WorldWideScience

Sample records for resident academic year

  1. [Depression, anxiety and suicide risk symptoms among medical residents over an academic year].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-López, José Luis; Arenas-Osuna, Jesús; Angeles-Garay, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of dissatisfaction among residents is related to burnout syndrome, stress and depression. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence of depression, anxiety and suicide risk symptoms and its correlation with mental disorders among medical residents over an academic year. 108 medical residents registered to second year of medical residence answered the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Suicide Risk Scale of Plutchik: at the entry, six months later and at the end of the academic year. Residents reported low depressive symptoms (3.7 %), low anxiety symptoms (38 %) and 1.9 % of suicide risk at the beginning of the academic year, which increased in second measurement to 22.2 % for depression, 56.5 % for anxiety and 7.4 % for suicide risk. The statistical analysis showed significant differences between the three measurements (p depressive disorder was 4.6 % and no anxiety disorder was diagnosed. Almost all of the residents with depressive disorder had personal history of depression. None reported the work or academic environment as a trigger of the disorder. There was no association by specialty, sex or civil status. The residents that are susceptible to depression must be detected in order to receive timely attention if they develop depressive disorder.

  2. Pediatric Resident Academic Projects While on Global Health Electives: Ten Years of Experience at the University of Minnesota.

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    Pitt, Michael B; Slusher, Tina M; Howard, Cynthia R; Cole, Valerie B; Gladding, Sophia P

    2017-07-01

    Many residency programs require residents to complete an academic project as part of a global health (GH) elective. However, there has been little description of the range of projects residents have pursued during GH electives or the extent to which these projects are consistent with proposed best practices. The authors conducted a document review of 67 written summaries or copies of presentations of academic projects (hereafter, summaries) completed by pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents at the University of Minnesota while on GH electives from 2005 to 2015. Two authors independently coded each summary for the type of project completed; when the project idea was generated; explicit mention of a mentor from the home institution, host institution, or both; whether a needs assessment was conducted; and whether there were plans for sustainability. Most of the 67 projects were categorized into one of three project types: quality/process improvement (28 [42%]), education (18 [27%]), or clinical research (14 [21%]). Most summaries explicitly mentioned a mentor (45 [67%]), reported conducting a needs assessment (38 [57%]), and indicated sustainability plans (45 [67%]). Of the 42 summaries that indicated the timing of idea generation, 30 (71%) indicated the idea was developed after arriving at the host site. Residents undertook a wide range of academic projects during GH electives, most commonly quality/process improvement and education projects. The projects were largely aligned with best practices, with most summaries indicating the resident worked with a mentor, conducted a needs assessment, and made plans for sustainability.

  3. A mid year comparison study of career satisfaction and emotional states between residents and faculty at one academic medical center

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    Wessel Kristen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME new requirements raise multiple challenges for academic medical centers. We sought to evaluate career satisfaction, emotional states, positive and negative experiences, work hours and sleep among residents and faculty simultaneously in one academic medical center after implementation of the ACGME duty hour requirements. Methods Residents and faculty (1330 in the academic health center were asked to participate in a confidential survey; 72% of the residents and 66% of the faculty completed the survey. Results Compared to residents, faculty had higher levels of satisfaction with career choice, competence, importance and usefulness; lower levels of anxiousness and depression. The most positive experiences for both groups corresponded to strong interpersonal relationships and educational value; most negative experiences to poor interpersonal relationships and issues perceived outside of the physician's control. Approximately 13% of the residents and 14% of the faculty were out of compliance with duty hour requirements. Nearly 5% of faculty reported working more than 100 hours per week. For faculty who worked 24 hour shifts, nearly 60% were out of compliance with the duty-hour requirements. Conclusion Reasons for increased satisfaction with career choice, positive emotional states and experiences for faculty compared to residents are unexplained. Earlier studies from this institution identified similar positive findings among advanced residents compared to more junior residents. Faculty are more frequently at risk for duty-hour violations. If patient safety is of prime importance, faculty, in particular, should be compliant with the duty hour requirements. Perhaps the ACGME should contain faculty work hours as part of its regulatory function.

  4. Assessing Career Outcomes of a Resident Academic Administrator, Clinician Educator Track: A Seven-Year Follow-up.

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    Penner, Anne E; Lundblad, Wynne; Azzam, Pierre N; Gopalan, Priya; Jacobson, Sansea L; Travis, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    This study reports the academic outcomes, including scholarly productivity, of the graduates of one residency training track for future clinician educators and academic administrators. Since its implementation in 2008, the Academic Administrator, Clinician Educator (AACE) track at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic - UPMC has grown in popularity with reports of participants achieving post-graduate academic success; however, there has been no prior assessment of outcomes. In 2015 all graduates of the track were surveyed using an anonymous, web-based survey. Twenty-nine total graduates were surveyed RESULTS: Twenty-four graduates responded to the survey (83% response rate). The graduates are very active in academic psychiatry with 23 (96%) holding an academic appointment with different administrative roles, medical director (50%) and training director (17%) being the most frequent. Participants have also been active in pursuing scholarship with 80% presenting their scholarly projects at local and national conferences and producing post-graduate, peer-reviewed articles (50%). This study underscores the benefits of a clinician educator track and suggests areas for future growth.

  5. Is past academic productivity predictive of radiology resident academic productivity?

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    Patterson, Stephanie K; Fitzgerald, James T; Boyse, Tedric D; Cohan, Richard H

    2002-02-01

    The authors performed this study to determine whether academic productivity in college and medical school is predictive of the number of publications produced during radiology residency. The authors reviewed the records of 73 radiology residents who completed their residency from 1990 to 2000. Academic productivity during college, medical school, and radiology residency, other postgraduate degrees, and past careers other than radiology were tabulated. The personal essay attached to the residency application was reviewed for any stated academic interest. Residents were classified as being either previously productive or previously unproductive. Publication rates during residency and immediately after residency were compared for the two groups. For the productive residents, a correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between past frequency of publication and type of previous activity. Least-squares regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between preresidency academic productivity, advanced degrees, stated interest in academics, and other careers and radiology residency publications. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of articles published by those residents who were active and those who were not active before residency (P = .21). Only authorship of papers as an undergraduate was weakly predictive of residency publication. These selected measures of academic productivity as an undergraduate and during medical school are not helpful for predicting publication during residency. There was no difference in publication potential between those residents who were academically productive in the past and those who were not.

  6. Factors Influencing American Plastic Surgery Residents Toward an Academic Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetta, Matthew D; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J; Kasten, Steven J

    2018-02-01

    Plastic surgery residency program directors have an interest in recruiting applicants who show an interest in an academic practice. Medical school achievements (ie, United States Medical Licensing Examination® scores, publications, and Alpha Omega Alpha status) are metrics assessed to grade applicants but may not correlate with ultimately choosing an academic career. This study was designed to investigate factors influencing residents' choices for or against academic careers. A 25-item online questionnaire was designed to measure baseline interest in academic plastic surgery and factors that influence decisions to continue on or abandon that career path. This questionnaire was disseminated to the integrated/combined plastic surgery residents during the 2013 to 2014 academic year. One hundred twenty-five respondents indicated that they were currently interested in pursuing academic practice (n = 78) or had lost interest in academic practice (n = 47). Among all respondents, 92.8% (n = 116) stated they were interested in academic careers at the time of residency application, but one-third (n = 41) subsequently lost interest. Those residents who retained interest in academic careers indicated resident/medical student educational opportunities (57%) and complexity of patients (52%) as reasons. Those who lost interest cited a lack of autonomy (43%), publishing requirements (32%), and income discrepancy (26%) as reasons. Many residents report losing interest in academics during residency. Traditional metrics valued in the recruitment process may not serve as positive predictors of an academic career path. Reasons why residents lose interest are not easily correctable, but mentorship, adequate career counseling, and research opportunities during training remain factors that can be addressed across all residency programs.

  7. [Burnout effect on academic progress of Oncology medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ávila, Gabriel; Bello-Villalobos, Herlinda

    2014-01-01

    In the formative period of the courses taken in medical specializations, new and greater responsibilities are accepted by physicians in personal and academic spheres. The interaction of several factors that encompass the practice of these physicians could surpass their capacity to cope, causing on these professionals a high level of stress and professional exhaustion, which will affect their academic development. The objective of this research was to establish if the occupational stress of these medical residents affects their academic progress. We administered the Spanish version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to 52 residents of three specializations in Oncology (Medical Oncology, Surgical Oncology, and Radio-Oncology). These residents accepted voluntarily at the same time of their third cognitive exam. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 13.5 %, with a high frequency among medical residents of first degree. Medical Oncology residents showed a higher emotional exhaustion and lower personal fulfillment. Considering the three specializations, the academic progress was higher in the third year, with a significant difference to Surgical Oncology and Medical Oncology (p = 0.026 and 0.015, respectively). No significant difference was found between burnout syndrome, academic progress and sociodemographic characteristics. The presence of burnout syndrome does not affect the academic progress of Oncology medical residents.

  8. The Resident Academic Project Program: A Structured Approach to Inspiring Academic Development During Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Jill; Vaida, Sonia J; Bezinover, Dmitri; McCloskey, Diane E; Mets, Berend

    2016-02-15

    We report the successful implementation of structured resident academic projects in our Department of Anesthesiology at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Beginning with the graduating class of 2010, we adopted an expectation that each resident complete a project that results in a manuscript of publishable quality. Defining a clear timeline for all steps in the project and providing research education, as well as the necessary infrastructure and ongoing support, has helped grow the academic productivity of our anesthesia residents.

  9. Analysis of PGY-1 Pharmacy Resident Candidate Letters of Recommendation at an Academically Affiliated Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Milena M; Masic, Dalila; Gettig, Jacob P

    2018-04-01

    Letters of recommendation (LORs) are a critical component for differentiating among similarly qualified pharmacy residency candidates. These letters contain information that is difficult to ascertain from curricula vitae and pharmacy school transcripts. LOR writers may use any words or phrases appropriate for each candidate as there is no set framework for LORs. The objective of this study was to characterize descriptive themes in postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) pharmacy residency candidates' LORs and to examine which themes of PGY-1 pharmacy residency candidates' LORs are predictive of an interview invitation at an academically affiliated residency program. LORs for candidates from the Pharmacy Online Residency Centralized Application System (PhORCAS) from 2013 and 2014 for the Midwestern University PGY-1 Pharmacy Residency were analyzed. LOR characteristics and descriptive themes were collected. All scores for candidate characteristics and overall PhORCAS recommendation were also recorded. A total of 351 LORs for 111 candidates from 2013 (n = 47 candidates) and 2014 (n = 64 candidates) were analyzed; 36 (32.4%) total candidates were offered an interview. Themes that were identified as predictors of an interview included a higher median (interquartile range) number of standout words (3 words [1.3-4] vs 3.8 words [2.5-5.5], P < .01) and teaching references (3.7 words [2.7-6] vs 5.7 words [3.7-7.8], P = .01). For this residency program, standout words and teaching references were important when offering interviews.

  10. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  11. Professor in Residence: An Innovative Academic-Practice Partnership.

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    Hinic, Katherine; Kowalski, Mildred Ortu; Silverstein, Wendy

    2017-12-01

    This article describes an academic-practice partnership between an American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet ® -designated hospital and an academic nurse educator that has increased the hospital's capacity for research, evidence-based practice, and support for nurses continuing their education. Through close collaboration with the full-time nurse researcher and members of the nursing education department, the professor in residence consults with clinical staff to support completion of research and evidence-based practice projects. The collaboration also has resulted in the development of a formal year-long mentoring program for clinical nurses in the area of evidence-based practice. Individual support and academic consults are offered to nurses enrolled in school to promote advancement of nurses' educational level. This collaboration has been beneficial for both the hospital and the university, increasing the capacity for scholarly activities for nurses in the hospital and serving as a forum for ongoing faculty practice and scholarship. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):552-556. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Assessment of pediatric residents burnout in a tertiary academic centre

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    Roaa S. Jamjoom

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study burnout among pediatric residents at King Abdulazaiz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey that was administered to all pediatric residents enrolled in the Saudi Paediatric Board program (PGY1-PGY4 in a large tertiary academic hospital in the Western region of Saudi Arabia (King Abdulaziz University Hospital. The survey were sent via E-mail to 50 registered general pediatric residents. Results: Seventy percent of the pediatric residents completed the survey. More than 70% of residents experiencing severe burnout. Forty-three percent suffering emotional exhaustion, 71.8% experiencing depersonalization and 40.6% suffering from low accomplishment. Conclusion: Burnout syndrome appear to be a serious threat to resident well-being in our program. Moreover, pediatric residents in our institute experienced higher levels of depersonalization than their peers nationally and internationally.

  13. Residents' Perspectives on Careers in Academic Medicine: Obstacles and Opportunities.

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    Lin, Steven; Nguyen, Cathina; Walters, Emily; Gordon, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Worsening faculty shortages in medical schools and residency programs are threatening the US medical education infrastructure. Little is known about the factors that influence the decision of family medicine residents to choose or not choose academic careers. Our study objective was to answer the following question among family medicine residents: "What is your greatest concern or fear about pursuing a career in academic family medicine?" Participants were family medicine residents who attended the Faculty for Tomorrow Workshop at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference in 2016 and 2017. Free responses to the aforementioned prompt were analyzed using a constant comparative method and grounded theory approach. A total of 156 participants registered for the workshops and 95 (61%) answered the free response question. Eight distinct themes emerged from the analysis. The most frequently recurring theme was "lack of readiness or mentorship," which accounted for nearly one-third (31%) of the codes. Other themes included work-life balance and burnout (17%), job availability and logistics (15%), lack of autonomy or flexibility (11%), competing pressures/roles (10%), lower financial rewards (4%), politics and bureaucracy (4%), and research (3%). To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify barriers and disincentives to pursuing a career in academic medicine from the perspective of family medicine residents. There may be at least eight major obstacles, for which we summarize and consider potential interventions. More research is needed to understand why residents choose, or don't choose, academic careers.

  14. Quality of life during orthopaedic training and academic practice. Part 1: orthopaedic surgery residents and faculty.

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    Sargent, M Catherine; Sotile, Wayne; Sotile, Mary O; Rubash, Harry; Barrack, Robert L

    2009-10-01

    A pilot study of two academic training programs revealed concerning levels of resident burnout and psychological dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to determine the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty on a national scale and to identify risk factors for decompensation. Three hundred and eighty-four orthopaedic residents and 264 full-time orthopaedic faculty members completed a voluntary, anonymous survey consisting of three validated instruments (the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale) and question sets assessing demographic information, relationship issues, stress reactions/management, and work/life balance. High levels of burnout were seen in 56% of the residents and 28% of the faculty members. Burnout risk was greatest among second-postgraduate-year residents and residents in training programs with six or more residents per postgraduate year. Sixteen percent of residents and 19% of faculty members reported symptoms of psychological distress. Sleep deprivation was common among the residents and correlated positively with every distress measure. Faculty reported greater levels of stress but greater satisfaction with work and work/life balance. A number of factors, such as making time for hobbies and limiting alcohol use, correlated with decreased dysfunction for both residents and faculty. Despite reporting high levels of job satisfaction, orthopaedic residents and faculty are at risk for burnout and distress. Identification of protective factors and risk factors may provide guidance to improve the quality of life of academic orthopaedic surgeons in training and beyond.

  15. A novel mentorship programme for residents integrating academic development, clinical teaching and graduate medical education assessment.

