future pandemic influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Min-Chul; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-01

    The currently used vaccine strategy to combat influenza A virus (IAV) aims to provide highly specific immunity to circulating seasonal IAV strains. However, the outbreak of 2009 influenza pandemic highlights the danger in this strategy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that universal vaccination that offers broader but weaker protection would result in cross protective T-cell responses after primary IAV infection, which would subsequently provide protective immunity against future pandemic strains. Specifically, we used tandem repeat M2e epitopes on virus-like particles (M2e5x VLP) that induced heterosubtypic immunity by eliciting antibodies to a conserved M2e epitope. M2e5x VLP was found to be superior to strain-specific current split vaccine in conferring heterosubtypic cross protection and in equipping the host with cross-protective lung-resident nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8+ T cell responses to a subsequent secondary infection with a new pandemic potential strain. Immune correlates for subsequent heterosubtypic immunity by M2e5x VLP vaccination were found to be virus-specific CD8+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and expressing lung-resident memory phenotypic markers CD69+ and CD103+ as well as M2e antibodies. Hence, vaccination with M2e5x VLP may be developable as a new strategy to combat future pandemic outbreaks. PMID:26864033

  17. Mer tyrosine kinase promotes the survival of t(1;19)-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sarah; Pfeiffer, Christian; Strube, Susanne; Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Loges, Sonja; Waizenegger, Jonas; Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Cario, Gunnar; Möricke, Anja; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M

    2015-01-29

    Patients with t(1;19)-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are prone to central nervous system (CNS) relapses, and expression of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, and Mer) receptor Mer is upregulated in these leukemias. We examined the functional role of Mer in the CNS in preclinical models and performed correlative studies in 64 t(1;19)-positive and 93 control pediatric ALL patients. ALL cells were analyzed in coculture with human glioma cells and normal rat astrocytes: CNS coculture caused quiescence and protection from methotrexate toxicity in Mer(high) ALL cell lines, which was antagonized by short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Mer. Mer expression was upregulated, prosurvival Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling were activated, and secretion of the Mer ligand Galectin-3 was stimulated. Mer(high) t(1;19) primary cells caused CNS involvement to a larger extent in murine xenografts than in their Mer(low) counterparts. Leukemic cells from Mer(high) xenografts showed enhanced survival in coculture. Treatment of Mer(high) patient cells with the Mer-specific inhibitor UNC-569 in vivo delayed leukemia onset, reduced CNS infiltration, and prolonged survival of mice. Finally, a correlation between high Mer expression and CNS positivity upon initial diagnosis was observed in t(1;19) patients. Our data provide evidence that Mer is associated with survival in the CNS in t(1;19)-positive ALL, suggesting a role as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Prospective evaluation of delayed central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Lohr, Frank; Fruehauf, Stefan; Wildermuth, Susanne; Kampen, Michael van; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of chronic radiation effects on the healthy adult brain using neuropsychological testing of intelligence, attention, and memory. Methods and Materials: 58 patients (43 ± 10 yr) undergoing hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (TBI, 14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy in 4 days) before bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were prospectively included. Twenty-one recurrence-free long-term survivors were re-examined 6-36 months (median 27 months) after completion of TBI. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence, attention, and memory using normative, standardized psychometric tests. Mood status was controlled, as well. Test results are given as IQ scores (population mean 100) or percentiles for attention and memory (population mean 50). Results: The 21 patients showed normal baseline test results of IQ (101 ± 13) and attention (53 ± 28), with memory test scores below average (35 ± 21). Test results of IQ (98 ± 17), attention (58 ± 27), and memory (43 ± 28) showed no signs of clinically measurable radiation damage to higher CNS (central nervous system) functions during the follow-up. The mood status was improved. Conclusion: The investigation of CNS toxicity after hyperfractionated TBI showed no deterioration of test results in adult recurrence-free patients with tumor-free CNS. The median follow-up of 27 months will be extended.

  19. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Isolated vasculitis of the CNS; Isolierte Vaskulitis des ZNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, F. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Reith, W. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    2000-11-01

    Vasculitis is a rare cause for disease of the CNS. The isolated vasculitis of the CNS is restricted to the CNS whereas other forms of vasculitis affect various organs including the CNS. Headache, encephalopathy, focal deficits and epileptic seizures are the major symptoms suggestive for vasculitis. One major criterion of the isolated vasculitis of the CNS is the lack of evidence for other vasculitis forms or for pathology of other organs. Angiography displays multifocal segmental stenosis of intracranial vessels. MRI demonstrates multiple lesions which in part show enhancement after gadolinium. A definite diagnosis can only be made on the grounds of biopsy from leptomeninges and parenchyma. Therapy consists of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid. (orig.) [German] Vaskulitiden sind eine seltene Ursache fuer Erkrankungen des ZNS. Die Vaskulitiden lassen sich in primaere und sekundaere einteilen, von denen sich die ueberwiegende Mehrzahl an verschiedenen Organsystemen einschliesslich dem ZNS manifestieren kann. Die isolierte ZNS-Vaskulitis ist auf das ZNS beschraenkt, bei ihr stehen klinisch-neurologisch wie bei den anderen Vaskulitisformen Kopfschmerzen, Enzephalopathie, fokale Defizite und epileptische Anfaelle im Vordergrund. Ein Kriterium der isolierten ZNS-Vaskulitis ist der klinische und laborchemische Ausschluss anderer Vaskulitiden bzw. der Beteiligung anderer Organsysteme. Multiple Kaliberspruenge intrakranieller Arterien in der zerebralen Angiographie und multiple, kleine, z.T. kontrastmittelaufnehmende Laesionen in der MRT des Schaedels sind vaskulitistypische Befunde, die allerdings auch bei anderen Vaskulitiden zu finden sind. Einzig beweisend ist eine Hirnhaut- und Hirnparenchymbiopsie. Besonders vor dem Hintergrund der therapeutischen Option, Immunsuppression mit Kortison und Cyclophosphamid, ist eine moeglichst genaue Diagnose erforderlich. (orig.)

  1. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Prospects for the development of epigenetic drugs for CNS conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyf, Moshe

    2015-07-01

    Advances in our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and their role in neuropsychiatric disorders are paving the way for a potential new therapeutic approach that is focused on reversing the epigenetic underpinnings of neuropsychiatric conditions. In this article, the complexity of epigenetic processes and the current level of proof for their involvement in CNS disorders are discussed. The preclinical evidence for efficacy of pharmacological approaches that target epigenetics in the CNS and the particular challenges of this approach are also examined. Finally, strategies to address these challenges through the development of improved evidence-based epigenetic therapeutics and through combining pharmacological and behavioural approaches are presented.

  3. The Effect of the Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus on the Regeneration Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-Goo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Following central nervous system(CNS injury, inhibitory influences at the site of axonal damage occur. Glial cells become reactive and form a glial scar, gliosis. Also myelin debris such as MAG inhibits axonal regeneration. Astrocyte-rich gliosis relates with up-regulation of GFAP and CD81, and eventually becomes physical and mechanical barrier to axonal regeneration. MAG is one of several endogenous axon regeneration inhibitors that limit recovery from CNS injury and disease. It was reported that molecules that block such inhibitors enhanced axon regeneration and functional recovery. Recently it was reported that treatment with anti-CD81 antibodies enhanced functional recovery in the rat with spinal cord injury. So in this current study, the author investigated the effect of the water extract of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus on the regulation of CD81, GFAP and MAG that increase when gliosis occurs. Methods : MTT assay was performed to examine cell viability, and cell-based ELISA, western blot and PCR were used to detect the expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG. Then also immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm in vivo. Results : Water extract of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus showed relatively high cell viability at the concentration of 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.5%. The expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG in astrocytes was decreased after the administration of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus water extract. These results was confirmed in the brain sections following cortical stab injury by immunohistochemistry. Conclusion : The authors observed that Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus significantly down-regulates the expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG. These results suggest that Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus can be a candidate to regenerate CNS injury.

  4. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming; Kosterin, Paul; Salzberg, Brian M.; Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Thom, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice

  5. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kosterin, Paul [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Salzberg, Brian M. [Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M. [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Thom, Stephen R., E-mail: sthom@smail.umaryland.edu [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in naïve mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: • Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. • MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. • CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. • Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  6. Immune Players in the CNS : The Astrocyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Cathy J.; Massie, Ann; De Keyser, Jacques

    In the finely balanced environment of the central nervous system astrocytes, the most numerous cell type, play a role in regulating almost every physiological system. First found to regulate extracellular ions and pH, they have since been shown to regulate neurotransmitter levels, cerebral blood

  7. γH2AX expression as adaptive response of lymphocyte cells in resident of Takandeang village area with high background natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iin Kurnia; Teja Kisnanto; Yanti Lusiyanti

    2016-01-01

    Resident that living in high natural radiation has the potential for DNA damage due to exposure to radiation as a part of radiation adaptive response. It has also potentially initiation of genome instability that can cause cancer cell. DNA damage which can be observed with the γH2AX as biomarkers of DNA double strand break. This study aims to determine the expression γH2AX as the adaptive response of lymphocyte of populations living in areas with high natural radiation after being irradiated with challenge dose of 2 Gy. Blood samples from 12 residents were irradiated with 2 Gy and then the detection and counting of γH2AX foci were performed before and after irradiation at 50 lymphocyte cells. From the results study it was found a significant increase in the number of γH2AX foci in lymphocytes after receiving irradiation (p = 0.004). There were no significant differences in the number of γH2AX foci by age and gender either prior to or after irradiation. From this data we can conclude that 2 Gy irradiation directly causes DNA damage as in vitro adaptive response that observed by expression of γH2AX foci. (author)

  8. Social basis for solar cells on rented houses. Decision making in the PV-project in Heerhugowaard and the experiences of residents and neighbours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Mierlo, B.; Van Roekel, A.; Westra, C.

    1994-11-01

    At the end of ten solar homes were officially opened in the newly built area Butterhuizen in Heerhugowaard, Netherlands. Those houses are provided with grid-connected solar cell systems on the roof to generate electricity that is supplied to the grid. The solar panels are owned by the regional energy utility (PEN) and allowed by the renter of the dwellings. In this report of the demonstration project three years of experiences and opinions of organizations and residents, involved in the project, are evaluated. The results give a first indication of the chances and constraints to apply solar cells in the housing construction in the Netherlands. 4 figs., 3 ills., 17 tabs., 13 refs., 3 appendices

  9. Tissues Use Resident Dendritic Cells and Macrophages to Maintain Homeostasis and to Regain Homeostasis upon Tissue Injury: The Immunoregulatory Role of Changing Tissue Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Lech

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most tissues harbor resident mononuclear phagocytes, that is, dendritic cells and macrophages. A classification that sufficiently covers their phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity during homeostasis and disease does not yet exist because cell culture-based phenotypes often do not match those found in vivo. The plasticity of mononuclear phagocytes becomes obvious during dynamic or complex disease processes. Different data interpretation also originates from different conceptual perspectives. An immune-centric view assumes that a particular priming of phagocytes then causes a particular type of pathology in target tissues, conceptually similar to antigen-specific T-cell priming. A tissue-centric view assumes that changing tissue microenvironments shape the phenotypes of their resident and infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes to fulfill the tissue's need to maintain or regain homeostasis. Here we discuss the latter concept, for example, why different organs host different types of mononuclear phagocytes during homeostasis. We further discuss how injuries alter tissue environments and how this primes mononuclear phagocytes to enforce this particular environment, for example, to support host defense and pathogen clearance, to support the resolution of inflammation, to support epithelial and mesenchymal healing, and to support the resolution of fibrosis to the smallest possible scar. Thus, organ- and disease phase-specific microenvironments determine macrophage and dendritic cell heterogeneity in a temporal and spatial manner, which assures their support to maintain and regain homeostasis in whatever condition. Mononuclear phagocytes contributions to tissue pathologies relate to their central roles in orchestrating all stages of host defense and wound healing, which often become maladaptive processes, especially in sterile and/or diffuse tissue injuries.

  10. CNS Intravascular Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Awad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular lymphoma is a rare but well-described entity. The clinical manifestations are heterogeneous. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented initially with syncope followed by subacute cognitive decline that progressed to minimally conscious state. Shortly after the transfer to our tertiary center the patient died. Brain autopsy disclosed the diagnosis of B-cell intravascular lymphoma. We speculate that syncope could be the first manifestation of central nervous system intravascular lymphoma and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained syncope. In addition, we stress the importance of early brain biopsy in unexplained white matter disease.

  11. Microglia and mast cells: two tracks on the road to neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, Stephen D; Giusti, Pietro; Facci, Laura

    2012-08-01

    One of the more important recent advances in neuroscience research is the understanding that there is extensive communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Proinflammatory cytokines play a key role in this communication. The emerging realization is that glia and microglia, in particular, (which are the brain's resident macrophages), constitute an important source of inflammatory mediators and may have fundamental roles in CNS disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to proinflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, principally those of immune origin. Mast cells are of particular relevance in this context. These immunity-related cells, while resident in the CNS, are capable of migrating across the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers in situations where the barrier is compromised as a result of CNS pathology. Emerging evidence suggests the possibility of mast cell-glia communications and opens exciting new perspectives for designing therapies to target neuroinflammation by differentially modulating the activation of non-neuronal cells normally controlling neuronal sensitization, both peripherally and centrally. This review aims to provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells, in particular, and the possibility that mast cell-microglia crosstalk may contribute to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerate disease progression, as well as promote pain transmission pathways. We conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signaling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings.

  12. Analysis of neurocognitive function and CNS endpoints in the PROTEA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Amanda; Johanssen, Veronika; Gerstoft, Jan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During treatment with protease inhibitor monotherapy, the number of antiretrovirals with therapeutic concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is lower, compared to standard triple therapy. However, the clinical consequences are unclear. METHODS: A total of 273 patients with HIV...... RNA Colour Trail Tests...... events related to the CNS were collected at each visit. RESULTS: Patients were 83% male and 88% White, with median age 43 years. There were more patients with nadir CD4 count below 200 cells/µL in the DRV/r monotherapy arm (41/137, 30%) than the triple therapy arm (30/136, 22%). At Week 48...

  13. Molecularly-Driven Doublet Therapy for Recurrent CNS Malignant Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-20

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Ganglioglioma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma, Anaplastic; Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Brain Cancer; Brain Tumor; Central Nervous System Neoplasms; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; CNS Embryonal Tumor With Rhabdoid Features; Ganglioneuroblastoma of Central Nervous System; CNS Tumor; Embryonal Tumor of CNS; Ependymoma; Glioblastoma; Glioma; Glioma, Malignant; Medulloblastoma; Medulloblastoma; Unspecified Site; Medulloepithelioma; Neuroepithelial Tumor; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Neuroepithelial; Papillary Tumor of the Pineal Region (High-grade Only); Pediatric Brain Tumor; Pineal Parenchymal Tumor of Intermediate Differentiation (High-grade Only); Pineoblastoma; Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Refractory Brain Tumor; Neuroblastoma. CNS; Glioblastoma, IDH-mutant; Glioblastoma, IDH-wildtype; Medulloblastoma, Group 3; Medulloblastoma, Group 4; Glioma, High Grade; Neuroepithelial Tumor, High Grade; Medulloblastoma, SHH-activated and TP53 Mutant; Medulloblastoma, SHH-activated and TP53 Wildtype; Medulloblastoma, Chromosome 9q Loss; Medulloblastoma, Non-WNT Non-SHH, NOS; Medulloblastoma, Non-WNT/Non-SHH; Medulloblastoma, PTCH1 Mutation; Medulloblastoma, WNT-activated; Ependymoma, Recurrent; Glioma, Recurrent High Grade; Glioma, Recurrent Malignant; Embryonal Tumor, NOS; Glioma, Diffuse Midline, H3K27M-mutant; Embryonal Tumor With Multilayered Rosettes (ETMR); Ependymoma, NOS, WHO Grade III; Ependymoma, NOS, WHO Grade II; Medulloblastoma, G3/G4; Ependymoma, RELA Fusion Positive

  14. A map of taste neuron projections in the Drosophila CNS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We provide a map of the projections of taste neurons in the CNS of Drosophila. Using a collection of 67 GAL4 drivers representing the entire repertoire of Gr taste receptors, we systematically map the projections of neurons expressing these drivers in the thoracico-abdominal ganglion and the suboesophageal ganglion ...

  15. Problems of prophylactic CNS radiotherapy in acute children's leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, V.; Pribylova, O.; Abrahamova, J.; Hynieova, H.; Hrodek, O.

    1980-01-01

    The prophylactic treatment of the CNS was conducted by cobalt teletherapy of the cranium and by intrathecal application of MTX after the induction of primary remission in 70 children with acute leukemia throughout 5 years up to the end of 1978. The method of the combined radio- and chemoprophylaxis of the CNS was being changed during the years, especially as far as the radiation dose for the cranium was concerned. A detailed analysis made in a group of 59 children with the minimum interval of 18 months from the beginning of the treatment showed the best results after the application of a dose of 24 Gy/3 weeks. Following this procedure the relapse of leukemia in the CNS occurred in 9% only, whereas on the application of doses of 20 Gy and lower it occurred in 35 to 40%. On the whole 24 out of 59 children, i.e. 41%, are surviving, 35 children, i.e. 59%, died. Mostly complete, but only temporary, epilation was an invariable consequence of the irradiation of the cranium. The somnolence syndrome was only sporadically observed. It cannot be excluded, however, that some of its forms in patients discharged from hospital escaped attention. No case was recorded of serious impairment of the CNS of the leukoencephalopathic type. Up to now the psychomotor, intellectual and emotional development of the surviving children has been normal. (author)

  16. Neurolymphomatosis: An International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Grisariu (Sigal); B. Avni (Batia); T.T. Batchelor (Tracy); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); F. Bokstein (Felix); D. Schiff (David); O. Kuittinen (Outi); M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); P. Roth (Patrick); A. Nemets (Anatoly); E. Shalom (Edna); D. Ben-Yehuda (Dina); T. Siegal (Tali)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNeurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare clinical entity. The International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group retrospectively analyzed 50 patients assembled from 12 centers in 5 countries over a 16-year period. NL was related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 90% and to acute leukemia in 10%.

  17. Sleep disorders in children after treatment for a CNS tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term survival of children with a central nervous system (CNS) tumour is improving. However, they experience late effects, including altered habits and patterns of sleep. We evaluated the presence and type of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness in these children, and its associations with

  18. Commentary on Special Issue : CNS Diseases and the Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F.

    In an increasing number of central nervous system (CNS) diseases a pathogenic contribution of the immune system is proposed. However, the exact underlying mechanisms are often poorly understood. The collection of articles in this special issue presents a state-of-the-art review of adaptive and

  19. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development: 2016 conference insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Abrey, Lauren E; Heffron, Timothy P; Tonge, Peter J; Dar, Arvin C; Weiss, William A; Gallo, James M

    2017-07-18

    CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development November 2016, AZ, USA The 2016 second CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference addressed diverse viewpoints about why new drug discovery/development focused on CNS cancers has been sorely lacking. Despite more than 70,000 individuals in the USA being diagnosed with a primary brain malignancy and 151,669-286,486 suffering from metastatic CNS cancer, in 1999, temozolomide was the last drug approved by the US FDA as an anticancer agent for high-grade gliomas. Among the topics discussed were economic factors and pharmaceutical risk assessments, regulatory constraints and perceptions and the need for improved imaging surrogates of drug activity. Included were modeling tumor growth and drug effects in a medical environment in which direct tumor sampling for biological effects can be problematic, potential new drugs under investigation and targets for drug discovery and development. The long trajectory and diverse impediments to novel drug discovery, and expectation that more than one drug will be needed to adequately inhibit critical intracellular tumor pathways were viewed as major disincentives for most pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies. While there were a few unanimities, one consensus is the need for continued and focused discussion among academic and industry scientists and clinicians to address tumor targets, new drug chemistry, and more time- and cost-efficient clinical trials based on surrogate end points.

  20. CNS and inflammation | Tomoum | Egyptian Journal of Pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. CNS and inflammation. Hoda Y ...

