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Sample records for resident alveolar macrophages

  1. Resident alveolar macrophages are susceptible to and permissive of Coxiella burnetii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Calverley

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a zoonotic disease with potentially life-threatening complications in humans. Inhalation of low doses of Coxiella bacteria can result in infection of the host alveolar macrophage (AM. However, it is not known whether a subset of AMs within the heterogeneous population of macrophages in the infected lung is particularly susceptible to infection. We have found that lower doses of both phase I and phase II Nine Mile C. burnetii multiply and are less readily cleared from the lungs of mice compared to higher infectious doses. We have additionally identified AM resident within the lung prior to and shortly following infection, opposed to newly recruited monocytes entering the lung during infection, as being most susceptible to infection. These resident cells remain infected up to twelve days after the onset of infection, serving as a permissive niche for the maintenance of bacterial infection. A subset of infected resident AMs undergo a distinguishing phenotypic change during the progression of infection exhibiting an increase in surface integrin CD11b expression and continued expression of the surface integrin CD11c. The low rate of phase I and II Nine Mile C. burnetii growth in murine lungs may be a direct result of the limited size of the susceptible resident AM cell population.

  2. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

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    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  3. Radionuclide study of the action of cadmium on alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reulet, Maryse.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental toxicity of cadmium was studied on the lung, using cadmium sulfate, cadmium acetate and the radioactive isotope cadmium 109 in chloride or acetate form. The results are given in the following order: part one is devoted to the results of investigations on chronic cadmium poisoning and the role of alveolar macrophages in this poisoning; in part two the uptake of cadmium on alveolar macrophages is studied with cadmium 109, administered intraperitoneally; in part three the action of cadmium on the phospholipid metabolism of alveolar macrophages is examined. The cadmium, as sulfate or acetate, is administered in several ways: by intraperitoneal injection; or by inhalation of cadmium dusts or aerosols. The effect of cadmium on the oxidative metabolism of alveolar macrophages is studied in part four. This work is carried out 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' after cadmium oxide dusting of the air [fr

  4. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

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    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  5. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin lα or 1β. The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes

  6. Alveolar macrophage dysregulation in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1.

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    Rouhani, Farshid N; Brantly, Mark L; Markello, Thomas C; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; O'Brien, Kevin; Hess, Richard; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A; Gochuico, Bernadette R

    2009-12-01

    Individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 (HPS-1), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, develop an accelerated form of progressive fibrotic lung disease. The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis associated with HPS-1 is unknown. To investigate the potential pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in HPS-1, lung cells and proteins from individuals with HPS-1 were studied. Forty-one subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis were evaluated with pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography scan, and bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells and analytes were analyzed. Concentrations of total bronchoalveolar lavage cells and alveolar macrophages were significantly higher in epithelial lining fluid from subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers. Concentrations of cytokines and chemokines (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) in alveolar epithelial lining fluid were significantly higher in subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers (P system in which to study the pathogenesis and treatment of HPS pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuan Junlan; Li Yanzhen; Yang Likai; Sun Xun; Zhang Qiang; Gong Tao; Zhang Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 ± 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague–Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  8. Interaction of rat alveolar macrophages with dental composite dust.

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    Van Landuyt, K L; Cokic, S M; Asbach, C; Hoet, P; Godderis, L; Reichl, F X; Van Meerbeek, B; Vennemann, A; Wiemann, M

    2016-11-26

    Dental composites have become the standard filling material to restore teeth, but during the placement of these restorations, high amounts of respirable composite dust (nano-sized particles may be released in the breathing zone of the patient and dental operator. Here we tested the respirable fraction of several composite particles for their cytotoxic effect using an alveolar macrophage model system. ​METHODS: Composite dust was generated following a clinical protocol, and the dust particles were collected under sterile circumstances. Dust was dispersed in fluid, and 5-μm-filtered to enrich the respirable fractions. Quartz DQ12 and corundum were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Four concentrations (22.5 μg/ml, 45 μg/ml, 90 μg/ml and 180 μg/ml) were applied to NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Light and electron microscopy were used for subcellular localization of particles. Culture supernatants were tested for release of lactate dehydrogenase, glucuronidase, TNF-α, and H 2 O 2 . Characterization of the suspended particles revealed numerous nano-sized particles but also many high volume particles, most of which could be removed by filtering. Even at the highest concentration (180 μg/ml), cells completely cleared settled particles from the bottom of the culture vessel. Accordingly, a mixture of nano- and micron-scaled particles was observed inside cells where they were confined to phagolysosomes. The filtered particle fractions elicited largely uniform dose-dependent responses, which were elevated compared to the control only at the highest concentration, which equaled a mean cellular dose of 120 pg/cell. A low inflammatory potential was identified due to dose-dependent release of H 2 O 2 and TNF-α. However, compared to the positive control, the released levels of H 2 O 2 and TNF-α were still moderate, but their release profiles depended on the type of composite. Alveolar macrophages are able to phagocytize respirable composite dust

  9. Characterization of CD44 expressed on alveolar macrophages in patients with diffuse panbronchiolitis

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    Katoh, S; Matsubara, Y; Taniguchi, H; Fukushima, K; Mukae, H; Kadota, J; Matsukura, S; Kohno, S

    2001-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 may play an important role in neutrophil infiltration in the airways of patients with diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). Furthermore, alveolar macrophages could produce IL-8 subsequent to CD44-hyaluronic acid (HA) interaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of CD44 expressed on alveolar macrophages to the pathogenesis of DPB. We examined the concentration of soluble CD44 (sCD44) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and CD44 expression on macrophages in BALF from patients with DPB before and after low-dose, long-term macrolide therapy. We also assessed the HA-binding ability of alveolar macrophages as a functional analysis of the CD44 molecule. The sCD44 concentration in BALF was significantly lower in patients with DPB than in healthy volunteers. Percentages of alveolar macrophages expressing low CD44 (CD44 low+) and HA-nonbinding alveolar macrophages were higher in patients with DPB compared with healthy volunteers. Furthermore, macrolide therapy normalized CD44 expression and HA-binding ability of macrophages in BALF from DPB patients. Our findings suggest that alveolar macrophage dysfunction could result from abnormalities of CD44 expression in patients with DPB and that these events could contribute to the pathogenesis of DPB. PMID:11737075

  10. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages Share Ontogeny with MYB-Independent Tissue-Resident Macrophages

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    Julian Buchrieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident macrophages, such as microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells, derive from Myb-independent yolk sac (YS progenitors generated before the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Myb-independent YS-derived resident macrophages self-renew locally, independently of circulating monocytes and HSCs. In contrast, adult blood monocytes, as well as infiltrating, gut, and dermal macrophages, derive from Myb-dependent HSCs. These findings are derived from the mouse, using gene knockouts and lineage tracing, but their applicability to human development has not been formally demonstrated. Here, we use human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs as a tool to model human hematopoietic development. By using a CRISPR-Cas9 knockout strategy, we show that human iPSC-derived monocytes/macrophages develop in an MYB-independent, RUNX1-, and SPI1 (PU.1-dependent fashion. This result makes human iPSC-derived macrophages developmentally related to and a good model for MYB-independent tissue-resident macrophages, such as alveolar and kidney macrophages, microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells.

  11. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribot, Wilson J; Panchal, Rekha G; Brittingham, Katherine C; Ruthel, Gordon; Kenny, Tara A; Lane, Douglas; Curry, Bob; Hoover, Timothy A; Friedlander, Arthur M; Bavari, Sina

    2006-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are very important for pulmonary innate immune responses against invading inhaled pathogens because they directly kill the organisms and initiate a cascade of innate and adaptive immune responses...

  12. Ultrastructural types of alveolar macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavages from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

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    Burkhardt, Olaf; Lode, Hartmut; Welte, Tobias; Merker, Hans-Joachim

    2007-01-01

    By routine applied quantitative BAL methods are particularly helpful for the diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Here the morphology of the alveolar cells does not play a role. However, morphological and especially electron microscopic investigations might contribute to the clarification of the aetiology of this disease. In a prospective study we investigated the bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) from 10 patients with recently histologically diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis. Commonly applied cytological and immunological BAL diagnostic techniques were accompanied by morphological investigations of alveolar cells, especially alveolar macrophages, using light and electron microscopy. All patients showed lymphocytic alveolitis with an increased number of CD4 positive lymphocytes as well as an increased CD4/CD8 ratio. A striking light microscopic finding was the great morphological variety of the alveolar macrophages. Electron microscopy revealed typical lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils as well as three different types of alveolar macrophages in all 10 patients: type I (approx. 30%) with a normal macrophage morphology, a vacuole-rich type II (approx. 30%) with myelin-like structures and type III (approx. 40%) with electron-dense inclusions. The occurrence of intracellular myelin figures in type II macrophages is a hint for increased phagocytotic processes of surfactant with or without its overproduction in the sense of a secondary alveolar proteinosis. Numerous electron-dense inclusions in type III also indicate an increased macrophage activity that leads to an increased release of cytokines, which in turn can trigger an inflammatory reaction.

  13. Arachidonic acid metabolism in silica-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englen, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro production of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in adherent bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) incubated with silica was investigated. BAM were pre-labelled with 3 H-AA, and lipid metabolites released into the culture medium were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was simultaneously assayed to provide an indication of cell injury. Increasing doses of silica selectively stimulated the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of AA metabolism, while cyclooxygenase metabolite output was suppressed. LDH release increased in a linear, dose-dependent fashion over the range of silica doses used. Moreover, within 15 min following addition of a high silica dose, a shift to the production of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites occurred, accompanied by a reduction in cyclooxygenase products. This rapid alteration in AA metabolism preceded cell injury. To examine the relationship between cytotoxicity and AA metabolite release by BAM exposed to silicas with different cytotoxic and fibrogenic activities, BAM were exposed to different doses of DQ-12, Minusil-5, and Sigma silicas, and carbonyl iron beads. The median effective dose (ED 50 ) of each particulate to stimulate the release of AA metabolites and LDH was calculated. The ED 50 values for DQ-12, Minusil-5, and Sigma silica showed that the relative cytotoxicities of the different silicas for BAM corresponded to the relative potencies of the silicas to elicit 5-lipoxygenase metabolites from BAM. These results indicate that the cytotoxic, and presumed fibrogenic potential, of a silica is correlated with the potency to stimulate the release of leukotrienes from AM

  14. Sulfite induces release of lipid mediators by alveolar macrophages

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    Beck-Speier, I.; Dayal, N.; Maier, L. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. for Inhalation Biology; Denzlinger, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. II, Medical Clinic; Haberl, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. III, Medical Clinic

    1998-03-01

    Air pollutants are supposed to modulate physiological responses of alveolar macrophages (AM). This study was addressed to the question whether at neutral pH sulfur(IV) species in comparison to sulfur(VI) species cause AM to release proinflammatory mediators and which pathways are involved in their generation. Supernatants obtained from canine AM treated with sulfite (0.1 mM to 2 mM) enhanced the respiratory burst of canine neutrophils, measured by lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, whereas supernatants derived from AM treated with sulfate (1 mM) did not. The neutrophil-stimulating activity released by sulfite-treated AM consisted of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) as shown by desensitization of the corresponding receptors. Inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2} substantially suppressed release of neutrophil-stimulating activity by sulfite-treated AM. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase in sulfite-treated AM also reduced neutrophil-stimulating activity, while inhibition of cyclooxygenase had no effect. In conclusion, sulfite induces AM to release lipid mediators via phospholipase A{sub 2}- and 5-lipoxygenase-dependent pathways. These mediators activate neutrophils via the receptors for PAF and LTB{sub 4}. (orig.)

  15. Antioxidant properties of taurine in rat alveolar macrophages

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    Castranova, V.; Banks, M.A.; Porter, D.W.; Martin, W.G. (National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV (United States) West Virginia Univ., Morgantown (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Isolated rat alveolar macrophages (RAM) which had taken-up and accumulated extracellular (0-500 {mu}M) taurine (TAU) were exposed to 0.45 {plus minus} 0.05 ppm ozone for 30 minutes in a modified tissue culture flask containing TAU-supplemented medium. Recovered cells were assayed for oxidant damage and media analyzed for leakage of intracellular components. Cell viability significantly increased, while recovery of cells decreased (possibly due to increased adherence) with increasing TAU. At 100 {mu}M (rat plasma TAU level), TAU protected against the ozone-induced increase in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence, diminished leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein into the medium, and partially restored the ozone-inactivated Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity of RAM. Efflux of oxidized glutathione was maximized and K{sup +} leakage was minimized by the addition of 250 {mu}M TAU. At 250-500 {mu}M TAU, leakages of lipid peroxidation products and protein were enhanced, while the intracellular TAU content dramatically increased. These results indicate that TAU has both direct and indirect antioxidant properties at low levels and pro-oxidant properties at high levels in RAM.

  16. Rapid host defense against Aspergillus fumigatus involves alveolar macrophages with a predominance of alternatively activated phenotype.

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    Shikha Bhatia

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with chronic diseases such as invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunosuppressed patients and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA in patients with cystic fibrosis or severe asthma. Because of constant exposure to this fungus, it is critical for the host to exercise an immediate and decisive immune response to clear fungal spores to ward off disease. In this study, we observed that rapidly after infection by A. fumigatus, alveolar macrophages predominantly express Arginase 1 (Arg1, a key marker of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs. The macrophages were also found to express Ym1 and CD206 that are also expressed by AAMs but not NOS2, which is expressed by classically activated macrophages. The expression of Arg1 was reduced in the absence of the known signaling axis, IL-4Rα/STAT6, for AAM development. While both Dectin-1 and TLR expressed on the cell surface have been shown to sense A. fumigatus, fungus-induced Arg1 expression in CD11c(+ alveolar macrophages was not dependent on either Dectin-1 or the adaptor MyD88 that mediates intracellular signaling by most TLRs. Alveolar macrophages from WT mice efficiently phagocytosed fungal conidia, but those from mice deficient in Dectin-1 showed impaired fungal uptake. Depletion of macrophages with clodronate-filled liposomes increased fungal burden in infected mice. Collectively, our studies suggest that alveolar macrophages, which predominantly acquire an AAM phenotype following A. fumigatus infection, have a protective role in defense against this fungus.

  17. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

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    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University (United States); Malur, Achut G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University (United States); Thomassen, Mary Jane, E-mail: thomassenm@ecu.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University (United States)

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  18. Depletion of alveolar macrophages in CD11c diphtheria toxin receptor mice produces an inflammatory response

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    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Rana, Deepa; Steele, Shaun P; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in initiating the immune response to inhaled pathogens and have been shown to be the first cell type infected following intranasal inoculation with several pathogens, including Francisella tularensis. In an attempt to further dissect the role of alveolar macrophages in the immune response to Francisella, we selectively depleted alveolar macrophages using CD11c.DOG mice. CD11c.DOG mice express the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) under control of the full CD11c promoter. Because mice do not express DTR, tissue restricted expression of the primate DTR followed by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) has been widely used as a tool in immunology to examine the effect of acute depletion of a specific immune subset following normal development. We successfully depleted alveolar macrophages via intranasal administration of DT. However, alveolar macrophage depletion was accompanied by many other changes to the cellular composition and cytokine/chemokine milieu in the lung that potentially impact innate and adaptive immune responses. Importantly, we observed a transient influx of neutrophils in the lung and spleen. Our experience serves as a cautionary note to other researchers using DTR mice given the complex changes that occur following DT treatment that must be taken into account when analyzing data. PMID:26029367

  19. Cell Origin Dictates Programming of Resident versus Recruited Macrophages during Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Kara J; Barthel, Lea; Mohning, Michael P; Thomas, Stacey M; McCubbrey, Alexandra L; Danhorn, Thomas; Leach, Sonia M; Fingerlin, Tasha E; O'Connor, Brian P; Reisz, Julie A; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Bratton, Donna L; Jakubzick, Claudia V; Janssen, William J

    2017-09-01

    Two populations of alveolar macrophages (AMs) coexist in the inflamed lung: resident AMs that arise during embryogenesis, and recruited AMs that originate postnatally from circulating monocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether origin or environment dictates the transcriptional, metabolic, and functional programming of these two ontologically distinct populations over the time course of acute inflammation. RNA sequencing demonstrated marked transcriptional differences between resident and recruited AMs affecting three main areas: proliferation, inflammatory signaling, and metabolism. Functional assays and metabolomic studies confirmed these differences and demonstrated that resident AMs proliferate locally and are governed by increased tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acid metabolism. Conversely, recruited AMs produce inflammatory cytokines in association with increased glycolytic and arginine metabolism. Collectively, the data show that even though they coexist in the same environment, inflammatory macrophage subsets have distinct immunometabolic programs and perform specialized functions during inflammation that are associated with their cellular origin.

  20. Evaluation of Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Losa García

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar macrophage (AM secretes interleukin 1β (IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8, all of them inflammatory cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of many lung diseases. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the basal and stimulated secretion of these cytokines by human AMs. Human AMs were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL from four healthy controls and 13 patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease (five cases of sarcoidosis, three of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and five of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. AMs were cultured in the presence or absence of different concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, phorbolmyristate and gammainterferon. IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 levels were measured in BAL fluid and culture supernatant using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The substance found to stimulate the secretion of inflammatory cytokines to the greatest extent was LPS at a concentration of 10 μg/ml. Regarding the secretion of IL-1β, four observations were of interest: basal secretion was very low; LPS exerted a potent stimulatory effect; considerable within-group variability was observed; and there were no significant differences in the comparisons among groups. With respect to TNF-α secretion, the results were similar. The only striking finding was the higher basal secretion of this cytokine with respect to that of IL-1β. Regarding the secretion of IL-6, the same pattern followed by TNF-α was found. However, it should be stressed that the increase induced by LPS was smaller than in the two previous cytokines. Regarding the secretion of IL-8, three findings were patent: the strong basal secretion of this cytokine; the moderate increase induced by LPS; and the existence of significant differences among the different groups with respect to the stimulated secretion of this cytokine, which reached maximum values in patients with idiopathic pulmonary

  1. Differential gene expression profiling of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae during induction of primary alveolar macrophage apoptosis in piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Ruidong, Zhai; Liu, Shiting; Zhang, Hu; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Gu, Jingmin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P. R.; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleura pneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease that causes serious problems for the swine industry. Successful infection by this bacterium requires breaking the first line of defence in the lungs, the primary alveolar macrophages

  2. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of diesel exhaust particles on human alveolar macrophage responsiveness to lipopolysaccharideS. Mundandhara1 , S. Becker2 and M. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, HSD, Chapel Hill, NC, USEpidemiological...

  3. A Potent Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Inhibitor to Study the Function of TRAP in Alveolar Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, Carian E; van der Veen, T. Anienke; Putri, Kurnia S S; de Almeida, Andreia; Draijer, Christina; Mauad, Thais; Fejer, Gyorgy; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van den Berge, Maarten; Bossé, Yohan; Sin, Don; Hao, Ke; Reithmeier, Anja; Andersson, Göran; Olinga, Peter; Timens, Wim; Casini, Angela; Melgert, Barbro N

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, two isoforms 5a and 5b) is highly expressed in alveolar macrophages, but its function there is unclear and potent selective inhibitors of TRAP are required to assess functional aspects of the protein. We found higher TRAP activity/expression in

  4. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P. (Univ. of California-Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke.

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Induced Pulmonary Granulomatous Disease: Twist1 and Alveolar Macrophage M1 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Barna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis, a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown cause, has been linked to several environmental risk factors, among which are some that may favor carbon nanotube formation. Using gene array data, we initially observed that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells from sarcoidosis patients displayed elevated mRNA of the transcription factor, Twist1, among many M1-associated genes compared to healthy controls. Based on this observation we hypothesized that Twist1 mRNA and protein expression might become elevated in alveolar macrophages from animals bearing granulomas induced by carbon nanotube instillation. To address this hypothesis, wild-type and macrophage-specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ knock out mice were given oropharyngeal instillation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT. BAL cells obtained 60 days later exhibited significantly elevated Twist1 mRNA expression in granuloma-bearing wild-type or PPARγ knock out alveolar macrophages compared to sham controls. Overall, Twist1 expression levels in PPARγ knock out mice were higher than those of wild-type. Concurrently, BAL cells obtained from sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls validated gene array data: qPCR and protein analysis showed significantly elevated Twist1 in sarcoidosis compared to healthy controls. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophages from healthy controls indicated that Twist1 was inducible by classical (M1 macrophage activation stimuli (LPS, TNFα but not by IL-4, an inducer of alternative (M2 macrophage activation. Findings suggest that Twist1 represents a PPARγ-sensitive alveolar macrophage M1 biomarker which is induced by inflammatory granulomatous disease in the MWCNT model and in human sarcoidosis.

  6. Enhanced alveolar monocytic phagocyte (macrophage) proliferation in tobacco and marijuana smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbers, R.G.; Evans, M.J.; Gong, H. Jr.; Tashkin, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that enhanced cell division accounted for the augmented numbers of monocytic phagocytes with characteristics attributed to alveolar macrophages (AM) found in the lungs of habitual tobacco (T) and marijuana (M) smokers. The monocytic phagocytes, that is, alveolar macrophages, were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 12 nonsmoking subjects; 10 subjects who smoked T only (TS); 13 subjects who smoked M only (MS); and 6 smokers of both T and M (MTS). The replication of these cells was determined by measuring the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into the DNA of dividing cells and visually counting 2,000 cells on autoradiographically prepared cytocentrifuge cell preparations. This study demonstrated that the number of [ 3 H]thymidine-labeled monocytic phagocytes with characteristics of alveolar macrophages from either TS or MS have a higher proliferative index compared to cells (macrophages) from nonsmokers, p less than 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. The total number of BAL macrophages that are in mitosis in TS (17.90 +/- 4.50 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) or MTS (10.50 +/- 4.20 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are 18- and 10-fold greater, respectively, than the number obtained from nonsmokers (1.01 +/- 0.18 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml). Interestingly, the number of [ 3 H]thymidine-labeled macrophages from MS (2.90 +/- 0.66 labeled AM x 10(3)/ml) are also greater than the number obtained from nonsmokers, although this is not statistically significant. The stimulus augmenting alveolar macrophage replication is as yet unknown but may likely be found in the T or M smoke

  7. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on alveolar lung macrophage survival and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Nielsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) recently emerged as an important cause of reproductive disorders and pneumonia in domestic pigs throughout the world. Acute cytocidal replication of PRRSV in alveolar lung macrophages causes the acute pneumonia; however, it remains largely...... analysis of cell size and membrane integrity) led to 40% reduction in the total number of phagocytozing cells. However, viable/uninfected macrophages in PRRSV-infected cultures exhibited normal phagocytic ability at 48 h, indicating that no soluble phagocytosis-suppressive mediators were induced by PRRSV...... infection in this system. In short, in our minimal system containing only a single cell type, phagocytosis-suppressive effects of PRRSV infection were detected, that acted at the culture level by reducing the total number of alveolar lung macrophages....

  8. Importance of Bacterial Replication and Alveolar Macrophage-Independent Clearance Mechanisms during Early Lung Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M.; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J.; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A.; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae. PMID:25583525

  9. Development and maintainance of resident macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero, Elisa Gomez; Geissmann, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the many roles of macrophages in health and disease states in vivo remain poorly understood. The purpose of this Review is to present and discuss current knowledge on the developmental biology of macrophages, as it underlies the concept of a layered myeloid system composed of ‘resident’ macrophages that mostly originate from yolk sac progenitors and of ‘passenger’ or ‘transitory’ myeloid cells that originate and renew from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and to provide a framework to investigate the functions of macrophages in vivo. PMID:26681456

  10. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  11. Carbon black nanoparticles induce type II epithelial cells to release chemotaxins for alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Ken

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are a key cell in dealing with particles deposited in the lungs and in determining the subsequent response to that particle exposure. Nanoparticles are considered a potential threat to the lungs and the mechanism of pulmonary response to nanoparticles is currently under intense scrutiny. The type II alveolar epithelial cell has previously been shown to release chemoattractants which can recruit alveolar macrophages to sites of particle deposition. The aim of this study was to assess the responses of a type II epithelial cell line (L-2 to both fine and nanoparticle exposure in terms of secretion of chemotactic substances capable of inducing macrophage migration. Results Exposure of type II cells to carbon black nanoparticles resulted in significant release of macrophage chemoattractant compared to the negative control and to other dusts tested (fine carbon black and TiO2 and nanoparticle TiO2 as measured by macrophage migration towards type II cell conditioned medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of the conditioned medium from particle treated type II cells revealed that a higher number of protein bands were present in the conditioned medium obtained from type II cells treated with nanoparticle carbon black compared to other dusts tested. Size-fractionation of the chemotaxin-rich supernatant determined that the chemoattractants released from the epithelial cells were between 5 and 30 kDa in size. Conclusion The highly toxic nature and reactive surface chemistry of the carbon black nanoparticles has very likely induced the type II cell line to release pro-inflammatory mediators that can potentially induce migration of macrophages. This could aid in the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of particle deposition and the subsequent removal of the particles by phagocytic cells such as macrophages and neutrophils. Future studies in this area could focus on the exact identity of the substance(s released by the

  12. In vitro toxicity of gallium arsenide in alveolar macrophages evaluated by magnetometry, cytochemistry and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M; Karube, H; Niitsuya, M; Aizawa, Y; Okayasu, I; Kotani, M

    1999-12-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a chemical compound of gallium and arsenic, causes various toxic effects including pulmonary diseases in animals. Since the toxicity is not completely investigated, GaAs has been used in workplaces as the material of various semiconductor products. The present study was conducted to clarify the toxicity of GaAs particles in the alveolar macrophages of hamsters using magnetometry, enzyme release assays and morphological examinations. Alveolar macrophages obtained from hamsters by tracheobronchial lavage and adhered to the disks in the bottom of wells were exposed to ferrosoferric oxide and GaAs particles. Ferrosoferric oxide particles were magnetized externally and the remanent magnetic field was measured. Relaxation, a fast decline of the remanent magnetic fields radiated from the alveolar macrophages, was delayed and decay constants were decreased dose-dependently due to exposure to GaAs. Because the relaxation is thought to be associated with cytoskeleton, the exposure of GaAs may have impaired the motor function of them. Enzyme release assay and morphological findings indicated the damage to the macrophages. Thus the cytotoxicity causes cytostructural changes and cell death. According to DNA electrophoresis and the TUNEL method, necrotic changes occur more frequently than apoptotic changes.

  13. Evaluation of the alveolar macrophage role in the pulmonary distribution of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezingar-Liebard, Florence

    1999-01-01

    Actinide oxide inhalation is potentially a risk during the fuel fabrication process in the electronuclear industry. These particles can induce pulmonary lesions. The alveolar macrophage play an important role in the particle sequestration and transport but the actinide toxicity towards these cells is not well known. The aim of this work was to characterize the evolution of particle localisation in lungs after inhalation and to evaluate the role of macrophages in the lesion histo-genesis. We have used of a solid track detector to visualise alpha dose distribution within lung tissue. After 237 NpO 2 , MOX or PuO 2 inhalation by rats, different kinetics of clearance were observed for the sub-pleural and peri-bronchial areas compared to the others alveolar areas. For initial lung burdens that alter the lung clearance, particle aggregates were observed. Their kinetic and localisation vary depending on the aerosol, for a same global dose delivered to the lungs. This could be due to the different specific alpha activities of the particles and to the particle number deposited in the lung to obtain a similar burden but it could be also due to a chemical toxicity of neptunium higher than that of the others actinides. The flow cytometry methods developed allow us to measure apoptosis, phagocytosis and free radicals generation. After addition of soluble uranium to the culture medium, similar results were obtained using either alveolar macrophages extracted from rats or a macrophage cell line. This work confirms that alveolar macrophages are involved in the aggregate formation which induces heterogeneous dose distribution within the different lung tissues. (author) [fr

  14. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Oberdorster, G. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Early activation of the alveolar macrophage is critical to the development of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naidu, BV; Krishnadasan, B; Farivar, AS; Woolley, SM; Thomas, R; Rooijen, van N.; Verrier, ED; Mulligan, MS

    2003-01-01

    .006) and marked reductions in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid leukocyte accumulation. Alveolar macrophage-depleted animals also demonstrated marked reductions of the elaboration of multiple proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines in the lavage effluent and nuclear transcription factors in lung

  16. Reduced number and morphofunctional change of alveolar macrophages in MafB gene-targeted mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Sato-Nishiwaki

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AMs play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We previously demonstrated that the transcription factor, MafB, increased in the AMs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, and in those of human patients with COPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of MafB in AMs using newly established transgenic (TG mice that specifically express dominant negative (DN MafB in macrophages under the control of macrophage scavenger receptor (MSR enhancer-promoter. We performed cell differential analyses in bronchoalveolar lavage cells, morphological analyses with electron microscopy, and flow cytometry-based analyses of surface markers and a phagocytic capacity assay in macrophages. AM number in the TG mice was significantly decreased compared with wild-type (WT mice. Morphologically, the high electron density area in the nucleus increased, the shape of pseudopods on the AMs was altered, and actin filament was less localized in the pseudopods of AMs of TG mice, compared with WT mice. The expression of surface markers, F4/80 and CD11b, on peritoneal macrophages in TG mice was reduced compared with WT mice, while those on AMs remained unchanged. Phagocytic capacity was decreased in AMs from TG mice, compared with WT mice. In conclusion, MafB regulates the phenotype of macrophages with respect to the number of alveolar macrophages, the nuclear compartment, cellular shape, surface marker expression, and phagocytic function. MSR-DN MafB TG mice may present a useful model to clarify the precise role of MafB in macrophages.

  17. Effects of X irradiation on the cytoskeleton of rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladyman, S.J.; Townsend, K.M.S.; Edwards, C.

    1984-01-01

    The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons has been used to demonstrate that an absorbed dose of 120 Gy from X rays causes a distinctive and reproducible alteration of the cytoskeleton of intact rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The alteration has also been shown to be rapidly and completely ''repaired'' and to be apparently similar to alterations caused by colchicine but dissimilar to those caused by cytochalasin B. From these observations and those of other workers who have studied the irradiation of extracted microtubular proteins in vitro, the authors think it likely that microtubules rather than microfilaments are the radiosensitive component of the macrophage cytoskeleton

  18. Effects of inhaled alpha-emitting actinides on mouse alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A; Talbot, R J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of inhaled alpha-emitting actinides on the alveolar macrophage (AM) population of the rodent lung are reviewed and, in particular, of the effects of 239PuO2 on murine AM. The effects discussed include changes the AM pool size, macrophage diameter, mobility, phagocytic competence, and enzyme content. Finally, similarities in the dose-response relationships for the induction of nuclear aberrations by alpha emitters and in the induction of lung tumors by the same materials are noted. PMID:1327735

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on chemoluminescence of alveolar macrophages in Guinea Pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benichou, G.; Dormont, D.; Herodin, F.; Pasquier, C.

    1988-01-01

    The capacity of Guinea Pig alveolar macrophages to produce oxygenated free radicals after in vitro gamma irradiation was studied. We observed an increase of resting cell chemiluminescence with 3 Gy, then an important decrease from 3 Gy to 30 Gy. Chemiluminescence of zymosan activated macrophages was reduced at 10 Gy and 30 Gy, while activation by IgG anti-MHC antigens was not affected by the same radiation doses. These results could be of great interest for the study pulmonary defense mechanisms after irradiation [fr

  20. Benzo(a)pyrene activation and detoxification by human pulmonary alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.V.; McLemore, T.L.; Martin, R.R.; Marshall, M.H.; Wray, N.P.; Busbee, D.L.; Cantrell, E.T.; Arnott, M.S.; Griffin, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of pulmonary alveolar macrophages and circulating lymphocytes from five smokers and five nonsmokers for their ability to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography were carried out. Utilizing this approach, further investigation of activation and detoxification by several human cell types could provide the basis for more precise and comprehensive studies of carcinogen and drug metabolism in the human lung, and for a better assessment of cancer risk in selected populations

  1. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae.

  2. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae.

  3. Virus-induced enhancement of arachidonate metabolism by bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laegreid, W.W.; Taylor, S.M.; Leid, R.W.; Silflow, R.M.; Evermann, J.R.; Breeze, R.G.; Liggitt, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Virus infection of alveolar macrophages both in vivo and in vitro has been associated with a variety of changes in cellular function. Some of these changes are identical to the effects that arachidonate-derived mediators, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, have on macrophage function. Virus infection of macrophages has been previously shown to increase the output of some arachidonate metabolites, most notably PGE2. However, the effect of virus infection on arachidonate metabolism in general has not been well described. In our experiments, primary cultures of alveolar macrophages obtained from normal cattle by bronchoalveolar lavage, were infected in vitro with parainfluenza type 3 virus. At days 0 to 4 post-infection (p.i.) these cells were labelled with 3H-arachidonic acid and stimulated with either serum-coated zymosan, the calcium ionophore A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate. The complete spectrum of arachidonate-derived metabolites was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV and on-line radiometric monitoring of column eluant. The total output of metabolites of arachidonic acid by virus-infected alveolar macrophages was increased over that of noninfected controls (with all stimuli tested) by day 4 p.i. (P less than or equal to 0.05). The production of metabolites by the cyclooxygenase, 12- and 5-lipoxygenase enzyme systems was significantly increased, as was the release of 3H-arachidonate. The lack of stimulus specificity and the increases in arachidonate release suggest that greater substrate availability, due either to increased phospholipase activity or direct virus-membrane interaction, may be responsible for the virus-induced enhancement of metabolite output.

  4. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tang, Ming-Chi [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Liang-Mou [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  5. Entry and elimination of marine mammal Brucella spp. by hooded seal (Cystophora cristata alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett K Larsen

    Full Text Available A high prevalence of Brucellapinnipedialis serology and bacteriology positive animals has been found in the Northeast Atlantic stock of hooded seal (Cystophoracristata; however no associated gross pathological changes have been identified. Marine mammal brucellae have previously displayed different infection patterns in human and murine macrophages. To investigate if marine mammal Brucella spp. are able to invade and multiply in cells originating from a presumed host species, we infected alveolar macrophages from hooded seal with a B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate. Hooded seal alveolar macrophages were also challenged with B. pinnipedialis reference strain (NCTC 12890 from harbor seal (Phocavitulina, B. ceti reference strain (NCTC 12891 from harbor porpoise (Phocoenaphocoena and a B. ceti Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchusacutus isolate (M83/07/1, to evaluate possible species-specific differences. Brucella suis 1330 was included as a positive control. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by post mortem bronchoalveolar lavage of euthanized hooded seals. Phenotyping of cells in the lavage fluid was executed by flow cytometry using the surface markers CD14 and CD18. Cultured lavage cells were identified as alveolar macrophages based on morphology, expression of surface markers and phagocytic ability. Alveolar macrophages were challenged with Brucella spp. in a gentamicin protection assay. Following infection, cell lysates from different time points were plated and evaluated quantitatively for colony forming units. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal isolate was verified by immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the marine mammal brucellae were able to enter hooded seal alveolar macrophages; however, they did not multiply intracellularly and were eliminated within 48 hours, to the contrary of B. suis that showed the classical pattern of a pathogenic strain. In conclusion, none of the four marine mammal strains

  6. Characterization of immortalized MARCO and SR-AI/II-deficient murine alveolar macrophage cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imrich Amy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages (AM avidly bind and ingest unopsonized inhaled particles and bacteria through class A scavenger receptors (SRAs MARCO and SR-AI/II. Studies to characterize the function of these SRAs have used AMs from MARCO or SR-AI/II null mice, but this approach is limited by the relatively low yield of AMs. Moreover, studies using both MARCO and SR-AI/II-deficient (MS-/- mice have not been reported yet. Hence, we sought to develop continuous cell lines from primary alveolar macrophages from MS-/- mice. Results We used in vitro infection of the primary AMs with the J2 retrovirus carrying the v-raf and v-myc oncogenes. Following initial isolation in media supplemented with murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, we subcloned three AM cell lines, designated ZK-1, ZK-2 and ZK-6. These cell lines grow well in RPMI-1640-10% FBS in the absence of M-CSF. These adherent but trypsin-sensitive cell lines have a doubling time of approximately 14 hours, exhibit typical macrophage morphology, and express macrophage-associated cell surface Mac-1 (CD11b and F4/80 antigens. The cell lines show robust Fc-receptor dependent phagocytosis of opsonized red blood cells. Similar to freshly isolated AMs from MS-/- mice, the cell lines exhibit decreased phagocytosis of unopsonized titanium dioxide (TiO2, fluorescent latex beads and bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus compared with the primary AMs from wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Our results indicated that three contiguous murine alveolar macrophage cell lines with MS-/- (ZK1, ZK2 and ZK6 were established successfully. These cell lines demonstrated macrophage morphology and functional activity. Interestingly, similar to freshly isolated AMs from MS-/- mice, the cell lines have a reduced, but not absent, ability to bind and ingest particles, with an altered pattern of blockade by scavenger receptor inhibitors. These cell lines will facilitate in vitro studies to further define

  7. Toxicity of penicillic acid for rat alveolar macrophages in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, W.G.; Simpson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Penicillic acid (PA) is a polyketide mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. This mycotoxin is toxic in experimental animals and has also been reported to be carcinogenic. The cytotoxicity of penicillic acid was studied in rat albeolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The effects of penicillic acid on membrane integrity were studied by measuring cell volume changes and 51 Cr release. There was a significant decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cell cultures exposed to 1.0 mM penicillic acid for 4 hr. Inhibition of the incorporation of [ 3 H]leucine into protein was both dose- and time-dependent and protein synthesis was inhibited significantly after 2 hr exposure to ≥0.1 mM penicillic acid. RNA synthesis was inhibited to a lesser extent than protein synthesis. There was significant inhibition of phagocytosis after 2 hr exposure at ≥0.3 mM penicillic acid and the ED 50 for phagocytosis was 0.09 mM. Thus phagocytosis was more sensitive to the toxic effects of penicillic acid than any other cellular process studied. The data suggest the possibility of a respiratory hazard to agricultural workers exposed to contaminated grain

  8. Alveolar macrophage accumulation rates, for 28 nm and 250 nm PSL, are mediated by separate mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, O R; Wong, V A, E-mail: moss@thehamner.or [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27509-2137 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    When macrophages accumulate 28 nm and 250 nm diameter polystyrene latex (PSL) beads, the accumulation rates should reflect differences in molecular and cellular function. We used a confocal microscope to measure the accumulation rates of nanoparticles by F344-rat-alveolar macrophages (approx25,000 cells adhered to a 0.7 cm{sup 2} surface). Over the cells were layered 0.1 ml of media, and 0.1 ml of media-with-beads. Fresh cells were introduced for each exposure scenario. The maximum possible individual macrophage exposures were as follows: 8x10{sup 6}, 8x10{sup 5}, and 8x10{sup 4} 28 nm beads per macrophage; and 8x10{sup 4} and 1.12x10{sup 4} 250 nm beads per macrophage. Accumulation rates were estimated over 23 minutes. The increase in bead accumulation-rate matched changes in bead-availability: 7x increase for 250 nm beads; 100x increase for 28 nm beads; and 700x increase for all bead availabilities. The maximum sustained 28 nm bead accumulation rate was > 30,000 /min (for 5 min). Increases in bead accumulation could be explained by two mechanisms: bead-diffusion; and, for the macrophage, macropinocytosis. Also for the highest concentrations of 28 nm beads, we saw a colligative threshold - possibly due to beads masking the cell surface or obstructing cellular mechanisms.

  9. Alveolar macrophage accumulation rates, for 28 nm and 250 nm PSL, are mediated by separate mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, O. R.; Wong, V. A.

    2009-02-01

    When macrophages accumulate 28 nm and 250 nm diameter polystyrene latex (PSL) beads, the accumulation rates should reflect differences in molecular and cellular function. We used a confocal microscope to measure the accumulation rates of nanoparticles by F344-rat-alveolar macrophages (~25,000 cells adhered to a 0.7 cm2 surface). Over the cells were layered 0.1 ml of media, and 0.1 ml of media-with-beads. Fresh cells were introduced for each exposure scenario. The maximum possible individual macrophage exposures were as follows: 8x106, 8x105, and 8x104 28 nm beads per macrophage; and 8x104 and 1.12x104 250 nm beads per macrophage. Accumulation rates were estimated over 23 minutes. The increase in bead accumulation-rate matched changes in bead-availability: 7x increase for 250 nm beads; 100x increase for 28 nm beads; and 700x increase for all bead availabilities. The maximum sustained 28 nm bead accumulation rate was > 30,000 /min (for 5 min). Increases in bead accumulation could be explained by two mechanisms: bead-diffusion; and, for the macrophage, macropinocytosis. Also for the highest concentrations of 28 nm beads, we saw a colligative threshold -- possibly due to beads masking the cell surface or obstructing cellular mechanisms.

  10. Ceramide 1-phosphate inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase and blocks apoptosis in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, María H; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    We previously reported that incubation of bone-marrow derived macrophages in the absence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a cytokine that is essential for their growth and survival, resulted in stimulation of acid sphingomyelinase, accumulation of ceramides, and induction of apoptosis [A. Gomez-Munoz et al. 2004. Ceramide 1-phosphate blocks apoptosis through inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase in macrophages. J Lipid Res 45: 99-105]. Here, we show that alveolar NR8383 macrophages, which are not dependent on M-CSF for viability, undergo apoptosis when they are incubated in the absence of serum. NR8383 cells showed increased levels of ceramides under apoptotic conditions, but in contrast to bone marrow macrophage acid and neutral sphingomyelinases were only slightly activated. We found that the major mechanism for ceramide generation in NR8383 macrophages was stimulation of their synthesis de novo. This action involved activation of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the key regulatory enzyme of this pathway. A relevant finding was that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) inhibited SPT activity and ceramide accumulation leading to inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, C1P enhanced the activity of antiapoptotic protein kinase B and its downstream effector nuclear factor kappa B. These observations add a new dimension to the understanding of the pro-survival actions of C1P in mammalian cells.

  11. Metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchus and cultured human pulmonary alveolar macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Harris, C.C.; Stoner, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    The metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchial epithelium and pulmonary alveolar macrophages was studied. Explants of bronchus were prepared and pulmonary alveolar macrophages were isolated from peripheral lung by trypsinization and by differential adhesion to plastic tissue...... culture dishes. After 7 days in culture the bronchus explant and the macrophages were exposed to (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene, and the binding to cellular macromolecules was studied. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was determined by the release of tritiated water into the culture medium from metabolized...

  12. Mannose-functionalized solid lipid nanoparticles are effective in targeting alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana; Sarmento, Bruno; Seabra, Vítor

    2018-03-01

    Mannose receptor is highly expressed on alveolar macrophages, being a potential target to promote the specific local drug delivery of anti-tuberculosis agents through the use of functionalized nanocarriers. In this work, isoniazid (Isn)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), reinforced with stearylamine (SA) were produced by double emulsion technique and further surface-functionalized with mannose in a straightforward chemical approach. Upon pre-formulation assessment, SLN close to 500 nm average size, positively charged and with association efficiency of ISN close to 50% were obtained. Functionalization with mannose was performed after SLN production and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Both functionalized and non-functionalized SLN demonstrated to devoid of toxicity when tested in human lung epithelial cell line (NCI-H441) and differentiated THP-1 (dTHP-1), reducing the intrinsic cytotoxicity of Isn when incorporated into SLN. Uptake studies were conducted on same macrophage-like cells and the results showed that fluorescent mannosylated SLN (M-SLN) were more efficient in be internalized comparatively to SLN. Moreover, the uptake of M-SLN was reduced when cells were pre-incubated with mannose, demonstrating the receptor-dependence internalization of functionalized SLN. These functionalized nanocarriers may represent a useful platform to target alveolar macrophages for delivering anti-infective drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Toxicity of chongqing acid fogwater on rabbit alveolar macrophages in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, W Q; Zhuo, J B

    1992-07-01

    We collected acid fogwater on a fogday and observed its toxic effects on rabbits' pulmonary alveolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The fogwater was diluted into 4 concentrations: 1, 1/10, 1/100, and 1/1000 of the original fogwater and the exposure time was 12 hours. The results showed that both the AM's viability and the phagocytic capacity were depressed significantly, but the AM's lysosomal enzyme--acid phosphatase activity was found to be stimulated to increase. All these changes were directly correlated with the degree of pollution of the fogwater. Of these three toxicity indices, the most sensitive one was the change of AM's phagocytic capacity.

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm. It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was

  15. Study of possible changes brought about by plutonium oxide in the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar macrophages of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouvroy, Huguette

    1970-06-01

    This report describes the various techniques used for determining the acid phosphatase activity of alveolar rabbit macrophages after inhalation of radioactive plutonium oxide particles, exposure of the animals, removal and sampling of the alveolar cells, and technical dosage. The results obtained are presented; they do not make it possible, in this particular case, to affirm that an important change in the enzymatic activity studied occurs. (author) [fr

  16. Differential and strain-specific triggering of bovine alveolar macrophage effector functions by mycoplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungi, T W; Krampe, M; Sileghem, M; Griot, C; Nicolet, J

    1996-12-01

    Mycoplasma strains being considered as pathogenic or non-pathogenic for cattle were tested on their capacity to activate bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Of particular interest was the behaviour of Mycoplasma mycoides ssp. mycoides small colony type (M.m.m. SC), the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). Increases in procoagulant activity (PCA), tumor necrosis factor-alpha- (TNF-alpha) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) generation were tested. To minimize an influence of macrophage activation by mycoplasma growth media, mycoplasmas were cultured on embryonic calf nose epithelial cells. The three macrophage functions tested were not correlated, but were differentially induced in strain-specific manner. Four out of seven strains induced PCA, regardless of pathogenicity, and all strains promoted moderate NO generation at high concentrations. All tested M.m.m. SC strains (Afadé, L2 and PG1), and the pathogenic M. bovis, induced TNF-alpha production at low concentrations (10(6) colony forming units per ml). M.sp. serogroup 7 and the non-pathogenic M. bovirhinis and Acholeplasma laidlawii did not induce TNF-alpha up to 10(8) cfu/ml. Thus, strain-specific differences are reflected in differential macrophage activation patterns. The findings are consistent with an important role for TNF-alpha in pathogenesis of CBPP.

  17. Functional ability and fate of pulmonary alveolar macrophages after intratracheal instillation into rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; Feddersen, D.; Mueller, H.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Haley, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) from donor rats were intratracheally instilled into recipient rats to determine if donor macrophages were functionally similar to the recipient's own macrophages. Recipient and donor (extrinsic) PAM were equivalent in their ability to phagocytize 1.7 μm and 3.9 μm latex microspheres in vivo and sensitized sheep red blood cells in vitro. Also, the extrinsic PAM appeared functionally equivalent to recipient PAM with respect to ability to translocate into interstitial tissue and migrate to the lung-associated lymph nodes (LALN). The recipient PAN appeared to phagocytize the extrinsic PAM, but the extrinsic PAM did not appear to phagocytize the recipient PAM. This could represent a different degree of physiological coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic PAM activities in the lung. Overall, results indicated that extrinsic PAM can live and function in the lungs of recipient rats, and perform most or all of the functions ascribed to recipient PAM. Results also support the hypothesis that PAM are able to move into the pulmonary interstitium and translocate to the LALM without the involvement of other pulmonary macrophages. (author)

  18. Modulation of the effects of alveolar macrophages on lung fibroblast collagen production rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.G.; Greenberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) may function as effector cells that can either stimulate or inhibit lung fibroblast collagen production. However, conditions that determine the predominant effect of AM on fibroblasts are not well understood. To delineate factors that modulate the effects of AM on lung fibroblasts, we studied the interaction of AM products and fibroblasts in vitro. The AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of hamsters with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Conditioned medium (CM) from the AM cultures was incubated in varying amounts with lung fibroblast (IMR-90) cultures. After metabolic labeling with (/sup 3/H)proline, fibroblast collagen production based on procollagen-specific radioactivity was determined. Macrophage CM in concentrations greater than 5% suppressed collagen production, an event attributed to the macrophage-derived suppressive factor that we have previously characterized. Macrophages were also determined to produce PGE2 in culture. Authentic PGE2 at concentrations found in CM was found to suppress fibroblast collagen production, indicating that AM-derived PGE2 contributes to the suppressive activity in CM. To examine possible stimulatory factors in CM, the fibroblasts were preincubated with indomethacin. This approach was based on our previous observation that AM-derived suppressive factor increases endogenous fibroblast PGE2 and that its activity can be blocked by indomethacin. Macrophage CM in a concentration of 20% did not suppress the collagen production of indomethacin-treated fibroblasts. However, CM concentrations of 5 and 10% increased collagen production (173 and 143% of control values, respectively), indicating the presence of stimulatory factor(s) in macrophage-conditioned medium.

  19. Electron-microscopic studies of alveolar macrophages from gamma-ray irradiated guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krystev, Kh.; Najdenski, Kh.M.; Velyanov, D.K.; Radoevska, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The alveolar macrophages (AM) were obtained from whole body gamma-irradiated guinea pigs (0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; 92.5 rad/min). The cell suspension contained granulocytes, lymphocytes and disintegrating epithelial and white blood cells, as well as two types of microphages: large (possessing nuclei of saddle bag-like or highly folded form) and small (with spherical or eggshaped nuclei). Eleven electronograms were presented showing all ultrastuctural changes of both small and large AM. The morphological differences between the small and large alveolar macrophages were slight. Marked changes were observed in the large AM on day 1 following 0.5 Gy irradiation: a considerable increase in dimensions of phagosomes turning in digestive vacuoles, lamellarly limited and containing osmiophilic, irregularly formed, densely or lamellarly arranged matter; folded nuclei with slightly vacuolized cytoplasm. The ultrastructural changes in the AM of sublethal dose (2 Gy) irradiated animals were stronger and regenerative processes in them were less possible. On day 30 after irradiation several damaged AM were observed with large digestive vacuoles of fine-grain content, vacuolized endoplasmic reticulum, entirely lyzed nuclear chromatin and free nuclei without cytoplasm. All observations were a convincing indication that guinea pigs AM were more radiosensitive than that obtained from rats and mice

  20. Radiation effects on chemiluminescence of resting and immunologically activated alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benichou, G.; Dormont, D.; Herodin, F.; Pasquier, C.; Hopital Saint Antoine, 75 - Paris

    1986-01-01

    In resting cells, for low radiation doses, a transient activation of chemiluminescence was observed, maximal at 3 Gy. At 10 Gy, CL returned to the control value; greater doses (above 30 Gy) induced a progressive diminution of the response which was abolished at 100 Gy. Activated alveolar macrophages showed a 30% decrease of the chemiluminescence at 10 Gy. The respiratory burst induced by opsonized zymosan was abolished at 30 Gy. IgG anti-MHC(IgGαB 1 ) activated specifically the GP S2 alveolar macrophages by alloantibody bipolar bridging; by contrast IgG which are directed against non-specific allogeneic determinants (IgG α B 3 ) or specific F(ab') 2 (F(ab') 2 αB 1 ) are unable to stimulate the cells. For all the tested doses, irradiation had no effect on this activation mechanism. The results with the three doses tested (3 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy) are comparable to those using the positive control cells. The same results are obtained with the class II antigens and their specific IgG. (UK)

  1. Functional alterations of alveolar macrophages subjected to smoke exposure and antioxidant lazaroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Lantz, R C; Vermeulen, M W; Chen, G J; Breceda, V; Robledo, R F; Hays, A M; Young, S; Witten, M L

    1999-08-01

    Acute inhalation of diesel fuel-polycarbonate plastic (DFPP) smoke causes severe lung injury, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and death. It has been reported that the initiation of acute lung injury is associated with the activation of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). To further explore the pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages (AM) of New Zealand rabbits ventilated and exposed to a 60 tidal volume of DFPP smoke in vivo were recovered at 1 h post-smoke. Smoke exposure induced significant increases in both mRNA and protein levels for PAM tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), when compared to smoke control. Smoke also induced a biphasic response (inhibited at 2 h, enhanced at 24 h after cell isolation) in the production of superoxide (O2-) by PAM. However, aerosolized lazaroid, U75412E (1.6 mg/kg body weight), significantly attenuated smoke-induced expression in AM TNF-alpha at the protein level but not at the mRNA level, and smoke-induced changes in AM production of O2-. This study suggests that highly expressing AM TNF-alpha following smoke may be a key contributor to the cascade that establishes an acute injury process and exacerbates oxidant-derived cell injury. Whereas, the lazaroid may ameliorate smoke-induced lung injury by attenuating AM TNF-alpha release, in addition to its primary antioxidative mechanism.