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    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Nadel, Eric S

    2016-02-01

    Mentorship fosters career development and growth. During residency training, mentorship should support clinical development along with intellectual and academic interests. Reported resident mentoring programmes do not typically include clinical components. We designed a programme that combines academic development with clinical feedback and assessment in a four-year emergency medicine residency programme. Incoming interns were assigned an advisor. At the conclusion of the intern year, residents actively participated in selecting a mentor for the duration of residency. The programme consisted of quarterly meetings, direct clinical observation and specific competency assessment, assistance with lecture preparation, real-time feedback on presentations, simulation coaching sessions, and discussions related to career development. Faculty participation was recognized as a valuable component of the annual review process. Residents were surveyed about the overall programme and individual components. Over 88 % of the respondents said that the programme was valuable and should be continued. Senior residents most valued the quarterly meetings and presentation help and feedback. Junior residents strongly valued the clinical observation and simulation sessions. A comprehensive mentorship programme integrating clinical, professional and academic development provides residents individualized feedback and coaching and is valued by trainees. Individualized assessment of clinical competencies can be conducted through such a programme.

  16. Patient satisfaction and resident postgraduate year status.

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    Nadkarni, Girish N; Sabharwal, Manpreet Singh; Ammakkanavar, Natraj Reddy; Annapureddy, Narender; Malhan, Rishi; Mehta, Bijal; Kanakadandi, Vijay Naag; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Fried, Ethan D

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has been recognized as an important variable affecting healthcare behavior. However, there are limited data on the relationship between doctor post-graduate year (PGY) status and patient satisfaction with provider interpersonal skills and humanistic qualities. The authors aims to assess this relationship using an American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) questionnaire. Participants were: patients attending a primary care clinic at a large urban academic hospital; and physicians treating them. The survey questionnaire was the ABIM patient satisfaction instrument; ten questions pertaining to humanistic qualities and communication skills with responses from poor to excellent. Mann Whitney U test and multi-variable logistic regression analyses were used to explore score differences by PGY level. The postgraduate year one (PGY1) had higher patient-satisfaction levels compared to PGY2/PGY3 residents. The PGY1 level residents were more likely to score in the 90th percentile and this remained constant even after adjusting for confounders. The research was a single-center study and may have been subject to confounding factors such as patient personality types and a survey ceiling effect. The survey's cross-sectional nature may also be a potential limitation. Practical implications - Patient satisfaction varies significantly with PGY status. Though clinical skills may improve with increasing experience, findings imply that interpersonal and humanistic qualities may deteriorate. The study is the first to assess patient satisfaction with PGY status and provides evidence that advanced trainees may need support to keep their communication skills and humanistic qualities from deteriorating as stressors increase to ensure optimal patient satisfaction.

  17. Mind the Gap: Promoting Careers in Academic Research to Psychiatry Residents

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    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Chisolm, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally-tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists, and to promote careers in academic research. Methods The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum’s participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. Results The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3and 2 years respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Conclusions Results suggest it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, little disruption to the residents’ schedule, and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training. PMID:24497181

  18. Nationwide survey of US integrated 6-year cardiothoracic surgical residents.

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    Lebastchi, Amir H; Yuh, David D

    2014-08-01

    Integrated 6-year cardiothoracic surgical residency programs have recently been implemented in the United States. We report the results of the first published nationwide survey assessing the motivations, satisfaction, and ambitions of integrated 6-year residents. A 63-question web-based survey was distributed to 83 residents enrolled in 21 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited integrated 6-year programs in November 2013. There was an outstanding 69% response rate. The median age of integrated 6-year residents was 29 years with women comprising 24%. A clear majority had faculty mentorship (95%) and significant clinical exposure in medical school. Focused (100%) and abbreviated (74%) training curricula were identified as the top advantages of integrated 6-year programs; the format itself was a significant factor (46%) in career choice. Most integrated 6-year residents (95%) were satisfied with their program; 80.7% were satisfied with their operative experience thus far. Career plans skewed toward adult cardiac surgery (67%), followed by pediatric cardiac (24%) and general thoracic (9%) surgery; 49% were not particularly concerned about future employment, with 65% foreseeing an increase in opportunities. Specialized training (eg, aortic, heart failure, minimally invasive, congenital) was anticipated by 77%. Most integrated 6-year residents envision an academic career (94.7%). This survey takes an important snapshot of the nascent integrated 6-year format. Mentorship and intense clinical exposure are critical in attracting applicants. Purported advantages of the format are holding true among integrated 6-year residents, with the majority satisfied with their programs. These early data indicate that this format holds significant promise in attracting and retaining highly qualified trainees to academic cardiothoracic surgery. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Relationship Between Academic Motivation and Lifelong Learning During Residency: A Study of Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Wiljer, David; Yufe, Shira; Knox, Matthew K; Fefergrad, Mark; Silver, Ivan; Harris, Ilene; Tekian, Ara

    2016-10-01

    To examine the relationship between lifelong learning (LLL) and academic motivation for residents in a psychiatry residency program, trainee factors that influence LLL, and psychiatry residents' LLL practices. Between December 2014 and February 2015, 105 of 173 (61%) eligible psychiatry residents from the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, completed a questionnaire with three study instruments: an LLL needs assessment survey, the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JeffSPLL), and the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). The AMS included a relative autonomy motivation score (AMS-RAM) measuring the overall level of intrinsic motivation (IM). A significant correlation was observed between JeffSPLL and AMS-RAM scores (r = 0.39, P motivation identification domain (mean difference [M] = 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.01, 0.75]; P = .045; d = 0.44) compared with senior residents. Clinician scientist stream (CSS) residents had significantly higher JeffSPLL scores compared with non-CSS residents (M = 3.15; 95% CI [0.52, 5.78]; P = .020; d = 0.57). The use of rigorous measures to study LLL and academic motivation confirmed prior research documenting the positive association between IM and LLL. The results suggest that postgraduate curricula aimed at enhancing IM, for example, through support for learning autonomously, could be beneficial to cultivating LLL in learners.

  20. Investigating the Status of Training Quality of Ophthalmologic Residents in Khatam-Ol-Anbia Hospital in Mashhad, Based on the Standards of EFQM Organizational Excellence Model in the Academic Year 2012-2013

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    Akbar Derakhshan

    2016-05-01

    general perception; educational, research, and pedagogy; support and guidance; and for loyalty, honesty, and values; were obtained as 6.19, 6.39, 6.61, and 7.44, respectively. The total score was obtained to be 129.32 (out of the standard 200 according to the criterion of customer results in EFQM model. Moreover, the status of training quality of learners in Ophthalmology residency in terms of gender and academic years did not show a significant difference. However, the mean value of indices in native residents showed a higher number in comparison with the students who declared themselves as non-native, indicating a significant difference (P=0.01.Conclusions: In this research, the general status of training quality of Ophthalmology residents, based on the required mean value and extraction of the total score obtained, reveals a higher than average level. These results, together with the difference in the mean value of indices in the native and non-native residents can act as a guide for decision-making and managerial policymaking in this subspecialty therapeutic, educational, and research hospital.Keywords: ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, EFQM, TRAINING QUALITY, RESIDENTS

  1. Evaluation of Academic Library Residency Programs in the United States for Librarians of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Angela; Blue, Yolanda; Im, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate academic library residency programs that successfully recruit and retain academic librarians of color. This study examines library residencies in the United States and discusses findings of two nationwide surveys. One survey posed questions to residents about the structure of their residencies, aspects…

  2. Examination of the Residency Interview Process for Academic Pathology Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Annual resident recruitment is a complex undertaking that requires many departmental resources of faculty time and effort and in many cases financial investment for meals and lodging. The applicants represent the future of the profession as well as the providers of patient care in the respective training programs. Although we understand the importance of this process, as we become more and more distracted by financial, administrative, and academic duties, the demands of recruitment have not decreased and continue annually. In an attempt to find the best practices for the improvement in our methods of recruitment, a review of the literature on the employment interviews with a specific eye to pathology residency relevant information was conducted. This article reviews some of the factors proven to be important to the applicants as well as an examination of the structure of the interview and the postinterview applicant evaluation process. PMID:28725755

  3. Prostate Brachytherapy Case Volumes by Academic and Nonacademic Practices: Implications for Future Residency Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cail, Daniel W.; Chen, Yu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prostate brachytherapy has continued to decline in the United States. We examined the national practice patterns of both academic and nonacademic practices performing prostate brachytherapy by case volume per year to further characterize the decline and postulate the effect this trend might have on training the next generation of residents. Methods and Materials: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone radiation therapy in 2004 to 2012 were identified. The annual brachytherapy case volume at each facility was determined and further categorized into ≤12 cases per year (ie, an average of ≤1 cases per month), 13 to 52 cases per year, and ≥53 cases per year (ie, an average of ≥1 cases per week) in academic practices versus nonacademic practices. Results: In 2004 to 2012, academic practices performing an average of ≤1 brachytherapy cases per month increased from 56.4% to 73.7%. In nonacademic practices, this percentage increased from 60.2% to 77.4% (P<.0001 for both). Practices performing an average of ≥1 cases per week decreased among both academic practices (from 6.7% to 1.5%) and nonacademic practices (from 4.5% to 2.7%). Conclusions: Both academic and nonacademic radiation oncology practices have demonstrated a significant reduction in the use of prostate brachytherapy from 2004 to 2012. With the case volume continuing to decline, it is unclear whether we are prepared to train the next generation of residents in this critical modality.

  4. Career outcomes of nondesignated preliminary general surgery residents at an academic surgical program.

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    Ahmad, Rima; Mullen, John T

    2013-01-01

    There remains a debate as to whether nondesignated preliminary (NDP) positions in surgery ultimately translate into successful surgical careers for those who pursue them. We sought to identify the success with which our NDP residents were able to transition to their desired career and what, if any, factors contributed to their success. The records of all NDP residents accepted into the Massachusetts General Hospital General Surgery Residency Program from 1995 to 2010 were examined and long-term follow-up was completed. Thirty-four NDP residents were identified, including 26.5% US graduates and 73.5% international medical graduates. At the end of the initial preliminary year, 30 (88%) got placed in a postgraduate residency program, whereas 4 (12%) pursued other career paths. Of those who got placed, 25 (83%) attained surgical residency positions, including 17 (57%) who continued as preliminary residents at our institution and 8 (27%) who got placed in categorical surgical positions at other programs. After multiple preliminary years, 15 of 17 achieved a categorical position, of which, 93% were in surgical fields. Overall, 64.7% of all entering NDP residents eventually went on to have careers in general surgery (50%) or surgical subspecialties (14.7%), and 24 of 34 (71%) fulfilled their desired career goals. No factor predicted success. From 1995 to 2012 there have been 15 midlevel (11 postgraduate year 4) vacancies in our program, 4 of which were filled by preliminary residents, 2 from our program and 2 from elsewhere. All have gone on to board certifications and careers in surgery. More than 70% of NDP residents in our program successfully transitioned to their desired career paths, many achieving categorical surgical positions and academic surgical careers, thus demonstrating the benefit of this track to both residency programs and trainees. © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The learning styles of orthopedic residents, faculty, and applicants at an academic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Raveesh Daniel; Deegan, Brian Francis; Klena, Joel Christian

    2014-01-01

    To train surgeons effectively, it is important to understand how they are learning. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) is based on the theory of experiential learning, which divides the learning cycle into 4 stages: active experimentation (AE), abstract conceptualization (AC), concrete experience, and reflective observation. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the learning styles of orthopedic residents, faculty, and applicants at an east-coast residency program. A total of 90 Kolb LSI, Version 3.1 surveys, and demographic questionnaires were distributed to all residency applicants, residents, and faculty at an academic program. Data collected included age, sex, type of medical school (MD or DO), foreign medical graduate status, and either year since college graduation, postgraduate year level (residents only), or years since completion of residency (faculty only). Seventy-one completed Kolb LSI surveys (14 residents, 14 faculty members, and 43 applicants) were recorded and analyzed for statistical significance. The most prevalent learning style among all participants was converging (53.5%), followed by accommodating (18.3%), diverging (18.3%), and assimilating (9.9%) (p = 0.13). The applicant and resident groups demonstrated a high tendency toward AE followed by AC. The faculty group demonstrated a high tendency toward AC followed by AE. None of the 24 subjects who were 26 years or under had assimilating learning styles, in significant contrast to the 12% of 27- to 30-year-olds and 18% of 31 and older group (p learning style involves problem solving and decision making, with the practical application of ideas and the use of hypothetical-deductive reasoning. Learning through AE decreased with age, whereas learning through AC increased. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of a Dedicated Emergency Medicine Teaching Resident Rotation at a Large Urban Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, James; Golden, Andrew; Bryant, Alyssa; Babcock, Christine

    2016-03-01

    In the face of declining bedside teaching and increasing emergency department (ED) crowding, balancing education and patient care is a challenge. Dedicated shifts by teaching residents (TRs) in the ED represent an educational intervention to mitigate these difficulties. We aimed to measure the perceived learning and departmental impact created by having TR. TRs were present in the ED from 12 pm-10 pm daily, and their primary roles were to provide the following: assist in teaching procedures, give brief "chalk talks," instruct junior trainees on interesting cases, and answer clinical questions in an evidence-based manner. This observational study included a survey of fourth-year medical students (MSs), residents and faculty at an academic ED. Surveys measured the perceived effect of the TR on teaching, patient flow, ease of procedures, and clinical care. Survey response rates for medical students, residents, and faculty are 56%, 77%, and 75%, respectively. MSs perceived improved procedure performance with TR presence and the majority agreed that the TR was a valuable educational experience. Residents perceived increased patient flow, procedure performance, and MS learning with TR presence. The majority agreed that the TR improved patient care. Faculty agreed that the TR increased resident and MS learning, as well as improved patient care and procedure performance. The presence of a TR increased MS and resident learning, improved patient care and procedure performance as perceived by MSs, residents and faculty. A dedicated TR program can provide a valuable resource in achieving a balance of clinical education and high quality healthcare.