  1. Glial cells and volume transmission in the CNS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Chvátal, Alexandr

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2000), s. 397-409 ISSN 0197-0186 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226; GA ČR GV309/97/K048; GA ČR GA309/99/0657; GA ČR GA305/99/0655; GA MŠk VS96130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : ion homeostasis * glia * tortuossity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.662, year: 2000

  2. The spectrum of post-vaccination inflammatory CNS demyelinating syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota

    2014-03-01

    A wide variety of inflammatory diseases temporally associated with the administration of various vaccines, has been reported in the literature. A PubMed search from 1979 to 2013 revealed seventy one (71) documented cases. The most commonly reported vaccinations that were associated with CNS demyelinating diseases included influenza (21 cases), human papilloma virus (HPV) (9 cases), hepatitis A or B (8 cases), rabies (5 cases), measles (5 cases), rubella (5 cases), yellow fever (3 cases), anthrax (2 cases),meningococcus (2 cases) and tetanus (2 cases). The vast majority of post-vaccination CNS demyelinating syndromes, are related to influenza vaccination and this could be attributed to the high percentage of the population that received the vaccine during the HI1N1 epidemia from 2009 to 2012. Usually the symptoms of the CNS demyelinating syndrome appear few days following the immunization (mean: 14.2 days) but there are cases where the clinical presentation was delayed (more than 3 weeks or even up to 5 months post-vaccination) (approximately a third of all the reported cases). In terms of the clinical presentation and the affected CNS areas, there is a great diversity among the reported cases of post-vaccination acute demyelinating syndromes. Optic neuritis was the prominent clinical presentation in 38 cases, multifocal disseminated demyelination in 30, myelitis in 24 and encephalitis in 17. Interestingly in a rather high proportion of the patients (and especially following influenza and human papiloma virus vaccination-HPV) the dominant localizations of demyelination were the optic nerves and the myelon, presenting as optic neuritis and myelitis (with or without additional manifestations of ADEM), reminiscent to neuromyelitic optica (or, more generally, the NMO-spectrum of diseases). Seven patients suffered an NMO-like disease following HPV and we had two similar cases in our Center. One patient with post-vaccination ADEM, subsequently developed NMO. Overall, the

  3. Mock-up tests on the combustion of hydrogen air mixture in the vertical tube simulating the CNS channel of the CARR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Xu, Jian

    2007-01-01

    A two-phase thermo-siphon loop for removing nuclear heating and maintaining the stable liquid level in the moderator cell was adopted for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China advanced research reactor (CARR). The moderator is liquid hydrogen. The two-phase thermo-siphon loop consists of the crescent-shape moderator cell, the moderator transfer tube, and the condenser. The hydrogen is supplied from the buffer tank to the condenser. The main feature of the loop is that the moderator cell is covered by the helium sub-cooling system. The cold helium gas from the helium refrigerator is firstly introduced into the helium sub-cooling system and then flows up through the tube covering the moderator transfer tube into the condenser. The main part of this system is installed in the CNS vertical channel made of aluminum alloy 6061 T6 (Al-6061-T6) of 6 mm in thickness, 270 mm in outer diameter and about 6 m in height. For confirming the safety of the CNS channel, the combustion tests using a tube compatible with the CNS channel were carried out using the hydrogen-air mixture under which air is introduced into the tube at 1 atmosphere, and then hydrogen gas is supplied from the gas cylinder up to the test pressures. And maximum test pressure is 0.14 MPa G. This condition is involved with the maximum design basis accident of the CARR-CNS. The peak pressure due to combustion was 1.09 MPa, and the design pressure of the CNS channel is 3 MPa. The safety of the CNS was thus verified even if the maximum design basis accident occurs. The pressure and stress distributions along the axial direction and the displacement of the tube were also measured.

  4. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exerts CNS region-specific effects on rat microglial inflammatory and TLR4 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M C Smith

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH during sleep is a hallmark of sleep apnea, causing significant neuronal apoptosis, and cognitive and behavioral deficits in CNS regions underlying memory processing and executive functions. IH-induced neuroinflammation is thought to contribute to cognitive deficits after IH. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that IH would differentially induce inflammatory factor gene expression in microglia in a CNS region-dependent manner, and that the effects of IH would differ temporally. To test this hypothesis, adult rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (2 min intervals of 10.5% O2 for 8 hours/day during their respective sleep cycles for 1, 3 or 14 days. Cortex, medulla and spinal cord tissues were dissected, microglia were immunomagnetically isolated and mRNA levels of the inflammatory genes iNOS, COX-2, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 and the innate immune receptor TLR4 were compared to levels in normoxia. Inflammatory gene expression was also assessed in tissue homogenates (containing all CNS cells. We found that microglia from different CNS regions responded to IH differently. Cortical microglia had longer lasting inflammatory gene expression whereas spinal microglial gene expression was rapid and transient. We also observed that inflammatory gene expression in microglia frequently differed from that in tissue homogenates from the same region, indicating that cells other than microglia also contribute to IH-induced neuroinflammation. Lastly, microglial TLR4 mRNA levels were strongly upregulated by IH in a region- and time-dependent manner, and the increase in TLR4 expression appeared to coincide with timing of peak inflammatory gene expression, suggesting that TLR4 may play a role in IH-induced neuroinflammation. Together, these data indicate that microglial-specific neuroinflammation may play distinct roles in the effects of intermittent hypoxia in different CNS regions.

  5. Dual DNA methylation patterns in the CNS reveal developmentally poised chromatin and monoallelic expression of critical genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    Full Text Available As a first step towards discovery of genes expressed from only one allele in the CNS, we used a tiling array assay for DNA sequences that are both methylated and unmethylated (the MAUD assay. We analyzed regulatory regions of the entire mouse brain transcriptome, and found that approximately 10% of the genes assayed showed dual DNA methylation patterns. They include a large subset of genes that display marks of both active and silent, i.e., poised, chromatin during development, consistent with a link between differential DNA methylation and lineage-specific differentiation within the CNS. Sixty-five of the MAUD hits and 57 other genes whose function is of relevance to CNS development and/or disorders were tested for allele-specific expression in F(1 hybrid clonal neural stem cell (NSC lines. Eight MAUD hits and one additional gene showed such expression. They include Lgi1, which causes a subtype of inherited epilepsy that displays autosomal dominance with incomplete penetrance; Gfra2, a receptor for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF that has been linked to kindling epilepsy; Unc5a, a netrin-1 receptor important in neurodevelopment; and Cspg4, a membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan associated with malignant melanoma and astrocytoma in human. Three of the genes, Camk2a, Kcnc4, and Unc5a, show preferential expression of the same allele in all clonal NSC lines tested. The other six genes show a stochastic pattern of monoallelic expression in some NSC lines and bi-allelic expression in others. These results support the estimate that 1-2% of genes expressed in the CNS may be subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate that the group includes genes implicated in major disorders of the CNS as well as neurodevelopment.

  6. Sendai Virus Mucosal Vaccination Establishes Lung-Resident Memory CD8 T Cell Immunity and Boosts BCG-Primed Protection against TB in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhidong; Wong, Ka-Wing; Zhao, Hui-Min; Wen, Han-Li; Ji, Ping; Ma, Hui; Wu, Kang; Lu, Shui-Hua; Li, Feng; Li, Zhong-Ming; Shu, Tsugumine; Xu, Jian-Qing; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2017-05-03

    Accumulating evidence has shown the protective role of CD8 + T cells in vaccine-induced immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) despite controversy over their role in natural immunity. However, the current vaccine BCG is unable to induce sufficient CD8 + T cell responses, especially in the lung. Sendai virus, a respiratory RNA virus, is here engineered firstly as a novel recombinant anti-TB vaccine (SeV85AB) that encodes Mtb immuno-dominant antigens, Ag85A and Ag85B. A single mucosal vaccination elicited potent antigen-specific T cell responses and a degree of protection against Mtb challenge similar to the effect of BCG in mice. Depletion of CD8 + T cells abrogated the protective immunity afforded by SeV85AB vaccination. Interestingly, only SeV85AB vaccination induced high levels of lung-resident memory CD8 + T (T RM ) cells, and this led to a rapid and strong recall of antigen-specific CD8 + T cell responses against Mtb challenge infection. Furthermore, when used in a BCG prime-SeV85AB boost strategy, SeV85AB vaccine significantly enhanced protection above that seen after BCG vaccination alone. Our findings suggest that CD8 + T RM cells that arise in lungs responding to this mucosal vaccination might help to protect against TB, and SeV85AB holds notable promise to improve BCG's protective efficacy in a prime-boost immunization regimen. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering probes based on TAT peptide-conjugated Au nanostars for distinguishing the differentiation of lung resident mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chaowen; Cao, Xiaowei; Chen, Xiang; Sun, Zhaorui; Xiang, Zou; Zhao, Hang; Qian, Weiping; Han, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Lung resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) are important regulators of pathophysiological processes including tissue repair and fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Therefore, increasing attention has focused on the functional differentiation of LR-MSCs. However, the distinction between the undifferentiated and differentiated LR-MSCs, which are closely related and morphologically similar, is difficult to achieve by conventional methods. In this study, by employing the TAT Peptide-conjugated Au nanostars (AuNSs) as an intracellular probe, we developed a method for the identification of LR-MSC differentiation by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. SERS spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) that allowed unambiguous distinction of subtypes and monitoring of component changes during cellular differentiation. Furthermore, to ascertain whether co-culture with alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells and incubation with transform growth factor (TGF)-β were involved in regulating the differentiation of LR-MSCs, we investigated the protein expression levels of epithelial markers and fibroblastic markers on LR-MSCs. Our results demonstrated that co-culture with ATII cells or incubation with TGF-β could induce the differentiation of LR-MSCs as confirmed by SERS analysis, a method that is capable of noninvasive characterization of and distinction between subtypes of LR-MSCs during differentiation. We have provided a new tool that may facilitate stem cell research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  9. Potential Role of Oxidative Stress in mediating the Effect of Hypergravity on the Developing CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Lipinski, B.

    The present studies will explore the mechanisms through which altered gravity affects the developing CNS We have previously shown that exposure to hypergravity during the perinatal period adversely impacts cerebellar structure and function Pregnant rat dams were exposed to 1 65 G on a 24-ft centrifuge at NASA-ARC from gestational day G 5 through giving birth Both dams and their offspring remained at 1 65 G until pups reached postnatal day P 21 Control rats were raised under identical conditions in stationary cages On P21 motor behavior as determined by performance on a rotorod was more negatively impacted in hypergravity-exposed HG male 39 5 than in HG female pups 29 1 The total number of Purkinje cells determined stereologically in cerebella isolated from a subset of P21 rats was decreased in both HG males and HG female pups but the correlation between Purkinje cell number and rotorod performance was more consistent in male pups The level of 3-nitrosotyrosine 3-NT an index of oxidative damage to proteins was determined by ELISA in cerebellar tissue derived from a separate subset of P21 rats The level of 3-NT was increased by 127 in HG males but only 42 in HG females These results suggest that the effect of altered gravity on the developing brain may be mediated by oxidative stress These results also suggest that the developing male CNS may be more sensitive to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress than the developing female CNS Supported by NIEHS grant ES11946-01

  10. Auditory system physiology (CNS) : behavioral studies psychoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Neff, William

    1975-01-01

    nerve; subsequently, however, they concluded that the recordings had been from aberrant cells of the cochlear nucleus lying central to the glial margin of the VIII nerve (GALAMBOS and DAVIS, 1948). The first successful recordmgs from fibres of the cochlear nerve were made by TASAKI (1954) in the guinea pig. These classical but necessarily limited results were greatly extended by ROSE, GALAMBOS, and HUGHES (1959) in the cat cochlear nucleus and by KATSUKI and co-workers (KATSUKI et at. , 1958, 1961, 1962) in the cat and monkey cochlear nerve. Perhaps the most significant developments have been the introduction of techniques for precise control of the acoustic stimulus and the quantitative analysis of neuronal response patterns, notably by the laboratories of KIANG (e. g. GERSTEIN and KIANG, 1960; KIANG et at. , 1962b, 1965a, 1967) and ROSE (e. g. ROSE et at. , 1967; HIND et at. , 1967). These developments have made possible a large number of quanti­ tative investigations of the behaviour of representative num...

  11. Characterization of NCR1+ cells residing in lymphoid tissues in the gut of lambs indicates that the majority are NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Line; Boysen, Preben; Åkesson, Caroline Piercey; Gunnes, Gjermund; Connelley, Timothy; Storset, Anne K; Espenes, Arild

    2013-11-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important for immune protection of the gut mucosa. Previous studies have shown that under pathologic conditions NK cells, T cells and dendritic cells are found co-localised in secondary lymphoid organs where their interaction coordinates immune responses. However, in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), there are few detailed reports on the distribution of NK cells. Sheep harbour several types of organised lymphoid tissues in the gut that have different functions. The ileal Peyer's patch (IPP) functions as a primary lymphoid tissue for B cell generation, while the jejunal Peyer's patches (JPPs) and colon patches (CPs) are considered secondary lymphoid tissues. In the present study, we analysed tissues from healthy lambs by flow cytometry and in situ multicolour immunofluorescence, using recently described NCR1 antibodies to identify ovine NK cells. Most NCR1+ cells isolated from all tissues were negative for the pan T cell marker CD3, and thus comply with the general definition of NK cells. The majority of NCR1+ cells in blood as well as secondary lymphoid organs expressed CD16, but in the GALT around half of the NCR1+ cells were negative for CD16. A semi-quantitative morphometric study on tissue sections was used to compare the density of NK cells in four compartments of the IPPs, JPP and CPs. NCR1+ cells were found in all gut segments. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between compartments of the primary lymphoid organ IPP and the secondary lymphoid organs of the JPPs and CP. NK cells co-localised and made close contact with T cells, dendritic cells and other NK cells, but did not show signs of proliferation. We conclude that NK cells are present in all investigated segments of the sheep gut, but that presence of other innate lymphoid cells expressing NCR1 cannot be excluded.

  12. Predicting Drug Concentration-Time Profiles in Multiple CNS Compartments Using a Comprehensive Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Välitalo, Pyry A; Huntjens, Dymphy R; Proost, Johannes H; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W; van den Berg, Dirk-Jan; Hartman, Robin; Wong, Yin Cheong; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, John G C; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2017-01-01

    Drug development targeting the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to poor predictability of drug concentrations in various CNS compartments. We developed a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for prediction of drug concentrations in physiologically relevant CNS

  13. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  14. Functional conservation of atonal and Math1 in the CNS and PNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arie, N.; Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; Malicki, D. M.; Armstrong, D.; Matzuk, M.; Bellen, H. J.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the extent to which atonal and its mouse homolog Math1 exhibit functional conservation, we inserted (beta)-galactosidase (lacZ) into the Math1 locus and analyzed its expression, evaluated consequences of loss of Math1 function, and expressed Math1 in atonal mutant flies. lacZ under the control of Math1 regulatory elements duplicated the previously known expression pattern of Math1 in the CNS (i.e., the neural tube, dorsal spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellar external granule neurons) but also revealed new sites of expression: PNS mechanoreceptors (inner ear hair cells and Merkel cells) and articular chondrocytes. Expressing Math1 induced ectopic chordotonal organs (CHOs) in wild-type flies and partially rescued CHO loss in atonal mutant embryos. These data demonstrate that both the mouse and fly homologs encode lineage identity information and, more interestingly, that some of the cells dependent on this information serve similar mechanoreceptor functions.

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, a lysosomal storage disease, triggers a pathogenic CNS autoimmune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovich Phillip G

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, using a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IIIB, a lysosomal storage disease with severe neurological deterioration, we showed that MPS IIIB neuropathology is accompanied by a robust neuroinflammatory response of unknown consequence. This study was to assess whether MPS IIIB lymphocytes are pathogenic. Methods Lymphocytes from MPS IIIB mice were adoptively transferred to naïve wild-type mice. The recipient animals were then evaluated for signs of disease and inflammation in the central nervous system. Results Our results show for the first time, that lymphocytes isolated from MPS IIIB mice caused a mild paralytic disease when they were injected systemically into naïve wild-type mice. This disease is characterized by mild tail and lower trunk weakness with delayed weight gain. The MPS IIIB lymphocytes also trigger neuroinflammation within the CNS of recipient mice characterized by an increase in transcripts of IL2, IL4, IL5, IL17, TNFα, IFNα and Ifi30, and intraparenchymal lymphocyte infiltration. Conclusions Our data suggest that an autoimmune response directed at CNS components contributes to MPS IIIB neuropathology independent of lysosomal storage pathology. Adoptive transfer of purified T-cells will be needed in future studies to identify specific effector T-cells in MPS IIIB neuroimmune pathogenesis.

  16. Astrocyte-Secreted Matricellular Proteins in CNS Remodelling during Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma V. Jones

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Matricellular proteins are secreted, nonstructural proteins that regulate the extracellular matrix (ECM and interactions between cells through modulation of growth factor signaling, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Despite being well described in the context of nonneuronal tissues, recent studies have revealed that these molecules may also play instrumental roles in central nervous system (CNS development and diseases. In this minireview, we discuss the matricellular protein families SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, Hevin/SC1 (SPARC-like 1, TN-C (Tenascin C, TSP (Thrombospondin, and CCN (CYR61/CTGF/NOV, which are secreted by astrocytes during development. These proteins exhibit a reduced expression in adult CNS but are upregulated in reactive astrocytes following injury or disease, where they are well placed to modulate the repair processes such as tissue remodeling, axon regeneration, glial scar formation, angiogenesis, and rewiring of neural circuitry. Conversely, their reexpression in reactive astrocytes may also lead to detrimental effects and promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  18. Tendencies the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Jimenez Medina, Jose

    2004-01-01

    It is known that the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) tumors is based on the use of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) and that chemotherapy (QMT) is used even more, as well as the other drugs. A bibliographic review was made to update the knowledge on the current trends and perspectives of RT applied to CNS tumors. The following were found among them: a) combinations of RT and CMT; b) radiosensitizers incorporated to the radiant treatment; c) angiogenesis inhibitors associated with RT; d) the scale-up or increase of the RT doses thanks to the development of new technologies, such as 3 D conformal radiotherapy, intensity- modulated radiotherapy, surgery and others. Another field of research is that of the changes in the rhythm or fractioning of the RT: hyperfractionated, accelerated, combinations of both, etc., which will allow mainly to increase the dosage scale-up

  19. CNS relapse in a low risk acute promyelocytic leukemia patient treated with ATRA-based regimen: is there a role for prophylactic CNS therapy in acute promyelocytic leukemia?

    OpenAIRE

    Gangadharan, K. V.; Prabhu, Raghuveer; Mampilly, Neena

    2009-01-01

    Though the incidence of CNS relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3 FAB classification) has increased following the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), still CNS relapse accounts for only 2–3% of all relapses in AML-M3 trated with standard ATRA plus chemotherapy regimen. We report a case of low risk AML-M3 treated with standard therapy, developing CNS relapse while on maintenance therapy with ATRA + 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) + methotrexate (MTX).

  20. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Fan; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-01-01

    Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN) of the central nervous system (CNS), there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat.

  1. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M Bráz

    Full Text Available Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN of the central nervous system (CNS, there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat.

  2. Blood-CNS Barrier Impairment in ALS Patients versus an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana eGarbuzova-Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a severe neurodegenerative disease with a compli-cated and poorly understood pathogenesis. Recently, alterations in the blood-Central Nervous System barrier (B-CNS-B have been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage. The majority of findings on ALS microvascular pathology have been deter-mined in mutant SOD1 rodent models, identifying barrier damage during disease develop-ment which might similarly occur in familial ALS patients carrying the SOD1 mutation. However, our knowledge of B-CNS-B competence in sporadic ALS (SALS has been limited. We recently showed structural and functional impairment in postmortem gray and white mat-ter microvessels of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients, suggesting pervasive barrier damage. Although numerous signs of barrier impairment (endothelial cell degenera-tion, capillary leakage, perivascular edema, downregulation of tight junction proteins, and microhemorrhages are indicated in both mutant SOD1 animal models of ALS and SALS pa-tients, other pathogenic barrier alterations have as yet only been identified in SALS patients. Pericyte degeneration, perivascular collagen IV expansion, and white matter capillary abnor-malities in SALS patients are significant barrier related pathologies yet to be noted in ALS SOD1 animal models. In the current review, these important differences in blood-CNS barrier damage between ALS patients and animal models, which may signify altered barrier transport mechanisms, are discussed. Understanding discrepancies in barrier condition between ALS patients and animal models may be crucial for developing effective therapies.