  2. In vivo metabolism of pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II pneumonocytes and macrophages from Syrian hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfleger, R.C.; Waide, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Young adult Syrian hamsters were injected intraperitoneally with 14 C-glycerol and 3 H-palmitate 17 hr before they were sacrificed and pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II cells and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were isolated. Incorporation of the two labeled components into the cellular lipids showed that the 3 H-specific activity of the phospholipids from the type II cells was three times that of the PAM and the utilization of 14 C-glycerol into phosphatidyl choline (PC) was 50% greater than incorporation into the PC from PAMs. The PC from type II cells showed that 30% was disaturated and from PAMs 21% was disaturated. Another phosphatide, phosphatidyl glycerol contained about one-third of the molecules in disaturated form. These data are consistent with the view that both type II cells and PAMs can synthesize surface-active phospholipids but it is generally accepted that only the pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II cells excrete the disaturated phospholipids which comprise the surface-active components of pulmonary surfactant

  3. Increased iron sequestration in alveolar macrophages in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Philippot

    Full Text Available Free iron in lung can cause the generation of reactive oxygen species, an important factor in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD pathogenesis. Iron accumulation has been implicated in oxidative stress in other diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, but little is known about iron accumulation in COPD. We sought to determine if iron content and the expression of iron transport and/or storage genes in lung differ between controls and COPD subjects, and whether changes in these correlate with airway obstruction. Explanted lung tissue was obtained from transplant donors, GOLD 2-3 COPD subjects, and GOLD 4 lung transplant recipients, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells were obtained from non-smokers, healthy smokers, and GOLD 1-3 COPD subjects. Iron-positive cells were quantified histologically, and the expression of iron uptake (transferrin and transferrin receptor, storage (ferritin and export (ferroportin genes was examined by real-time RT-PCR assay. Percentage of iron-positive cells and expression levels of iron metabolism genes were examined for correlations with airflow limitation indices (forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 and the ratio between FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC. The alveolar macrophage was identified as the predominant iron-positive cell type in lung tissues. Furthermore, the quantity of iron deposit and the percentage of iron positive macrophages were increased with COPD and emphysema severity. The mRNA expression of iron uptake and storage genes transferrin and ferritin were significantly increased in GOLD 4 COPD lungs compared to donors (6.9 and 3.22 fold increase, respectively. In BAL cells, the mRNA expression of transferrin, transferrin receptor and ferritin correlated with airway obstruction. These results support activation of an iron sequestration mechanism by alveolar macrophages in COPD, which we postulate is a protective mechanism against iron induced oxidative

  4. Surfactant Protein D Binds to Coxiella burnetii and Results in a Decrease in Interactions with Murine Alveolar Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Soltysiak

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of Q fever. Infections are usually acquired after inhalation of contaminated particles, where C. burnetii infects its cellular target cells, alveolar macrophages. Respiratory pathogens encounter the C-type lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D during the course of natural infection. SP-D is a component of the innate immune response in the lungs and other mucosal surfaces. Many Gram-negative pulmonary pathogens interact with SP-D, which can cause aggregation, bactericidal effects and aid in bacterial clearance. Here we show that SP-D binds to C. burnetii in a calcium-dependent manner with no detectable bacterial aggregation or bactericidal effects. Since SP-D interactions with bacteria often alter macrophage interactions, it was determined that SP-D treatment resulted in a significant decrease in C. burnetii interactions to a mouse alveolar macrophage model cell line MH-S indicating SP-D causes a significant decrease in phagocytosis. The ability of SP-D to modulate macrophage activation by C. burnetii was tested and it was determined that SP-D does not alter the correlates measured for macrophage activation. Taken together these studies support those demonstrating limited activation of alveolar macrophages with C. burnetii and demonstrate interactions with SP-D participate in reduction of phagocyte attachment and phagocytosis.

  5. Solubilization of 241AmO2 in alveolar macrophage cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.V.; Schneider, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Cultured rabbit alveolar macrophages were used to study the effect of phagocytosis on the solubilization of 241 AmO 2 . A comparison was made of the solubility of phagocytized AmO 2 and AmO 2 in cell-free media, in the presence and absence of 0.1 mM DTPA. A time-dependent increase of 26% in the soluble (0.1-μm filtrate) intracellular americium fraction was seen in macrophages cultured for 3 days. The addition of 0.1mM DTPA to culture medium resulted in an increase of 36% over the same time period. In contrast, cell-free media without DTPA resulted in less than a 2% increase in solubility after 4 days of incubation, while addition of 0.1mM DTPA resulted in a 5% increase over the same time period. These results indicate cell-mediated solbuilization of phagocytized AmO 2 by macrophages

  6. Retention of inhaled plutonium oxide. Elimination procedures by pulmonary lavage and effect of the alveolar macrophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, Daniel.

    1977-03-01

    A large fraction of the plutonium particles, reaching the deeper lung are retained in the alveolar macrophages during several months. Cell function changes were measured in vivo and in vitro. Stimulation of macrophage mobility and phagocytosis or natural clearance processes were uneffective on PuO 2 excretion. In vivo pulmonary lavage was the only effective therapy. The procedures of in toto pulmonary lavage in order to obtain the highest number of macrophages are described. A study of the physiological and histological consequences showed no long-term pathology, lesions observed during 48 h after lavage were restored quickly. A single lavage eliminated 12-25% only of the lung burden. A procedure of ten repeated lavages (1 per week) eliminated 60-90% of the lung burden. The action of lavage seemed twofold: direct elimination in the rinsing liquid and faster pulmonary clearance with low lymph node overload. Survivals in treated animals kept for long-term observations were compatible with the lung burdens remaining after treatment. Demontration of an inhibiting effect on pulmonary fibrosis should indicate a larger utilization [fr

  7. The Cytokine TGF-β Promotes the Development and Homeostasis of Alveolar Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xueyang; Buttgereit, Anne; Lelios, Iva; Utz, Sebastian G; Cansever, Dilay; Becher, Burkhard; Greter, Melanie

    2017-11-21

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) derive from fetal liver monocytes, which colonize the lung during embryonic development and give rise to fully mature AMs perinatally. AM differentiation requires granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but whether additional factors are involved in AM regulation is not known. Here we report that AMs, in contrast to most other tissue macrophages, were also dependent on transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGF-βR) signaling. Conditional deletion of TGF-βR in mice at different time points halted the development and differentiation of AMs. In adult mice, TGF-β was also critical for AM homeostasis. The source of TGF-β was AMs themselves, indicative of an autocrine loop that promotes AM self-maintenance. Mechanistically, TGF-βR signaling resulted in upregulation of PPAR-γ, a signature transcription factor essential for the development of AMs. These findings reveal an additional layer of complexity regarding the guidance cues, which govern the genesis, maturation, and survival of AMs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarze Per E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α, a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr, with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm, but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm. The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm and quartz (≤ 2 μm to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses

  9. Toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to alveolar macrophages: comparative study revealing differences in their mechanism of toxic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I. M.; Poelen, M. C.; Hempenius, R. A.; Gijbels, M. J.; Alink, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide is generally ascribed to their oxidative potential. In this study their toxic mechanism of action was compared using an intact cell model. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed by means of gas diffusion through a Teflon film. In this in vitro system, ozone

  10. Atorvastatin protected from paraquat-induced cytotoxicity in alveolar macrophages via down-regulation of TLR-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh-Tabrizi, Nazli; Malekinejad, Hassan; Varasteh, Soheil; Cheraghi, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The current study designed to clarify the mechanism of paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and protective effects of Atorvastatin on freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AMs). AMs were collected via bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to various concentrations of paraquat in the presence and absence of

  11. Alveolar macrophages and type I IFN in airway homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divangahi, Maziar; King, Irah L; Pernet, Erwan

    2015-05-01

    Globally, respiratory infections cause more than 4 million deaths per year, with influenza and tuberculosis (TB) in particular being major causes of mortality and morbidity. Although immune cell activation is critical for killing respiratory pathogens, this response must be tightly regulated to effectively control and eliminate invading microorganisms while minimizing immunopathology and maintaining pulmonary function. The distinct microenvironment of the lung is constantly patrolled by alveolar macrophages (Mφ), which are essential for tissue homeostasis, early pathogen recognition, initiation of the local immune response, and resolution of inflammation. Here, we focus on recent advances that have provided insight into the relation between pulmonary Mφ, type I interferon (IFN) signaling, and the delicate balance between protective and pathological immune responses in the lung. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative morphology and morphometry of alveolar macrophages from six mammalian species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Weissman, D.N.; Bice, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were collected from normal, healthy mice, rats, dogs, cynomolgus monkeys, chimpanzees and humans and evaluated for morphologic and morphometric characteristics. The PAM of mice, rats, and dogs were morphologically similar to one another and had statistically similar frequency distributions for PAM size. The range of cell size for these three species was narrow. The PAM of nonhuman primates and humans were morphologically heterogenous with increased cytoplasmic vacuolation, irregular cell outlines and increased numbers of multi nucleated cells as compared to the PAM of rodents and dogs. The mean size of human PAMs was statistically greater than that for all other species evaluated, including nonhuman primates. These data indicate that significant differences in PAM morphology and size exist among species and that such differences may be important when selecting species for studies of PAM. (author)

  13. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-12-01

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  14. Chronic cigarette smoking enhances spontaneous release of tumour necrosis factor-α from alveolar macrophages of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Pessina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Some biological effects of chronic cigarette smoking (two cigarettes for 2 h, daily for 4 months in rats were evaluated. During the smoking period, body weight of smoker rats was always significantly lower than that of control rats. Immediately after the last smoking session the carboxyhaemoglobin concentration in the blood was about 8.5% and the polymorphonuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar fluid increased significantly. At the same time, enzymatic analyses on the supernatants of bronchoalveolar fluid revealed a significant increase of β-glucuronidase in the smoker group. Alveolar macrophages, collected 0, 8 and 24 h after the last smoking session, significantly increased the generation of superoxide anion and, after incubation for 24 h at 37° C in a humidified atmosphere, released significantly high amounts of TNF-α. When challenged with lipopolysaccharide, alveolar macrophages of smoker rats released much more TNF-α but, in such a case, TNF-α release was about one half of that observed in the control group. Peritoneal macrophages of both control and smoker rats were unable either to generate high levels of superoxide anion or to release significant amounts of TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated the activated state of alveolar macrophages and the resting state of peritoneal macrophages.

  15. Studies on the binding and transport processes of americium-241 hydroxide polymers in rat lung and bovine alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taya, A.

    1986-03-01

    The binding of Am-241 hydroxide polymers to the cell components of rat lung was investigated using differential centrifugation, density gradient centrifugation with different media, gel chromatography, free flow electrophoresis and electron microscopic autoradiography with Pu-241. The bovine alveolar macrophage cultures were introduced as an in vitro test system for Am-241 uptake. Form the biochemical and electron microscopic studies it can be concluded that Am-241 is taken up by pulmonary macrophages, where its first storage site is probably the lysosome. Then the Am-241 seems to be solubilized in the lysosomes and to be bound to the cytosolic ferritin of macrophages. Am-241 might be released from the cells and crosses the alveolar membranes as bound to transferrin or as low molecular weight form. (orig.) [de

  16. DNA repair in baboon alveolar macrophages: a system for assessing biohazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meltz, M.L.

    1976-06-01

    The repair of DNA in the alveolar macrophages of the baboon has been investigated after treatment of the cells in vitro with ultraviolet light and with the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate. Repair replication has been observed to occur after ultraviolet-light irradiation of macrophages attached to plastic dishes. The two different techniques used for measuring repair replication were a standard density-gradient procedure which separates normal-density, repair-replicated, preexisting DNA from semiconservatively synthesized DNA containing sufficient (/sup 3/H)bromodeoxyuridine to cause a density shift; and an alternative procedure applicable to nonproliferating cell systems wherein residual semiconservative synthesis is inhibited by hydroxyurea, and the increased incorporation of the DNA precursor (/sup 3/H)thymidine due to repair replication is measured. The latter technique was applied to the investigation of the concentration dependence of repair replication both after and during the treatment of the cells with the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate. The labeling after treatment measures the repair of damage still present at the end of the treatment interval, while the labeling during treatment allows for greater sensitivity and detection of all repair occurring during the treatment period.

  17. Innate immune response of human alveolar macrophages during influenza A infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieru Wang

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AM are one of the key cell types for initiating inflammatory and immune responses to influenza virus in the lung. However, the genome-wide changes in response to influenza infection in AM have not been defined. We performed gene profiling of human AM in response to H1N1 influenza A virus PR/8 using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 chips and verified the changes at both mRNA and protein levels by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. We confirmed the response with a contemporary H3N2 influenza virus A/New York/238/2005 (NY/238. To understand the local cellular response, we also evaluated the impact of paracrine factors on virus-induced chemokine and cytokine secretion. In addition, we investigated the changes in the expression of macrophage receptors and uptake of pathogens after PR/8 infection. Although macrophages fail to release a large amount of infectious virus, we observed a robust induction of type I and type III interferons and several cytokines and chemokines following influenza infection. CXCL9, 10, and 11 were the most highly induced chemokines by influenza infection. UV-inactivation abolished virus-induced cytokine and chemokine response, with the exception of CXCL10. The contemporary influenza virus NY/238 infection of AM induced a similar response as PR/8. Inhibition of TNF and/or IL-1β activity significantly decreased the secretion of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL5 and CXCL8 by over 50%. PR/8 infection also significantly decreased mRNA levels of macrophage receptors including C-type lectin domain family 7 member A (CLEC7A, macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1, and CD36, and reduced uptake of zymosan. In conclusion, influenza infection induced an extensive proinflammatory response in human AM. Targeting local components of innate immune response might provide a strategy for controlling influenza A infection-induced proinflammatory response in vivo.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Innate Responses in a New Model of Lung Alveolar Macrophages

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    Minjeong Woo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung alveolar macrophages (AMs are in the first line of immune defense against respiratory pathogens and play key roles in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb in humans. Nevertheless, AMs are available only in limited amounts for in vitro studies, which hamper the detailed molecular understanding of host-Mtb interactions in these macrophages. The recent establishment of the self-renewing and primary Max Planck Institute (MPI cells, functionally very close to lung AMs, opens unique opportunities for in vitro studies of host-pathogen interactions in respiratory diseases. Here, we investigated the suitability of MPI cells as a host cell system for Mtb infection. Bacterial, cellular, and innate immune features of MPI cells infected with Mtb were characterized. Live bacteria were readily internalized and efficiently replicated in MPI cells, similarly to primary murine macrophages and other cell lines. MPI cells were also suitable for the determination of anti-tuberculosis (TB drug activity. The primary innate immune response of MPI cells to live Mtb showed significantly higher and earlier induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, interleukin 6 (IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1β, as compared to stimulation with heat-killed (HK bacteria. MPI cells previously showed a lack of induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 to a wide range of stimuli, including HK Mtb. By contrast, we show here that live Mtb is able to induce significant amounts of IL-10 in MPI cells. Autophagy experiments using light chain 3B immunostaining, as well as LysoTracker labeling of acidic vacuoles, demonstrated that MPI cells efficiently control killed Mtb by elimination through phagolysosomes. MPI cells were also able to accumulate lipid droplets in their cytoplasm following exposure to lipoproteins. Collectively, this study establishes the MPI cells as a relevant, versatile host cell model for TB research, allowing a deeper understanding of AMs functions

  19. Lipid-Laden Alveolar Macrophages and pH Monitoring in Gastroesophageal Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages and pH monitoring have been used in the diagnosis of chronic aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER. This study was conducted to prove a correlation between the detection of alimentary pulmonary fat phagocytosis and an increasing amount of proximal gastroesophageal reflux. It was assumed that proximal gastroesophageal reflux better correlates with aspiration than distal GER. Patients from 6 months to 16 years with unexplained recurrent wheezy bronchitis and bronchial hyperreactivity, or recurrent pneumonia with chronic cough underwent 24-hour double-channel pH monitoring and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Aspiration of gastric content was determined by counting lipid laden alveolar macrophages from BAL specimens. There were no correlations between any pH-monitoring parameters and counts of lipid-laden macrophages in the whole study population, even when restricting analysis to those with abnormal reflux index expressing clinically significant GER. Quantifying lipid-laden alveolar macrophages from BAL in children with gastroesophageal-related respiratory disorders does not have an acceptable specificity to prove chronic aspiration as an underlying etiology. Therefore, research for other markers of pulmonary aspiration is needed.

  20. [Role of oxidative stress in endoplasmic reticulum stress? induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages triggered by quartz dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Lu, Xiaoting; Li, Qiuying; Liu, Chengyun; Liu, Ying

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the role of oxidative stress in the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages triggered by quartz dust. Seventy-two healthy adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, quartz dust group, quartz dust plus N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) group, and NAC group, with 18 rats in each group. One milliliter of sterile saline (for the control and NAC groups) or 1 ml of saline with 5%ultrafine quartz dust (for dust group and dust plus NAC group) was given to each rat by non-exposed endotracheal infusion. From the second day after dust infusion, rats in dust plus NAC group and NAC group received intragastric administration of NAC (100 mg/kg). In each week, the treatment with NAC lasted for 5 consecutive days, followed by 2 days' interval. For each group, 6 rats were randomly selected on the 14th, 28th, or 56th day after dust exposure; they were sacrificed by bloodletting from the femoral artery, and the lungs were collected. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected to separate macrophages. The protein expression of caspase-12 in alveolar macrophages, the apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) content of alveolar macrophages, and the protein carbonyl content of alveolar macrophages were determined by Western blot, flow cytometry, and colorimetry, respectively. Increased protein expression of caspase-12, apoptosis rate, and content of ROS and protein carbonyl were discovered on the 14th day in the dust group, in comparison with the control group (P quartz dust. Oxidative damage of protein in the endoplasmic reticulum may play an important role in the process.

  1. Alveolar macrophage graded hemosiderin score from bronchoalveolar lavage in horses with exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Michèle Y; Viel, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a quantitative scoring system for evaluation of hemosiderin content of alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalevolar lavage provides a more sensitive test for the detection of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) in horses than does endoscopy of the lower airways. A sample population composed of 74 Standardbred racehorses aged 2-5 years was used. Horses were grouped as either control (EIPH-negative) or EIPH-positive based on history and repeated postexertional endoscopic evaluation of the bronchial airways. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and cytocentrifuge slides were stained with Perl's Prussian blue. Alveolar macrophages were scored for hemosiderin content by a method described by Golde and associates to obtain the total hemosiderin score (THS). Test performance criteria were determined with a contingency table. All subjects had some degree of hemosiderin in the alveolar macrophages, regardless of group. The distribution of cells among the different grades followed a significantly different pattern for the control group versus horses with EIPH (P hemosiderin by means of the Golde scoring system shows promise as a more sensitive approach than repeated postexertional endoscopy alone to detect EIPH.

  2. [Role of calcium activated-potassium channels in the injury to rat alveolar macrophages induced by quartz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Sun, Jingzhi; Yang, Li; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of calcium activated-potassium channels (KCa) in the injury to rat alveolar macrophages induced by quartz. The experiments were conducted on a rat alveolar macrophage cell line (NR8383) in vitro, where crystal silica (100 üg/ml) and amorphous silica (100 üg/ml) were used as the test substances and the cells without any treatment as negative controls. At first the effects of two kinds of quartz were compared. Then KCa special inhibitors (Paxilline for BK, Tram-34 for IK, Apamin for SK) were added in different doses to the in vitro test system with 100 üg/ml crystal quartz as matrix, to observe the function of such channels. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) were tested. Comparing to the negative control group, cell viability reduced, LDH leakage, IL-1β and TNF-α release increased significantly in the amorphous quartz group, furthermore, the effects by crystal quartz were much more serious than those by amorphous quartz, with a statistical significance (P quartz group, IK blockers (Tram-34) led to increase in cell viability significantly, with a statistical significance (P quartz in the rat alveolar macrophages cell line in vitro, which might serve as a signal in the early regulation of inflammatory responses by quartz.

  3. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  4. The effects of beryllium metal particles on the viability and function of cultured rat alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Lowther, W.T.; Hoover, M.D.; Brooks, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were exposed in vitro to beryllium metal particles. The particles used were relatively large (Be-II) and small (Be-V) size fractions of beryllium metal obtained from an aerosol cyclone, and a beryllium metal aerosol generated by laser vaporization of beryllium metal in an argon atmosphere (Be-L). Glass beads (GB) were used as a negative control particle. The endpoints examined included cell killing (trypan blue dye exclusion) and phagocytic ability (sheep red blood cell uptake). Phagocytic ability was inhibited by beryllium particles at concentrations that did not cause appreciable cell killing. Results based on the mass concentration of particles in culture medium were transformed by the amount of specific surface area of the particles to permit expression of toxicity on the basis of amount of surface area of particles per unit volume of culture medium. On a mass concentration basis, the order of cytotoxicity was Be-L > Be-V ∼ Be-II > GB; for inhibition of phagacytosis, the cytotoxicity order was Be-L ∼ Be-V > Be-II > GB. On a surface area concentration basis, the order of toxicity for viability was altered to Be-II > Be-L ∼ Be-V (with GB indeterminant) and to Be-V > Be-II ∼ Be-L > GB for inhibition of phagocytosis. We conclude that there are factors in addition to specific surface area that influence the expression of toxic effects in cultured PAM. (author)

  5. Investigation of fine chalk dust particles' chemical compositions and toxicities on alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yang, Zhenhua; Li, Ruijin; Geng, Hong; Dong, Chuan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate chemical compositions of fine chalk dust particles (chalk PM2.5) and examine their adverse effects on alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. Morphologies and element concentrations of individual chalk particles were analyzed by using the quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA). The oxidative response of AMs and the potential to generate nitric oxide (NO) by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) and nitrate reductase method were assessed 4h following the treatment of AMs with differing dosages of fine chalk particles, respectively. Oxidative stress and cytotoxicity elicited by chalk PM2.5 were also examined. The results showed that fine chalk particles were mainly composed of gypsum, calcite, dolomite and a little amount of organic adhesives. Exposure to chalk PM2.5 at 100 μg mL(-1) or 300 μg mL(-1) significantly increased intracellular catalase, malondialdehyde, and NO levels and decreased superoxide dismutase level in AMs, leading to leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and reduction of the cell viability. Furthermore, luminol-dependent CL from respiratory burst in AMs was enhanced. It was suggested that chalk PM2.5 could make oxidative damages on AMs and result in cytotoxicity, being likely attributed to excessive reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species induced by mixture of fine gypsum and calcite/dolomite particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on pulmonary alveolar macrophages of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchideh, K.; Chen, B.T.; Mauderly, J.L.; Brooks, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study was part of a larger investigation of the health effects resulting from different methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. Cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were evaluated. Fischer 344/N, male rats (4/group) were randomly assigned to 5 different exposure groups: (1) nose-only sham-exposed control, (2) whole-body sham-exposed control, (3) nose-only intermittent, (4) nose-only continuous, and (5) whole-body continuous. Sham controls were exposed to clean air. PAMs were obtained by lung lavage and chromosomal damage was measured. Multiple comparison demonstrated no significant differences between smoke-exposed groups and their respective sham-exposed controls, between the sham-exposed groups, or among the three smoke exposed groups. Highly significant smoke-induced differences in both structural and numerical aberrations were observed when data for the respective control groups and exposed groups were pooled and compared. Results from this study demonstrate the clastogenicity of cigarette smoke on rat PAM. (author)

  7. Radiosensitivity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in rats exposed to local X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Yifen; Fei Lihua; Wu Dechang

    1987-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) in rats exposed to local thoracic X-irradiatoin was studied. The percentages of mitotic and labeling cells were used as biological endpoints. The parameters of radiosensitivity of PAMs obtained on the second day after local exposure are as follows: D 0 = 0.68 Gy, Dq = 0.06 Gy, n = 1.1 for mitotic cells and D 0 = 1.04 Gy, Dq = 0.12 Gy, n = 1.12 for labeling cells. The parameters of radiosensitivity of PAMs in bronchical lavage obtained immediately after X-irradiation are: D 0 = 3.56 Gy, Dq = 0.77 Gy, n = 1.24 for labeling cells and D 0 = 3.69 Gy, Dq = 0.35 Gy, n = 1.1 for mitotic cells. The comparison of thses results indicates that the radiation effect on PAMs obtained immediately after X-irradiation is less severe than that of PAMs obtained 2 days later. It might be caused by the delay of cell cycle within 2 days after X-irradiation

  8. Protein tyrosine kinase but not protein kinase C inhibition blocks receptor induced alveolar macrophage activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pollock

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The selective enzyme inhibitors genistein and Ro 31-8220 were used to assess the importance of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK and protein kinase C (PKC, respectively, in N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP induced generation of superoxide anion and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM. Genistein (3–100 μM dose dependently inhibited FMLP (3 nM induced superoxide generation in non-primed AM and TXB2 release in non-primed or in lipopolysaccharide (LPS (10 ng/ml primed AM to a level > 80% but had litle effect up to 100 μM on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA (10 nM induced superoxide release. Ro 31-8220 inhibited PMA induced superoxide generation (IC50 0.21 ± 0.10 μM but had no effect on or potentiated (at 3 and 10 μM FMLP responses in non-primed AM. In contrast, when present during LPS priming as well as during FMLP challenge Ro 31-8220 (10 μM inhibited primed TXB2 release by > 80%. The results indicate that PTK activation is required for the generation of these inflammatory mediators by FMLP in AM. PKC activation appears to be required for LPS priming but not for transducing the FMLP signal; rather, PKC activation may modulate the signal by a negative feedback mechanism.

  9. The effect of oxygen and paraquat on the 14C-glucose oxidation of rabbit alveolar macrophages and lung slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussouw, D.J.; Engelbrecht, F.M.

    1979-01-01

    In this study, we measured the effects of different concentrations of paraquat (0,01 mM and 1,0 mM) on the 1- 14 CO 2 and 6- 14 CO 2 production of rabbit lung slices and isolated alveolar macrophages, in 20% and 95% oxygen phases respectively. A 95% oxygen phase induced an increase in the 6- 14 C-glucose oxidation of control lung slices over a 3-hour period, while the increased activity of the pentose pathway over the first 2 hours started to decline during the third hour of incubation. Paraquat (1,0mM) in 20% oxygen caused a consistent increase in the 6- 14 CO 2 production by lung slices, but in a 95% oxygen phase gradually inhibited the 6- 14 C-glucose oxidation over a period of 3 hours. The pentose phosphate pathway was highly significantly stimulated by 1,0 mM paraquat in 20% and 95% oxygen over 3 hours. When isolated alveolar macrophages (viability 95%) were incubated in a 20% and 95% oxygen phase respectively, both the 6- 14 C-glucose and 1- 14 C-glucose oxidation rates were significantly inhibited by 1,0 mM paraquat after 1 hour. Our results confirmed the initial increase in glycolytic metabolism induced by paraquat, but also indicated that the 6- 14 CO 2 production was significantly inhibited by paraquat when lung slices were incubated in a 95% oxygen phase. The fact that the glucose metabolism in alveolar macrophages is more sensitive to paraquat exposure than that of cells in lung slices may be related to the genesis of the intra-alveolar pulmonary lesions described in the literature

  10. Depletion of resident macrophages does not alter sensory regeneration in the avian cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Warchol

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary effector cells of the innate immune system and are also activated in response to tissue injury. The avian cochlea contains a population of resident macrophages, but the precise function of those cells is not known. The present study characterized the behavior of cochlear macrophages after aminoglycoside ototoxicity and also examined the possible role of macrophages in sensory regeneration. We found that the undamaged chick cochlea contains a large resting population of macrophages that reside in the hyaline cell region, immediately outside the abneural (inferior border of the sensory epithelium. Following ototoxic injury, macrophages appear to migrate out of the hyaline cell region and towards the basilar membrane, congregating immediately below the lesioned sensory epithelium. In order to determine whether recruited macrophages contribute to the regeneration of sensory receptors, we quantified supporting cell proliferation and hair cell recovery after the elimination of most resident macrophages via application of liposomally-encapsulated clodronate. Examination of macrophage-depleted specimens at two days following ototoxic injury revealed no deficits in hair cell clearance, when compared to normal controls. In addition, we found that elimination of macrophages did not affect either regenerative proliferation of supporting cells or the production of replacement hair cells. However, we did find that macrophage-depleted cochleae contained reduced numbers of proliferative mesothelial cells below the basilar membrane. Our data suggest that macrophages are not required for normal debris clearance and regeneration, but that they may play a role in the maintenance of the basilar membrane.

  11. Resident Macrophages and Lymphocytes in the Canine Endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, M A; Payan-Carreira, R

    2015-10-01

    Resident immune cells play a major role in endometrial immunity and in tissue homoeostasis. This study aimed to analyse the distribution of macrophages, B and T lymphocytes (respectively, Mø, B-Lym and T-Lym) in the canine endometrium throughout the oestrous cycle and in late involution (at the proestrus stage post-parturition). An immunohistochemistry technique was used on samples from 50 post-pubertal healthy female dogs, of which five in late post-partum. The distribution of resident immune cells was analysed in three endometrial layers (superficial, intermediate and basal areas). Mø, B-Lym and T-Lym were demonstrated to reside in the endometrium in all the stages of the canine cycle; their numbers being considerably higher during late involution. T-Lym were scattered in the stroma or amidst the glandular epithelium, constituting the predominant immune cell population in anestrus and proestrus, but decreased in number at all other stages. Endometrial B-Lym remained fairly constant during the canine cycle, although its numbers were higher in late involution. Mø counts were higher during anestrus compared to the other stages, the cells being displaced into the superficial endometrial layer. Mø demonstrated the highest level in late involution samples, forming small aggregates below the surface epithelium. The number of immune cells was not normally distributed, suggesting the influence of individual factors, such as age or parity, not explored herein due to limited sample availability. Still, this study provides important information for the interpretation of endometrial biopsies in dogs and for the understanding of the increased susceptibility to uterine infection during dioestrus found in the bitch. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Edema toxin impairs anthracidal phospholipase A2 expression by alveolar macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Raymond

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is a spore-forming gram-positive bacterium. Infection with this pathogen results in multisystem dysfunction and death. The pathogenicity of B. anthracis is due to the production of virulence factors, including edema toxin (ET. Recently, we established the protective role of type-IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA against B. anthracis. A component of innate immunity produced by alveolar macrophages (AMs, sPLA2-IIA is found in human and animal bronchoalveolar lavages at sufficient levels to kill B. anthracis. However, pulmonary anthrax is almost always fatal, suggesting the potential impairment of sPLA2-IIA synthesis and/or action by B. anthracis factors. We investigated the effect of purified ET and ET-deficient B. anthracis strains on sPLA2-IIA expression in primary guinea pig AMs. We report that ET inhibits sPLA2-IIA expression in AMs at the transcriptional level via a cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent process. Moreover, we show that live B. anthracis strains expressing functional ET inhibit sPLA2-IIA expression, whereas ET-deficient strains induced this expression. This stimulatory effect, mediated partly by the cell wall peptidoglycan, can be counterbalanced by ET. We conclude that B. anthracis down-regulates sPLA2-IIA expression in AMs through a process involving ET. Our study, therefore, describes a new molecular mechanism implemented by B. anthracis to escape innate host defense. These pioneering data will provide new molecular targets for future intervention against this deadly pathogen.

  13. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van, E-mail: Stephan.vanEeden@hli.ubc.ca

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  14. microRNA-124 negatively regulates TLR signaling in alveolar macrophages in response to mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunyan; Li, Yong; Li, Min; Deng, Guangcun; Wu, Xiaoling; Zeng, Jin; Hao, Xiujing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jing; Cho, William C S; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2014-11-01

    The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating immune responses have attracted increasing attention in recent years; and the alveolar macrophages (AMs) are the main targets of mycobacterial infection, which play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. However, the immunoregulatory role of miRNAs in AMs has not been fully demonstrated. In this study, we find that miR-124 is up-regulated in the peripheral leukocytes of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis; furthermore, the expression miR-124 can be induced upon Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection in both RAW264.7 AM cells in vitro and murine AMs in vivo. Mechanistically, miR-124 is able to modulate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling activity in RAW264.7 cells in response to BCG infection. In this regard, multiple components of TLR signaling cascade, including the TLR6, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), TNFR-associated factor 6 and tumor necrosis factor-α are directly targeted by miR-124. In addition, both overexpression of TLR signaling adaptor MyD88 and BCG infection are able to augment miR-124 transcription, while MyD88 expression silenced by small interfering RNA dramatically suppresses miR-124 expression in AMs in vitro. Moreover, the abundance of miR-124 transcript in murine AMs of MyD88 deficient mice is significantly less than that of their wild-type or heterozygous littermates; and the BCG infection fails to induce miR-124 expression in the lung of MyD88 deficient mouse. These results indicate a negative regulatory role of miR-124 in fine-tuning inflammatory response in AMs upon mycobacterial infection, in part through a mechanism by directly targeting TLR signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-01-01

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 μm or less, PM 10 ) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 μm or less, PM 2.5 ) and ultrafine particles (0.1 μm or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-κB and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-κB pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  16. Alveolar macrophages infected with Ames or Sterne strain of Bacillus anthracis elicit differential molecular expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia D Langel

    Full Text Available Alveolar macrophages (AMs phagocytose Bacillus anthracis following inhalation and induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines to mediate the activation of innate immunity. Ames, the virulent strain of B. anthracis, contains two plasmids that encode the antiphagocytic poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule and the lethal toxin. The attenuated Sterne strain of B. anthracis, which lacks the plasmid encoding capsule, is widely adapted as a vaccine strain. Although differences in the outcome of infection with the two strains may have originated from the presence or absence of an anti-phagocytic capsule, the disease pathogenesis following infection will be manifested via the host responses, which is not well understood. To gain understanding of the host responses at cellular level, a microarray analysis was performed using primary rhesus macaque AMs infected with either Ames or Sterne spores. Notably, 528 human orthologs were identified to be differentially expressed in AMs infected with either strain of the B. anthracis. Meta-analyses revealed genes differentially expressed in response to B. anthracis infection were also induced upon infections with multiple pathogens such as Francisella Novicida or Staphylococcus aureus. This suggests the existence of a common molecular signature in response to pathogen infections. Importantly, the microarray and protein expression data for certain cytokines, chemokines and host factors provide further insights on how cellular processes such as innate immune sensing pathways, anti-apoptosis versus apoptosis may be differentially modulated in response to the virulent or vaccine strain of B. anthracis. The reported differences may account for the marked difference in pathogenicity between these two strains.

  17. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming [Department and Institute of Infectious Disease, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Ning, Qin, E-mail: qning@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department and Institute of Infectious Disease, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China)

    2010-05-28

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  18. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages with Interferon-γ Promotes Antioxidant Defenses via the Nrf2-ARE Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staitieh, Bashar S; Egea, Eduardo E; Fan, Xian; Azih, Nnamdi; Neveu, Wendy; Guidot, David M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage phenotype and function is dependent on the underlying microenvironment. Many diseases are accompanied by abnormal shifts in macrophage polarization state that limit the ability of the cells to become innate immune effectors. Previous work in the field suggests that chronic alcohol ingestion, which is associated with a shift away from innate immune effector macrophages, is also associated with a deficient response to oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that the optimal response to oxidative stress was dependent on the ability of the macrophage to become an innate immune effector cell. To investigate this hypothesis, we first confirmed that we could reproducibly polarize NR8383 cells (a rat alveolar macrophage cell line) into the prototypical M1 and M2 states (using IFN-γ and IL-4, respectively). We then tested the polarized cells for their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) using the Amplex red assay and found that IFN-γ-polarized cells had greater scavenging capacity. To elucidate the mechanism of the enhanced response to oxidative stress, we then assessed key components of the anti-oxidant response; specifically, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), the master transcription factor responsible for the cellular response to oxidative stress, and one of its downstream effectors, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). We found that both proteins were significantly upregulated in the IFN-γ-polarized cells. To confirm that Nrf2 is an integral component of this improved anti-oxidant response, we transfected IFN-γ-polarized cells with either silencing RNA to Nrf2 or control silencing RNA and found that hydrogen peroxide scavenging was significantly impaired in the si-Nrf2-treated cells. Further, transfecting untreated cells with si-Nrf2 polarized them toward the M2 phenotype in the absence of IL-4, suggesting a mechanistic role for Nrf2 in macrophage polarization. We then

  19. The exhibition to ozone diminishes the adherence and increases the membrane permeability of macrophages alveolar of rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.

    2000-01-01

    Ozone gas is generated photochemically in areas with high levels of automotive or industrial emissions, and causes irritation and inflammation of the airways if inhaled. Rat alveolar macrophages were obtained by lung lavage from male Sprague Dawley rats and used as a model to assess ozone induced cell damage (0,594 ppm for up to 60 minutes). Ozone exposure caused loss of cell adherence to a polystyrene substrate and increased membrane permeability, as noted by increases in specific 51 Cr release and citoplasmic calcium levels. The results indicate that the cell membrane is a target for ozone damage. Elevations of cytoplasmic calcium could mediate other macrophage responses to ozone , including eicosanoid and nitric oxide production, with concomitant decreases in phagocytic ability and superoxide production. (Author) [es

  20. Profiling microRNA expression in bovine alveolar macrophages using RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Peter; Foroushani, Amir B K; Magee, David A; McCabe, Matthew S; Browne, John A; Nalpas, Nicolas C; Conlon, Kevin M; Gordon, Stephen V; Bradley, Daniel G; MacHugh, David E; Lynn, David J

    2013-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and are known to play a key role in regulating both adaptive and innate immunity. Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) help maintain lung homeostasis and constitute the front line of host defense against several infectious respiratory diseases, such as bovine tuberculosis. Little is known, however, about the role miRNAs play in these cells. In this study, we used a high-throughput sequencing approach, RNA-seq, to determine the expression levels of known and novel miRNAs in unchallenged BAMs isolated from lung lavages of eight different healthy Holstein-Friesian male calves. Approximately 80 million sequence reads were generated from eight BAM miRNA Illumina sequencing libraries, and 80 miRNAs were identified as being expressed in BAMs at a threshold of at least 100 reads per million (RPM). The expression levels of miRNAs varied over a large dynamic range, with a few miRNAs expressed at very high levels (up to 800,000RPM), and the majority lowly expressed. Notably, many of the most highly expressed miRNAs in BAMs have known roles in regulating immunity in other species (e.g. bta-let-7i, bta-miR-21, bta-miR-27, bta-miR-99b, bta-miR-146, bta-miR-147, bta-miR-155 and bta-miR-223). The most highly expressed miRNA in BAMs was miR-21, which has been shown to regulate the expression of antimicrobial peptides in Mycobacterium leprae-infected human monocytes. Furthermore, the predicted target genes of BAM-expressed miRNAs were found to be statistically enriched for roles in innate immunity. In addition to profiling the expression of known miRNAs, the RNA-seq data was also analysed to identify potentially novel bovine miRNAs. One putatively novel bovine miRNA was identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first RNA-seq study to profile miRNA expression in BAMs and provides an important reference dataset for investigating the regulatory roles miRNAs play in this important immune cell type. Copyright

  1. Incorporation of resident macrophages in engineered tissues: Multiple cell type response to microenvironment controlled macrophage-laden gelatine hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Camille; Ciftci, Sait; Knopf-Marques, Helena; Guner, Rabia; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Debry, Christian; Barthes, Julien; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2018-02-01

    The success of tissue engineering strategy is strongly related to the inflammatory response, mainly through the activity of macrophages that are key cells in initial immune response to implants. For engineered tissues, the presence of resident macrophages can be beneficial for maintenance of homeostasis and healing. Thus, incorporation of macrophages in engineered tissues can facilitate the integration upon implantation. In this study, an in-vitro model of interaction was developed between encapsulated naive monocytes, macrophages induced with M1/M2 stimulation and incoming cells for immune assisted tissue engineering applications. To mimic the wound healing cascade, naive THP-1 monocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts were seeded on the gels as incoming cells. The interaction was first monitored in the absence of the gels. To mimic resident macrophages, THP-1 cells were encapsulated in the presence or absence of IL-4 to control their phenotype and then these hydrogels were seeded with incoming cells. Without encapsulation, activated macrophages induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. Once encapsulated no adverse effects were seen. Macrophage-laden hydrogels attracted more endothelial cells and fibroblasts compared to monocytes-laden hydrogels. The induction (M2 stimulation) of encapsulated macrophages did not change the overall number of attracted cells; but significantly affected their morphology. M1 stimulation by a defined media resulted in more secretion of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to M2 stimulation. It was demonstrated that there is a distinct effect of encapsulated macrophages on the behaviour of the incoming cells; this effect can be harnessed to establish a microenvironment more prone to regeneration upon implantation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Ziltener

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and reactive oxygen species (ROS are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs, as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection.

  3. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  4. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens on human alveolar macrophages by granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence of glucocorticoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, J J; Fernandez, M H; Sousa, A R; Lane, S J; Lee, T H; Hawrylowicz, C M

    1999-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) present antigen poorly to CD4+ T cells and respond weakly to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) for up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecule expression. In atopic asthma, however, AM exhibit enhanced antigen-presenting cell (APC) activity. Since granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is increased in the airways of asthmatic patients, we have investigated its role in modulating the APC function of AM. The effects of glucocorticoids were also studied since earlier studies showed optimal induction of MHC antigens on monocytes by GM-CSF in their presence. GM-CSF in the presence, but not the absence, of dexamethasone enhanced the expression of HLA-DR, -DP and -DQ antigens by AM. However AM and monocytes differed in the optimal concentration of steroid required to mediate this effect (10−10 m and 10−7 m, respectively). Induction of MHC antigens was glucocorticoid specific and independent of IFN-γ. These studies suggest the existence of an IFN-γ-independent pathway of macrophage activation, which may be important in regulating APC function within the lung. PMID:10469240

  5. A co-culture system with an organotypic lung slice and an immortal alveolar macrophage cell line to quantify silica-induced inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Hofmann

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that amorphous silica nanoparticles cause toxic effects on lung cells in vivo as well as in vitro and induce inflammatory processes. The phagocytosis of silica by alveolar macrophages potentiates these effects. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of silica toxicity, we applied a co-culture system including the immortal alveolar epithelial mouse cell line E10 and the macrophage cell line AMJ2-C11. In parallel we exposed precision-cut lung slices (lacking any blood cells as well as residual alveolar macrophages of wild type and P2rx7-/- mice with or without AMJ2-C11 cells to silica nanoparticles. Exposure of E10 cells as well as slices of wild type mice resulted in an increase of typical alveolar epithelial type 1 cell proteins like T1α, caveolin-1 and -2 and PKC-β1, whereas the co-culture with AMJ2-C11 showed mostly a slightly lesser increase of these proteins. In P2rx7-/- mice most of these proteins were slightly decreased. ELISA analysis of the supernatant of wild type and P2rx7-/- mice precision-cut lung slices showed decreased amounts of IL-6 and TNF-α when incubated with nano-silica. Our findings indicate that alveolar macrophages influence the early inflammation of the lung and also that cell damaging reagents e.g. silica have a smaller impact on P2rx7-/- mice than on wild type mice. The co-culture system with an organotypic lung slice is a useful tool to study the role of alveolar macrophages during lung injury at the organoid level.

  6. Atividade antioxidante de macrófagos alveolares em ratos endotoxêmicos Anti-oxidative activity of alveolar macrophages in endotoxemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Félix de Melo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da endotoxemia sobre a atividade antioxidante de macrófagos alveolares em ratos da linhagem Wistar. Foram utilizados 24 ratos machos, com idade entre 90 e 120 dias, os quais foram divididos em dois grupos: controle e endotoxêmico. O grupo endotoxêmico foi submetido à injeção intraperitonial de lipopolissacarídio na dose de 1mg/kg de peso corporal. Após 24 h, coletou-se sangue para contagem total e diferencial de leucócitos; lavado broncoalveolar para contagem total e diferencial dos leucócitos e, a partir de macrófagos isolados deste lavado, foram realizadas as dosagens de superóxido e superóxido dismutase. A endotoxemia aumentou a contagem total de leucócitos e o número de neutrófilos no sangue periférico, no lavado broncoalveolar, e aumentou a produção de superóxido sem modificar a produção da superóxido dismutase. Esses resultados sugerem que a endotoxemia induz a uma resposta inflamatória no pulmão. Contudo, não altera a atividade antioxidante em ratos adultos. Tal fato potencializa a resposta contra agentes infecciosos pelo hospedeiro, mas também pode contribuir na patogênese de injúria pulmonar.The effects of endotoxemia on the antioxidant activity in alveolar macrophages of Wistar rats were evaluated. Twenty-four male rats, 90-120 days of age, were separated into 2 groups: control and endotoxemic. To the endotoxemic animals was administered, intraperitoneally, a lipopolyssaccaride at dosage of 1mg/kg body weight. Twenty-four hours after this procedure, blood was collected for total and differential leukocytes counts. In addition, bronchoalveolar lavage was collected for total and differential leukocyte counting. From this lavage macrophages were isolated for the dosage of superoxide and superoxide dismutase. The endotoxemia increased the total leukocyte counts and the number of neutrophils in the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage of the rats. There was an increased superoxide

  7. Stimulation of interleukin-1 and -6 production in alveolar macrophages by the neotropical liana, Uncaria tomentosa (uña de gato)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, I; Assinewe, V; Cano, P; Awang, D V; Arnason, J T

    1999-02-01

    Two extracts of different collections of the traditional medicine uña de gato (Uncaria tomentosa) from Peru were characterized by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography as containing approximately 6 mg/g total oxindole content prior to studies with alveolar macrophages. The plant preparations greatly stimulated IL-1 and IL-6 production by rat macrophages in a dose dependent manner in the range of 0.025-0.1 mg/ml. They were also able to enhance IL-1 and -6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. The results suggest a strong immunostimulant action of this plant.

  8. Characterization of a resident population of adventitial macrophage progenitor cells in postnatal vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Spoon, Daniel B; Chue, Colin D; Hoffman, Scott J; Witt, Tyra A; Delacroix, Sinny; Kleppe, Laurel S; Mueske, Cheryl S; Pan, Shuchong; Gulati, Rajiv; Simari, Robert D

    2014-07-18

    Macrophages regulate blood vessel structure and function in health and disease. The origins of tissue macrophages are diverse, with evidence for local production and circulatory renewal. We identified a vascular adventitial population containing macrophage progenitor cells and investigated their origins and fate. Single-cell disaggregates from adult C57BL/6 mice were prepared from different tissues and tested for their capacity to form hematopoietic colony-forming units. Aorta showed a unique predilection for generating macrophage colony-forming units. Aortic macrophage colony-forming unit progenitors coexpressed stem cell antigen-1 and CD45 and were adventitially located, where they were the predominant source of proliferating cells in the aortic wall. Aortic Sca-1(+)CD45(+) cells were transcriptionally and phenotypically distinct from neighboring cells lacking stem cell antigen-1 or CD45 and contained a proliferative (Ki67(+)) Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD135(-)CD115(+)CX3CR1(+)Ly6C(+)CD11b(-) subpopulation, consistent with the immunophenotypic profile of macrophage progenitors. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that Sca-1(+)CD45(+) adventitial macrophage progenitor cells were not replenished via the circulation from bone marrow or spleen, nor was their prevalence diminished by depletion of monocytes or macrophages by liposomal clodronate treatment or genetic deficiency of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Rather adventitial macrophage progenitor cells were upregulated in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) and LDL-R(-/-) mice, with adventitial transfer experiments demonstrating their durable contribution to macrophage progeny particularly in the adventitia, and to a lesser extent the atheroma, of atherosclerotic carotid arteries. The discovery and characterization of resident vascular adventitial macrophage progenitor cells provides new insight into adventitial biology and its participation in atherosclerosis and provokes consideration of the broader existence of local macrophage

  9. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O

    2017-01-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand...... the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hours. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage...... marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. RESULTS: iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep...

  10. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO 3 . We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O 2 − ). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O 2 − may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O 2 − may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

  11. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Pérez-Arellano

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs. An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities. All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease.

  12. Protective phenotypes of club cells and alveolar macrophages are favored as part of endotoxin-mediated prevention of asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luciana N; Leimgruber, Carolina; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Acosta, Patricio L; Brahamian, Jorge M; Polack, Fernando P; Miró, María S; Quintar, Amado A; Sotomayor, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is a chronic allergic disease that involves T-helper type 2 (Th2)-inflammation and airway remodeling. Bronchiolar club cells (CC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are sentinel cells of airway barrier against inhaled injuries, where allergy induces mucous metaplasia of CC and the alternative activation of AM, which compromise host defense mechanisms and amplify Th2-inflammation. As there is evidence that high levels of environmental endotoxin modulates asthma, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the activation of local host defenses by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) previous to allergy development can contribute to preserving CC and AM protective phenotypes. Endotoxin stimulus before allergen exposition reduced hallmarks of allergic inflammation including eosinophil influx, Interleukin-4 and airway hyperreactivity, while the T-helper type 1 related cytokines IL-12 and Interferon-γ were enhanced. This response was accompanied by the preservation of the normal CC phenotype and the anti-allergic proteins Club Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP) and Surfactant-D, thereby leading to lower levels of CC metaplasia and preventing the increase of the pro-Th2 cytokine Thymic stromal lymphopoietin. In addition, classically activated alveolar macrophages expressing nitric oxide were promoted over the alternatively activated ones that expressed arginase-1. We verified that LPS induced a long-term overexpression of CCSP and the innate immune markers Toll-like receptor 4, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, changes that were preserved in spite of the allergen challenge. These results demonstrate that LPS pre-exposition modifies the local bronchioalveolar microenvironment by inducing natural anti-allergic mechanisms while reducing local factors that drive Th2 type responses, thus modulating allergic inflammation. PMID:25504013

  13. The antifibrotic effects of alveolar macrophages 5-HT2C receptors blockade on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaidy, Samah M; Essawy, Soha S

    2016-12-01

    The most widespread chronic fibrosing lung disease is idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Lung serotonin (5-HT) content is increased during pulmonary fibrosis with the implication of 5-HT2 receptors in the pathogenesis. Serotonin plays important roles in alveolar macrophages function through 5-HT2C receptors activation. Numerous studies described the important role of 5-HT2A/B receptor blockers in suppressing different types of fibrosis as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The current study pointed to examine the antifibrotic effects of RS-102221 and/or terguride through in vivo model of pulmonary fibrosis. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis was through a single dose of intra-tracheal bleomycin instillation (5mg/kg dissolved in phosphate buffer saline) in adult male albino Wistar rats. Next day of bleomycin instillation, intraperitoneal injection of RS-102221 (0.5mg/kg/d) and/or terguride (1.2mg/kg/d) were administered and continued for 14 days. Noticeable increase in 5-HT2C receptors expression was observed in fibrotic lung tissues with marked allocation belonging to alveolar macrophages. Either RS-102221 or terguride reduced the increments in lung water contents, grading of lung fibrosis, lung tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF- β1 ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in lung injury and fibrosis-induced by bleomycin. Moreover, collagen content and myofibroblasts-alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SМA) were significantly decreased. Additionally, the simultaneous administration of RS-102221 with terguride had a synergistic outcome compared to that obtained by individual monotherapy. These findings suggested the potential use of 5-HT2A/B/C antagonists as anti-fibrotic agents in lung fibrosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  14. Neutrophil Migration into the Infected Uroepithelium Is Regulated by the Crosstalk between Resident and Helper Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Zec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial defense against infections depends on the cooperation between distinct phagocytes of the innate immune system, namely macrophages and neutrophils. However, the mechanisms driving this cooperation are incompletely understood. In this study we describe the crosstalk between Ly6C+ and Ly6C− macrophage-subtypes and neutrophils in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. Ly6C− macrophages acted as tissue resident sentinels and attracted circulating phagocytes by chemokines. Ly6C+ macrophages produced tumor necrosis factor (TNF that licensed Ly6C− macrophages to release preformed CXCL2, which in turn caused matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 secretion by neutrophils to enable transepithelial migration.