  7. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Shaffer, Jenny L.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest

  8. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  9. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  10. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  11. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  12. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  13. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  14. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  15. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-11-01

    To determine family medicine residents' learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. London, Ont. All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians' teaching sessions (20%),and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents' homes (32%),and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents' various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and

  16. Resident wellness: institutional trends over 10 years since 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dongseok Choi,1,2 Andrea Cedfeldt,3,4 Christine Flores,5 Kimberly Irish,3 Patrick Brunett,3,6 Donald Girard3,4 1OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 2School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea; 3Division of Graduate Medical Education, 4Department of Medicine, 5Division of Continuing Professional Development, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Background: The surveys in this study were carried out at the Graduate Medical Education Division at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU. OHSU implemented two significant wellness initiatives: a wellness program in 2004, and a policy allowing 4 half-days off each academic year to pursue personal or family health care needs in 2010. This study provides a secondary data analysis of five cross-sectional surveys of career satisfaction of resident and fellow trainees. Methods: All trainees were surveyed five times over a 10-year period using anonymous, cross-sectional web-based survey instruments. Surveys included questions about career satisfaction, perceived stress, sleep hours, burnout, and related factors.Results: This represents 10 years of accumulated responses from over 2,200 residents with results showing continual improvement in their career satisfaction. Response rates ranged from 56% to 72%. During the study period, there was a significant positive change in overall resident career satisfaction, with little change in factors traditionally considered to be predictive of overall career satisfaction such as sleep hours or perceived stress level. In addition, our data support that availability of time for personal tasks could positively impact the overall training experience.Conclusion: We postulate that the improvements in satisfaction relate to two major institutional innovations designed to promote resident wellness. Keywords: satisfaction, burnout, graduate medical education

  17. Another Record Year for Academic Pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how, fueled by the war on terrorism, Congress has awarded a record $1.8 billion in academic earmarks in the 2002 fiscal year. Profiles several recipient programs and includes a campus-by-campus list of projects. (EV)

  18. Association of preresidency peer-reviewed publications with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private practice career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Thomas, Charles R; Wilson, Lynn D; Holliday, Emma B; Jaboin, Jerry J

    The decision of radiation oncology residents to pursue academic versus private practice careers plays a central role in shaping the present and future of the field, but factors that are potentially predictive of this decision are lacking. This study was performed to examine the role of several factors publicly available before residency on postresidency career choice, including preresidency peer-reviewed publications (PRPs), which have been associated with resident career choice in comparably competitive subspecialties such as neurosurgery. Using a combination of Internet searches, telephone interviews, and the 2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology directory, a list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates was compiled, along with their postresidency career choice. PRP was defined as the number of PubMed publications encompassing the end of the calendar year (2010) in which residency applications were due; this number was then correlated with career choice. A total of 163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-certified programs were examined: 78% were male, 22% were MDs/PhDs, and 79 graduates (48%) chose academic careers. Fifty-two percent of graduates had at least 1 PRP at the time of application to radiation oncology residency; 35% had more than 1 PRP. Regarding career choice, the difference between 0 and 1+ PRP was statistically significant (odds ratio, 3.3; P 1 PRP. Sex, PhD, or non-PhD dual degree status were not associated with career choice. Radiation oncology residency graduates with 1 or more PRPs at the time of residency application were roughly 2 times more likely to choose an academic career as their initial career choice than graduates with no preresidency PRPs. This information may prove useful to medical students, medical school advisors, and residency program directors and deserves further prospective investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier

  19. Impact of a Dedicated Emergency Medicine Teaching Resident Rotation at a Large Urban Academic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ahn, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the face of declining bedside teaching and increasing emergency department (ED crowding, balancing education and patient care is a challenge. Dedicated shifts by teaching residents (TRs in the ED represent an educational intervention to mitigate these difficulties. We aimed to measure the perceived learning and departmental impact created by having TR. Methods: TRs were present in the ED from 12pm-10pm daily, and their primary roles were to provide the following: assist in teaching procedures, give brief “chalk talks,” instruct junior trainees on interesting cases, and answer clinical questions in an evidence-based manner. This observational study included a survey of fourth-year medical students (MSs, residents and faculty at an academic ED. Surveys measured the perceived effect of the TR on teaching, patient flow, ease of procedures, and clinical care. Results: Survey response rates for medical students, residents, and faculty are 56%, 77%, and 75%, respectively. MSs perceived improved procedure performance with TR presence and the majority agreed that the TR was a valuable educational experience. Residents perceived increased patient flow, procedure performance, and MS learning with TR presence. The majority agreed that the TR improved patient care. Faculty agreed that the TR increased resident and MS learning, as well as improved patient care and procedure performance. Conclusion: The presence of a TR increased MS and resident learning, improved patient care and procedure performance as perceived by MSs, residents and faculty. A dedicated TR program can provide a valuable resource in achieving a balance of clinical education and high quality healthcare.

  20. Increased Academic Productivity of Orthopaedic Surgery Residents Following 2011 Duty Hour Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Savage, Kevin; Gil, Joseph A; Eberson, Craig P; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-12-19

    In 2003 and again in 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated increasingly stringent resident duty hour restrictions. With less time required at the hospital, residents theoretically have more time for other academic activities, such as research. Our study seeks to examine whether the number of research publications by orthopaedic residents increased following implementation of the 2011 ACGME duty hour restrictions. Pubmed was queried using publicly available alumni lists from programs across the United States. The years 2008 to 2011 were included to assess pre-2011 productivity. The years 2012 to 2015 were included in the post 2011 group. Paired t tests were used to assess differences between groups. Statistical significance was set to p care in any meaningful way. In our study, there was a statistically significant increase in publications after 2011; however, the number of publications between NIH funded and non-NIH funded programs did not differ. Our study is the first to demonstrate that with increasing duty hour restrictions, orthopaedic surgery residents may be using more of their free time to conduct research. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors Influencing the Gender Breakdown of Academic Radiology Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James C; Yoon, Sora C; Cater, Sarah Wallace; Grimm, Lars J

    2017-07-01

    To determine the gender distribution of radiology residency programs and identify associations with radiology departmental factors. The residency programs affiliated with the top 50 research medical school from US News and World Report were identified. The gender of all radiology residency graduates from each program from 2011 to 2015 were collected. Radiology departmental factors were collected: gender of chairperson, gender of program director, gender of faculty, geographic location, and city population of the residency program. The median percentage of female radiology faculty and residents were calculated and classified as above or below the median. Comparisons were made between residency programs and departmental factors via a Pearson χ 2 univariate test or logistic regression. There were 618 (27.9%) female and 1,598 (72.1%) male residents in our study, with a median female representation of 26.4% in each program. Programs with a female residency program director were significantly more likely to have an above-median percentage of female residents versus a male program director (68.4% versus 38.7%, P = .04). Programs in the Northeast (70.6%) and West (70.0%) had higher above-median female representation than the South (10.0%) and Midwest (38.5%, P < .01). There was no association with city population size (P = .40), gender of faculty (P = .40), residency size (P = .91), or faculty size (P = .15). Radiology residency programs with a female residency program director and those in the Northeast or West have a greater concentration of female residents. Residency programs that aim to increase female representation should investigate modifiable factors that can improve their recruitment practices. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Fifty years of residency in Psychiatry at the University of Montreal: relevance and necessity of the Residents' Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the fiftieth anniversary celebrations of the Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal, the present article offers to retrace the history of the Psychiatry Resident's Association (ARPUM). Since the Association's activities and demands reflected the concerns of the time, a depiction of the Residency Program and exploration of the historical and administrative context, in each key period, is also undertaken. Multiple psychiatrists from every decade, who were once active members of the Association, were interviewed and asked to describe the Residency Program at their time, with its positive and negative aspects, based on their own personal experience as a resident, but also as a member of the organization. The interviewees were also invited to share their recollections of the various Association's demands, representations, activities and functioning, depending on the issues and periods. Various private and public archives were also used, in order to contextualize the residents' experiences and the Association's work. A brief exploration of the historical and political context that led to the creation of the organization is explained. Training and working conditions of residents at that time are reported, enabling the understanding of the first demands when the group was born. Historical jumps are then proposed, from decades to decades, in order to depict key issues, whether they were academic, clinical or organizational, through which the Association worked, over the evolution of the Residency Program. The internal functioning and its occasional problems throughout the years are also described, as is the role in organizing social and educational events. The Residency Program is in constant mutation, and the Association has played its part in shaping the psychiatric training at the Université de Montréal. Multiple positive and tangible impacts were and are still made possible from the collaborative work between the Département de

  3. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-06-01

    3 resident per year programs, respectively, P productivity. Subspecialty resident publications are highest in cerebrovascular surgery. Resident research and publication is a key metric for assessing the productivity of academic neurosurgery programs and is consistent with one of the core foci of neurosurgical training. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  4. Residents values in a rational decision-making model: an interest in academics in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, John Christian; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Santen, Sally

    2016-10-01

    Academic physicians train the next generation of doctors. It is important to understand the factors that lead residents to choose an academic career to continue to effectively recruit residents who will join the national medical faculty. A decision-making theory-driven, large scale assessment of this process has not been previously undertaken. To examine the factors that predict an Emergency resident's interest in pursuing an academic career at the conclusion of training. This study employs the ABEM Longitudinal Survey (n = 365). A logistic regression model was estimated using an interest in an academic career in residency as the dependent variable. Independent variables include gender, under-represented minority status, survey cohort, number of dependent children, possession of an advanced degree, ongoing research, publications, and the appeal of science, independence, and clinical work in choosing EM. Logistic regression resulted in a statistically significant model (p < 0.001). Residents who chose EM due to the appeal of science, had peer-reviewed publications and ongoing research were more likely to be interested in an academic career at the end of residency (p < 0.05). An increased number of children (p < 0.05) was negatively associated with an interest in academics. Individual resident career interests, research productivity, and lifestyle can help predict an interest in pursuing an academic career. Recruitment and enrichment of residents who have similar values and behaviors should be considered in programs interested in generating more graduates who enter an academic career.

  5. Innovative partnerships to advance public health training in community-based academic residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo JC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joan C Lo,1–3 Thomas E Baudendistel,2,3 Abhay Dandekar,3,4 Phuoc V Le,5 Stanton Siu,2,3 Bruce Blumberg6 1Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente East Bay, Oakland, CA, USA; 4Department of Pediatrics, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 5School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative partnerships between community-based academic residency ­training programs and schools of public health, represent an innovative approach to training future physician leaders in population management and public health. In Kaiser Permanente Northern California, development of residency-Masters in Public Health (MPH tracks in the Internal Medicine Residency and the Pediatrics Residency programs, with MPH graduate studies completed at the University of California Berkeley School of Public Health, enables physicians to integrate clinical training with formal education in epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy, and disease prevention. These residency-MPH programs draw on more than 50 years of clinical education, public health training, and health services research – creating an environment that sparks inquiry and added value by developing skills in patient-centered care through the lens of population-based outcomes. Keywords: graduate medical education, public health, master’s degree, internal medicine, pediatrics, residency training

  6. Improving Communication Skills: A Course for Academic Medical Center Surgery Residents and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, Steven E; Gupta, Meera; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Morris, Jon B

    2015-01-01

    To improve physician/patient communication and familiarize surgeons with contemporary skills for and metrics assessing communication, courses were developed to provide academic general surgery residents and faculty with a toolkit of information, behaviors, and specific techniques. If academic faculty are expected to mentor residents in communication and residents are expected to learn good communication skills, then both should have the necessary education to accomplish such a goal. Didactic lectures introduced current concepts of physician-patient communication including information on better patient care, fewer malpractice suits, and the move toward transparency of communication metrics. Next, course participants viewed and critiqued "Surgi-Drama" videos, with actors simulating "before" and "after" physician-patient communication scenarios. Finally, participants were provided with a "toolkit" of techniques for improving physician-patient communication including "2-3-4"-a semiscripted short communication tool residents and other physicians can use in patient encounters-and a number of other acronymic approaches. Each participant was asked to complete an anonymous evaluation to assess course content satisfaction. Overall, 86% of residents participated (68/79), with a 52% response rate (35/68) for the evaluation tool. Overall, 88% of faculty participated (84/96), with an 84% response rate (71/84). Residents voiced satisfaction with all domains. For faculty, satisfaction was quantitatively confirmed (Likert score 4 or 5) in 4 of 7 domains, with the highest satisfaction in "communication of goals" and "understanding of the HCAHPS metric." The percentage of "top box" Doctor Communication Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores and national percentile ranking showed a sustained increase more than 1 and 2 years from the dates of the courses. The assessment of communication skills is increasing in importance in the practice of

  7. Can Future Academic Surgeons be Identified in the Residency Ranking Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninato, Toni; Kleiman, David A; Zarnegar, Rasa; Fahey, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The goal of surgical residency training programs is to train competent surgeons. Academic surgical training programs also have as a mission training future academicians-surgical scientists, teachers, and leaders. However, selection of surgical residents is dependent on a relatively unscientific process. Here we sought to determine how well the residency selection process is able to identify future academicians in surgery. Rank lists from an academic surgical residency program from 1992 to 1997 were examined. All ranked candidates׳ career paths after residency were reviewed to determine whether they stayed in academics, were university affiliated, or in private practice. The study was performed at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY. A total of 663 applicants for general surgery residency participated in this study. In total 6 rank lists were evaluated, which included 663 candidates. Overall 76% remained in a general surgery subspecialty. Of those who remained in general surgery, 49% were in private practice, 20% were university affiliated, and 31% had academic careers. Approximately 47% of candidates that were ranked in the top 20 had ≥20 publications, with decreasing percentages as rank number increased. There was a strong correlation between the candidates׳ rank position and pursuing an academic career (p career. The residency selection process can identify candidates likely to be future academicians. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Academic Medical Library Services Contribute to Scholarship in Medical Faculty and Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peace Ossom Williamson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Quesenberry, A. C., Oelschlegel, S., Earl, M., Leonard, K., & Vaughn, C. J. (2016. The impact of library resources and services on the scholarly activity of medical faculty and residents. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 35(3, 259-265. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02763869.2016.1189778 Abstract Objective – To assess the impact of academic medical library services and resources on information-seeking behaviours during the academic efforts of medical faculty and residents. Design – Value study derived from a 23-item survey. Setting – Public medical residency program and training hospital in Tennessee, USA. Subjects – 433 faculty and residents currently employed by or completing residency in an academic medical centre. Methods – Respondents completed a 23-question survey about their use of library resources and services in preparation for publishing, presenting, and teaching. The library services in the survey included literature searches completed by librarians and document delivery for preparation of publications, presentations, and lecture material. The survey also included questions about how resources were being accessed in preparation for scholarship. The survey sought information on whether respondents published articles or chapters or presented papers or posters in the previous three years. If respondents answered in the affirmative to one of the aforementioned methods of scholarship, they were provided with further questions about how they access library resources and whether they sought mediated literature search and document delivery services in preparation for their recent presentations and publications. The survey also included questions concerning what types of scholarly activity prompt faculty and residents to use online library resources. Main Results – The study was provided to 433 subjects, including 220 faculty and 213 residents, contacted through an email distribution list. The response rate to the

  9. First-Year Residents Outperform Third-Year Residents after Simulation-Based Education in Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Corbridge, Thomas C.; Schroedl, Clara J.; Wilcox, Jane E.; Cohen, Elaine R.; McGaghie, William C.; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prior research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents’ critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training to third-year residents who received clinical training alone. Methods During their first three months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally-trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. Results Simulator-trained first-year residents (n=40) scored significantly higher compared to traditionally-trained third-year residents (n=27) on the bedside assessment, 91.3% (95% CI 88.2% to 94.3%) vs. 80.9% (95% CI 76.8% to 85.0%), P = simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency than third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical ICU rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients. PMID:23222546

  10. Effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Washington, Chantel I; Stewart, Katherine I; Shen, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Previous work has shown American obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents are lacking in menopause training. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum in improving OB/GYN residents' knowledge and self-assessed competency in menopause topics. We developed a menopause medicine-teaching curriculum for OB/GYN residents at our academic hospital-based residency program. The 2-year curriculum was composed of year 1: four 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab with cases presentations, and year 2: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab. Core topics included menopause physiology, hormone therapy, breast health, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune disease. Pre- and posttests assessed resident knowledge and comfort in core topics, and a pre- and postcurriculum survey assessed utility and learning satisfaction. From July 2011 to June 2013, 34 OB/GYN residents completed the menopause curriculum annually with an average attendance at each module of 23 residents. Pre-/posttest scores improved from a mean pretest score of 57.3% to a mean posttest score of 78.7% (P menopause patients with 75.8% reporting feeling "barely comfortable" and 8.4% feeling "not at all comfortable." After the 2-year curriculum, 85.7% reported feeling "comfortable/very comfortable" taking care of menopause patients. The majority of residents (95.2%) reported the menopause curriculum was "extremely useful." A 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for OB/GYN residents utilizing lectures and a lab with case studies is an effective modality to improve resident knowledge required to manage menopause patients.

  11. U.S. Dental Specialty Residents' Expectations and Anticipated Benefits of Academic Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, Elena; Martin-Peele, Melanie; Fifield, Judith

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to assess features of an academic career that dental specialty residents, as a group and by gender, find most attractive and to identify what determines their expectations for responsibilities and professional growth in academic employment. In November 2013, an invitation to participate in the study along with a link to an online survey was sent to the 407 U.S. program directors of six of the dental specialties (endodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, prosthodontics, and orthodontics), asking them to forward the survey to their residents. A total of 287 residents responded (112 [41.3%] female and 159 [58.7%] male) out of 4,400 enrolled in these specialty training programs (6.5% response rate). The female respondents were significantly more interested in joining academia than were the male respondents (female 48%; male 31.5%; pgenders were attracted to academic dentistry by opportunities for intellectual and professional stimulation, but the lifestyle of academicians was significantly more important for the female respondents. The most important feature of a successful academic career for the female respondents was the ability to have a good balance between career and personal life. While opportunity to conduct research was a positive feature for all residents interested in academia and both male and female respondents agreed strongly on the need for collaboration between faculty members for productive research, male respondents agreed significantly more than female respondents that faculty members should conduct independent research. Faculty members' feedback about academic employment were a significantly positive influence on those planning an academic career compared to those planning to enter private practice. This study found that the female and male residents differed in their expectations of responsibilities and professional growth in academic employment. These results may be useful for

  12. U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, hundreds of thousands of persons become legal permanent residents (LPRs) or “green card” recipients of the United States. LPRs, as defined by immigration...