  3. Morphological evaluation of fetus CNS and its related anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Katayama, Kazuaki; Mochizuki, Matsuto

    1989-01-01

    The fetus central nervous system was evaluated morphologically by ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT scan to analyze the prenatal diagnostic value for CNS anomalies. A total of 31 patients with 42 lesions had been diagnosed during the preceding 7 years. The patients included 24 with hydrocephalus, three with anencephaly, three with myeloschisis, three with holoprosencephaly, three with an encephalocele, two with a Dandy-Walker cyst, one with hydroencephalodysplasia, one with an intracranial neoplasm, one with sacrococcygeal teratoma, and one with sacral agenesis. Compared with US and MRI, CT proved to be more accurate in the detection of spine and cranium-bone morphology. This finding seems to be valuable in the diagnosis of spina bifida, cranium bifidum and some cases of hypertensive hydrocephalus, especially in the axial view. MRI was definitely superior in the anatomico-pathological diagnosis of cerebral dysgenesis, ventriculomegaly, intracranial tumors, and other brain parenchymal changes in view of multi-dimensional analysis. The most considerable disadvantage of MRI in the diagnosis of a fetus CNS anomaly is the poor information about spine and cranium morphology. A super-conducting MRI system is still insufficient to demonstrate the spinal cord of a fetus. US was routinely used, and the multidimensional slices were useful for screening the CNS abnormalies. Some of the fetus brain lesions, such as intracranial hematomas, had a specific echogenecity on US. However, US sometimes failed to demarcate the cerebral parenchymal or subdural morphological changes because its artifacts had hyperchoic shadows. While US, MRI, and CT were valuable diagnostic tools in the morphological evaluation of fetus CNS and its related anomalies, each modality has different diagnostic advantages and disadvantages. Improvement can be expected when these diagnostic imaging modalities are complementary, depending upon the nature of the anatomy. (J.P.N.)

  4. 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book is a compilation of selected papers from the 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS (EIWAC2015). The work focuses on novel techniques for aviation infrastructure in air traffic management (ATM) and communications, navigation, surveillance, and informatics (CNSI) domains. The contents make valuable contributions to academic researchers, engineers in the industry, and regulators of aviation authorities. As well, readers will encounter new ideas for realizing a more efficient and safer aviation system. .

  5. Relationship between CNS and immunology, in relation to psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Azhar, Asim; Ali, Ashraf; Rehan, Mohd; Zia, Qamar; Owais, Mohammad; Alexiou, Athanasios; Rauf, Ahmar; Ganash, Magdah; Kamal, Muhammad Amjad

    2018-01-29

    Higher animals, especially the human beings have the privilege of employing advanced central nervous system (CNS) as well as the evolved immune system to ward off various onslaughts throughout their life. Alterations in inflammatory and neural regulatory pathways lead to several disorders that are now becoming the cause of concern across the world. Deregulation in bidirectional network, particularly in aging population, leads to several neurodegenerative diseases such as having dementia as a one of the major characteristics. Interestingly, research updates have signified the role of abrupt immune regulation in several brain diseases, establishing a link between altered immune system and CNS related diseases. In the later period of life time, the role has altered the immune response in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders, which has become more visible. Recent research advances have indicated a close relationship between emotion and psychology to diseases and immunology, proclaiming the need of providing enhanced attention on mechanistic aspect of psychoneuroimmunological disorders. In the present manuscript, we present a synopsis on the linkage of CNS and immune system with respect to psychology, with the aim to further understand the biological machinery of psychoneuroimmunological disorders. The immune system of human beings plays an important role in keeping pathogen onslaughts on bay. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS–STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Line S.; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K.; Nandakumar, Ramya; Mogensen, Trine H.; Meyer, Morten; Vægter, Christian; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Paludan, Søren R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV-induced type I IFN expression in CNS cells and these cytokines are induced in a cGAS–STING-dependent manner. Consistently, mice defective in cGAS or STING are highly susceptible to acute HSE. Although STING is redundant for cell-autonomous antiviral resistance in astrocytes and neurons, viral replication is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS–STING pathway orchestrates an antiviral program that includes type I IFNs and immune-priming of other cell types. PMID:27830700

  7. Microtubule-Targeting Agents Enter the Central Nervous System (CNS): Double-edged Swords for Treating CNS Injury and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Byoung Dae

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules have been among the most successful targets in anticancer therapy and a large number of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are in various stages of clinical development for the treatment of several malignancies. Given that injury and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS) are accompanied by acute or chronic disruption of the structural integrity of neurons and that microtubules provide structural support for the nervous system at cellular and intracellular levels, microtubules are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for treating CNS disorders. It has been postulated that exogenous application of MTAs might prevent the breakdown or degradation of microtubules after injury or during neurodegeneration, which will thereby aid in preserving the structural integrity and function of the nervous system. Here we review recent evidence that supports this notion and also discuss potential risks of targeting microtubules as a therapy for treating nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Resident Arterial Cells and Circulating Bone Marrow-Derived Cells both Contribute to Intimal Hyperplasia in a Rat Allograft Carotid Transplantation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Neointimal formation following vascular injury remains a major mechanism of restenosis, whereas the precise sources of neointimal cells are still uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that both injured arterial cells and non-arterial cells contribute to intimal hyperplasia. Methods: Following allograft transplantation of the balloon-injured carotid common artery (n = 3-6, the cellular composition of the transplant grafts and the origins of neointimal cells were measured by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Results: Smooth muscle actin (SMA-positive and CD68-positive cells were clearly observed 14 days later in the neointima after allograft transplantation of the balloon-injured carotid common artery, where re-endothelialization was not yet complete. Green fluorescent protein (GFP and wild-type (WT allograft transplantation revealed that the majority of the neointima cells were apparently from the recipient (≈85% versus the donor (≈15%. Both monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCR2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling were involved in intimal hyperplasia, with bone marrow-derived cells also playing a role. Conclusion: These data support the hypothesis that intimal hyperplasia could develop in our novel rat allograft transplantation model of arterial injury, where neointima is attributable not only to local arterial cells but also non-arterial cells including the bone marrow.

  9. Proteomic responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals residing in high level natural radiation areas of Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishad, S.; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differential proteomic changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from seven male individuals from High Level Natural Radiation Areas (HLNRA) as compared to seven male individuals from the adjoining Normal Level Natural Radiation Areas (NLNRA) of Kerala. Comparative proteomic analysis using two dimensional analysis coupled with mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified five proteins that were significantly (fold change ±1.5, p=0.05) altered in individuals from HLNRA as compared to NLNRA: 78 KDa Glucose regulated protein (GRP78), beta/gamma actin (cytoskeletal protein), lactate dehydrogenase (carbohydrate metabolism) and fibrinogen beta and gamma (extracellular proteins). Higher expression of GRP78, which is involved in unfolded protein response, in HLNRA individuals, indicates a possible upregulation of pro-survival pathways with chronic radiation

  10. In Vitro Generation of Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Steens, Jennifer; Zuk, Melanie; Benchellal, Mohamed; Bornemann, Lea; Teichweyde, Nadine; Hess, Julia; Unger, Kristian; Görgens, André; Klump, Hannes; Klein, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Summary: The vascular wall (VW) serves as a niche for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In general, tissue-specific stem cells differentiate mainly to the tissue type from which they derive, indicating that there is a certain code or priming within the cells as determined by the tissue of origin. Here we report the in vitro generation of VW-typical MSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), based on a VW-MSC-specific gene code. Using a lentiviral vector expressing the so-called Yamanaka f...

  11. Age-related response of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic miceto phthalic anhydrideexposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related changes are associated with susceptibility to infection, malignancy, autoimmunity, response to vaccination and wound healing. To investigate the relationship of several pathological phenotypes of allergic inflammationto age, alterations in theIL-4 derived luciferase signal and general phenotype biomarkers were measured in young (2-month-old and old (12-month-old IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg mice with phthalic anhydride (PA-induced allergic inflammationfor 2 weeks. There was no difference in the ear phenotypes and thickness between young and old mice, although these levels were higher in the PA-treated group thantheacetone-olive oil (AOO-treated group. The luciferase signal was detected in the mesenteric lymph node (ML, thymus and pancreas of both young and old PA-treated mice, but showed a greater increasein old Tg mice (exceptin thethymus. Agreaterincrease inthe epidermal thickness and dermal thickness was measured in old PA-treated mice than young PA-treated mice, while total mast cell number remainedconstant in both groups. Furthermore, the concentration of IgE was greater in young PA-treated mice than in old PA-treated mice,as wasthe expression of VEGF and IL-6. Taken together, theresults of this study showed that an animal’s age is an important factor that must be considered when PA-induced allergic inflammation in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice areinvestigated to screen for allergens and therapeutic compounds.

  12. The assessment of cytotoxic T cell and natural killer cells activity in residents of high and ordinary background radiation areas of Ramsar-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Borzoueisileh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective radiation dose of human from natural sources is about 2.4 mSv/y and the dose limit for radiation workers is 20 mSv/y. Ramsar, a city in Iran, has been the subject of concern in the last forty years for a high level of radiation measured in some spots as high as 260 mSv/y. Carcinogenesis is one of the most studied effects of radiation especially in high doses. Recent studies showed that the high level of natural radiation received by inhabitants of this area, paradoxically don′t have significant health effect. Natural killer (NK cells and cytotoxic T cells are the most important cells in tumor immune surveillance and CD107a is a widely expressed intracellular protein located in the lysosomal/endosomal membrane. CD107a transiently located on the cell membrane can be used as a marker of CD8 + T cell degranulation following stimulation. It is also expressed, to a lower extent, on activated NK cells. In this study, 60 healthy people were selected randomly and their consent obtained and confounding factors such as sex, age, life-styles was matched then the count of activated NK and CD8 + cells was compared in high and normal background radiation areas inhabitants of Ramsar. After filling the questionnaire and measurement of background radiation, blood samples of 30 healthy people from each region were analyzed immediately by means of flowcytometry. The leukocytes and their subsets were not significantly different between two groups and the count of active cells was higher in control group. The result shows that the changes in immune system occur due to radiation and maybe it is as a result of higher radiosensitivity of activated cells.

  13. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  14. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  15. Induction of Microglial Activation by Mediators Released from Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microglia are the resident immune cells in the brain and play a pivotal role in immune surveillance in the central nervous system (CNS. Brain mast cells are activated in CNS disorders and induce the release of several mediators. Thus, brain mast cells, rather than microglia, are the “first responders” due to injury. However, the functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain uninvestigated. Methods: Conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells induces microglial activation similar to co-culture of microglia with HMC-1 cells. Primary cultured microglia were examined by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy. TNF- alpha and IL-6 were measured with commercial ELISA kits. Cell signalling was analysed by Western blotting. Results: In the present study, we found that the conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells stimulated microglial activation and the subsequent production of the pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-6. Co-culture of microglia and HMC-1 cells with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH for 24, 48 and 72 hours increased TNF-α and IL-6 production. Antagonists of histamine receptor 1 (H1R, H4R, proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2 or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 reduced HMC-1-induced pro-inflammatory factor production and MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Conclusions: These results imply that activated mast cells trigger microglial activation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS inflammation-related diseases.

  16. Clinical manifestations of CNS infections caused by enterovirus type 71

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Soon Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Enterovirus 71, one of the enteroviruses that are responsible for both hand-foot-and-mouth disease and herpangina, can cause neural injury. During periods of endemic spread of hand-foot-andmouth disease caused by enterovirus 71, CNS infections are also frequently diagnosed and may lead to increased complications from neural injury, as well as death. We present the results of our epidemiologic research on the clinical manifestations of children with CNS infections caused by enterovirus 71. Methods: The study group consisted of 42 patients admitted for CNS infection by enterovirus 71 between April 2009 and October 2009 at the Department of Pediatrics of 5 major hospitals affiliated with the Catholic University of Korea. We retrospectively reviewed initial symptoms and laboratory findings on admission, the specimen from which enterovirus 71 was isolated, fever duration, admission period, treatment and progress, and complications. We compared aseptic meningitis patients with encephalitis patients. Results: Of the 42 patients (23 men, 19 women, hand-foot-and-mouth disease was most prevalent (n=39, followed by herpangina (n=3, upon initial clinical diagnosis. Among the 42 patients, 15 (35.7% were classified as severe, while 27 (64.3% were classified as mild. Factors such as age, fever duration, presence of seizure, and use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG were statistically different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Our results indicate that patients with severe infection caused by enterovirus 71 tended to be less than 3 years old, presented with at least 3 days of fever as well as seizure activity, and received IVIG treatment.

  17. Blood volume changes after radiotherapy of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, F.; Fuss, M.; Scholdei, R.; Essig, M.; Lohr, F.; Rempp, K.; Brix, G.; Knopp, M.V.; Engenhart, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1996-01-01

    The pathogenesis of late delayed radiation damage in normal brain tissue is most likely due to damage to the vascular endothelium. The mitotic activity of gliomas was shown to correlate with the tumor induced angiogenesis. Dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC MRI) allows the measurement of the cerebral hemodynamics based on the indicator dilution theory. We describe theory and technique of the method and present our experience with blood volume measurements after irradiation of the CNS. We established a double slice technique on a standard 1.5 T MR system without hardware modifications, which allows an absolute quantification of the blood volume in regions of interest (ROI) within the brain. Fifty-five T2* weighted double slice images were acquired before, during and after bolus injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg in 5 sec.) using a SD FLASH sequence (simultaneous dual fast low angle shot, TR/TE1/TE2 31/16/25, flip angle 10 ). Concentration-time curves were calculated from the measured signal-time curves. Blood volume values in tissue were normalised and calculated in absolute values (ml/100 g) based on the knowledge of the arterial input function (AIF), which was measured in the brain supplying arteries. The whole procedure requires only 2 to 3 minutes, the time for post processing is about 15 to 20 minutes. Blood volume parameter images of representative cases demonstrate the blood volume changes after radiotherapy. A reduction in blood volume could be observed in normal brain tissue and low-grade gliomas, while recurrent tumors were accompanied by a local increase in blood volume. Radiation induced blood volume changes in the CNS can be measured using dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging. The measurements in normal brain tissue allow a functional in-vivo analysis of late delayed radiation reactions of the CNS. (orig.) [de

  18. In Vitro Generation of Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Steens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The vascular wall (VW serves as a niche for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In general, tissue-specific stem cells differentiate mainly to the tissue type from which they derive, indicating that there is a certain code or priming within the cells as determined by the tissue of origin. Here we report the in vitro generation of VW-typical MSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, based on a VW-MSC-specific gene code. Using a lentiviral vector expressing the so-called Yamanaka factors, we reprogrammed tail dermal fibroblasts from transgenic mice containing the GFP gene integrated into the Nestin-locus (NEST-iPSCs to facilitate lineage tracing after subsequent MSC differentiation. A lentiviral vector expressing a small set of recently identified human VW-MSC-specific HOX genes then induced MSC differentiation. This direct programming approach successfully mediated the generation of VW-typical MSCs with classical MSC characteristics, both in vitro and in vivo. : In this article, Klein and colleagues show that iPSCs generated from skin fibroblasts of transgenic mice carrying a GFP gene under the control of the endogenous Nestin promoter to facilitate lineage tracing (NEST-iPSCs can be directly programmed toward mouse vascular wall-typical multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (VW-MSC by ectopic lentiviral expression of a previously defined VW-MSC-specific HOX code. Keywords: vascular wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells, HOX gene, induced pluripotent stem cells, direct programming, nestin

  19. Uptake of synthetic naked RNA by skin-resident dendritic cells via macropinocytosis allows antigen expression and induction of T-cell responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Abderraouf; Vascotto, Fulvia; Kautz-Neu, Kordula; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur; von Stebut, Esther; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Intradermal administration of antigen-encoding RNA has entered clinical testing for cancer vaccination. However, insight into the underlying mechanism of RNA uptake, translation and antigen presentation is still limited. Utilizing pharmacologically optimized naked RNA, the dose-response kinetics revealed a rise in reporter signal with increasing RNA amounts and a prolonged RNA translation of reporter protein up to 30 days after intradermal injection. Dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis were shown to engulf RNA, and the signal arising from the reporter RNA was significantly diminished after DC depletion. Macropinocytosis was relevant for intradermal RNA uptake and translation in vitro and in vivo. By combining intradermal RNA vaccination and inhibition of macropinocytosis, we show that effective priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells also relies on this uptake mechanism. This report demonstrates that direct antigen translation by dermal DCs after intradermal naked RNA vaccination is relevant for efficient priming of antigen-specific T-cells.

  20. Colocalization of a CD1d-Binding Glycolipid with a Radiation-Attenuated Sporozoite Vaccine in Lymph Node-Resident Dendritic Cells for a Robust Adjuvant Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Kawamura, Akira; Andrews, Chasity D; Miller, Jessica L; Wu, Douglass; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Oren, Deena; Padte, Neal N; Porcelli, Steven A; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kappe, Stefan H I; Ho, David D; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-09-15

    A CD1d-binding glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), activates invariant NK T cells and acts as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying nearly 100-fold stronger CD1d binding affinity. In the current study, 7DW8-5 was found to exert a more potent adjuvant effect than αGalCer for a vaccine based on radiation-attenuated sporozoites of a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, also referred to as irradiated P. yoelii sporozoites (IrPySpz). 7DW8-5 had a superb adjuvant effect only when the glycolipid and IrPySpz were conjointly administered i.m. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of distinctly different biodistribution patterns of αGalCer and 7DW8-5 on their respective adjuvant activities. Although both glycolipids induce a similar cytokine response in sera of mice injected i.v., after i.m. injection, αGalCer induces a systemic cytokine response, whereas 7DW8-5 is locally trapped by CD1d expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Moreover, the i.m. coadministration of 7DW8-5 with IrPySpz results in the recruitment of DCs to dLNs and the activation and maturation of DCs. These events cause the potent adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, resulting in the enhancement of the CD8(+) T cell response induced by IrPySpz and, ultimately, improved protection against malaria. Our study is the first to show that the colocalization of a CD1d-binding invariant NK T cell-stimulatory glycolipid and a vaccine, like radiation-attenuated sporozoites, in dLN-resident DCs upon i.m. conjoint administration governs the potency of the adjuvant effect of the glycolipid. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. HuCNS-SC Human NSCs Fail to Differentiate, Form Ectopic Clusters, and Provide No Cognitive Benefits in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Marsh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs can improve cognition in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, AD is a protracted disorder, and prior studies have examined only short-term effects. We therefore used an immune-deficient model of AD (Rag-5xfAD mice to examine long-term transplantation of human NSCs (StemCells Inc.; HuCNS-SCs. Five months after transplantation, HuCNS-SCs had engrafted and migrated throughout the hippocampus and exhibited no differences in survival or migration in response to β-amyloid pathology. Despite robust engraftment, HuCNS-SCs failed to terminally differentiate and over a quarter of the animals exhibited ectopic human cell clusters within the lateral ventricle. Unlike prior short-term experiments with research-grade HuCNS-SCs, we also found no evidence of improved cognition, no changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and no increase in synaptic density. These data, while disappointing, reinforce the notion that individual human NSC lines need to be carefully assessed for efficacy and safety in appropriate long-term models.