  15. [Reference values of hemosiderin-laden alveolar macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, P; Kitz, R; Weimer, B; Hofmann, D

    1999-05-01

    Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare disease of unknown etiology, mainly affecting children and adolescents. Pulmonary haemosiderosis may occur in association with several respiratory or other disease (Lupus erythematosus, Goodpastures syndrome). Delay in diagnosing can lead to fatal complications. BAL appears to be the method of choice to detect haemosiderin-laden macrophages. No reference values are available for children to date. 64 bronchoalveolar lavages were performed to establish reference values of haemosiderin-laden macrophages in children. Less haemosiderin was found in children compared to adults, and hence a new haemosiderin score was established for paediatric patients. Compared to healthy children, no elevated haemosiderine levels were found in children with chronic pulmonary disease such as bronchiectasis or chronic aspiration caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux. Therefore even a mildly increased amount of haemosiderin-laden macrophages in children requires medical attention.

  16. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in alveolar macrophages, type II pneumocytes, and airways in smokers: relationship to lung function and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison M; Loy, Leanna B; Abboud, Raja T; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Coxson, Harvey O; Muller, Nestor L; Kalloger, Steve; Li, Xing; Mark Elliott, W; English, John C; Finley, Richard J; Paré, Peter D

    2014-08-01

    An imbalance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinase-1, also known as interstitial collagenase, has been implicated as a potentially important proteinase in the genesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and, more specifically, emphysema. We performed quantitative immunohistochemical assessment of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in the resected lung of 20 smokers/ex-smokers who had varying severity of airflow obstruction and emphysema and compared this with the lungs of 5 nonsmokers. Emphysema was measured using a morphometric measure of the lungs' surface area/volume ratio and with qualitative and quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema. There were significantly more matrix metalloproteinase-1-expressing alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes as well as a greater percentage of small airways that stained positively for matrix metalloproteinase-1 in the lungs of smokers than in those of nonsmokers (p lung surface area/volume ratio and to qualitative estimates of emphysema on CT. These findings suggest that cigarette smoking increases expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in alveolar macrophages as well as in alveolar and small airway epithelial cells. Smokers who develop emphysema have increased alveolar macrophage expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1.

  17. The Role of Alveolar Macrophage Beta-2 Adrenergic Receptors in Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    which are required for pro-inflammatory response against influenza suggested by attenuation of inflammation with inhibitors of glycolysis (Hk2) and...increased expression of glycolytic metabolic genes and Irg1 and exhibited increased glycolysis (measured by Seahorse XF24). Importantly, inhibition...of glycolysis or carbonic anhydrase attenuated influenza induced IL-6 response from macrophages. These results suggested influenza induced

  18. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel Barnawi

    Full Text Available We previously reported that alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are defective in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells, with a similar defect in response to cigarette smoke. The exact mechanisms for this defect are unknown. Sphingolipids including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P are involved in diverse cellular processes and we hypothesised that a comprehensive analysis of this system in alveolar macrophages in COPD may help to delineate the reasons for defective phagocytic function.We compared mRNA expression of sphingosine kinases (SPHK1/2, S1P receptors (S1PR1-5 and S1P-degrading enzymes (SGPP1, SGPP2, SGPL1 in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages from 10 healthy controls, 7 healthy smokers and 20 COPD patients (10 current- and 10 ex-smokers using Real-Time PCR. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Functional associations were assessed between sphingosine signalling system components and alveolar macrophage phagocytic ability in COPD. To elucidate functional effects of increased S1PR5 on macrophage phagocytic ability, we performed the phagocytosis assay in the presence of varying concentrations of suramin, an antagonist of S1PR3 and S1PR5. The effects of cigarette smoking on the S1P system were investigated using a THP-1 macrophage cell line model.We found significant increases in SPHK1/2 (3.4- and 2.1-fold increases respectively, S1PR2 and 5 (4.3- and 14.6-fold increases respectively, and SGPL1 (4.5-fold increase in COPD vs. controls. S1PR5 and SGPL1 expression was unaffected by smoking status, suggesting a COPD "disease effect" rather than smoke effect per se. Significant associations were noted between S1PR5 and both lung function and phagocytosis. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of SPHK1, SPHK2, S1PR2 and S1PR5 by THP-1 macrophages, confirming the results in patient

  19. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are defective in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells, with a similar defect in response to cigarette smoke. The exact mechanisms for this defect are unknown. Sphingolipids including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are involved in diverse cellular processes and we hypothesised that a comprehensive analysis of this system in alveolar macrophages in COPD may help to delineate the reasons for defective phagocytic function. We compared mRNA expression of sphingosine kinases (SPHK1/2), S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and S1P-degrading enzymes (SGPP1, SGPP2, SGPL1) in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages from 10 healthy controls, 7 healthy smokers and 20 COPD patients (10 current- and 10 ex-smokers) using Real-Time PCR. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Functional associations were assessed between sphingosine signalling system components and alveolar macrophage phagocytic ability in COPD. To elucidate functional effects of increased S1PR5 on macrophage phagocytic ability, we performed the phagocytosis assay in the presence of varying concentrations of suramin, an antagonist of S1PR3 and S1PR5. The effects of cigarette smoking on the S1P system were investigated using a THP-1 macrophage cell line model. We found significant increases in SPHK1/2 (3.4- and 2.1-fold increases respectively), S1PR2 and 5 (4.3- and 14.6-fold increases respectively), and SGPL1 (4.5-fold increase) in COPD vs. controls. S1PR5 and SGPL1 expression was unaffected by smoking status, suggesting a COPD "disease effect" rather than smoke effect per se. Significant associations were noted between S1PR5 and both lung function and phagocytosis. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of SPHK1, SPHK2, S1PR2 and S1PR5 by THP-1 macrophages, confirming the results in patient-derived macrophages

  20. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersio...

  1. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup −}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup −} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup −} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through

  2. Platelet CLEC-2 protects against lung injury via effects of its ligand podoplanin on inflammatory alveolar macrophages in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, Siân; Rayes, Julie; Wichaiyo, Surasak; Haining, Elizabeth J; Lowe, Kate; Grygielska, Beata; Laloo, Ryan; Flodby, Per; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D; Thickett, David R; Watson, Steve P

    2017-12-01

    There is no therapeutic intervention proven to prevent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Novel mechanistic insights into the pathophysiology of ARDS are therefore required. Platelets are implicated in regulating many of the pathogenic processes that occur during ARDS; however, the mechanisms remain elusive. The platelet receptor CLEC-2 has been shown to regulate vascular integrity at sites of acute inflammation. Therefore the purpose of this study was to establish the role of CLEC-2 and its ligand podoplanin in a mouse model of ARDS. Platelet-specific CLEC-2-deficient, as well as alveolar epithelial type I cell (AECI)-specific or hematopoietic-specific podoplanin deficient, mice were established using cre-loxP strategies. Combining these with intratracheal (IT) instillations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we demonstrate that arterial oxygen saturation decline in response to IT-LPS in platelet-specific CLEC-2-deficient mice is significantly augmented. An increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophils and protein was also observed 48 h post-IT-LPS, with significant increases in pro-inflammatory chemokines detected in BAL of platelet-specific CLEC-2-deficient animals. Deletion of podoplanin from hematopoietic cells but not AECIs also reduces lung function and increases pro-inflammatory chemokine expression following IT-LPS. Furthermore, we demonstrate that following IT-LPS, platelets are present in BAL in aggregates with neutrophils, which allows for CLEC-2 interaction with podoplanin expressed on BAL inflammatory alveolar macrophages. Taken together, these data suggest that the platelet CLEC-2-podoplanin signaling axis regulates the severity of lung inflammation in mice and is a possible novel target for therapeutic intervention in patients at risk of developing ARDS. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Toll-like receptor 2 expression is decreased on alveolar macrophages in cigarette smokers and COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabel Peter

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Cigarette smoke exposure including biologically active lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the particulate phase of cigarette smoke induces activation of alveolar macrophages (AM and alveolar epithelial cells leading to production of inflammatory mediators. This represents a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Respiratory pathogens are a major cause of exacerbations leading to recurrent cycles of injury and repair. The interaction between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and the host is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR's. In the present study we characterized the expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR- 2, TLR4 and CD14 on human AM compared to autologous monocytes obtained from patients with COPD, healthy smokers and non-smokers. Methods The study population consisted of 14 COPD patients without evidence for acute exacerbation, 10 healthy smokers and 17 healthy non-smokers stratified according to age. The expression of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 surface molecules on human AM compared to autologous monocytes was assessed ex vivo using FACS analysis. In situ hybridization was performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells by application of the new developed HOPE-fixative. Results The expression of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 on AM from COPD patients, smokers and non-smokers was reduced as compared to autologous monocytes. Comparing AM we detected a reduced expression of TLR2 in COPD patients and smokers. In addition TLR2 mRNA and protein expression was increased after LPS stimulation on non-smokers AM in contrast to smokers and COPD patients. Conclusion Our data suggest a smoke related change in the phenotype of AM's and the cellular response to microbial stimulation which may be associated with impairment of host defenses in the lower respiratory tract.

  4. An in vitro alveolar macrophage assay for the assessment of inflammatory cytokine expression induced by atmospheric particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijan, Zana; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Heo, Jongbae; Kado, Norman Y; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos; Shafer, Martin M

    2015-07-01

    Exposures to air pollution in the form of particulate matter (PM) can result in excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the respiratory system, potentially causing both localized cellular injury and triggering a systemic inflammatory response. PM-induced inflammation in the lung is modulated in large part by alveolar macrophages and their biochemical signaling, including production of inflammatory cytokines, the primary mechanism via which inflammation is initiated and sustained. We developed a robust, relevant, and flexible method employing a rat alveolar macrophage cell line (NR8383) which can be applied to routine samples of PM from air quality monitoring sites to gain insight into the drivers of PM toxicity that lead to oxidative stress and inflammation. Method performance was characterized using extracts of ambient and vehicular engine exhaust PM samples. Our results indicate that the reproducibility and the sensitivity of the method are satisfactory and comparisons between PM samples can be made with good precision. The average relative percent difference for all genes detected during 10 different exposures was 17.1%. Our analysis demonstrated that 71% of genes had an average signal to noise ratio (SNR) ≥ 3. Our time course study suggests that 4 h may be an optimal in vitro exposure time for observing short-term effects of PM and capturing the initial steps of inflammatory signaling. The 4 h exposure resulted in the detection of 57 genes (out of 84 total), of which 86% had altered expression. Similarities and conserved gene signaling regulation among the PM samples were demonstrated through hierarchical clustering and other analyses. Overlying the core congruent patterns were differentially regulated genes that resulted in distinct sample-specific gene expression "fingerprints." Consistent upregulation of Il1f5 and downregulation of Ccr7 was observed across all samples, while TNFα was upregulated in half of the samples and downregulated in

  5. An interspecies comparison of the phagocytosis and dissolution of 241AmO2 particles by rat, dog and monkey alveolar macrophages in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taya, A.; Carmack, D.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the phagocytosis and dissolution of 241 AmO 2 particles by rat, dog and monkey alveolar macrophages (PAM) in vitro. The phagocytosis and dissolution of 241 AmO 2 particles were followed up to 20 and 72 h, respectively. Dog and monkey PAM took up 241 AmO 2 particles at similar rates, whereas rat PAM phagocytosed only 60% of the amount phagocytosed by dog and monkey PAM at 20h. The PAM of the three species dissolved 241 AmO 2 particles at similar rates; 8-10% was dissolved by 72h. The results of the 241 AmO 2 uptake in vitro may reflect in vivo situations, where the differences in uptake seen in vitro would probably diminish at later times after exposure. The dissolution results imply that the dissolution of 241 AmO 2 particles by alveolar macrophages of the three species might be species-independent. (author)

  6. Long-term persistence of human donor alveolar macrophages in lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguíluz-Gracia, Ibon; Schultz, Hans Henrik Lawaetz; Sikkeland, Liv I. B.

    2016-01-01

    . A fraction of the AMFs proliferated locally, demonstrating that at least a subset of human AMFs have the capacity to self-renew. Lungs of humanised mice were found to abundantly contain populations of human AMFs expressing markers compatible with a monocyte origin. Moreover, in patients with lung....... CONCLUSIONS: The finding that human AMFs are maintained in the lung parenchyma for several years indicates that pulmonary macrophage transplantation can be a feasible therapeutic option for patients with diseases caused by dysfunctional AMFs. Moreover, in a lung transplantation setting, long-term persistence...

  7. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections.

  8. Microparticles from apoptotic platelets promote resident macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasina, E M; Cauwenberghs, S; Feijge, M A H; Heemskerk, J W M; Weber, C; Koenen, R R

    2011-09-29

    Platelets shed microparticles not only upon activation, but also upon ageing by an apoptosis-like process (apoptosis-induced platelet microparticles, PM(ap)). While the activation-induced microparticles have widely been studied, not much is known about the (patho)physiological consequences of PM(ap) formation. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that PM(ap) display activated integrins and interact to form microparticle aggregates. PM(ap) were chemotactic for monocytic cells, bound to these cells, an furthermore stimulated cell adhesion and spreading on a fibronectin surface. After prolonged incubation, PM(ap) promoted cell differentiation, but inhibited proliferation. Monocyte membrane receptor analysis revealed increased expression levels of CD11b (integrin α(M)β(2)), CD14 and CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, but not of CCR2. This indicated that PM(ap) polarized the cells into resident M2 monocytes. Cells treated with PM(ap) actively consumed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and released matrix metalloproteinases and hydrogen peroxide. Further confirmation for the differentiation towards resident professional phagocytes came from the finding that PM(ap) stimulated the expression of the (ox)LDL receptors, CD36 and CD68, and the production of proinflammatory and immunomodulating cytokines by monocytes. In conclusion, interaction of PM(ap) with monocytic cells has an immunomodulating potential. The apoptotic microparticles polarize the cells into a resident M2 subset, and induce differentiation to resident professional phagocytes.

  9. Silica Induces Changes in Cytosolic Free Calcium, Cytosolic pH, and Plasma Membrane Potential in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Tárnok

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineral‐dust induced activation of pulmonary phagocytes is thought to be involved in the induction of severe lung diseases. The activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM by silica was investigated by flow cytometry. Short‐term incubation (10 min of BAM with silica gel and quartz dust particles induced increases in the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i, decreases in intracellular pH (pHi, and increases in plasma membrane potential (PMP. The extent of these changes was concentration dependent, related to the type of dust and was due to Ca2+ influx from the extracellular medium. An increase in [Ca2+]i was inhibited, when extracellular Ca2+ was removed. Furthermore the calcium signal was quenched by Mn2+ and diminished by the calcium channel blocker verapamil. The protein kinase C specific inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide II (GF 109203 X did not inhibit the silica‐induced [Ca2+]i rise. In contrast, silica‐induced cytosolic acidification and depolarization were inhibited by GF 109203 X but not by removal of extracellular calcium. Addition of TiO2 particles or heavy metal‐containing dusts had no effect on any of the three parameters. Our data suggest the existence of silica‐activated transmembrane ion exchange mechanisms in BAM, which might be involved in the specific cytotoxicity of silica by Ca2+‐dependent and independent pathways.

  10. Low pH Environmental Stress Inhibits LPS and LTA-Stimulated Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley F. Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric aspiration increases the risks for developing secondary bacterial pneumonia. Cytokine elaboration through pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs is an important mechanism in initiating innate immune host response. Effects of low pH stress, a critical component of aspiration pathogenesis, on the PRR pathways were examined, specifically toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and TLR4, using isolated rat alveolar macrophages (aMØs. We assessed the ability of aMØs after brief exposure to acidified saline to elaborate proinflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA stimulation, known ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively. Low pH stress reduced LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine release (CINC-1, MIP-2, TNF-, MCP-1, and IFN-. LPS and LTA increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations while Ca2+ chelation by BAPTA decreased LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine responses. BAPTA blocked the effects of low pH stress on most of LPS-stimulated cytokines but not of LTA-stimulated responses. In vivo mouse model demonstrates suppressed E. coli and S. pneumoniae clearance following acid aspiration. In conclusion, low pH stress inhibits antibacterial cytokine response of aMØs due to impaired TLR2 (MyD88 pathway and TLR4 signaling (MyD88 and TRIF pathways. The role of Ca2+ in low pH stress-induced signaling is complex but appears to be distinct between LPS- and LTA-mediated responses.

  11. Microarray analysis of the effect of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus M-like protein in infecting porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhe; Zhang, Hui; Yi, Li; Fan, Hongjie; Lu, Chengping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus), which belongs to Lancefield group C streptococci, is an important pathogen of domesticated species, causing septicemia, meningitis and mammitis. M-like protein (SzP) is an important virulence factor of S. zooepidemicus and contributes to bacterial infection and antiphagocytosis. To increase our knowledge of the mechanism of SzP in infection, we profiled the response of porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAM) to infection with S. zooepidemicus ATCC35246 wild strain (WD) and SzP-knockout strain (KO) using the Roche NimbleGen Porcine Genome Expression Array. We found SzP contributed to differential expression of 446 genes, with upregulation of 134 genes and downregulation of 312 genes. Gene Ontology category and KEGG pathway were analyzed for relationships among differentially expressed genes. These genes were represented in a variety of functional categories, including genes involved in immune response, regulation of chemokine production, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR on 12 representative genes. The data will contribute to understanding of SzP mediated mechanisms of S. zooepidemicus pathogenesis.

  12. Microarray analysis of the effect of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus M-like protein in infecting porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Ma

    Full Text Available Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus, which belongs to Lancefield group C streptococci, is an important pathogen of domesticated species, causing septicemia, meningitis and mammitis. M-like protein (SzP is an important virulence factor of S. zooepidemicus and contributes to bacterial infection and antiphagocytosis. To increase our knowledge of the mechanism of SzP in infection, we profiled the response of porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAM to infection with S. zooepidemicus ATCC35246 wild strain (WD and SzP-knockout strain (KO using the Roche NimbleGen Porcine Genome Expression Array. We found SzP contributed to differential expression of 446 genes, with upregulation of 134 genes and downregulation of 312 genes. Gene Ontology category and KEGG pathway were analyzed for relationships among differentially expressed genes. These genes were represented in a variety of functional categories, including genes involved in immune response, regulation of chemokine production, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR on 12 representative genes. The data will contribute to understanding of SzP mediated mechanisms of S. zooepidemicus pathogenesis.

  13. Differential response to dexamethasone on the TXB2 release in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages induced by zymosan and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Salgueiro

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticosteroids reduce the production of inflammatory mediators but this effect may depend on the stimulus. We have compared the time course of the effect of dexamethasone on the thromboxane B2 (TXB2 release induced by cytokine stimulation and zymosan in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and opsonized zymosan (OZ, all stimulate TXB2 release. High concentrations of dexamethasone (1–10 μM inhibit the TXB2 production induced by both cytokines and OZ, but the time course of this response is different. Four hours of incubation with dexamethasone reduce the basal TXB2 release and that induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but do not modify the TXB2 release induced by OZ. However, this stimulus was reduced after 24 h incubation. Our results suggest that the antiinflammatory activity of glucocorticosteroids shows some dependence on stimulus and, therefore, may have more than one mechanism involved.

  14. Immunomodulation of the response to excretory/secretory antigens of Fasciola hepatica by Anapsos in Balb/C mice and rat alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Abán, Julio; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Martínez-Fernández, Antonio R; Muro, Antonio

    2007-04-01

    It is known that excretory/secretory antigens of Fasciola hepatica (ESFh) trigger a Th2-like immune response. Anapsos (A) is an aqueous hydrosoluble extract obtained from the rhizomes of the fern Polypodium leucotomos that has shown immunomodulator effects in some parasitic infections and immunological disorders. In this work we assess the effect of Anapsos and ESFh and Quillaja saponaria extract (Qs) on BALB/c mice and rat alveolar macrophages. Anapsos modulates the response of mice immunized with ESFh, decreasing IgG antibodies in A+ESFh- and A+Qs+ESFh-treated mice and triggering high levels of gammaIFN in spleen cell culture in comparison with ESFh- and Qs + ESFh--treated groups. Moreover, Anapsos showed statistically significant inhibitory effects on the nitrite production by rat alveolar macrophages prestimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as ESFh antigen in comparison with macrophages stimulated only with LPS. The application of ESFh and Anapsos combined avoids this inhibitory effect. Thus, Anapsos modulates the immune response against ESFh in naive mice and on the nitrite production in prestimulated rat aveolar macrophages.

  15. SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica is required for the suppression of porcine alveolar macrophage cytokine expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova Barbora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes localized at Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1 are involved in Salmonella enterica invasion of host non-professional phagocytes. Interestingly, in macrophages, SPI-1-encoded proteins, in addition to invasion, induce cell death via activation of caspase-1 which also cleaves proIL-1β and proIL-18, precursors of 2 proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we were therefore interested in whether SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS may influence proinflammatory response of macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages with wild-type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and their isogenic SPI-1 deletion mutants. ΔSPI1 mutants of both serovars invaded approx. 5 times less efficiently than the wild-type strains and despite this, macrophages responded to the infection with ΔSPI1 mutants by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, TNFα, IL-23α and GM-CSF. Identical macrophage responses to that induced by the ΔSPI1 mutants were also observed to the infection with sipB but not the sipA mutant. The hilA mutant exhibited an intermediate phenotype between the ΔSPI1 mutant and the wild-type S. Enteritidis. Our results showed that the SPI-1-encoded T3SS is required not only for cell invasion but in macrophages also for the suppression of early proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  16. MerTK Cleavage on Resident Cardiac Macrophages Compromises Repair After Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBerge, Matthew; Yeap, Xin Yi; Dehn, Shirley; Zhang, Shuang; Grigoryeva, Lubov; Misener, Sol; Procissi, Daniel; Zhou, Xin; Lee, Daniel C; Muller, William A; Luo, Xunrong; Rothlin, Carla; Tabas, Ira; Thorp, Edward B

    2017-09-29

    Clinical benefits of reperfusion after myocardial infarction are offset by maladaptive innate immune cell function, and therapeutic interventions are lacking. We sought to test the significance of phagocytic clearance by resident and recruited phagocytes after myocardial ischemia reperfusion. In humans, we discovered that clinical reperfusion after myocardial infarction led to significant elevation of the soluble form of MerTK (myeloid-epithelial-reproductive tyrosine kinase; ie, soluble MER), a critical biomarker of compromised phagocytosis by innate macrophages. In reperfused mice, macrophage Mertk deficiency led to decreased cardiac wound debridement, increased infarct size, and depressed cardiac function, newly implicating MerTK in cardiac repair after myocardial ischemia reperfusion. More notably, Mertk(CR ) mice, which are resistant to cleavage, showed significantly reduced infarct sizes and improved systolic function. In contrast to other cardiac phagocyte subsets, resident cardiac MHCII LO CCR2 - (major histocompatibility complex II/C-C motif chemokine receptor type 2) macrophages expressed higher levels of MerTK and, when exposed to apoptotic cells, secreted proreparative cytokines, including transforming growth factor-β. Mertk deficiency compromised the accumulation of MHCII LO phagocytes, and this was rescued in Mertk(CR ) mice. Interestingly, blockade of CCR2-dependent monocyte infiltration into the heart reduced soluble MER levels post-ischemia reperfusion. Our data implicate monocyte-induced MerTK cleavage on proreparative MHCII LO cardiac macrophages as a novel contributor and therapeutic target of reperfusion injury. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  18. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  19. Comparison of plasma, epithelial lining fluid, and alveolar macrophage concentrations of solithromycin (CEM-101) in healthy adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodvold, Keith A; Gotfried, Mark H; Still, J Gordon; Clark, Kay; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2012-10-01

    The steady-state concentrations of solithromycin in plasma were compared with concomitant concentrations in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from intrapulmonary samples during bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in 30 healthy adult subjects. Subjects received oral solithromycin at 400 mg once daily for five consecutive days. Bronchoscopy and BAL were carried out once in each subject at either 3, 6, 9, 12, or 24 h after the last administered dose of solithromycin. Drug concentrations in plasma, ELF, and AM were assayed by a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Solithromycin was concentrated extensively in ELF (range of mean [± standard deviation] concentrations, 1.02 ± 0.83 to 7.58 ± 6.69 mg/liter) and AM (25.9 ± 20.3 to 101.7 ± 52.6 mg/liter) in comparison with simultaneous plasma concentrations (0.086 ± 0.070 to 0.730 ± 0.692 mg/liter). The values for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24) values) based on mean and median ELF concentrations were 80.3 and 63.2 mg · h/liter, respectively. The ratio of ELF to plasma concentrations based on the mean and median AUC(0-24) values were 10.3 and 10.0, respectively. The AUC(0-24) values based on mean and median concentrations in AM were 1,498 and 1,282 mg · h/L, respectively. The ratio of AM to plasma concentrations based on the mean and median AUC(0-24) values were 193 and 202, respectively. Once-daily oral dosing of solithromycin at 400 mg produced steady-state concentrations that were significantly (P solithromycin administration.

  20. Human alveolar macrophage responses to air pollution particulates are associated with insoluble components of coarse material, including particulate endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, J M; Becker, S

    2001-02-15

    Inhalation of particulate matter in the ambient air has been shown to cause pulmonary morbidity and exacerbate asthma. Alveolar macrophage (AM) are essential for effective removal of inhaled particles and microbes in the lower airways. While some particles minimally effect AM function others inhibit antimicrobial activity or cause cytokine and growth factor production leading to inflammation and tissue remodeling. This study has investigated the effects of water soluble (s) and insoluble (is) components of Chapel Hill, North Carolina ambient particulate matter in the size ranges 0.1-2.5 microm (PM2.5) and 2.5-10 microm (PM10) diameter, on human AM IL-6, TNFalpha, and MCP-1 cytokine production and host defense mechanisms including phagocytosis and oxidant production. Cytokines were found to be induced by isPM10 to a much higher extent (>50-fold) than sPM10, which in turn stimulated production better than isPM2.5, while sPM2.5 was inactive. Previous studies have indicated that endotoxin (ETOX) is a component of sPM10 responsible for cytokine production. Here, it is shown that inhibition of isPM10-induced cytokine production was partially achieved with polymyxin B and LPS-binding protein (LBP), but not with a metal chelator, implicating ETOX as a cytokine-inducing moiety also in isPM10. In addition to inducing cytokines, exposure to isPM10, but not the other PM fractions, also inhibited phagocytosis and oxidant generation in response to yeast. This inhibition was ETOX independent. The decrease in host defenses may be the result of apoptosis in the AM population, which was also found to be specifically caused by isPM10. These results show that the functional capacity of AM is selectively modulated by insoluble components of coarse PM, including the biocontaminant ETOX.

  1. In Vitro Study of Mutagenesis Induced by Crocidolite-Exposed Alveolar Macrophages NR8383 in Cocultured Big Blue Rat2 Embryonic Fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, Y.; Gate, L.; Darne, C.; Bottin, M.C.; Langlais, C.

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos-induced mutagenicity in the lung may involve reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) released by alveolar macrophages. With the aim of proposing an alternative in vitro mutagenesis test, a co culture system of rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) and transgenic Big Blue Rat 2 embryonic fibroblasts was developed and tested with a crocidolite sample. Crocidolite exposure induced no detectable increase in ROS production from NR8383, contrasting with the oxidative burst that occurred following a brief exposure (1 hour) to zymosan, a known macrophage activator. In separated co cultures, crocidolite and zymosan induced different changes in the gene expressions involved in cellular inflammation in NR8383 and Big Blue. In particular, both particles induced up-regulation of iNOS expression in Big Blue, suggesting the formation of potentially genotoxic nitrogen species. However, crocidolite exposure in separated or mixed co cultures induced no mutagenic effects whereas an increase in Big Blue mutants was detected after exposure to zymosan in mixed co cultures. NR8383 activation by crocidolite is probably insufficient to induce in vitro mutagenic events. The mutagenesis assay based on the co culture of NR8383 and Big Blue cannot be used as an alternative in vitro method to assess the mutagenic properties of asbestos fibres.

  2. Myelopotentiating effect of curcumin in tumor-bearing host: Role of bone marrow resident macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva; Bharti, Alok Chandra; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study if curcumin, which is recognized for its potential as an antineoplastic and immunopotentiating agent, can also influence the process of myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host. Administration of curcumin to tumor-bearing host augmented count of bone marrow cell (BMC) accompanied by an up-regulated BMC survival and a declined induction of apoptosis. Curcumin administration modulated expression of cell survival regulatory molecules: Bcl2, p53, caspase-activated DNase (CAD) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) along with enhanced expression of genes of receptors for M-CSF and GM-CSF in BMC. The BMC harvested from curcumin-administered hosts showed an up-regulated colony forming ability with predominant differentiation into bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), responsive for activation to tumoricidal state. The number of F4/80 positive bone marrow resident macrophages (BMM), showing an augmented expression of M-CSF, was also augmented in the bone marrow of curcumin-administered host. In vitro reconstitution experiments indicated that only BMM of curcumin-administered hosts, but not in vitro curcumin-exposed BMM, augmented BMC survival. It suggests that curcumin-dependent modulation of BMM is of indirect nature. Such prosurvival action of curcumin is associated with altered T H1 /T H2 cytokine balance in serum. Augmented level of serum-borne IFN-γ was found to mediate modulation of BMM to produce enhanced amount of monokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α), which are suggested to augment the BMC survival. Taken together the present investigation indicates that curcumin can potentiate myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host, which may have implications in its therapeutic utility. Highlights: ► Curcumin augments myelopoiesis in tumor-bearing host. ► Bone marrow resident macrophages mediate curcumin-dependent augmented myelopoiesis. ► Serum borne cytokine are implicated in modulation of bone marrow resident

  3. Myelopotentiating effect of curcumin in tumor-bearing host: Role of bone marrow resident macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva [School of Biotechnology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, U.P. (India); Bharti, Alok Chandra [Division of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cytology and Preventive Oncology, Noida, UP (India); Singh, Sukh Mahendra, E-mail: sukhmahendrasingh@yahoo.com [School of Biotechnology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, U.P. (India)

    2012-08-15

    The present investigation was undertaken to study if curcumin, which is recognized for its potential as an antineoplastic and immunopotentiating agent, can also influence the process of myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host. Administration of curcumin to tumor-bearing host augmented count of bone marrow cell (BMC) accompanied by an up-regulated BMC survival and a declined induction of apoptosis. Curcumin administration modulated expression of cell survival regulatory molecules: Bcl2, p53, caspase-activated DNase (CAD) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) along with enhanced expression of genes of receptors for M-CSF and GM-CSF in BMC. The BMC harvested from curcumin-administered hosts showed an up-regulated colony forming ability with predominant differentiation into bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), responsive for activation to tumoricidal state. The number of F4/80 positive bone marrow resident macrophages (BMM), showing an augmented expression of M-CSF, was also augmented in the bone marrow of curcumin-administered host. In vitro reconstitution experiments indicated that only BMM of curcumin-administered hosts, but not in vitro curcumin-exposed BMM, augmented BMC survival. It suggests that curcumin-dependent modulation of BMM is of indirect nature. Such prosurvival action of curcumin is associated with altered T{sub H1}/T{sub H2} cytokine balance in serum. Augmented level of serum-borne IFN-γ was found to mediate modulation of BMM to produce enhanced amount of monokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α), which are suggested to augment the BMC survival. Taken together the present investigation indicates that curcumin can potentiate myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host, which may have implications in its therapeutic utility. Highlights: ► Curcumin augments myelopoiesis in tumor-bearing host. ► Bone marrow resident macrophages mediate curcumin-dependent augmented myelopoiesis. ► Serum borne cytokine are implicated in modulation of bone marrow resident

  4. Response of a phagocyte cell system to products of macrophage breakdown as a probable mechanism of alveolar phagocytosis adaptation to deposition of particles of different cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalova, L I; Katsnelson, B A; Osipenko, A B; Yushkov, B N; Babushkina, L G

    1980-04-01

    The adaptation of the alveolar phagocytosis response to the quantitative and qualitative features of dust deposited during inhalation consists not only in enhanced recruitment of alveolar macrophages (AM), but also in adding a more or less pronounced neutrophil leukocyte (NL) recruitment as an auxiliary participant of particle clearance. The NL contribution to clearance is especially typical for response to cytotoxic particles (quartz, in particular). An important feature of the adaptation considered is the limitation of the number of AM and NL recruited when an efficient clearance can be achieved by a lesser number of cells due to increased AM reistance to the damaging actin of phagocytized particles. The main mechanism providing the adequacy of the alveolar phagocytosis response is its self-regulation thrugh the products of macrophage breakdown (PMB). In a series of experiments with intraperitoneal and intratracheal injections of syngenetic PMB into rats and mice, it was shown that these products stimulate respiration and migration of phagocytic cells, their dose-dependent attraction to the site of PMB formation with the predominant NL contribution, increasing with the increase of amount of PMB, the AM and NL precursor cells recruitment from reserve pools, and the replenishment of these reserves in the process of hemopoiesis. At least some of the above effects are connected with the action of the lipid components of PMB. The action of specialized regulative systems of the organism can modify the response to PMB, judging by the results obtained by hydrocortisone injection. Autocontrol of alveolar phagocytosis requires great care in attempts at artificial stimulation of this process, as an excessive cell recruitment may promote the retention of particles in lungs.

  5. Aspirin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in porcine alveolar macrophages by modulating protein kinase C and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yuzhong; Chen, Fanglin; Zhang, Anmei; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Jianguo; Xie, Qichao; Chen, Zhengtang

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has been demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting COX-2 and PGE2 in Alveolar macrophages (AMs). However, the mechanisms have not been fully understood. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with aspirin inhibited LPS-induced COX-2 and PGE2 upregulation, IκBα degradation, NFκB activation and the increase of PKC activity, but elevated LPS-induced the decrease of PTP activity. The PKC inhibitor calphostin C dramatically reduced the COX-2 mRNA and PGE2 levels, but the PTP inh...

  6. Studies on the biological behaviour of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide aerosols: Inhalation experiments with rats and in vitro studies with alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.L.; Drosselmeyer, E.; Hotz, G.; Seidel, A.; Thiele, H.; Pickering, S.; Ray, I.C.

    1987-02-01

    The retention of spherical and of irregularly shaped (U, Pu) mixed oxides in rat lung was analyzed after inhalation and intratracheal instillation. Their biological behaviour was relatively independent of particle shape and application route with only a few percent of radioactivity being transferred to other organs. In vivo and in vitro uptake and intracellular distribution in rat and bovine alveolar macrophages were analyzed as dependent on various parameters. In addition, detailed electron microscopic studies were performed demonstrating particles within membrane limited vacuoles as well as lying free in the cytoplasm. Under in vitro conditions the uptake process was finished after a few hours. After differential centrifugation of lung or macrophage homogenates the particles sedimented in the first (1000 g) fraction. (orig.) [de

  7. Preincubation of macrophages alveolar of rate with vitamin C or E attenuate the damage to the plasmatic membrane caused by exhibition to ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.

    2001-01-01

    The damaging effects of a 60 minute ozone exposure (0.594 ppm) on the cell membrane of rat alveolar macrophages was assessed by measuring specific release of 51 Cr label from the cells. Preincubation of the macrophages in the presence of vitamin C (sodium ascorbate) or vitamine E (DL α tocoferol) prior the ozone exposure significantly diminished 51 Cr release. The protective effect of vitamin E was dose dependent. A proposal accounting for the protective effect of vitamins E and C on the cell membrane is presented, and our findings are discussed in relation to recent reports showing that antioxidant supplementation contributes to preserve pulmonary function in ozone-exposed normal and asthmatic volunteers. (Author) [es

  8. Sex differences in the response of the alveolar macrophage proteome to treatment with exogenous surfactant protein-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelps David S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice are less capable of clearing bacteria and surviving from bacterial pneumonia than females. However, if an oxidative stress (acute ozone exposure occurs before infection, the advantage shifts to males who then survive at higher rates than females. We have previously demonstrated that survival in surfactant protein-A (SP-A knockout (KO mice compared to WT was significantly reduced. Because the alveolar macrophage (AM is pivotal in host defense we hypothesized that SP-A and circulating sex hormones are responsible for these sex differences. We used 2D-DIGE to examine the relationship of sex and SP-A on the AM proteome. The role of SP-A was investigated by treating SP-A KO mice with exogenous SP-A for 6 and 18 hr and studying its effects on the AM proteome. Results We found: 1 less variance between KO males and females than between the WT counterparts by principal component analysis, indicating that SP-A plays a role in sex differences; 2 fewer changes in females when the total numbers of significantly changing protein spots or identified whole proteins in WT or 18 hr SP-A-treated males or females were compared to their respective KO groups; 3 more proteins with functions related to chaperones or protease balance and Nrf2-regulated proteins changed in response to SP-A in females than in males; and 4 the overall pattern of SP-A induced changes in actin-related proteins were similar in both sexes, although males had more significant changes. Conclusions Although there seems to be an interaction between sex and the effect of SP-A, it is unclear what the responsible mechanisms are. However, we found that several of the proteins that were expressed at significantly higher levels in females than in males in WT and/or in KO mice are known to interact with the estrogen receptor and may thus play a role in the SP-A/sex interaction. These include major vault protein, chaperonin subunit 2 (beta (CCT2, and Rho

  9. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Parys Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  10. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-derived lipid-associated membrane proteins induce apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophage via increasing nitric oxide production, oxidative stress, and caspase-3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fangfang; Ni, Bo; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Xiong, Qiyan; Xiao, Shaobo; Shao, Guoqing

    2013-09-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in swine. Lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) of mycoplasma are the main pathogenicity factors in mycoplasma diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of M. hyopneumoniae LAMP on porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) 3D4/21 cell line. Apoptotic features, such as chromatin condensation and apoptotic bodies, were observed in LAMP-treated PAM 3D4/21 cells. Moreover, LAMP significantly increased the number of TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in PAM 3D4/21 cells compared with the untreated control. In addition, flow cytometric analysis using dual staining with annexin-V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) showed that LAMP of M. hyopneumoniae induced a time-dependent apoptosis in PAM 3D4/21 cells. Moreover, increased levels of superoxide anion production and activated caspase-3 in PAM 3D4/21 cells were observed after exposure to LAMP. Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) was also confirmed in the cell supernatants. Besides, apoptotic rates increase and caspase-3 activation were suppressed by NOS inhibitor or antioxidant. It is suggested that LAMP of M. hyopneumoniae induced apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophage via NO production, superoxide anion production, and caspase-3 activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Virulent and avirulent strains of equine arteritis virus induce different quantities of TNF-α and other proinflammatory cytokines in alveolar and blood-derived equine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Brian D.; Balasuriya, Udeni B.R.; Watson, Johanna L.; Bosio, Catharine M.; MacKay, Robert J.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2003-01-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) infects endothelial cells (ECs) and macrophages in horses, and many of the clinical manifestations of equine viral arteritis (EVA) reflect vascular injury. To further evaluate the potential role of EAV-induced, macrophage-derived cytokines in the pathogenesis of EVA, we infected cultured equine alveolar macrophages (AMphi), blood monocyte-derived macrophages (BMphi), and pulmonary artery ECs with either a virulent (KY84) or an avirulent (CA95) strain of EAV. EAV infection of equine AMphi, BMphi, and ECs resulted in their activation with increased transcription of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Furthermore, the virulent KY84 strain of EAV induced significantly higher levels of mRNA encoding proinflammatory cytokines in infected AMphi and BMphi than did the avirulent CA95 strain. Treatment of equine ECs with the culture supernatants of EAV-infected AMphi and BMphi also resulted in EC activation with cell surface expression of E-selectin, whereas infection of ECs with purified EAV alone caused only minimal expression of E-selectin. The presence of TNF-α in the culture supernatants of EAV-infected equine AMphi, BMphi, and ECs was confirmed by bioassay, and the virulent KY84 strain of EAV induced significantly more TNF-α in all cell types than did the avirulent CA95 strain. Thus, the data indicate that EAV-induced, macrophage-derived cytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of EVA in horses, and that the magnitude of the cytokine response of equine AMphi, BMphi, and ECs to EAV infection reflects the virulence of the infecting virus strain

  12. Oval cell response is attenuated by depletion of liver resident macrophages in the 2-AAF/partial hepatectomy rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Macrophages are known to play an important role in hepatocyte mediated liver regeneration by secreting inflammatory mediators. However, there is little information available on the role of resident macrophages in oval cell mediated liver regeneration. In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of macrophages in oval cell expansion induced by 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We depleted macrophages in the liver of 2-AAF/PH treated rats by injecting liposome encapsulated clodronate 48 hours before PH. Regeneration of remnant liver mass, as well as proliferation and differentiation of oval cells were measured. We found that macrophage-depleted rats suffered higher mortality and liver transaminase levels. We also showed that depletion of macrophages yielded a significant decrease of EPCAM and PCK positive oval cells in immunohistochemical stained liver sections 9 days after PH. Meanwhile, oval cell differentiation was also attenuated as a result of macrophage depletion, as large foci of small basophilic hepatocytes were observed by day 9 following hepatectomy in control rats whereas they were almost absent in macrophage depleted rats. Accordingly, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed lower expression of albumin mRNA in macrophage depleted livers. Then we assessed whether macrophage depletion may affect hepatic production of stimulating cytokines for liver regeneration. We showed that macrophage-depletion significantly inhibited hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, along with a lack of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation during the early period following hepatectomy. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that macrophages play an important role in oval cell mediated liver regeneration in the 2-AAF/PH model.

  13. Characterization of part of the toxic effects due to alpha irradiation and to the physico-chemical properties of some actinides. An in vitro study on the alveolar macrophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizon, Celine

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the specific effects due to radiotoxicity of α irradiation and the chemical toxicity of actinides. This was performed on alveolar macrophages extracted from rats and primates by pulmonary lavage. This was done by an in vitro study using either α irradiation from electrodeposited sources, or soluble actinides and lanthanides added to the culture medium. Necrosis and apoptosis induction were quantified after vital staining. For each treatment, cells were studied 1 or 7 days after plating. After either α irradiation or exposure to elements, the main route of death induced was apoptosis. After α irradiation, alveolar macrophages are very radioresistant cells. The observed D0 was between 30 and 100 Gy, depending on the species studied and the time in culture at exposure. In fact, alveolar macrophages irradiated after 1 week in culture have show less radioresistance than those treated after 1 day. The chemical toxicity of Uranium and Neptunium was independent both of time in culture at exposure and the animal species. The threshold we observed were respectively at 5 10 -4 and 3 10 -6 M. Moreover, within the concentrations studied, Thorium have not shown any toxicity towards alveolar macrophages. 1 day after plating macrophages, lanthanides exerts a higher chemical toxicity than actinides (threshold : 5 10 -6 M, Gadolinium, 5 10 -5 M, Cerium). These toxicities decreases more than 10 times after exposure 7 days after plating or for primates cells. This phenomenon seems to be due to cell harvesting and/or to cell adaptation to culture. Preliminary results show an impairment of cytokines production, which could be specific of the toxic studied. This was observed at concentrations which appeared non toxic as regards to apoptosis induction. The use of primates alveolar macrophages allow us to extrapolate some of the obtained results to Human. (author) [fr

  14. Nicotine attenuates activation of tissue resident macrophages in the mouse stomach through the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nemethova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an endogenous mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system attenuates macrophage activation via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. This concept has however not been demonstrated at a cellular level in intact tissue. To this end, we have studied the effect of nicotine on the activation of resident macrophages in a mouse stomach preparation by means of calcium imaging. METHODS: Calcium transients ([Ca(2+]i in resident macrophages were recorded in a mouse stomach preparation containing myenteric plexus and muscle layers by Fluo-4. Activation of macrophages was achieved by focal puff administration of ATP. The effects of nicotine on activation of macrophages were evaluated and the nAChR involved was pharmacologically characterized. The proximity of cholinergic nerves to macrophages was quantified by confocal microscopy. Expression of β2 and α7 nAChR was evaluated by β2 immunohistochemistry and fluorophore-tagged α-bungarotoxin. RESULTS: In 83% of macrophages cholinergic varicose nerve fibers were detected at distances <900 nm. The ATP induced [Ca(2+]i increase was significantly inhibited in 65% or 55% of macrophages by 100 µM or 10 µM nicotine, respectively. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the β2 nAChR preferring antagonist dihydro-β-eryhtroidine but not by hexamethonium (non-selective nAChR-antagonist, mecamylamine (α3β4 nAChR-preferring antagonist, α-bungarotoxin or methyllycaconitine (both α7 nAChR-preferring antagonist. Macrophages in the stomach express β2 but not α7 nAChR at protein level, while those in the intestine express both receptor subunits. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in situ demonstration of an inhibition of macrophage activation by nicotine suggesting functional signaling between cholinergic neurons and macrophages in the stomach. The data suggest that the β2 subunit of the nAChR is critically involved in the nicotine-induced inhibition

  15. Cigarette smoke extract-treated mast cells promote alveolar macrophage infiltration and polarization in experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tian; Ning, Qian; Li, Feiyan; Chen, Tianjun; Yao, Yan; Sun, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may modulate the immune response of exposed individuals. Mast cell function can be altered by cigarette smoking, but the role of smoking in COPD remains poorly understood. The current study aimed to explore the role of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated mast cells in COPD pathogenesis. Cytokine and chemokine expression as well as degranulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were detected in cells exposed to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and various doses of CSE. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs into C57BL/6J mice was performed, and macrophage infiltration and polarization were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Furthermore, a coculture system of BMMCs and macrophages was established to examine macrophage phenotype transition. The role of protease serine member S31 (Prss31) was also investigated in the co-culture system and in COPD mice. CSE exposure suppressed cytokine expression and degranulation in BMMCs, but promoted the expressions of chemokines and Prss31. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs induced macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization in the mouse lung. Moreover, CSE-treated BMMCs triggered macrophage M2 polarization via Prss31 secretion. Recombinant Prss31 was shown to activate interleukin (IL)-13/IL-13Rα/Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 6 signaling in macrophages. Additionally, a positive correlation was found between Prss31 expression and the number of M2 macrophages in COPD mice. In conclusion, CSE-treated mast cells may induce macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization via Prss31 expression, and potentially contribute to COPD progression.

  16. Modulation of alveolar macrophage innate response in proinflammatory-, pro-oxidant-, and infection- models by mint extract and chemical constituents: Role of MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Niket; Chandra, Harish

    2018-01-01

    There is a continuing need for discovering novel primary or adjunct therapeutic agents to treat inflammatory conditions and infections. Natural products have inspired the discovery of several modern therapeutics; however, there is a paucity of mechanistic information on their mode of action. This study investigated the therapeutic potential and mode of action of corn mint's (Mentha arvensis) leaf extract (ME) in alveolar macrophages (AMs) challenged with model pro-inflammatory (LPS), pro- oxidant (LPS or H 2 O 2 ), and infection (Mycobacterium) agents and contribution of its dominant constituents rosmarinic acid, l-menthol, and l-menthone. LPS-induced inflammatory response in the murine AM cell line MH-S was significantly reduced in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1α) and nitric oxide (NO) when pre- or post-treated with ME. The ME pretreatment of macrophages led to a significant increase (P≤0.05) in phagocytic activity toward Mycobacterium smegmatis and a greater pathogen clearance in 24h in both ME pre-treated (P≤0.05) and post-treated cells. Significant attenuation (P≤0.01) of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in LPS- or H 2 O 2- treated macrophages by pretreatment with whole mint extract (ME) was accounted for in part by the mint constituents rosmarinic acid and l-menthone. Attenuation of pro-inflammatory response by ME pretreatment coincided with the significant reduction in total and phosphorylated JNK1/2, decrease in total p38, and increase in phospho-ERK1/2 thereby implying a role of differential modulation of MAPKs. Taken together, the results demonstrate that corn mint leaf components cause potent anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-infection effects in AMs via suppression of the production of cytokines/soluble mediators and ROS and increased pathogen clearance, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the mode of action of corn mint targeting the alveolar macrophages and on the potential role of MAPKs

  17. Resident corneal c-fms(+) macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45(+) cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Resident corneal c-fms+ macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45+ cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. PMID:27185163

  19. Genistein suppresses Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in macrophages and attenuates alveolar bone loss in ligature-induced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Bae, Seung Han; Ha, Min Hee; Choe, So-Hui; Hyeon, Jin-Yi; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2016-02-01

    Genistein is a major isoflavone subclass of flavonoids found in soybean and a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The present study aimed to assess the effect of genistein on the production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen associated with different forms of periodontal disease, and to evaluate its possible influence on alveolar bone loss in ligature-induced periodontitis using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis as well. LPS was isolated from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 by using the standard hot phenol-water method. Culture supernatants were analyzed for nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression was evaluated by immunoblot analysis. Real-time PCR was carried out to measure iNOS and IL-6 mRNA expression. In addition, effect of genistein on alveolar bone loss was evaluated in a rat model of experimental periodontitis using micro-CT analysis. Genistein significantly attenuated P. intermedia LPS-induced production of iNOS-derived NO and IL-6 with attendant decrease in their mRNA expression in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, when genistein was administered to rats, decreases in alveolar bone height and bone volume fraction induced by ligature placement were significantly inhibited. Genistein administration also prevented ligature-induced alterations in the microstructural parameters of trabecular bone, including trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, bone mineral density and structure model index. While additional studies are required, we suggest that genistein could be utilized for the therapy of human periodontitis in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aspirin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in porcine alveolar macrophages by modulating protein kinase C and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuzhong; Chen, Fanglin; Zhang, Anmei; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Jianguo; Xie, Qichao; Chen, Zhengtang

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has been demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting COX-2 and PGE(2) in Alveolar macrophages (AMs). However, the mechanisms have not been fully understood. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with aspirin inhibited LPS-induced COX-2 and PGE(2) upregulation, IκBα degradation, NFκB activation and the increase of PKC activity, but elevated LPS-induced the decrease of PTP activity. The PKC inhibitor calphostin C dramatically reduced the COX-2 mRNA and PGE(2) levels, but the PTP inhibitor peroxovanadium (POV) significantly increased the COX-2 mRNA and PGE(2) levels. Furthermore, the PTP inhibitor mitigated the inhibitory effect of aspirin on COX-2 and PGE(2) upregulation and NF-κB activation, whereas the PKC inhibitor enhanced the inhibitory effects of aspirin on the production of COX-2 and PGE(2). Our data indicate a novel mechanism by which aspirin acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent in alveolus macrophages and ALI.