  13. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  14. Barriers to advancement in academic surgery: views of senior residents and early career faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B; Crandall, Marie; Brasel, Karen; Hauschild, Tricia; Neumayer, Leigh

    2013-11-01

    A significant faculty attrition rate exists in academic surgery. The authors hypothesized that senior residents and early-career faculty members have different perceptions of advancement barriers in academic surgery. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered electronically to surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers. Residents identified a lack of mentorship as a career barrier about half as often as faculty members. Residents were twice as likely as faculty members to view childbearing as a career barrier. Many early-career faculty members cite a lack of mentors as a limitation to their career development in academic surgery. Childbearing remains a complex perceived influence for female faculty members in particular. Female faculty members commonly perceive differential treatment and barriers on the basis of their sex. Faculty development programs should address both systemic and sex-specific obstacles if academic surgery is to remain a vibrant field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Self-reported attitudes and behaviors of general surgery residents about ethical academic practices in test taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignol, Valerie P; Gans, Alyssa; Booth, Branyan A; Markert, Ronald; Termuhlen, Paula M

    2010-08-01

    A correlation exists between people who engage in academic dishonesty as students and unethical behaviors later as professionals. Academic dishonesty has been assessed among medical students, but not among general surgery residents. We sought to describe the attitudes of general surgery residents with regard to ethical practices in test taking. A survey with 4 scenarios describing activities related to examination taking that may or may not be considered unethical was administered. Participants were asked about participation in the activities-either personally or any knowledge of others-and whether the activities were unethical. Fifty-seven of 62 residents (92%) participated. For each scenario, >70% indicated that neither they nor anyone else they knew had participated in the activities. Behaviors deemed unethical included memorizing or using memorized questions to prepare for future tests (52%), selling questions for financial gain (90%), and purchasing previously used questions (57%). No difference in attitudes was seen among incoming interns, junior-level (postgraduate year [PGY]1-3), or senior-level (PGY4-6) residents. Overall, general surgery residents indicated that they had not participated in activities they felt to be unethical. Defining what is unethical was less clear. This represents an area for further education. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Residents' surgical performance during the laboratory years: an analysis of rule-based errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathwani, Jay N; Wise, Brett J; Garren, Margaret E; Mohamadipanah, Hossein; Van Beek, Nicole; DiMarco, Shannon M; Pugh, Carla M

    2017-11-01

    Nearly one-third of surgical residents will enter into academic development during their surgical residency by dedicating time to a research fellowship for 1-3 y. Major interest lies in understanding how laboratory residents' surgical skills are affected by minimal clinical exposure during academic development. A widely held concern is that the time away from clinical exposure results in surgical skills decay. This study examines the impact of the academic development years on residents' operative performance. We hypothesize that the use of repeated, annual assessments may result in learning even without individual feedback on participants simulated performance. Surgical performance data were collected from laboratory residents (postgraduate years 2-5) during the summers of 2014, 2015, and 2016. Residents had 15 min to complete a shortened, simulated laparoscopic ventral hernia repair procedure. Final hernia repair skins from all participants were scored using a previously validated checklist. An analysis of variance test compared the mean performance scores of repeat participants to those of first time participants. Twenty-seven (37% female) laboratory residents provided 2-year assessment data over the 3-year span of the study. Second time performance revealed improvement from a mean score of 14 (standard error = 1.0) in the first year to 17.2 (SD = 0.9) in the second year, (F[1, 52] = 5.6, P = 0.022). Detailed analysis demonstrated improvement in performance for 3 grading criteria that were considered to be rule-based errors. There was no improvement in operative strategy errors. Analysis of longitudinal performance of laboratory residents shows higher scores for repeat participants in the category of rule-based errors. These findings suggest that laboratory residents can learn from rule-based mistakes when provided with annual performance-based assessments. This benefit was not seen with operative strategy errors and has important implications for

  17. Ontario Radiation Oncology Residents' Needs in the First Postgraduate Year-Residents' Perspective Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Warner, Eiran; Zhang Liying; Kane, Gabrielle; Ackerman, Ida; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Agboola, Olusegun; Metz, Catherine de; Rodrigues, George; Voruganti, Sachi; Rappolt, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess radiation oncology residents' needs and satisfaction in their first postgraduate year (PGY-1) in the province of Ontario. Methods and Materials: Of 62 radiation oncology residents, 58 who had completed their PGY-1 and were either enrolled or had graduated in 2006 were invited to participate in a 31-item survey. The questionnaire explored PGY-1 residents' needs and satisfaction in four domains: clinical workload, faculty/learning environment, stress level, and discrimination/harassment. The Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests were used to determine relationships between covariate items and summary scores. Results: Of 58 eligible residents, 44 (75%) responded. Eighty-four percent of residents felt that their ward and call duties were appropriate. More than 50% of respondents indicated that they often felt isolated from their radiation oncology program. Only 77% agreed that they received adequate feedback, and 40% received sufficient counseling regarding career planning. More than 93% of respondents thought that faculty members had contributed significantly to their learning experience. Approximately 50% of residents experienced excessive stress and inadequate time for leisure or for reading the medical literature. Less than 10% of residents indicated that they had been harassed or experienced discrimination. Eighty-three percent agreed or strongly agreed that their PGY-1 experience had been outstanding. Conclusions: Most Ontario residents were satisfied with their PGY-1 training program. More counseling by radiation oncology faculty members should be offered to help residents with career planning. The residents might also benefit from more exposure to 'radiation oncology' and an introduction to stress management strategies

  18. Resident experience of abuse and harassment in emergency medicine: ten years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siu Fai; Grant, Kelly; Bhoj, Tanuja; Lent, Gretchen; Garrick, Jocelyn Freeman; Greenwald, Peter; Haber, Marc; Singh, Malini; Prodany, Karla; Sanchez, Leon; Dickman, Eitan; Spencer, James; Perera, Tom; Cowan, Ethan

    2010-02-01

    In 1995, a Society for Academic Emergency Medicine in-service survey reported high rates of verbal and physical abuse experienced by Emergency Medicine (EM) residents. We sought to determine the prevalence of abuse and harassment 10 years later to bring attention to these issues and determine if there has been a change in the prevalence of abuse over this time period. To determine the prevalence of abuse and harassment in a sample of EM residencies. We conducted a cross-section survey of EM residents from 10 residencies. EM residents were asked about their experience with verbal abuse, verbal threats, physical threats, physical attacks, sexual harassment, and racial harassment; and by whom. The primary outcome of the study was the prevalence of abuse and harassment as reported by EM residents. There were 196 of 380 residents (52%) who completed the survey. The prevalence of any type of abuse experienced was 91%; 86% of residents experienced verbal abuse, 65% verbal threats, 50% physical threats, 26% physical attacks, 23% sexual harassment, and 26% racial harassment. Women were more likely than men to encounter sexual harassment (37% [38/102] vs. 8% [7/92]; p harassment was not limited to minorities (23% [16/60] for Caucasians vs. 26% [29/126] for non-Caucasians; p = 0.59). Senior residents were more likely to have encountered verbal and physical abuse. Only 12% of residents formally reported the abuse they experienced. Abuse and harassment during EM residency continues to be commonplace and is underreported. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of Resident Physicians as Triage Liaison Providers in an Academic Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Victoria; Jain, Sushil K; Gottlieb, Michael; Aldeen, Amer; Gravenor, Stephanie; Schmidt, Michael J; Malik, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is associated with detrimental effects on ED quality of care. Triage liaison providers (TLP) have been used to mitigate the effects of crowding. Prior studies have evaluated attending physicians and advanced practice providers as TLPs, with limited data evaluating resident physicians as TLPs. This study compares operational performance outcomes between resident and attending physicians as TLPs. This retrospective cohort study compared aggregate operational performance at an urban, academic ED during pre- and post-TLP periods. The primary outcome was defined as cost-effectiveness based upon return on investment (ROI). Secondary outcomes were defined as differences in median ED length of stay (LOS), median door-to-provider (DTP) time, proportion of left without being seen (LWBS), and proportion of "very good" overall patient satisfaction scores. Annual profit generated for physician-based collections through LWBS capture (after deducting respective salary costs) equated to a gain (ROI: 54%) for resident TLPs and a loss (ROI: -31%) for attending TLPs. Accounting for hospital-based collections made both profitable, with gains for resident TLPs (ROI: 317%) and for attending TLPs (ROI: 86%). Median DTP time for resident TLPs was significantly lower (phistorical control. Proportion of "very good" patient satisfaction scores and LWBS was improved for both resident and attending TLPs over historical control. Overall median LOS was not significantly different. Resident and attending TLPs improved DTP time, patient satisfaction, and LWBS rates. Both resident and attending TLPs are cost effective, with residents having a more favorable financial profile.

  20. High-speed Internet Use and Academic Gratifications in the College Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Denise; Schrum, Lynne

    2003-01-01

    A multimethod exploration of undergraduates' high-speed Internet use in residence halls took a uses-and-gratifications approach and revealed Internet use as integral to students' lives. Students' negative comments about Internet distractions from academic work led to identification of an individual difference variable, internal locus of control of…

  1. The Impact of Parents’ Years since Migration on Children’s Academic Achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    2012-01-01

    of a positive impact of parents’ years since migration on children’s academic achievement. Mothers’ years of residence tend to be more important for Danish, while fathers’ years of residence tend to be more important for math. The effects vary by gender, and family-specific effects influence girls’ and boys......In this paper, we employ register data for eight cohorts of second-generation immigrant pupils to identify the impact of each parent’s years since migration on their children’s school achievements. We exploit variation in years since migration and within-family variation. We find evidence...

  2. Improving resident well-being and clinical learning environment through academic initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nathaniel; Appelbaum, Nital; Amendola, Michael; Dodson, Kelley; Kaplan, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Organizational effects on job satisfaction, burnout, work-life balance, and perceived support have not been studied in the context of the clinical learning environment. We evaluated the relationship between academic resources and resident well-being, the clinical learning environment, and in-service examination performance of surgical residents. Residents of general surgery and surgical specialty programs were recruited from March 2016 through June 2016 across the Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast regions. Program directors were asked to allow distribution of a paper survey or to forward an electronic survey link onto residents. Five dichotomous questions were asked regarding access to academic resources. Validated measures were obtained assessing resident well-being and perceived clinical learning environment. Data were analyzed through t-tests and chi-squared test of independence. We received 276 respondents across 50 programs. Residents perceiving adequate support to succeed had less burnout (P = 0.008), better resilience (P = 0.009), better job satisfaction (P workplace climate (P < 0.001), better organizational support (P < 0.001), and were more likely to have high performance on the in-service examination (P = 0.001). Specific resources including educational stipends, review questions, in-service board prep, and support for poor performers correlated with improved well-being and perceived clinical learning environment. Provision of academic resources has implications beyond in-service examination performance, correlating with improved resident well-being and perceptions of the clinical learning environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Training surgical residents for a career in academic global surgery: a novel training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, JaBaris D; Matousek, Alexi C; Scott, John W; Cooper, Zara; Smink, Douglas S; Bolman, Ralph Morton; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Zinner, Michael J; Riviello, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Academic global surgery is a nascent field focused on improving surgical care in resource-poor settings through a broad-based scholarship agenda. Although there is increasing momentum to expand training opportunities in low-resource settings among academic surgical programs, most focus solely on establishing short-term elective rotations rather than fostering research or career development. Given the complex nature of surgical care delivery and programmatic capacity building in the resource-poor settings, many challenges remain before global surgery is accepted as an academic discipline and an established career path. Brigham and Women's Hospital has established a specialized global surgery track within the general surgery residency program to develop academic leaders in this growing area of need and opportunity. Here we describe our experience with the design and development of the program followed by practical applications and lessons learned from our early experiences. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comorbidity and 1-year mortality risks in nursing home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.T.; Mehr, D.R.; Ooms, M.E.; Madsen, R.W.; Petroski, G.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Pot, A.M.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of chronic diseases and disease combinations on 1-year mortality in nursing home residents. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using electronically submitted Minimum Data Set (MDS) information and Missouri death certificate data. SETTING: Five hundred twenty-two

  5. Effectiveness of Resident Physicians as Triage Liaison Providers in an Academic Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Weston

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department (ED crowding is associated with detrimental effects on ED quality of care. Triage liaison providers (TLP have been used to mitigate the effects of crowding. Prior studies have evaluated attending physicians and advanced practice providers as TLPs, with limited data evaluating resident physicians as TLPs. This study compares operational performance outcomes between resident and attending physicians as TLPs. Methods: This retrospective cohort study compared aggregate operational performance at an urban, academic ED during pre- and post-TLP periods. The primary outcome was defined as cost-effectiveness based upon return on investment (ROI. Secondary outcomes were defined as differences in median ED length of stay (LOS, median door-to-provider (DTP time, proportion of left without being seen (LWBS, and proportion of “very good” overall patient satisfaction scores. Results: Annual profit generated for physician-based collections through LWBS capture (after deducting respective salary costs equated to a gain (ROI: 54% for resident TLPs and a loss (ROI: −31% for attending TLPs. Accounting for hospital-based collections made both profitable, with gains for resident TLPs (ROI: 317% and for attending TLPs (ROI: 86%. Median DTP time for resident TLPs was significantly lower (p<0.0001 than attending or historical control. Proportion of “very good” patient satisfaction scores and LWBS was improved for both resident and attending TLPs over historical control. Overall median LOS was not significantly different. Conclusion: Resident and attending TLPs improved DTP time, patient satisfaction, and LWBS rates. Both resident and attending TLPs are cost effective, with residents having a more favorable financial profile.

  6. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  7. [Socio-economic and psycho-affective factors and their influence on academic performance of residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola Álvarez, David

    2015-03-01

    Academic performance is the mean objective of the teaching-learning process, but there are many other variables or factors outside the OB/GYN resident involved in this process, such as those related to the environment in which they operate, teachers, interaction with their peers, family, society, and many other factors contained individually, such as learning styles, motivation, study habits, personality traits, among others. Identify which are the main socio-economic and psycho-affective factors that influence on academic performance of residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Observational, cross-sectional quantitative, correlational and non-experimental study in Obstetrics and Gynecology residents of a public general hospital tertiary care. A type survey to obtain data and deepen personal and socioeconomic status of each resident instrument was designed. Females predominated with 15 cases and only 5 were male. Sixteen of medical residents claimed that having a good habit of sleep helps improve their academic performance and their performance in academic and healthcare activities. Fifteen felt that work much better with peers of the opposite sex. Ten felt that developing a type of self-directed learning contributes greatly to improve their performance and 19 felt that having a mentor during residency contributes to improve their academic performance. Fifteen reported being victim of abuse or discrimination from their peers. Sixteen claimed to have been very sad or depressed at some point during residency. Eight consumed alcohol and seven used tobacco to relax.