  2. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  3. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging and Drug Transport to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, D; Gromnicova, R; McQuaid, C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles with a core size of 2nm covalently coated with glycans to maintain solubility, targeting molecules for brain endothelium, and cargo molecules hold great potential for delivery of therapies into the CNS. They have low toxicity, pass through brain endothelium in vitro and in vivo, and move rapidly through the brain parenchyma. Within minutes of infusion the nanoparticles can be detected in neurons and glia. These nanoparticles are relatively easy to synthesize in association with their surface ligands. They can be detected by electron microscopy, ICP-mass spectrometry, and spectroscopy. However, modification of the basic gold nanoparticle is required for in vivo imaging by MR or radioactive methods. Depending on their surface coat, the nanoparticles cross the brain endothelium by the plasma membrane/cytosolic route (passive transport) or by vesicular transcytosis (active transport). A primary aim of current research is to improve the biodistribution of the nanoparticles for CNS drug delivery. Smaller gold nanoparticles are removed rapidly via the kidney, while larger nanoparticles are taken up by mononuclear phagocytes in various tissues. Receptors selectively located on brain endothelium can act as targets for the nanoparticles, to increase their delivery to the brain. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phytocannabinoids as novel therapeutic agents in CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew J; Williams, Claire M; Whalley, Benjamin J; Stephens, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The Cannabis sativa herb contains over 100 phytocannabinoid (pCB) compounds and has been used for thousands of years for both recreational and medicinal purposes. In the past two decades, characterisation of the body's endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid, eCB) system (ECS) has highlighted activation of central CB(1) receptors by the major pCB, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) as the primary mediator of the psychoactive, hyperphagic and some of the potentially therapeutic properties of ingested cannabis. Whilst Δ(9)-THC is the most prevalent and widely studied pCB, it is also the predominant psychotropic component of cannabis, a property that likely limits its widespread therapeutic use as an isolated agent. In this regard, research focus has recently widened to include other pCBs including cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), Δ(9)tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ(9)-THCV) and cannabidivarin (CBDV), some of which show potential as therapeutic agents in preclinical models of CNS disease. Moreover, it is becoming evident that these non-Δ(9)-THC pCBs act at a wide range of pharmacological targets, not solely limited to CB receptors. Disorders that could be targeted include epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, affective disorders and the central modulation of feeding behaviour. Here, we review pCB effects in preclinical models of CNS disease and, where available, clinical trial data that support therapeutic effects. Such developments may soon yield the first non-Δ(9)-THC pCB-based medicines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. “Targeting astrocytes in CNS injury and disease: A translational research approach”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filous, Angela R.; Silver, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are a major constituent of the central nervous system. These glia play a major role in regulating blood-brain barrier function, the formation and maintenance of synapses, glutamate uptake, and trophic support for surrounding neurons and glia. Therefore, maintaining the proper functioning of these cells is crucial to survival. Astrocyte defects are associated with a wide variety of neuropathological insults, ranging from neurodegenerative diseases to gliomas. Additionally, injury to the CNS causes drastic changes to astrocytes, often leading to a phenomenon known as reactive astrogliosis. This process is important for protecting the surrounding healthy tissue from the spread of injury, while it also inhibits axonal regeneration and plasticity. Here, we discuss the important roles of astrocytes after injury and in disease, as well as potential therapeutic approaches to restore proper astrocyte functioning. PMID:27026202

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  8. Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  9. Emerging pharmacological approaches to promote neurogenesis from endogenous glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Enrica; Nato, Giulia; Buffo, Annalisa

    2017-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are emerging as leading contributors to the global disease burden. While some drug-based approaches have been designed to limit or prevent neuronal loss following acute damage or chronic neurodegeneration, regeneration of functional neurons in the adult Central Nervous System (CNS) still remains an unmet need. In this context, the exploitation of endogenous cell sources has recently gained an unprecedented attention, thanks to the demonstration that, in some CNS regions or under specific circumstances, glial cells can activate spontaneous neurogenesis or can be instructed to produce neurons in the adult mammalian CNS parenchyma. This field of research has greatly advanced in the last years and identified interesting molecular and cellular mechanisms guiding the neurogenic activation/conversion of glia. In this review, we summarize the evolution of the research devoted to understand how resident glia can be directed to produce neurons. We paid particular attention to pharmacologically-relevant approaches exploiting the modulation of niche-associated factors and the application of selected small molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary CNS Nonamyloidogenic Light Chain Deposition Disease: Case Report and Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Juan Jose; Markert, James M; Meador, William; Chapman, Philip; Perry, Arie; Hackney, James R

    2017-12-01

    The true incidence of light chain deposition disease (LCDD) restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. To our knowledge only 7 cases of LCDD restricted to the brain have been previously reported. We herein describe an unusual example. A 44-year-old man presented with a history of ischemic retinopathy in 2004 and left lower extremity hypoesthesia in 2007 that progressed gradually to left-sided weakness and numbness in the 2 years prior to his hospitalization in 2015. A stereotactic brain biopsy was performed, displaying nonspecific hyaline deposits of amorphous "amyloid-like" material involving deep brain white matter and vessels. These were Congo red negative and were accompanied by a sparse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Plasma cells demonstrated kappa light chain class restriction by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). There was patchy reactivity with kappa immunohistochemistry in the amorphous deposits. A diagnosis of light chain deposition disease was made. Subsequent systemic myeloma and lymphoma workups were negative. Previously reported cases have included men and women, spanning the ages of 19 and 72 years, often presenting with hemiparesis, hypoesthesia, or seizures. Deposits have been reported in the cerebrum and cerebellum. T2/FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) changes are usual, but lesions may or may not produce contrast enhancement. The light chain deposition may be of kappa or lambda class. Most lesions have been accompanied by local lymphoid and/or plasma cell infiltrates exhibiting light chain restriction of the same class as the deposits. In summary, LCDD limited to the CNS is a rare lesion consisting of deposition of amyloid-like, but Congo red-negative monotypic light chain usually produced by local lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates.

  11. Interferon-gamma and nitric oxide synthase 2 mediate the aggregation of resident adherent peritoneal exudate cells: implications for the host response to pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagawat S Chandrasekar

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (Ifnγ, a key macrophage activating cytokine, plays pleiotropic roles in host immunity. In this study, the ability of Ifnγ to induce the aggregation of resident mouse adherent peritoneal exudate cells (APECs, consisting primarily of macrophages, was investigated. Cell-cell interactions involve adhesion molecules and, upon addition of Ifnγ, CD11b re-localizes preferentially to the sites of interaction on APECs. A functional role of CD11b in enhancing aggregation is demonstrated using Reopro, a blocking reagent, and siRNA to Cd11b. Studies with NG-methyl-L-arginine (LNMA, an inhibitor of Nitric oxide synthase (Nos, NO donors, e.g., S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP or Diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA/NO, and Nos2-/- mice identified Nitric oxide (NO induced by Ifnγ as a key regulator of aggregation of APECs. Further studies with Nos2-/- APECs revealed that some Ifnγ responses are independent of NO: induction of MHC class II and CD80. On the other hand, Nos2 derived NO is important for other functions: motility, phagocytosis, morphology and aggregation. Studies with cytoskeleton depolymerizing agents revealed that Ifnγ and NO mediate the cortical stabilization of Actin and Tubulin which contribute to aggregation of APECs. The biological relevance of aggregation of APECs was delineated using infection experiments with Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium. APECs from orally infected, but not uninfected, mice produce high amounts of NO and aggregate upon ex vivo culture in a Nos2-dependent manner. Importantly, aggregated APECs induced by Ifnγ contain fewer intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to their single counterparts post infection. Further experiments with LNMA or Reopro revealed that both NO and CD11b are important for aggregation; in addition, NO is bactericidal. Overall, this study elucidates novel roles for Ifnγ and Nos2 in regulating Actin, Tubulin, CD11b, motility and morphology during the

  12. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  13. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of therapeutic effect of Liriope platyphylla on phthalic anhydride-induced atopic dermatitis in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Moon Hwa; Kim, Ji Eun; Hwang, In Sik; Lee, Young Ju; An, Bum Su; Hong, Jin Tae; Lee, Sang Hak; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2013-07-30

    A variety of previous pharmacological studies have suggested that Liriope platyphylla may exert beneficial biological effects on inflammation, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorder, obesity, and atopic dermatitis (AD). The therapeutic effect of aqueous extract of Liriope platyphylla (AEtLP) on AD was quantified using the luciferase report system in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg) mice. Alteration of the luciferase signal was quantified in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice co-treated with phthalic anhydride (PA) and AEtLP for 2 weeks using the IVIS imaging system. Phenotypes of AD were assessed by ear thickness analysis, measurement of immune-related organ weights, ELISA, and histological and pathological analysis in Tg mice. A strong luciferase signal was detected in the abdominal region of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice treated with only PA. However, this signal was significantly reduced in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice co-treated with PA+AEtLP in an AEtLP concentration-dependent manner. Especially, three organs, the thymus, pancreas, and submandibular lymph node (SL), showed a high signal response to PA treatment. Furthermore, to verify whether or not alteration of the luciferase signal is associated with AD, these disease response phenotypes were measured in the same group of mice. Common allergenic responses including increases in ear thickness, lymph node weight, IgE concentration, and infiltrated mast cells were detected in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice treated with PA. However, these responses were dramatically decreased by AEtLP treatment for 2 weeks. These results indicate that the luciferase signal may successfully reflect the therapeutic effects of AEtLP in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice. Further, we suggest additional evidence that Liriope platyphylla may be considered as an effective therapeutic drug for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toll like receptor-3 ligand poly-ICLC promotes the efficacy of peripheral vaccinations with tumor antigen-derived peptide epitopes in murine CNS tumor models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eguchi Junichi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptor (TLR3 ligands serve as natural inducers of pro-inflammatory cytokines capable of promoting Type-1 adaptive immunity, and TLR3 is abundantly expressed by cells within the central nervous system (CNS. To improve the efficacy of vaccine strategies directed against CNS tumors, we evaluated whether administration of a TLR3 ligand, polyinosinic-polycytidylic (poly-IC stabilized with poly-lysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC would enhance the anti-CNS tumor effectiveness of tumor peptide-based vaccinations. Methods C57BL/6 mice bearing syngeneic CNS GL261 glioma or M05 melanoma received subcutaneous (s.c. vaccinations with synthetic peptides encoding CTL epitopes- mEphA2 (671–679, hgp100 (25–33 and mTRP-2 (180–188 for GL261, or ovalbumin (OVA: 257–264 for M05. The mice also received intramuscular (i.m. injections with poly-ICLC. Results The combination of subcutaneous (s.c. peptide-based vaccination and i.m. poly-ICLC administration promoted systemic induction of antigen (Ag-specific Type-1 CTLs expressing very late activation antigen (VLA-4, which confers efficient CNS-tumor homing of vaccine-induced CTLs based on experiments with monoclonal antibody (mAb-mediated blockade of VLA-4. In addition, the combination treatment allowed expression of IFN-γ by CNS tumor-infiltrating CTLs, and improved the survival of tumor bearing mice in the absence of detectable autoimmunity. Conclusion These data suggest that poly-ICLC, which has been previously evaluated in clinical trials, can be effectively combined with tumor Ag-specific vaccine strategies, thereby providing a greater index of therapeutic efficacy.

  16. P13.10 Intracranial response to nivolumab in NSCLC patients with untreated or progressing CNS metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, S.; Dudnik, E.; Perlov, E.; Zer, A.; Flex, D.; Peled, N.; Siegal, T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in about 30% of patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Local treatment strategies (e.g., radiotherapy or surgery) result in delays in systemic therapy administration and are frequently associated with neurocognitive impairment. Nivolumab is an anti-PD1 immune check-point inhibitor which has been recently approved by the FDA as a second line treatment of NSCLC. Data regarding its intracranial activity is lacking. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed efficacy and safety of nivolumab administered intravenously at a dose of 3mg/kg q2 weeks in five pts with advanced NSCLC and new or progressing intracranial metastases which were diagnosed before or within 1 month after starting the treatment. Results: Pt baseline characteristics were as follows: median age 78y (range, 52–84); 2 males; 4 smokers; ECOG PS 0/1/2 - 2 pts/1 pt/2 pts; histological subtype: adenocarcinoma/ squamous-cell carcinoma/NSCLC NOS 3 pts /1 pt/1 pt; EGFR WT/ALK neg/KRAS M all/all/2 pts. Four pts had parenchymal brain metastases, three pts had leptomeningeal disease. All pts were asymptomatic and did not require corticosteroids or immediate brain irradiation. Dramatic response in the brain was observed in two pts (including 1 pt with leptomeningeal spread demonstrating a complete response in the CNS); time-to-response comprised 5 weeks and 9 weeks; all responses are still ongoing at the time of the report (18+ weeks, 19+ weeks). In one pt stabilization of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis for 10 weeks was achieved. Systemic responses and intracranial responses were largely concordant. No treatment-related or CNS-metastases related grade ≥ 3 adverse events were observed. Conclusions: Nivolumab has a promising intracranial activity and favorable safety profile in pts with NSCLC and untreated/progressing CNS metastases. Nivolumab CNS activity warrants further evaluation.

  17. Dendritic cells and anergic type I NKT cells play a crucial role in sulfatide-mediated immune regulation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Igor; Halder, Ramesh; Bischof, Felix; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-08-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells can be divided into two groups: type I NKT cells use a semi-invariant TCR, whereas type II express a relatively diverse set of TCRs. A major subset of type II NKT cells recognizes myelin-derived sulfatides and is selectively enriched in the CNS tissue during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have shown that activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells by sulfatide prevents induction of EAE. In this article, we have addressed the mechanism of regulation, as well as whether a single immunodominant form of synthetic sulfatide can treat ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE in SJL/J mice. We have shown that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency and effector function of myelin proteolipid proteins 139-151/I-A(s)-tetramer(+) cells in lymphoid and CNS tissues. In addition, type I NKT cells and dendritic cells (DCs) in the periphery, as well as CNS-resident microglia, are inactivated after sulfatide administration, and mice deficient in type I NKT cells are not protected from disease. Moreover, tolerized DCs from sulfatide-treated animals can adoptively transfer protection into naive mice. Treatment of SJL/J mice with a synthetic cis-tetracosenoyl sulfatide, but not α-galactosylceramide, reverses ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE. Our data highlight a novel immune-regulatory pathway involving NKT subset interactions leading to inactivation of type I NKT cells, DCs, and microglial cells in suppression of autoimmunity. Because CD1 molecules are nonpolymorphic, the sulfatide-mediated immune-regulatory pathway can be targeted for development of non-HLA-dependent therapeutic approaches to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. 6. CNS international conference on CANDU maintenance. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 6th CNS International Conference on CANDU Maintenance took place in Toronto, Ontario on November 16-18, 2003. The theme for the conference was 'Maintenance for Life'. About 270 delegates attended the conference held by the Canadian Nuclear Society. The conference consisted of four parallel sessions, a pattern that continued throughout the conference. Papers were grouped under the following headings: Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Assessments; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Inspections; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Maintenance; Fuel Channels and End Fittings - Universal Delivery Machine; Water Upgrading; Performance and Plant Life Improvement; Steam Generator Life Management; Steam Generator Modifications; Steam Generators - Inspections; Steam Generators - Assessments; Maintenance Programs; Feeder Inspections; Feeder Assessment and Mitigation; Valve Maintenance; Instrumentation and Control; Inspection Technology; and Fuel Handling

  19. Long-living RNA in the CNS of terrestrial snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierusalimsky, Victor N; Balaban, Pavel M

    2018-02-01

    Click-iT method can be used to trace the neurons where the newly synthesized RNA transcripts occur. Our experiments performed with the CNS of terrestrial mollusk Helix demonstrate that 5-ethynyluridine (EU) is selectively incorporated in RNA but not in DNA. The time of EU accumulation necessary for its detection was about several hours. EU was injected into the body cavity of adult mollusks, and was detectable in neurons for several days. In juveniles, EU was introduced via bathing of snails in the EU-containing saline, and was reliably detected within time period of several weeks. Our data suggest that short-living forms of RNA cannot be detected by Click-iT method, while the long-living forms of RNA can be spatially detected in individual neurons.

  20. Potential medicinal plants for CNS disorders: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas

    2006-12-01

    Although very few drugs are currently approved by regulatory authorities for treating multi-factorial ailments and disorders of cognition such as Alzheimer's disease, certain plant-derived agents, including, for example, galantamine and rivastigmine (a semi-synthetic derivative of physostigmine) are finding an application in modern medicine. However, in Ayurveda, the Indian traditional system of medicine which is more than 5000 years old, selected plants have long been classified as 'medhya rasayanas', from the Sanskrit words 'medhya', meaning intellect or cognition, and 'rasayana', meaning 'rejuvenation'. These plants are used both in herbal and conventional medicine and offer benefits that pharmaceutical drugs lack. In the present article, an attempt has been made to review the most important medicinal plants, including Ginkgo biloba, St John's wort, Kava-kava, Valerian, Bacopa monniera and Convolvulus pluricaulis, which are widely used for their reputed effectiveness in CNS disorders.

  1. Effect on the HANARO CNS under a HRS Malfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Hark Rho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Dong Gil [GNEC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Owing to national research demands on a cold neutron beam utilization, the Cold Neutron Research Facility project has been carried out since July 2003 and is now at the completion stage of the detail design for the HANARO cold neutron source. The cold neutron source (CNS) facility, one of the main parts of the CNRF, includes the in-pool assembly (IPA) and related systems to moderate thermal neutrons through a cryogenic moderator, liquid hydrogen, into cold neutrons with the generation of a nuclear heat load, about 500 W. In order to acquire the information about the IPA integrity under a helium refrigeration system (HRS) malfunction, a thermo-siphon mock-up test has been performed using liquid hydrogen as a working fluid. Of the pressure and temperature in the IPA, the experimental results are reported in this paper to determine whether the integrity of the IPA is maintained under an abnormal condition.

  2. The Gut-Brain Axis, BDNF, NMDA and CNS Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Raeesah; Stone, Trevor W

    2016-11-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) microbiota and the 'gut-brain axis' are proving to be increasingly relevant to early brain development and the emergence of psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on the influence of the GI tract on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its relationship with receptors for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR), as these are believed to be involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. NMDAR may be associated with the development of schizophrenia and a range of other psychopathologies including neurodegenerative disorders, depression and dementias. An analysis of the routes and mechanisms by which the GI microbiota contribute to the pathophysiology of BDNF-induced NMDAR dysfunction could yield new insights relevant to developing novel therapeutics for schizophrenia and related disorders. In the absence of GI microbes, central BDNF levels are reduced and this inhibits the maintenance of NMDAR production. A reduction of NMDAR input onto GABA inhibitory interneurons causes disinhibition of glutamatergic output which disrupts the central signal-to-noise ratio and leads to aberrant synaptic behaviour and cognitive deficits. Gut microbiota can modulate BDNF function in the CNS, via changes in neurotransmitter function by affecting modulatory mechanisms such as the kynurenine pathway, or by changes in the availability and actions of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the brain. Interrupting these cycles by inducing changes in the gut microbiota using probiotics, prebiotics or antimicrobial drugs has been found promising as a preventative or therapeutic measure to counteract behavioural deficits and these may be useful to supplement the actions of drugs in the treatment of CNS disorders.

  3. Mast cells, glia and neuroinflammation: partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Giusti, Pietro

    2014-03-01

    Glia and microglia in particular elaborate pro-inflammatory molecules that play key roles in central nervous system (CNS) disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, mainly those of immune origin such as mast cells. The latter are found in most tissues, are CNS resident, and traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers when barrier compromise results from CNS pathology. Growing evidence of mast cell-glia communication opens new perspectives for the development of therapies targeting neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells that normally control neuronal sensitization - both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be up-regulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamine family. One such member, N-palmitoylethanolamine is proposed to have a key role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the face of external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. N-Palmitoylethanolamine has proven efficacious in mast-cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This review will provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells and the possibility that mast cell-microglia cross-talk contributes to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerates disease progression, as well as promoting pain transmission pathways. We will conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signalling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Possible involvement of TLRs and hemichannels in stress-induced CNS dysfunction via mastocytes, and glia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Adam; Maturana, Carola J; Harcha, Paloma A; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR) family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca(2+) influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

  5. Possible Involvement of TLRs and Hemichannels in Stress-Induced CNS Dysfunction via Mastocytes, and Glia Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Aguirre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system (CNS, mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca2+ influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

  6. MRI patterns in recurrence of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Altedorneburg, Gernot; Heuser, Lothar; Pels, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PCNSL are rare but highly malignant brain tumors. ► PCNSL recur in different anatomic sites compared with initial presentation. ► Non-parenchymal contrast enhancement is a frequent finding at initialdiagnosis and at relapse. -- Abstract: Purpose: Primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSL) are highly malignant non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma restricted to the CNS. While MRI features of PCNSL at initial presentation have been comprehensively described, literature on MRI-characteristics at relapse is sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate anatomic location and contrast enhancement patterns at PCNSL recurrence by cranial MRI. Methods: Sixteen immunocompetent patients (9 men, 7 women, median age 65 years) with histologically proven PCNSL and initial response to a standardized polychemotherapy, but suffering from a relapse were consecutively recorded. Native and contrast-enhanced MRI examinations carried out at initial presentation and at time of relapse were compared. Anatomical site of parenchymal enhancement, frequency and presence of non-parenchymal contrast enhancement (i.e. ventricular, superficial, subependymal) patterns at initial presentation and at relapse were recorded and compared. Results: Local recurrence was found at the site of the initial tumor presentation in four of the 16 cases. Six of 11 patients presenting a unilateral PCNSL at initial presentation had a bilateral involvement at relapse. In two cases, recurrence appeared solely on the contralateral side without involvement of the hemisphere initially affected. At both dates, subependymal enhancement was the most often found non-parenchymal pattern (six at initial presentation, and five at relapse). The number of patients with a ventricular contrast enhancement increased from one at initial presentation to four at relapse. Conclusions: PCNSL tend to recur in different parenchymal anatomic sites as compared with the site of the initial tumor presentation. Contrast-enhancing non

  7. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  8. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    events. Immunological control of HSV involves activation of innate immune pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR3, which detects double-stranded RNA and induces type I IFN expression. Humans with defects in the TLR3/IFN pathway have an elevated susceptibility to HSV infections of the CNS. However......Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation...