  1. L-Arginine is not the limiting factor for nitric oxide synthesis by human alveolar macrophages in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijsers, RBR; ten Hacken, NHT; Van Ark, [No Value; Folkerts, G; Nijkamp, FP; Postma, DS

    2001-01-01

    Unlike murine mononuclear phagocytes, human macrophages do not release high amounts of nitric oxide (NO) in vitro despite the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). To determine whether this limited NO synthesis in vitro is due to limited availability of the NOS substrate L-arginine, and putative

  2. Avaliação da função de macrófagos alveolares em cavalos clinicamente sadios Evaluation of alveolar macrophage function in healthy horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mori

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Devido à importância dos macrófagos alveolares (MA nos mecanismos de defesa pulmonar, foram realizados estudos para avaliar a atividade desses fagócitos em cavalos hígidos. Foram realizados lavados broncoalveolares (LBA em cinco cavalos clinicamente sadios. A citologia foi realizada pela citocentrifugação das amostras e posterior confecção de lâminas coradas pelo método de Rosenfeld. Todas as amostras do LBA foram centrifugadas e a concentração celular foi ajustada para 2×10(6 células/ml, para a mensuração da atividade macrofágica (testes de espraiamento, fagocitose e liberação de peróxido de hidrogênio. A contagem diferencial das células presentes no LBA demonstrou a predominância de macrófagos (59,0± 6,9%. Os resultados obtidos nos testes de mensuração da atividade macrofágica foram: índice de espraiamento 25,1± 19,7%, índice de fagocitose 89,4± 6,2% e liberação de peróxido de hidrogênio 1,6± 0,3nmoles/2×10(5 células (sem PMA - phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate e 1,8± 0,4nmoles/2×10(5 células (com PMA. Os resultados demonstraram um padrão de atividade para MA de cavalos hígidos, os quais apresentaram índices de ativação mesmo sem elicitação prévia, indicando que as técnicas utilizadas foram adequadas para tal propósito.Due to the importance of alveolar macrophages (AM in pulmonary defense mechanisms, studies were performed in order to evaluate the activity of these cells. Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL were obtained from five healthy horses, and cytology was performed on glass slides after cytocentrifugation of the samples. Slides were stained by Rosenfeld. All BAL samples were centrifuged and cell concentration was adjusted to 2×10(6 cells/ml, for the measurement of AM activity (spreading, phagocytosis and hydrogen peroxide release tests. Differential counting of the BAL cells demonstrated that macrophages were the predominant type of cell (59.0± 6.9%. Measurement of AM activity presented the

  3. The concentrations of clinafloxacin in alveolar macrophages, epithelial lining fluid, bronchial mucosa and serum after administration of single 200 mg oral doses to patients undergoing fibre-optic bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeybourne, D; Andrews, J M; Cunningham, B; Jevons, G; Wise, R

    1999-01-01

    The concentrations of clinafloxacin were measured in serum, bronchial mucosa, alveolar macrophages and epithelial lining fluid after single 200 mg oral doses of clinafloxacin had been administered to 15 subjects who were undergoing bronchoscopy. Concentrations were measured using a microbiological assay method. Mean concentrations in serum, bronchial mucosa, alveolar macrophages and epithelial lining fluid at a mean of 1.27 h post-dose were 1.54, 2.65, 15.60 and 2.71 mg/L respectively. These site concentrations exceeded the MIC90 for common respiratory pathogens and indicate that clinafloxacin is likely to be effective in the treatment of a wide range of respiratory tract infections.

  4. Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Inflammatory Response and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Downregulation in Brucella abortus-Infected Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C.; Hielpos, M. Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  5. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of telithromycin, a ketolide antimicrobial agent, to lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of telithromycin (TEL), as a model antimicrobial agent, for the treatment of respiratory infections was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer. The time courses of the concentration of TEL in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs) following administration of an aerosol formulation to rat lungs were markedly higher than that following the administration of an oral formulation (50 mg/kg). The time course of the concentrations of TEL in plasma following administration of the aerosol formulation was markedly lower than that in ELF and AMs. These results indicate that the aerosol formulation is more effective in delivering TEL to ELF and AMs, compared to the oral formulation, despite a low dose and it avoids distribution of TEL to the blood. In addition, the antibacterial effects of TEL in ELF and AMs following administration of the aerosol formulation were estimated by pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics analysis. The concentrations of TEL in ELF and the AMs time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration of TEL ratio were markedly higher than the effective values. This study indicates that an antibiotic aerosol formulation may be an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  6. Murine iPSC-Derived Macrophages as a Tool for Disease Modeling of Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis due to Csf2rb Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Mucci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represent an innovative source for the standardized in vitro generation of macrophages (Mφ. We here describe a robust and efficient protocol to obtain mature and functional Mφ from healthy as well as disease-specific murine iPSCs. With regard to morphology, surface phenotype, and function, our iPSC-derived Mφ (iPSC-Mφ closely resemble their counterparts generated in vitro from bone marrow cells. Moreover, when we investigated the feasibility of our differentiation system to serve as a model for rare congenital diseases associated with Mφ malfunction, we were able to faithfully recapitulate the pathognomonic defects in GM-CSF signaling and Mφ function present in hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (herPAP. Thus, our studies may help to overcome the limitations placed on research into certain rare disease entities by the lack of an adequate supply of disease-specific primary cells, and may aid the development of novel therapeutic approaches for herPAP patients.

  7. The pancreas anatomy conditions the origin and properties of resident macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Boris; Carrero, Javier A; Ferris, Stephen T; Sojka, Dorothy K; Moore, Lindsay; Epelman, Slava; Murphy, Kenneth M; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Unanue, Emil R

    2015-09-21

    We examine the features, origin, turnover, and gene expression of pancreatic macrophages under steady state. The data distinguish macrophages within distinct intrapancreatic microenvironments and suggest how macrophage phenotype is imprinted by the local milieu. Macrophages in islets of Langerhans and in the interacinar stroma are distinct in origin and phenotypic properties. In islets, macrophages are the only myeloid cells: they derive from definitive hematopoiesis, exchange to a minimum with blood cells, have a low level of self-replication, and depend on CSF-1. They express Il1b and Tnfa transcripts, indicating classical activation, M1, under steady state. The interacinar stroma contains two macrophage subsets. One is derived from primitive hematopoiesis, with no interchange by blood cells and alternative, M2, activation profile, whereas the second is derived from definitive hematopoiesis and exchanges with circulating myeloid cells but also shows an alternative activation profile. Complete replacement of islet and stromal macrophages by donor stem cells occurred after lethal irradiation with identical profiles as observed under steady state. The extraordinary plasticity of macrophages within the pancreatic organ and the distinct features imprinted by their anatomical localization sets the base for examining these cells in pathological conditions. © 2015 Calderon et al.

  8. T Cell Zone Resident Macrophages Silently Dispose of Apoptotic Cells in the Lymph Node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, Myriam; Simon, Léa; Jorquera, Audrey; Ghigo, Clément; Dembele, Doulaye; Nowak, Jonathan; Gentek, Rebecca; Wienert, Stephan; Klauschen, Frederick; Malissen, Bernard; Dalod, Marc; Bajénoff, Marc

    2017-08-15

    In lymph nodes (LNs), dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to dispose of apoptotic cells, a function pertaining to macrophages in other tissues. We found that a population of CX3CR1 + MERTK + cells located in the T cell zone of LNs, previously identified as DCs, are efferocytic macrophages. Lineage-tracing experiments and shield chimeras indicated that these T zone macrophages (TZM) are long-lived macrophages seeded in utero and slowly replaced by blood monocytes after birth. Imaging the LNs of mice in which TZM and DCs express different fluorescent proteins revealed that TZM-and not DCs-act as the only professional scavengers, clearing apoptotic cells in the LN T cell zone in a CX3CR1-dependent manner. Furthermore, similar to other macrophages, TZM appear inefficient in priming CD4 T cells. Thus, efferocytosis and T cell activation in the LN are uncoupled processes designated to macrophages and DCs, respectively, with implications to the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Chaiqinchengqi decoction on inositol requiring enzyme 1α in alveolar macrophages of dogs with acute necrotising pancreatitis induced by sodium taurocholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guo; Xiaoxiang, Wang; Ruijie, Luo; Xiaoxin, Zhang; Xiaonan, Yang; Qing, Xia; Ping, Xue

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) on inositol requiring enzyme lα (IRElα) in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of the dog model of acute necrotising pancreatitis (ANP) induced by sodium taurocholate. Fifteen beagle dogs were randomised into a control group, ANP group and CQCQD group (n = 5 per group). ANP was induced by a retrograde duct injection of 50 mg/kg of 5% sodium taurocholate. The dogs in the control group received injections of the same volume of saline as the sodium taurocholate. After the models were induced, the dogs in the CQCQD group were administered 10 mL/kg CQCQD every 2 h for 6 h. Two hours after the last administration of either CQCQD or saline, they were sacrificed by anaesthesia. AMs were collected to determine the IRElα and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA and protein expression, and pancreatic tissues were collected for histopathology analysis. Compared with the ANP group, the mRNA and protein expression of IREl a and the protein expression of IL-1β of AMs in the CQCQD group were significantly down-regulated, and the pancreatic histopathology score of the CQCQD group also was lower. There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression of IL-1β of AMs between the two groups. The CQCQD-induced down-regulation of the IL-1β protein expression may involve the down-regulation of the mRNA and protein expression of IRElα in AMs.

  10. Respiratory tract responses to dust: Relationships between dust burden, lung injury, alveolar macrophage fibronectin release, and the development of pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, K.E.; Maurer, J.K.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Romberger, D.; Rennard, S.I.; Crosby, L. (Procter Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to investigate the responses of the respiratory tract to silica (SiO2) or titanium dioxide (TiO2). Rats were intratracheally instilled with 5-100 mg/kg of dust and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total protein (TP) and ex vivo alveolar macrophage (AM) fibronectin release assessed on Days 7, 14, and 28 after exposure. Lung dust burdens were determined on Days 1, 7, and 28 after instillation. Both dusts elicited dose-related increases in BALF LDH and TP, a response which was more pronounced and progressive with SiO2. All doses of SiO2 elicited persistent increases in AM fibronectin release. TiO2 stimulated persistent increases in AM fibronectin release at greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg, with transient or no effect at less than or equal to 10 mg/kg. Increased SiO2 retention was observed for all doses and TiO2 retention was increased only at doses greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg. In vitro exposure of naive AM to SiO2 or TiO2 did not stimulate AM fibronectin release. Histopathology demonstrated fibrosis at all SiO2 doses; only TiO2 doses greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg resulted in fibrosis. These results reveal an association between increased dust retention, lung injury, activation of AM fibronectin release, and the development of fibrosis. The magnitude and temporal pattern of responses clearly differentiated SiO2 from TiO2. The correlation of BALF markers of lung injury and increased AM fibronectin release with the development of fibrosis supports the use of these parameters as predictive biomarkers of dust-induced interstitial lung disease.

  11. Aerosol-based efficient delivery of clarithromycin, a macrolide antimicrobial agent, to lung epithelial lining fluid and alveolar macrophages for treatment of respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-04-01

    Macrolide antimicrobial agents are generally given by the oral route for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and alveolar macrophages (AMs). However, because macrolides distribute to many different tissues via the blood after oral administration, systemic side effects are frequently induced. In contrast with oral administration, aerosolization may be an efficient method for delivering macrolides directly to ELF and AMs. In this study, the efficacy of aerosol-based delivery of clarithromycin (CAM), as a model macrolide, for the treatment of respiratory infections was evaluated by comparison with oral administration. The aerosol formulation of CAM (0.2 mg/kg) was administered to rat lungs using a Liquid MicroSprayer(®). The oral formulation of CAM (50 mg/kg) was used for comparison. Time courses of concentrations of CAM in ELF and AMs following administration were obtained, and then the bioavailability (BA) was calculated. In addition, the area under the concentrations of CAM in ELF and AMs-time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of isolates ratio [area under the curve (AUC/MIC(90))] were calculated to estimate the antibacterial effects in ELF and AMs. The BA of CAM in ELF and AMs following administration of aerosol formulation were markedly greater than that following administration of oral formulation. This indicates that the aerosol formulation is more effective in delivering CAM to ELF and AMs, compared with the oral formulation, despite a low dose. The AUC/MIC(90) of CAM in ELF and AMs were markedly higher than the effective values. This indicates that the aerosol formulation could be useful for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms infected in ELF and AMs. This study suggests that aerosol formulation of macrolides is an effective pulmonary drug delivery system for the treatment of respiratory infections.

  12. Innate immune response to a H3N2 subtype swine influenza virus in newborn porcine trachea cells, alveolar macrophages, and precision-cut lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ortega, Mario; Melo, Sandrine; Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Ramé, Christelle; Olivier, Michel; Soubieux, Denis; Marc, Daniel; Simon, Gaëlle; Herrler, Georg; Berri, Mustapha; Dupont, Joëlle; Meurens, François

    2014-04-09

    Viral respiratory diseases remain of major importance in swine breeding units. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is one of the main known contributors to infectious respiratory diseases. The innate immune response to swine influenza viruses has been assessed in many previous studies. However most of these studies were carried out in a single-cell population or directly in the live animal, in all its complexity. In the current study we report the use of a trachea epithelial cell line (newborn pig trachea cells - NPTr) in comparison with alveolar macrophages and lung slices for the characterization of innate immune response to an infection by a European SIV of the H3N2 subtype. The expression pattern of transcripts involved in the recognition of the virus, interferon type I and III responses, and the host-response regulation were assessed by quantitative PCR in response to infection. Some significant differences were observed between the three systems, notably in the expression of type III interferon mRNA. Then, results show a clear induction of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways in infected NPTr cells. Conversely, PI3K/Akt signaling pathways was not activated. The inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway clearly reduced interferon type I and III responses and the induction of SOCS1 at the transcript level in infected NPTr cells. Similarly, the inhibition of MAPK pathway reduced viral replication and interferon response. All together, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the innate immune response to H3N2 SIV and may help identify strategies to effectively control SIV infection.

  13. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a child from an informal settlement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical, histopathological, biochemical and genetic data.[3]. Surfactant homeostasis is critical for lung function and is tightly regulated, in part by pulmonary granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which is required for surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophage maturation.

  15. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of 14 C-amino acid mixture, [ 14 C]leucine, [ 14 C]uridine, and carrier-free 32 P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli

  16. MicroRNA profiling of the bovine alveolar macrophage response to Mycobacterium bovis infection suggests pathogen survival is enhanced by microRNA regulation of endocytosis and lysosome trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    BRADLEY, DANIEL

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a major problem for global agriculture, spreads via an airborne route and is taken up by alveolar macrophages (AM) in the lung. Here, we describe the first next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) approach to temporally profile miRNA expression in primary bovine AMs post-infection with M. bovis. One, six, and forty miRNAs were identified as significantly differentially expressed at 2, 24 and 48 h post-infection, respect...

  17. Bulky PAH-DNA induced by exposure of a co-culture model of human alveolar macrophages and embryonic epithelial cells to atmospheric particulate pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Imane; Garcon, Guillaume; Billet, Sylvain; Shirali, Pirouz; Andre, Veronique; Le Goff, Jeremie; Sichel, Francois; Roy Saint-Georges, Francoise; Mulliez, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Because of their deep penetration in human lungs, fine airborne particulate matter were described as mainly responsible for the deleterious effects of exposure to air pollution on health. Organic constituents are adsorbed on particles surface and, after inhalation, some (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) can be activated into reactive metabolites and can bind to DNA. The formation of bulky DNA adducts has been researched after exposure of mono-and co-cultures of alveolar macrophages (AM) and human embryonic human lung epithelial (L132), to fine air pollution particulate matter Air samples have been collected with cascade impactor and characterized: size distribution (92.15% 2 /g), inorganic (Fe, AI, Ca, Na, K, Mg, Pb, etc.) and organic compounds (PAHs, etc.). 32 P post-labeling method was applied to detect bulky DNA adducts in AM and L132, in mono-and co-cultures, 72 h after their exposure to atmospheric particles at their Lethals and Effects concentrations or (LC or CE) to 50% (i.e. MA: EC 50 = 74.63 μg/mL and L132: LC-5-0 = 75.36 μg/mL). Exposure to desorbed particles (MA: C1= 61.11 μg/mL and L132 : C2 = 61.71 μg/mL) and B[a]P (1 μM) were included. Bulky PAH-DNA adducts were detected in AM in mono-culture after exposure to total particles (Pt), to B[a]P and desorbed particles (Pd). Whatever the exposure, no DNA adduct was detected in L132 in mono-culture. These results are coherent with the enzymatic activities of cytochrome P450 l Al in AM and L132. Exposure of co-culture to Pt, or Pd induced bulky adducts to DNA in AM but not in L132. Exposure to B[a]P alone has altered the DNA of AM and L132, in co-culture. Exposure to Pt is closer to the environmental conditions, but conferred an exposure to amounts of genotoxic agents compared to studies using organic extracts. The formation of bulky DNA adducts was nevertheless observed in AM exposed to Pt, in mono- or co-culture, indicating that they were competent in terms of metabolic activation of PAHs. The

  18. Concentrations of garenoxacin in plasma, bronchial mucosa, alveolar macrophages and epithelial lining fluid following a single oral 600 mg dose in healthy adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J; Honeybourne, D; Jevons, G; Boyce, M; Wise, R; Bello, A; Gajjar, D

    2003-03-01

    A microbiological assay was used to measure concentrations of garenoxacin (BMS-284756) in plasma, bronchial mucosa (BM), alveolar macrophages (AM) and epithelial lining fluid (ELF), following a single 600 mg oral dose. Twenty-four healthy subjects were allocated into four nominal time intervals after the dose, 2.5-3.5, 4.5-5.5, 10.5-11.5 and 23.5-24.5 h. Mean concentrations in plasma, BM, AM and ELF, respectively, for the four nominal time windows were for 2.5-3.5 h 10.0 mg/L (S.D. 2.8), 7.0 mg/kg (S.D. 1.3), 106.1 mg/L (S.D. 60.3) and 9.2 mg/L (S.D. 3.6); 4.5-5.5 h 8.7 mg/L (S.D. 2.2), 6.0 mg/kg (S.D. 1.9), 158.6 mg/L (S.D. 137.4) and 14.3 mg/L (S.D. 8.2); 10.5-11.5 h 6.1 mg/L (S.D. 1.9), 4.0 mg/kg (S.D. 1.4), 76.0 mg/L (S.D. 47.7) and 7.9 mg/L (S.D. 4.6); and 23.5-24.5 h 2.1 mg/L (S.D. 0.5), 1.7 mg/kg (S.D. 0.7), 30.7 mg/L (S.D. 12.9) and 3.3 mg/L (S.D. 2.3). Concentrations at all sites exceeded MIC(90)s for the common respiratory pathogens Haemophilus influenzae (0.03 mg/L), Moraxella catarrhalis (0.015 mg/L) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (0.06 mg/L). These data suggest that garenoxacin should be effective in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

  20. Resident microglia, and not peripheral macrophages, are the main source of brain tumor mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Annett; Brandenburg, Susan; Turkowski, Kati; Müller, Susanne; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-07-15

    Gliomas consist of multiple cell types, including an abundant number of microglia and macrophages, whereby their impact on tumor progression is controversially discussed. To understand their unique functions and consequently manipulate either microglia or macrophages in therapeutic approaches, it is essential to discriminate between both cell populations. Because of the lack of specific markers, generally total body irradiated chimeras with labeled bone marrow cells were used to identify infiltrated cells within the brain. However, total body irradiation (TBI) affects the blood-brain barrier integrity, which in turn potentially facilitates immune cell infiltration. In this study, changes on the blood-brain barrier were avoided using head-protected irradiation (HPI). Head protection and total body irradiated chimeras exhibited similar reconstitution levels of the myeloid cell lineage in the blood, enabling the comparable analyses of brain infiltrates. We demonstrate that the HPI model impeded a massive unspecific influx of donor-derived myeloid cells into naive as well as tumor-bearing brains. Moreover, experimental artifacts such as an enlarged distribution of infiltrated cells and fourfold increased tumor volumes are prevented in head-protected chimeras. In addition, our data evidenced for the first time that microglia are able to up-regulate CD45 and represent an inherent part of the CD45(high) population in the tumor context. All in all, HPI allowed for the unequivocal distinction between microglia and macrophages without alterations of tumor biology and consequently permits a detailed and realistic description of the myeloid cell composition in gliomas. © 2014 UICC.

  1. Modulation of functional characteristics of resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal murine macrophages by a recombinant banana lectin.

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    Emilija Marinkovic

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that a recombinant banana lectin (rBanLec, which structural characteristics and physiological impacts highly resemble those reported for its natural counterparts, binds murine peritoneal macrophages and specifically modulates their functional characteristics. By using rBanLec in concentrations ranging from 1 μg to 10 μg to stimulate resident (RMs and thioglycollate-elicited (TGMs peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, we have shown that effects of rBanLec stimulation depend on its concentration but also on the functional status of macrophages and their genetic background. rBanLec, in a positive dose-dependent manner, promotes the proliferation of TGMs from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, while its mitogenic influence on RMs is significantly lower (BALB/c mice or not detectable (C57BL/6 mice. In all peritoneal macrophages, irrespective of their type and genetic background, rBanLec, in a positive dose dependent manner, enhances the secretion of IL-10. rBanLec stimulation of RMs from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 resulted in a positive dose-dependent promotion of proinflammatory phenotype (enhancement of NO production and IL-12 and TNFα secretion, reduction of arginase activity. Positive dose-dependent skewing toward proinflammatory phenotype was also observed in TGMs from C57BL/6 mice. However, the enhancement of rBanLec stimulation promotes skewing of TGMs from BALB/c mice towards anti-inflammatory profile (reduction of NO production and IL-12 secretion, enhancement of arginase activity and TGFβ and IL-4 secretion. Moreover, we established that rBanLec binds oligosaccharide structures of TLR2 and CD14 and that blocking of signaling via these receptors significantly impairs the production of TNFα and NO in BALB/c macrophages. Since the outcome of rBanLec stimulation depends on rBanLec concentration as well as on the functional characteristics of its target cells and their genetic background, further studies are needed to

  2. IL-4 directly signals tissue-resident macrophages to proliferate beyond homeostatic levels controlled by CSF-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckerl, Dominik; Thomas, Graham D.; Hewitson, James P.; Duncan, Sheelagh; Brombacher, Frank; Maizels, Rick M.; Hume, David A.; Allen, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦs) colonize tissues during inflammation in two distinct ways: recruitment of monocyte precursors and proliferation of resident cells. We recently revealed a major role for IL-4 in the proliferative expansion of resident MΦs during a Th2-biased tissue nematode infection. We now show that proliferation of MΦs during intestinal as well as tissue nematode infection is restricted to sites of IL-4 production and requires MΦ-intrinsic IL-4R signaling. However, both IL-4Rα–dependent and –independent mechanisms contributed to MΦ proliferation during nematode infections. IL-4R–independent proliferation was controlled by a rise in local CSF-1 levels, but IL-4Rα expression conferred a competitive advantage with higher and more sustained proliferation and increased accumulation of IL-4Rα+ compared with IL-4Rα− cells. Mechanistically, this occurred by conversion of IL-4Rα+ MΦs from a CSF-1–dependent to –independent program of proliferation. Thus, IL-4 increases the relative density of tissue MΦs by overcoming the constraints mediated by the availability of CSF-1. Finally, although both elevated CSF1R and IL-4Rα signaling triggered proliferation above homeostatic levels, only CSF-1 led to the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils. Thus, the IL-4 pathway of proliferation may have developed as an alternative to CSF-1 to increase resident MΦ numbers without coincident monocyte recruitment. PMID:24101381

  3. Cre/lox Studies Identify Resident Macrophages as the Major Source of Circulating Coagulation Factor XIII-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Cora M L; Simpson, Kingsley R; Griffin, Kathryn J; Brown, Jane M; Cheah, Lih T; Smith, Kerrie A; Vacher, Jean; Cordell, Paul A; Kearney, Mark T; Grant, Peter J; Pease, Richard J

    2017-08-01

    To establish the cellular source of plasma factor (F)XIII-A. A novel mouse floxed for the F13a1 gene, FXIII-A flox/flox (Flox), was crossed with myeloid- and platelet-cre-expressing mice, and cellular FXIII-A mRNA expression and plasma and platelet FXIII-A levels were measured. The platelet factor 4-cre.Flox cross abolished platelet FXIII-A and reduced plasma FXIII-A to 23±3% ( P cre on plasma FXIII-A was exerted outside of the megakaryocyte lineage because plasma FXIII-A was not reduced in the Mpl -/- mouse, despite marked thrombocytopenia. In support of this, platelet factor 4-cre depleted FXIII-A mRNA in brain, aorta, and heart of floxed mice, where FXIII-A pos cells were identified as macrophages as they costained with CD163. In the integrin αM-cre.Flox and the double copy lysozyme 2-cre.cre.Flox crosses, plasma FXIII-A was reduced to, respectively, 75±5% ( P =0.003) and 30±7% ( P <0.001), with no change in FXIII-A content per platelet, further consistent with a macrophage origin of plasma FXIII-A. The change in plasma FXIII-A levels across the various mouse genotypes mirrored the change in FXIII-A mRNA expression in aorta. Bone marrow transplantation of FXIII-A +/+ bone marrow into FXIII-A -/- mice both restored plasma FXIII-A to normal levels and replaced aortic and cardiac FXIII-A mRNA, while its transplantation into FXIII-A +/+ mice did not increase plasma FXIII-A levels, suggesting that a limited population of niches exists that support FXIII-A-releasing cells. This work suggests that resident macrophages maintain plasma FXIII-A and exclude the platelet lineage as a major contributor. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. In vivo transfer of intracellular labels from locally implanted bone marrow stromal cells to resident tissue macrophages.

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    Edyta Pawelczyk

    Full Text Available Intracellular labels such as dextran coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU or green fluorescent protein (GFP are frequently used to study the fate of transplanted cells by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescent microscopy. Bystander uptake of labeled cells by resident tissue macrophages (TM can confound the interpretation of the presence of intracellular labels especially during direct implantation of cells, which can result in more than 70% cell death. In this study we determined the percentages of TM that took up SPION, BrdU or GFP from labeled bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that were placed into areas of angiogenesis and inflammation in a mouse model known as Matrigel plaque perfusion assay. Cells recovered from digested plaques at various time points were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The analysis of harvested plaques revealed 5% of BrdU(+, 5-10% of GFP(+ and 5-15% of dextran(+ macrophages. The transfer of the label was not dependent on cell dose or viability. Collectively, this study suggests that care should be taken to validate donor origin of cells using an independent marker by histology and to assess transplanted cells for TM markers prior to drawing conclusions about the in vivo behavior of transplanted cells.

  5. Altered Polarization, Morphology, and Impaired Innate Immunity Germane to Resident Peritoneal Macrophages in Mice with Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with perturbed innate immunity. Macrophages, bridging innate immunity and metabolic disturbances, play important roles in controlling immune homeostasis. However, the effect of long-term diabetic milieu (DM on the functions and phenotypes of macrophages is still not clear. In this study, we used resident peritoneal macrophages (RPMs from 5-month-old db/db mice to investigate the changes of macrophages. It was found that RPMs in db/db mice significantly reduced phagocytosis and adhesion capacity. After standardization with body weight, the number of F4/80+ RPMs markedly reduced in db/db mice, and, furthermore, the macrophages skewed to M2-polarizated macrophages. The results of morphology found that the RPMs shape of db/db mice was nearly round, but the RPMs shape of control mice was spindle-shaped and irregular. In this study, we found the cell numbers, morphology, and innate immunity functions of RPMs in 5-month-old type 2 diabetic mice (db/db mice obtained by abdominal cavity lavage were significantly altered. Importantly, we also found the remarkably increased M2-RPMs in diabetic mice for the first time.

  6. MicroRNA profiling of the bovine alveolar macrophage response to Mycobacterium bovis infection suggests pathogen survival is enhanced by microRNA regulation of endocytosis and lysosome trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Peter; Magee, David A; Nalpas, Nicolas C; Bryan, Kenneth; McCabe, Matthew S; Browne, John A; Conlon, Kevin M; Gordon, Stephen V; Bradley, Daniel G; MacHugh, David E; Lynn, David J

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a major problem for global agriculture, spreads via an airborne route and is taken up by alveolar macrophages (AM) in the lung. Here, we describe the first next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) approach to temporally profile miRNA expression in primary bovine AMs post-infection with M. bovis. One, six, and forty miRNAs were identified as significantly differentially expressed at 2, 24 and 48 h post-infection, respectively. The differential expression of three miRNAs (bta-miR-142-5p, bta-miR-146a, and bta-miR-423-3p) was confirmed by RT-qPCR. Pathway analysis of the predicted mRNA targets of differentially expressed miRNAs suggests that these miRNAs preferentially target several pathways that are functionally relevant for mycobacterial pathogenesis, including endocytosis and lysosome trafficking, IL-1 signalling and the TGF-β pathway. Over-expression studies using a bovine macrophage cell-line (Bomac) reveal the targeting of two key genes in the innate immune response to M. bovis, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) and TGF-β receptor 2 (TGFBR2), by miR-146. Taken together, our study suggests that miRNAs play a key role in tuning the complex interplay between M. bovis survival strategies and the host immune response.

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAP; Alveolar proteinosis; Pulmonary alveolar phospholipoproteinosis; Alveolar lipoproteinosis phospholipidosis ... PAP is unknown. In others, it occurs with lung infection or an immune problem. It also can ...

  8. Gene expression profiling of human alveolar macrophages infected by B. anthracis spores demonstrates TNF-α and NF-κb are key components of the innate immune response to the pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of anthrax, has recently been used as an agent of bioterrorism. The innate immune system initially appears to contain the pathogen at the site of entry. Because the human alveolar macrophage (HAM plays a key role in lung innate immune responses, studying the HAM response to B. anthracis is important in understanding the pathogenesis of the pulmonary form of this disease. Methods In this paper, the transcriptional profile of B. anthracis spore-treated HAM was compared with that of mock-infected cells, and differentially expressed genes were identified by Affymetrix microarray analysis. A portion of the results were verified by Luminex protein analysis. Results The majority of genes modulated by spores were upregulated, and a lesser number were downregulated. The differentially expressed genes were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway analysis, the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID analysis, the Promoter Analysis and Interaction Network Toolset (PAINT and Oncomine analysis. Among the upregulated genes, we identified a group of chemokine ligand, apoptosis, and, interestingly, keratin filament genes. Central hubs regulating the activated genes were TNF-α, NF-κB and their ligands/receptors. In addition to TNF-α, a broad range of cytokines was induced, and this was confirmed at the level of translation by Luminex multiplex protein analysis. PAINT analysis revealed that many of the genes affected by spores contain the binding site for c-Rel, a member of the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Other transcription regulatory elements contained in many of the upregulated genes were c-Myb, CP2, Barbie Box, E2F and CRE-BP1. However, many of the genes are poorly annotated, indicating that they represent novel functions. Four of the genes most highly regulated by spores have only previously been associated with head and neck and lung carcinomas. Conclusion The

  9. Macrophage Responses to Epithelial Dysfunction Promote Lung Fibrosis in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    monocyte-derived alveolar macrophages based on single cell molecular classification in patients with pulmonary fibrosis. We have recruited a planned number...of patients into the study and performed transcriptional profiling by means of RNA-seq on single cell and bulk sorted populations or alveolar...macrophages. Major findings: In agreement with our hypothesis, using single cell RNA-seq, we found substantial heterogeneity of alveolar macrophages in the

  10. Hyperglycemia Aggravates Hepatic Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting Liver-Resident Macrophage M2 Polarization via C/EBP Homologous Protein-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuqing Rao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aggravated liver ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury has been observed in hyperglycemic hosts, but its underlying mechanism remains undefined. Liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells, KCs and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of liver IR injury. In this study, we evaluated the role of ER stress in regulating KC activation and liver IR injury in a streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic/diabetic mouse model. Compared to the control group (CON group, hyperglycemic mice exhibited a significant increase in liver injury and intrahepatic inflammation following IR. KCs obtained from hyperglycemic mice secreted higher levels of the pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-6, while they secreted significantly lower levels of the anti-inflammatory factor IL-10. Furthermore, enhanced ER stress was revealed by increased C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP activation in both IR-stressed livers and KCs from hyperglycemic mice. Specific CHOP knockdown in KCs by siRNA resulted in a slight decrease in TNF-α and IL-6 secretion but dramatically enhanced anti-inflammatory IL-10 secretion in the hyperglycemic group, while no significant changes in cytokine production were observed in the CON group. We also analyzed the role of hyperglycemia in macrophage M1/M2 polarization. Interestingly, we found that hyperglycemia inhibited IL-10-secreting M2-like macrophage polarization, as revealed by decreased Arg1 and Mrc1 gene induction accompanied by a decrease in STAT3 and STAT6 signaling pathway activation. CHOP knockdown restored Arg1 and Mrc1 gene induction, STAT3 and STAT6 activation, and most importantly, IL-10 secretion in hyperglycemic KCs. Finally, in vivo CHOP knockdown in KCs enhanced intrahepatic anti-inflammatory IL-10 gene induction and protected the liver against IR injury in hyperglycemic mice but had no significant effects in control mice. Our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia induces hyper-inflammatory activation of KCs

  11. MD-2 regulates LPS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1beta secretion by a MyD88/NF-κB-dependent pathway in alveolar macrophages cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Man; Hu, Lijuan; Li, Dandan; Wang, Yanying; He, Yuting; Zhu, Lei; Ren, Weiying

    2017-10-01

    Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) is required in the recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and participates in LPS-induced alveolar macrophage (AM) inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome aggravates inflammation in LPS-induced ALI. However, there is currently little known about the relationship between MD-2 signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome. This study showed that NLRP3 expression, IL-1beta (IL-1β) secretion, and pyroptosis were up-regulated after LPS stimulation in the NR8383 AM cell-line. MD-2 gene knock-down reduced LPS-induced mRNA and protein expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β secretion in NR8383 cells, and inhibited the MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway. Conversely, over-expression of MD-2 not only heightened NLRP3, MyD88, and NF-κB p65 protein expression, it also aggravated the LPS-induced inflammatory response. Furthermore, the NF-κB inhibitor SN50 had a beneficial role in decreasing NLRP3 and caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression. The observations suggest that MD-2 helps to regulate LPS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and the inflammatory response in NR8383 cells, and likely does so by affecting MyD88/NF-κB signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physico-chemical properties of quartz from industrial manufacturing and its cytotoxic effects on alveolar macrophages: The case of green sand mould casting for iron production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzano, Elena; Tomatis, Maura; Turci, Francesco; Pardi, Luca A; Bronco, Simona; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Muniz Miranda, Maurizio; Zoleo, Alfonso; Capacci, Fabio; Fubini, Bice; Ghigo, Dario; Romanelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-15

    Industrial processing of materials containing quartz induces physico-chemical modifications that contribute to the variability of quartz hazard in different plants. Here, modifications affecting a quartz-rich sand during cast iron production, have been investigated. Composition, morphology, presence of radicals associated to quartz and reactivity in free radical generation were studied on a raw sand and on a dust recovered after mould dismantling. Additionally, cytotoxicity of the processed dust and ROS and NO generation were evaluated on MH-S macrophages. Particle morphology and size were marginally affected by casting processing, which caused only a slight increase of the amount of respirable fraction. The raw sand was able to catalyze OH and CO2(-) generation in cell-free test, even if in a lesser extent than the reference quartz (Min-U-Sil), and shows hAl radicals, conventionally found in any quartz-bearing raw materials. Enrichment in iron and extensive coverage with amorphous carbon were observed during processing. They likely contributed, respectively, to increasing the ability of processed dust to release CO2- and to suppressing OH generation respect to the raw sand. Carbon coverage and repeated thermal treatments during industrial processing also caused annealing of radiogenic hAl defects. Finally, no cellular responses were observed with the respirable fraction of the processed powder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of alveolar macrophage function after experimental infection with equine herpesvirus-1 in horses Avaliação da função dos macrófagos alveolares após infecção experimental em cavalos por herpesvírus eqüino tipo 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mori

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of the pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM in the lung defense mechanism was evaluated in horses infected with equine hespesvirus-1 (EHV-1. Five adult horses were exposed to 10(6.6 TCID50 EHV-1 by intranasal instillation. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was performed using cytocentrifugation of samples and slides stained by Rosenfeld. Cell concentration was adjusted to 2´10(6 cells/ml, for the measurement of macrophage activity - spreading, phagocytosis of zymosan particles and release of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. All animals were positive in virus isolation on the second, third and fifth days post-inoculation (DPI. Seroconversion was observed on the 14th DPI. Lymphocytosis was observed by BAL cytology on the 16th DPI. Measurement of macrophage activity demonstrated a marked increase in the spreading rate, on the 23rd and 30th DPI. Phagocytosis was decreased on the second DPI, and returned to levels similar to those observed before inoculation on the 23rd DPI. The amount of H2O2 released by PAM declined on day 2, but, by day 16, they returned to values similar to those observed before inoculation. The decline in PAM activity in the acute phase of disease is indirect evidence that these cells have an important role in lung defense mechanisms against this agent.O papel dos macrófagos alveolares (MA nos mecanismos de defesa pulmonar foi estudado em cavalos infectados pelo herpesvírus eqüino tipo 1 (EHV-1. Cinco cavalos adultos foram inoculados com 10(6,6 TCID50 do EHV-1, por instilação intranasal. A citologia do lavado broncoalveolar (LBA foi feita usando-se citocentrifugação das amostras e confecção de lâminas coradas por Rosenfeld. A concentração celular foi ajustada para 2´10(6 células/ml, para mensuração da atividade macrofágica - espraiamento, fagocitose de partículas de zymosan e liberação de peróxido de hidrogênio (H2O2. Observou-se soroconversão no 14º dia pós-inoculação (DPI e isolamento viral

  14. Coarse(PM(2.5-10)), fine(PM(2.5)), and ultrafine air pollution particles induce/increase immune costimulatory receptors on human blood-derived monocytes but not on alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Susanne; Soukup, Joleen

    2003-05-09

    Diesel particles have been shown to possess adjuvant activity and influence the development of allergic sensitization. Also, more heterogeneous mixtures of pollution particles have been shown to affect host defenses and development of immunity in animal models. In the present study it was determined whether freshly collected particulate matter (PM(10)) in the size ranges 2.5-10 micro m (PM(2.5-10), coarse), 0.1-2.5 micro m (PM(2.5), fine), and micro m (ultrafine) in diameter affected the development of antigen presenting cells by evaluating the expression of surface receptors involved in T-cell interaction on both human alveolar macrophages (AM) and blood-derived monocytes (Mo). A Mo-AM coculture was exposed to 50 micro g/ml of particles and expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80, and CD86 on each cell type was assessed by flow cytometry. Mo upregulated the expression of all four receptors in response to each of the particle fractions, while expression was unaffected in AM. The cells were also exposed to two model air pollution particles, diesel dust and volcanic ash, neither of which affected receptor expression. Furthermore, Mo and AM were separately exposed to the three PM size fractions and supernatants assessed for the T-helper (CD4(+)) lymphocyte chemoattractant interleukin-16 (IL-16). AM, but not Mo, produced IL-16, and this chemoattractant was released only in response to PM(2.5-10). These data suggest that a wide size range of pollution particles contain materials that may promote antigen presentation by Mo, while the capability to specifically recruit CD4(+) lymphocytes is contained in AM stimulated with the coarse PM fraction.

  15. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

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    K Rennis Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia.

  16. Monocytes/Macrophages Upregulate the Hyaluronidase HYAL1 and Adapt Its Subcellular Trafficking to Promote Extracellular Residency upon Differentiation into Osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Puissant

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts are giant bone-resorbing cells originating from monocytes/macrophages. During their differentiation, they overexpress two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin K and TRAP, which are secreted into the resorption lacuna, an acidified sealed area in contact with bone matrix where bone degradation takes place. Here we report that the acid hydrolase HYAL1, a hyaluronidase able to degrade the glycosaminoglycans hyaluronic acid (HA and chondroitin sulfate, is also upregulated upon osteoclastogenesis. The mRNA expression and protein level of HYAL1 are markedly increased in osteoclasts differentiated from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages or primary mouse bone marrow monocytes compared to these precursor cells. As a result, the HYAL1-mediated HA hydrolysis ability of osteoclasts is strongly enhanced. Using subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that HYAL1 proteins are sorted to the osteoclast lysosomes even though, in contrast to cathepsin K and TRAP, HYAL1 is poorly mannose 6-phosphorylated. We reported previously that macrophages secrete HYAL1 proforms by constitutive secretion, and that these are recaptured by the cell surface mannose receptor, processed in endosomes and sorted to lysosomes. Present work highlights that osteoclasts secrete HYAL1 in two ways, through lysosomal exocytosis and constitutive secretion, and that these cells promote the extracellular residency of HYAL1 through downregulation of the mannose receptor. Interestingly, the expression of the other main hyaluronidase, HYAL2, and of lysosomal exoglycosidases involved in HA degradation, does not increase similarly to HYAL1 upon osteoclastogenesis. Taken together, these findings point out the predominant involvement of HYAL1 in bone HA metabolism and perhaps bone remodeling via the resorption lacuna.

  17. Tissues Use Resident Dendritic Cells and Macrophages to Maintain Homeostasis and to Regain Homeostasis upon Tissue Injury: The Immunoregulatory Role of Changing Tissue Environments

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    Maciej Lech

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most tissues harbor resident mononuclear phagocytes, that is, dendritic cells and macrophages. A classification that sufficiently covers their phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity during homeostasis and disease does not yet exist because cell culture-based phenotypes often do not match those found in vivo. The plasticity of mononuclear phagocytes becomes obvious during dynamic or complex disease processes. Different data interpretation also originates from different conceptual perspectives. An immune-centric view assumes that a particular priming of phagocytes then causes a particular type of pathology in target tissues, conceptually similar to antigen-specific T-cell priming. A tissue-centric view assumes that changing tissue microenvironments shape the phenotypes of their resident and infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes to fulfill the tissue's need to maintain or regain homeostasis. Here we discuss the latter concept, for example, why different organs host different types of mononuclear phagocytes during homeostasis. We further discuss how injuries alter tissue environments and how this primes mononuclear phagocytes to enforce this particular environment, for example, to support host defense and pathogen clearance, to support the resolution of inflammation, to support epithelial and mesenchymal healing, and to support the resolution of fibrosis to the smallest possible scar. Thus, organ- and disease phase-specific microenvironments determine macrophage and dendritic cell heterogeneity in a temporal and spatial manner, which assures their support to maintain and regain homeostasis in whatever condition. Mononuclear phagocytes contributions to tissue pathologies relate to their central roles in orchestrating all stages of host defense and wound healing, which often become maladaptive processes, especially in sterile and/or diffuse tissue injuries.

  18. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Mareike D; Nielsen, Peter J; Stichling, Nicole; Cohen, Idan; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Wood, Connor; Engelhard, Peggy; Suomalainen, Maarit; Gyory, Ildiko; Huber, Michael; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Gordon, Siamon; Jakob, Thilo; Martin, Stefan F; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Greber, Urs F; Freudenberg, Marina A; Fejer, György

    2017-08-01

    The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs) and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells) than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors. IMPORTANCE Macrophages play crucial roles in inflammation and defense against infection. Several macrophage subtypes have been identified with differing abilities to respond to infection with both natural adenoviruses and recombinant adenoviral vectors. Adenoviruses are important respiratory pathogens that elicit vigorous innate responses in vitro and in vivo The cell surface receptors mediating macrophage type-specific adenovirus sensing are largely unknown. The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed on some subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages, including lung alveolar macrophages

  19. Characterisation of cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 expression in mouse resident peritoneal macrophages in vitro; interactions of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with COX2.

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    Tordjman, C; Coge, F; Andre, N; Rique, H; Spedding, M; Bonnet, J

    1995-05-17

    Resident peritoneal macrophages exposed to inflammatory stimuli (zymosan, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) represent a widely used model for studying arachidonic acid metabolism and for screening of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis inhibitors. In the present study, cyclooxygenase 1 (COX1) was shown constitutively expressed in mouse adherent and non-adherent macrophages whereas expression of COX2 was observed only in adherent cells, even when cultured in minimal conditions (Ca-, Mg- and serum-free medium). The COX2 expression was amplified by arachidonic acid cascade stimulating agents (Ca, Mg, zymosan) and by LPS in a time-dependant manner; PGE2 by itself amplified LPS-induced COX2 expression. In well-defined experimental conditions of COX2 expression (LPS-stimulated adherent macrophages), we studied specific interactions of some representative anti-inflammatory drugs with COX2 enzymatic activity and expression. By contrast with dexamethasone, which reduced PGE2 release together with a strong reduction of COX2 expression (protein and mRNA), non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduced PGE2 synthesis without any effect at the COX2 mRNA level. This reduction of PGE2 production by NSAIDs resulted from either an exclusive enzymatic inhibition (aspirin, NS398, 6-Methoxy naphtyl acetic acid) or an enzymatic inhibition associated with a slight decrease of COX2 protein level (indomethacin). For paracetamol and salicylic acid, two weak inhibitors of COX enzymatic activity, reduction of PGE2 synthesis appeared to be related to reduced level of COX2. These findings show that the macrophage can be used as a cellular model to study specifically COX1 and COX2. In this cell type, COX2 expression is dependent on adhesion, enhanced by stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism, and auto amplified by PGE2. Furthermore, the results indicate that known NSAIDs differ in their interaction with cyclooxygenase, being able to inhibit either COX2 enzymatic activity, and/or COX2 expression

  20. Concentrations in plasma, epithelial lining fluid, alveolar macrophages and bronchial mucosa after a single intravenous dose of 1.6 mg/kg of iclaprim (AR-100) in healthy men.

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    Andrews, J; Honeybourne, D; Ashby, J; Jevons, G; Fraise, A; Fry, P; Warrington, S; Hawser, S; Wise, R

    2007-09-01

    A validated microbiological assay was used to measure concentrations of iclaprim (AR-100) in plasma, bronchial mucosa (BM), alveolar macrophages (AM) and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) after a single 1.6 mg/kg intravenous 60 min iv infusion of iclaprim. Male volunteers were randomly allocated to three nominal sampling time intervals 1-2 h (Group A), 3-4 h (Group B) and 5.5-7.0 h (Group C) after the start of the drug infusion. Mean iclaprim concentrations in plasma, BM, AM and ELF, respectively, were for Group A 0.59 mg/L (SD 0.18), 0.51 mg/kg (SD 0.17), 24.51 mg/L (SD 21.22) and 12.61 mg/L (SD 7.33); Group B 0.24 mg/L (SD 0.05), 0.35 mg/kg (SD 0.17), 7.16 mg/L (SD 1.91) and 6.38 mg/L (SD 5.17); and Group C 0.14 mg/L (SD 0.05), no detectable level in BM, 5.28 mg/L (SD 2.30) and 2.66 mg/L (SD 2.08). Iclaprim concentrations in ELF and AM exceeded the MIC(90) for penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90 0.06 mg/L), penicillin-intermediate S. pneumoniae (MIC90 2 mg/L), penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (MIC90 4 mg/L) for 7, 7 and 4 h, respectively, and Chlamydia pneumoniae (MIC90 0.5 mg/L) for 7 h. Mean iclaprim concentrations in ELF exceeded the MIC90 for Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 4 mg/L) and Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90 8 mg/L) for up to 4 and 2 h, respectively; in AM the MIC90 was exceeded for up to 7 h. Furthermore, the MIC90 for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of 0.12 mg/L was exceeded at all sites for up to 7 h. These data suggest that iclaprim reaches lung concentrations that should be effective in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

  1. Update on macrophage clearance of inhaled micro- and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Marianne

    2010-08-01

    Lung macrophages, that is, the intravascular, interstitial, pleural, and surface macrophages, are part of the mononuclear phagocyte system. They are derived from the hematopoietic stem cell in the bone marrow with the monocytes as their putative precursors. Macrophages residing on the inner surfaces of the lungs and immersed within the lung lining layer, that is, the alveolar and the airway macrophages, are constantly exposed to the environment; it is those cells that are recognized as first line of cellular host defense. Phagocytic uptake of inhaled and deposited particles is the main mechanism to remove insoluble micrometer-sized particles from the lung surfaces, where mucociliary transport, cough, or sneezing fail or are absent. Phagocytosis requires an intact cytoskeleton and is most efficient when mediated by Fc-receptors, but complement and scavenger receptors like MARCO and CD206 are just as important. The main pathway for the clearance of macrophage-associated particles is by mucociliary transport; to a lesser degree and species specific, particle-containing macrophages may reenter into the interstitium and go from there to the lymphatics. Inhaled nanometer-sized particles that deposit along the entire respiratory tract, however, are not efficiently phagocytosed by surface macrophages. Uptake by spontaneous or stimulated (macro-) pinocytosis or electrokinetic's phenomena may become more important. In addition, translocation of nanometer-sized particles into the interstitium and to the blood circulation brings them into contact with other fluids; altered particle properties may influence particle uptake. Moreover, translocated particles may interact with lung macrophage populations that were previously not considered of great significance for the clearance of inhaled particles.

  2. Metabolic activation of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons coated onto airborne PM{sub 2.5} in isolated human alveolar macrophages; Etude de l'activation metabolique des composes organiques volatils et des hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques d'un aerosol anthropogenique par des macrophages alveolaires humains en culture primaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Georges, F.; Mulliez, P. [Hopital Saint Philibert - GHICL-FLM, Service de Pneumologie, 59 - Lomme (France); Saint-Georges, F.; Abbas, I.; Garcon, G.; Billet, S.; Verdin, A.; Shirali, P. [LCE-EA2598, Lab. de Recherche en toxicologie Industrielle et Environnementale - ULCO-MREI, 59 - Dunkerque (France); Gosset, P. [Hopital Saint Vincent, Laboratoire d' Anatomie et de Cytologie Pathologiques - GHICL-FLM, 59 - Lille (France); Courcot, D. [LCE-EA2598, Lab. de Catalyse et Environnement - ULCO-MREI, 59 - Dunkerque (France)

    2009-01-15

    To contribute to improve the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of action involved in air pollution Particulate Matter (PM)-induced cytotoxicity, we were interested in the metabolic activation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and/or Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH)-coated onto Dunkerque City's PM{sub 2.5} in human Alveolar Macrophages (AM) isolated from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF). This in vitro cell lung model is very close to the normal in vivo situation, notably in the characteristics that AM display in terms of gene expression of phase I and phase II-metabolizing enzymes. The bronchoscopic examinations and BAL procedures were carried out without any complications. The exposure of AM, during 24, 48 or 72 h, to increasing concentrations of the collected aerosol induced significant variations of the activities of the extracellular lactate dehydrogenase and the mitochondrial dehydrogenase. The lethal concentrations at 10% and 50% were 14.93 and 74.63 {mu}g/mL for AM, respectively, and indicated the relatively higher sensibility of such target lung cells. VOC and/or PAH-coated at low levels onto the surface of the particulate fraction significantly induced gene expression of cytochrome P450 (GYP) 1A1, CYP2E1, NADPH Quinone oxido-reductase (NQO)-1) and Glutathione S-Transferase (GST)P1 and M3, versus controls, suggesting thereby the formation of biologically reactive metabolites. Moreover, these results suggested the role of physical vector of carbonaceous core of PM, which can, therefore, increase both the penetration and the retention of attached-VOC into the cells, thereby enabling them to exert a more durable induction. Hence, we concluded that the metabolic activation of the very low doses of VOC and/or PAH-coated onto Dunkerque City's PM{sub 2.5} is one of the underlying mechanisms of action closely involved in its cytotoxicity in isolated human AM in culture. (author)

  3. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed.