  8. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians.Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM in July and August of 2012.Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate. Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035. The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%, e-Books (45%, and board study (32%. Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010, review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019, and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001.Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks.Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  9. Effect of Performance Deficiencies on Graduation and Board Certification Rates: A 10-Year Multicenter Study of Anesthesiology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A.; Fitzsimons, Michael G.; Pardo, Manuel C.; Hawkins, Joy L.; Huang, Yue Ming; Rudolph, Maria D. D.; Keyes, Mary A.; Howard-Quijano, Kimberly J.; Naim, Natale Z.; Buckley, Jack C.; Grogan, Tristan R.; Steadman, Randolph H.

    2016-01-01

    Background This multi-center, retrospective study was conducted to determine how resident performance deficiencies affect graduation and board certification. Methods Primary documents pertaining to resident performance were examined over a 10-year period at four academic anesthesiology residencies. Residents entering training between 2000 and 2009 were included, with follow-up through February 2016. Residents receiving actions by the programs’ Clinical Competency Committee were categorized by the area of deficiency and compared to peers without deficiencies. Results A total of 865 residents were studied (range: 127–275 per program). Of these, 215 residents received a total of 405 actions from their respective Clinical Competency Committee. Among those who received an action compared to those who did not, the proportion graduating differed (93% versus 99%, respectively, Pgraduating dropped to 55%. When more than three Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were deficient, the proportion graduating also dropped significantly. Conclusions Overall graduation and board certification rates were consistently high in residents with no, or isolated, deficiencies. Residents deficient in an Essential Attribute, or multiple competencies, are at high risk of not graduating or achieving board certification. More research is needed on the effectiveness and selective deployment of remediation efforts, particularly for high-risk groups. PMID:27119434

  10. An Intervention to Improve Academic Literacies in a First Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Intervention to Improve Academic Literacies in a First Year University Biology Course. ... Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning ... These changes in his report writing as well as in his attitude and motivation for writing the report were ...

  11. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  12. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  13. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  14. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  15. 34 CFR 668.3 - Academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions. For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section— (1) A week is a consecutive seven-day period; (2... offered by the institution if the institution offers a two-year program leading to an associate degree or a four-year program leading to a baccalaureate degree. (2) An institution's written request must— (i...

  16. U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  17. U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A legal permanent resident (LPR) or “green card” recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  18. U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A legal permanent resident (LPR) or “green card” recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  19. U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A legal permanent resident (LPR) or “green card” recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  20. U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A legal permanent resident (LPR) or “green card” recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  1. [Academic achievement, engagement and burnout among first year medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez H, Paula; Pérez V, Cristhian; Parra P, Paula; Ortiz M, Liliana; Matus B, Olga; McColl C, Peter; Torres A, Graciela; Meyer K, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Stress may affect the sense of wellbeing and academic achievement of university students. To assess the relationship of academic engagement and burnout with academic achievement among first year medical students. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student and Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey (MBI-SS) were applied to 277 first year medical students of four universities. Their results were correlated with the grades obtained in the different courses. Moderately high engagement and low burnout levels were detected. There was a high level of satisfaction with studies and a moderate exhaustion level. Academic achievement was associated with the degree of engagement with studies but not with burnout. Conglomerate analysis detected a group of students with high levels of wellbeing, characterized by high levels of academic engagement and low burnout. Other group had moderate levels of engagement and lack of personal fulfilment. Other group, identified as extenuated, had high levels of personal exhaustion and depersonalization. Finally the disassociated group had a low academic engagement, low emotional exhaustion, high levels of depersonalization and lack of personal fulfillment. Academic achievement is associated with the level of engagement with studies but not with burnout.

  2. Academic time at a level 1 trauma center: no resident, no problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Dickinson, Rebecca M; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Frankel, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Globally, the compliance of resident work-hour restrictions has no impact on trauma outcome. However, the effect of protected education time (PET), during which residents are unavailable to respond to trauma patients, has not been studied. We hypothesized that PET has no impact on the outcome of trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective review of relevant patients at an academic level I trauma center. During PET, a trauma attending and advanced practice providers (APPs) responded to trauma activations. PGY1, 3, and 4 residents were also available at all other times. The outcome of new trauma patient activations during Thursday morning 3-hours resident PET was compared with same time period on other weekdays (non-PET) using a univariate and multivariate analysis. From January 2005 to April 2010, a total of 5968 trauma patients were entered in the registry. Of these, 178 patients (2.98%) were included for study (37 PET and 141 non-PET). The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 16.2. Although no significant difference were identified in mortality, complications, or length of stay (LOS), we do see that length of emergency department stay (ED-LOS) tends to be longer during PET, although not significantly (314 vs 381 minutes, p = 0.74). On the multiple logistic regression model, PET was not a significant factor of complications, LOS, or ED-LOS. Few trauma activations occur during PET. New trauma activations can be staffed safely by trauma activations and APPs. However, there could be some delays in transferring patients to appropriate disposition. Additional study is required to determine the effect of PET on existing trauma inpatients. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving academic achievement after First year Studentship in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study therefore recommended that the negative experiences should be part of the orientation given to first year students in the University. Second, that universities should not use the grade point average obtained during the first year to compute the final GPA for graduating students. Keywords:Academic Achievement ...

  4. Comparison of private versus academic practice for general surgeons: a guide for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroen, Anneke T; Brownstein, Michelle R; Sheldon, George F

    2003-12-01

    Medical students and residents often make specialty and practice choices with limited exposure to aspects of professional and personal life in general surgery. The purpose of this study was to portray practice composition, career choices, professional experiences, job satisfaction, and personal life characteristics specific to practicing general surgeons in the United States. A 131-question survey was mailed to all female members (n = 1,076) and a random 2:1 sample of male members (n = 2,152) of the American College of Surgeons in three mailings between September 1998 and March 1999. Respondents who were not actively practicing general surgery in the United States and both trainees and surgeons who did not fit the definition of private or academic practice were excluded. Detailed questions regarding practice attributes, surgical training, professional choices, harassment, malpractice, career satisfaction, and personal life characteristics were included. Separate five-point Likert scales were designed to measure influences on career choices and satisfaction with professional and personal matters. Univariate analyses were used to analyze responses by surgeon age, gender, and practice type. A response rate of 57% resulted in 1,532 eligible responses. Significant differences between private and academic practice were noted in case composition, practice structure, and income potential; no major differences were seen in malpractice experience. Propensity for marriage and parenthood differed significantly between men and women surgeons. Overall career satisfaction was very high regardless of practice type. Some differences by surgeon gender in perceptions of equal career advancement opportunities and of professional isolation were noted. This study offers a comprehensive view of general surgery to enable more informed decisions among medical students and residents regarding specialty choice or practice opportunities.

  5. Verb-Noun Collocation Proficiency and Academic Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ebrahimi-Bazzaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally vocabulary and collocations in particular have significant roles in language proficiency. A collocation includes two words that are frequently joined concurrently in the memory of native speakers. There have been many linguistic studies trying to define, to describe, and to categorise English collocations. It contains grammatical collocations and lexical collocations which include nouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverb. In the context of a foreign language environment such as Iran, collocational proficiency can be useful because it helps the students improve their language proficiency. This paper investigates the possible relationship between verb-noun collocation proficiency among students from one academic year to the next. To reach this goal, a test of verb-noun collocations was administered to Iranian learners. The participants in the study were 212 Iranian students in an Iranian university. They were selected from the second term of freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. The students’ age ranged from 18 to 35.The results of ANOVA showed there was variability in the verb-noun collocations proficiency within each academic year and between the four academic years. The results of a post hoc multiple comparison tests demonstrated that the means are significantly different between the first year and the third and fourth years, and between the third and the fourth academic year; however, students require at least two years to show significant development in verb-noun collocation proficiency. These findings provided a vital implication that lexical collocations are learnt and developed through four academic years of university, but requires at least two years showing significant development in the language proficiency.

  6. A 15-year review of the Stanford Internal Medicine Residency Program: predictors of resident satisfaction and dissatisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn JS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available James S Kahn,1–3 Ronald M Witteles,3,4 Kenneth W Mahaffey,3–5 Sumbul A Desai,2,3 Errol Ozdalga,2,3 Paul A Heidenreich1,3 1Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, 2Division of Primary Care and Population Health, 3Department of Medicine, 4Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, 5Stanford Center for Clinical Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Introduction: Satisfaction with training and with educational experiences represents important internal medicine (IM programmatic goals. Graduates from IM residency programs are uniquely poised to provide insights into their educational and training experiences and to assess whether these experiences were satisfactory and relevant to their current employment. Methods: We surveyed former IM residents from the training program held during the years 2000–2015 at the Department of Medicine, Stanford University. The first part of the survey reviewed the IM residency program and the second part sought identifying data regarding gender, race, ethnicity, work, relationships, and financial matters. The primary outcome was satisfaction with the residency experience. Results: Of the 405 individuals who completed the Stanford IM residency program in the study period, we identified 384 (95% former residents with a known email address. Two hundred and one (52% former residents responded to the first part and 185 (48% answered both the parts of the survey. The mean age of the respondents was 36.9 years; 44% were female and the mean time from IM residency was 6.1 (±4.3 years. Fifty-eight percent reported extreme satisfaction with their IM residency experience. Predictors associated with being less than extremely satisfied included insufficient outpatient experience, insufficient international experience, insufficient clinical research experience, and insufficient time spent with family and peers. Conclusion: The residents expressed an overall high satisfaction rate with

  7. Talented athletes and academic achievements : a comparison over 14 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Laura; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the academic achievements of 200 talented athletes in 1992/1993 and 200 in 2006/2007, aged 14-16 years. When compared with the national average, the athletes in 2006/2007 attended pre-university classes more often (2 = 57.001, p.05). Of the

  8. The Relationships among Academic Attitudes, Psychological Attitudes, and the First-Semester Academic Achievement of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy L.; Weigand, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among academic and psychological attitudes and academic achievement of first-year students. The College Resilience Scale, the Academic Motivation Scale, the College Self-Efficacy Inventory, and the University Environment Scale were administered to 164 first-year undergraduate students enrolled at a large RU/VH…

  9. U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: Fiscal Year 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs), also known as “green card” holders, are non-citizens who are lawfully authorized to live permanently within the United States.

  10. Productivity change of surgeons in an academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yuichi; Otake, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshihito; Oiso, Giichiro; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to calculate total factor productivity of surgeons in an academic year and to evaluate the effect of surgical trainees on their productivity. We analyzed all the surgical procedures performed from April 1 through September 30, 2013 in the Teikyo University Hospital. The nonradial and nonoriented Malmquist model under the variable returns-to-scale assumptions was employed. A decision-making unit is defined as a surgeon with the highest academic rank in the surgery. Inputs were defined as the number of physicians who assisted in surgery, and the time of surgical operation from skin incision to skin closure. The output was defined as the surgical fee for each surgery. April is the beginning month of a new academic year in Japan, and we divided the study period into April to June and July to September 2013. We computed each surgeon's Malmquist index, efficiency change, and technical change. We analyzed 2789 surgical procedures that were performed by 105 surgeons. The Malmquist index of all surgeons was significantly greater than 1 (p = 0.0033). The technical change was significantly greater than 1 (p productive in the beginning months of a new academic year. The main factor of this productivity loss is considered to be surgical training. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Academic and Resident Radiation Oncologists' Attitudes and Intentions Regarding Radiation Therapy near the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Shane; Dosoretz, Arie P; Yu, James B; Evans, Suzanne B; Decker, Roy H

    2016-02-01

    There has been increasing scrutiny about cancer treatment for patients very near the end of life (EoL), yet a substantial number receive palliative radiation therapy (RT) in this setting. Our aim was to document the attitudes and intentions of thought leaders and trainees in giving RT near the EoL. We distributed an anonymous survey to 473 radiation oncologists and residents. The survey examined the clinical and psychosocial factors considered as well as intentions and expectations in the delivery of RT near the EoL. Factors surrounding unfinished treatment courses, and the formative factors that shape opinions about RT at the EoL were also explored. We received 139 responses (29%). Eighty-nine percent of respondents worked at academic institutions. The factors that respondents most often consider very or extremely important to offer RT near the EoL were the preference of the patient to be treated (94%), the ability to tolerate treatment (88%), and palliative intent (70%). After instances when their patients were unable to complete treatment near the EoL, 42% of respondents said they would prescribe a shorter treatment the next time they see a similar patient. Personal experience (71%) was most often listed as very or extremely important in shaping their opinions about RT near the EoL. Survey respondents, 89% of whom were academic radiation oncologists, have a positive view of palliative RT near the EoL. They favor shorter fractionation for patients near the EoL. Personal experience is most important in shaping practices and attitudes.

  12. Attributions of Academic Performance among Third Year and Fourth Year Biology Major Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick John B. Solar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive study aimed to determine the attributions of academic performance of third year and fourth year biology major students in the College of Education, West Visayas State University, School Year 2013-2014. The academic performance were categorized or measured in terms of test, projects, workbooks, and laboratory experiments, class participation, and attendance. The Attributions in academic performance were evaluated using the closed-form questionnairechecklist,categorized intoin termsof ability, effort, luck, or task difficulty. Mean frequency, mean percentage, Mann-Whitney U-test, two-sampled test set at 0.05 level of significance were used to determine if there were significant difference in the attribution when the students were taken according to their year level. The result of the study revealed that the Third Year biology majors attributed their academic performance to effort which is shown to have the highest percentage attribution in overall rank. There was no significant difference in the attributions of academic performance for third year and fourth year biology major students in termsof test, whilethe result forprojects, workbooks, and laboratory experiment and class participation and attendance categories,was found out to havea significant difference in the attributionfor the third and fourth years biology Major students’ academic performances.

  13. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brooks, Audrey J; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Brenner, Michelle; Brown, Melanie; Esparham, Anna; Gerstbacher, Dana; Golianu, Brenda; Mark, John; Weydert, Joy; Yeh, Ann Ming; Maizes, Victoria

    2018-04-23

    It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents ( N = 203), and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  14. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary McClafferty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents (N = 203, and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  15. Resident operative experience in general surgery, plastic surgery, and urology 5 years after implementation of the ACGME duty hour policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simien, Christopher; Holt, Kathleen D; Richter, Thomas H; Whalen, Thomas V; Coburn, Michael; Havlik, Robert J; Miller, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Resident duty hour restrictions were implemented in 2002-2003. This study examines changes in resident surgical experience since these restrictions were put into place. Operative log data for 3 specialties were examined: general surgery, urology, and plastic surgery. The academic year immediately preceding the duty hour restrictions, 2002-2003, was used as a baseline for comparison to subsequent academic years. Operative log data for graduating residents through 2007-2008 were the primary focus of the analysis. Examination of associated variables that may moderate the relationship between fewer duty hours and surgical volume was also included. Plastic surgery showed no changes in operative volume following duty hour restrictions. Operative volume increased in urology programs. General surgery showed a decrease in volume in some operative categories but an increase in others. Specifically the procedures in vascular, plastic, and thoracic areas showed a consistent decrease. There was no increase in the percentage of programs' graduates falling below minimum requirements. Procedures in pancreas, endocrine, and laparoscopic areas demonstrated an increase in volume. Graduates in larger surgical programs performed fewer procedures than graduates in smaller programs; this was not the case for urology or plastic surgery programs. The reduction of duty hours has not resulted in an across the board decrease in operative volume. Factors other than duty hour reforms may be responsible for some of the observed findings.