  9. Endogenous GLP1 and GLP1 analogue alter CNS responses to palatable food consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kulve, Jennifer S.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Groot, Paul F. C.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Ijzerman, Richard G.

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) affects appetite, supposedly mediated via the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we investigate whether modulation of CNS responses to palatable food consumption may be a mechanism by which GLP1 contributes to the central regulation of feeding. Using

  10. CNS metastasis from malignant uveal melanoma: a clinical and histopathological characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, S K; Lindegaard, J; Isager, P

    2008-01-01

    was observed in two cases (14%). The amount of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes was pronounced in three cases (23%). CONCLUSION: The proportion of uveal melanoma patients having CNS metastasis was 0.7%. Eleven patients had multiple organ metastases, and the average time from the initial CNS symptoms to death...

  11. Multiple lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections alter interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-10 and IL-6 and IL-7 receptor mRNA in CNS and spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Figlewicz, Dianne P; Beuca, Timothy Petru; Bullock, Kristin; Hansen, Kim; Banks, William A; Raskind, Murray A; Peskind, Elaine R

    2017-07-04

    Neuroinflammation is proposed to be an important component in the development of several central nervous system (CNS) disorders including depression, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and traumatic brain injury. However, exactly how neuroinflammation leads to, or contributes to, these central disorders is unclear. The objective of the study was to examine and compare the expression of mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-10 and the receptors for IL-6 (IL-6R) and IL-7 (IL-7R) using in situ hybridization in discrete brain regions and in the spleen after multiple injections of 3mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a model of neuroinflammation. In the spleen, LPS significantly elevated IL-6 mRNA expression, then IL-10 mRNA, with no effect on IL-7 or IL-7R mRNA, while significantly decreasing IL-6R mRNA expression. In the CNS, LPS administration had the greatest effect on IL-6 and IL-6R mRNA. LPS increased IL-6 mRNA expression only in non-neuronal cells throughout the brain, but significantly elevated IL-6R mRNA in neuronal populations, where observed, except the cerebellum. LPS resulted in variable effects on IL-10 mRNA, and had no effect on IL-7 or IL-7R mRNA expression. These studies indicate that LPS-induced neuroinflammation has substantial but variable effects on the regional and cellular patterns of CNS IL-6, IL-7 and IL-10, and for IL-6R and IL-7R mRNA expression. It is apparent that administration of LPS can affect non-neuronal and neuronal cells in the brain. Further research is required to determine how CNS inflammatory changes associated with IL-6, IL-10 and IL-6R could in turn contribute to the development of CNS neurological disorders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effectiveness of Prescription-Based CNS Stimulants on Hospitalization in Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Christopher; Polcwiartek, Christoffer; Asztalos, Marton

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Negative symptoms and cognitive deficits are main features of schizophrenia but with limited treatment options. Earlier studies have suggested that central nervous system (CNS) stimulants have a small effect on these domains, but with inconclusive results. As the first study to date, we...... aimed to investigate whether CNS stimulants improve naturalistic outcomes (psychiatric admissions and antipsychotic use) in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: By using extensive health registers all patients with schizophrenia and their use of CNS stimulants in Denmark were identified. Two models...... were used to investigate the effectiveness of CNS stimulants in patients with schizophrenia between 1995 and 2014; a mirror-image model with 605 individuals, using paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and a follow-up study with 789 individuals, using a conditional risk-set model. RESULTS: CNS...

  13. Targeted CNS delivery using human MiniPromoters and demonstrated compatibility with adeno-associated viral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N de Leeuw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical for human gene therapy is the availability of small promoters tools to drive gene expression in a highly specific and reproducible manner. We tackled this challenge by developing human DNA MiniPromoters (MiniPs using computational biology and phylogenetic conservation. MiniPs were tested in mouse as single-copy knock-ins at the Hprt locus on the X chromosome and evaluated for lacZ reporter expression in central nervous system (CNS and non–CNS tissue. Eighteen novel MiniPs driving expression in mouse brain were identified, 2 MiniPs for driving pan-neuronal expression and 17 MiniPs for the mouse eye. Key areas of therapeutic interest were represented in this set: the cerebral cortex, embryonic hypothalamus, spinal cord, bipolar and ganglion cells of the retina, and skeletal muscle. We also demonstrated that three retinal ganglion cell MiniPs exhibit similar cell type specificity when delivered via adeno-associated virus vectors intravitreally. We conclude that our methodology and characterization has resulted in desirable expression characteristics that are intrinsic to the MiniPromoter, not dictated by copy-number effects or genomic location, and results in constructs predisposed to success in adeno-associated virus. These MiniPs are immediately applicable for preclinical studies toward gene therapy in humans and are publicly available to facilitate basic and clinical research, and human gene therapy.

  14. Therapy of CNS leukemia with intraventricular chemotherapy and low-dose neuraxis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinherz, P.; Jereb, B.; Galicich, J.

    1985-01-01

    Successful treatment of CNS leukemic relapse has been frustrated by frequent local recurrence and eventual marrow relapse. The authors describe the treatment of meningeal leukemia in 39 children with intrathecal remission induction followed by the placement of an Ommaya reservoir to facilitate the administration and distribution of chemotherapeutic agents into the CSF. Six hundred or 900 rad of craniospinal radiation and maintenance intraventricular and intrathecal chemotherapy was then administered. Systemic reinduction therapy was added in the later cases. Sixteen children (41%) experienced no further events, with 17+ months to 13+ years (median, 25 months) follow-up . Eleven patients (28%) had CNS recurrence, nine (23%) bone marrow (BM) relapse, and two (5%) testicular relapse as the next adverse event. The course of patients with first isolated CNS relapse differed from that of the others. Eleven (69%) of 16 patients treated for first isolated CNS relapse are alive and 9 are event free, while only 35% of patients whose CNS relapse occurred simultaneously or after recurrent disease at other sites are alive (P = .04). Seven of 23 in the later group are event free. The difference is due to the increased incidence of BM relapse in the later group (30% v 6%; P = .04). For patients with first isolated CNS relapse, the life-table median CNS remission duration is 42 months. The projected CNS relapse-free survival and event-free survival 8 to 10 years after CNS relapse are 40% and 32%, respectively. Headache, nausea, and emesis of short duration were frequent during therapy. In three patients, the reservoir had to be removed for infection. No patient suffered neurologic deficit related to the reservoir. The therapy described can reduce the CNS relapse rate with manageable toxicity

  15. Is risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapse related to adjuvant taxane treatment in node-positive breast cancer? Results of the CNS substudy in the intergroup Phase III BIG 02-98 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestalozzi, B.C.; Francis, P.; Quinaux, E.

    2008-01-01

    for these patients. RESULTS: CNS relapse occurred in 4.0% of control patients and 3.7% of docetaxel-treated patients. CNS relapse occurred in 27% of deceased patients in both treatment groups. CNS relapse was usually accompanied by neurologic symptoms (90%), and 25% of patients with CNS relapse died without evidence...... of extra-CNS relapse. Only 20% of patients survived 1 year from the diagnosis of CNS relapse. Prognosis of CNS relapse was worse for patients with meningeal carcinomatosis when compared with brain metastases. Unexpected findings included a higher rate of positive cerebrospinal fluid cytology (8% versus 3......%) and more frequent use of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis (47% versus 30%) in the docetaxel-treated patients. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence that adjuvant docetaxel treatment is associated with an increased frequency of CNS relapse Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  16. The Coordinated Noninvasive Studies (CNS) Project. Phase 1. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Psychology of Music : lectures on temporal perception Basic Sciences course for otolaryngology residents: lectures on auditory anatomy and physiology...and Parkinsonism , and pathologies involving arousal, such as addictive personality, hyperactivity, and coma. Indications promise new applications in...within individual patients is studied in order to characterize individual expressions of a disorder, to examine progression (or remission with therapy

  17. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  18. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  19. Risk Factors for Subsequent Central Nervous System Tumors in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Melissa; Shaw, Bronwen E; Brazauskas, Ruta

    2017-01-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk of subsequent solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors. The risk of CNS tumors after HCT in pediatric HCT recipients is not known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CNS tumors in pediatric recipients...

  20. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  1. Time-course expression of CNS inflammatory, neurodegenerative tissue repair markers and metallothioneins during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Penkowa, M; Demestre, M

    2005-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE and MS are characterized by CNS inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration. The inflammatory response occurring within the CNS leads to glial activation, dysfunction and death, as well...

  2. [Competency-based Neurosurgery Residency Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Jiménez Roldan, Luis; Alen, José F; Castaño, Ana M; Munarriz, Pablo M; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A programme proposal for competency-based Neurosurgery training adapted to the specialization project is presented. This proposal has been developed by a group of neurosurgeons commissioned by the SENEC (Spanish Society of Neurosurgery) and could be modified to generate a final version that could come into force coinciding with the implementation of the specialization programme. This document aims to facilitate the test of the new programme included in the online version of our journal. Total training period is 6 years; initial 2 years belong to the surgery specialization and remaining 4 years belong to core specialty period. It is a competency-based programmed based on the map used by the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) including the following domains of clinical competency: Medical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, health systems, interprofessional collaboration and professional and personal development. Subcompetencies map in the domains of Knowledge and Patient care (including surgical competencies) was adapted to the one proposed by AANS and CNS (annex 1 of the programme). A subcompetency map was also used for the specialization rotations. Resident's training is based on personal study (self-learning) supported by efficient use of information sources and supervised clinical practice, including bioethical instruction, clinical management, research and learning techniques. Resident evaluation proposal includes, among other instruments, theoretical knowledge tests, objective and structured evaluation of the level of clinical competency with real or standardised patients, global competency scales, 360-degree evaluation, clinical record audits, milestones for residents progress and self-assessment (annex 2). Besides, residents periodically assess the teaching commitment of the department's neurosurgeons and other professors participating in rotations, and annually

  3. Rumor management in nursing systems: role of the psychiatric CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, P; Stuart, G W

    1995-11-01

    RUMOR MANAGEMENT AND control is particularly important in nursing systems during times of change. In this article, a brief history of the study of rumor and the rumor process is given and applied to nursing, systems thinking and the CNS, and three types of rumor are described. Examples are given and strategies and approaches for managing rumor are prescribed. The first approach, used when a final decision about a planned change has not been made, helps avoid "trickle down" and builds trust and empowerment by soliciting and using input from those who will be affected by the proposed change. The intent of the second approach, used when a decision has been finalized or an event has occurred and rumor has preceded an official announcement, is to debrief from the occurrence or transform the decision. The last approach is used to interrupt a pattern of misinformation and to clarify or inform. The nurse leader or manager must stay in the communication loop and refrain from blaming a speculated source in order to correct information.

  4. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. VP-shunt dysfunction caused by malaria CNS infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbach, Michael Karl; Bernhard, Matthias; Siekmeyer, Manuela; Lippmann, Norman; Kiess, Wieland; Nestler, Ulf; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Preuss, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Malaria is a widespread mosquito-borne infectious disease with over 300 million cases and roughly 900 thousand deaths in 2013. Cerebral involvement of malaria causes 50 % of all infection-associated deaths, especially in children below the age of 5 years. Hydrocephalus is a medical condition with abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in physiological cavities and ventricles. Standard treatment is the implantation of a cerebrospinal fluid shunt device. A common problem associated with shunt treatment especially in pediatric patients is infection and consecutive shunt dysfunction caused by bacteriae or high protein levels clogging the valve. In these cases, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are predominantly found in CSF cultures. We present a case of a 2-year old boy from Saudi Arabia with a ventriculoperitoneal (VP)-shunt-dependent congenital hydrocephalus who suffered from cerebral malaria and developed consecutive shunt failure. To the best of our knowledge, shunt failure caused by malaria CNS infection with Plasmodium falciparum has not yet been reported in the literature and should be considered as a rare cause of VP-shunt failure in patients with atypical VP-shunt infections living in or traveling from endemic areas.

  7. Growth of Malignant Non-CNS Tumors Alters Brain Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Nersisyan, Lilit; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David; Mancini, Maria; Sidransky, David; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Cancer survivors experience numerous treatment side effects that negatively affect their quality of life. Cognitive side effects are especially insidious, as they affect memory, cognition, and learning. Neurocognitive deficits occur prior to cancer treatment, arising even before cancer diagnosis, and we refer to them as “tumor brain.” Metabolomics is a new area of research that focuses on metabolome profiles and provides important mechanistic insights into various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. Many neurological diseases and conditions affect metabolic processes in the brain. However, the tumor brain metabolome has never been analyzed. In our study we used direct flow injection/mass spectrometry (DI-MS) analysis to establish the effects of the growth of lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and sarcoma on the brain metabolome of TumorGraft™ mice. We found that the growth of malignant non-CNS tumors impacted metabolic processes in the brain, affecting protein biosynthesis, and amino acid and sphingolipid metabolism. The observed metabolic changes were similar to those reported for neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging, and may have potential mechanistic value for future analysis of the tumor brain phenomenon. PMID:29515623

  8. Stress preconditioning of spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne I Rodgers

    Full Text Available Cortical spreading depression (CSD is closely associated with important pathologies including stroke, seizures and migraine. The mechanisms underlying SD in its various forms are still incompletely understood. Here we describe SD-like events in an invertebrate model, the ventilatory central pattern generator (CPG of locusts. Using K(+ -sensitive microelectrodes, we measured extracellular K(+ concentration ([K(+](o in the metathoracic neuropile of the CPG while monitoring CPG output electromyographically from muscle 161 in the second abdominal segment to investigate the role K(+ in failure of neural circuit operation induced by various stressors. Failure of ventilation in response to different stressors (hyperthermia, anoxia, ATP depletion, Na(+/K(+ ATPase impairment, K(+ injection was associated with a disturbance of CNS ion homeostasis that shares the characteristics of CSD and SD-like events in vertebrates. Hyperthermic failure was preconditioned by prior heat shock (3 h, 45 degrees C and induced-thermotolerance was associated with an increase in the rate of clearance of extracellular K(+ that was not linked to changes in ATP levels or total Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity. Our findings suggest that SD-like events in locusts are adaptive to terminate neural network operation and conserve energy during stress and that they can be preconditioned by experience. We propose that they share mechanisms with CSD in mammals suggesting a common evolutionary origin.

  9. TNF-alpha expression by resident microglia and infiltrating leukocytes in the central nervous system of mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renno, T; Krakowski, M; Piccirillo, C

    1995-01-01

    , then coordinately dropped to background levels during remission. Analysis of cells isolated from the CNS of mice with acute EAE showed that the Th1 cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-gamma, were produced by infiltrating CD4+ T cells. In contrast, TNF-alpha was predominantly transcribed by non-T mononuclear CNS cells......, the majority of which were identified as microglia and macrophages by their Mac-1 phenotype. Microglia could be discriminated by their low expression of CD45. Incubation of freshly derived, adult microglia from normal, uninfiltrated, CNS with activated Th1 supernatant induced the production of TNF-alpha m...

  10. Resident Bacteria-Stimulated Interleukin-10-Secreting B Cells Ameliorate T-Cell-Mediated Colitis by Inducing T-Regulatory-1 Cells That Require Interleukin-27 SignalingSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Mishima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The regulatory roles of interleukin-10 (IL10-producing B cells in colitis are not fully understood, so we explored the molecular mechanisms by which these cells modulate mucosal homeostasis. Methods: CD4+ T cells from wild-type (WT, Il10−/−, or Il27ra−/− mice were cotransferred with B cells from specific pathogen-free (SPF or germ-free (GF WT or Il10−/− mice into Rag2−/−Il10−/−(double-knockout mice, and the severity of colitis and intestinal regulatory T-cell populations were characterized. In vitro, WT or Il10−/− B cells were cocultured with unfractionated, naïve or regulatory T cells plus Il10−/− antigen-presenting cells and stimulated with cecal bacterial lysate (CBL with or without IL27 or anti-IL10R blockade. Gene expressions, cytokines in the supernatant and cell populations were assessed. Results: WT but not Il10−/− B cells attenuated T helper cell TH1/TH17-mediated colitis in double-knockout mice that also received WT but not Il10−/− T cells. In vitro, CBL-stimulated WT B cells secrete abundant IL10 and suppress interferon-γ (IFNγ and IL17a-production by T cells without requiring cell contact. Although both WT and Il10−/− B cells induced Foxp3+CD4+ T-regulatory cells, only WT B cells induced IL10-producing (Foxp3-negative T regulatory-1 (Tr-1 cells both in vivo and in vitro. However, IL10-producing B cells did not attenuate colitis or induce Tr-1 cells in the absence of T cell IL27 signaling in vivo. WT B cell-dependent Tr-1 induction and concomitant decreased IFNγ-secretion were also mediated by T-cell IL27-signaling in vitro. Conclusions: IL10-secreting B cells activated by physiologically relevant bacteria ameliorate T-cell-mediated colitis and contribute to intestinal homeostasis by suppressing effector T cells and inducing Tr-1 cells via IL27-signaling on T cells. Keywords: Experimental

  11. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  12. Microwave & Magnetic (M2) Proteomics Reveals CNS-Specific Protein Expression Waves that Precede Clinical Symptoms of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Itay; Mahesula, Swetha; Purkar, Anjali; Black, David; Catala, Alexis; Gelfond, Jonathon A. L.; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Haskins, William E.

    2014-09-01

    Central nervous system-specific proteins (CSPs), transported across the damaged blood-brain-barrier (BBB) to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood (serum), might be promising diagnostic, prognostic and predictive protein biomarkers of disease in individual multiple sclerosis (MS) patients because they are not expected to be present at appreciable levels in the circulation of healthy subjects. We hypothesized that microwave & magnetic (M2) proteomics of CSPs in brain tissue might be an effective means to prioritize putative CSP biomarkers for future immunoassays in serum. To test this hypothesis, we used M2 proteomics to longitudinally assess CSP expression in brain tissue from mice during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. Confirmation of central nervous system (CNS)-infiltrating inflammatory cell response and CSP expression in serum was achieved with cytokine ELISPOT and ELISA immunoassays, respectively, for selected CSPs. M2 proteomics (and ELISA) revealed characteristic CSP expression waves, including synapsin-1 and α-II-spectrin, which peaked at day 7 in brain tissue (and serum) and preceded clinical EAE symptoms that began at day 10 and peaked at day 20. Moreover, M2 proteomics supports the concept that relatively few CNS-infiltrating inflammatory cells can have a disproportionally large impact on CSP expression prior to clinical manifestation of EAE.

  13. The C-C Chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 and Their Receptor CCR4 in CNS Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Scheu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It affects more than two million people worldwide, mainly young adults, and may lead to progressive neurological disability. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a murine disease model induced by active immunization with myelin proteins or transfer of encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells that recapitulates clinical and neuropathological features of MS. Chemokine ligand-receptor interactions orchestrate leukocyte trafficking and influence multiple pathophysiological cellular processes, including antigen presentation and cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs. The C-C class chemokines 17 (CCL17 and 22 (CCL22 and their C-C chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 have been shown to play an important role in homeostasis and inflammatory responses. Here, we provide an overview of the involvement of CCR4 and its ligands in CNS autoimmunity. We review key clinical studies of MS together with experimental studies in animals that have demonstrated functional roles of CCR4, CCL17, and CCL22 in EAE pathogenesis. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of newly developed CCR4 antagonists and a humanized anti-CCR4 antibody for treatment of MS.