  5. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  6. Expression of functional toll-like receptor-2 and -4 on alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lynne; Medford, Andrew R L; Uppington, Kay M; Robertson, John; Witherden, Ian R; Tetley, Teresa D; Millar, Ann B

    2004-08-01

    The recognition of potentially harmful microorganisms involves the specific recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to play a central role in this process. TLR-4 is the major recognition receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, whereas TLR-2 responds to bacterial products from gram-positive organisms. Although resident alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense against microbial attack, it is now understood that the alveolar epithelium also plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity of the lung. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether human primary type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII) express functional TLR-2 and TLR-4 and how they may be regulated by inflammatory mediators. We have used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry to determine basal and inducible expression on ATII. We have used highly purified preparations of the gram-positive bacterial product lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and LPS to look at the functional consequences of TLR-2 and TLR-4 ligation, respectively, in terms of interleukin-8 release. We have shown that human primary ATII cells express mRNA and protein for both TLR-2 and TLR-4, which can be modulated by incubation with LPS and tumor necrosis factor. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that these receptors are functional. This suggests that ATII have the potential to contribute significantly to the host defense of the human alveolus against bacteria.

  7. Effects of ischemia on lung macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aigul Moldobaeva

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis after pulmonary ischemia is initiated by reactive O(2 species and is dependent on CXC chemokine growth factors, and its magnitude is correlated with the number of lavaged macrophages. After complete obstruction of the left pulmonary artery in mice, the left lung is isolated from the peripheral circulation until 5-7 days later, when a new systemic vasculature invades the lung parenchyma. Consequently, this model offers a unique opportunity to study the differentiation and/or proliferation of monocyte-derived cells within the lung. In this study, we questioned whether macrophage subpopulations were differentially expressed and which subset contributed to growth factor release. We characterized the change in number of all macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, alveolar macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B- and mature lung macrophages (MHCII(int, CD11C+, CD11B+ in left lungs from mice immediately (0 h or 24 h after left pulmonary artery ligation (LPAL. In left lung homogenates, only lung macrophages increased 24 h after LPAL (vs. 0 h; p<0.05. No changes in proliferation were seen in any subset by PCNA expression (0 h vs. 24 h lungs. When the number of monocytic cells was reduced with clodronate liposomes, systemic blood flow to the left lung 14 days after LPAL decreased by 42% (p<0.01 compared to vehicle controls. Furthermore, when alveolar macrophages and lung macrophages were sorted and studied in vitro, only lung macrophages secreted the chemokine MIP-2α (ELISA. These data suggest that ischemic stress within the lung contributes to the differentiation of immature monocytes to lung macrophages within the first 24 h after LPAL. Lung macrophages but not alveolar macrophages increase and secrete the proangiogenic chemokine MIP-2α. Overall, an increase in the number of lung macrophages appears to be critical for neovascularization in the lung, since clodronate treatment decreased their number and attenuated functional angiogenesis.

  8. Key Role of the Scavenger Receptor MARCO in Mediating Adenovirus Infection and Subsequent Innate Responses of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike D. Maler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor MARCO is expressed in several subsets of naive tissue-resident macrophages and has been shown to participate in the recognition of various bacterial pathogens. However, the role of MARCO in antiviral defense is largely unexplored. Here, we investigated whether MARCO might be involved in the innate sensing of infection with adenovirus and recombinant adenoviral vectors by macrophages, which elicit vigorous immune responses in vivo. Using cells derived from mice, we show that adenovirus infection is significantly more efficient in MARCO-positive alveolar macrophages (AMs and in AM-like primary macrophage lines (Max Planck Institute cells than in MARCO-negative bone marrow-derived macrophages. Using antibodies blocking ligand binding to MARCO, as well as gene-deficient and MARCO-transfected cells, we show that MARCO mediates the rapid adenovirus transduction of macrophages. By enhancing adenovirus infection, MARCO contributes to efficient innate virus recognition through the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS. This leads to strong proinflammatory responses, including the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, alpha/beta interferon, and mature IL-1α. These findings contribute to the understanding of viral pathogenesis in macrophages and may open new possibilities for the development of tools to influence the outcome of infection with adenovirus or adenovirus vectors.

  9. Effect of neonatal malnutrition on expression of nitric oxide synthase enzyme, production of free radicals and in vitro viability of alveolar macrophages infected with methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Natália Gomes; da Costa, Thacianna Barreto; Pedrosa, Amanda Lúcia Farias; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; da Gonçalves de Albuquerque, Suênia Cunha; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; de Paiva Cavalcanti, Milena; de Castro, Célia Maria Machado Barbosa

    2016-02-01

    Evaluate the effects of neonatal malnutrition on the microbicidal response and viability of in vitro macrophages infected with Staphylococcus aureus sensitive/resistant to methicillin. Male Wistar rats (n = 24) were divided into two distinct groups: nourished (rats breast-fed by mothers undergoing diet with 17% casein) and malnourished (rats breast-fed by mothers undergoing diet with 8% casein). Macrophages were recovered after surgical tracheostomy procedure by collecting bronchoalveolar lavage. Four systems were established: negative control, composed only by phagocytes; positive control, macrophages plus lipopolysaccharide; and two test systems, macrophages plus Staphylococcus aureus sensitive and resistant to methicillin. Plates were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. After this period, tests for the analysis of cell viability and microbicidal response were performed. In the statistical analysis, the Student's t and ANOVA tests were used, accepting p resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, increased production of superoxide anion in the malnourished group was detected. Neonatal malnutrition focusing on critical periods of development promoted lower expression of iNOS, nitric oxide production, cell viability, and exacerbated reactive oxygen species production. The high levels of reactive oxygen species may favor the onset of serious and systemic infections with fatal outcome if associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Proteinosis alveolar pulmonar Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

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    Concepción Sánchez Infante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La proteinosis alveolar pulmonar es una enfermedad respiratoria crónica, caracterizada por alteración en el metabolismo del surfactante, lo que determina su acumulación anormal en el espacio alveolar. Es una enfermedad extremadamente rara. Se han reportado solamente 500 casos en la literatura. Se describió por primera vez en 1958. Se presenta un caso de proteinosis alveolar pulmonar en un lactante de 2 meses, con desnutrición proteico energética, que ingresa por dificultad respiratoria e hipoxemia, y, con imágenes radiológicas de tipo retículo-nodulillar, en vidrio deslustrado, en el cual se plantea inicialmente el diagnóstico de bronconeumonía. Ante la evolución desfavorable y no respuesta al tratamiento, se realizó un estudio para descartar enfermedades pulmonares crónicas. El paciente fallece y se confirma el diagnóstico por anatomía patológica. Se realiza una revisión del tema.The pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by surfactant metabolism alteration determining its abnormal accumulation in the alveolar space. It is a disease very rare and in literature only 500 cases have been reported; it was described for the first time in 1958. This is a case presentation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in an infant aged 2 months with energetic protein malnutrition admitted due to respiratory difficulty and hypoxemia and with radiologic images of the reticulonodulillary, in frosting glass, where initially is made the diagnosis of bronchopneumonia. In the face of unfavorable evolution and no response to treatment, a study was conducted to rule out chronic pulmonary diseases. Patient died confirming the diagnosis according to the pathologic anatomy. A review on subject is carried out.

  11. Rat macrophage C-type lectin is an activating receptor expressed by phagocytic cells.

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    Ana Lobato-Pascual

    Full Text Available Macrophage C-type lectin (MCL is a membrane surface receptor encoded by the Antigen Presenting Lectin-like gene Complex (APLEC. We generated a mouse monoclonal antibody for the study of this receptor in the rat. We demonstrate that rat MCL is expressed on blood monocytes and neutrophils, as well as on several tissue macrophage populations, including alveolar and peritoneal cavity macrophages. We also demonstrate MCL expression on a subset of resident spleen macrophages. Immunohistochemistry analysis of the spleen showed staining specifically in the marginal zone and red pulp. Exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators or to yeast cell wall extract (zymosan increased surface MCL expression on peritoneal macrophages. We characterized a rat myeloid cell line, RMW, which expresses high levels of MCL. We found that MCL co-immunoprecipitated with the activating adaptor protein FcεRIγ in these cells. Moreover, beads coated with anti-MCL antibody increased phagocytosis in the RMW cells. Together, these observations indicate that rat MCL is a receptor that activates phagocytosis in myeloid cells under inflammatory conditions.

  12. Further characterization of a highly attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 mutant deleted for the genes encoding Braun lipoprotein and plasminogen activator protease in murine alveolar and primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Christina J; Tiner, Bethany L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L; Fitts, Eric C; Huante, Matthew B; Endsley, Janice J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-03-01

    We recently characterized the Δlpp Δpla double in-frame deletion mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 molecularly, biologically, and immunologically. While Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) activates toll-like receptor-2 to initiate an inflammatory cascade, plasminogen activator (Pla) protease facilitates bacterial dissemination in the host. The Δlpp Δpla double mutant was highly attenuated in evoking bubonic and pneumonic plague, was rapidly cleared from mouse organs, and generated humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to provide subsequent protection to mice against a lethal challenge dose of wild-type (WT) CO92. Here, we further characterized the Δlpp Δpla double mutant in two murine macrophage cell lines as well as in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages to gauge its potential as a live-attenuated vaccine candidate. We first demonstrated that the Δpla single and the Δlpp Δpla double mutant were unable to survive efficiently in murine and human macrophages, unlike WT CO92. We observed that the levels of Pla and its associated protease activity were not affected in the Δlpp single mutant, and, likewise, deletion of the pla gene from WT CO92 did not alter Lpp levels. Further, our study revealed that both Lpp and Pla contributed to the intracellular survival of WT CO92 via different mechanisms. Importantly, the ability of the Δlpp Δpla double mutant to be phagocytized by macrophages, to stimulate production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and to activate the nitric oxide killing pathways of the host cells remained unaltered when compared to the WT CO92-infected macrophages. Finally, macrophages infected with either the WT CO92 or the Δlpp Δpla double mutant were equally efficient in their uptake of zymosan particles as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Overall, our data indicated that although the Δlpp Δpla double mutant of Y. pestis CO92 was highly attenuated, it retained the ability to elicit innate and subsequent acquired immune

  13. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Setting of Inhaled Toxin Exposure and Chronic Substance Abuse

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    Meirui Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare lung disorder in which defects in alveolar macrophage maturation or function lead to the accumulation of proteinaceous surfactant in alveolar space, resulting in impaired gas exchange and hypoxemia. PAP is categorized into three types: hereditary, autoimmune, and secondary. We report a case of secondary PAP in a 47-year-old man, whose risk factors include occupational exposure to inhaled toxins, especially aluminum dust, the use of anabolic steroids, and alcohol abuse, which in mice leads to alveolar macrophage dysfunction through a zinc-dependent mechanism that inhibits granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF receptor signalling. Although the rarity and vague clinical presentation of PAP can pose diagnostic challenges, clinician awareness of PAP risk factors may facilitate the diagnostic process and lead to more prompt treatment.

  15. Role of Osteal Macrophages in Bone Metabolism

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    Sun Wook Cho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have been shown to have pleiotropic functions in various pathophysiologies, especially in terms of anti-inflammatory and regenerative activity. Recently, the novel functions of bone marrow resident macrophages (called osteal macrophages were intensively studied in bone development, remodeling and tissue repair processes. This review discusses the current evidence for a role of osteal macrophages in bone modeling, remodeling, and fracture healing processes.

  16. The elusive antifibrotic macrophage

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    Adhyatmika eAdhyatmika

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e. antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behaviour stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behaviour in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behaviour.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

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    Surender Kashyap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM is a rare, chronic lung disease with bilateral intra-alveolar calcium and phosphate deposition throughout the lung parenchyma with predominance to lower and midzone. Although, etiology and pathogenesis of PAM is not fully understood, the mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium-phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type II cells resulting in the accumulation and forming of microliths rich in calcium phosphate (due to impaired clearance are considered to be the cause of the disease. Chest radiograph and high-resolution CT of thorax are nearly pathognomonic for diagnosing PAM. HRCT demonstrates diffuse micronodules showing slight perilobular predominance resulting in calcification of interlobular septa. Patients with PAM are asymptomatic till development of hypoxemia and cor-pulmonale. No therapy has been proven to be beneficial except lung transplantation.

  18. Action of the medicine Canova® on peritoneal resident macrophages infected with Trypanosoma cruzi = Ação do medicamento Canova® em macrófagos peritoniais residentes infectados por Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Tagawa Cardoso de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20 million of people are chronically infected withTrypanosoma cruzi in Latin America. The present work investigated the action of the homeopathic medicine Canova® on in vitro experimental infections with T. cruzi Y strain, using Swiss mice resident peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that Canova®induced a decrease in the production of H2O2 and TNF-a at 20 and 40% concentrations when compared to the control RPMI. However, when compared with this medicine excipient, a significant decrease in these mediators was observed with Canova® at 40% concentration only. The production of NO and phagocytic activity were not affected. TNF-a inhibits T. cruzi replication in peritoneal macrophages in vitro, becoming an important agent of infection control by this parasite. Within this context, Canova®, unlike what has been reported with other infections, would function as a stimulator of the infection, since it inhibited the production of TNF-α by peritoneal resident macrophages in vitro. Further studies should be carried out with elicited macrophages, in order to confirm the inhibitoryactivity of Canova® on the production of TNF-α and other mediators in macrophages infected by T. cruzi.Aproximadamente 20 milhões de pessoas são cronicamente infectadas pelo Trypanosoma cruzi na América Latina. O presente trabalhoinvestigou a ação do medicamento homeopático Canova® em infecções experimentais “in vitro” com Trypanosoma cruzi, cepa Y, usando macrófagos residentes peritoniais de camundongos Swiss. Os resultados indicaram que Canova® induz a diminuição significativa da produção de H2O2 e TNF-α em concentrações de 20 e 40%, quando comparado com ocontrole RPMI. Quando comparado com o excipiente do medicamento, observou-se diminuição na concentração destes mediadores apenas na concentração de 40%. A produção de NO e a atividade fagocítica não foram afetadas. TNF-α inibe a replicação do protozoário em

  19. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Hodgkinson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type, and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type. The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation.

  20. Dual roles for macrophages in ovarian cycle-associated development and remodelling of the mammary gland epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Angela C L; Hodson, Leigh J; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Robertson, Sarah A; Ingman, Wendy V

    2010-12-01

    Each ovarian cycle, the mammary gland epithelium rotates through a sequence of hormonally regulated cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These studies investigate the role of macrophages in this cellular turnover. Macrophage populations and their spatial distribution were found to fluctuate across the cycle. The number of macrophages was highest at diestrus, and the greatest number of macrophages in direct contact with epithelial cells occurred at proestrus. The physiological necessity of macrophages in mammary gland morphogenesis during the estrous cycle was demonstrated in Cd11b-Dtr transgenic mice. Ovariectomised mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone to stimulate alveolar development, and with the progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone to induce regression of the newly formed alveolar buds. Macrophage depletion during alveolar development resulted in a reduction in both ductal epithelial cell proliferation and the number of alveolar buds. Macrophage depletion during alveolar regression resulted in an increased number of branch points and an accumulation of TUNEL-positive cells. These studies show that macrophages have two roles in the cellular turnover of epithelial cells in the cycling mammary gland; following ovulation, they promote the development of alveolar buds in preparation for possible pregnancy, and they remodel the tissue back to its basic architecture in preparation for a new estrous cycle.

  1. Proteinosis alveolar pulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Sánchez Infante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La proteinosis alveolar pulmonar es una enfermedad respiratoria crónica, caracterizada por alteración en el metabolismo del surfactante, lo que determina su acumulación anormal en el espacio alveolar. Es una enfermedad extremadamente rara. Se han reportado solamente 500 casos en la literatura. Se describió por primera vez en 1958. Se presenta un caso de proteinosis alveolar pulmonar en un lactante de 2 meses, con desnutrición proteico energética, que ingresa por dificultad respiratoria e hipoxemia, y, con imágenes radiológicas de tipo retículo-nodulillar, en vidrio deslustrado, en el cual se plantea inicialmente el diagnóstico de bronconeumonía. Ante la evolución desfavorable y no respuesta al tratamiento, se realizó un estudio para descartar enfermedades pulmonares crónicas. El paciente fallece y se confirma el diagnóstico por anatomía patológica. Se realiza una revisión del tema.

  2. Alveolar development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  3. Soluble ICAM-1 activates lung macrophages and enhances lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B

    1998-01-01

    of the proteosome inhibitor and by genistein. Alveolar macrophages showed adherence to immobilized sICAM-1 in a CD18-dependent manner. Finally, airway instillation of sICAM-1 intensified lung injury produced by intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes in a manner associated with enhanced lung production...... of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 and increased neutrophil recruitment. Therefore, through engagement of beta2 integrins, sICAM-1 enhances alveolar macrophage production of MIP-2 and TNF-alpha, the result of which is intensified lung injury after intrapulmonary disposition of immune complexes....

  4. MEK1/2 Inhibition Promotes Macrophage Reparative Properties1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Matthew E.; Eddy, William E.; Gong, Ke-Qin; Lovelace-Macon, Lara L.; McMahan, Ryan S.; Charron, Jean; Liles, W. Conrad; Manicone, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have important functional roles in regulating the timely promotion and resolution of inflammation. While many of the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the pro-inflammatory responses of macrophages are well characterized, the components that regulate macrophage reparative properties are less well understood. We identified the MEK1/2 pathway as a key regulator of macrophage reparative properties. Pharmacological inhibition of the MEK1/2 pathway (MEKi) significantly increased expression of IL-4/IL-13 (M2) responsive genes in murine bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of the MEK1 gene using LysMCre+/+MEK1fl/fl macrophages as an alternate approach yielded similar results. MEKi enhanced STAT6 phosphorylation, and MEKi induced changes in M2 polarization were dependent on STAT6. In addition, MEKi-treatment significantly increased both murine and human macrophage efferocytosis of apoptotic cells (AC) independent of macrophage polarization and STAT6. These phenotypes were associated with increased gene and protein expression of Mertk, Tyro3, and Abca1, three proteins that promote macrophage efferocytosis. We also studied the effects of MEKi on in vivo macrophage efferocytosis and polarization. MEKi treated mice had increased efferocytosis of apoptotic PMNs instilled into the peritoneum. Furthermore, administration of MEKi after LPS-induced lung injury led to improved recovery of weight, fewer neutrophils in the alveolar compartment, and greater macrophage M2 polarization. Collectively, these results show that MEK1/2 inhibition is capable of promoting reparative properties of both murine and human macrophages. These studies suggest that the MEK1/2 pathway may be a therapeutic target to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of macrophage functions. PMID:28003382

  5. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  6. FoxO1 regulates allergic asthmatic inflammation through regulating polarization of the macrophage inflammatory phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sangwoon; Lee, Tae Jin; Reader, Brenda F.; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Gyu; Park, Gye Young; Karpurapu, Manjula; Ballinger, Megan N.; Qian, Feng; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Hae Young; Unterman, Terry G.; Croce, Carlo M.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocyte and tissue macrophages influence the initiation, progression, and resolution of type 2 immune responses, and alveolar macrophages are the most prevalent immune-effector cells in the lung. While we were characterizing the M1- or M2-like macrophages in type 2 allergic inflammation, we discovered that FoxO1 is highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages. Although several studies have been focused on the fundamental role of FoxOs in hematopoietic and immune cells, the exact role that FoxO1 plays in allergic asthmatic inflammation in activated macrophages has not been investigated. Growing evidences indicate that FoxO1 acts as an upstream regulator of IRF4 and could have a role in a specific inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that IRF4 expression regulated by FoxO1 in alveolar macrophages is required for established type 2 immune mediates allergic lung inflammation. Our data indicate that targeted deletion of FoxO1 using FoxO1-selective inhibitor AS1842856 and genetic ablation of FoxO1 in macrophages significantly decreases IRF4 and various M2 macrophage-associated genes, suggesting a mechanism that involves FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in alveolar macrophages that works to polarize macrophages toward established type 2 immune responses. In response to the challenge of DRA (dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus) allergens, macrophage specific FoxO1 overexpression is associated with an accentuation of asthmatic lung inflammation, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of FoxO1 by AS1842856 attenuates the development of asthmatic lung inflammation. Thus, our study identifies a role for FoxO1-IRF4 signaling in the development of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages that contribute to type 2 allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27007158

  7. Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar machrophages with in vitro exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted in vitro exposures of Wistar rat alveolar macrophages (AM) to compare and contrast the toxicity of particulate matter (PM) produced in combustion of biodiesel blend (B20) and petroleum diesel (PDEP). The PM contain detectable levels of transition metals and ions howe...

  8. Evidence for an intracellular niche for Bordetella pertussis in broncho-alveolar lavage cells of mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, SMM; Hazenbos, WLW; van de Winkel, JGJ; Mooi, FR

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis can attach, invade and survive intracellularly in human macrophages in vitro. To study the significance of this bacterial feature in vivo, we analyzed the presence of viable bacteria in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells of mice infected with B, pertussis. We found B. pertussis

  9. Bulky PAH-DNA induced by exposure of a co-culture model of human alveolar macrophages and embryonic epithelial cells to atmospheric particulate pollution; Adduits encombrants a l'ADN dans des cocultures de cellules pulmonaires humaines exposees a une pollution atmospherique particulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Imane; Garcon, Guillaume; Billet, Sylvain; Shirali, Pirouz [Universite Lille Nord de France - Lille (France); Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interactions sur le Vivant, MREI, Universite du Littoral Cote d' Opale, Dunkerque (France); Andre, Veronique; Le Goff, Jeremie; Sichel, Francois [GRECAN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie et centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Roy Saint-Georges, Francoise; Mulliez, Philippe [Service de Pneumologie, Hopital Saint-Philibert, GHICL, Lille (France)

    2012-01-15

    Because of their deep penetration in human lungs, fine airborne particulate matter were described as mainly responsible for the deleterious effects of exposure to air pollution on health. Organic constituents are adsorbed on particles surface and, after inhalation, some (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) can be activated into reactive metabolites and can bind to DNA. The formation of bulky DNA adducts has been researched after exposure of mono-and co-cultures of alveolar macrophages (AM) and human embryonic human lung epithelial (L132), to fine air pollution particulate matter Air samples have been collected with cascade impactor and characterized: size distribution (92.15% < 2.5{mu}.m), specific surface area (1 m{sup 2}/g), inorganic (Fe, AI, Ca, Na, K, Mg, Pb, etc.) and organic compounds (PAHs, etc.). {sup 32}P post-labeling method was applied to detect bulky DNA adducts in AM and L132, in mono-and co-cultures, 72 h after their exposure to atmospheric particles at their Lethals and Effects concentrations or (LC or CE) to 50% (i.e. MA: EC{sub 50} = 74.63 {mu}g/mL and L132: LC-5-0 = 75.36 {mu}g/mL). Exposure to desorbed particles (MA: C1= 61.11 {mu}g/mL and L132 : C2 = 61.71 {mu}g/mL) and B[a]P (1 {mu}M) were included. Bulky PAH-DNA adducts were detected in AM in mono-culture after exposure to total particles (Pt), to B[a]P and desorbed particles (Pd). Whatever the exposure, no DNA adduct was detected in L132 in mono-culture. These results are coherent with the enzymatic activities of cytochrome P450 l Al in AM and L132. Exposure of co-culture to Pt, or Pd induced bulky adducts to DNA in AM but not in L132. Exposure to B[a]P alone has altered the DNA of AM and L132, in co-culture. Exposure to Pt is closer to the environmental conditions, but conferred an exposure to amounts of genotoxic agents compared to studies using organic extracts. The formation of bulky DNA adducts was nevertheless observed in AM exposed to Pt, in mono- or co-culture, indicating that

  10. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of three types of macrophages culture supernatant on CFU-GM in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Hongxun; Fu Li; Zhao Fengchen; Han Fen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of peritional macrophyge(PM), alveolar macrophage (AM), and Kupffer cell (KC) on colony forming unite granulacyte/macrophage (CFU -GM) in irradiated mice. Methods: Using techniques of hemopoietic progenitors in vitro, the authors studied the effects of three types of macrophages culture supernatant on CFU - GM. Results: It is shown that three types of macrophages culture supernatant may stimulate proliferation and differentiation of CFU-GM in irradiated mice, and KC is the best one in comparison to others. Conclusion: three types of macrophages culture supernatant may protect CFU-GM irradiated mice with KC being the best method. (authors)

  12. In Vitro Toxicity of Aluminum Nanoparticles in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, Andrew; Bleckmann, Charles; England, E; Hess Saber /Hussain, Krista; Schlager, John J

    2001-01-01

    ...s (30 and 40nm average size) compared to aluminum metal nanoparticles (50, 80, and 120nm). This study used toxicity endpoints involving cell viability, mitochondrial function, phagocytotic ability, and inflammatory response...

  13. Soluble ICAM-1 activates lung macrophages and enhances lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B

    1998-01-01

    Because of the important role of rat ICAM-1 in the development of lung inflammatory injury, soluble recombinant rat ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) was expressed in bacteria, and its biologic activities were evaluated. Purified sICAM-1 did bind to rat alveolar macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and induced ...

  14. Degradation of parathyroid hormone in macrophage endosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diment, S.; Martin, K.J.; Stahl, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted as an 84 amino acid protein that is rapidly cleaved between amino acids 34 and 35 by Kupffer cells in liver. The resulting amino terminal peptide (1-34) is active at PTH target organs (kidney and bone). Cathepsin D can process PTH to 1-34 in vitro, and a cathepsin D-like protease, which may rapidly process proteins, is present in endosomes of alveolar macrophages. The authors set out to determine whether PTH is degraded to 1-34 in endosomes, and to elucidate the mechanism of hormone processing in vivo. Intracellular transport of 125 I-PTH was assessed by binding to alveolar macrophages at 4 0 C, followed by internalization at 37 0 C. Distribution of PTH among plasma membranes, endosomes and lysosomes was determined by subcellular fractionation. Degradation of the ligand to TCA-soluble fragments in each compartment was assayed at neutral and acid pH. 1-34 in supernatants was separated from undergraded PTH by gel filtration and detected by bioassay on kidney membranes. The authors data suggest that: 1) macrophages rapidly degrade PTH to TCA-soluble fragments. 2) macrophages do not secrete proteases that degrade extracellular PTH. 3) PTH is internalized into endocytic vesicles after 5 mins, but not delivered to lysosomes within 30 mins. 4) A bioactive peptide is released into the extracellular medium after 20 mins. 5) PTH is degraded in endosomes at acid pH by a pepstatin-sensitive protease

  15. AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF CELLS FROM BRONCHO ALVEOLAR LAVAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lezoray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Broncho alveolar lavage is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for confirming alveolar hemorrhage. Golde has introduced a ranking score, based on the hemosiderin content of macrophages which enables ranking cells from 0 to 4 based on the degree of Prussian blue stain. We propose a complete image analysis scheme to automatically perform both the extraction of the cellular objects and the ranking of each cell according to the Golde score. The image analysis techniques used mainly involve clustering and mathematical morphology. A 2D histogram is clustered to extract the main cellular components, a color watershed is used to determine and refine the regions. Finally, the cellular components of interest are firstly classified according to their hue and secondly according to their staining repartition. The proposed image analysis technique is very fast and produces reliable and accurate results.

  16. Depletion of tumor associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programming changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤ 50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of IGF-I, CXCL1, IL-6 and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programming in vehicle and clodronate liposome treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2 had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  17. Alveolar type II cell transplantation restores pulmonary surfactant protein levels in lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Xaubet, Antoni; Peinado, Victor I; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Alveolar Type II cell transplantation has been proposed as a cell therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Its long-term benefits include repair of lung fibrosis, but its success partly depends on the restoration of lung homeostasis. Our aim was to evaluate surfactant protein restoration after alveolar Type II cell transplantation in an experimental model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Lung fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. Alveolar Type II cells were obtained from healthy animals and transplanted 14 days after bleomycin was administered. Furthermore, one group transplanted with alveolar macrophages and another group treated with surfactant were established to evaluate the specificity of the alveolar Type II cell transplantation. The animals were euthanized at 21 days after bleomycin instillation. Lung fibrosis was confirmed by a histologic study and an evaluation of the hydroxyproline content. Changes in surfactant proteins were evaluated by mRNA expression, Western blot and immunofluorescence studies. The group with alveolar Type II cell transplantation was the only one to show a reduction in the degree of lung fibrosis and a complete recovery to normal levels of surfactant proteins. One of the mechanisms involved in the beneficial effect of alveolar Type II cell transplantation is restoration of lung surfactant protein levels, which is required for proper respiratory function. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    that siderocalin expression is upregulated following M.tb infection of mouse macrophage cell lines and primary murine alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, siderocalin added exogenously as a recombinant protein or overexpressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line inhibited the intracellular growth of the pathogen......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show....... A variant form of siderocalin, which is expressed only in the macrophage cytosol, inhibited intracellular M.tb growth as effectively as the normal, secreted form, an observation that provides mechanistic insight into how siderocalin might influence iron acquisition by the bacteria in the phagosome. Our...

  19. Bone marrow macrophages support prostate cancer growth in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soki, Fabiana N; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Yeo Won; Jones, Jacqueline D; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Entezami, Payam; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Pienta, Kenneth J; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-11-03

    Resident macrophages in bone play important roles in bone remodeling, repair, and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, yet their role in skeletal metastasis remains under investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of macrophages in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis, using two in vivo mouse models of conditional macrophage depletion. RM-1 syngeneic tumor growth was analyzed in an inducible macrophage (CSF-1 receptor positive cells) ablation model (MAFIA mice). There was a significant reduction in tumor growth in the tibiae of macrophage-ablated mice, compared with control non-ablated mice. Similar results were observed when macrophage ablation was performed using liposome-encapsulated clodronate and human PC-3 prostate cancer cells where tumor-bearing long bones had increased numbers of tumor associated-macrophages. Although tumors were consistently smaller in macrophage-depleted mice, paradoxical results of macrophage depletion on bone were observed. Histomorphometric and micro-CT analyses demonstrated that clodronate-treated mice had increased bone volume, while MAFIA mice had reduced bone volume. These results suggest that the effect of macrophage depletion on tumor growth was independent of its effect on bone responses and that macrophages in bone may be more important to tumor growth than the bone itself. In conclusion, resident macrophages play a pivotal role in prostate cancer growth in bone.

  20. Lung collagens perpetuate pulmonary fibrosis via CD204 and M2 macrophage activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Stahl

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by abundant collagen production and accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 in the lower respiratory tract. Mechanisms as to how alveolar macrophages are activated by collagen breakdown products are unknown. Alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 30 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and 37 healthy donors (HD. Alveolar macrophages were cultured in the presence of collagen type I, III, IV and V monomers w/wo a neutralizing antibody against scavenger receptor I class A (CD204. Culture supernatants were assayed for the M2 markers CCL18, CCL2, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra by ELISA. Furthermore, expression of phospho-Akt was measured using ELISA and expression of CD204 by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. Stimulation with collagen type I and III monomers significantly up-regulated CCL18, IL-1ra production of alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, expression of CCL2 and CD204 were up-regulated by collagen type I exposure. In addition, collagen type I stimulation increased pospho-Akt expression. Collagen type I effects were abrogated by neutralizing antiCD204 and a non-selective Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002. Spontaneous CD204 expression of alveolar macrophages was significantly increased in patients with IPF. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that monomeric collagen type I via CD204 induces phospho-Akt expression shifting alveolar macrophages to the profibrotic M2 type. Innate immune responses induced by collagen monomers might perpetuate pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eHoppstädter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth.We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: GM-CSF/LPS/IFN-gamma was used to generate primary human M1 cells and M-CSF/IL-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages. PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-gamma and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø 26 and 41 nm and microparticles (Ø 1.75 µm was quantified. At the concentration used (50 µg/ml, silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human monocyte-derived macrophages compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages (TAM obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue.In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but might also open up therapeutic perspectives allowing to specifically target M2

  2. Estrogen Signaling Contributes to Sex Differences in Macrophage Polarization during Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Aleksander; Fang, Xi; White, Preston B; Heller, Nicola M

    2017-09-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic Th2 inflammation in the lungs that constricts the airways and presents as coughing and wheezing. Asthma mostly affects boys in childhood and women in adulthood, suggesting that shifts in sex hormones alter the course of the disease. Alveolar macrophages have emerged as major mediators of allergic lung inflammation in animal models as well as humans. Whether sex differences exist in macrophage polarization and the molecular mechanism(s) that drive differential responses are not well understood. We found that IL-4-stimulated bone marrow-derived and alveolar macrophages from female mice exhibited greater expression of M2 genes in vitro and after allergen challenge in vivo. Alveolar macrophages from female mice exhibited greater expression of the IL-4Rα and estrogen receptor (ER) α compared with macrophages from male mice following allergen challenge. An ERα-specific agonist enhanced IL-4-induced M2 gene expression in macrophages from both sexes, but more so in macrophages from female mice. Furthermore, IL-4-stimulated macrophages from female mice exhibited more transcriptionally active histone modifications at M2 gene promoters than did macrophages from male mice. We found that supplementation of estrogen into ovariectomized female mice enhanced M2 polarization in vivo upon challenge with allergen and that macrophage-specific deletion of ERα impaired this M2 polarization. The effects of estrogen are long-lasting; bone marrow-derived macrophages from ovariectomized mice implanted with estrogen exhibited enhanced IL-4-induced M2 gene expression compared with macrophages from placebo-implanted littermates. Taken together, our findings suggest that estrogen enhances IL-4-induced M2 gene expression and thereby contributes to sex differences observed in asthma. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  4. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of 59 Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of 59 Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in 59 Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models

  5. Alveolar bone resorption after tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Popovski, Stipica

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar ridge resorption has long been considered an unavoidable consequence of tooth extraction. Atrophy of the alveolar bone may cause significant esthetic and surgical problems in implantation, as well as at prosthetic and restorative dentistry. Alveolar ridge prophylaxis immediately upon tooth extraction may reduce such sequelae for both, the treating dentist and the patient. Attempts to reduce alveolar bone resorption have included the placement of natural roots, root analogues, and...

  6. Macrophage Akt1 Kinase-Mediated Mitophagy Modulates Apoptosis Resistance and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Deshane, Jessy S; Ryan, Alan J; Thannickal, Victor J; Carter, A Brent

    2016-03-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disorder with increasing incidence. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis. Mitophagy, the selective engulfment of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagasomes, is important for cellular homeostasis and can be induced by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we show Akt1 induced macrophage mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitophagy. Mice harboring a conditional deletion of Akt1 in macrophages (Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre) and Park2(-/-) mice had impaired mitophagy and reduced active transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Although Akt1 increased TGF-β1 expression, mitophagy inhibition in Akt1-overexpressing macrophages abrogated TGF-β1 expression and fibroblast differentiation. Importantly, conditional Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre mice and Park2(-/-) mice had increased macrophage apoptosis and were protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, IPF alveolar macrophages had evidence of increased mitophagy and displayed apoptosis resistance. These observations suggest that Akt1-mediated mitophagy contributes to alveolar macrophage apoptosis resistance and is required for pulmonary fibrosis development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA Damage Signaling Instructs Polyploid Macrophage Fate in Granulomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrtwich, Laura; Nanda, Indrajit; Evangelou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    granuloma-resident macrophages formed via modified cell divisions and mitotic defects and not, as previously thought, by cell-to-cell fusion. TLR2 signaling promoted macrophage polyploidy and suppressed genomic instability by regulating Myc and ATR. We propose that, in the presence of persistent...

  8. Macrophage Polarization in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Weighing Down our Understanding of Macrophage Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Kraakman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes are now recognized as chronic pro-inflammatory diseases. In the last decade, the role of the macrophage in particular has become increasingly implicated in their pathogenesis. Abundant literature now establishes that monocytes get recruited to peripheral tissues (ie pancreas, liver and adipose tissue to become resident macrophages and contribute to local inflammation, development of insulin resistance or even pancreatic dysfunction. Furthermore, an accumulation of evidence has established an important role for macrophage polarisation in the development of metabolic diseases. The general view in obesity is that there is an imbalance in the ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, with M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages being enhanced compared with M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages being down-regulated, leading to chronic inflammation and the propagation of metabolic dysfunction. However, there is emerging evidence revealing a more complex scenario with the spectrum of macrophage states exceeding well beyond the M1/M2 binary classification and confused further by human and animal models exhibiting different macrophage profiles. In this review we will discuss the recent findings regarding macrophage polarization in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  9. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis and tuberculosis in a diabetic patient: a rare or a seldom diagnosed association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira-Silva J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP, in association with tuberculosis, is described in a 35-year-old diabetic patient. Lung biopsy showed an intra-alveolar accumulation of PAS-positive material, and multifocal granulomas compatible with tuberculosis. The bronchoalveolar culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PAP results from an imbalance of the mechanisms that regulate the homeostasis of the surfactant, where specific proteins are involved, especially SP-A and SP-D, the cytokines, IL-10 and GM-CSF, in addition to alveolar macrophages and type-II pneumocytes. Chemotaxis and phagocytic capacity are reduced. PAP and diabetes share several immunological disfunctions that may increase the risk for tuberculosis. Although there are no controlled studies, the diagnosis of PAP in diabetic patients with tuberculosis must be considered.

  10. Intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.; Prat, J.; Lopez, J.I.; Velilla, O.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975 Dail and Liebow described the clinical and pathological characteristics of a pulmonary tumor which they dominated intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor (IVBAT). Our aim is to acquaint radiologists with the existence of this tumor by describing the radiologic findings in 2 patients with IVBAT, 1 with hepatic involvement ant the other with pulmonary osteoarthropathy. (author). 7 refs.; 2 figs

  11. Human alveolar echinococcosis in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usubalieva, Jumagul; Minbaeva, Gulnara; Ziadinov, Iskender; Deplazes, Peter; Torgerson, Paul R

    2013-07-01

    Human echinococcosis is a reportable disease in Kyrgyzstan. Between 1995 and 2011, human alveolar echinococcosis increased from 60 cases per year. The origins of this epidemic, which started in 2004, may be linked to the socioeconomic changes that followed the dissolution of the former Soviet Union.

  12. True Fibroma of Alveolar Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankargouda Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign fibrous overgrowths are often found in the oral cavity, almost always being reactive/irritational in nature. However, benign mesenchymal neoplasms of the fibroblasts are extremely uncommon. Here we report a case of “True Fibroma of Alveolar Mucosa” for its rarity.

  13. The impact of breed and tissue compartment on the response of pig macrophages to lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanovic, Ronan; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Downing, Alison; Beraldi, Dario; Sester, David P; Freeman, Tom C; Tuggle, Christopher K; Archibald, Alan L; Hume, David A

    2013-08-28

    The draft genome of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa) has recently been published permitting refined analysis of the transcriptome. Pig breeds have been reported to differ in their resistance to infectious disease. In this study we examine whether there are corresponding differences in gene expression in innate immune cells We demonstrate that macrophages can be harvested from three different compartments of the pig (lungs, blood and bone-marrow), cryopreserved and subsequently recovered and differentiated in CSF-1. We have performed surface marker analysis and gene expression profiling on macrophages from these compartments, comparing twenty-five animals from five different breeds and their response to lipopolysaccharide. The results provide a clear distinction between alveolar macrophages (AM) and monocyte-derived (MDM) and bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). In particular, the lung macrophages express the growth factor, FLT1 and its ligand, VEGFA at high levels, suggesting a distinct pathway of growth regulation. Relatively few genes showed breed-specific differential expression, notably CXCR2 and CD302 in alveolar macrophages. In contrast, there was substantial inter-individual variation between pigs within breeds, mostly affecting genes annotated as being involved in immune responses. Pig macrophages more closely resemble human, than mouse, in their set of macrophage-expressed and LPS-inducible genes. Future research will address whether inter-individual variation in macrophage gene expression is heritable, and might form the basis for selective breeding for disease resistance.

  14. Alveolar inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Martina; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Viglio, Simona

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In infected lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, opportunistic pathogens and mutated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) contribute to chronic airway inflammation that is characterized by neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, cytokine release...

  15. Mechanism of action and morphologic changes in the alveolar bone in response to selective alveolar decortication-facilitated tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloul, S Susan; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Morgan, Elise F; Carvalho, Roberto S; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test if corticotomy-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling underlie orthodontic tooth movement and how selective alveolar decortication enhances the rate of tooth movement. A total of 114 Sprague-Dawley rats were included in 3 treatment groups: selective alveolar decortication alone (SADc); tooth movement alone (TM); and "combined" therapy (SADc + TM). Surgery was performed around the buccal and palatal aspects of the left maxillary first molar tooth and included 5 decortication dots on each side. Tooth movement was performed on the first molar using a 25-g Sentalloy spring. Measurements were done at baseline (day 0: no treatment rendered) and on days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42. Microcomputed tomography, Faxitron analyses, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) of expressed mRNAs were used to assess changes. The combined group showed increased tooth movement (P = 0.04) at 7 days compared with the tooth movement group with significantly decreased bone volume (62%; P = 0.016) and bone mineral content (63%; P = 0.015). RNA markers of osteoclastic cells and key osteoclastic regulators (M-CSF [macrophage colony-stimulating factor], RANKL [receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand], OPG [osteoprotegerin], calcitonin receptor [CTR], TRACP-5b [tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b], cathepsin K [Ctsk]) all showed expression indicating increased osteoclastogenesis in the combined group. RNA markers of osteoblastic cells (OPN [osteopontin], BSP [bone sialoprotein], OCN [osteocalcin]) also showed increased anabolic activity in response to the combination of alveolar decortication and tooth movement. The data suggest that the alveolar decortication enhances the rate of tooth movement during the initial tooth displacement phase; this results in a coupled mechanism of bone resorption and bone formation during the earlier stages of treatment, and this mechanism underlies the rapid orthodontic tooth movement

  16. Concurrent infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Haemophilus parasuis in two types of porcine macrophages: apoptosis, production of ROS and formation of multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanová, Lenka; Matiašková, Katarína; Levá, Lenka; Štěpánová, Hana; Nedbalcová, Kateřina; Matiašovic, Ján; Faldyna, Martin; Salát, Jiří

    2017-05-04

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most significant and economically important infectious diseases affecting swine worldwide and can predispose pigs to secondary bacterial infections caused by, e.g. Haemophilus parasuis. The aim of the presented study was to compare susceptibility of two different types of macrophages which could be in contact with both pathogens during infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) and in co-infection with H. parasuis. Alveolar macrophages (PAMs) as resident cells provide one of the first lines of defence against microbes invading lung tissue. On the other hand, monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs) represent inflammatory cells accumulating at the site of inflammation. While PAMs were relatively resistant to cytopathogenic effect caused by PRRSV, MDMs were much more sensitive to PRRSV infection. MDMs infected with PRRSV increased expression of pro-apoptotic Bad, Bax and p53 mRNA. Increased mortality of MDMs may be also related to a higher intensity of ROS production after infection with PRRSV. In addition, MDMs (but not PAMs) infected with H. parasuis alone formed multinucleated giant cells (MGC); these cells were not observed in MDMs infected with both pathogens. Higher sensitivity of MDMs to PRRSV infection, which is associated with limited MDMs survival and restriction of MGC formation, could contribute to the development of multifactorial respiratory disease of swine.

  17. Diesel Exhaust Particles and the Induction of Macrophage Activation and Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Akeem O

    2018-02-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are an important component of air particulate matter, generated from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuel in diesel engines. Several epidemiological and experimental data have shown the ability of DEP to induce oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory response as mechanisms in macrophage activation and dysfunction. Macrophages are very important to immunity and immune response due to their ability to phagocyte microbes and parasites. They also respond to toxic chemicals, such as DEP, in the environment and studies have shown that their functions may be impaired by their exposure to DEP. For instance, the ultrafine particles (UFP) of DEP are capable of penetrating deep into the lungs and getting deposited in the alveolar component, where they can mitigate against the phagocytosis function of the alveolar macrophages. In this review, data linking DEP exposure to macrophage activation and dysfunction are addressed together with the various mechanisms involved in these DEP-induced effects.

  18. Differential contribution of monocytes to heart macrophages in steady-state and after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidt, Timo; Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Sager, Hendrik B.; Sebas, Matt; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Sun, Yuan; Da Silva, Nicolas; Panizzi, Peter; van der Lahn, Anja M.; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages populate the steady-state myocardium. Previously, all macrophages were thought to arise from monocytes; however, it emerged that, in several organs, tissue-resident macrophages may self-maintain through local proliferation. Our aim was to study the contribution of monocytes to

  19. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin-dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladapted hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis.

  20. Glycoprotein profiles of macrophages at different stages of activation as revealed by lectin binding after electrophoretic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimura, T; North, S M; Nicolson, G L

    1987-01-01

    Glycoprotein profiles of rat macrophages (M phi) at different stages of activation were studied by examining the reactivity of various lectins to the glycoproteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 (RCA1) revealed several components including glycoproteins of Mr 160 kDa and 65 kDa prominent in resident M phi. A pokeweed mitogen (PWM) isolectin, Pa-4, recognizes branched poly(N-acetyllactosamine)-type carbohydrate chains, and revealed a significant increase in glycoproteins of Mr ranging from 70 kDa to 150 kDa on thioglycolate-elicited M phi. Increased reactivity of PWM to thioglycolate-elicited M phi was observed by direct binding of 125I-labeled Pa-4 to intact or glutaraldehyde-fixed M phi. Histochemical staining of formaldehyde-fixed M phi in vitro with biotinylated Pa-4 was consistent with the gel analysis, that is, resident M phi had no reactivity while thioglycolate-elicited M phi showed slight reactivity. Alveolar and intratumoral M phi bound more Pa-4 than resident or thioglycolate-elicited M phi. The PWM isolectin may therefore serve as a marker for an early stage of M phi activation.

  1. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  2. The role of macrophage derived growth factors in pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, J.A.; Jarpe, M.; Benson, J.M.; Henderson, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Factors released from rat alveolar macrophages exposed to high (95 μg/mL) concentrations of the fibrogenic agent, nickel subsulfide, were found to inhibit the proliferation of cultured lung epithelial cells and stimulate the growth of fibroblasts. Such factors, if present in the alveoli of rats exposed by inhalation to nickel subsulfide in vivo, may play a role in inhibiting re-epithelization of nickel-damaged lungs and in stimulating fibroblast proliferation, leading to pulmonary fibrosis. (author)

  3. Heterogeneity of the radiosensitivity and origins of tissue macrophage colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghiso, Yoichi; Yamada, Yutaka (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that the radiosensitivity and origin of tissue macrophage precursors differ from those of hemopoietic macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-Ms) committed to macrophage-lineage cells. We assessed the origins of tissue macrophage colony-forming cells (M-CFCs) in mice by comparing their kinetics and radiosensitivities in the normal steady state and under the conditions of bone marrow depletion by [sup 89]Sr-administration and/or splenectomy. The results indicate that the radiosensitive peritoneal M-CFCs elicited by thioglycollate are derived from bone marrow macrophage precursors; where as alveolar M-CFCs, which are radioresistant, are self-sustained locally and independent of hemopoietic macrophage precursors. In contrast, highly radiosensitive liver M-CFCs are probably derived from CFU-Ms that appear to be propagated in the spleen in association with hemopoietic responses. (author).

  4. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin

  5. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Rückerl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2 similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell.

  6. Origins and Hallmarks of Macrophages: Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Chawla, Ajay; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Macrophages the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system are found in all tissues and exhibit great functional diversity. They have roles in development, homeostasis, tissue repair, and immunity. While anatomically distinct, resident tissue macrophages exhibit different transcriptional profiles, and functional capabilities, they are all required for the maintenance of homeostasis. However, these reparative and homeostatic functions can be subverted by chronic insults, resulting in a causal association of macrophages with disease states. In this review, we discuss how macrophages regulate normal physiology and development and provide several examples of their pathophysiologic roles in disease. We define the “hallmarks” of macrophages performing particular functions, taking into account novel insights into the diversity of their lineages, identity, and regulation. This diversity is essential to understand because macrophages have emerged as important therapeutic targets in many important human diseases. PMID:23619691

  7. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  8. Immune modulation with sulfasalazine attenuates immunopathogenesis but enhances macrophage-mediated fungal clearance during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although T cells are critical for host defense against respiratory fungal infections, they also contribute to the immunopathogenesis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP. However, the precise downstream effector mechanisms by which T cells mediate these diverse processes are undefined. In the current study the effects of immune modulation with sulfasalazine were evaluated in a mouse model of PcP-related Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (PcP-IRIS. Recovery of T cell-mediated immunity in Pneumocystis-infected immunodeficient mice restored host defense, but also initiated the marked pulmonary inflammation and severe pulmonary function deficits characteristic of IRIS. Sulfasalazine produced a profound attenuation of IRIS, with the unexpected consequence of accelerated fungal clearance. To determine whether macrophage phagocytosis is an effector mechanism of T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance and whether sulfasalazine enhances clearance by altering alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity, a novel multispectral imaging flow cytometer-based method was developed to quantify the phagocytosis of Pneumocystis in vivo. Following immune reconstitution, alveolar macrophages from PcP-IRIS mice exhibited a dramatic increase in their ability to actively phagocytose Pneumocystis. Increased phagocytosis correlated temporally with fungal clearance, and required the presence of CD4(+ T cells. Sulfasalazine accelerated the onset of the CD4(+ T cell-dependent alveolar macrophage phagocytic response in PcP-IRIS mice, resulting in enhanced fungal clearance. Furthermore, sulfasalazine promoted a TH2-polarized cytokine environment in the lung, and sulfasalazine-enhanced phagocytosis of Pneumocystis was associated with an alternatively activated alveolar macrophage phenotype. These results provide evidence that macrophage phagocytosis is an important in vivo effector mechanism for T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance, and that macrophage phenotype can be altered

  9. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  10. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  11. Ontogeny and Polarization of Macrophages in Inflammation: Blood monocytes versus tissue macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwitia eDey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of new information in recent years on the origin of macrophages in the steady-state and in the context of inflammation has opened up numerous new avenues of investigation and possibilities for therapeutic intervention. In contrast to the classical model of macrophage development, it is clear that tissue-resident macrophages can develop from yolk sac-derived erythromyeloid progenitors, fetal liver progenitors and bone marrow-derived monocytes. Under both homeostatic conditions and in response to pathophysiological insult, the contribution of these distinct sources of macrophages varies significantly between tissues. Furthermore, while all of these populations of macrophages appear to be capable of adopting the polarized M1/M2 phenotypes, their respective contribution to inflammation, resolution of inflammation and tissue repair remains poorly understood and is likely to be tissue- and disease-dependent. A better understanding of the ontology and polarization capacity of macrophages in homeostasis and disease will be essential for the development of novel therapies that target the inherent plasticity of macrophages in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory disease.