  16. Are 2 Years Enough? Exploring Technical Skills Acquisition Among General Surgery Residents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elizabeth G; Salles, Gil F

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: Recent studies have shown that up to 40% of the General Surgery (GS) residents are not confident with their surgical skills. There is concern that residents are at risk of receiving inadequate training due to the low number of operations they perform. In Brazil, although all GS residents receive by law the Board Certification at the end of their programs, the assessment of their technical skills is not mandatory in Medical Residency programs' training. Consequently, our concern was that current GS medical residency format might be insufficient to create competent and autonomous general surgery residents after 2 years of regular training. Hence, the aim was to assess GS residents' surgical skills in their final months of training to evaluate the present format of GS residency programs in Brazil. Trained surgical faculty members directly observed 11 operations of varying difficulty performed by 2nd-year regular GS residents and by 4th-year residents in the optional Advanced Program in General Surgery. Participants were located at 3 university and 3 nonuniversity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo (Brazil's largest cities). Surgical skills were assessed using an internally developed observation checklist reviewed by subject matter experts. Sixty residents (46 regular 2nd-year trainees and 14 advanced 4th-year trainees) were assessed on performing 499 operations. Only 10 residents (17%), all advanced 4th-year residents, satisfactorily performed all operations and were considered eligible for the Board Certification. Even after excluding the 2 operations of greatest difficulty, only 24 regular 2nd-year residents (52%) satisfactorily performed the other 9 operations. Residents from hospitals with open Emergency Departments performed better than those from hospitals without Emergency Departments. Insights: The results of this pilot study suggest that residents with 2 years of training are not prepared for independent high-level surgical practice. The

  17. Academic self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and academic performance in first-year university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto A. Alegre

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between academic self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and academic performance of first-year university students in the Metropolitan Lima area. An assessment was made of 284 students (138 male and 146 female students admitted to a private university of Lima for the 2013-2 term by using a non-probability and incidental procedure and the General Academic Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, the University Academic Self-Regulated Learning Questionnaire; and for the academic performance of every student, their registered weighted GPA was taken into account. Formulated hypothesis was accepted as correlation coefficients resulting from academic selfefficacy; self-regulated learning and academic performance were both positive and significant, but low. In addition, the correlation between academic selfefficacy and self-regulated learning were positive, significant and moderate.

  18. A two-year experience of an integrated simulation residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittels, Kathleen A; Takayesu, James K; Nadel, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) is increasingly used in medical education, but its role in Emergency Medicine (EM) residency education is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of HPS when fully integrated into an EM residency didactic curriculum. The study design was a cross-sectional survey performed in 2006, 2 years after the implementation of an integrated simulation curriculum. Fifty-four residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-4) of a 4-year EM residency were surveyed with demographic and curricular questions on the perceived value of simulation relative to other teaching formats. Survey items were rated on a bipolar linear numeric scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 9 (strongly agree), with 5 being neutral. Data were analyzed using Student t-tests. Forty residents responded to the survey (74% response rate). The perceived effectiveness of HPS was higher for junior residents than senior residents (8.0 vs. 6.2, respectively, peffectiveness of lectures (7.8 vs. 7.9, respectively, p=0.1), morbidity and mortality conference (8.5 vs. 8.7, respectively, p=0.3), and trauma conference (8.4 vs. 8.8, respectively, p=0.2) between junior and senior residents. Scores for perceptions of improvement in residency training (knowledge acquisition and clinical decision-making) after the integration of HPS into the curriculum were positive for all residents. Residents' perceptions of HPS integration into an EM residency curriculum are positive for both improving knowledge acquisition and learning clinical decision-making. HPS was rated as more effective during junior years than senior years, while the perceived efficacy of more traditional educational modalities remained constant throughout residency training. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Development of a Post-Graduate Year 2 Pharmacy Residency in Clinical Pharmacogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James M.; Gammal, Roseann S.; Relling, Mary V.; Crews, Kristine R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The structure and development of an innovative clinical pharmacogenetics post-graduate year 2 (PGY2) ASHP-accredited residency program is described. Summary The advent of the era of genomics has left practitioners wondering how to interpret the data obtained from sequencing and genotyping patients. In order to train the next leaders in the area of implementing pharmacogenetics, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital established the first accredited residency program in clinical pharmacogenetics. The 12-month long PGY2 residency was created in accordance with the ASHP standards for advanced practice residencies. The resident learns to optimize patient outcomes through the expert provision of evidence-based, patient-centered precision medicine as an integral part of an interdisciplinary team. The resident gains hands-on experience in a dynamic environment regarding all aspects of running a clinical pharmacogenetics service. Since the first resident graduated in 2012, the program has graduated one resident each year. Conclusion To fill a need for pharmacists trained in pharmacogenetics, an innovative PGY2 residency in clinical pharmacogenetics was successfully developed. Upon completion of the program, residents are equipped with the clinical skills and necessary experience to drive precision medicine forward and lead the implementation of pharmacogenetics in various healthcare settings. PMID:28274984

  20. Academic Satisfaction Level and Academic Achievement among Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: Academic Year 2015-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Khadijeh Jamshidi; Babak Mohammadi; Zahra Mohammadi; Mohammad Karimi Parviz; Roghayeh Poursaberi; Mohammad Mehdi Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Academic satisfaction is considered one of the most important factors affecting academic achievement among students. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between academic satisfaction and academic achievement among students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with 346 student participants using stratified random sampling. The research instrument included the Student Academic Sa...

  1. Academic achievement in first-year Portuguese college students: the role of academic preparation and learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Paula; Guisande, Adelina M; Almeida, Leandro S; Páramo, Fernanda M

    2009-06-01

    This paper analyses the role of academic preparation and learning strategies in the prediction of first-year Portuguese college students' academic achievement, considering students' sex and academic field attended. A sample of 445 first-year college students (68.5% female) from the University of Minho (25.8% enrolled in economics, 35.3% in science/technology, and 38.9% in humanities degrees) participated in the study. Students answered a questionnaire on learning strategies in the classroom at the end of the first semester, which consisted of 44 items organized in five dimensions: comprehensive approach, surface approach, personal competency perceptions, intrinsic motivation, and organization of study activities. Academic achievement (grade point average at the end of first year) and academic preparation (students' higher education access mark) were obtained through the academic records of the university. Results showed that academic preparation was the strongest predictor of first-year academic achievement, and only marginal additional variance was explained by learning strategies as assessed by the self-reported questionnaire. There were sex and academic field differences, but these variables do not seem strong enough to affect the results, although the different percentages of variance captured by each model and the different weights associated to higher education access mark, stimulate the use of these and/or other personal and contextual variables when analysing the phenomenon.

  2. Training Psychiatry Residents in Quality Improvement: An Integrated, Year-Long Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Weinberg, Michael; Cabaniss, Deborah L.; Kistler; Susan C.; Isaacs, Abby J.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Essock, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a curriculum for psychiatry residents in Quality Improvement (QI) methodology. Methods: All PGY3 residents (N=12) participated in a QI curriculum that included a year-long group project. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the curriculum, using a modified Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment…

  3. Surgical Pathology Resident Rotation Restructuring at a Tertiary Care Academic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea R. Mehr MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the field of pathology and resident education necessitate ongoing evaluation of residency training. Evolutionary change is particularly important for surgical pathology rotations, which form the core of anatomic pathology training programs. In the past, we organized this rotation based on subjective insight. When faced with the recent need to restructure the rotation, we strove for a more evidence-based process. Our approach involved 2 primary sources of data. We quantified the number of cases and blocks submitted per case type to estimate workload and surveyed residents about the time required to gross specimens in all organ systems. A multidisciplinary committee including faculty, residents, and staff evaluated the results and used the data to model how various changes to the rotation would affect resident workload, turnaround time, and other variables. Finally, we identified rotation structures that equally distributed work and created a point-based system that capped grossing time for residents of different experience. Following implementation, we retrospectively compared turnaround time and duty hour violations before and after these changes and surveyed residents about their experiences with both systems. We evaluated the accuracy of the point-based system by examining grossing times and comparing them to the assigned point values. We found overall improvement in the rotation following the implementation. As there is essentially no literature on the subject of surgical pathology rotation organization, we hope that our experience will provide a road map to improve pathology resident education at other institutions.

  4. Surgical Pathology Resident Rotation Restructuring at a Tertiary Care Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Chelsea R; Obstfeld, Amrom E; Barrett, Amanda C; Montone, Kathleen T; Schwartz, Lauren E

    2017-01-01

    Changes in the field of pathology and resident education necessitate ongoing evaluation of residency training. Evolutionary change is particularly important for surgical pathology rotations, which form the core of anatomic pathology training programs. In the past, we organized this rotation based on subjective insight. When faced with the recent need to restructure the rotation, we strove for a more evidence-based process. Our approach involved 2 primary sources of data. We quantified the number of cases and blocks submitted per case type to estimate workload and surveyed residents about the time required to gross specimens in all organ systems. A multidisciplinary committee including faculty, residents, and staff evaluated the results and used the data to model how various changes to the rotation would affect resident workload, turnaround time, and other variables. Finally, we identified rotation structures that equally distributed work and created a point-based system that capped grossing time for residents of different experience. Following implementation, we retrospectively compared turnaround time and duty hour violations before and after these changes and surveyed residents about their experiences with both systems. We evaluated the accuracy of the point-based system by examining grossing times and comparing them to the assigned point values. We found overall improvement in the rotation following the implementation. As there is essentially no literature on the subject of surgical pathology rotation organization, we hope that our experience will provide a road map to improve pathology resident education at other institutions.

  5. The academic adjustment scale : Measuring the adjustment of permanent resident or sojourner students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joel R.; Guan, Yao; Koc, Yasin

    In this paper we developed and validated the Academic Adjustment Scale (AAS) - a new scale for measuring academic adjustment, which was developed with a focus on student sojourners who temporarily relocate to a new culture for the purpose of tertiary education, but also is validated for use with

  6. Concussion assessment and management knowledge among chiropractic fourth year interns and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Pichini, Alessandro; Scappaticci, Steven; Savic, Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the degree of knowledge chiropractic fourth year interns and post-graduate chiropractic residents have in regard to concussion diagnosis and management. A survey modified from a study conducted by Boggild and Tator (2012), was administered to fourth year chiropractic interns and post-graduate residents via SurveyMonkey.com. Chiropractic fourth year interns and postgraduate chiropractic specialty college residents scored 5.2 and 5.25 out of 9 respectively, which compares well with Bogglid and Tator's reports on medical students and residents. Several knowledge gaps were identified in the sample population. The results from this survey show that the concussion knowledge among Canadian fourth year chiropractic interns and specialty college residents compares favorably with the knowledge of fourth year medical students and residents in diagnosing and managing concussions. Chiropractors appear to possess the skills and knowledge to diagnose and manage concussion equal to their medical counterparts. However, knowledge gaps regarding concussion diagnosis and management were found among chiropractic students and residents.

  7. Academic Self-Efficacy, Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Performance in First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, Alberto A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between academic self-efficacy, self-regulated learning and academic performance of first-year university students in the Metropolitan Lima area. An assessment was made of 284 students (138 male and 146 female students) admitted to a private university of Lima for the 2013-2 term by using…

  8. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on resident physicians. Further study is needed better understand how tablet computers and other mobile devices may assist in medical education and patient care.

  9. Introductory lecture series for first-year radiology residents: implementation, investment and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Teresa; Chew, Felix S

    2013-03-01

    A lecture series aimed at providing new radiology residents a rapid course on the fundamental concepts of professionalism, safety, and interpretation of diagnostic imaging was established. Evaluation of the course's educational value was attempted through surveys. Twenty-six live 45-minute lectures presented by 16 or 17 faculty members were organized exclusively for the first class of radiology residents, held over a 2-month period at the beginning of certain weekdays. Online surveys were conducted after the course to gather feedback from residents. Average resident rotation evaluation scores were measured over the first semester for the two classes before and after this new course implementation. The lecture series was successfully organized and implemented. A total of 33 residents sat through the course over three summers. Faculty reported a reasonable number of preparation hours, and 100% of residents indicated they valued the course. Comparison of class average evaluation scores before and after the existence of this 2-month course did not significantly change. This collection of introductory lectures on professionalism, safety, and diagnostic imaging, delivered early in the first year of the radiology residency, requires a reasonable number of invested preparation hours by the faculty but results in a universal increase in resident confidence. However, we were unable to demonstrate an objective improvement in resident performance on clinical rotations. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex role identity, academic stress and wellbeing of first-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sex role identity, academic stress and wellbeing of first-year university students. ... and perceived academic stress, psychological wellbeing and self-esteem. ... personal attributes and how these can aid or hinder adjustment to university life.

  11. Evaluation of Laparoscopic Curricula in American Urology Residency Training: A 5-Year Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Matthew B; Morrison, Kasey Y; Schenkman, Noah S

    2016-03-01

    Medical simulation offers the advantage of improving resident skill and comfort without impacting patient care. Five years ago, we identified trends in the use of robotic and laparoscopic simulation in 2008 and 2009 at American urology residency training programs. We seek to identify the changes in the use of simulators and the presence of formal curricula in the wake of technological advances and changes in graduate medical education. Attendees of the American Urological Association (AUA) Basic Sciences Course, mostly in their second or third year of residency, were surveyed on the availability and use of laparoscopic/robotic simulators at their program, the presence of a formal curriculum, and a Likert scale questionnaire regarding face and content validity. Over a 5-year period, the availability of virtual reality robotic simulators substantially increased from 14% to nearly 60% availability in 2013. Despite this increase, the frequency of simulator use remained unchanged (p = 0.40) and the reported presence of formal curricula decreased from 41% to 34.8%. There was no significant difference in simulator use between residents in programs with or without laparoscopic/robotic curricula (p = 0.95). There was also a decrease in the percentage of residents who felt official laparoscopic curricula (93%-81%) and simulators (82%-74%) should be involved in resident education. In the past 5 years, despite evidence supporting benefits from simulator use and increasing availability, self-reported resident use has remained unchanged and the reporting of presence of laparoscopic/robotic curricula has decreased. With more dedicated investment in formal curricula, residency training programs may receive greater returns on their simulator investments, improve resident skills and comfort, and ultimately improve the quality of patient care.

  12. Perceptions about Training during Endocrinology Residency Programs in India over the Years: A Cross-sectional Study (PEER India Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Deepak; Dutta, Deep; Singla, Rajiv; Surana, Vineet; Aggarwal, Sameer; Gupta, Yashdeep; Kalra, Sanjay; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Tandon, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    Background: Residents' perception on quality of endocrinology training in India is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the perceptions about endocrinology residency programs in India among current trainees as compared to practicing endocrinologists. Methods: Trainees attending a preconference workshop at the annual conference of Endocrine Society of India (ESI) were given a questionnaire designed to evaluate their perceptions on their training. These evaluated the reasons for choosing endocrinology, their experiences during residency, and career plans. Practicing endocrinologists attending ESICON with at least 5-year experience were evaluated as controls. Results: Questionnaires from 63 endocrine trainees and 78 practicing endocrinologists were analyzed. Endocrinology is perceived to be the super-specialty with the best quality of life (QOL) but fair with regard to financial remuneration. Among current trainees, 61.89%, 31.74%, and 34.91% are satisfied with training in clinical endocrinology, laboratory endocrinology, and clinical/translational research, respectively. The corresponding figures for practicing endocrinologists are 71.78%, 25.63%, and 30.75%, respectively. Exposure to national endocrinology conferences during their endocrinology residency was adequate. However, exposure to international endocrinology conferences, research publications, project writing, and grant application are limited. Laboratory endocrinology is rated as the most neglected aspect during endocrine residency. Most of the trainees want to establish their own clinical practice in the long run. Very few trainees (17.46%) wish to join the medical education services. Conclusion: There is a good perception of QOL in endocrinology in spite of average financial remuneration. There is dissatisfaction with the quality of training in laboratory endocrinology and clinical research. Very few endocrine trainees consider academics as a long-term career option in India. PMID:28459024

  13. Can a Clinician-Scientist Training Program Develop Academic Orthopaedic Surgeons? One Program's Thirty-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Aaron M; Rettig, Samantha A; Kale, Neel K; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-10-25

    Clinician-scientist numbers have been stagnant over the past few decades despite awareness of this trend. Interventions attempting to change this problem have been seemingly ineffective, but research residency positions have shown potential benefit. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinician-scientist training program (CSTP) in an academic orthopedic residency in improving academic productivity and increasing interest in academic careers. Resident training records were identified and reviewed for all residents who completed training between 1976 and 2014 (n = 329). There were no designated research residents prior to 1984 (pre-CSTP). Between 1984 and 2005, residents self-selected for the program (CSTP-SS). In 2005, residents were selected by program before residency (CSTP-PS). Residents were also grouped by program participation, research vs. clinical residents (RR vs. CR). Data were collected on academic positions and productivity through Internet-based and PubMed search, as well as direct e-mail or phone contact. Variables were then compared based on the time duration and designation. Comparing all RR with CR, RR residents were more likely to enter academic practice after training (RR, 34%; CR, 20%; p = 0.0001) and were 4 times more productive based on median publications (RR, 14; CR, 4; p scientists. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alcohol Trajectories over Three Years in a Swedish Residence Hall Student Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriettae Ståhlbrandt

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that college students have a high alcohol consumption, less is known about the long-term drinking trajectories amongst college students and, in particular, students living in residence halls, known to be high-risk drinkers. Over four consecutive years, the drinking habits of 556 Swedish residence hall students were analyzed. The main instruments for measuring outcome were AUDIT (Alcohol Use Identification Disorders Test, SIP (Short Index of Problems and eBAC (estimated Blood Alcohol Concentration. The drinking trajectories among Swedish residence hall students showed stable and decreasing drinking patterns, with age and gender being predictors of group membership.