  14. Ultrastructural localization of NADPH diaphorase and nitric oxide synthase in the neuropils of the snail CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacsa, Kálmán; Elekes, Károly; Serfőző, Zoltán

    2015-08-01

    Comparative studies on the nervous system revealed that nitric oxide (NO) retains its function through the evolution. In vertebrates NO can act in different ways: it is released solely or as a co-transmitter, released from presynaptic or postsynaptic site, spreads as a volumetric signal or targets synaptic proteins. In invertebrates, however, the possible sites of NO release have not yet been identified. Therefore, in the present study, the subcellular distribution of the NO synthase (NOS) was examined in the central nervous system (CNS) of two gastropod species, the terrestrial snail, Helix pomatia and the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, which are model species in comparative neurobiology. For the visualization of NOS NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and an immunohistochemical procedure using a universal anti-NOS antibody were applied. At light microscopic level both techniques labeled identical structures in sensory tracts ramifying in the neuropils of central ganglia and cell bodies of the Lymnaea and Helix CNS. At ultrastructural level NADPH-d reactive/NOS-immunoreactive materials were localized on the nuclear envelope and membrane segments of the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, as well as the cell membrane and axolemma of positive perikarya. NADPH-d reactive and NOS-immunoreactive varicosities connected to neighboring neurons with both unspecialized and specialized synaptic contacts. In the varicosities, the majority of the NADPH-d reactive/NOS-immunoreactive membrane segments were detected in round and pleomorph agranular vesicles of small size (50-200 nm). However, only a small portion (16%) of the vesicles displayed the NADPH-d reactivity/NOS-immunoreactivity. No evidence for the postsynaptic location of NOS was found. Our results suggest that the localization of NADPH-diaphorase and NOS is identical in the snail nervous system. In contrast to vertebrates, however, NO seems to act exclusively in an anterograde way possibly released from membrane

  15. The Potential of the CNS as a Reservoir for HIV-1 Infection: Implications for HIV Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fois, Alessandro F; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-06-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to establish latent infection is a key obstacle to its eradication despite the existence of effective antiretroviral drugs. The brain has been postulated as a reservoir for latent infection, but its role in HIV persistence remains unclear. In this review, we discuss the evidence surrounding the role of the central nervous system (CNS) as a viral reservoir and the potential challenges this might present in eradicating HIV. The strategies for eradication of HIV and their application to latent CNS infection are explored. Finally, we outline new developments in drug delivery and new therapeutic modalities designed to target HIV infection in the CNS.

  16. Involvement of nitric oxide through endocannabinoids release in microglia activation during the course of CNS regeneration in the medicinal leech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafah, Karim; Croix, Dominique; Vizioli, Jacopo; Desmons, Annie; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The medicinal leech is notable for its capacity to regenerate its central nervous system (CNS) following mechanical trauma. Using an electrochemical nitric oxide (NO)-selective electrode to measure NO levels, we found that the time course of NO release in the injured leech CNS is partially under the control of endocannabinoids, namely, N-arachidonyl ethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG). Relative quantification of these endocannabinoids was performed by stable isotope dilution (2AGd8 and AAEd8) coupled to mass spectrometry in course of regeneration process or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) treatment. Data show that 2-AG levels rose to a maximum about 30 min after injury or ATP treatment, and returned to baseline levels 4 h after injury. In same conditions, AEA levels also rapidly (within 5 min) dropped after injury or ATP treatment to the nerve cord, but did not fully return to baseline levels within 4 h of injury. In correlation with these data, chemoattraction activities of endocannabinoids on isolated leech microglial cells have been shown in vitro and in vivo reflecting that control over NO production is accompanied by the controlled chemoattraction of microglia directed from the periphery to the lesion site for neuronal repair purposes. Taken together, our results show that in the leech, after injury concurrent with ATP production, purinergic receptor activation, NO production, microglia recruitment, and accumulation to lesion site, a fine imbalance occurs in the endocannabinoid system. These events can bring explanations about the ability of the leech CNS to regenerate after a trauma and the key role of endocannabinoids in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Central nervous system prophylaxis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Khan, Nadia; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Kizilbash, Sani Haider; Barta, Stefan K

    2016-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a relatively uncommon manifestation; with most cases of CNS involvement occuring during relapse after primary therapy. CNS dissemination typically occurs early in the disease course and is most likely present subclinically at the time of diagnosis in many patients who later relapse in the CNS. CNS relapse in these patients is associated with poor outcomes. Based on a CNS relapse rate of 5% in DLBCL and weighing the benefits against the toxicities, universal application of CNS prophylaxis is not justified. The introduction of rituximab has significantly reduced the incidence of CNS relapse in DLBCL. Different studies have employed other agents for CNS prophylaxis, such as intrathecal chemotherapy and high-dose systemic agents with sufficient CNS penetration. If CNS prophylaxis is to be given, it should be preferably administered during primary chemotherapy. However, there is no strong evidence that supports any single approach for CNS prophylaxis. In this review, we outline different strategies of administering CNS prophylaxis in DLBCL patients reported in literature and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  19. Lipoprotein Lipase Is a Feature of Alternatively-Activated Microglia and May Facilitate Lipid Uptake in the CNS During Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Gorkhali, Sachi; Given, Katherine; Coates, Alison M; Boyle, Kristen E; Macklin, Wendy B; Eckel, Robert H

    2018-01-01

    Severe demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) such as multiple sclerosis (MS), can be devastating for many young lives. To date, the factors resulting in poor remyelination and repair are not well understood, and reparative therapies that benefit MS patients have yet to be developed. We have previously shown that the activity and abundance of Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL)-the rate-limiting enzyme in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins-is increased in Schwann cells and macrophages following nerve crush injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), suggesting that LPL may help scavenge myelin-derived lipids. We hypothesized that LPL may play a similar role in the CNS. To test this, mice were immunized with MOG 35-55 peptide to induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). LPL activity was increased ( p < 0.05) in the brain at 30 days post-injection, coinciding with partial remission of clinical symptoms. Furthermore, LPL abundance and activity was up-regulated ( p < 0.05) at the transition between de- and re-myelination in lysolecithin-treated ex vivo cerebellar slices. Since microglia are the key immune effector cells of the CNS we determined the role of LPL in microglia. Lipid uptake was decreased ( p < 0.001) in LPL-deficient BV-2 microglial cells compared to WT. In addition, LPL-deficient cells showed dramatically reduced expression of anti-inflammatory markers, YM1 (-22 fold, p < 0.001), and arginase 1 (Arg1; -265 fold, p < 0.001) and increased expression of pro-inflammatory markers, such as iNOS compared to WT cells (+53 fold, p < 0.001). This suggests that LPL is a feature of reparative microglia, further supported by the metabolic and inflammatory profile of LPL-deficient microglia. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that LPL expression is a novel feature of a microglial phenotype that supports remyelination and repair through the clearance of lipid debris. This mechanism may be exploited to develop future

  20. Glial cells as drug targets : What does it take?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development

  1. Netrin-1 Confines Rhombic Lip-Derived Neurons to the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Yung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During brainstem development, newborn neurons originating from the rhombic lip embark on exceptionally long migrations to generate nuclei important for audition, movement, and respiration. Along the way, this highly motile population passes several cranial nerves yet remains confined to the CNS. We found that Ntn1 accumulates beneath the pial surface separating the CNS from the PNS, with gaps at nerve entry sites. In mice null for Ntn1 or its receptor DCC, hindbrain neurons enter cranial nerves and migrate into the periphery. CNS neurons also escape when Ntn1 is selectively lost from the sub-pial region (SPR, and conversely, expression of Ntn1 throughout the mutant hindbrain can prevent their departure. These findings identify a permissive role for Ntn1 in maintaining the CNS-PNS boundary. We propose that Ntn1 confines rhombic lip-derived neurons by providing a preferred substrate for tangentially migrating neurons in the SPR, preventing their entry into nerve roots.

  2. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  3. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alternations in CNS Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    2007) Iron in fetal and neonatal nutrition . Semin Fetal Neonatal Med 12: 54-63 Raymond GV, Bauman ML, Kemper TL (1996) Hippocampus in autism : a...phenotype for Autism and related alternations in CNS development PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mark D. Noble, Ph.D... Autism and related alternations in CNS development 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0702 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  4. CLIPPERS among patients diagnosed with non-specific CNS neuroinflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, B M; Lindelof, Mette; Illes, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids (CLIPPERS) is an inflammatory CNS disorder characterized by 1) subacute onset of cerebellar and brainstem symptoms, 2) peripontine contrast-enhancing perivascular lesions with a "salt-and-pepper" appeara......Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids (CLIPPERS) is an inflammatory CNS disorder characterized by 1) subacute onset of cerebellar and brainstem symptoms, 2) peripontine contrast-enhancing perivascular lesions with a "salt...

  5. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  6. Intracellular Signaling Pathway Regulation of Myelination and Remyelination in the CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaesser, Jenna M.; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L.

    2016-01-01

    The restoration of myelin sheaths on demyelinated axons remains a major obstacle in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently approved therapies work by modulating the immune system to reduce the number and rate of lesion formation but are only partially effective since they are not able to restore lost myelin. In the healthy CNS, myelin continues to be generated throughout life and spontaneous remyelination occurs readily in response to insults. In patients with MS, however, remyelination eventually fails, at least in part as a result of a failure of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation and the subsequent production of new myelin. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that drive the process of myelin sheath formation is therefore important in order to speed the development of novel therapeutics designed to target remyelination. Here we review data supporting critical roles for three highly conserved intracellular signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and ERK/MAPK in the regulation of OPC differentiation and myelination both during development and in remyelination. Potential points of crosstalk between the three pathways and important areas for future research are also discussed. PMID:26957369

  7. CSF cytokines/chemokines as biomarkers in neuroinflammatory CNS disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C

    2016-01-01

    Despite improved understanding of the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory disorders of the brain and development of new diagnostic markers, our biomarker repertoire to demonstrate and monitor inflammation remains limited. Using PubMed database, we reviewed 83 studies on CSF cytokines and chemokines and describe the pattern of elevation and possible role of cytokines/chemokines as biomarkers in viral and autoimmune inflammatory neurological disorders of the CNS. Despite inconsistencies and overlap of cytokines and chemokines in different neuroinflammation syndromes, there are some trends regarding the pattern of cytokines/chemokine elevation. Namely B cell markers, such as CXCL13 and BAFF are predominantly investigated and found to be elevated in autoantibody-associated disorders, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is elevated mainly in viral encephalitis. Th2 and Th17 cytokines are frequently elevated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), whereas Th1 and Th17 cytokines are more commonly elevated in multiple sclerosis (MS). Cytokine/chemokine profiling might provide new insights into disease pathogenesis, and improve our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacological studies on drug dependence in rodents: dependence on opioids and CNS depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T

    1990-01-01

    Physical and psychic dependence on opioids and CNS depressants in rodents were examined using the drug-admixed food (DAF) method. A comparison of several methods for developing physical dependence on opioids was made. The DAF method has the advantage of rapidly inducing a high degree of physical dependence without causing morbidity or mortality. When morphine-dependent rats were pretreated with several opioids, naloxone-precipitated weight loss was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. A procedure for the development of severe physical dependence on CNS depressants was also established. Drug concentrations were rapidly increased until animals showed moderate to severe CNS depression, and then this condition was maintained for at least 10 days. With this procedure, animals became severely dependent on CNS depressants. Another technique, intermittent infusion, was developed that has been used to quantify short-acting CNS depressant dependence potential. The sedative effects of pentobarbital were used as an index in the determination of the injection intervals. These results suggest that the DAF method and the new approaches are useful tools for assessing the physical dependence potential of new drugs. Moreover, oral self-administration and weight pulling procedures were utilized along with the DAF method. Procedures for the oral self-administration of opioids and CNS depressants were established. Opioid-dependent rats pulled the weight to obtain the DAF even though they had free access to normal food. This weight-pulling procedure may be useful for assessing the degree of reinforcing effects for drugs in rats.

  9. Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insult in aging, and traumatic CNS injury, and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Diana M; Muccigrosso, Megan M; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2015-09-01

    Glia of the central nervous system (CNS) help to maintain homeostasis in the brain and support efficient neuronal function. Microglia are innate immune cells of the brain that mediate responses to pathogens and injury. They have key roles in phagocytic clearing, surveying the local microenvironment and propagating inflammatory signals. An interruption in homeostasis induces a cascade of conserved adaptive responses in glia. This response involves biochemical, physiological and morphological changes and is associated with the production of cytokines and secondary mediators that influence synaptic plasticity, cognition and behavior. This reorganization of host priorities represents a beneficial response that is normally adaptive but may become maladaptive when the profile of microglia is compromised. For instance, microglia can develop a primed or pro-inflammatory mRNA, protein and morphological profile with aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease. As a result, primed microglia exhibit an exaggerated inflammatory response to secondary and sub-threshold challenges. Consequences of exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia include the development of cognitive deficits, impaired synaptic plasticity and accelerated neurodegeneration. Moreover, impairments in regulatory systems in these circumstances may make microglia more resistant to negative feedback and important functions of glia can become compromised and dysfunctional. Overall, the purpose of this review is to discuss key concepts of microglial priming and immune-reactivity in the context of aging, traumatic CNS injury and neurodegenerative disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  11. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  12. Health-related quality of life of significant others of patients with malignant CNS versus non-CNS tumors: a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele, F.W.; Heimans, J.J.; Aaronson, N.K.; Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Postma, T.J.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Klein, M.

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that brain tumor patients’ significant others (SOs: partners, other family members or close friends) may face greater stress than those of patients with malignancies not involving the central nervous system (CNS), due to progressive changes in neurological and cognitive

  13. Multipotent nestin-positive stem cells reside in the stroma of human eccrine and apocrine sweat glands and can be propagated robustly in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Nagel

    Full Text Available Human skin harbours multiple different stem cell populations. In contrast to the relatively well-characterized niches of epidermal and hair follicle stem cells, the localization and niches of stem cells in other human skin compartments are as yet insufficiently investigated. Previously, we had shown in a pilot study that human sweat gland stroma contains Nestin-positive stem cells. Isolated sweat gland stroma-derived stem cells (SGSCs proliferated in vitro and expressed Nestin in 80% of the cells. In this study, we were able to determine the precise localization of Nestin-positive cells in both eccrine and apocrine sweat glands of human axillary skin. We established a reproducible isolation procedure and characterized the spontaneous, long-lasting multipotent differentiation capacity of SGSCs. Thereby, a pronounced ectodermal differentiation was observed. Moreover, the secretion of prominent cytokines demonstrated the immunological potential of SGSCs. The comparison to human adult epidermal stem cells (EpiSCs and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs revealed differences in protein expression and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, we found a coexpression of the stem cell markers Nestin and Iα6 within SGSCs and human sweat gland stroma. In conclusion the initial results of the pilot study were confirmed, indicating that human sweat glands are a new source of unique stem cells with multilineage differentiation potential, high proliferation capacity and remarkable self renewal. With regard to the easy accessibility of skin tissue biopsies, an autologous application of SGSCs in clinical therapies appears promising.

  14. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleoni, Silvia, E-mail: silviacolleoni@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Galli, Cesare [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Dipartimento Clinico Veterinario, Universita di Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (Italy); Giannelli, Serena G. [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio [Laboratory of Functional Neurochemistry, Interdepartmental Research Center for Parkinson' s Disease, Neurological Institute C. Mondino, Via Mondino 2, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Broccoli, Vania, E-mail: broccoli.vania@hsr.it [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lazzari, Giovanna, E-mail: giovannalazzari@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  15. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colleoni, Silvia; Galli, Cesare; Giannelli, Serena G.; Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio; Broccoli, Vania; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  16. Test-retest reliability and practice effects of the computerized neuropsychological test battery CNS Vital Signs : Evaluation in a Dutch healthy sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, S.D.; Rijnen, S.J.M.; Emons, W.H.M.; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Gehring, K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CNS Vital Signs (CNS VS) is a computerized neuropsychological test battery that is translated into many languages. Test-retest reliability and potential practice effects of CNS VS were evaluated. Method: Dutch healthy participants were tested with CNS VS (T0), and retested after 3 (T1)

  17. Pt nanoparticles residing in the pores of porous LaNiO₃ nanocubes as high-efficiency electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Kuai, Long; Wang, Qing; Geng, Baoyou

    2012-09-07

    Pt-filled porous LaNiO₃ cubes are prepared through a facile route. The characterizations reveal that large numbers of pores (9-10 nm) are distributed homogeneously in porous LaNiO₃ cubes. The Pt nanoparticles residing in the pores of porous LaNiO₃ cubes are about 5 nm in size. The investigation on the electrocatalytic activity reveals that electrocatalytic activity of the obtained Pt loaded porous LaNiO₃ nanocubes exhibit a significantly improved electrochemical active surface area (EASA) and a remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic performance toward methanol oxidation. The results are significant for improving the efficiency of Pt-based catalysts for DMFCs as well as the applications of perovskite compounds.

  18. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential T-cell expression of LFA-1 in residents from Africa and Denmark. Description of the phenomenon and its possible basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Elhassan, I M; Dodoo, D

    1994-01-01

    All circulating T cells constitutively express the adhesion molecule leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18) at either low or high surface density. In the present paper we have compared the expression of the LFA-1 alpha-chain CD11a on peripheral T cells obtained from indigenous...

  20. Role of ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters in erlotinib CNS penetration and intracellular accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeliegy, Mohamed A; Carcaboso, Angel M; Tagen, Michael; Bai, Feng; Stewart, Clinton F

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of drug transporters in central nervous system (CNS) penetration and cellular accumulation of erlotinib and its metabolite, OSI-420. After oral erlotinib administration to wild-type and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-knockout mice (Mdr1a/b(-/-), Abcg2(-/-), Mdr1a/b(-/-)Abcg2(-/-), and Abcc4(-/-)), plasma was collected and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) was sampled using intracerebral microdialysis. A pharmacokinetic model was fit to erlotinib and OSI-420 concentration-time data, and brain penetration (P(Brain)) was estimated by the ratio of ECF-to-unbound plasma area under concentration-time curves. Intracellular accumulation of erlotinib was assessed in cells overexpressing human ABC transporters or SLC22A solute carriers. P(Brain) in wild-type mice was 0.27 ± 0.11 and 0.07 ± 0.02 (mean ± SD) for erlotinib and OSI-420, respectively. Erlotinib and OSI-420 P(Brain) in Abcg2(-/-) and Mdr1a/b(-/-)Abcg2(-/-) mice were significantly higher than in wild-type mice. Mdr1a/b(-/-) mice showed similar brain ECF penetration as wild-type mice (0.49 ± 0.37 and 0.04 ± 0.02 for erlotinib and OSI-420, respectively). In vitro, erlotinib and OSI-420 accumulation was significantly lower in cells overexpressing breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) than in control cells. Only OSI-420, not erlotinib, showed lower accumulation in cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) than in control cells. The P-gp/BCRP inhibitor elacridar increased erlotinib and OSI-420 accumulation in BCRP-overexpressing cells. Erlotinib uptake was higher in OAT3- and OCT2-transfected cells than in empty vector control cells. Abcg2 is the main efflux transporter preventing erlotinib and OSI-420 penetration in mouse brain. Erlotinib and OSI-420 are substrates for SLC22A family members OAT3 and OCT2. Our findings provide a mechanistic basis for erlotinib CNS penetration, cellular uptake, and efflux mechanisms. ©2010 AACR.

  1. In vivo Piroxicam Metabolites: Possible Source for Synthesis of Central Nervous System (CNS) Acting Depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saganuwan, Saganuwan A

    2017-01-01

    Piroxicam has been reported to be convertible to Central Nervous System (CNS) acting agents. It has serious depressant effects at high doses. In view of this, structures of piroxicam metabolites were assessed for possible conversion to CNS depressants. Literature search was carried out with intent to identifying piroxicam metabolites and the possibility of converting them to CNS acting depressants. Piroxicam is convertible to hydroxymethylated metabolite which may be converted to barbiturates such as thiopentone and thiamylal. Whereas cyclodehydrated metabolite may be converted to acetylcyclodehydrated compound that may be in turn converted to acetylacetone and cyclohexamide. However, carboxybenzothiazine metabolite may be converted to carboxamide compound, benzolactone which is convertible to phenazone. Carboxybenzothiazine is also convertible to 2-aminopyridine mepyramine and triplenamine. Conversion of carboxybenzothiazine to gamma aminobutyric acid and phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine, thioridazine, fluphenazine and perphenazine is highly possible. Structurally, barbituric compounds, carboxamide, cyclodehydrated, benzothiazine and carboxybenzothiazine metabolites may act via dopamine and adrenergic receptors causing depression of CNS activities. Piroxicam metabolites may also act via histamine, melatonin and potassium channel receptors causing CNS depression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Detail Design of the hydrogen system and the gas blanketing system for the HANARO-CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Kim, Young Ki; Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Bong Su; Lee, Yong Seop

    2007-04-15

    The cold neutron source (CNS), which will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, makes thermal neutrons to moderate into the cold neutrons with the ranges of 0.1 {approx} 10 meV passing through a moderator at about 22K. A moderator to produce cold neutrons is liquid hydrogen, which liquefies by the heat transfer with cryogenic helium flowing from the helium refrigeration system (HRS). Because of its installed location, the hydrogen system is designed to be surrounded by the gas blanketing system to notify the leakage on the system and to prevent hydrogen leakage out of the CNS. The hydrogen system, consisted of hydrogen charging unit, hydrogen storage unit, hydrogen buffer tank, and hydrogen piping, is designed to smoothly and safely supply hydrogen to and to draw back hydrogen from the IPA of the CNS under the HRS operation mode. Described is that calculation for total required hydrogen amount in the CNS as well as operation schemes of the hydrogen system. The gas blanketing system (GBS) is designed for the supply of the compressed nitrogen gas into the air pressurized valves for the CNS, to isolate the hydrogen system from the air and the water, and to prevent air or water intrusion into the vacuum system as well as the hydrogen system. All detail descriptions are shown inhere as well as the operation scheme for the GBS.