  12. Macrophage Populations in Visceral Adipose Tissue from Pregnant Women: Potential Role of Obesity in Maternal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyerahi Bravo-Flores

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with inflammatory changes and accumulation and phenotype polarization of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Obese pregnant women have alterations in adipose tissue composition, but a detailed description of macrophage population is not available. In this study, we characterized macrophage populations in visceral adipose tissue (VAT from pregnant women with normal, overweight, and obese pregestational weight. Immunophenotyping of macrophages from VAT biopsies was performed by flow cytometry using CD45 and CD14 as markers of hematopoietic and monocyte linage, respectively, while HLA-DR, CD11c, CD163, and CD206 were used as pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Adipocyte number and size were evaluated by light microscopy. The results show that pregnant women that were overweight and obese during the pregestational period had adipocyte hypertrophy. Two different macrophage populations in VAT were identified: recruited macrophages (CD45+CD14+, and a novel population lacking CD45, which was considered to be a resident macrophages subset (CD45−CD14+. The number of resident HLA−DRlow/− macrophages showed a negative correlation with body mass index (BMI. Both resident and recruited macrophages from obese women expressed higher CD206 levels. CD11c expression was higher in resident HLA-DR+ macrophages from obese women. A strong correlation between CD206 and CD11c markers and BMI was observed. Our findings show that being overweight and obese in the pregestational period is associated with adipocyte hypertrophy and specific ATMs populations in VAT.

  13. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuna Zoe de Back

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC. During steady state haematopoiesis, approximately 1010 red blood cells are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  14. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Loercher, U.; Kitz, R.; Zielen, S.; Ahrens, P.; Koenig, R.

    1996-01-01

    Two asymptomatic Turkish sibs are presented, a 4-year-old boy and his 7-year-old sister, with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage. Chest radiographs and high resolution CT demonstrated wide-spread intra-alveolar calcifications in both lungs. The lesions were sharply defined and less than 1 mm in diameter. CT documented a high concentration of microliths along the bronchovascular bundles, the intralobular fissue and the (sub)pleural lung parenchyma. The combination of bronchoalveolar lavage and roentgenographic appearance in high resolution CT are characteristic and pathognomonic, and can confirm the diagnosis. The more severe changes in the elder sib and the radiographic controls suggest that the pulmonary disease may be progressive in our patients. The described family of consanguineous, unaffected parents with two affected and one healthy child confirmed the autosomal recessive inheritance of PAM (McKusick 265100). In addition, the affected girl had autosomal recessive Waardenburg-anophthalmia syndrome (McKusick 206920), raising the question of whether this is a chance occurrence or possibly a contiguous gene syndrome. (orig.)

  15. The LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment into rat air pouches is mediated by TNFα: likely macrophage origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C-D. Arreto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of resident cells during the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment into rat air pouches was investigated. In this model, LPS (Escherichia coli, O55: B5 strain; 2–2000 ng induced a dose– and time-dependent neutrophil recruitment accompanied by the generation of a tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα-like activity. Dexamethasone (0.05–5 mug and cycloheximide (6 ng, injected 2 h before LPS into the pouches, inhibited the neutrophil recruitment and the generation of the TNFα-like activity, while the H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine (1 and 4 mg/kg, i.p., 0.5 h before LPS and the PAF-receptor antagonist WEB 2170 (0.05 and 1 mg/kg, i.p., 0.5 h before LPS had no effect. Purified alveolar macrophages (AM were used to replenish the pouches of cycloheximide-treated recipient rats. AM provided by PBS-treated animals led to the recovery of the LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment and of the TNFα-like formation contrasting with those from cycloheximide-treated animals (1 mg/kg, i.p.. When delivered in situ, liposome-encapsulated clodronate, a macrophage depletor, significantly impaired both the LPSinduced neutrophil recruitment and the TNFα-like activity. An anti-murine TNFα polyclonal antibody (0.5 h before LPS was also effective. These results emphasize the pivotal role of macrophages for LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment via the formation of TNFα.

  16. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  17. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin.

  18. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin.

  19. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin.

  20. CT quantification of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurche, K.D.; Kubale, R.; Vallee, D.; Ostertag, H.

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare, familial disease with massive symmetrical intra-alveolar calcium deposition. Conventional CT findings and CT measurements with a dual energy technique were carried out in a 26-year-old patient suffering from this disease. The importance of the findings in the differential diagnosis and for estimating the progression and prognosis of the disease is discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Beryllium uptake and related biological effects studied in THP-1 differentiated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Lin, Lin; Hang, Wei; Yan, Xiaomei

    2009-11-01

    Investigation of cellular uptake of metal compounds is important in understanding metal-related toxicity and diseases. Inhalation of beryllium aerosols can cause chronic beryllium disease, a progressive, granulomatous fibrosis of the lung. Studies in laboratory animals and cultured animal cells indicate that alveolar macrophages take up beryllium compounds and participate in a hypersensitivity immune response to a beryllium-containing antigen. In the present work, human monocyte cell line THP-1 was induced with phorbol myristate acetate to differentiate into a macrophage. This cell with characteristics of human alveolar macrophages was employed to study cellular beryllium uptake and related biological effects. Morphological changes, phagocytosis of fluorescent latex beads, and cell surface CD14 expression were used to verify the successful differentiation of THP-1 monocytes into macrophages. An improved mass spectrometry method for quantitative analysis of intracellular beryllium as opposed to the traditional radioisotopic approach was developed using ICP-MS. The influence of the solubility of beryllium compounds, exposure duration, and beryllium concentration on the incorporation of beryllium was studied. Our data indicated that the uptake of particulate BeO was much more significant than that of soluble BeSO(4), suggesting the major cellular uptake pathway is phagocytosis. Nevertheless, subsequent DAPI nuclear staining and PARP cleavage study indicated that beryllium uptake had a negligible effect on the apoptosis of THP-1 macrophages compared to the unstimulated macrophage control. Meanwhile, no substantial variation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha production was observed for THP-1 macrophages upon beryllium exposure. These data imply alveolar macrophages could have some level of tolerance to beryllium and this may explain why most Be-exposed individuals remain healthy throughout life.

  2. Roles of Macrophage Subtypes in Bowel Anastomotic Healing and Anastomotic Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyao Shi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in host defense, in addition to the powerful ability to phagocytose pathogens or foreign matters. They fulfill a variety of roles in immune regulation, wound healing, and tissue homeostasis preservation. Macrophages are characterized by high heterogeneity, which can polarize into at least two major extremes, M1-type macrophages (classical activation which are normally derived from monocytes and M2-type macrophages (alternative activation which are mostly those tissue-resident macrophages. Based on the wound healing process in skin, the previous studies have documented how these different subtypes of macrophages participate in tissue repair and remodeling, while the mechanism of macrophages in bowel anastomotic healing has not yet been established. This review summarizes the currently available evidence regarding the different roles of polarized macrophages in the physiological course of anastomotic healing and their pathological roles in anastomotic leakage, the most dangerous complication after gastrointestinal surgery.

  3. Macrophages and bone inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Gu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone metabolism is tightly regulated by the immune system. Accelerated bone destruction is observed in many bone diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, and particle-induced osteolysis. These pathological conditions are associated with inflammatory responses, suggesting the contribution of inflammation to bone destruction. Macrophages are heterogeneous immune cells and are polarized into the proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 phenotypes in different microenvironments. The cytokines produced by macrophages depend on the macrophage activation and polarization. Macrophages and macrophage-derived cytokines are important to bone loss in inflammatory bone disease. Recent studies have shown that macrophages can be detected in bone tissue and interact with bone cells. The interplay between macrophages and bone cells is critical to bone formation and repair. In this article, we focus on the role of macrophages in inflammatory bone diseases, as well as discuss the latest studies about macrophages and bone formation, which will provide new insights into the therapeutic strategy for bone disease.

  4. Dichloroacetate Decreases Cell Health and Activates Oxidative Stress Defense Pathways in Rat Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes

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    Alexis Valauri-Orton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichloroacetate (DCA is a water purification byproduct that is known to be hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic and to induce peripheral neuropathy and damage macrophages. This study characterizes the effects of the haloacetate on lung cells by exposing rat alveolar type II (L2 cells to 0–24 mM DCA for 6–24 hours. Increasing DCA concentration and the combination of increasing DCA concentration plus longer exposures decrease measures of cellular health. Length of exposure has no effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, glutathione, SOD, or CAT. Increasing DCA concentration alone does not affect total glutathione or its redox ratio but does increase activity in the SOD/CAT oxidative stress defense pathway. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells rely on SOD and CAT more than glutathione to combat DCA-induced stress.

  5. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  6. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Albert, Matthew L; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder.

  7. Macrophages and vascular adhesion molecules in oral Kaposi's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, L A; Dekker, N P; Regezi, J A

    1996-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a heterogeneous tumor where spindle cells are predominant and macrophages and factor XIIIa positive dendrocytes are abundant. The origin of the macrophages and dendrocytes is unclear, although their numbers suggest a critical role in KS pathogenesis. To determine if KS macrophages are recruited from the blood stream or proliferate on-site, we examined biopsy specimens 1) for expression and distribution of vascular adhesion molecules (PECAM-1, ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin, L-selectin) and the macrophage-associated adhesion-molecule ligand, VLA-4; 2) for dual expression of proliferation (Ki-67) and lineage-associated markers (KP-1, CD34, factor XIIIa, LCA); and 3) for dual expression of macrophage (KP-1) and endothelial cell (CD34) associated markers. Avidinbiotin peroxidase techniques were used. Resident vessels were found to strongly express PECAM-1, ELAM-1, ICAM-1, P-selectin, and moderately express VCAM-1 and VLA-4. Tumor spindle cells showed less intense expression of ELAM-1, ICAM-1 and P-selectin. The most frequent double-stain combination was Ki-67 + CD34+. In contrast, the combinations of Ki-67 + KP-1+, Ki-67 + XIIIa+ and Ki-67 + LCA+ were rarely seen. The enhanced expression of adhesion molecules on resident vessels and the lack of evidence of macrophage proliferation suggest that the abundant macrophages in KS are recruited from the blood stream.

  8. Macrophages interaction with pulmonary surfactant using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Minette; Telesford, Dana Marie; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Alveolar pulmonary surfactant, composed mostly of phospholipids, is essential for maintenance of normal lung function. However, increased production of lung surfactant can lead to many pulmonary inflammatory disorders. Alveolar macrophages are responsible for the degradation of the surfactant and exhibit increased lipid uptake in inflamated lungs. Owing to their limited clearance capability, excessive accumulation of surfactant may impair their phagocytic function. In this study, the interaction of the macrophages with different lipid components was studied using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy, a nonlinear vibrational technique which combines spectroscopy and microscopy, allows noninvasive characterization and imaging of chemical species without preparation or labeling. A monolayer of THP-1 macrophages and palmitic acid-d31 on phosphate buffer solution was transferred to a coverslip using the Langmuir-Blodgett method and then imaged using CARS by mapping the CH2 stretch signal of the lipid membrane of the macrophage and C-D stretch signal from palmitic acid-d31. Preliminary results showed CARS images of the macrophage on the solid substrate and thermal degradation of the sample due to long exposure to high laser power. A contrast image is expected to be observed by mapping the CH2 and C-D signals, which can show the lipid interaction and phagocytosis of the macrophage.

  9. Comparison of lung alveolar and tissue cells in silica-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstrand, M; Absher, P M; Hemenway, D R; Trombley, L; Baldor, L C

    1991-01-01

    The silicon dioxide mineral, cristobalite (CRS) induces inflammation involving both alveolar cells and connective tissue compartments. In this study, we compared lung cells recovered by whole lung lavage and by digestion of lung tissue from rats at varying times after 8 days of exposure to aerosolized CRS. Control and exposed rats were examined between 2 and 36 wk after exposure. Lavaged cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage with phosphate-buffered saline. Lung wall cells were prepared via collagenase digestion of lung tissue slices. Cells from lavage and lung wall were separated by Percoll density centrifugation. The three upper fractions, containing mostly macrophages, were cultured, and the conditioned medium was assayed for effect on lung fibroblast growth and for activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Results demonstrated that the cells separated from the lung walls exhibited different reaction patterns compared with those cells recovered by lavage. The lung wall cells exhibited a progressive increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes compared with a steady state in cells of the lung lavage. This increase in macrophages apparently was due to low density cells, which showed features of silica exposure. Secretion of a fibroblast-stimulating factor was consistently high by lung wall macrophages, whereas lung lavage macrophages showed inconsistent variations. The secretion of NAG was increased in lung lavage macrophages, but decreased at most observation times in lung wall macrophages. No differences were found among cells in the different density fractions regarding fibroblast stimulation and enzyme secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Effect of Alveolar Segmental Sandwich Osteotomy on Alveolar Height: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan S; Prasad, Kavitha; Shetty, Vibha; Ranganath, Krishnappa; Lalitha, R M; Dexith, Jayashree; Munoyath, Sejal K; Kumar, Vineeth

    2017-12-01

    Bone loss following extraction is maximum in horizontal dimension. Height is also reduced which is pronounced on the buccal aspect. Various surgical procedures are available to correct the bone volume viz. GBR, onlay bone grafting, alveolar distraction and sandwich osteotomy. Sandwich osteotomy has been found to increase the vertical alveolar bone height successfully. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of alveolar segmental sandwich osteotomy on alveolar height and crestal width. A prospective study was undertaken from December 2012 to August 2014. Seven patients with 12 implant sites with a mean age of 36 years were recruited. All seven patients with 12 implant sites underwent alveolar segmental sandwich osteotomy and interpositional bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was assessed radiographically preoperatively, immediate post-op, and at 3 months post-op. Alveolar bone width was assessed radiographically preoperatively and at 3 months post-op. Statistical significance was inferred at p  Sandwich osteotomy can be used as an alternative technique to increase alveolar bone height prior to implant placement. Moderate alveolar deficiency can be predictably corrected by this technique.

  11. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...

  12. Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Bai, An; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Kinney, William H; Weaver, Michael; Zhang, Gong; Honda, Jennifer R; Chan, Edward D

    2016-07-01

    With the worldwide emergence of highly drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), novel agents that have direct antimycobacterial effects or that enhance host immunity are urgently needed. Curcumin is a polyphenol responsible for the bright yellow-orange colour of turmeric, a spice derived from the root of the perennial herb Curcuma longa. Curcumin is a potent inducer of apoptosis-an effector mechanism used by macrophages to kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). An in vitro human macrophage infection model was used to determine the effects of curcumin on MTB survival. We found that curcumin enhanced the clearance of MTB in differentiated THP-1 human monocytes and in primary human alveolar macrophages. We also found that curcumin was an inducer of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Curcumin mediated these anti-MTB cellular functions, in part, via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) activation. Curcumin protects against MTB infection in human macrophages. The host-protective role of curcumin against MTB in macrophages needs confirmation in an animal model; if validated, the immunomodulatory anti-TB effects of curcumin would be less prone to drug resistance development. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Immunological Priming Requires Tregs and Interleukin-10-Producing Macrophages to Accelerate Resolution from Severe Lung Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Yoshiki; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Mandke, Pooja; Mock, Jason R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Horton, Maureen R.; King, Landon S.; D'Alessio, Franco R.

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming lung inflammation frequently occurs following exposure to both direct infectious and non-infectious agents, and is a leading cause of mortality world-wide. In that context, immunomodulatory strategies may be utilized to limit severity of impending organ damage. We sought to determine whether priming the lung by activating the immune system, or immunological priming, could accelerate resolution of severe lung inflammation. We assessed the importance of alveolar macrophages, regulatory T cells, and their potential interaction during immunological priming. We demonstrate that oropharyngeal delivery of low-dose lipopolysaccharide can immunologically prime the lung to augment alveolar macrophage production of interleukin-10 and enhance resolution of lung inflammation induced by a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide or by pseudomonas bacterial pneumonia. Interleukin-10 deficient mice did not achieve priming and were unable to accelerate lung injury resolution. Depletion of lung macrophages or regulatory T cells during the priming response completely abrogated the positive effect of immunological priming on resolution of lung inflammation and significantly reduced alveolar macrophage interleukin-10 production. Finally, we demonstrated that oropharyngeal delivery of synthetic CpG-oligonucleotides elicited minimal lung inflammation compared to low-dose lipopolysaccharide, but nonetheless primed the lung to accelerate resolution of lung injury following subsequent lethal lipopolysaccharide exposure. Immunological priming is a viable immunomodulatory strategy used to enhance resolution in an experimental acute lung injury model with the potential for therapeutic benefit against a wide array of injurious exposures. PMID:24688024

  14. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  15. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients.

  16. Characteristics and potential role of M2 macrophages in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shengyang He, Lihua Xie, Junjuan Lu, Shenghua SunDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Background: COPD is a multi-pathogenesis disease mainly caused by smoking. A further understanding of the mechanism of smoking-related COPD might contribute to preventions and treatments of this disease in the early stages. This study was designed to identify the characteristics of M2 macrophages in COPD for a better understanding about their potential role.Materials and methods: COPD models were built in the C57BL/6 mouse by cigarette smoke (CS exposure combined with intraperitoneal injection of cigarette smoke extract (CSE. The modeling efficiency was evaluated by lung function and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining. The number of different macrophage phenotypes was detected by immunohistochemical staining (IHS of CD206, CD86 and CD68 on the lung tissue paraffin section. The RAW264.7 cells were polarized toward the M2 phenotype by interleukin IL-4 and confirmed by a flow cytometer. The gene expression levels of TGF-βRII, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 in CSE-treated M2 macrophages were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The expression levels of TGF-β/Smad pathway-related makers (TGF-βRII, p-Smad2, p-Smad3, Smad7 and TGF-β in alveolar M2 macrophages were detected by two consecutive paraffin section IHS.Results: The COPD model is well established, which is confirmed by the lung function test and lung H&E staining. The whole number of macrophages and the ratio of M2/M1 phenotype are both increased (p<0.05. The level of CD206+ cells in IL-4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells is up to 93.4%, which is confirmed by a flow cytometer. The gene expression of TGF-βRII, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 are all enhanced (p<0.05 in CES-treated M2 macrophages, which is detected by RT-PCR. The protein levels of TGF-β/Smad pathway-related markers are

  17. SARS-CoV replicates in primary human alveolar type II cell cultures but not in type I-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossel, Eric C.; Wang, Jieru; Jeffers, Scott; Edeen, Karen E.; Wang, Shuanglin; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Funk, C. Joel; Manzer, Rizwan; Miura, Tanya A.; Pearson, Leonard D.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a disease characterized by diffuse alveolar damage. We isolated alveolar type II cells and maintained them in a highly differentiated state. Type II cell cultures supported SARS-CoV replication as evidenced by RT-PCR detection of viral subgenomic RNA and an increase in virus titer. Virus titers were maximal by 24 hours and peaked at approximately 105 pfu/mL. Two cell types within the cultures were infected. One cell type was type II cells, which were positive for SP-A, SP-C, cytokeratin, a type II cell-specific monoclonal antibody, and Ep-CAM. The other cell type was composed of spindle-shaped cells that were positive for vimentin and collagen III and likely fibroblasts. Viral replication was not detected in type I-like cells or macrophages. Hence, differentiated adult human alveolar type II cells were infectible but alveolar type I-like cells and alveolar macrophages did not support productive infection. PMID:18022664

  18. Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xu; Sun, Li; Zhou, Li; Ma, Tong-Cui; Song, Li; Wu, Jian-Guo; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a class of cell-released small vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by delivering functional factors to recipient cells. During hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the interaction between liver resident macrophages and hepatocytes is a key component in liver innate immunity. In this study, we explored the role of exosomes in the delivery of innate anti-HCV factors to hepatocytes from macrophages. We showed that supernatant from TLR3-activated macrophage cultures could...

  19. Understanding macrophage activation in the adipose tissue: at the crossroads of immunology and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutens, Lily

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages and their monocyte precursors continuously patrol the bloodstream and tissues, ready to eliminate unwelcome visitors such as pathogens or foreign particles. Tissue-resident macrophages are crucial during development and for maintaining tissue homeostasis as well. The engulfment of

  20. The role of perivascular and meningeal macrophages in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polfliet, Machteld M. J.; van de Veerdonk, F.; Döpp, Ed A.; van Kesteren-Hendrikx, Esther M. L.; van Rooijen, Nico; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2002-01-01

    The perivascular (PVM) and meningeal (MM) macrophages constitute a major population of resident macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS). To investigate a possible role of PVM and MM during CNS inflammation, we have analysed PVM and MM during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an

  1. Involvement of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy and Efficacy of Human iPS Cell-Derived Macrophages in Its Treatment.

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    Genki Suenaga

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients. Furthermore, the proportion of intracellular TTR in CD14+ monocytes was reduced in peripheral blood compared with healthy donors. Based on these results, we next examined degradation and endocytosis of TTR in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived myeloid lineage cells (MLs, which function like macrophages. iPS-MLs express CD163 and CD206, and belong to the inhibitory macrophage category. In addition, iPS-MLs degrade both native and aggregated TTR in a cell-dependent manner in vitro. Further, iPS-MLs endocytose aggregated, and especially polymerized, TTR. These results suggest that decreased tissue-localized macrophages disrupt clearance of TTR-derived amyloid deposits, leading to progression of a pathological condition in FAP patients. To improve this situation, clinical application of pluripotent stem cell-derived MLs may be useful as an approach for FAP therapy.

  2. Gallium arsenide differentially affects processing of phagolysosomal targeted antigen by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T A; Hartmann, C B; McCoy, K L

    1998-03-01

    Gallium arsenide, a semiconductor utilized in the electronics industry, causes immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's effect on macrophages to process antigen for activating pigeon cytochrome-specific helper T cell hybridoma was investigated. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg gallium arsenide or vehicle intraperitoneally. Five-day exposure suppressed processing by splenic macrophages but augmented processing by thioglycollate-elicited and resident peritoneal macrophages. Cytochrome coupled to latex beads was targeted to phagolysosomes to examine processing in lysosomes. Cytochrome beads required phagocytosis for processing and were located in phagolysosomes. Gallium arsenide did not alter the phagocytic ability of macrophages. Peritoneal macrophages normally processed the targeted antigen, indicating that gallium arsenide influenced compartment(s) preceding lysosomes. However, the processing efficiency of exposed splenic macrophages depended on the size of particulate cytochrome, suggesting that processing varied in phagolysosomes of different sizes. Gallium arsenide impacted different intracellular compartments in these macrophages, perhaps contributing to systemic immunotoxicity and local inflammation caused by exposure.

  3. [Cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae. Proposal of new alveolar score by the Alveolar Cleft Score (ACS) classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molé, C; Simon, E

    2015-06-01

    The management of cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae remains problematic today. To optimize it, we tried to establish a new clinical index for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Seven tissue indicators, that we consider to be important in the management of alveolar sequelae, are listed by assigning them individual scores. The final score, obtained by adding together the individual scores, can take a low, high or maximum value. We propose a new classification (ACS: Alveolar Cleft Score) that guides the therapeutic team to a prognosis approach, in terms of the recommended surgical and prosthetic reconstruction, the type of medical care required, and the preventive and supportive therapy to establish. Current studies are often only based on a standard radiological evaluation of the alveolar bone height at the cleft site. However, the gingival, the osseous and the cellular areas bordering the alveolar cleft sequelae induce many clinical parameters, which should be reflected in the morphological diagnosis, to better direct the surgical indications and the future prosthetic requirements, and to best maintain successful long term aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cysteamine-mediated clearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

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    Chandra L Shrestha

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are virulent, multi-drug resistant pathogens that survive and replicate intracellularly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. We have discovered that B. cenocepacia cannot be cleared from CF macrophages due to defective autophagy, causing continued systemic inflammation and infection. Defective autophagy in CF is mediated through constitutive reactive oxygen species (ROS activation of transglutaminase-2 (TG2, which causes the sequestration (accumulation of essential autophagy initiating proteins. Cysteamine is a TG2 inhibitor and proteostasis regulator with the potential to restore autophagy. Therefore, we sought to examine the impact of cysteamine on CF macrophage autophagy and bacterial killing. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs and alveolar macrophages were isolated from CF and non-CF donors. Macrophages were infected with clinical isolates of relevant CF pathogens. Cysteamine caused direct bacterial growth killing of live B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, P. aeruginosa and MRSA in the absence of cells. Additionally, B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, and P. aeruginosa invasion were significantly decreased in CF MDMs treated with cysteamine. Finally, cysteamine decreased TG2, p62, and beclin-1 accumulation in CF, leading to increased Burkholderia uptake into autophagosomes, increased macrophage CFTR expression, and decreased ROS and IL-1β production. Cysteamine has direct anti-bacterial growth killing and improves human CF macrophage autophagy resulting in increased macrophage-mediated bacterial clearance, decreased inflammation, and reduced constitutive ROS production. Thus, cysteamine may be an effective adjunct to antibiotic regimens in CF.

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae hides inside apoptotic neutrophils to silently infect and propagate in macrophages.

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    Jan Rupp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracellular pathogens have developed elaborate strategies for silent infection of preferred host cells. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common pathogen in acute infections of the respiratory tract (e.g. pneumonia and associated with chronic lung sequelae in adults and children. Within the lung, alveolar macrophages and polymorph nuclear neutrophils (PMN are the first line of defense against bacteria, but also preferred host phagocytes of chlamydiae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We could show that C. pneumoniae easily infect and hide inside neutrophil granulocytes until these cells become apoptotic and are subsequently taken up by macrophages. C. pneumoniae infection of macrophages via apoptotic PMN results in enhanced replicative activity of chlamydiae when compared to direct infection of macrophages, which results in persistence of the pathogen. Inhibition of the apoptotic recognition of C. pneumoniae infected PMN using PS- masking Annexin A5 significantly lowered the transmission of chlamydial infection to macrophages. Transfer of apoptotic C. pneumoniae infected PMN to macrophages resulted in an increased TGF-ss production, whereas direct infection of macrophages with chlamydiae was characterized by an enhanced TNF-alpha response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data suggest that C. pneumoniae uses neutrophil granulocytes to be silently taken up by long-lived macrophages, which allows for efficient propagation and immune protection within the human host.

  6. Hemosiderin in sputum macrophages may predict infective exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Sindu; Ho, Terence; Kjarsgaard, Melanie; Radford, Katherine; Borhan, A S M; Thabane, Lehana; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-04-12

    Infective exacerbations of COPD are common and are accompanied by neutrophilic bronchitis in sputum. Increased respiratory iron content has been associated with respiratory tract infection, though it is unclear if this represents a predisposing factor for infection or the sequelae of inflammation. Iron overload, as assessed in the airways, may be an important biomarker for recurrent infective exacerbations of COPD. The purpose of our study was to determine if hemosiderin in sputum macrophages is related to infective exacerbations of COPD. We undertook a retrospective observational study of 54 consecutive patients who presented with an exacerbation of COPD and had sputum examined including assessment for hemosiderin in alveolar macrophages. The relation between infective exacerbations in the previous two years and the percent of hemosiderin-positive macrophages was analyzed with linear regression. To account for the non-parametric distribution of infective exacerbations, negative binomial regression modelling was used to account for other covariates. The percent of hemosiderin positive alveolar macrophages (hemosiderin index), analyzed parametrically and non-parametrically, demonstrated a significant correlation with increasing numbers of infective exacerbations in the previous two years. In a multivariate regression analysis, hemosiderin index was an independent predictor of infective exacerbations. COPD patients with raised hemosiderin index (≥20%) had higher levels of sputum IL-6 compared to patients with lower levels (hemosiderin index in sputum alveolar macrophages measured at the time of AECOPD may be related to the frequency of infective exacerbations of COPD.

  7. Intrinsic Gastrointestinal Macrophages: Their Phenotype and Role in Gastrointestinal MotilitySummary

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    Gianluca Cipriani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the role of macrophages in the regulation and maintenance of gastrointestinal function in health and disease. This work has proceeded in the context of an increased understanding of the complex phenotypic variation in macrophages throughout the body and has shown previously unidentified roles for macrophages in diseases such as gastroparesis, postoperative ileus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Opportunities for exploiting the phenotypic modulation of tissue resident macrophages have been identified as possible therapies for some of these diseases. In addition, macrophages are an established component of the innate immune system and can respond to variations and changes in the intestinal microbiome and potentially mediate part of the impact of the microbiota on intestinal health. We reviewed the latest work on novel concepts in defining macrophage phenotype, discuss possible mechanisms of action for tissue-resident macrophages in the gut, address the significance of microbiome effects on macrophage phenotype, and review the known and possible roles of macrophages in motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Keywords: Monocyte–Macrophage Precursor Cells, Gastrointestinal Motility, Enteric Nervous System, Interstitial Cells of Cajal

  8. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigi Anterior Berjejal dengan Tulang Alveolar yang Tipis

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    Miesje K. Purwanegara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior teeth movement in orthodontic treatment is limited to labiolingual direction by very thin alveolar bone. An uncontrolled anterior tooth movement to labiolingual direction can cause alveolar bone perforation at its root segment. This case report is to remind us that alveolar bone thickness limits orthodontc tooth movement. A case of crowded anterior teeth with thin alveolar bone in malocclusion I is reported. This case is treated using adgewise orthodontic appliance. Protraction of anterior teeth is anticipated due to thin alveolar bone on the anterior surface. The conclusion is although the alveolar bone surrounding the crowded anterior teeth is thin, by controlling the movement the teeth reposition is allowed.

  9. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages for Unraveling Human Macrophage Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-01

    Despite a substantial appreciation for the critical role of macrophages in cardiometabolic diseases, understanding of human macrophage biology has been hampered by the lack of reliable and scalable models for cellular and genetic studies. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages (IPSDM), as an unlimited source of subject genotype-specific cells, will undoubtedly play an important role in advancing our understanding of the role of macrophages in human diseases. In this review, we summarize current literature in the differentiation and characterization of IPSDM at phenotypic, functional, and transcriptomic levels. We emphasize the progress in differentiating iPSC to tissue resident macrophages, and in understanding the ontogeny of in vitro differentiated IPSDM that resembles primitive hematopoiesis, rather than adult definitive hematopoiesis. We review the application of IPSDM in modeling both Mendelian genetic disorders and host-pathogen interactions. Finally, we highlighted the potential areas of research using IPSDM in functional validation of coronary artery disease loci in genome-wide association studies, functional genomic analyses, drug testing, and cell therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Deletion of c-FLIP from CD11bhiMacrophages Prevents Development of Bleomycin-induced Lung Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbrey, Alexandra L; Barthel, Lea; Mohning, Michael P; Redente, Elizabeth F; Mould, Kara J; Thomas, Stacey M; Leach, Sonia M; Danhorn, Thomas; Gibbings, Sophie L; Jakubzick, Claudia V; Henson, Peter M; Janssen, William J

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease with complex pathophysiology and fatal prognosis. Macrophages (MΦ) contribute to the development of lung fibrosis; however, the underlying mechanisms and specific MΦ subsets involved remain unclear. During lung injury, two subsets of lung MΦ coexist: Siglec-F hi resident alveolar MΦ and a mixed population of CD11b hi MΦ that primarily mature from immigrating monocytes. Using a novel inducible transgenic system driven by a fragment of the human CD68 promoter, we targeted deletion of the antiapoptotic protein cellular FADD-like IL-1β-converting enzyme-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) to CD11b hi MΦ. Upon loss of c-FLIP, CD11b hi MΦ became susceptible to cell death. Using this system, we were able to show that eliminating CD11b hi MΦ present 7-14 days after bleomycin injury was sufficient to protect mice from fibrosis. RNA-seq analysis of lung MΦ present during this time showed that CD11b hi MΦ, but not Siglec-F hi MΦ, expressed high levels of profibrotic chemokines and growth factors. Human MΦ from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis expressed many of the same profibrotic chemokines identified in murine CD11b hi MΦ. Elimination of monocyte-derived MΦ may help in the treatment of fibrosis. We identify c-FLIP and the associated extrinsic cell death program as a potential pathway through which these profibrotic MΦ may be pharmacologically targeted.

  11. Technical considerations and precautions in in situ bronchoalveolar lavage and alveolar infiltrating cells isolation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Wajhul

    2015-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is an important tool in experimental toxicology and pharmacology. A number of researchers have utilized BAL in studies involving rodents. However, the detailed procedure of performing BAL in rodents has rarely been reported. In the present article, in situ BAL in rats has been described with technical points that ensure the quality and validity of BALF samples. BAL was performed in rats of Wistar strain. Flow cytometry and microscopy were utilized to analyze the BAL cells. The collected volume of BALF was 84.32 ± 2.7% of instilled volume. Alveolar macrophages were found to be prevalent in normal lungs when analyzed under microscope and by flow cytometry. The main problem that one may face is the accidental contamination of BALF samples with blood of the animal itself. Presence of blood in BALF certainly adds a significant number of cells and other biochemical variables. No blood contamination was detected in BALF. Here, a simple procedure for BAL and collection of alveolar cells (macrophages in the present study) is explained with an emphasis on technical steps and precautions, which ensures the quality of the BALF samples. Data exhibit that there is no blood contamination in the BALF and provide evidence that the technical points considered in the procedure here are successful in maintaining the quality and validity of BALF samples.

  12. Could intra-alveolar hemosiderin deposition in adults be used as a marker for previous asphyxial episodes in cases of autoerotic death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W; Masoumi, Homeyra; Haas, Elizabeth; Sage, Martin; Krous, Henry F

    2011-05-01

    Intra-alveolar hemorrhage and hemosiderin have been cited as possible markers of recent and remote asphyxial events. Little study has been undertaken of the potential significance of intra-alveolar hemosiderin in adults as a potential marker of previous sublethal asphyxial episodes. Ten cases of lethal sexual asphyxia (an entity known to be associated with repetitive sublethal asphyxial episodes) and 20 randomly selected, age- and sex-matched controls had sections of lung stained for hemosiderin. Subsequently, intra-alveolar, iron-containing macrophages were counted. All cases were men (ages 15-50 years; mean 31.8). No significant increase in hemosiderin was found in victims of sexual asphyxia, indicating that asphyxial episodes in sublethal sexual asphyxial activities may not be sufficiently intense or prolonged to cause intra-alveolar hemorrhage or that intra-alveolar hemorrhage in adults is a relatively nonspecific finding. These results do not support intra-alveolar hemosiderin deposition as a marker for previous sublethal asphyxial events in autoerotic asphyxia. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia Induce Synergistic Alveolar Bone Loss in a Mouse Periodontitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settem, Rajendra P.; El-Hassan, Ahmed Taher; Honma, Kiyonobu; Stafford, Graham P.

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is strongly associated with chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, leading to tooth loss. Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic pathogen, is thought to promote dental plaque formation by serving as a bridge bacterium between early- and late-colonizing species of the oral cavity. Previous studies have shown that F. nucleatum species synergize with T. forsythia during biofilm formation and pathogenesis. In the present study, we showed that coinfection of F. nucleatum and T. forsythia is more potent than infection with either species alone in inducing NF-κB activity and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in monocytic cells and primary murine macrophages. Moreover, in a murine model of periodontitis, mixed infection with the two species induces synergistic alveolar bone loss, characterized by bone loss which is greater than the additive alveolar bone losses induced by each species alone. Further, in comparison to the single-species infection, mixed infection caused significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration in the gingivae and osteoclastic activity in the jaw bones. These data show that F. nucleatum subspecies and T. forsythia synergistically stimulate the host immune response and induce alveolar bone loss in a murine experimental periodontitis model. PMID:22547549

  14. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Castro Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics.

  15. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  16. Leukocyte compartments in the mouse lung: distinguishing between marginated, interstitial, and alveolar cells in response to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Kathryn E; Cagnina, R Elaine; Wallace, Kori L; Ramos, Susan I; Mehrad, Borna; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-31

    We developed a flow cytometry-based assay to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte populations in the marginated vascular, interstitial, and alveolar compartments of the mouse lung. An intravenous injection of a fluorescently labeled anti-CD45 antibody was used to label circulating and marginated vascular leukocytes. Following vascular flushing to remove non-adherent cells and collection of broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lungs were digested and a second fluorescent anti-CD45 antibody was added ex vivo to identify cells not located in the vascular space. In the naïve mouse lung, we found about 11 million CD45+ leukocytes, of which 87% (9.5 million) were in the vascular marginated compartment, consisting of 17% NK cells, 17% neutrophils, 57% mononuclear myeloid cells (monocytes, macrophage precursors and dendritic cells), and 10% T cells (CD4+, CD8+, and invariant NKT cells). Non-vascular compartments including the interstitial compartment contained 7.7×10(5)cells, consisting of 49% NK cells, 25% dendritic cells, and 16% other mononuclear myeloid cells. The alveolar compartment was overwhelmingly populated by macrophages (5.63×10(5)cells, or 93%). We next studied leukocyte margination and extravasation into the lung following acid injury, a model of gastric aspiration. At 1 h after injury, neutrophils were markedly elevated in the blood while all other circulating leukocytes declined by an average of 79%. At 4 h after injury, there was a peak in the numbers of marginated neutrophils, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a peak in the number of alveolar NK cells. Most interstitial cells consisted of DCs, neutrophils, and CD4+ T cells, and most alveolar compartment cells consisted of macrophages, neutrophils, and NK cells. At 24 h after injury, there was a decline in the number of all marginated and interstitial leukocytes and a peak in alveolar neutrophils. In sum, we have developed a novel assay to study leukocyte margination and trafficking following

  17. Bone graft healing in alveolar osteoplasty in patients with unilateral lip, alveolar process, and palate clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Dariusz; Wójcicki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Secondary osteoplasty by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting is the most common procedure used in the reconstruction of the continuity of the maxillary alveolar process. The aim of the study was to analyze retrospectively the effect of certain factors on the course of the bone graft healing process in patients with unilateral complete clefts of the lip, alveolar process, and palate. The investigations involved 62 children aged 8 to 14 years (mean age, 11 years) with unilateral complete cleft of the lip, alveolar process, and palate operated on at the Clinic of Plastic Surgery in Polanica Zdrój from November 2007 to April 2009. All the procedures consisted in the reconstruction of the maxillary alveolar process by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting from the iliac bone. The analysis was performed on the basis of computed tomography scans presenting maxillary alveolar processes in the horizontal cross-sectional planes performed on the second or third postoperative day and after 6 months. They were used as the basis for the measurement of the volume and density (condensation) of the bone graft, the surface of its adhesion to the maxillary alveolar bone, and the volume and density of the healed bone. The following correlation coefficients were determined: between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the volume of the healed bone, between the adhesion surface of the bone to the alveolar bone and the density of the healed bone, and between the density of the graft and the volume of the healed bone. Increasing the surface of the graft adhesion to the bone ridges of the alveolar cleft contributes to increased volume of the healed bone and slows down the increase in its density (on 6-month follow-up). Crushing of the bone graft increases its resorption and reduces volume of the healed bone.

  18. Alveolar Ridge Carcinoma. Two Cases Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupo Triguero, Raul J; Vivar Bauza, Miriam; Alvarez Infante, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Two cases with alveolar ridge carcinoma due to prosthetist traumatism are discussed in this paper, after 9 and 10 years of using dental prosthesis. Both patients began with disturbance in the alveolar ridge. The clinical examination and biopsy showed a well differenced carcinoma. The treatment was radical surgery and radiotherapy in the first patient, and conservative surgery with radiotherapy in the second case .The patients had xerostomia after radiotherapy and the woman had difficulties with mastication. The advantages and disadvantages of the treatment were discussed, focused on the prevention and treatment for oral

  19. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other t...

  20. MicroRNAs Control Macrophage Formation and Activation: The Inflammatory Link between Obesity and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cheng-An Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation and recruitment of resident macrophages in tissues in response to physiological stress are crucial regulatory processes in promoting the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that microRNAs play important roles in modulating monocyte formation, macrophage maturation, infiltration into tissues and activation. Macrophage-dependent systemic physiological and tissue-specific responses also involve cell-cell interactions between macrophages and host tissue niche cell components, including other tissue-resident immune cell lineages, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle and others. In this review, we highlight the roles of microRNAs in regulating the development and function of macrophages in the context of obesity, which could provide insights into the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  2. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  3. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  4. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were perf...

  5. Role of macrophages in early host resistance to respiratory Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

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    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen that causes nosocomial pneumonia and other infections. Although it is recognized as an increasing threat to immunocompromised patients, the mechanism of host defense against A. baumannii infection remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the potential role of macrophages in host defense against A. baumannii infection using in vitro macrophage culture and the mouse model of intranasal (i.n. infection. Large numbers of A. baumannii were taken up by alveolar macrophages in vivo as early as 4 h after i.n. inoculation. By 24 h, the infection induced significant recruitment and activation (enhanced expression of CD80, CD86 and MHC-II of macrophages into bronchoalveolar spaces. In vitro cell culture studies showed that A. baumannii were phagocytosed by J774A.1 (J774 macrophage-like cells within 10 minutes of co-incubation, and this uptake was microfilament- and microtubule-dependent. Moreover, the viability of phagocytosed bacteria dropped significantly between 24 and 48 h after co-incubation. Infection of J774 cells by A. baumannii resulted in the production of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and moderate amounts of nitric oxide (NO. Prior treatment of J774 cells with NO inhibitors significantly suppressed their bactericidal efficacy (P<0.05. Most importantly, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages significantly enhanced the susceptibility of mice to i.n. A. baumannii challenge (P<0.01. These results indicate that macrophages may play an important role in early host defense against A. baumannii infection through the efficient phagocytosis and killing of A. baumannii to limit initial pathogen replication and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines for the rapid recruitment of other innate immune cells such as neutrophils.

  6. IL-34 Suppresses Candida albicans Induced TNFα Production in M1 Macrophages by Downregulating Expression of Dectin-1 and TLR2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a fungus that is an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Normally, C. albicans exists as a harmless commensal and does not trigger inflammatory responses by resident macrophages in skin mucosa, which may be caused by a tolerance of skin macrophage to C. albicans. IL-34 is a recently discovered cytokine, constitutively expressed by keratinocytes in the skin. IL-34 binds to the receptor of M-CSF, thereby stimulating tissue macrophage maturation and differentiation. Resident macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity and may transform into inflammatory M1 macrophages for immunity or anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages for tissue repair. M1 macrophages produce higher levels of inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα in response to C. albicans stimulation. In this study, it was demonstrated that IL-34 attenuated TNFα production by M1 macrophages challenged with heat killed Candida (HKC. The molecular mechanism of IL-34 mediated suppression of HKC induced TNFα production by M1 macrophages was by the inhibition of M1 macrophage expression of key C. albicans pattern recognition receptors (PPRs, namely, Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and Dectin-1. The results of this study indicated that constitutive IL-34 expressed by skin keratinocytes might suppress resident macrophage responses to C. albicans colonisation by maintaining low levels TLR2 and Dectin-1 expression by macrophages.

  7. Distinct Hepatic Macrophage Populations in Lean and Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral Monibas, Rafael; Johnson, Andrew M F; Osborn, Olivia; Traves, Paqui G; Mahata, Sushil K

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder associated with the development of non-communicable diseases such as cirrhosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. In humans and rodents, obesity promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation, which leads to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins. Liver macrophages (resident as well as recruited) play a significant role in hepatic inflammation and insulin resistance (IR). Interestingly, depletion of hepatic macrophages protects against the development of high-fat-induced steatosis, inflammation, and IR. Kupffer cells (KCs), liver-resident macrophages, are the first-line defense against invading pathogens, clear toxic or immunogenic molecules, and help to maintain the liver in a tolerogenic immune environment. During high fat diet feeding and steatosis, there is an increased number of recruited hepatic macrophages (RHMs) in the liver and activation of KCs to a more inflammatory or M1 state. In this review, we will focus on the role of liver macrophages (KCs and RHMs) during obesity.

  8. Distinct macrophage populations in lean and obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mayoral Monibas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder associated with the development of non-communicable diseases such as cirrhosis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and type 2 diabetes (T2D. In humans and rodents, obesity promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation, which leads to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins. Liver macrophages (resident as well as recruited play a significant role in hepatic inflammation and insulin resistance (IR. Interestingly, depletion of hepatic macrophages protects against the development of high-fat-induced steatosis, inflammation and IR. Kupffer cells (KCs, liver resident macrophages, are the first-line defense against invading pathogens, clear toxic or immunogenic molecules and help to maintain the liver in a tolerogenic immune environment. During high fat diet (HFD feeding and steatosis, there is an increased number of recruited hepatic macrophages (RHMs in the liver and activation of KCs to a more inflammatory or M1 state. In this review we will focus on the role of liver macrophages (KCs and RHMs during obesity.

  9. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong, E-mail: nzhang@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  11. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC

  12. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e. , a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated.

  13. Rapid, radiolabeled-microculture method that uses macrophages for in vitro evaluation of Mycobacterium leprae viability and drug susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, A; Sathish, M; Seshadri, P S; Nath, I

    1983-04-01

    This paper describes a microculture rapid assay using radiolabeling and mouse macrophages to determine the viability and the drug susceptibility or resistance of Mycobacterium leprae. Comparison of M. leprae resident macrophage cultures maintained in 96-well flat-bottomed plates showed results for viability and susceptibility or resistance to dapsone that were similar to results for concurrent cultures in Leighton tubes with greater numbers of bacilli and macrophages.

  14. Rapid, Radiolabeled-Microculture Method That Uses Macrophages for In Vitro Evaluation of Mycobacterium leprae Viability and Drug Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, A.; Sathish, M.; Seshadri, P. S.; Nath, Indira

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a microculture rapid assay using radiolabeling and mouse macrophages to determine the viability and the drug susceptibility or resistance of Mycobacterium leprae. Comparison of M. leprae resident macrophage cultures maintained in 96-well flat-bottomed plates showed results for viability and susceptibility or resistance to dapsone that were similar to results for concurrent cultures in Leighton tubes with greater numbers of bacilli and macrophages.

  15. Regenerative Capacity of Macrophages for Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil eRawji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter injury, consisting of loss of axons, myelin and oligodendrocytes, is common in many neurological disorders and is believed to underlie several motor and sensory deficits. Remyelination is the process in which the insulative myelin sheath is restored to axons, thereby facilitating recovery from functional loss. Remyelination proceeds with oligodendrocyte precursor cells that differentiate into oligodendrocytes to synthesize the new myelin sheath after demyelination. This process is influenced by several factors, including trophic factors, inhibitory molecules in the lesion microenvironment, age of the subject, as well as the inflammatory response. Currently studied strategies that enhance remyelination consist of pharmacological approaches that directly induce oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation or using agents to neutralize the inhibitory microenvironment. Another strategy is to harness a reparative inflammatory response. This response, coordinated by central nervous system resident microglia and peripherally-derived infiltrating macrophages, has been shown to be important in the remyelination process. These innate immune cells perform important functions in remyelination, including the proteolysis and phagocytosis of inhibitory molecules present in the lesion microenvironment, the provision of trophic and metabolic factors to oligodendrocyte precursor cells, in addition to iron handling capacity. Additionally, an initial pro-inflammatory phase followed by a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phase has been shown to be important for oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and differentiation, respectively. This review will discuss the beneficial roles of macrophages/microglia in remyelination and discuss therapeutic strategies to obtain the optimal regenerative macrophage phenotype for enhanced remyelination.

  16. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  17. Silver Nanoparticles in Alveolar Bone Surgery Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver (Ag ions have well-known antimicrobial properties and have been applied as nanostrategies in many medical and surgical fields, including dentistry. The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs may be an option for reducing bacterial adhesion to dental implant surfaces and preventing biofilm formation, containing the risk of peri-implant infections. Modifying the structure or surface of bone grafts and membranes with Ag NPs may also prevent the risk of contamination and infection that are common when alveolar bone augmentation techniques are used. On the other hand, Ag NPs have revealed some toxic effects on cells in vitro and in vivo in animal studies. In this setting, the aim of the present paper is to summarize the principle behind Ag NP-based devices and their clinical applications in alveolar bone and dental implant surgery.

  18. Alveolar ridge preservation immediately after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Bouckaert, M; Lemmer, J

    2013-10-01

    Ridge preservation procedures immediately after tooth extraction, are commonly used with a view to minimising remodelling and shrinkage of the alveolar ridge, associated with socket healing. These procedures may sometimes be effective, but they cannot completely prevent reduction in dimension of the ridge. Certain biomater als used may actually hamper normal deposition of bone within the healing socket, reducing bone trabeculae that can integrate with the implant surface. However, in extraction sockets in alveolar ridges of low bone density, particles of implanted bone substitute incorporated in the healing bone, may enhance the mechanical support for the implant, provided by normal healed bone of low trabecular density alone. This paper reviews biological rationales and procedures for ridge preservation immediately after extraction and comments on their clinical use.

  19. Induced macrophage activation in live excised atherosclerotic plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebble, Hannah; Cross, Sean; Marks, Edward; Healy, Joe; Searle, Emily; Aamir, Raja; Butler, Anthony; Roake, Justin; Hock, Barry; Anderson, Nigel; Gieseg, Steven P

    2018-03-23

    Atherosclerotic plaques are complex tissues containing many different cell types. Macrophages contribute to inflammation, formation of the necrotic core, and plaque rupture. We examined whether macrophages in plaque can be activated and compared this to monolayer cells. The volume of calcium in the plaque was compared to the level of macrophage activation measured by total neopterin output. Carotid plaque samples were cut into 3 mm sections and cultured for up to 96 h. Live sections were stimulated with interferon-γ, phytohaemagglutinin or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophage activation and oxidative stress were monitored by total neopterin (oxidized and non-oxidized 7,8-dihydroneopterin) and neopterin levels every 24 h for up to 4 d. The calcium content of two plaques was investigated by spectral imaging. Direct stimulation of macrophages in plaque sections with interferon-γ caused a sustained increase in neopterin (p = .037) and total neopterin (p = .003). The addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to plaque had no significant effect on total neopterin production (p = .073) but increased neopterin (p = .037) whereas phytohaemagglutinin caused a significant increase in both neopterin and total neopterin (p = .0279 and .0168). There was an inverse association (R 2  = 0.91) between the volume of calcium and macrophage activation as measured by total neopterin production in stimulated plaque tissue. Resident macrophages within excised carotid plaque activated either directly or indirectly generate the biomarkers 7,8-dihydroneopterin and neopterin. Macrophage activation rather than the oxidative environment is associated with plaque calcification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical research on repairing alveolar cleft with osteoinduction active material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Qian; Tian, Kun; Yang, Li; Xiong, Gui-fa

    2010-08-01

    To study the feasibility and authenticity of repairing alveolar defects in alveolar cleft patients with osteoinduction active material (OAM) in clinic. Twenty-seven cases of alveolar defect chosen from clinic were divided into two groups (test group and control group). For test group (12 cases), OAM was transplanted to repair the alveolar cleft. For control group (15 cases), autogenous ilium cancellous bone were transplanted into the defect region to repair alveolar cleft. At 6 months after operation, CT and three-dimensional reconstruction were used to observe alveolar appearance, and the effect and clinical success rate of recover alveolar cleft by using different repair material were compared. In the 27 cases, all the maxillary continuity was restored except two of test group and two of control group. There was no significant difference between test group and control group regarding the clinical success rate of the alveolar cleft repair (P = 1.000). OAM was used to repair the alveolar cleft that can result in new bone formations and the burgeon of canines from the bone grafted areas. There is no significant difference between OAM and autogenous ilium cancellous bone regarding the effect of the alveolar cleft repair.