  15. Relationship between academic performance and affective changes during the first year at medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Machado, Vanessa Foresto; Madisson, Mariani Mendes; Resende, Tamara Lovatto; Valério, Fernando Passador; Troncon, Luiz Ernesto De Almeida

    2013-05-01

    Entering medical school may be associated with changes in the students' life, which can affect academic motivation and impair academic performance. This work aimed at measuring longitudinally academic motivation, anxiety, depression and social adjustment in first-year medical students and determining the relationships between these variables and academic performance, as measured mainly by grades on regular exams. Eighty-five first-year medical students (age: 17-25 years) were included after giving informed consent. Beck's Anxiety (BAI) and Beck's Depression (BDI) Inventories, the self-reported Social Adjustment Scale (SAS-SR) and the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) were applied two months after admission and at the end of the academic year. BAI scores increased throughout the year (7.3 ± 6.6 versus 28.8 ± 6.7; p 0.10). SAS-SR subscales scores remained stable, except for a decreasing pattern for leisure/social life (1.8 ± 0.4 versus 2.1 ± 0.4; p motivation to know (22.2 ± 4.5 versus 19.7 ± 5.5; p academic performance and the global scores for any of the scales except for the SAS-SR subscale for academic life (r = -0.48, p academic year, first-year medical students showed increased anxiety, decreased academic motivation and a maladjusted leisure/social life, which however does not seem to affect academic achievement.

  16. Three-year emergency medicine training program in The Netherlands: first evaluation from the residents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Salomon Willem; Gaakeer, Menno Iskander; Veugelers, Rebekka

    2013-07-26

    The Netherlands' 3-year training in Emergency Medicine (EM) was formally approved and introduced in November 2008. To identify areas for improvement, we conducted the first evaluation of this curriculum from the residents' perspective. A questionnaire was composed on ten aspects of the curriculum. It contained multiple-choice, open and opinion questions; answers to the latter were classified using the Likert scale. The questionnaires were mailed to all enrolled residents. We mailed questionnaires to all 189 enrolled residents, and 105 responded (55.6%). Although they were satisfied with their training overall, 96.2% thought it was currently too short: 18.3% desired extension to 4 years, 76.0% to 5 and 1.9% to 6 years. Nevertheless, residents expected that they would function effectively as emergency physicians (EPs) after finishing their 3-year training program. Bedside teaching was assessed positively by 35.2%. All rotations were assessed positively, with the general practice rotation seen as contributing the least to the program. According to 43.7%, supervising EPs were available for consultation; 40.7% thought that, in a clinical capacity, the EP was sufficiently present during residents' shifts. When EPs were present, 82.5% found them to be easily accessible, and 66.6% viewed them as role models. In the Emergency Medicine Departments (EDs) with a higher number of EPs employed, residents tended to perceive better supervision and were more likely to see their EPs as role models. While residents were stimulated to do research, actual support and assistance needed to be improved. Although overall, the current training program was evaluated positively, the residents identified four areas for improvement: (1) in training hospitals, trained EPs should be present more continuously for clinical supervision; (2) bedside teaching should be improved, (3) scientific research should be facilitated more and (4) the training program should be extended.

  17. Ten Years in the Academic Integrity Trenches: Experiences and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Doug; Nau, S. Zaung; Symons, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, our university launched its Academic Integrity Program (AIP) in order to promote and protect academic integrity. All commencing students must complete this online AIP within 14 days of starting their course. Satisfactory completion of this module with a test score of 80% is required before students can access their course materials.…

  18. Class attendance and academic performance of second year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the impact of classroom attendance on academic performance of university students in an Organic Chemistry course. It also looked into the moderating effect of gender on attendance and academic performance. Data was collected through expo-facto survey involving real time documentation of ...

  19. Visitors and Residents: Mapping Student Attitudes to Academic Use of Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fiona; White, David; Hirst, Tony; Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The Visitors and Residents model of internet use suggests a continuum of modes of engagement with the online world, ranging from tool use to social spaces. In this paper, we examine evidence derived from a large cohort of students to assess whether this idea can be validated by experimental evidence. We find statistically significant differences…

  20. Matrix Organization of a Residency Program in an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ellen S.; Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Matrix organization offers a structure that can facilitate coordination and cooperation in health care educational administration. Its application within the health care system is reviewed, the matrix organization of the primary care residency at the University of Pennsylvania is reported, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed.…

  1. The pediatric residency training on tobacco project: four-year parent outcome findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymowitz, Norman; Pyle, Sara A; Haddock, C Keith; Schwab, Joseph V

    2008-08-01

    To assess parent behavioral change and perception of resident intervention on tobacco. In a long-term study of the efficacy of training pediatric residents to address tobacco conducted at the New Jersey Medical School, sixteen pediatric training programs were assigned randomly to either special or standard training conditions. Parent surveys were administered in the fall of 2001 and 2005 in order to assess the effects of resident intervention on parent behavior, as well as parent perceptions of resident intervention. The percent of parents who smoke at sites associated with the special training condition, but not of those at sites associated with standard training, who reported that residents advised them to stop smoking, offered to help them quit, and provided quit smoking materials increased significantly from baseline to year 4. The percent of parents in the special training condition who reported quitting smoking in the past year also increased, although the increase was not statistically significant. A majority of the parents associated with each training condition reported receiving intervention for second hand smoke (SHS). For each training condition, the level of intervention to prevent exposure of infants and children to SHS exposure was similar at baseline and year 4, as was the percent of parents who reported having a smoke-free household. The results support the efficacy of the special training program and underscore the importance of preparing pediatric residents to address tobacco.

  2. A Formalized Three-Year Emergency Medicine Residency Ultrasound Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Residency Program Ultrasound Education Curriculum is a three-year curriculum for PGY-1 to PGY-3 learners. Introduction/Background: Each year of the three-year The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Curriculum focuses on different aspects of emergency ultrasonography, thereby promoting progressive understanding and utilization of point-of-care ultrasound in medical decision-making during residency training. Ultrasound is an invaluable bedside tool for emergency physicians; this skill must be mastered by resident learners during residency training, and ultrasound competency is a required ACGME milestone.1 The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP currently recommends that 11 applications of emergency ultrasound be part of the core skills of an emergency physician.2 This curriculum acknowledges the standards developed by ACEP and the ACGME. Objectives: Learners will 1 know the indications for each the 11 ACEP point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS applications; 2 perform each of the 11 ACEP POCUS applications; 3 integrate POCUS into medical decision-making. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: independent, self-directed learning (textbook and literature reading, brief didactic sessions describing indications and technique for each examination, hands-on ultrasound scanning under the direct supervision of ultrasound faculty with real-time feedback, and quality assurance review of ultrasound images. Residents are expected to perform a minimum of 150 ultrasound examinations with associated quality assurance during the course of their residency training. The time requirements, reading material, and ultrasound techniques taught vary depending on the year of training. Length of curriculum: The entirety of the curriculum is three years; however, each year of residency training has

  3. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association between postgraduate year 2 residency program characteristics and primary project publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Joseph M; Shafeeq, Hira; Hammond, Drayton A; Li, Chenghui; Devlin, John W

    2018-03-15

    The association among residency program and research mentor characteristics, program director perceptions, and the publication of the primary research project for postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) graduates was assessed. Using a validated electronic survey, residency program directors (RPDs) of critical care PGY2 graduates were asked about primary research project publication success, program and research project mentor characteristics, and RPDs' perceptions surrounding project completion. All 55 RPDs surveyed responded; 44 (79%) reported being a research project mentor. PGY2 research project publications in 2011 and 2012 totaled 26 (37%) and 27 (35%), respectively. A significant relationship existed between research project publication and the number of residents in the program ( p project publication is important to their employer ( p projects versus no publications included the number of graduates in the PGY2 program (odds ratio [OR], 5.6; p project publication (OR, 10.2; p project versus no research projects was also independently associated with the RPD's perception that the employer valued research project publication (OR, 5.1; p = 0.04). A survey of RPDs of critical care PGY2 residents found that the number of PGY2 residents, the number of publications by the least experienced research mentor, and the perception that publishing the residents' research projects is important to the employer were independently associated with publication rates of residency research projects. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Four years of training in family medicine: implications for residency redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, J Lewis; McPherson, Vanessa; Little, John M

    2012-09-01

    In light of the ongoing consideration for extending the length of residency education in family medicine in the United States, this paper reports the findings from a retrospective, qualitative study of six family physicians that elected to extend their residency training from 3 to 4 years. Each participant completed a written questionnaire and a structured personal interview focusing on various aspects of career development resulting from the additional year of training. The authors independently evaluated these interviews to identify major themes. All the participants were found to have been involved in teaching medicine, valued a more flexible and expanded curriculum, and appreciated their individualized curricula-based on their respective career interests. Given the opportunity, each would opt again for a fourth year of training. There were mixed opinions as to whether the fourth year should be required of all family medicine residents. Other perceived benefits reported were: a better opportunity to find a personally satisfactory practice, additional time for gaining clarity about career plans, and a higher beginning salary as a result of the additional skills and experiences gained. This study of mid-career physicians supports that a fourth-year (PGY4) curriculum in family medicine may enhance subsequent career satisfaction. Further studies of residents in other PGY4 training programs are necessary to assess outcomes comparing our findings as well as guide the discipline's leaders in residency redesign.

  6. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  7. Examination of Nondesignated Preliminary Surgery Residents Recruited Since the Inception of Supplementary Offer and Acceptance Program: Lessons Learned From a Large Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuja-Cruz, Maria; Travis, Claire; Benge, Michael; Caufield, Barbara; Nehler, Mark

    The majority of surgery programs roster non-designated preliminary (NDP) residents. We and others have reported on the success of NDP resident mentoring with regard to categorical position placement. Lacking is a focus on the candidates themselves and differences based on initial career of choice. NDP residents' files since the institution of SOAP were reviewed for demographics, initial career choice, financial burden, region of medical school of origin, application and interview history, and pre-screen interview candidate score (high score of 22 - data includes USMLE scores, major clerkship grades, and AOA) used for categorical recruitment. From 2012-16 79 NDP residents have been recruited at UCDenver (82% via SOAP). Median age was 28 years, majority were single (73%), and male (82%). Thirty percent belonged to an under-represented minority group. Mean debt was $156,000 but 20% owe over $250,000. 90% attended US medical schools with 65% from the NRMP "South" region. 86% were recruited as fourth year students. NDPs were categorized as failing to match in general surgery (38%), surgical subspecialties (47%), or other (15%). NDPs applied to median of 68 programs (range 7-200) and granted a median of 8 interviews (range 0-24). NDPs had a mean pre-screening interview score of 13 out of 22 and only 9% would have met the standard threshold to obtain a categorical surgery interview. There were no differences in pre-screening scores in the three groups. 95% NDPs (excluding present year) successfully completed their R1 year (three resigned - one obtained a general surgery spot mid-year and two after matching in non-general surgery fields). 68% NDPs placed in categorical positions after the R1 year. The placement was better for the surgical subspecialty group compared to the other two. The bias is that due to a more competitive applicant pool recruiting NDPs from surgical subspecialties would be optimal. However, those unmatched surgical subspecialty candidates are no better

  8. class attendance and academic performance of second year

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Data was collected through expo-facto survey involving real time ... still a major concern for educators and educational researchers all over the world ..... attendance on students' academic performance using association rule mining technique.

  9. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  10. Competencies for first year residents - physicians' views from medical schools with different undergraduate curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Sophie; Schick, Kristina; Deppermann, Jana; Prediger, Sarah; Berberat, Pascal O; Kadmon, Martina; Harendza, Sigrid

    2017-09-07

    Frameworks like the CanMEDS model depicting professional roles and specific professional activities provide guidelines for postgraduate education. When medical graduates start their residency, they should possess certain competencies related to communication, management and professionalism while other competencies will be refined during postgraduate training. Our study aimed to evaluate the relevance of different competencies for a first year resident required for entrustment decision from the perspective of physicians from medical faculties with different undergraduate medical curricula. Nine hundred fifty-two surgeons and internists from three medical schools with different undergraduate medical curricula were invited to rank 25 competencies according to their relevance for first year residents. The rankings were compared between universities, specialties, physicians' positions, and gender. Two hundred two physicians participated, 76 from Hamburg University, 44 from Oldenburg University, and 82 from Technical University Munich. No significant differences were found regarding the top 10 competencies relevant for first year residents between the universities. 'Responsibility' was the competency with the highest rank overall. Internists ranked 'Structure, work planning and priorities' higher while surgeons ranked 'Verbal communication with colleagues and supervisors' higher. Consultants evaluated 'Active listening to patients' more important than department directors and residents. Female physicians ranked 'Verbal communication with colleagues and supervisors' and 'Structure, work planning and priorities' significantly higher while male physicians ranked 'Scientifically and empirically grounded method of working' significantly higher. Physicians from universities with different undergraduate curricula principally agreed on the competencies relevant for first year residents. Some differences between physicians from different positions, specialties, and gender were

  11. [Preference Changes Regarding Future Work Area and Intended Position Among German Residents after Four Years of Residency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Stine; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Römer, Farina; Krause-Solberg, Lea; Scherer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Introduction  We investigated the preferences of medical residents in Germany with regard to future working place (hospital or private practice) and position (employment/self-employment in private practice; resp. specialist/senior or chief physician in the hospital). This is analysed in a gender comparative perspective, including the influence of parenthood. Methods  Annual postal surveys among graduates of seven medical faculties in Germany from their last year ("Practical Year") until after four years of postgraduate training. The return rate at baseline was 48 % and the four surveys after reached rates from 85 % up. In all samples about two thirds were women, which corresponds to the actual gender differentiation in under- and postgraduate training. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were performed. Results  Compared to private practice the hospital is clearly preferred, although the attraction of hospital jobs decreased over the years. The decision for or against the hospital is connected to the discipline. Working in private practice is seen as possibility for part time work. Men prefer self-employment whereas women prefer to work under an employment contract. In the hospital, male doctors prefer to work in leading positions. Those positions are associated with full-time work. Leadership training especially takes place in university hospitals. Discussion  Three trends are recognized: Reluctance against leading positions, growing interest for part time work and rising popularity of work as an employee in private practice. Those trends can be understood as a rejection of traditional professional role models. The realization of these preferences is easily feasible because of the current labour market situation. Therefore, emerging problems have to be faced in another way. A change of gender-typical role models was rarely detected. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Year-End Clinic Handoffs: A National Survey of Academic Internal Medicine Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Erica; Harris, Christina; Lee, Wei Wei; Pincavage, Amber T; Ouchida, Karin; Miller, Rachel K; Chaudhry, Saima; Arora, Vineet M

    2017-06-01

    While there has been increasing emphasis and innovation nationwide in training residents in inpatient handoffs, very little is known about the practice and preparation for year-end clinic handoffs of residency outpatient continuity practices. Thus, the latter remains an identified, yet nationally unaddressed, patient safety concern. The 2014 annual Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) survey included seven items for assessing the current year-end clinic handoff practices of internal medicine residency programs throughout the country. Nationwide survey. All internal medicine program directors registered with APDIM. Descriptive statistics of programs and tools used to formulate a year-end handoff in the ambulatory setting, methods for evaluating the process, patient safety and quality measures incorporated within the process, and barriers to conducting year-end handoffs. Of the 361 APDIM member programs, 214 (59%) completed the Transitions of Care Year-End Clinic Handoffs section of the survey. Only 34% of respondent programs reported having a year-end ambulatory handoff system, and 4% reported assessing residents for competency in this area. The top three barriers to developing a year-end handoff system were insufficient overlap between graduating and incoming residents, inability to schedule patients with new residents in advance, and time constraints for residents, attendings, and support staff. Most internal medicine programs do not have a year-end clinic handoff system in place. Greater attention to clinic handoffs and resident assessment of this care transition is needed.