  3. Curcumin loaded NLC induces histone hypoacetylation in the CNS after intraperitoneal administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglia, Carmelo; Frasca, Giuseppina; Musumeci, Teresa; Rizza, Luisa; Puglisi, Giovanni; Bonina, Francesco; Chiechio, Santina

    2012-06-01

    The natural p300-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor, curcumin (CUR), has been widely investigated for its potential therapeutic effect as an anticancer and anti-inflammatory agent. Notwithstanding this interesting pharmacological profile, CUR shows some drawbacks, such as poor absorption and a very fast metabolism and elimination, that limit its clinical use. Aim of the present study was to formulate CUR loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC-CUR) in order to improve the bioavailability and stability of this compound after systemic administration with increased effects in the central nervous system (CNS). NLC-CUR were prepared and characterized on their physicochemical properties by PCS and DSC analyses. Thus, NLC-CUR were systemically injected and the effects in the CNS were compared with a CUR control formulation containing 0.05% DMSO (DMSO-CUR). Our results demonstrate that CUR is able to decrease histone acetylation in the CNS when included in NLCs. Western blot analysis shows that intraperitoneal injection of NLC-CUR (100mg/kg) in mice induces a marked hypoacetylation of histone 4 (H4) at lysine 12 (K12) in the spinal cord compared with control group. Notably, DMSO-CUR (100mg/kg) did not change the H4K12 acetylation level in the CNS. Our study suggests a novel approach to ameliorate the pharmacokinetics of CUR that allows a better permeation in the CNS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Different response to glucocorticoid therapy in autoimmune diseases of CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Željka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells and interleukin (IL-17, their signature cytokine, have the main role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The effect of glucocorticoids (GC on expression and production of IL-17 has not been thoroughly tested yet. Also, the site of action of GC is not precisely defined. This paper presents the main results of the Doctoral thesis devoted to studies of GC on the production of IL-17 in the model of EAE, induced in susceptible laboratory animals. Methylprednisolone (MP, a synthetic glucocorticoid, inhibit in vitro production of IL-17 in mitogen-stimulated lymph node cells (LNC as well as in myelin basic protein (MBP-stimulated draining LNC in dose- dependent manner. However, under the same conditions inhibitory effect of the MP on production and expression of the genes for IFN-γ, a cytokine that TH1 cells generate, is significantly more pronounced. Interestingly, when we analyzed effects of MP applied in vivo in EAE, the same phenomenon was observed: the proportion of IFN-γ producing, but not all of IL-17 cells were reduced in cells isolated from MP treated rats in comparison to control rats which indicates that MP achieves its effects not only in the peripheral lymphoid tissues, but also in target tissue. Different sensitivities of Th1 and Th17 cells that are major cellular sources of IFN-γ or IL-17 in the effect of the GC has been observed in other animal models and in human disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the relative resistance of Th17 cells on the operation of GC is very important for the development of new strategies in the treatment of those forms of autoimmune and chronic diseases that are resistant to the effect of glucocorticoids.

  5. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available The generation of functionally distinct neuronal subtypes within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS requires the precise regulation of progenitor gene expression in specific neuronal territories during early embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has implicated histone deacetylase (HDAC proteins in cell specification, proliferation, and differentiation in diverse embryonic and adult tissues. However, although HDAC proteins have shown to be expressed in the developing vertebrate neural tube, their specific role in CNS neural progenitor fate specification remains unclear. Prior work from our lab showed that the Tcf7l2/Tcf4 transcription factor plays a key role in ventral progenitor lineage segregation by differential repression of two key specification factors, Nkx2.2 and Olig2. In this study, we found that administration of HDAC inhibitors (Valproic Acid (VPA, Trichostatin-A (TSA, or sodium butyrate in chick embryos in ovo disrupted normal progenitor gene segregation in the developing neural tube, indicating that HDAC activity is required for this process. Further, using functional and pharmacological approaches in vivo, we found that HDAC activity is required for the differential repression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 by Tcf7l2/Tcf4. Finally, using dominant-negative functional assays, we provide evidence that Tcf7l2/Tcf4 repression also requires Gro/TLE/Grg co-repressor factors. Together, our data support a model where the transcriptional repressor activity of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 involves functional interactions with both HDAC and Gro/TLE/Grg co-factors at specific target gene regulatory elements in the developing neural tube, and that this activity is required for the proper segregation of the Nkx2.2 (p3 and Olig2 (pMN expressing cells from a common progenitor pool.

  6. Neuropilin-1 Is Expressed on Lymphoid Tissue Residing LTi-like Group 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells and Associated with Ectopic Lymphoid Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhagaie, Medya Mara; Björklund, Åsa K; Mjösberg, Jenny; Erjefält, Jonas S; Cornelissen, Anne S; Ros, Xavier Romero; Bal, Suzanne M; Koning, Jasper J; Mebius, Reina E; Mori, Michiko; Bruchard, Melanie; Blom, Bianca; Spits, Hergen

    2017-02-14

    Here, we characterize a subset of ILC3s that express Neuropilin1 (NRP1) and are present in lymphoid tissues, but not in the peripheral blood or skin. NRP1 + group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) display in vitro lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) activity. In agreement with this, NRP1 + ILC3s are mainly located in proximity to high endothelial venules (HEVs) and express cell surface molecules involved in lymphocyte migration in secondary lymphoid tissues via HEVs. NRP1 was also expressed on mouse fetal LTi cells, indicating that NRP1 is a conserved marker for LTi cells. Human NRP1 + ILC3s are primed cells because they express CD45RO and produce higher amounts of cytokines than NRP1 - cells, which express CD45RA. The NRP1 ligand vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) served as a chemotactic factor for NRP1 + ILC3s. NRP1 + ILC3s are present in lung tissues from smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting a role in angiogenesis and/or the initiation of ectopic pulmonary lymphoid aggregates. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Satellite glial cells in human trigeminal ganglia have a broad expression of functional Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; van Velzen, Monique; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2017-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate immune responses to a wide variety of danger- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), expression profile and function of TLRs in the human peripheral nervous system (PNS) are ill-defined. We analyzed TLR expression of satellite glial cells (SGCs) and microglia, glial cells predominantly involved in local immune responses in ganglia of the human PNS and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of the CNS, respectively. Ex vivo flow cytometry analysis of cell suspensions obtained from human cadaveric trigeminal ganglia (TG) and NAWM showed that both SGCs and microglia expressed TLR1-5, TLR7, and TLR9, although expression levels varied between these cell types. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of TLR1-TLR4 and TLR9 by SGCs in situ. Stimulation of TG- and NAWM-derived cell suspensions with ligands of TLR1-TLR6, but not TLR7 and TLR9, induced interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion. We identified CD45 LOW CD14 POS SGCs and microglia, but not CD45 HIGH leukocytes and CD45 NEG cells as the main source of IL-6 and TNF-α upon stimulation with TLR3 and TLR5 ligands. In conclusion, human TG-resident SGCs express a broad panel of functional TLRs, suggesting their role in initiating and orchestrating inflammation to pathogens in human sensory ganglia. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  9. Zebrafish as a model to investigate CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Marnie A; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Targeting innate receptors with MIS416 reshapes Th responses and suppresses CNS disease in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine White

    Full Text Available Modification of the innate immune cell environment has recently been recognized as a viable treatment strategy for reducing autoimmune disease pathology. MIS416 is a microparticulate immune response modifier that targets myeloid cells, activating cytosolic receptors NOD2 and TLR9, and has completed a phase 1b/2a trial for the treatment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Using a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, we are investigating the pathways by which activation of TLR9 and NOD2 may modify the innate immune environment and the subsequent T cell-mediated autoimmune responses. We have found that MIS416 has profound effects on the Th subset balance by depressing antigen-specific Th1, Th17, and Th2 development. These effects coincided with an expansion of specific myeloid subpopulations and increased levels of MIS416-stimulated IFN-γ by splenocytes. Additionally, systemic IFN-γ serum levels were enhanced and correlated strongly with disease reduction, and the protective effect of MIS416 was abrogated in IFN-γ-deficient animals. Finally, treatment of secondary progressive MS patients with MIS416 similarly elevated the levels of IFN-γ and IFN-γ-associated proteins in the serum. Together, these studies demonstrate that administration of MIS416, which targets innate cells, reshapes autoimmune T cell responses and leads to a significant reduction in CNS inflammation and disease.

  11. Piracetam and piracetam-like drugs: from basic science to novel clinical applications to CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykh, Andrei G; Sadaie, M Reza

    2010-02-12

    There is an increasing interest in nootropic drugs for the treatment of CNS disorders. Since the last meta-analysis of the clinical efficacy of piracetam, more information has accumulated. The primary objective of this systematic survey is to evaluate the clinical outcomes as well as the scientific literature relating to the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, dosing, toxicology and adverse effects of marketed and investigational drugs. The major focus of the literature search was on articles demonstrating evidence-based clinical investigations during the past 10 years for the following therapeutic categories of CNS disorders: (i) cognition/memory; (ii) epilepsy and seizure; (iii) neurodegenerative diseases; (iv) stroke/ischaemia; and (v) stress and anxiety. In this article, piracetam-like compounds are divided into three subgroups based on their chemical structures, known efficacy and intended clinical uses. Subgroup 1 drugs include piracetam, oxiracetam, aniracetam, pramiracetam and phenylpiracetam, which have been used in humans and some of which are available as dietary supplements. Of these, oxiracetam and aniracetam are no longer in clinical use. Pramiracetam reportedly improved cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injuries. Although piracetam exhibited no long-term benefits for the treatment of mild cognitive impairments, recent studies demonstrated its neuroprotective effect when used during coronary bypass surgery. It was also effective in the treatment of cognitive disorders of cerebrovascular and traumatic origins; however, its overall effect on lowering depression and anxiety was higher than improving memory. As add-on therapy, it appears to benefit individuals with myoclonus epilepsy and tardive dyskinesia. Phenylpiracetam is more potent than piracetam and is used for a wider range of indications. In combination with a vasodilator drug, piracetam appeared to have an additive beneficial effect on various

  12. Model study evaluating environmental benefits uprova-tion cns/atm air traffic control technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.П. Бабак

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available  Previous results of different researches show that in 2015 it follows to expect the additional improvements in fuel consumption and decrease of CO2 emission on 5% by implementation of the CNS/ATM systems. Application of the CNS/ATM systems will benefit in three directions: improvement of carrying airport capacity, accordingly the reduction of number of delays in the loaded airports; shortening of flights’ duration due to the use of more direct routes; and reduction of the vertical echeloning (RVSM.  A parametric model for the detailed research of influencing of height and speed of the aircraft flights on engine emission and fuel consumption was developed, it allows to evaluate an ecological efficiency of the implementation of CNS/ATM technologies.

  13. Abbreviated exposure to hypoxia is sufficient to induce CNS dysmyelination, modulate spinal motor neuron composition, and impair motor development in neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens O Watzlawik

    Full Text Available Neonatal white matter injury (nWMI is an increasingly common cause of cerebral palsy that results predominantly from hypoxic injury to progenitor cells including those of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Existing mouse models of nWMI utilize prolonged periods of hypoxia during the neonatal period, require complex cross-fostering and exhibit poor growth and high mortality rates. Abnormal CNS myelin composition serves as the major explanation for persistent neuro-motor deficits. Here we developed a simplified model of nWMI with low mortality rates and improved growth without cross-fostering. Neonatal mice are exposed to low oxygen from postnatal day (P 3 to P7, which roughly corresponds to the period of human brain development between gestational weeks 32 and 36. CNS hypomyelination is detectable for 2-3 weeks post injury and strongly correlates with levels of body and brain weight loss. Immediately following hypoxia treatment, cell death was evident in multiple brain regions, most notably in superficial and deep cortical layers as well as the subventricular zone progenitor compartment. PDGFαR, Nkx2.2, and Olig2 positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cell were significantly reduced until postnatal day 27. In addition to CNS dysmyelination we identified a novel pathological marker for adult hypoxic animals that strongly correlates with life-long neuro-motor deficits. Mice reared under hypoxia reveal an abnormal spinal neuron composition with increased small and medium diameter axons and decreased large diameter axons in thoracic lateral and anterior funiculi. Differences were particularly pronounced in white matter motor tracts left and right of the anterior median fissure. Our findings suggest that 4 days of exposure to hypoxia are sufficient to induce experimental nWMI in CD1 mice, thus providing a model to test new therapeutics. Pathological hallmarks of this model include early cell death, decreased OPCs and hypomyelination in early postnatal life

  14. Chikungunya fever: CNS infection and pathologies of a re-emerging arbovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Trina; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie Christine; Hoarau, Jean Jacques; Krejbich Trotot, Pascale; Denizot, Melanie; Lee-Pat-Yuen, Ghislaine; Sahoo, Renubala; Guiraud, Pascale; Ramful, Duksha; Robin, Stephanie; Alessandri, Jean Luc; Gauzere, Bernard Alex; Gasque, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and causes an acute symptomatic illness with fever, skin rash, and incapacitating arthralgia, which can evolve into chronic rheumatoid arthritis in elderly patients. This is a tropical disease originally described in central/east Africa in the 1960s, but its 2004 re-emergence in Africa and rapid spread in lands in and around the Indian Ocean (Reunion island, India, Malaysia) as well as Europe (Italy) led to almost 6 million cases worldwide. The risk of importation and spreading diseases with long-term sequelae is even greater today given the global distribution of the vectors (including in the Americas), increased tourism and the apparent capacity of CHIKV to produce high levels of viremia (10(9)-10(12) virus/ml of blood) and new mutants. CHIKV-associated neuropathology was described early in the 1960s, but it is the unprecedented incidence rate in Indian Ocean areas with efficient clinical facilities that allowed a better description of cases with severe encephalitis, meningoencephalitis, peripheral neuropathies and deaths among newborns (mother-to-child infection), infants and elderly patients. Death rates following CHIKV infection were estimated at 1:1000 cases in la Reunion's outbreak. These clinical observations have been corroborated by experimental infection in several mouse models, leading to CNS pathologies. We further describe in this review the capacity of CHIKV to infect neurons and glial cells, delineate the fundamental innate (intrinsic) immune defence mechanisms to protect from infection and argue about the possible mechanisms involved in the encephalopathy. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Orientia, rickettsia, and leptospira pathogens as causes of CNS infections in Laos: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Lee, Sue J; Panyanivong, Phonepasith; Craig, Scott B; Tulsiani, Suhella M; Blacksell, Stuart D; Dance, David A B; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Sengduangphachanh, Amphone; Phoumin, Phonelavanh; Paris, Daniel H; Newton, Paul N

    2015-02-01

    Scrub typhus (caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi), murine typhus (caused by Rickettsia typhi), and leptospirosis are common causes of febrile illness in Asia; meningitis and meningoencephalitis are severe complications. However, scarce data exist for the burden of these pathogens in patients with CNS disease in endemic countries. Laos is representative of vast economically poor rural areas in Asia with little medical information to guide public health policy. We assessed whether these pathogens are important causes of CNS infections in Laos. Between Jan 10, 2003, and Nov 25, 2011, we enrolled 1112 consecutive patients of all ages admitted with CNS symptoms or signs requiring a lumbar puncture at Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos. Microbiological examinations (culture, PCR, and serology) targeted so-called conventional bacterial infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, S suis) and O tsutsugamushi, Rickettsia typhi/Rickettsia spp, and Leptospira spp infections in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We analysed and compared causes and clinical and CSF characteristics between patient groups. 1051 (95%) of 1112 patients who presented had CSF available for analysis, of whom 254 (24%) had a CNS infection attributable to a bacterial or fungal pathogen. 90 (35%) of these 254 infections were caused by O tsutsugamushi, R typhi/Rickettsia spp, or Leptospira spp. These pathogens were significantly more frequent than conventional bacterial infections (90/1051 [9%] vs 42/1051 [4%]; pLaos. Antibiotics, such as tetracyclines, needed for the treatment of murine typhus and scrub typhus, are not routinely advised for empirical treatment of CNS infections. These severely neglected infections represent a potentially large proportion of treatable CNS disease burden across vast endemic areas and need more attention. Wellcome Trust UK. Copyright © 2015 Dittrich et al. Open Access article published under the terms of CC BY. Published by .. All

  16. Test-Retest Reliability of a Computerized Concussion Test: CNS Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Ashley C; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive testing is an important concussion evaluation tool, but for neurocognitive tests to be useful, their psychometric properties must be well established. Test-retest reliability of computerized neurocognitive tests can influence their clinical utility. The reliability for a commonly used computerized neurocognitive test, CNS Vital Signs, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to examine test-retest reliability and reliable change indices for CNS Vital Signs in a healthy, physically active college population. CNS Vital Signs yields acceptable test-retest reliability, with greater reliability between the second and third test administration compared with between the first and second administration. Cohort study. Level 3. Forty healthy, active volunteers (16 men, 24 women; mean age, 21.05 ± 2.17 years) reported to a clinical laboratory for 3 sessions, 1 week apart. At each session, participants were administered CNS Vital Signs. Outcomes included standard scores for the following CNS Vital Signs domains: verbal memory, visual memory, psychomotor speed, cognitive flexibility, complex attention, processing speed, reaction time, executive functioning, and reasoning. Participants performed significantly better on the second session and/or third session than they did on the first testing session on 6 of 9 neurocognitive domains. Pearson r test-retest correlations between sessions ranged from 0.11 to 0.87. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.10 to 0.86. Clinicians should consider using reliable change indices to account for practice effects, identify meaningful score changes due to pathology, and inform clinical decisions. This study highlights the importance of clinicians understanding the psychometric properties of computerized neurocognitive tests when using them in the management of sport-related concussion. If CNS Vital Signs is administered twice within a small time frame (such as 1 week), athletes should be expected to

  17. Studying neuronal biomechanics and its role in CNS development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franze, Kristian; Svoboda, Hanno; da F. Costa, Luciano; Guck, Jochen; Holt, Christine

    2013-03-01

    During the development of the nervous system, neurons migrate and grow over great distances. Currently, our understanding of nervous tissue development is, in large part, based on studies of biochemical signaling. Despite the fact that forces are involved in any kind of cell motion, mechanical aspects have so far rarely been considered. Here we used deformable cell culture substrates, traction force microscopy and calcium imaging to investigate how neurons probe and respond to their mechanical environment. While the growth rate of retinal ganglion cell axons was increased on stiffer substrates, their tendency to grow in bundles, which they show in vivo, was significantly enhanced on more compliant substrates. Moreover, if grown on substrates incorporating linear stiffness gradients, neuronal axons were repelled by stiff substrates. Mechanosensing involved the application of forces driven by the interaction of actin and myosin II, and the activation of stretch-activated ion channels leading to calcium influxes into the cells. Applying a modified atomic force microscopy techniquein vivo, we found mechanical gradients in developing brain tissue along which neurons grow. The application of chondroitin sulfate, which is a major extracellular matrix component in the developing brain, changed tissue mechanics and disrupted axonal pathfinding. Hence, our data suggest that neuronal growth is not only guided by chemical signals - as it is currently assumed - but also by the nervous tissue's mechanical properties.