  1. Alveolar ridge preservation in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ronald E; Ioannidis, Alexis; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2018-02-27

    In the esthetic zone, in the case of tooth extraction, the clinician is often confronted with a challenge regarding the optimal decision-making process for providing a solution using dental implants. This is because, after tooth extraction, alveolar bone loss and structural and compositional changes of the covering soft tissues, as well as morphological alterations, can be expected. Ideally, the therapeutic plan starts before tooth extraction and it offers three options: spontaneous healing of the extraction socket; immediate implant placement; and techniques for preserving the alveolar ridge at the site of tooth removal. The decision-making process mainly depends on: (i) the chosen time-point for implant placement and the ability to place a dental implant; (ii) the quality and quantity of soft tissue in the region of the extraction socket; (iii) the remaining height of the buccal bone plate; and (iv) the expected rates of implant survival and success. Based on scientific evidence, three time-periods for alveolar ridge preservation are described in the literature: (i) soft-tissue preservation with 6-8 weeks of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the soft tissues); (ii) hard- and soft-tissue preservation with 4-6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard and soft tissues); and (iii) hard-tissue preservation with > 6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard tissues). © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  3. Microparticles from apoptotic platelets promote resident macrophage differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Vasina, E M; Cauwenberghs, S; Feijge, M A H; Heemskerk, J W M; Weber, C; Koenen, R R

    2011-01-01

    Platelets shed microparticles not only upon activation, but also upon ageing by an apoptosis-like process (apoptosis-induced platelet microparticles, PMap). While the activation-induced microparticles have widely been studied, not much is known about the (patho)physiological consequences of PMap formation. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that PMap display activated integrins and interact to form microparticle aggregates. PMap were chemotactic for monocytic cells, ...

  4. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163 is a marker of disease activity and progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Moller, H J; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the expression of the soluble form of the resident macrophage marker CD163 (sCD163) and its association with core parameters for disease activity, including radiographic progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Macrophages, PPARs, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo A. Van Ginderachter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mononuclear phagocytes often function as control switches of the immune system, securing the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory reactions. For this purpose and depending on the activating stimuli, these cells can develop into different subsets: proinflammatory classically activated (M1 or anti-inflammatory alternatively activated (M2 macrophages. The expression of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs is regulated by M1- or M2-inducing stimuli, and these receptors are generally considered to counteract inflammatory M1 macrophages, while actively promoting M2 activation. This is of importance in a tumor context, where M1 are important initiators of inflammation-driven cancers. As a consequence, PPAR agonists are potentially usefull for inhibiting the early phases of tumorigenesis through their antagonistic effect on M1. In more established tumors, the macrophage phenotype is more diverse, making it more difficult to predict the outcome of PPAR agonism. Overall, in our view current knowledge provides a sound basis for the clinical evaluation of PPAR ligands as chemopreventive agents in chronic inflammation-associated cancer development, while cautioning against the unthoughtful application of these agents as cancer therapeutics.

  6. Increased survival and proliferation of the epidemic strain Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Giovanni Monteiro; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Real, Fernando; Teixeira, Daniela; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane

    2017-09-13

    Outbreaks of infections caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria have been reported worldwide generally associated with medical procedures. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 was obtained during an epidemic of postsurgical infections and was characterized by increased persistence in vivo. To better understand the successful survival strategies of this microorganism, we evaluated its infectivity and proliferation in macrophages (RAW and BMDM) and alveolar epithelial cells (A549). For that, we assessed the following parameters, for both M. abscessus CRM0019 as well as the reference strain M. abscessus ATCC 19977: internalization, intracellular survival for up 3 days, competence to subvert lysosome fusion and the intracellular survival after cell reinfection. CRM0019 and ATCC 19977 strains showed the same internalization rate (approximately 30% after 6 h infection), in both A549 and RAW cells. However, colony forming units data showed that CRM0019 survived better in A549 cells than the ATCC 19977 strain. Phagosomal characteristics of CRM0019 showed the bacteria inside tight phagosomes in A549 cells, contrasting to the loosely phagosomal membrane in macrophages. This observation holds for the ATCC 19977 strain in both cell types. The competence to subvert lysosome fusion was assessed by acidification and acquisition of lysosomal protein. For M. abscessus strains the phagosomes were acidified in all cell lines; nevertheless, the acquisition of lysosomal protein was reduced by CRM0019 compared to the ATCC 19977 strain, in A549 cells. Conversely, in macrophages, both M. abscessus strains were located in mature phagosomes, however without bacterial death. Once recovered from macrophages M. abscessus could establish a new intracellular infection. Nevertheless, only CRM0019 showed a higher growth rate in A549, increasing nearly 10-fold after 48 and 72 h. M. abscessus CRM0019 creates a protective and replicative niche in alveolar epithelial cells mainly by

  7. Langerhans Cells - The Macrophage in Dendritic Cell Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebel, Thomas; Voisin, Benjamin; Nagao, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    Our assumptions on the identity and functions of Langerhans cells (LCs) of the epidermis have undergone considerable changes. Once thought to be prototypic representatives of the dendritic cell (DC) lineage, they are now considered to be a specialized subset of tissue-resident macrophages. Despite this, LCs display a remarkable mixture of properties. Like many tissue macrophages, they self-maintain locally. However, unlike tissue macrophages and similar to DCs, they homeostatically migrate to lymph nodes and present antigen to antigen-specific T cells. Current evidence indicates that the immune responses initiated by LCs are complex and dependent on antigenic properties and localization of the stimulus. This complexity is reflected in the recently demonstrated roles of LCs in type 17, regulatory, and humoral immune responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Cyclophilin A (CypA) is associated with the inflammatory infiltration and alveolar bone destruction in an experimental periodontitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lihua; Li, Chengzhang; Cai, Cia; Xiang, Junbo; Cao, Zhengguo

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective: CypA is able to regulate inflammatory responses and MMPs production via interaction with its cell surface receptor, EMMPRIN. This study aimed to address the possible association of CypA with pathological inflammation and destruction of periodontal tissues, and whether CypA-EMMPRIN interaction exists in periodontitis. Materials and methods: Experimental periodontitis was induced by ligation according to our previous method. Histological and radiographic examinations were performed. Western blot was used to detect CypA and EMMPRIN expressions in gingival tissues. Immunohistochemistry was applied for CypA, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, as well as cell markers of macrophage, lymphocyte and neutrophil. CypA expression, alveolar bone loss, and inflammatory infiltrations were quantified followed by correlation analyses. Results: Western blot revealed that CypA and EMMRPIN expressions were dramatically elevated in inflamed gingival tissues (ligature group) as compared to healthy gingival tissues (control group). The enhanced CypA and EMMPRIN expressions were highly consistent in cell localization on seriate sections. They were permanently co-localized in infiltrating macrophages and lymphocytes, as well as osteoclasts and osteoblasts in interradicular bone, but rarely expressed by infiltrating neutrophils. MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions were also sharply increased in inflamed gingiva. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were mainly over-expressed by macrophages, while MMP-1 was over-produced by fibroblasts and infiltrating cells. The number of CypA-positive cells was strongly correlated with the ACJ-AC distance (r = 0.839, p = 0.000), the number of macrophages (r = 0.972, p = 0.000), and the number of lymphocytes (r = 0.951, p = 0.000). Conclusion: CypA is associated with the inflammatory infiltration and alveolar bone destruction of periodontitis. CypA-EMMPRIN interaction may exist in these pathological processes.

  9. Spironolactone attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury partially via modulating mononuclear phagocyte phenotype switching in circulating and alveolar compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent experimental studies provide evidence indicating that manipulation of the mononuclear phagocyte phenotype could be a feasible approach to alter the severity and persistence of pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR has been reported as a target to regulate macrophage polarization. The present work was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of MR antagonism in bleomycin-induced acute lung injury and fibrosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first demonstrated the expression of MR in magnetic bead-purified Ly6G-/CD11b+ circulating monocytes and in alveolar macrophages harvested in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF from C57BL/6 mice. Then, a pharmacological intervention study using spironolactone (20 mg/kg/day by oral gavage revealed that MR antagonism led to decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production (downregulated monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor β1, and interleukin-1β at mRNA and protein levels and collagen deposition (decreased lung total hydroxyproline content and collagen positive area by Masson' trichrome staining in bleomycin treated (2.5 mg/kg, via oropharyngeal instillation male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, serial flow cytometry analysis in blood, BALF and enzymatically digested lung tissue, revealed that spironolactone could partially inhibit bleomycin-induced circulating Ly6C(hi monocyte expansion, and reduce alternative activation (F4/80+CD11c+CD206+ of mononuclear phagocyte in alveoli, whereas the phenotype of interstitial macrophage (F4/80+CD11c- remained unaffected by spironolactone during investigation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work provides the experimental evidence that spironolactone could attenuate bleomycin-induced acute pulmonary injury and fibrosis, partially via inhibition of MR-mediated circulating monocyte and alveolar macrophage phenotype switching.

  10. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  11. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Alveolar Hemorrhage after Exposure to Organic Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is associated with severe outcomes. We report a case of acute respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation and was clinically and pathologically diagnosed as DAH related to exposure to organic dust. A 39-year-old man, who had visited a warehouse to grade beans for purchase, was referred to our hospital for impending respiratory failure. His initial radiographic examinations revealed diffuse bilateral ground-glass opacities in his lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage resulted in progressively bloodier returns, which is characteristic of DAH. He underwent bedside open lung biopsy of his right lower lobe in the intensive care unit. Biopsy results revealed DAH and organization with accumulation of hemosiderin-laden macrophages and a few fibroblastic foci. The patient was treated with empirical antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids and successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation. DAH might be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute respiratory failure after exposure to organic particles.

  12. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    Antigens of Yellow Fever virus, which is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes aegypti 389 mosquito , can be found inside the rough endoplasmic...742 in transgenic mice expressing human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM, CD150). 743 Journal of virology 84:3033-3042. 744 46

  13. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribot, Wilson J; Panchal, Rekha G; Brittingham, Katherine C; Ruthel, Gordon; Kenny, Tara A; Lane, Douglas; Curry, Bob; Hoover, Timothy A; Friedlander, Arthur M; Bavari, Sina

    2006-01-01

    .... Although several factors contribute to inhalational anthrax, we hypothesized that unimpeded infection of Bacillus anthracis is directly linked to disabling the innate immune functions contributed by AM...

  14. In vitro Toxicity and Inflammatory Response Induced by Copper Nanoparticles in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    cells, and personal-care products to include sunscreen (Oberdörster, G., et al., 2005:825). Nanomaterials have also being used in toothpastes ...experiment to ensure sufficient cells were available for each respective assay. Cells obtained from culture flasks were placed in 50 mL conical tubes

  15. Intranasal Fentanyl Intoxication Leading to Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzycki, Shannon; Yarema, Mark; Dunham, Michael; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Increasing rates of opioid abuse, particularly fentanyl, may lead to more presentations of unusual effects of opioid toxicity. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare complication of fentanyl overdose. A 45-year-old male presented in hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring intubation. Comprehensive drug screening detected fentanyl without exposure to cocaine. Further history upon the patient's recovery revealed exposure to snorted fentanyl powder immediately prior to presentation. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potential, though rare, presentation of opioid intoxication. Recognition of less common complications of opioid abuse such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is important in proper management of overdoses.

  16. Macrophages in Homeostatic Immune Function

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    Jonathan eJantsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism and salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5] expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Experience from a tertiary care center and systematic review of Indian literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadda, Vijay; Tiwari, Pawan; Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Bharti, Sachidanand Jee; Kumar, Vinod; Garg, Rakesh; Trikha, Anjan; Jain, Deepali; Arava, Sudheer; Khilnani, Gopi C; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by deposition of lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli, with a variable clinical course. Here, we report an experience of management of PAP at our center. A systematic review of previously reported cases from India is also included in the article. Materials and Methods: This study included patients with primary PAP managed at our center from 2009 to 2015. Diagnosis of primary PAP was based on histopathologic diagnosis on bronchoalveolar lavage or transbronchial lung biopsy and absence of causes of secondary PAP. For systematic review of Indian publications, the literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases using the terms “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis'” or “alveolar proteinosis” and “India” or “Indian.” Results: During the above-specified period, five patients with diagnosis of PAP were admitted at our center. Median age of patients was 32 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30.5–59); 80% were female. Mean duration (± standard deviation) of symptoms was 6.2 (±1.79) months. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies were elevated in 4 out of 5 patients (80%). For management, whole lung lavage (WLL) was done for four patients with median volume of 32.5 (IQR 18–74) L per patient. All the patients showed significant symptomatic as well as improvement in physiological parameters. Subcutaneous GM-CSF and ambroxol were given to 3 patients and 1 patient, respectively. The median follow-up of all patients was 18 (IQR 5–44) months. A systematic review of all Indian studies of PAP revealed thirty publications. Conclusions: WLL is the most common, effective, and safe therapy in patients with PAP. GM-CSF administration is an efficacious treatment for patients with incomplete response after WLL. PMID:27890991

  18. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Experience from a tertiary care center and systematic review of Indian literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Hadda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disorder characterized by deposition of lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli, with a variable clinical course. Here, we report an experience of management of PAP at our center. A systematic review of previously reported cases from India is also included in the article. Materials and Methods: This study included patients with primary PAP managed at our center from 2009 to 2015. Diagnosis of primary PAP was based on histopathologic diagnosis on bronchoalveolar lavage or transbronchial lung biopsy and absence of causes of secondary PAP. For systematic review of Indian publications, the literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases using the terms “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis'” or “alveolar proteinosis” and “India” or “Indian.” Results: During the above-specified period, five patients with diagnosis of PAP were admitted at our center. Median age of patients was 32 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30.5–59; 80% were female. Mean duration (± standard deviation of symptoms was 6.2 (±1.79 months. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF antibodies were elevated in 4 out of 5 patients (80%. For management, whole lung lavage (WLL was done for four patients with median volume of 32.5 (IQR 18–74 L per patient. All the patients showed significant symptomatic as well as improvement in physiological parameters. Subcutaneous GM-CSF and ambroxol were given to 3 patients and 1 patient, respectively. The median follow-up of all patients was 18 (IQR 5–44 months. A systematic review of all Indian studies of PAP revealed thirty publications. Conclusions: WLL is the most common, effective, and safe therapy in patients with PAP. GM-CSF administration is an efficacious treatment for patients with incomplete response after WLL.

  19. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  20. Serum YKL-40 is a reliable biomarker for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonella, Francesco; Long, Xiaoping; He, Xuan; Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Griese, Matthias; Guzman, Josune; Costabel, Ulrich

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by alveolar filling. YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein produced by macrophages and epithelial cells, is increased in patients with interstitial lung diseases. We aimed to evaluate the role of YKL-40 as a biomarker for PAP. A total of 34 patients with autoimmune PAP and 50 healthy controls were studied. YKL-40 was measured by ELISA in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Chitinase coding gene polymorphisms (CHI3L1-329 and -131) were detected by PCR and pyrosequencing. Correlations between serum YKL-40 levels and disease outcome were analysed. Baseline serum and BALF levels of YKL-40 were higher in PAP patients than in controls (286 ± 27 ng/mL vs 42 ± 4 ng/mL, P 40 levels correlated with diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DL CO ) at baseline (P = 0.002) and over time (P 40 levels than those who remained stable or improved (P 40. YKL-40 is elevated in serum and BALF of PAP patients, and may be of clinical utility to predict outcome in PAP. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  1. Establishment and evaluation of a stable cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line.

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    Feng Su

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells are recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. Recent research has confirmed that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs also play important roles against mycobacterium infections. Thus, establishing a stable cattle AEC line for future endogenous immune research on bacterial invasion is necessary. In the present study, we first purified and immortalized type II AECs (AEC II cells by transfecting them with a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse trancriptase gene. We then tested whether or not the immortalized cells retained the basic physiological properties of primary AECs by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Finally, we tested the secretion capacity of immortalized AEC II cells upon stimulation by bacterial invasion. The cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line (HTERT-AEC II that we established retained lung epithelial cell characteristics: the cells were positive for surfactants A and B, and they secreted tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in response to bacterial invasion. Thus, the cell line we established is a potential tool for research on the relationship between AECs and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  2. PERFORATION OF INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BY MAXILLARY ARTERY. LA PERFORACION DEL NERVIO ALVEOLAR INFERIOR POR LA ARTERIA MAXILAR

    OpenAIRE

    Vanishree S Nayak; Ramachandra Bhat K; Prakash Billakanti Babu

    2011-01-01

    Infratemporal fossa is clinically important anatomical area for the delivery of local anesthetic agents in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Variations in the anatomy of the inferior alveolar nerve and maxillary artery were studied in infratemporal dissection. During routine dissection of the head in an adult male cadaver an unusual variation in the origin of the inferior alveolar nerve and its relationship with the surrounding structures was observed. The inferior alveolar nerve originate...

  3. Mycobacterial P-1-Type ATPases Mediate Resistance to Zinc Poisoning in Human Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Botella, Helene; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irene; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charriere, Guillaume M.; Waddell, Simon J.; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A?parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this patt...

  4. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilva@pharmacy.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  5. Interaction between polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles and peritoneal macrophages: MTT metabolism, NBT reduction, and NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, T; Gaspar, R; Donato, A; Lopes, C

    1997-01-01

    The nature of interactions between macrophages and drug carriers is of primordial importance either in the design of more effective therapeutic strategies for macrophage-associated pathogenesis or in establishing new approaches for pharmacological action avoiding macrophages. Polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PMCA, PECA, PBCA and PIBCA nanoparticles) were assayed for their toxicity on peritoneal resident and thioglycolate-elicited macrophages. Cellular viability was assessed by MTT tetrazolium salt assay, oxidative burst by NBT reduction and NO production by nitrite evaluation. The nanoparticles tested led to cellular morphological modifications and induced toxicity in both types of macrophages in culture. The polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles uptake by peritoneal macrophages caused an increase in respiratory burst, as assessed by the NBT reduction assay, and induced the release of soluble toxic factors to the culture medium. The association of LPS with the PMCA nanoparticles significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) by resident macrophages. In contrast, the association of PBCA nanoparticles with LPS does not increase the nitrite production as compared with LPS alone, which may be due to a different physico-chemical interaction between LPS and the two types of polymers. In cultured mice peritoneal macrophages, nanoparticles of PACA induce the production of oxygen reactive products, which cause changes in the cell metabolism of both resident and elicited macrophages. PMCA nanoparticles in association with LPS significantly increase the expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase, leading to the release of large amount of NO, which may be highly cytotoxic to the cultured cells in the presence of peroxide generated from the oxidative burst.

  6. Macrophage Plasticity and the Role of Inflammation in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Kharraz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of damaged tissues and organs requires the coordinated action of several cell types, including infiltrating inflammatory cells and resident cells. Recent findings have uncovered a central role for macrophages in the repair of skeletal muscle after acute damage. If damage persists, as in skeletal muscle pathologies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, macrophage infiltration perpetuates and leads to progressive fibrosis, thus exacerbating disease severity. Here we discuss how dynamic changes in macrophage populations and activation states in the damaged muscle tissue contribute to its efficient regeneration. We describe how ordered changes in macrophage polarization, from M1 to M2 subtypes, can differently affect muscle stem cell (satellite cell functions. Finally, we also highlight some of the new mechanisms underlying macrophage plasticity and briefly discuss the emerging implications of lymphocytes and other inflammatory cell types in normal versus pathological muscle repair.

  7. Segment distraction to reduce a wide alveolar cleft before alveolar bone grafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binger, T.; Katsaros, C.; Rucker, M.; Spitzer, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a method for reduction of wide alveolar clefts prior to bone grafting. This method aims to facilitate bone grafting and achieve adequate soft tissue coverage of the graft with attached gingiva. CASE REPORT: Treatment of a patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate with a

  8. Microglia: unique and common features with other tissue macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Marco; Tay, Tuan Leng; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen

    2014-09-01

    Microglia are highly specialized tissue macrophages of the brain with dedicated functions in neuronal development, homeostasis and recovery from pathology Despite their unique localization in the central nervous system (CNS), microglia are ontogenetically and functionally related to their peripheral counterparts of the mononuclear phagocytic system in the body, namely tissue macrophages and circulating myeloid cells. Recent developments provided new insights into the myeloid system in the body with microglia emerging as intriguing unique archetypes. Similar to other tissue macrophages, microglia develop early during embryogenesis from immature yolk sac progenitors. But in contrast to most of their tissue relatives microglia persist throughout the entire life of the organism without any significant input from circulating blood cells due to their longevity and their capacity of self-renewal. Notably, microglia share some features with short-lived blood monocytes to limit CNS tissue damage in pathologies, but only bone marrow-derived cells display the ability to become permanently integrated in the parenchyma. This emphasizes the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived microglia-like cells. Further understanding of both fate and function of microglia during CNS pathologies and considering their uniqueness among other tissue macrophages will be pivotal for potential manipulation of immune cell function in the CNS, thereby reducing disease burden. Here, we discuss new aspects of myeloid cell biology in general with special emphasis on the brain-resident macrophages and microglia.

  9. Alveolar soft part sarcoma: A rare diagnosis

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    Priyanka Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS is an extremely rare disease arising from connective tissues with a propensity for recurrence and metastasis. Clinically, it can be confused with hemangioma or arterio-venous malformations. Thus, a high index of suspicion and histopathological examination are required to make a definitive diagnosis. We report a case of recurrent ASPS in a young female with multiple sites involvement without any features of metastasis who has been treated with excision of the symptomatic lesions followed by chemotherapy.

  10. Nostril Base Augmentation Effect of Alveolar Bone Graft

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    Woojin Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aims of alveolar bone grafting are closure of the fistula, stabilization ofthe maxillary arch, support for the roots of the teeth adjacent to the cleft on each side.We observed nostril base augmentation in patients with alveolar clefts after alveolar bonegrafting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nostril base augmentation effect ofsecondary alveolar bone grafting in patients with unilateral alveolar cleft.Methods Records of 15 children with alveolar clefts who underwent secondary alveolar bonegrafting with autogenous iliac cancellous bone between March of 2011 and May of 2012 werereviewed. Preoperative and postoperative worm’s-eye view photographs and reconstructedthree-dimensional computed tomography (CT scans were used for photogrammetry. Thedepression of the nostril base and thickness of the philtrum on the cleft side were measuredin comparison to the normal side. The depression of the cleft side pyriform aperture wasmeasured in comparison to the normal side on reconstructed three-dimensional CT.Results Significant changes were seen in the nostril base (P=0.005, the philtrum length(P=0.013, and the angle (P=0.006. The CT measurements showed significant changes in thepyriform aperture (P<0.001 and the angle (P<0.001.Conclusions An alveolar bone graft not only fills the gap in the alveolar process but alsoaugments the nostril base after surgery. In this study, only an alveolar bone graft was performedto prevent bias from other procedures. Nostril base augmentation can be achieved byperforming alveolar bone grafts in children, in whom invasive methods are not advised.

  11. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab') 2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  12. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-12-10

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release 'messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial 'apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50-120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  13. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of macrophage function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disorder with a key role for macrophages in all disease stages. Macrophages are involved as scavengers of lipids, regulate inflammation, attract other immune cells and contribute to the resolution of inflammation, fibrosis and plaque stability.

  15. A Pneumocyte–Macrophage Paracrine Lipid Axis Drives the Lung toward Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Penn, Raymond B.; Fessler, Michael B.; Madenspacher, Jennifer; Stafstrom, William; Kavuru, Mani; Lu, Bo; Kallen, Caleb B.; Walsh, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-laden macrophages, or “foam cells,” are observed in the lungs of patients with fibrotic lung disease, but their contribution to disease pathogenesis remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that fibrosis induced by bleomycin, silica dust, or thoracic radiation promotes early and sustained accumulation of foam cells in the lung. In the bleomycin model, we show that foam cells arise from neighboring alveolar epithelial type II cells, which respond to injury by dumping lipids into the distal airspaces of the lungs. We demonstrate that oxidized phospholipids accumulate within alveolar macrophages (AMs) after bleomycin injury and that murine and human AMs treated with oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPc) become polarized along an M2 phenotype and display enhanced production of transforming growth factor-β1. The direct instillation of oxPc into the mouse lung induces foam cell formation and triggers a severe fibrotic reaction. Further, we show that reducing pulmonary lipid clearance by targeted deletion of the lipid efflux transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 1 increases foam cell formation and worsens lung fibrosis after bleomycin. Conversely, we found that treatment with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor attenuates fibrotic responses, at least in part through its ability to decrease AM lipid accumulation. In summary, this work describes a novel mechanism leading to foam cell formation in the mouse lung and suggests that strategies aimed at blocking foam cell formation might be effective for treating fibrotic lung disorders. PMID:25409201

  16. Autocrine abscisic acid plays a key role in quartz-induced macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Mirko; Sturla, Laura; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Scarfì, Sonia; Bruzzone, Santina; Usai, Cesare; Guida, Lucrezia; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2012-03-01

    Inhalation of quartz induces silicosis, a lung disease where alveolar macrophages release inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Here we report the pivotal role of abscisic acid (ABA), a recently discovered human inflammatory hormone, in silica-induced activation of murine RAW264.7 macrophages and of rat alveolar macrophages (AMs). Stimulation of both RAW264.7 cells and AMs with quartz induced a significant increase of ABA release (5- and 10-fold, respectively), compared to untreated cells. In RAW264.7 cells, autocrine ABA released after quartz stimulation sequentially activates the plasma membrane receptor LANCL2 and NADPH oxidase, generating a Ca(2+) influx resulting in NFκ B nuclear translocation and PGE(2) and TNF-α release (3-, 2-, and 3.5-fold increase, respectively, compared to control, unstimulated cells). Quartz-stimulated RAW264.7 cells silenced for LANCL2 or preincubated with a monoclonal antibody against ABA show an almost complete inhibition of NFκ B nuclear translocation and PGE(2) and TNF-α release compared to controls electroporated with a scramble oligonucleotide or preincubated with an unrelated antibody. AMs showed similar early and late ABA-induced responses as RAW264.7 cells. These findings identify ABA and LANCL2 as key mediators in quartz-induced inflammation, providing possible new targets for antisilicotic therapy.

  17. Different endocytotic uptake mechanisms for nanoparticles in epithelial cells and macrophages

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    Dagmar A. Kuhn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge regarding cellular uptake of nanoparticles is of great importance for future biomedical applications. Four different endocytotic uptake mechanisms, that is, phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis, were investigated using a mouse macrophage (J774A.1 and a human alveolar epithelial type II cell line (A549. In order to deduce the involved pathway in nanoparticle uptake, selected inhibitors specific for one of the endocytotic pathways were optimized regarding concentration and incubation time in combination with fluorescently tagged marker proteins. Qualitative immunolocalization showed that J774A.1 cells highly expressed the lipid raft-related protein flotillin-1 and clathrin heavy chain, however, no caveolin-1. A549 cells expressed clathrin heavy chain and caveolin-1, but no flotillin-1 uptake-related proteins. Our data revealed an impeded uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles by J774A.1 macrophages when actin polymerization and clathrin-coated pit formation was blocked. From this result, it is suggested that macropinocytosis and phagocytosis, as well as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, play a crucial role. The uptake of 40 nm nanoparticles in alveolar epithelial A549 cells was inhibited after depletion of cholesterol in the plasma membrane (preventing caveolin-mediated endocytosis and inhibition of clathrin-coated vesicles (preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our data showed that a combination of several distinguishable endocytotic uptake mechanisms are involved in the uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in both the macrophage and epithelial cell line.

  18. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages.

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    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA

  19. SP-R210 (Myo18A Isoforms as Intrinsic Modulators of Macrophage Priming and Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Yang

    Full Text Available The surfactant protein (SP-A receptor SP-R210 has been shown to increase phagocytosis of SP-A-bound pathogens and to modulate cytokine secretion by immune cells. SP-A plays an important role in pulmonary immunity by enhancing opsonization and clearance of pathogens and by modulating macrophage inflammatory responses. Alternative splicing of the Myo18A gene results in two isoforms: SP-R210S and SP-R210L, with the latter predominantly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In this study we show that SP-A is required for optimal expression of SP-R210L on alveolar macrophages. Interestingly, pre-treatment with SP-A prepared by different methods either enhances or suppresses responsiveness to LPS, possibly due to differential co-isolation of SP-B or other proteins. We also report that dominant negative disruption of SP-R210L augments expression of receptors including SR-A, CD14, and CD36, and enhances macrophages' inflammatory response to TLR stimulation. Finally, because SP-A is known to modulate CD14, we used a variety of techniques to investigate how SP-R210 mediates the effect of SP-A on CD14. These studies revealed a novel physical association between SP-R210S, CD14, and SR-A leading to an enhanced response to LPS, and found that SP-R210L and SP-R210S regulate internalization of CD14 via distinct macropinocytosis-like mechanisms. Together, our findings support a model in which SP-R210 isoforms differentially regulate trafficking, expression, and activation of innate immune receptors on macrophages.

  20. Alveolar bone loss in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulkarim, Maher; Bissada, Nabil; Al-Zahrani, Mohammad; Ficara, Anthony; Siegel, Burton

    2005-04-01

    Obesity was found to be significantly associated with periodontal disease prevalence as measured by probing depth and clinical attachment loss. The aim of this study was to examine if obesity correlates with chronic periodontitis as diagnosed by radiographic alveolar bone loss. Four hundred subjects > or =18 years old were included; 200 with body mass index (BMI) > or =30 kg/m2 (obese) and 200 with BMI periodontitis. Obesity was found to be significantly associated with periodontitis in the uni-variate regression analysis (OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.55-3.63). After adjusting for age, gender, smoking, employment, diabetes, marital status, and number of teeth present, obese subjects were found to be 1.86 times more likely to have periodontitis (95% CI, 0.99-3.51) than non-obese ones. When the sample was stratified based on age, the multivariate association was statistically significant among individuals or = 40 years of age the association was statistically insignificant (OR = 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.95). Stratifying the sample based on gender and smoking status revealed a stronger association among females than males (OR = 3.14 vs. 1.95) and among non-smokers than smokers (OR = 3.36 vs. 2.22). Obesity is associated with increased prevalence of periodontitis as measured by radiographic alveolar bone loss, especially among younger individuals. Prevention and management of obesity may be considered to promote better systemic and periodontal health.

  1. Prevention of Alveolar Osteitis After Third Molar Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-16

    May 16, 2017 ... development of alveolar osteitis were obtained and analyzed. Comparative statistics were done using ... KEY WORDS: Alveolar osteitis, chlorhexidine, prevention, warm saline. Department of Dental. Surgery .... healing by inducing vasodilatation of the vasculature of oral cavity, and thus enhances migration ...

  2. Increased alveolar soluble Annexin V promotes lung inflammation and fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, S.; Shi, W.; Xu, W.; Frey, M.R.; Moats, R.; Pardo, A.; Selman, M.; Warburton, D.

    2015-01-01

    The causes underlying the self-perpetuating nature of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and usually lethal disease, remain unknown. We hypothesized that alveolar soluble Annexin V contributes to lung fibrosis, based on the observation that human IPF BALF containing high Annexin V levels promoted fibroblast involvement in alveolar epithelial wound healing that was reduced when Annexin V was depleted from the BALF.

  3. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process...

  4. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  5. Classification of alveolar bone destruction patterns on maxillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The defective diagnosis of alveolar structures is one of most serious handicaps when assessing available periodontal treatment options for the prevention of tooth loss. The aim of this research was to classify alveolar bone defects in the maxillary molar region which is a challenging area for dental implant ...

  6. Alveolar ridge preservation and biologic width management for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar bone atrophy is a chronically progressive, irreversible process which results in bone loss in both the buccal, lingual and apico-coronal region. Without bone preservation measures, bone resorption is experienced and continues for life. Preservation of alveolar ridge is indicated when a tooth-supported fixed partial ...

  7. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  8. Overexpression of sICAM-1 in the Alveolar Epithelial Space Results in an Exaggerated Inflammatory Response and Early Death in Gram Negative Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Jeffery L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sizeable body of data demonstrates that membrane ICAM-1 (mICAM-1 plays a significant role in host defense in a site-specific fashion. On the pulmonary vascular endothelium, mICAM-1 is necessary for normal leukocyte recruitment during acute inflammation. On alveolar epithelial cells (AECs, we have shown previously that the presence of normal mICAM-1 is essential for optimal alveolar macrophage (AM function. We have also shown that ICAM-1 is present in the alveolar space as a soluble protein that is likely produced through cleavage of mICAM-1. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 is abundantly present in the alveolar lining fluid of the normal lung and could be generated by proteolytic cleavage of mICAM-1, which is highly expressed on type I AECs. Although a growing body of data suggesting that intravascular sICAM-1 has functional effects, little is known about sICAM-1 in the alveolus. We hypothesized that sICAM-1 in the alveolar space modulates the innate immune response and alters the response to pulmonary infection. Methods Using the surfactant protein C (SPC promoter, we developed a transgenic mouse (SPC-sICAM-1 that constitutively overexpresses sICAM-1 in the distal lung, and compared the responses of wild-type and SPC-sICAM-1 mice following intranasal inoculation with K. pneumoniae. Results SPC-sICAM-1 mice demonstrated increased mortality and increased systemic dissemination of organisms compared with wild-type mice. We also found that inflammatory responses were significantly increased in SPC-sICAM-1 mice compared with wild-type mice but there were no difference in lung CFU between groups. Conclusions We conclude that alveolar sICAM-1 modulates pulmonary inflammation. Manipulating ICAM-1 interactions therapeutically may modulate the host response to Gram negative pulmonary infections.

  9. Contemporary Approaches in the Repair of Alveolar Clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Tatli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. The repair of the alveolar clefts is an important part of the treatment for patients with cleft lip and palate. The treatment concepts of alveolar bone grafting are still controversial. The corresponding controversial issues are; timing of alveolar bone grafting, graft materials, and timing of the orthodontic expansion. In the present article, aforementioned controversial issues and contemporary treatment modalities of the maxillary alveolar clefts were reviewed in the light of current literature. In conclusion, the most suitable time for alveolar bone grafting is mixed dentition period. Grafting procedure may be performed in the early or late phases of this period depending on some clinical features. Adjunct orthodontic expansion procedures should be performed before and/or after grafting depending on the patient's current features. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 563-574

  10. The roles of microglia/macrophages in tumor progression of brain cancer and metastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2017-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors and brain metastases are highly aggressive diseases that are often resistant to treatment. Consequently, the current prognosis of patients with brain tumors and metastases is dismal. Activated microglia and macrophages are often observed in close proximity to or within the malignant tumor masses, suggesting that microglia/macrophages play an important role in brain tumor progression. Microglia, being resident macrophages of the central nervous system, form a major component of the brain immune system. They exhibit anti-tumor functions by phagocytosis and the release of cytotoxic factors. However, these microglia/macrophages can be polarized into becoming tumor-supportive and immunosuppressive cells by certain tumor-derived soluble factors, thereby promoting tumor maintenance and progression. The activated microglia/macrophages also participate in the process of tumor angiogenesis, metastasis, dormancy, and relapse. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the dual roles of microglia/macrophages in brain tumor progression. We have also reviewed the effect of several well-known microglia/macrophages-derived molecules and signals on brain tumor progression and further discussed the potential therapeutic strategies for targeting the pro-tumor and metastatic functions of microglia/macrophages.

  11. Phagocytosis and immune response studies of Macrophage-Nanodiamond Interactions in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K-J; Lee, C-Y; Lin, Y-C; Lin, C-Y; Perevedentseva, E; Hung, S-F; Cheng, C-L

    2017-10-01

    The applications of nanodiamond as drug delivery and bio-imaging can require the relinquishing ND-drug conjugate via blood flow, where interaction with immune cells may occur. In this work, we investigated the ND penetration in macrophage and the immune response using the tissue-resident murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). Confocal fluorescence imaging, immunofluorescence analysis of nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor IRF-3 and transcriptional factor NF-κΒ, analysis of pro-inflammatory cytokines production IL-1β, IL-6 IL-10 with a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique were applied. The TNF-α factor production has been studied both in vitro at ND interaction with the macrophage and in vivo after ND injection in the mice blood system using immunoassay. The macrophage antibacterial function was estimated through E. coli bacterial colony formation. ND didn't stimulate the immune response and functionality of the macrophage was not altered. Using MTT test, ND was found negligibly cytotoxic to macrophages. Thus, ND can serve as a biocompatible platform for bio-medical applications. Left: Graphic representation of Nanodiamond internalization in macrophage. Right: (a) Fluorescence images of lysosomes, (b) nanodiamond and (c) merged image of nanodiamond internalization in macrophage. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimu

  13. Macrophages in the Human Cochlea: Saviors or Predators—A Study Using Super-Resolution Immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The human inner ear, which is segregated by a blood/labyrinth barrier, contains resident macrophages [CD163, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1-, and CD68-positive cells] within the connective tissue, neurons, and supporting cells. In the lateral wall of the cochlea, these cells frequently lie close to blood vessels as perivascular macrophages. Macrophages are also shown to be recruited from blood-borne monocytes to damaged and dying hair cells induced by noise, ototoxic drugs, aging, and diphtheria toxin-induced hair cell degeneration. Precise monitoring may be crucial to avoid self-targeting. Macrophage biology has recently shown that populations of resident tissue macrophages may be fundamentally different from circulating macrophages. We removed uniquely preserved human cochleae during surgery for treating petroclival meningioma compressing the brain stem, after ethical consent. Molecular and cellular characterization using immunofluorescence with antibodies against IBA1, TUJ1, CX3CL1, and type IV collagen, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SR-SIM were made together with transmission electron microscopy. The super-resolution microscopy disclosed remarkable phenotypic variants of IBA1 cells closely associated with the spiral ganglion cells. Monitoring cells adhered to neurons with “synapse-like” specializations and protrusions. Active macrophages migrated occasionally nearby damaged hair cells. Results suggest that the human auditory nerve is under the surveillance and possible neurotrophic stimulation of a well-developed resident macrophage system. It may be alleviated by the non-myelinated nerve soma partly explaining why, in contrary to most mammals, the human’s auditory nerve is conserved following deafferentiation. It makes cochlear implantation possible, for the advantage of the profoundly deaf. The IBA1 cells may serve additional purposes such as immune modulation, waste disposal, and nerve

  14. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophage polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGalván-Peña

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying the metabolism of immune cells in recent years has emphasized the tight link existing between the metabolic state and the phenotype of these cells. Macrophages in particular are a good example of this phenomenon. Whether the macrophage obtains its energy through glycolysis or through oxidative metabolism can give rise to different phenotypes. Classically activated or M1 macrophages are key players of the first line of defense against bacterial infections and are known to obtain energy through glycolysis. Alternatively activated or M2 macrophages on the other hand, are involved in tissue repair and wound healing and use oxidative metabolism to fuel their longer-term functions. Metabolic intermediates however, are not just a source of energy but can be directly implicated in a particular macrophage phenotype. In M1 macrophages, the Krebs cycle intermediate succinate regulates HIF1α, which is responsible for driving the sustained production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β. In M2 macrophages, the sedoheptulose kinase CARKL is critical for regulating the pentose phosphate pathway. The potential to target these events and impact on disease is an exciting prospect.

  15. PERFORATION OF INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BY MAXILLARY ARTERY. Perforation of inferior alveolar nerve by maxillary artery

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash B Billakanti

    2016-01-01

    La fosa infratemporal es un área anatómica clínicamente importante para la administración de agentes anestésicos locales en odontología y cirugía maxilofacial. Fueron estudiadas variaciones en la anatomía del nervio alveolar inferior y la arteria maxilar en la disección infratemporal. Durante la disección rutinaria de la cabeza en el cadáver de un varón adulto, fue observada una variación excepcional en el origen del nervio alveolar inferior y su relación con las estructuras circundantes. El ...

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival sof...

  17. Hemorragia alveolar associada a nefrite lúpica Alveolar hemorrhage associated with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga Teixeira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemorragia alveolar, como causa de insuficiência respiratória, é pouco freqüente, com diversas etiologias possíveis. Entre elas, o lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, que se apresenta geralmente como síndrome pulmão-rim, possui alta morbimortalidade. Acredita-se que a patogênese da microangiopatia, tanto renal como pulmonar, esteja associada ao depósito de imunocomplexos, que ativariam as vias de apoptose celular. Relatam-se dois casos de pacientes com nefrite lúpica que evoluíram com hemorragia alveolar associada à insuficiência respiratória necessitando de ventilação mecânica com evoluções totalmente distintas frente às terapias farmacológicas. O achado de anticorpos antimembrana basal em um dos casos evidencia a multiplicidade de mecanismos fisiopatológicos possivelmente envolvidos, que poderiam justificar as respostas heterogêneas frente aos tratamentos disponíveis.Alveolar hemorrhage leading to respiratory failure is uncommon. Various etiologies have been reported, including systemic lupus erythematosus, which generally presents as pulmonary-renal syndrome. It is believed that the pathogenesis of microangiopathy is related to deposits of immune complexes that lead to activation of cellular apoptosis. The authors report two cases of alveolar hemorrhage and respiratory failure, both requiring mechanical ventilation. The two cases had opposite outcomes after pharmacological therapy. The presence of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies in one of the cases demonstrates the multiplicity of physiopathological mechanisms that may be involved. This multiplicity of mechanisms provides a possible explanation for the heterogeneous responses to the available treatments.

  18. Macrophage heterogeneity in lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, Joke M M; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages in lymphoid organs exhibit a wide variety of phenotypes and functions. These cells excel in the removal of apoptotic cells that arise during the generation of immune cells and are thereby essential for the prevention of auto-immune responses. In addition to this macrophages in the secondary lymphoid organs form an important barrier for spreading of infections by phagocytosis of pathogens and the activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, the remarkable ability of macrophages to phagocytose and handle a wide range of self and non-self material and to produce immunomediators is effectively exploited within lymphoid organs to regulate immune activation.

  19. [Massive alveolar haemorrhage in Wegener's granulomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Roldán, J; Nuñez-Castillo, D; Fernández-Fígares, C; López-Leiva, I

    2014-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic vasculitis with involvement of primary granulomatous upper and lower respiratory tract, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis of small vessels. The lung disease ranges from asymptomatic pulmonary nodules to pulmonary infiltrates and fulminant alveolar haemorrhage. The prognosis is poor due to kidney and respiratory failure, although the data are changing due to new treatments with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide. We report a case with severe lung disease, which after appropriate anamnesis, multiple tests, and optimal sequential action, the patient was diagnosed with Wegener's granulomatosis. This disease has a low incidence in the Emergency Department, where the patient history supported by the appropriate additional provides a diagnostic suspicion. It is important that the Emergency Department has the skills to manage the stability in these patients in order to resolve their symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuron-macrophage crosstalk in the intestine: a ‘microglia’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eVerheijden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal macrophages are strategically located in different layers of the intestine, including the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa, where they perform complex tasks to maintain intestinal homeostasis. As the gastrointestinal tract is continuously challenged by foreign antigens, macrophage activation should be tightly controlled to prevent chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Unraveling the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific control of macrophage activation is crucial to get more insight into intestinal immune regulation. Two recent reports provide unanticipated evidence that the enteric nervous system acts as a critical regulator of macrophage function in the myenteric plexus. Both studies clearly illustrate that enteric neurons reciprocally interact with intestinal macrophages and are actively involved in shaping their phenotype. This concept has striking parallels with the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal signals maintain microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, in a quiescent, anti-inflammatory state. This inevitably evokes the perception that the ENS and CNS share mechanisms of neuroimmune interaction. In line, intestinal macrophages, both in the muscularis externa and (submucosa, express high levels of CX3CR1, a feature that was once believed to be unique for microglia. CX3CR1 is the sole receptor of fractalkine (CX3CL1, a factor mainly produced by neurons in the CNS to facilitate neuron-microglia communication. The striking parallels between resident macrophages of the brain and intestine might provide a promising new line of thought to get more insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling macrophage activation in the gut.

  1. Accelerated orthodontics with alveolar decortication and augmentation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezdani, A Arif

    2012-01-01

    This case report reiterates the fact that selective alveolar decortication in conjunction with periodontal alveolar augmentation with a bone graft indubitably and efficaciously produces rapid orthodontic tooth movement. A 29-year-old woman presented with a Class I malocclusion and increased bidentoalveolar protrusion with increased spacing between the maxillary and mandibular incisors. She readily agreed to selective alveolar decortication in conjunction with periodontal alveolar augmentation with a bone graft when presented with the proposal that her malocclusion could be corrected in one-third the treatment time required for conventional orthodontics. A preadjusted edgewise appliance (Roth prescription, 0.022 x 0.028-inch slot) was placed prior to the surgical procedure. One week later, full-thickness labial and lingual flaps were reflected in the maxillary and mandibular arches. The alveolar bone was selectively decorticated and periodontally augmented with a bone graft. Starting 1 week postsurgically, orthodontic adjustments were carried out every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the entire orthodontic treatment took 7 months. The rapid orthodontic tooth movement was attributed to the regional acceleratory phenomenon, triggered by selective alveolar decortication. The subsequent periodontal alveolar augmentation with the bone graft repaired the bony dehiscences and enhanced the bone volume and dramatically improved the patient's soft tissue profile.

  2. The tobacco smoke component, acrolein, suppresses innate macrophage responses by direct alkylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Milena; Spiess, Page C; Kasahara, David I; Randall, Matthew J; Deng, Bin; van der Vliet, Albert

    2012-01-01

    The respiratory innate immune system is often compromised by tobacco smoke exposure, and previous studies have indicated that acrolein, a reactive electrophile in tobacco smoke, may contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of smoking. Exposure of mice to acrolein at concentrations similar to those in cigarette smoke (5 ppm, 4 h) significantly suppressed alveolar macrophage responses to bacterial LPS, indicated by reduced induction of nitric oxide synthase 2, TNF-α, and IL-12p40. Mechanistic studies with bone marrow-derived macrophages or MH-S macrophages demonstrated that acrolein (1-30 μM) attenuated these LPS-mediated innate responses in association with depletion of cellular glutathione, although glutathione depletion itself was not fully responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Inhibitory actions of acrolein were most prominent after acute exposure (system.

  3. The macrophage switch in obesity development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eCastoldi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune cell infiltration in (white adipose tissue during obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In adipose tissue, the main population of leukocytes are macrophages. Macrophages can be classified into two major populations: M1, classically activated macrophages, and M2, alternatively activated macrophages, although recent studies have identified a broad range of macrophage subsets. During obesity, adipose tissue M1 macrophage numbers increase and correlate with adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. Upon activation, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages induce aerobic glycolysis. By contrast, in lean humans and mice, the number of M2 macrophages predominates. M2 macrophages secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and utilize oxidative metabolism to maintain adipose tissue homeostasis. Here we review the immunologic and metabolic functions of adipose tissue macrophages and their different facets in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Landscape and climatic characteristics associated with human alveolar echinococcosis in France, 1982 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarroux, M; Gaudart, J; Bresson-Hadni, S; Bardonnet, K; Faucher, B; Grenouillet, F; Knapp, J; Dumortier, J; Watelet, J; Gerard, A; Beytout, J; Abergel, A; Wallon, M; Vuitton, D A; Piarroux, R

    2015-05-07

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a severe hepatic disease caused by Echinococcus multilocularis. In France, the definitive and intermediate hosts of E. multilocularis (foxes and rodents, respectively) have a broader geographical distribution than that of human AE. In this two-part study, we describe the link between AE incidence in France between 1982 and 2007 and climatic and landscape characteristics. National-level analysis demonstrated a dramatic increase in AE risk in areas with very cold winters and high annual rainfall levels. Notably, 52% (207/401) of cases resided in French communes (smallest French administrative level) with a mountain climate. The mountain climate communes displayed a 133-fold (95% CI: 95-191) increase in AE risk compared with communes in which the majority of the population resides. A case-control study performed in the most affected areas confirmed the link between AE risk and climatic factors. This arm of the study also revealed that populations residing in forest or pasture areas were at high risk of developing AE. We therefore hypothesised that snow-covered ground may facilitate predators to track their prey, thus increasing E. multilocularis biomass in foxes. Such climatic and landscape conditions could lead to an increased risk of developing AE among humans residing in nearby areas.

  5. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  6. Macrophages in bone fracture healing: Their essential role in endochondral ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Claudia; El Khassawna, Thaqif; Serra, Alessandro; Dienelt, Anke; Wendler, Sebastian; Schell, Hanna; van Rooijen, Nico; Radbruch, Andreas; Lucius, Richard; Hartmann, Susanne; Duda, Georg N; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina

    2018-01-01

    In fracture healing, skeletal and immune system are closely interacting through common cell precursors and molecular mediators. It is thought that the initial inflammatory reaction, which involves migration of macrophages into the fracture area, has a major impact on the long term outcome of bone repair. Interestingly, macrophages reside during all stages of fracture healing. Thus, we hypothesized a critical role for macrophages in the subsequent phases of bone regeneration. This study examined the impact of in vivo induced macrophage reduction, using clodronate liposomes, on the different healing phases of bone repair in a murine model of a standard closed femoral fracture. A reduction in macrophages had no obvious effect on the early fracture healing phase, but resulted in a delayed hard callus formation, thus severely altering endochondral ossification. Clodronate treated animals clearly showed delayed bony consolidation of cartilage and enhanced periosteal bone formation. Therefore, we decided to backtrack macrophage distribution during fracture healing in non-treated mice, focusing on the identification of the M1 and M2 subsets. We observed that M2 macrophages were clearly prevalent during the ossification phase. Therefore enhancement of M2 phenotype in macrophages was investigated as a way to further bone healing. Induction of M2 macrophages through interleukin 4 and 13 significantly enhanced bone formation during the 3week investigation period. These cumulative data illustrate their so far unreported highly important role in endochondral ossification and the necessity of a fine balance in M1/M2 macrophage function, which appears mandatory to fracture healing and successful regeneration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Propolis reversed cigarette smoke-induced emphysema through macrophage alternative activation independent of Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Marina Valente; Cattani-Cavalieri, Isabella; de Brito-Gitirana, Lycia; Fautrel, Alain; Lagente, Vincent; Schmidt, Martina; Porto, Luís Cristóvão; Romana-Souza, Bruna; Valença, Samuel Santos; Lanzetti, Manuella

    2017-10-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an incurable and progressive disease. Emphysema is the principal manifestation of COPD, and the main cause of this condition is cigarette smoke (CS). Natural products have shown antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can prevent acute lung inflammation and emphysema, but there are few reports in the literature regarding therapeutic approaches to emphysema. We hypothesized that supplementation with natural extracts would repair lung damage in emphysema caused by CS exposure. Mice were exposed to 60days of CS and then treated or not with three different natural extracts (mate tea, grape and propolis) orally for additional 60days. Histological analysis revealed significant improvements in lung histoarchitecture, with recovery of alveolar spaces in all groups treated with natural extracts. Propolis was also able to recovery alveolar septa and elastic fibers. Propolis also increased MMP-2 and decreased MMP-12 expression, favoring the process of tissue repair. Additionally, propolis recruited leukocytes, including macrophages, without ROS release. These findings led us to investigate the profile of these macrophages, and we showed that propolis could promote macrophage alternative activation, thus increasing the number of arginase-positive cells and IL-10 levels and favoring an anti-inflammatory microenvironment. We further investigated the participation of Nrf2 in lung repair, but no Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus was observed in lung cells. Proteins and enzymes related to Nrf2 were not altered, other than NQO1, which seemed to be activated by propolis in a Nrf2-independent manner. Finally, propolis downregulated IGF1 expression. In conclusion, propolis promoted lung repair in a mouse emphysema model via macrophage polarization from M1 to M2 in parallel to the downregulation of IGF1 expression in a Nrf2-independent manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lrp5/β-Catenin Signaling Controls Lung Macrophage Differentiation and Inhibits Resolution of Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennello, Joseph A; Misharin, Alexander V; Flozak, Annette S; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Cheresh, Paul; Varga, John; Kamp, David W; Budinger, G R Scott; Gottardi, Cara J; Lam, Anna P

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies established that attenuating Wnt/β-catenin signaling limits lung fibrosis in the bleomycin mouse model of this disease, but the contribution of this pathway to distinct lung cell phenotypes relevant to tissue repair and fibrosis remains incompletely understood. Using microarray analysis, we found that bleomycin-injured lungs from mice that lack the Wnt coreceptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) and exhibit reduced fibrosis showed enrichment for pathways related to extracellular matrix processing, immunity, and lymphocyte proliferation, suggesting the contribution of an immune-matrix remodeling axis relevant to fibrosis. Activation of β-catenin signaling was seen in lung macrophages using the β-catenin reporter mouse, Axin2 +/LacZ . Analysis of lung immune cells by flow cytometry after bleomycin administration revealed that Lrp5 -/- lungs contained significantly fewer Siglec F low alveolar macrophages, a cell type previously implicated as positive effectors of fibrosis. Macrophage-specific deletion of β-catenin in CD11c cre ;β-catenin flox mice did not prevent development of bleomycin-induced fibrosis but facilitated its resolution by 8 weeks. In a nonresolving model of fibrosis, intratracheal administration of asbestos in Lrp5 -/- mice also did not prevent the development of fibrosis but hindered the progression of fibrosis in asbestos-treated Lrp5 -/- lungs, phenocopying the findings in bleomycin-treated CD11c cre ;β-catenin flox mice. Activation of β-catenin signaling using lithium chloride resulted in worsened fibrosis in wild-type mice, further supporting that the effects of loss of Lrp5 are directly mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Together, these data suggest that lung myeloid cells are responsive to Lrp5/β-catenin signaling, leading to differentiation of an alveolar macrophage subtype that antagonizes the resolution of lung fibrosis.