  18. 25th Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpee, Tatyana O; Destexhe, Alain; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sekulić, Vladislav; Skinner, Frances K; Wójcik, Daniel K; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Cserpán, Dorottya; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Kim, Jae K; Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Bennett, Matthew R; Josić, Kresimir; Elices, Irene; Arroyo, David

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents A1 Functional advantages of cell-type heterogeneity in neural circuits Tatyana O. Sharpee A2 Mesoscopic modeling of propagating waves in visual cortex Alain Destexhe A3 Dynamics and biomarkers of mental disorders Mitsuo Kawato F1 Precise recruitment of spiking output at theta frequencies requires dendritic h-channels in multi-compartment models of oriens-lac...

  19. Gene therapy and transplantation in CNS repair : the visual system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, Alan R; Hu, Ying; Leaver, Simone G; Mellough, Carla B; Park, Kevin; Verhaagen, J.; Plant, Giles W; Cui, Qi

    Normal visual function in humans is compromised by a range of inherited and acquired degenerative conditions, many of which affect photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium. As a consequence the majority of experimental gene- and cell-based therapies are aimed at rescuing or replacing these

  20. Imaging aspects of neurologic emergencies in children treated for non-CNS malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaste, S.C.; Langston, J.; Rodriguez-Galindo, C.; Furman, W.L.; Thompson, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    There is a paucity of radiologic literature addressing neurologic emergencies in children receiving therapy for non-CNS primary malignancies. In the acute setting, many of these children present to local community hospitals. This pictorial is from a single institutional experience describing the spectrum of neurologic emergencies seen in children with non-CNS cancers. We hope to familiarize pediatric radiologists with these entities in order to expedite diagnosis, facilitate treatment, and minimize morbity and mortality that may be associated with these complications. (orig.)

  1. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum resident protein of 90 kilodaltons associates with the T- and B-cell antigen receptors and major histocompatibility complex antigens during their assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, F.; DAVID, V.; WATKINS, S.; Brenner, M. B.

    1992-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), newly synthesized subunits of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR), membrane-bound immunoglobulin (mIg), and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens must fold correctly and assemble completely into multimeric protein complexes prior to transport to the

  3. Incidence and Outcomes of Central Nervous System Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Relapse after Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounder, Dana T; Khandelwal, Pooja; Chandra, Sharat; Jordan, Michael B; Kumar, Ashish R; Grimley, Michael S; Davies, Stella M; Bleesing, Jack J; Marsh, Rebecca A

    2017-05-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune regulatory disorder that commonly presents with central nervous system (CNS) involvement. The only cure for genetic HLH is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), typically treated with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We sought to estimate the incidence of CNS relapse after RIC HSCT, determine risk factors, and evaluate outcomes. We performed a retrospective chart review of 94 consecutive children and young adults with primary HLH who received RIC HSCT. CNS relapse within 1 year after transplantation was diagnosed by review of clinical symptoms, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and radiologic findings. Four (4.25%) patients developed symptoms of possible CNS HLH after HSCT and 3 patients were diagnosed. Eight patients underwent screening lumbar puncture because of history of active CNS disease at the onset of the conditioning regimen and 4 had evidence of continued disease. The overall incidence of CNS relapse and continued CNS disease after RIC HSCT was 8%. All patients with CNS disease after HSCT responded to CNS-directed therapy. Whole blood donor chimerism at the time of CNS relapse was low at 1% to 34%, but it remained high at 88% to 100% for patients with continued CNS disease. Overall survival for patients with CNS relapse was 50%, compared with 75% for patients without CNS disease (P = .079). Our data suggest that a low level of donor chimerism or active CNS disease at the time of transplantation increase the risk of CNS HLH after HSCT. Surveillance CSF evaluation after allogeneic RIC HSCT should be considered in patients with risk factors and CNS-directed treatment should be initiated if appropriate. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Incidence of cancer in children residing in ten jurisdictions of the Mexican Republic: importance of the Cancer registry (a population-based study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Palma-Padilla, Virginia; Carreón-Cruz, Rogelio; Ortega-Alvárez, Manuel Carlos; Mejía-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In 1996, Mexico started to register cases of childhood cancer. Here, we describe the incidence of cancer in children, residing in ten Mexican jurisdictions, who were treated by the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). New cases of childhood cancer, which were registered prospectively in nine principal Medical Centers of IMSS during the periods 1998–2000 (five jurisdictions) and 1996–2002 (five jurisdictions), were analyzed. Personnel were specifically trained to register, capture, and encode information. For each of these jurisdictions, the frequency, average annual age-standardized incidence (AAS) and average annual incidence per period by sex and, age, were calculated (rates per 1,000,000 children/years). In total 2,615 new cases of cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio generally >1, but in some tumors there were more cases in females (retinoblastoma, germ cells tumors). The principal groups of neoplasms in seven jurisdictions were leukemias, central nervous system tumors (CNS tumors), and lymphomas, and the combined frequency for these three groups was 62.6 to 77.2%. Most frequently found (five jurisdictions) was the North American-European pattern (leukemias-CNS tumors-lymphomas). Eight jurisdictions had AAS within the range reported in the world literature. The highest incidence was found for children underless than five year of age. In eight jurisdictions, leukemia had high incidence (>50). The AAS of lymphomas was between 1.9 to 28.6. Chiapas and Guerrero had the highest AAS of CNS tumors (31.9 and 30.3, respectively). The frequency and incidence of neuroblastoma was low. Chiapas had the highest incidence of retinoblastoma (21.8). Germ-cell tumors had high incidence. The North American-European pattern of cancers was the principal one found; the overall incidence was within the range reported worldwide. In general but particularly in two jurisdictions (Yucatán and Chiapas), it will be necessary to carry out studies concerning the

  5. Smooth Muscle Cells Derived From Second Heart Field and Cardiac Neural Crest Reside in Spatially Distinct Domains in the Media of the Ascending Aorta-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hisashi; Rateri, Debra L; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Majesky, Mark W; Daugherty, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the proximal thoracic aorta are embryonically derived from the second heart field (SHF) and cardiac neural crest (CNC). However, distributions of these embryonic origins are not fully defined. The regional distribution of SMCs of different origins is speculated to cause region-specific aortopathies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of SMCs of SHF and CNC origins in the proximal thoracic aorta. Mice with repressed LacZ in the ROSA26 locus were bred to those expressing Cre controlled by either the Wnt1 or Mef2c (myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2c) promoter to trace CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs, respectively. Thoracic aortas were harvested, and activity of β-galactosidase was determined. Aortas from Wnt1- Cre mice had β-galactosidase-positive areas throughout the region from the proximal ascending aorta to just distal of the subclavian arterial branch. Unexpectedly, β-galactosidase-positive areas in Mef2c- Cre mice extended from the aortic root throughout the ascending aorta. This distribution occurred independent of sex and aging. Cross and sagittal aortic sections demonstrated that CNC-derived cells populated the inner medial aspect of the anterior region of the ascending aorta and transmurally in the media of the posterior region. Interestingly, outer medial cells throughout anterior and posterior ascending aortas were derived from the SHF. β-Galactosidase-positive medial cells of both origins colocalized with an SMC marker, α-actin. Both CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs populate the media throughout the ascending aorta. The outer medial cells of the ascending aorta form a sleeve populated by SHF-derived SMCs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Physiological roles of CNS muscarinic receptors gained from knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Sørensen, Gunnar; Dencker, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    , knockout mice are likely to continue to provide valuable insights into brain physiology and pathophysiology, and advance the development of new medications for a range of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and addictions, as well as non-opioid analgesics...... receptors modulating neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release in many brain regions, shaping neuronal plasticity, and affecting functions ranging from motor and sensory function to cognitive processes. As gene targeting technology evolves including the use of conditional, cell type specific strains...

  7. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induc...

  8. 25th Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpee, Tatyana O.; Destexhe, Alain; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sekuli?, Vladislav; Skinner, Frances K.; W?jcik, Daniel K.; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Cserp?n, Dorottya; Somogyv?ri, Zolt?n; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josi?, Kresimir; Elices, Irene; Arroyo, David

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents A1 Functional advantages of cell-type heterogeneity in neural circuits Tatyana O. Sharpee A2 Mesoscopic modeling of propagating waves in visual cortex Alain Destexhe A3 Dynamics and biomarkers of mental disorders Mitsuo Kawato F1 Precise recruitment of spiking output at theta frequencies requires dendritic h-channels in multi-compartment models of oriens-lacunosum/moleculare hippocampal interneurons Vladislav Sekulić, Frances K. Skinner F2 Kernel methods in reconstruction of...

  9. Tailored central nervous system-directed treatment strategy for isolated CNS recurrence of adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Changcheng; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Weibo; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wu, Jingsheng; Sun, Zimin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this report was to investigate the tailored treatment strategies for isolated central nervous system (CNS) recurrence in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Isolated CNS recurrence was documented in 34 patients: there were 18, 6, and 10 patients with meningeal involvement type (type A), cranial nerve palsy type (type B), and myeloid sarcoma type (type C), respectively. For patients with type A, intrathecal chemotherapy was the predominant strategy. For type B, systemic HD-Ara-C with four cycles was the main treatment. For type C, cranial irradiation or craniospinal irradiation was adopted and two cycles of HD-Ara-C were given after the irradiation. The 5-year cumulative incidence of CNS recurrence was 12.8%. There was a significantly higher WBC count (32.6∼60.8 × 10(9)/l) in patients at first diagnosis who developed CNS recurrence (all of the three types) compared with patients with no CNS recurrence (10.1 × 10(9)/l) (P = 0.005). We found that a significantly more patients with AML-M5 and 11q23 abnormalities developed CNS recurrence in type A (P < 0.001, 0.005). Twenty-four out of 34 patients (70.6%) with CNS recurrence achieved CNS complete remission at a median of 58 days (range, 30-120). The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates for all CNS recurrence patients were 21.6 and 25.3%, respectively. This report indicates that the tailored CNS-directed strategy is an effective modality to treat CNS recurrence in adult AML, but further studies are needed to improve the long-term survival.

  10. Increased expression of the chemokines CXCL1 and MIP-1α by resident brain cells precedes neutrophil infiltration in the brain following prolonged soman-induced status epilepticus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koemeter-Cox Andrew I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD causes neuronal cell death and impaired behavioral function dependent on the induction of status epilepticus (SE. Little is known about the maturation of this pathological process, though neuroinflammation and infiltration of neutrophils are prominent features. The purpose of this study is to quantify the regional and temporal progression of early chemotactic signals, describe the cellular expression of these factors and the relationship between expression and neutrophil infiltration in damaged brain using a rat GD seizure model. Methods Protein levels of 4 chemokines responsible for neutrophil infiltration and activation were quantified up to 72 hours in multiple brain regions (i.e. piriform cortex, hippocampus and thalamus following SE onset using multiplex bead immunoassays. Chemokines with significantly increased protein levels were localized to resident brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells. Lastly, neutrophil infiltration into these brain regions was quantified and correlated to the expression of these chemokines. Results We observed significant concentration increases for CXCL1 and MIP-1α after seizure onset. CXCL1 expression originated from neurons and endothelial cells while MIP-1α was expressed by neurons and microglia. Lastly, the expression of these chemokines directly preceded and positively correlated with significant neutrophil infiltration in the brain. These data suggest that following GD-induced SE, a strong chemotactic response originating from various brain cells, recruits circulating neutrophils to the injured brain. Conclusions A strong induction of neutrophil attractant chemokines occurs following GD-induced SE resulting in neutrophil influx into injured brain tissues. This process may play a key role in the progressive secondary brain pathology observed in this model though further study is warranted.

  11. Neuroantigen-specific autoregulatory CD8+ T cells inhibit autoimmune demyelination through modulation of dendritic cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh P Kashi

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a well-established murine model of multiple sclerosis, an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. We have previously shown that CNS-specific CD8+ T cells (CNS-CD8+ ameliorate EAE, at least in part through modulation of CNS-specific CD4+ T cell responses. In this study, we show that CNS-CD8+ also modulate the function of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC, but not other APCs such as CD11b+ monocytes or B220+ B cells. DC from mice receiving either myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD8+ (MOG-CD8+ or proteolipid protein-specific CD8+ (PLP-CD8+ T cells were rendered inefficient in priming T cell responses from naïve CD4+ T cells (OT-II or supporting recall responses from CNS-specific CD4+ T cells. CNS-CD8+ did not alter DC subset distribution or MHC class II and CD86 expression, suggesting that DC maturation was not affected. However, the cytokine profile of DC from CNS-CD8+ recipients showed lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 production. These functions were not modulated in the absence of immunization with CD8-cognate antigen, suggesting an antigen-specific mechanism likely requiring CNS-CD8-DC interaction. Interestingly, blockade of IL-10 in vitro rescued CD4+ proliferation and in vivo expression of IL-10 was necessary for the suppression of EAE by MOG-CD8+. These studies demonstrate a complex interplay between CNS-specific CD8+ T cells, DC and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, with important implications for therapeutic interventions in this disease.

  12. The ROS/NF-κB/NR4A2 pathway is involved in H2O2 induced apoptosis of resident cardiac stem cells via autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingxing; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Honghong; Yin, Deling; Zhao, Jing

    2017-09-29

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs)-based therapy provides a promising avenue for the management of ischemic heart diseases. However, engrafted CSCs are subjected to acute cell apoptosis in the ischemic microenvironment. Here, stem cell antigen 1 positive (Sca-1 + ) CSCs proved to own therapy potential were cultured and treated with H 2 O 2 to mimic the ischemia situation. As autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), inhibited H 2 O 2 -induced CSCs apoptosis, thus we demonstrated that H 2 O 2 induced autophagy-dependent apoptosis in CSCs, and continued to find key proteins responsible for the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis. Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 4 Group A Member 2 (NR4A2), increased upon cardiomyocyte injury with unknown functions in CSCs, was increased by H 2 O 2 . NR4A2 siRNA attenuated H 2 O 2 induced autophagy and apoptosis in CSCs, which suggested an important role of NR4A2 in CSCs survival in ischemia conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NF-κB (P65) subunit were both increased by H 2 O 2 . Either the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or NF-κB signaling inhibitor, bay11-7082 could attenuate H 2 O 2 -induced autophagy and apoptosis in CSCs, which suggested they were involved in this process. Furthermore, NAC inhibited NF-κB activities, while bay11-7082 inhibited NR4A2 expression, which revealed a ROS/NF-κB/NR4A2 pathway responsible for H 2 O 2 -induced autophagy and apoptosis in CSCs. Our study supports a new clue enhancing the survival rate of CSCs in the infarcted myocardium for cell therapy in ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Phase I Trial of MK-0752 in Children With Refractory CNS Malignancies: A Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, Maryam; Stewart, Clinton F.; Olson, James; Wagner, Lars M.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Kocak, Mehmet; Packer, Roger J.; Goldman, Stewart; Gururangan, Sridharan; Gajjar, Amar; Demuth, Tim; Kun, Larry E.; Boyett, James M.; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), describe dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and characterize pharmacokinetic properties of MK-0752, a gamma secretase inhibitor, in children with refractory or recurrent CNS malignancies. Patients and Methods MK-0752 was administered once daily for 3 consecutive days of every 7 days at escalating dosages starting at 200 mg/m2. The modified continual reassessment method was used to estimate the MTD. A course was 28 days in duration. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed during the first course. Expression of NOTCH and hairy enhancer of split (HES) proteins was assessed in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before and following treatment with MK-0752. Results Twenty-three eligible patients were enrolled: 10 males (median age, 8.1 years; range, 2.6 to 17.7 years) with diagnoses of brainstem glioma (n = 6), ependymoma (n = 8), medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (n = 4), glioblastoma multiforme (n = 2), atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (n = 1), malignant glioma (n = 1), and choroid plexus carcinoma, (n = 1). Seventeen patients were fully evaluable for toxicity. No DLTs occurred in the three patients enrolled at 200 mg/m2/dose. At 260 mg/m2/dose, DLTs occurred in two of six patients, both of whom experienced grade 3 ALT and AST. There were no grade 4 toxicities; non–dose-limiting grade 3 toxicities included hypokalemia and lymphopenia. Population pharmacokinetic values (% coefficient of variation) for MK-0752 were apparent oral clearance, 0.444 (38%) L/h/m2; apparent volume of distribution, 7.36 (24%) L/m2; and ka, 0.358 (99%) hr−1. Conclusion MK-0752 is well-tolerated in children with recurrent CNS malignancies. The recommended phase II dose using the 3 days on followed by 4 days off schedule is 260 mg/m2/dose once daily. PMID:21825264

  14. Spatial and temporal profiles of growth factor expression during CNS demyelination reveal the dynamics of repair priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Gudi

    Full Text Available Demyelination is the cause of disability in various neurological disorders. It is therefore crucial to understand the molecular regulation of oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells in the CNS. Growth factors are known to be essential for the development and maintenance of oligodendrocytes and are involved in the regulation of glial responses in various pathological conditions. We employed the well established murine cuprizone model of toxic demyelination to analyze the expression of 13 growth factors in the CNS during de- and remyelination. The temporal mRNA expression profile during demyelination and the subsequent remyelination were analyzed separately in the corpus callosum and cerebral cortex using laser microdissection and real-time PCR techniques. During demyelination a similar pattern of growth factor mRNA expression was observed in both areas with a strong up-regulation of NRG1 and GDNF and a slight increase of CNTF in the first week of cuprizone treatment. HGF, FGF-2, LIF, IGF-I, and TGF-ß1 were up-regulated mainly during peak demyelination. In contrast, during remyelination there were regional differences in growth factor mRNA expression levels. GDNF, CNTF, HGF, FGF-2, and BDNF were elevated in the corpus callosum but not in the cortex, suggesting tissue differences in the molecular regulation of remyelination in the white and grey matter. To clarify the cellular source we isolated microglia from the cuprizone lesions. GDNF, IGF-1, and FGF mRNA were detected in the microglial fraction with a temporal pattern corresponding to that from whole tissue PCR. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis revealed IGF-1 protein expression also in the reactive astrocytes. CNTF was located in astrocytes. This study identified seven different temporal expression patterns for growth factors in white and grey matter and demonstrated the importance of early tissue priming and exact orchestration of different steps during callosal and cortical de

  15. Clinical, imaging and histopathological features of isolated CNS lymphomatoid granulomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Anil Kumar; Alexander, Mathew; Nair, Bijesh; Chacko, Geeta; Mani, Sunithi; Sudhakar, Sniya

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare systemic angiocentric/angiodestructive, B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Central nervous system involvement occurs as part of systemic disease. Isolated central nervous system disease is rare with only few case reports. A 53-year-old male presented with progressive cognitive decline, extrapyramidal features, and altered sensorium with seizures over the last 4 years. His magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multiple small enhancing nodules in subependymal/ependymal regions and along the vessels. Brain biopsy showed atypical lymphohistiocytic infiltrate suggestive of lymphomatoid granulomatosis. There was no evidence of systemic disease; thus, isolated central nervous system lymphomatoid granulomatosis was diagnosed

  16. Water transport between CNS compartments: contributions of aquaporins and cotransporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, N; Zeuthen, T

    2010-01-01

    or hydrocephalus. The molecular pathways by which water molecules cross the cell membranes of the brain are not well-understood, although the discovery of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in the brain improved our understanding of some of these transport processes, particularly under pathological conditions. In the present...... review we introduce another family of transport proteins as water transporters, namely the cotransporters and the glucose uniport GLUT1. In direct contrast to the aquaporins, these proteins have an inherent ability to transport water against an osmotic gradient. Some of them may also function as water...

  17. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio, E-mail: lucio.vismari@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Batista Camargo Junior, Joao, E-mail: joaocamargo@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  18. Physical Modeling of Shear Behavior of Infilled Rock Joints Under CNL and CNS Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amit Kumar; Rao, K. Seshagiri

    2018-01-01

    Despite their frequent natural occurrence, filled discontinuities under constant normal stiffness (CNS) boundary conditions have been studied much less systematically, perhaps because of the difficulties arising from the increased number of variable parameters. Because of the lack of reliable and realistic theoretical or empirical relations and the difficulties in obtaining and testing representative samples, engineers rely on judgment and often consider the shear strength of the infilled material itself as shear strength of rock joints. This assumption leads to uneconomical and also sometimes the unsafe design of underground structures, slopes, rock-socketed piles and foundations. To study the effect of infill on the shear behavior of rock joints, tests were performed on the modeled infilled rock joint having different joint roughness under constan