  9. Thalidomide treatment modulates macrophage pro-inflammatory function and cytokine levels in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced pneumonia in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-07-01

    Lung innate immune response plays an important role in the clearance of pathogens from lungs, however, profound activation of innate immune cells (alveolar macrophages or neutrophils) can lead to development of acute lung inflammation or injury by producing various pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1, TNF-alpha and H2O2 etc.). Present study is designed to investigate the immunomodulatory action of thalidomide in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced acute lung infection in BALB/c mice. Acute lung inflammation was induced by intranasal instillation of K. pneumoniae B5055 into mice without any anaesthesia and treated with thalidomide (30 mg/kg/day/po) or normal saline orally using a treatment schedule shown to modulate pro-inflammatory innate immune response. Thalidomide treatment modulated pro-inflammatory function of alveolar macrophages by significantly (ppneumonia caused by gram negative bacterial infection. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Alveolar cleft closure with iliac bone graft: A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tichvy Tammama

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The timing of alveolar bone grafting usually associated with the state of the developing of dentition. Post operative management is important to get a good result, and to prevent any complications.

  11. Horizontal alveolar bone loss: A periodontal orphan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attempts to successfully regenerate lost alveolar bone have always been a clinician′s dream. Angular defects, at least, have a fairer chance, but the same cannot be said about horizontal bone loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of horizontal alveolar bone loss and vertical bone defects in periodontal patients; and later, to correlate it with the treatment modalities available in the literature for horizontal and vertical bone defects. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. Part I was the radiographic evaluation of 150 orthopantomographs (OPGs (of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and seeking periodontal care, which were digitized and read using the AutoCAD 2006 software. All the periodontitis-affected teeth were categorized as teeth with vertical defects (if the defect angle was ≤45° and defect depth was ≥3 mm or as having horizontal bone loss. Part II of the study comprised search of the literature on treatment modalities for horizontal and vertical bone loss in four selected periodontal journals. Results: Out of the 150 OPGs studied, 54 (36% OPGs showed one or more vertical defects. Totally, 3,371 teeth were studied, out of which horizontal bone loss was found in 3,107 (92.2% teeth, and vertical defects were found only in 264 (7.8% of the teeth, which was statistically significant (P<.001. Search of the selected journals revealed 477 papers have addressed the treatment modalities for vertical and horizontal types of bone loss specifically. Out of the 477 papers, 461 (96.3% have addressed vertical bone loss, and 18 (3.7% have addressed treatment options for horizontal bone loss. Two papers have addressed both types of bone loss and are included in both categories. Conclusion: Horizontal bone loss is more prevalent than vertical bone loss but has been sidelined by researchers as very few papers have been published on the subject of regenerative treatment

  12. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  13. Soft tissue healing in alveolar socket preservation technique: histologic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Gaia; Rasperini, Giulio; Obot, Gregory; Farronato, Davide; Dellavia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    After tooth extraction, 14 alveolar sockets were grafted with porous bovine bone mineral particles and covered with non-cross-linked collagen membrane (test group), and 14 alveolar sockets were left uncovered. At 5 and 12 weeks, microvascular density (MVD), collagen content, and amount of lymphocytes (Lym) T and B were analyzed in soft tissue. At 5 weeks, MVD was significantly lower and Lym T was significantly higher in tests than in controls (P healing process of the soft tissue.

  14. Dynamic thermal performance of alveolar brick construction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia, A. de; Castell, A.; Medrano, M.; Cabeza, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Even though U-value does not measure thermal inertia, it is the commonly used parameter. → The thermal performance analysis of buildings must include the evaluation of transient parameters. → Transient parameters of alveolar brick constructive system show good agreement with its low energy consumption. -- Abstract: Alveolar bricks are being introduced in building sector due to the simplicity of their construction system and to the elimination of the insulation material. Nevertheless, it is not clear if this new system is energetically efficient and which is its thermal behaviour. This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study to evaluate the thermal behaviour of the alveolar brick construction system, compared with a traditional Mediterranean brick system with insulation. The experimental study consists of measuring the thermal performance of four real house-like cubicles. The thermal transmittance in steady-state, also known as U-value, is calculated theoretically and experimentally for each cubicle, presenting the insulated cubicles as the best construction system, with differences around 45% in comparison to the alveolar one. On the other hand, experimental results show significantly smaller differences on the energy consumption between the alveolar and insulated construction systems during summer period (around 13% higher for the alveolar cubicle). These values demonstrate the high thermal efficiency of the alveolar system. In addition, the lack of agreement between the measured energy consumption and the calculated U-values, guides the authors to analyze the thermal inertia of the different building components. Therefore, several transient parameters, extracted from the heat transfer matrix and from experimental data, are also evaluated. It can be concluded that the alveolar brick construction system presents higher thermal inertia than the insulated one, justifying the low measured energy consumption.

  15. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process of...... of the mandible. Light microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation, a few multinuclear giant cells, little inflammatory reaction, and no osteoinduction. It was concluded that no osteoinduction took place in goats....

  16. Postextraction Alveolar Ridge Preservation: Biological Basis and Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Giorgio; Pellegrini, Gaia; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in ord...

  17. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2009-06-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  18. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, Babs O.; van Bruggen, Robin; Deng, Dong Mei; Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Nazmi, Kamran; Schornagel, Karin; Vloet, Rianka P. M.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein receptor CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) superfamily class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Previously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and to

  19. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; van Bruggen, R.; Deng, D.M.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Schornagel, K.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van den Berg, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein re- ceptor CD163 is a member of the scaven- ger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) super- family class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Pre- viously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin- haptoglobin complexes

  20. Transcriptional immunoresponse of tissue-specific macrophages in swine after infection with African swine fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and cytokines are important in the control of inflammation and regulation of the immune response. However, they can also contribute to immunopathology in the host after viral infection and the regulatory network can be subverted by infectious agents, including viruses, some of which produce cytokine analogues or have mechanisms that inhibit cytokine function. African swine fever virus (ASFV encodes a number of proteins which modulate cytokine and chemokine induction, host transcription factor activation, stress responses, and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to elucidate the mechanisms of immune responses to ASFV in different subpopulations of porcine macrophages. A transcriptional immune response in different resident tissue macrophages following ASFV infection was presented in many publications. ASFV-susceptible porcine macrophages can be of several origins, such as peripheral blood, lungs, bone marrow, etc. blood monocytes, blood macrophages, and lung macrophages have demonstrated a modulation of phenotype. Monocyte-derived macrophages could express surface markers not found on their monocyte precursors. Moreover, they can undergo further differentiation after infection and during inflammation. When viruses infect such cells, immunological activity can be seriously impaired or modified.

  1. Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xu; Sun, Li; Zhou, Li; Ma, Tong-Cui; Song, Li; Wu, Jian-Guo; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    Exosomes are a class of cell-released small vesicles that mediate intercellular communication by delivering functional factors to recipient cells. During hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the interaction between liver resident macrophages and hepatocytes is a key component in liver innate immunity. In this study, we explored the role of exosomes in the delivery of innate anti-HCV factors to hepatocytes from macrophages. We showed that supernatant from TLR3-activated macrophage cultures could efficiently inhibit HCV replication in Huh7 cells. This macrophage-mediated anti-HCV activity was through exosomes because inhibiting exosomes could abrogate the action of macrophages. Further analyses demonstrated that TLR3-activated macrophages release exosomes that contain anti-HCV microRNA (miRNA)-29 family members. Inhibiting miRNA29 could restore HCV replication. These findings suggest a novel antiviral mechanism in liver innate immunity against HCV infection and provide insights to support further studies on developing exosome-based delivery system for disease treatment.-Zhou, Y., Wang, X., Sun, L., Zhou, L., Ma, T.-C., Song, L., Wu, J.-G., Li, J.-L., Ho, W.-Z. Toll-like receptor 3-activated macrophages confer anti-HCV activity to hepatocytes through exosomes. © FASEB.

  2. Nonpathogenic Lactobacillus rhamnosus activates the inflammasome and antiviral responses in human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Minja; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kekkonen, Riina A.; Kankainen, Matti; Latvala, Sinikka; Pirhonen, Jaana; Österlund, Pamela; Korpela, Riitta; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have utilized global gene expression profiling to compare the responses of human primary macrophages to two closely related, well-characterized Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC705, since our understanding of the responses elicited by nonpathogenic bacteria in human innate immune system is limited. Macrophages are phagocytic cells of the innate immune system that perform sentinel functions to initiate appropriate responses to surrounding stimuli. Macrophages that reside on gut mucosa encounter ingested and intestinal bacteria. Bacteria of Lactobacillus genus are nonpathogenic and used in food and as supplements with health-promoting probiotic potential. Our results demonstrate that live GG and LC705 induced quantitatively different gene expression profiles in macrophages. A gene ontology analysis revealed functional similarities and differences in responses to GG and LC705 that were reflected in host defense responses. Both GG and LC705 induced interleukin-1β production in macrophages that required caspase-1 activity. LC705, but not GG, induced type I interferon -dependent gene activation that correlated with its ability to prevent influenza A virus replication and production of viral proteins in macrophages. Our results indicate that nonpathogenic bacteria are able to activate the inflammasome. In addition, our results suggest that L. rhamnosus may prime the antiviral potential of human macrophages. PMID:22895087

  3. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael J; Eastman, Alison J; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R; Osterholzer, John J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Swanson, Joel A; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-03-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms that allow classical activation to counteract replication. C. neoformans-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time, and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in C. neoformans-containing lung cells compared with C. neoformans-free cells. Among C. neoformans-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased C. neoformans replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased C. neoformans replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of C. neoformans. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important C. neoformans survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies that decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-06-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis.

  5. Depletion of spleen macrophages delays AA amyloid development: a study performed in the rapid mouse model of AA amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lundmark

    Full Text Available AA amyloidosis is a systemic disease that develops secondary to chronic inflammatory diseases Macrophages are often found in the vicinity of amyloid deposits and considered to play a role in both formation and degradation of amyloid fibrils. In spleen reside at least three types of macrophages, red pulp macrophages (RPM, marginal zone macrophages (MZM, metallophilic marginal zone macrophages (MMZM. MMZM and MZM are located in the marginal zone and express a unique collection of scavenger receptors that are involved in the uptake of blood-born particles. The murine AA amyloid model that resembles the human form of the disease has been used to study amyloid effects on different macrophage populations. Amyloid was induced by intravenous injection of amyloid enhancing factor and subcutaneous injections of silver nitrate and macrophages were identified with specific antibodies. We show that MZMs are highly sensitive to amyloid and decrease in number progressively with increasing amyloid load. Total area of MMZMs is unaffected by amyloid but cells are activated and migrate into the white pulp. In a group of mice spleen macrophages were depleted by an intravenous injection of clodronate filled liposomes. Subsequent injections of AEF and silver nitrate showed a sustained amyloid development. RPMs that constitute the majority of macrophages in spleen, appear insensitive to amyloid and do not participate in amyloid formation.

  6. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of macrophage and matrix metalloproteinase-9 on proliferation of pulmonary fibroblast and synthesis of collagen IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liangwen; Sun Li; Diao Ruiying; Li Yang; Zhang Yong; Yin Jiye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore pathogenetic mechanism in initiation of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods: Alveolar macrophages in Wistar rats irradiated by 60 Co γ-ray were collected by alveolar lavage; condition medium was prepared for stimulating human lung fibroblast (HLF) proliferation; HLF proliferation activity was determined by MTT method; collagen IV (Col IV) in HLF was determined by Western blot; the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was determined by zymography. Results: HLF proliferation activity was significantly increased after stimulation of condition medium, and the increase was most evident within 48-72 hs. Col IV synthesis in HLF was increased and reached a peak at 12 h after stimulation and then began to decrease. MMP-9 activity began to increase at 12 h and reached a peak at 48 h and then decreased after 72 h. Conclusions: Cobalt-60 gamma ray irradiation of 20 Gy can stimulate secretion of some cytokines in alveolar macrophage to promote pulmonary interstitial fibroblast proliferation and synthesis of Col IV . Col IV can stimulate MMP-9 increase; MMP-9 can degrade excess Col IV. Such changes are involved in remodeling process of early pulmonary injury. (authors)

  8. Alveolar socket healing: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Mauricio G; Silva, Cléverson O; Misawa, Mônica; Sukekava, Flavia

    2015-06-01

    Tooth extraction induces a series of complex and integrated local changes within the investing hard and soft tissues. These local alterations arise in order to close the socket wound and to restore tissue homeostasis, and are referred to as '"socket healing". The aims of the present report were twofold: first, to describe the socket-healing process; and, second, to discuss what can be learned from the temporal sequence of healing events, in order to improve treatment outcomes. The socket-healing process may be divided into three sequential, and frequently overlapping, phases: inflammatory; proliferative; and modeling/remodeling. Several clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that the socket-healing process promotes up to 50% reduction of the original ridge width, greater bone resorption at the buccal aspect than at the lingual/palatal counterpart and a larger amount of alveolar bone reduction in the molar region. In conclusion, tooth extraction, once a simple and straightforward surgical procedure, should be performed in the knowledge that ridge reduction will follow and that further clinical steps should be considered to compensate for this, when considering future options for tooth replacement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Inferior alveolar canal course: a radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Xia, Bing; Gu, Zhiyuan

    2009-11-01

    To describe the morphology and course of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) as it appears in digital panoramic radiographs. Three hundred and eighty-six digital rotational panoramic radiographs (OPG) were studied using the Clinview Software (6.1.3.7 version, Instrumentarium). Among the 386 radiographs, 86 radiographs with 5-mm steel balls were used to calculate the magnification. The average magnification of radiographs in this study was 7.24+/-7.55%. The course of IAC as seen in the panoramic radiograph may be classified into four types: (1) linear curve, 12.75%, (2) spoon-shaped curve, 29.25%, (3) elliptic-arc curve, 48.5%, and (4) turning curve, 9.5%. On panoramic radiographs, the IAC appeared closest to the inferior border of the mandible in the region of the first molar. In relation to the teeth, on panoramic radiographs, the IAC appeared closest to the distal root tip of the third molar and furthest from the mesial root tip of the first molar. In the OPG, there are four types of IAC: linear, spoon shape, elliptic-arc, and turning curve. The data found in the study may be useful for dental implant, mandibule surgery, and dental anesthesia. The limitations of the panoramic radiograph in depicting the true three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the IAC are recognized, computed tomography (CT) and cone beam (CB)3D imaging being more precise.

  10. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarroux, Martine; Piarroux, Renaud; Knapp, Jenny; Bardonnet, Karine; Dumortier, Jérôme; Watelet, Jérôme; Gerard, Alain; Beytout, Jean; Abergel, Armand; Bresson-Hadni, Solange

    2013-01-01

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups. PMID:23647623

  11. Computed tomography of the alveolar bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, H.

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the conventional radiological methods used in odontology, computed tomography (CT) provides superposition-free images of the mandible and maxilla. Its value has been proved not only in cases of malignancy but also in many other problems. If an examination is performed with a slice thickness of less than 1.5 mm, the form and position of retained teeth in the alveolar bone, as well as subsequent lesions of neighboring permanent teeth, can be visualized so that early treatment can be planned. If the parodontal space of a retained tooth is visible, orthodontic intervention is possible. Precise assessment of horizontal or vertical bone loss is essential in inflammatory dental diseases. The morphology and extent of benign cystic lesions are also shown by CT. With CT surgical strategy of an intended implant therapy can take into account the remaining bone substance and the exact position of nerves and foramina. If such therapy is possible, the location, form and number of implants are easily defined. (orig.) [de

  12. Lung macrophage uptake of unopsonized environmental particulates: Role of scavenger-type receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobzik, L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The receptors responsible for avid alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis of unopsonized environmental particulates have not been well defined. This study used flow cytometry to quantitate the effects of a panel of soluble ligands for macrophage adhesion receptors on AM binding of unopsonized environmental dusts (titanium dioxide, TiO{sub 2}; iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; {alpha}-quartz, SiO{sub 2}; diesel engine exhaust dust) or fluorescent latex beads. Polyanionic ligands of the macrophage scavenger receptor (SR) for acetylated-LDL caused marked inhibition of AM binding of the oxide particles and latex beads (e.g., TiO{sub 2} binding; polyinosinic acid (polyl), 10 {mu}g/ml: 70.2 {+-} 1.5% inhibition, mean {+-} SE, n = 11). In contrast, no inhibition was seen with the polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfate (chond-S), or dextran, consistent with the known inhibitor profile of macrophage SRs for acetylated-LDL. AM uptake of latex or SiO{sub 2} beads instilled into lungs of hamsters was inhibited by administration of polyl but not chondroitin sulfate (AM beads per cell: control, 6.1 {+-} 0.7; polyl, 3.5 {+-} 0.2; chond-S, 5.1 {+-} 0.7, n {ge} 4, p < 0.05 for control vs polyl) indicating macrophage SRs operate in vivo as well as in vitro. In contrast, AM binding of the carbonaceous diesel dust particles was not inhibited by any ligand tested. AM uptake of unopsonized TiO{sub 2}, SR ligands or acetylated LDL caused no significant activation of AM respiratory burst or TNF production, consistent with past observations that opsonin-independent phagocytosis of inert particles by normal AMs is not accompanied by pro-inflammatory activation. These data implicate macrophage-type SRs in AM binding of charged environmental particles and indicate that distinct mechanisms mediate binding of carbonaceous dusts. 54 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Role of Monocyte/Macrophages during HIV/SIV Infection in Adult and Pediatric Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Merino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes/macrophages are a diverse group of cells that act as first responders in innate immunity and then as mediators for adaptive immunity to help clear infections. In performing these functions, however, the macrophage inflammatory responses can also contribute to pathogenesis. Various monocyte and tissue macrophage subsets have been associated with inflammatory disorders and tissue pathogeneses such as occur during HIV infection. Non-human primate research of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV has been invaluable in better understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection. The question of HIV/SIV-infected macrophages serving as a viral reservoir has become significant for achieving a cure. In the rhesus macaque model, SIV-infected macrophages have been shown to promote pathogenesis in several tissues resulting in cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurological diseases. Results from human studies illustrated that alveolar macrophages could be an important HIV reservoir and humanized myeloid-only mice supported productive HIV infection and viral persistence in macrophages during ART treatment. Depletion of CD4+ T cells is considered the primary cause for terminal progression, but it was reported that increasing monocyte turnover was a significantly better predictor in SIV-infected adult macaques. Notably, pediatric cases of HIV/SIV exhibit faster and more severe disease progression than adults, yet neonates have fewer target T cells and generally lack the hallmark CD4+ T cell depletion typical of adult infections. Current data show that the baseline blood monocyte turnover rate was significantly higher in neonatal macaques compared to adults and this remained high with disease progression. In this review, we discuss recent data exploring the contribution of monocytes and macrophages to HIV/SIV infection and progression. Furthermore, we highlight the need to further investigate their role in pediatric cases of infection.

  14. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  15. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Acute exposure to crystalline silica reduces macrophage activation in response to bacterial lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Lee Beamer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AM and crystalline silica (SiO2 using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes is largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g. 4 hours. Interestingly, these responses were dependent upon interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins.

  17. The role of alveolar epithelial cells in initiating and shaping pulmonary immune responses: communication between innate and adaptive immune systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga D Chuquimia

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells have been recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. However, more recently, other cells in the lungs such as alveolar epithelial cells (AEC have been found to play important roles in the defense and pathogenesis of infection. In the present study we first compared AEC with pulmonary macrophages (PuM isolated from mice in their ability to internalize and control Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG growth and their capacity as APCs. AEC were able to internalize and control bacterial growth as well as present antigen to primed T cells. Secondly, we compared both cell types in their capacity to secrete cytokines and chemokines upon stimulation with various molecules including mycobacterial products. Activated PuM and AEC displayed different patterns of secretion. Finally, we analyzed the profile of response of AEC to diverse stimuli. AEC responded to both microbial and internal stimuli exemplified by TLR ligands and IFNs, respectively. The response included synthesis by AEC of several factors, known to have various effects in other cells. Interestingly, TNF could stimulate the production of CCL2/MCP-1. Since MCP-1 plays a role in the recruitment of monocytes and macrophages to sites of infection and macrophages are the main producers of TNF, we speculate that both cell types can stimulate each other. Also, another cell-cell interaction was suggested when IFNs (produced mainly by lymphocytes were able to induce expression of chemokines (IP-10 and RANTES by AEC involved in the recruitment of circulating lymphocytes to areas of injury, inflammation, or viral infection. In the current paper we confirm previous data on the capacity of AEC regarding internalization of mycobacteria and their role as APC, and extend the knowledge of AEC as a multifunctional cell type by assessing the secretion of a broad array of factors in response to several different types of stimuli.

  18. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  19. Rare pneumoconiosis induced by long-term amorphous silica exposure: the histological characteristics and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 as an antifibrogenic mediator in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Toshio; Akaike, Yasushi; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamazaki, Kazuma; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Takemura, Tamiko

    2011-11-01

    Pneumoconiosis induced by non-crystalline silica is considered rare, although silicosis resulting from contact with crystalline silica is a well-known hazard associated with progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Here we describe a patient with pneumoconiosis induced by diatomaceous earth composed of amorphous silica detected by two-dimensional imaging of chemical elements. The histology revealed that the disease was characterized by a granulomatous reaction in the lung. A large number of macrophages laden with yellow and black pigments accumulated in alveolar spaces and were incorporated into the interstitial sites. Bronchiolar walls were destroyed by palisade macrophages, suggesting airflow obstruction. Packed macrophages adhering to and covering the denuded interstitium indicated that macrophages might be incorporated into pulmonary interstitium in this fashion. Immunohistochemistry showed that cyclooxygenase-2, an antifibrogenic mediator, was intensely expressed in the macrophages compared with macrophages in control lungs. No birefringent material was found in the tissues. When two-dimensional analysis of chemical elements was performed using an electron probe microanalyzer with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer, the resultant fine mapping of silicon and oxygen on the tissue indicated that the pigments phagocytosed by macrophages corresponded to amorphous silica. In conclusion, two-dimensional analysis of elements is very useful for pathologists in correlating the presence of chemical elements with histological changes. © 2011 The Authors. Pathology International © 2011 Japanese Society of Pathology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Distracción osteogénica alveolar como método de aumento del reborde alveolar Alveolar osteogenic distraction as method to increase the alveolar ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denia Morales Navarro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La distracción osteogénica alveolar, como proceso biológico de neoformación de hueso alveolar, nos motivó a la realización de la presente revisión bibliográfica, con el objetivo enfatizar en el análisis de las variables: antecedentes históricos en Cuba, clasificación de los distractores, fases de la distracción (latencia, distracción y consolidación, indicaciones, contraindicaciones, ventajas, desventajas y complicaciones. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica mediante la consulta de bases de datos de los sistemas referativos, como MEDLINE y PubMed con la utilización de descriptores "alveolar distraction" y "osteogenic distraction". Se consultaron las fuentes bibliográficas publicadas fundamentalmente en los últimos 5 años, lo que reveló que esta técnica es una excelente alternativa para la formación de huesos y tejidos blandos en zonas de atrofia alveolar, que consta de tres etapas: latencia, distracción y consolidación; un método previsible y con bajas tasas de reabsorción ósea en comparación con otras técnicas de aumento del reborde alveolar. Tiene su principal indicación en la terapia de implantes al proveer volumen óseo. Debemos individualizar cada caso y usar el método más adecuado según las características clínicas y personales del paciente. Una adecuada selección de los casos y una mejor comprensión de la técnica son los puntales para lograr exitosos resultados mediante la distracción osteogénica alveolar. En Cuba se ha aplicado poco la distracción alveolar, por lo que ha sido necesario ampliar los estudios sobre esta temática.The alveolar osteogenic distraction, as a biological process of alveolar bone neoformation, motivates us to make the bibliographic review whose objective was to emphasize in analysis the following variables: historical backgrounds in Cuba, distraction classification, distraction phases (latency, distraction and consolidation, indications, contraindications, advantages

  1. Macrophages play a dual role during pulmonary tuberculosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Thepen, Theo; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Florquin, Sandrine; van Rooijen, Nico; van de Winkel, Jan G.; van der Poll, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages provide the preferred hiding and replication site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis but display antimicrobial functions. This raises questions regarding the role of macrophages during tuberculosis. We depleted lungs of activated macrophages (activated macrophage(-) mice) and

  2. Proteinose alveolar pulmonar: série de quatro casos Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Thompson

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar a evolução de quatro casos de proteinose alveolar pulmonar atendidos na Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, enfocando a importância da lavagem pulmonar total como tratamento de escolha. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo de quatro pacientes, sendo três do gênero feminino, com idades de 22 a 34 anos, e histórias semelhantes de dispnéia progressiva e tosse seca. O diagnóstico final foi realizado por biópsia pulmonar a céu aberto. A lavagem pulmonar total foi realizada em três pacientes em centro cirúrgico, com anestesia geral e sonda de duplo lúme. RESULTADOS: Um paciente apresentou regressão espontânea da proteinose alveolar pulmonar, não sendo necessária a lavagem pulmonar. Nos outros três casos, o número de lavagens variou: uma única lavagem unilateral com remissão completa do quadro bilateralmente, três lavagens sem melhora significativa e quatro procedimentos intercalados com períodos de melhora. CONCLUSÃO: Constatamos em nossa casuística que a lavagem pulmonar se mostrou eficiente, apesar de alguns pacientes apresentarem certa resistência ao procedimento, enquanto que outros podem ter remissão completa da doença.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to present the evolution of four patients presenting pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and treated at the State University of Londrina School of Medicine. We focus on the importance of whole-lung lavage as the treatment of choice. METHODS: A retrospective study of four patients, three females and one male, 22 to 34 years old, presenting similar histories of progressive dyspnea and dry cough. The final diagnosis was established through open-lung biopsy. Three of the patients underwent whole-lung lavage in the Department of Surgery. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia and using a double-lumen endotracheal tube. RESULTS: One patient presented spontaneous regression of the pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

  3. Partial pulmonary embolization disrupts alveolarization in fetal sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Stuart B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is closely associated with an arrest of alveolar development and pulmonary capillary dysplasia, it is unknown whether these two features are causally related. To investigate the relationship between pulmonary capillaries and alveolar formation, we partially embolized the pulmonary capillary bed. Methods Partial pulmonary embolization (PPE was induced in chronically catheterized fetal sheep by injection of microspheres into the left pulmonary artery for 1 day (1d PPE; 115d gestational age; GA or 5 days (5d PPE; 110-115d GA. Control fetuses received vehicle injections. Lung morphology, secondary septal crests, elastin, collagen, myofibroblast, PECAM1 and HIF1α abundance and localization were determined histologically. VEGF-A, Flk-1, PDGF-A and PDGF-Rα mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. Results At 130d GA (term ~147d, in embolized regions of the lung the percentage of lung occupied by tissue was increased from 29 ± 1% in controls to 35 ± 1% in 1d PPE and 44 ± 1% in 5d PPE fetuses (p VEGF and Flk-1, although a small increase in PDGF-Rα expression at 116d GA, from 1.00 ± 0.12 in control fetuses to 1.61 ± 0.18 in 5d PPE fetuses may account for impaired differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts and alveolar development. Conclusions PPE impairs alveolarization without adverse systemic effects and is a novel model for investigating the role of pulmonary capillaries and alveolar myofibroblasts in alveolar formation.

  4. Asymmetric [14C]albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, 14 C-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, [ 14 C]albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space

  5. Alveolar ridge sockets preservation with bone grafting--review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Sergio; Koening, Bruno; Allegrini, Marcia Rivellino Facci; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Gedrange, Tomasz; Fanghaenel, Jochen; Lipski, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Alveolar bone seems to play a key role in providing support to the teeth, which are anchored to the bone by desmodontal fibers. The progressive alveolar bone resorption process occurs due to a loss of anatomic, biologic and mechanical factors. Mechanical stimulation of alveolar bone during mastication is crucial in keeping the teeth and underlying bone healthy. Tooth extraction leads to typical bone deficiency of ridge width and height of alveolar crest and reduces the possibility of placing screw titanium implants. When tooth extraction is necessary, trauma should be minimized during the procedure and bone preservation should receive careful attention. The literature has shown that early bone loss can be significantly reduced by socket grafting. The process of socket grafting requires an understanding of wound healing and an appreciation of the biological properties of the products available for socket grafting. Augmentative measures may, thus, be required to guarantee optimal prosthetic replacement of the lost tissue. Success or failure of augmentation procedures is dependent on revascularization and remodelling of the grafted bone into a vital, load bearing bone. In contrast to a visible three-dimensional change, the concept of remodelling refers to the internal turnover of bone, which is a coupled process where osteoclastic resorption and osteoblastic formation are more or less balanced. To restore alveolar bone loss and support efficient placement of dental implants, many different bone substitute such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, synthetic biomaterials and osteoactive agents have been proposed. In order to avoid harvesting an autograft, and thereby eliminating additional surgical procedures and risks, bone grafting materials and substitutes are alternative filler materials to be used for ridge augmentation. To present a literature review about biomaterials applicable in alveolar ridge sockets preservation to future implants insertion. The

  6. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  7. NFκB signaling in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M. Cleary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS is a pediatric soft tissue cancer commonly associated with a chromosomal translocation that leads to the expression of a Pax3:Foxo1 or Pax7:Foxo1 fusion protein, the developmental underpinnings of which may give clues to its therapeutic approaches. In aRMS, the NFκB–YY1–miR-29 regulatory circuit is dysregulated, resulting in repression of miR-29 and loss of the associated tumor suppressor activity. To further elucidate the role of NFκB in aRMS, we first tested 55 unique sarcoma cell lines and primary cell cultures in a large-scale chemical screen targeting diverse molecular pathways. We found that pharmacological inhibition of NFκB activity resulted in decreased cell proliferation of many of the aRMS tumor cultures. Surprisingly, mice that were orthotopically allografted with aRMS tumor cells exhibited no difference in tumor growth when administered an NFκB inhibitor, compared to control. Furthermore, inhibition of NFκB by genetically ablating its activating kinase inhibitor, IKKβ, by conditional deletion in a mouse model harboring the Pax3:Foxo1 chimeric oncogene failed to abrogate spontaneous tumor growth. Genetically engineered mice with conditionally deleted IKKβ exhibited a paradoxical decrease in tumor latency compared with those with active NFκB. However, using a synthetic-lethal approach, primary cell cultures derived from tumors with inactivated NFκB showed sensitivity to the BCL-2 inhibitor navitoclax. When used in combination with an NFκB inhibitor, navitoclax was synergistic in decreasing the growth of both human and IKKβ wild-type mouse aRMS cells, indicating that inactivation of NFκB alone may not be sufficient for reducing tumor growth, but, when combined with another targeted therapeutic, may be clinically beneficial.

  8. IAP survivin regulates atherosclerotic macrophage survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P.; Teissier, Elisabeth; Castier, Yves; Lesèche, Guy; Bijnens, Ann-Pascal; Daemen, Mat; Staels, Bart; Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory macrophage apoptosis is critical to atherosclerotic plaque formation, but its mechanisms remain enigmatic. We hypothesized that inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin regulates macrophage death in atherosclerosis. Western blot analysis revealed discrete survivin expression in

  9. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselyn Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD.

  10. Heterogeneity of macrophage activation in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forlenza, M.; Fink, I.R.; Raes, G.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we focus on four different activation states of fish macrophages. In vitro, stimulation with microbial ligands induces the development of innate activated macrophages whereas classically activated macrophages can be induced by stimulation with LPS in combination with (recombinant)

  11. An evaluation of the sociodemographic determinants of dental anxiety in patients scheduled for intra-alveolar extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Egbor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies on anxiety in patients having intra-alveolar extraction as well as the effect of patient's sociodemographic characteristics influencing level of associated anxiety are few in our environment. The aim of this study was to statistically analyze the sociodemographic determinants of dental anxiety in patients scheduled for intra-alveolar extraction. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 93 consecutive patients attending the outpatient clinic of the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Benin Teaching Hospital for intra-alveolar extraction in the months of November and December 2013. An interview-based questionnaire, Corah Dental Anxiety Scale Revised (DAS-R, was administered to evaluate levels of dental anxiety. Sociodemographic characteristics of the subjects were recorded. Descriptive statistics and regression models were done with the independent variables (sociodemographic factors and the dependent variable being the DAS-R. A P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The internal consistency of the scale used as determined by Cronbach alpha was 0.76. Mean DAS score was 8.12±2.58. Dental anxiety and age of subjects showed significant inverse relationship. Females had a higher mean DAS score (8.76 than the males (7.37 (P=0.006. Residence (urban/rural was not statistically significant. Singles reported the highest DAS score (9.41 (P=0.006. The educational level attained was significantly related to dental anxiety (P=0.005. Those with secondary school education had the highest DAS score (9.26. Class V social status had the highest mean anxiety score (P=0.012. Stepwise linear regression showed that the best predictors for dental anxiety were sex (P=0.008 and marital status (P=0.026. Conclusion: This present study demonstrates that sex and marital status are the predictive factors for dental anxiety in the overall management of patients indicated for intra-alveolar extraction.

  12. An evaluation of the sociodemographic determinants of dental anxiety in patients scheduled for intra-alveolar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbor, Peter E; Akpata, Osagie

    2014-01-01

    Studies on anxiety in patients having intra-alveolar extraction as well as the effect of patient's sociodemographic characteristics influencing level of associated anxiety are few in our environment. The aim of this study was to statistically analyze the sociodemographic determinants of dental anxiety in patients scheduled for intra-alveolar extraction. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 93 consecutive patients attending the outpatient clinic of the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Benin Teaching Hospital for intra-alveolar extraction in the months of November and December 2013. An interview-based questionnaire, Corah Dental Anxiety Scale Revised (DAS-R), was administered to evaluate levels of dental anxiety. Sociodemographic characteristics of the subjects were recorded. Descriptive statistics and regression models were done with the independent variables (sociodemographic factors) and the dependent variable being the DAS-R. A Pscale used as determined by Cronbach alpha was 0.76. Mean DAS score was 8.12±2.58. Dental anxiety and age of subjects showed significant inverse relationship. Females had a higher mean DAS score (8.76) than the males (7.37) (P=0.006). Residence (urban/rural) was not statistically significant. Singles reported the highest DAS score (9.41) (P=0.006). The educational level attained was significantly related to dental anxiety (P=0.005). Those with secondary school education had the highest DAS score (9.26). Class V social status had the highest mean anxiety score (P=0.012). Stepwise linear regression showed that the best predictors for dental anxiety were sex (P=0.008) and marital status (P=0.026). This present study demonstrates that sex and marital status are the predictive factors for dental anxiety in the overall management of patients indicated for intra-alveolar extraction.

  13. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. (Royal Free Hospital, London (England))

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  14. Hypocapnic but Not Metabolic Alkalosis Impairs Alveolar Fluid Reabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrianthefs, Pavlos M.; Briva, Arturo; Lecuona, Emilia; Dumasius, Vidas; Rutschman, David H.; Ridge, Karen M.; Baltopoulos, George J.; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha

    2005-01-01

    Acid-base disturbances, such as metabolic or respiratory alkalosis, are relatively common in critically ill patients. We examined the effects of alkalosis (hypocapnic or metabolic alkalosis) on alveolar fluid reabsorption in the isolated and continuously perfused rat lung model. We found that alveolar fluid reabsorption after 1 hour was impaired by low levels of CO2 partial pressure (PCO2; 10 and 20 mm Hg) independent of pH levels (7.7 or 7.4). In addition, PCO2 higher than 30 mm Hg or metabolic alkalosis did not have an effect on this process. The hypocapnia-mediated decrease of alveolar fluid reabsorption was associated with decreased Na,K-ATPase activity and protein abundance at the basolateral membranes of distal airspaces. The effect of low PCO2 on alveolar fluid reabsorption was reversible because clearance normalized after correcting the PCO2 back to normal levels. These data suggest that hypocapnic but not metabolic alkalosis impairs alveolar fluid reabsorption. Conceivably, correction of hypocapnic alkalosis in critically ill patients may contribute to the normalization of lung ability to clear edema. PMID:15764729

  15. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh A. Seifeldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate (CL/P is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material.

  16. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  17. HIV-1 and the macrophage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Cobos-Jimenez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; van 't Wout, Angelique B.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages and CD4(+) T cells are natural target cells for HIV-1, and both cell types contribute to the establishment of the viral reservoir that is responsible for continuous residual virus replication during antiretroviral therapy and viral load rebound upon treatment interruption. Scientific

  18. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  19. Establishment of self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages in vitro from murine bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Ito

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a key role in the innate immune system. Macrophages are thought to originate from hematopoietic precursors or the yolk sac. Here, we describe the in vitro establishment of self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs from murine bone marrow (BM. GM-IMs grow continuously in vitro in conditioned medium containing GM-CSF. The immunophenotype of GM-IMs is F4/80(high CD11b(high CD11c(low Ly6C(low. By comparing gene expression in GM-IMs and BM dendritic cells, we found that GM-IMs expressed lower levels of chemokines, cytokines and their receptors. GM-IMs are round in shape, attach loosely to non-coated culture dishes and have a marked phagocytic capacity. These results indicate that GM-IMs are macrophage precursor cells. Following stimulation with LPS, monocyte-like GM-IMs converted to flat macrophage-like cells that tightly adhered to non-coated culture dishes and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. These results indicated that GM-IMs differentiated to M1 pro-inflammatory macrophages. This was confirmed by stimulation of GM-IMs with IFNγ, an inducer of M1 markers. GM-IMs showed enhanced expression of M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and Retnla following stimulation by Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. When GM-IMs were injected into mice at sites of wounding, wound repair was enhanced. These results indicate that GM-IMs can differentiate to M2 macrophages. When GM-IMs were injected into clodronate-treated mice, they induced resident macrophage proliferation by producing M-CSF. In conclusion we have established self-renewable GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages in vitro from murine BM, which differentiate to M1 or M2 macrophages.

  20. Diffuse bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzolo, W; Zuliani, D; Pogliani, E; Caniatti, M; Bussadori, C

    2002-06-01

    An eight-year-old female German wirehaired pointer was presented with signs of respiratory distress. Clinical examination, laboratory results, thoracic radiography and echocardiography indicated the presence of a diffuse interstitial lung disease with secondary appropriate erythrocytosis, pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy of the lung suggested malignant epithelial neoplasia. A primary lung cancer with an unusually diffuse distribution of miliary/micronodular lesions was found at postmortem examination. Histological diagnosis was bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma. Bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma can occasionally occur in a diffuse fashion involving most or all of the lung parenchyma. In man, diffuse bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma is considered a great imitator of other, more common diffuse interstitial forms of lung disease. This case report indicates that it is also a differential diagnosis to consider in dogs.

  1. Signaling pathways required for macrophage scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis: analysis by scanning cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkler Aaron R

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scavenger receptors are important components of the innate immune system in the lung, allowing alveolar macrophages to bind and phagocytose numerous unopsonized targets. Mice with genetic deletions of scavenger receptors, such as SR-A and MARCO, are susceptible to infection or inflammation from inhaled pathogens or dusts. However, the signaling pathways required for scavenger receptor-mediated phagocytosis of unopsonized particles have not been characterized. Methods We developed a scanning cytometry-based high-throughput assay of macrophage phagocytosis that quantitates bound and internalized unopsonized latex beads. This assay allowed the testing of a panel of signaling inhibitors which have previously been shown to target opsonin-dependent phagocytosis for their effect on unopsonized bead uptake by human in vitro-derived alveolar macrophage-like cells. The non-selective scavenger receptor inhibitor poly(I and the actin destabilizer cytochalasin D were used to validate the assay and caused near complete abrogation of bead binding and internalization, respectively. Results Microtubule destabilization using nocodazole dramatically inhibited bead internalization. Internalization was also significantly reduced by inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (genistein and herbimycin A, protein kinase C (staurosporine, chelerythrine chloride and Gö 6976, phosphoinositide-3 kinase (LY294002 and wortmannin, and the JNK and ERK pathways. In contrast, inhibition of phospholipase C by U-73122 had no effect. Conclusion These data indicate the utility of scanning cytometry for the analysis of phagocytosis and that phagocytosis of unopsonized particles has both shared and distinct features when compared to opsonin-mediated phagocytosis.

  2. Haemosiderin-laden sputum macrophages for diagnosis in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.

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    Heidi Lederer

    Full Text Available Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD is a rare condition of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, in which post-capillary veins are affected. Since the therapeutic approach in PVOD differs from other forms of PAH, it is crucial to establish the diagnosis. Due to the fact that affected patients are often hemodynamically unstable, minimal invasive procedures are necessary for the diagnostic work-up. Chronic alveolar haemorrhage has been observed during bronchoalveolar lavage in PVOD cases. This study therefore investigates whether signs of alveolar haemorrhage can also be found in the sputum of these patients.Six patients suffering from PVOD were included in this analysis. As controls, patients with idiopathic PAH (n = 11, chronic thromboembolic PH (n = 9 and with sclerodermia-associated PH (n = 10 were assessed. Sputum from every patient was obtained by a non-invasive manner. The amount of haemosiderin-laden macrophages was determined using the Golde score. There were statistically significant more haemosiderin-laden macrophages in the sputum of patients suffering from PVOD as compared to the other groups (P<0.05. Assuming a cut-off of 200 on the Golde score, all of the 6 PVOD patients surpassed this value compared with only 1 out of the 30 cases with precapillary PH. Thus, sensitivity and specificity with respect to the diagnosis of PVOD was 100% and 97%, respectively.The content of haemosiderin-laden macrophages in the sputum of patients suffering from PVOD is significantly higher as compared to other forms of PH and may be useful in the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of these patients.

  3. Haemosiderin-laden sputum macrophages for diagnosis in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Heidi; Muggli, Bettina; Speich, Rudolf; Treder, Ula; Stricker, Hans; Goede, Jeroen; Ulrich, Silvia; Stämpfli, Simon F; Breitenstein, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare condition of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), in which post-capillary veins are affected. Since the therapeutic approach in PVOD differs from other forms of PAH, it is crucial to establish the diagnosis. Due to the fact that affected patients are often hemodynamically unstable, minimal invasive procedures are necessary for the diagnostic work-up. Chronic alveolar haemorrhage has been observed during bronchoalveolar lavage in PVOD cases. This study therefore investigates whether signs of alveolar haemorrhage can also be found in the sputum of these patients. Six patients suffering from PVOD were included in this analysis. As controls, patients with idiopathic PAH (n = 11), chronic thromboembolic PH (n = 9) and with sclerodermia-associated PH (n = 10) were assessed. Sputum from every patient was obtained by a non-invasive manner. The amount of haemosiderin-laden macrophages was determined using the Golde score. There were statistically significant more haemosiderin-laden macrophages in the sputum of patients suffering from PVOD as compared to the other groups (P<0.05). Assuming a cut-off of 200 on the Golde score, all of the 6 PVOD patients surpassed this value compared with only 1 out of the 30 cases with precapillary PH. Thus, sensitivity and specificity with respect to the diagnosis of PVOD was 100% and 97%, respectively. The content of haemosiderin-laden macrophages in the sputum of patients suffering from PVOD is significantly higher as compared to other forms of PH and may be useful in the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of these patients.

  4. Unveiling skin macrophage dynamics explains both tattoo persistence and strenuous removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranska, Anna; Shawket, Alaa; Jouve, Mabel; Baratin, Myriam; Malosse, Camille; Voluzan, Odessa; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Fiore, Frédéric; Bajénoff, Marc; Benaroch, Philippe; Dalod, Marc; Malissen, Marie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard

    2018-04-02

    Here we describe a new mouse model that exploits the pattern of expression of the high-affinity IgG receptor (CD64) and allows diphtheria toxin (DT)-mediated ablation of tissue-resident macrophages and monocyte-derived cells. We found that the myeloid cells of the ear skin dermis are dominated by DT-sensitive, melanin-laden cells that have been missed in previous studies and correspond to macrophages that have ingested melanosomes from neighboring melanocytes. Those cells have been referred to as melanophages in humans. We also identified melanophages in melanocytic melanoma. Benefiting of our knowledge on melanophage dynamics, we determined the identity, origin, and dynamics of the skin myeloid cells that capture and retain tattoo pigment particles. We showed that they are exclusively made of dermal macrophages. Using the possibility to delete them, we further demonstrated that tattoo pigment particles can undergo successive cycles of capture-release-recapture without any tattoo vanishing. Therefore, congruent with dermal macrophage dynamics, long-term tattoo persistence likely relies on macrophage renewal rather than on macrophage longevity. © 2018 Baranska et al.

  5. Regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities in male and female rat macrophages by sex steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and animal immune functions present sex dimorphism that seems to be mainly regulated by sex hormones. In the present study, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes total superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px were measured in intraperitoneal resident macrophages from adult male and female rats. In addition to comparing males and females, we also examined the regulation of these enzyme activities in macrophages by sex steroids. GSH-Px activity did not differ between male and female macrophages. However, both total SOD and CAT activities were markedly higher in females than in males (83 and 180%. Removal of the gonads in both males and females (comparison between castrated groups increased the difference in SOD activity from 83 to 138% and reduced the difference in CAT activity from 180 to 86%. Castration and testosterone administration did not significantly modify the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in male macrophages. Ovariectomy did not affect SOD or GSH-Px activity but markedly reduced (48% CAT activity. This latter change was fully reversed by estrogen administration, whereas progesterone had a smaller effect. These results led us to conclude that differences in the SOD and CAT activities may partially explain some of the differences in immune function reported for males and females. Also, estrogen is a potent regulator of CAT in macrophages and therefore this enzyme activity in macrophages may vary considerably during the menstrual cycle.

  6. Bone resorption and complications in alveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Tobias; Gerlach, Till; Schüsselbauer, Thomas; Gosau, Martin; Reichert, Torsten E; Driemel, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    Distraction osteogenesis presents an alternative procedure for augmentation of atrophic alveolar bone prior to inserting dental implants. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate complications of this method with specific focus on bone resorption during the consolidation period and the follow-up period after dental implant insertion into distracted bone. Thirty partially edentulous patients underwent a total of 36 vertical alveolar distractions with an extraosseous distraction system. Eleven devices were placed in the maxilla and 25 in the mandible. Eighty-two dental implants were inserted after a mean consolidation period of 4.5 months. Treatment results were evaluated by means of panoramic radiographs for distraction follow-up and periapical radiographs for implant follow-up. The mean length of the transport segment was 19 mm. The average alveolar height achieved was 6.4 mm with a mean resorption of 1.8 mm (21.1%) at the time of dental implant insertion. Main problems comprised oral displacement of the transport segment (n = 15) and inadequate soft tissue extension (n = 13). Eighty-two dental implants were inserted with an overall survival rate of 95.1% after 45.8 months. For periimplant marginal bone, an average resorption of 3.5 mm was recorded 50.4 months after implant insertion. Although alveolar distraction osteogenesis seems to be an effective tool to treat vertical defects of the alveolar ridge, it is not an uncomplicated procedure. A combination with vestibular augmentation of autogenous bone grafts should be considered. Overcorrection of 20% may compensate bone relapse during the consolidation period of the distracted alveolar bone. Further bone resorption after dental implantation is common.

  7. Alveolar bone width preservation after decoronation of ankylosed anterior incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Schwarz-Arad, Dvorah; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the alteration of alveolar ridge dimensions after decoronation procedures in children and adolescents at least 1 year after surgery. Twelve children who underwent decoronation of ankylosed maxillary anterior incisors with at least 1 year after surgery follow-up were recalled for reevaluation. All decoronations were performed when the ankylosed teeth were submerged 1-1.5 mm. During the recall appointment, impressions of the upper arch were obtained. The bucco-palatal alveolar dimensions of the decoronated teeth were measured on the cast at the mid-mesiodistal distance from the missing tooth and were compared with the distance from the contralateral healthy incisor. Overall, 12 children (9 male and 3 female) were reevaluated up to 82 months after decoronation (mean, 49.58 ± 24 months). The mean age of the patients at the time of trauma was 9.83 ± 2.8 years. The average bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge at the mid-decoronation area was 9 ± 1 mm compared with 10.17 ± 0.9 mm at the contralateral homologous tooth (difference of 1.67 ± 1.12, P = .004). The findings show a positive statistical correlation between the duration of the follow-up period and the bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge (P = .027). Although decoronation of ankylosed young permanent incisors resulted in a decrease in the bucco-palatal dimension with time, it did not prevent additional alveolar growth that occurs with age in a developing child and thus may help maintain the alveolar bone ridge width, height, and continuity and assist in future rehabilitation with less invasive ridge augmentation procedures required for implant placement. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A method for comparison of animal and human alveolar dose and toxic effect of inhaled ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, G.E.; Koren, H.; Aissa, M.

    1989-01-01

    Present models for predicting the pulmonary toxicity of O 3 in humans from the toxic effects