  13. BNP and NT-proBNP, Predictors of 1-Year Mortality in Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barents, Maaike; Hillege, Hans H. L.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; de Boer, Rudolph A.; Koster, J.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; de Jongste, Mike J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate 1-year mortality prediction of B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N terminal-proBNP (NT-proBNP) in institutionalized elderly with multiple morbidities. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting: One nursing home. Participants: Ninety-three residents (mean age 81

  14. The relationship between long working hours and depression among first-year residents in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ryoko; Seo, Emiko; Maeno, Takami; Ito, Makoto; Sanuki, Masaru; Maeno, Tetsuhiro

    2018-03-27

    In Japan, some residents develop mental health problems. In previous studies, it was reported that long working hours might be a cause of stress reaction such as depression. There were some reports that compared residents with 80 or more working hours with those with less than 80 working hours. However, many residents are practically detained for extra-long time, designated as 100 h or more per week, for medical practice, training, self-study, etc. There have been few reports on extra-long hours of work. This study evaluated the working environment and the amount of stress experienced by first-year residents, and examined the relationship between long working hours and depression, especially in the group of extra-long working hours. The study included 1241 first-year residents employed at 250 training hospitals in 2011. A self-report questionnaire was administered at the beginning of the residency and 3 months later to collect data on demographics, depressive symptoms, and training conditions (e.g., duration of work, sleep, disposable time, and night shift). Depressive symptoms were rated using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The mean duration of work per week was 79.4 h, with 97 residents (7.8%) working 100 h or more. At 3 months, clinically significant depressive symptoms were reported by 45.5% of residents working 100 or more h per week, which proportion was significantly greater than that for respondents working less than 60 h (P working week of 80 to 99.9 h was associated with a 2.83 fold higher risk and 100 h or more was associated with a 6.96-fold higher risk of developing depressive symptoms compared with a working week of less than 60 h. Working excessively long hours was significantly associated with development of depressive symptoms. Proper management of resident physicians' working hours is critical to maintaining their physical and mental health and to improve the quality of care they provide.

  15. A faculty-led mock residency interview exercise for fourth-year doctor of pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsfeld, Carrie F; Wall, Geoffrey C; Miesner, Andrew R; Schmidt, Ginelle; Haack, Sally L; Eastman, Darla K; Grady, Sarah; Fornoff, Anisa

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether a faculty-led mock-interview activity enhanced pharmacy student preparation for the residency interview process and increased match rates. Twenty-eight doctor of pharmacy students volunteered for a 40-minute mock-interview session with 2-person faculty teams. A standard roster of 12 interview questions was derived from published literature and the faculty members' experience. Feedback on the student's interview performance was provided verbally during the session. Following the interview, students were given a 2-part survey instrument. The first part of the survey was administered immediately following the mock-interview session and the second part was administered after the standard date for residency program results (known as "Match Day"). Participant match rates were compared to American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) national rates. 82.5% (23 of 27) of students in the mock-interview group matched a postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) program. Compared to national rates (61.9%), more students in our surveyed mock-interview group matched a PGY1 residency (P = .015; odds ratio [OR] 3.546, 95% CI 1.161-12.116). Higher match rates were seen in the students completing the mock residency interview compared to ASHP national rates. In general, students completing the mock interview found the process helpful and felt better prepared for their residency interviews.

  16. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E; Hopkins, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation.

  17. The Value of a Resident Aesthetic Clinic: A 7-Year Institutional Review and Survey of the Chief Resident Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler, Jason M; Carney, Martin J; Yan, Chen; Percec, Ivona

    2017-10-16

    With the evolving plastic surgery training paradigm, there is an increasing emphasis on aesthetic surgery education during residency. In an effort to improve aesthetic education and to encourage preparation for independent practice, our institution has supported a resident-run aesthetic clinic for over two decades. To provide insight into the educational benefits of a resident-run cosmetic clinic through longitudinal resident follow up and institutional experiential review. A retrospective review was conducted to identify all clinic-based aesthetic operations performed between 2009 and 2016. To capture residents' perspectives on the cosmetic resident clinic, questionnaires were distributed to the cohort. Primary outcome measures included: volume and types of cases performed, impact of clinic experience on training, confidence level performing cosmetic procedures, and satisfaction with chief clinic. Unpaired t tests were calculated to compare case volume/type with level of confidence and degree of preparedness to perform cosmetic procedures independently. Overall, 264 operations performed by 18 graduated chief residents were reviewed. Surveys were distributed to 28 chief residents (71.4% completion rate). Performing twenty or more clinic-based procedures was associated with higher levels of preparedness to perform cosmetic procedures independently (P = 0.037). Residents reported the highest confidence when performing cosmetic breast procedures when compared to face/neck (P = 0.005), body/trunk procedures (P = 0.39), and noninvasive facial procedures (P = 0.85). The continued growth of aesthetic surgery highlights the need for comprehensive training and preparation for the new generation of plastic surgeons. Performing cosmetic procedures in clinic is a valuable adjunct to the traditional educational curriculum and increases preparedness and confidence for independent practice. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission

  18. Feedback of final year ophthalmology postgraduates about their residency ophthalmology training in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduate students on the subject of their residency training. A similar survey conducted 7 years ago published in IJO had concluded that the residency program was not up to expectations in many centers. Our study aimed to see if ophthalmology training and student perceptions differed since then. Materials and Methods: For our study, we added a few questions to the same questionnaire used in the article "which is the best method to learn ophthalmology? Resident doctors′ perspective of ophthalmology training" published in IJO, Vol. 56 (5. Results: Forty-nine students (62.02% returned completed forms. Most students desired an orientation program on entering residency, and wished to undergo diagnostic training initially. Case-presentation with demonstration and Wet-lab learning were most preferred. There was a big difference between the number of surgeries students actually performed and the number they felt would have been ideal. Conclusion: On the whole, the students still felt the need for improved training across all aspects of ophthalmology.

  19. Does Research Training During Residency Promote Scholarship and Influence Career Choice? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a 10-Year Cohort of the UCSF-PRIME Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwes, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Bridget; Stanley, Marion; Grant, Ross; Shunk, Rebecca; Connor, Denise; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, and the Carnegie Foundation report on medical education recommend creating individualized learning pathways during medical training so that learners can experience broader professional roles beyond patient care. Little data exist to support the success of these specialized pathways in graduate medical education. We present the 10-year experience of the Primary Care Medicine Education (PRIME) track, a clinical-outcomes research pathway for internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). We hypothesized that participation in an individualized learning track, PRIME, would lead to a greater likelihood of publishing research from residency and accessing adequate career mentorship and would be influential on subsequent alumni careers. We performed a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residency alumni from UCSF who graduated in 2001 through 2010. We compared responses of PRIME and non-PRIME categorical alumni. We used Pearson's chi-square and Student's t test to compare PRIME and non-PRIME alumni on categorical and continuous variables. Sixty-six percent (211/319) of alumni responded to the survey. A higher percentage of PRIME alumni published residency research projects compared to non-PRIME alumni (64% vs. 40%; p = .002). The number of PRIME alumni identifying research as their primary career role was not significantly different from non-PRIME internal medicine residency graduates (35% of PRIME vs. 29% non-PRIME). Process measures that could explain these findings include adequate access to mentors (M 4.4 for PRIME vs. 3.6 for non-PRIME alumni, p medicine residency programs.

  20. Importance of First and Second Authorship in Assessing Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of US Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private Practice Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Mitin, Timur; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R; Jaboin, Jerry J

    2018-06-20

    The Hirsch index (h-index) has been shown to correlate with radiation oncology residents' having a first job in academics versus private practice, but it is limited by its inability to distinguish between the differing significance of coauthor roles in articles. A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates and their postresidency career choices was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for articles limited to first author only (h f ) and first or second-author only (h s ) for each resident. Mean h f was 2.06 for all resident graduates, and mean h s was 2.77. Residents with PhDs had significantly higher h f (3.11 versus 1.76, P gender. Only 10% of graduates without any first- and/or second-author articles cited at least once secured academic jobs. These findings indicate that stratifying publications by first or second authorship when developing benchmarks for evaluating resident productivity and postresidency career type may be useful. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships and Academic Motivation within One School Year: Developmental Changes and Linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Maulana, Ridwan; den Brok, Perry

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the developmental changes of teacher-student interpersonal relationships as well as that of academic motivation among first-grade secondary school students. In addition, the link between teacher-student interpersonal behaviour and academic motivation across the school year was investigated. The data were collected 5…

  2. Measuring the Academic Self-Efficacy of First-Year Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Marann; Flood, Barbara; Griffin, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This study measured the levels of academic self-efficacy of first-year accounting students. It also investigated whether there were any gender differences and the extent to which efficacy levels explained variation in academic performance. Overall the analysis revealed that many students lacked the confidence to participate fully in the academic…

  3. Mental Health and Academic Performance of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tammy Jordan; Oswalt, Sara B.; Ochoa, Yesenia

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of mental health issues are increasing among college students, and such issues pose a threat to health and academic performance. Purpose: The primary purpose of the study is to examine differences in mental health diagnoses and their related academic impact with a special focus on classification year in college.…

  4. Teacher-student interpersonal relationships and academic motivation within one school year : developmental changes and linkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Maulana, Ridwan; den Brok, Perry

    The present study explored the developmental changes of teacher-student interpersonal relationships as well as that of academic motivation among first-grade secondary school students. In addition, the link between teacher-student interpersonal behaviour and academic motivation across the school year

  5. Factors Associated With Academic Performance Among Second-Year Undergraduate Occupational Therapy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsaksen, Tore; Ellingham, Brian; Carstensen, Tove

    2018-01-01

    Background: Research into occupational therapy education and its outcomes for students is growing. More research is needed to determine the factors of importance for occupational therapy students’ academic outcomes. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with academic performance among second-year undergraduate occupational therapy students in Norway. Methods: Occupational therapy students (n = 111) from two education programs completed questionnaires asking for sociodemograph...

  6. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and Their First-Year Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien Elske; Deinum, Jan Folkert

    2018-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students' motivational profiles and examining differences in academic achievement based on these profiles. Data on academic motivation of 755 students in the field of mathematics and natural sciences were collected before the start of their bachelor's degree program; data on GPA were collected…

  7. Relationships between Learning Approach, Procrastination and Academic Achievement amongst First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saele, Rannveig Grøm; Dahl, Tove Irene; Sørlie, Tore; Friborg, Oddgeir

    2017-01-01

    Individual differences in student learning influence academic performance, and two aspects influencing the learning process are the particular learning approach the students use and procrastination behaviour. We examined the relationships between learning approaches, procrastination and academic achievement (measured 1 year later as the grade…

  8. Predicting Academic Success of Health Science Students for First Year Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Evans, Tess; Chivers, Paola T.

    2016-01-01

    Students commencing tertiary education enter through a number of traditional and alternative academic pathways. As a result, tertiary institutions encounter a broad range of students, varying in demographic, previous education, characteristics and academic achievement. In recent years, the relatively constant increase in tertiary applications in…

  9. The bidirectional pathways between internalizing and externalizing problems and academic performance from 6 to 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Internalizing and externalizing problems are associated with poor academic performance, both concurrently and longitudinally. Important questions are whether problems precede academic performance or vice versa, whether both internalizing and externalizing are associated with academic problems when simultaneously tested, and whether associations and their direction depend on the informant providing information. These questions were addressed in a sample of 816 children who were assessed four times. The children were 6-10 years at baseline and 14-18 years at the last assessment. Parent-reported internalizing and externalizing problems and teacher-reported academic performance were tested in cross-lagged models to examine bidirectional paths between these constructs. These models were compared with cross-lagged models testing paths between teacher-reported internalizing and externalizing problems and parent-reported academic performance. Both final models revealed similar pathways from mostly externalizing problems to academic performance. No paths emerged from internalizing problems to academic performance. Moreover, paths from academic performance to internalizing and externalizing problems were only found when teachers reported on children's problems and not for parent-reported problems. Additional model tests revealed that paths were observed in both childhood and adolescence. Externalizing problems place children at increased risk of poor academic performance and should therefore be the target for interventions.

  10. Assessment of first-year post-graduate residents: usefulness of multiple tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Ying; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Cheng, Hao-Min; Lee, Wen-Shin; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Chang, Ching-Chih; Huang, Chia-Chang

    2011-12-01

    Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE) usually needs a large number of stations with long test time, which usually exceeds the resources available in a medical center. We aimed to determine the reliability of a combination of Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), Internal Medicine in-Training Examination (IM-ITE(®)) and OSCE, and to verify the correlation between the small-scale OSCE+DOPS+IM-ITE(®)-composited scores and 360-degree evaluation scores of first year post-graduate (PGY(1)) residents. Between 2007 January to 2010 January, two hundred and nine internal medicine PGY1 residents completed DOPS, IM-ITE(®) and small-scale OSCE at our hospital. Faculty members completed 12-item 360-degree evaluation for each of the PGY(1) residents regularly. The small-scale OSCE scores correlated well with the 360-degree evaluation scores (r = 0.37, p ITE(®) score with small-scale OSCE+DOPS scores [small-scale OSCE+DOPS+IM-ITE(®)-composited scores] markedly enhanced their correlation with 360-degree evaluation scores (r = 0.85, p ITE(®)-composited scores suggested that both methods were measuring the same quality. Our results showed that the small-scale OSCE, when associated with both the DOPS and IM-ITE(®), could be an important assessment method for PGY(1) residents. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Empathy scores in medical school and ratings of empathic behavior in residency training 3 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Mangione, Salvatore; Nasca, Thomas J; Gonnella, Joseph S; Magee, Mike

    2005-12-01

    The authors designed the present study to examine the association between individuals' scores on the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE; M. Hojat, J. S. Gonnella, S. Mangione, T. J. Nasca, & M. Magee, 2003; M. Hojat, J. S. Gonnella, T. J. Nasca, S. Mangione, M. Vergare, & M. Magee, 2002; M. Hojat, S. Mangione, T. J. Nasca, M. J. M. Cohen, J. S. Gonnella, J. B. Erdmann, J. J. Veloski, & M. Magee, 2001), a self-report empathy scale, during medical school and ratings of their empathic behavior made by directors of their residency training programs 3 years later. Participants were 106 physicians. The authors examined the relationships between scores on the JSPE (with 20 Likert-type items) at the beginning of the students' 3rd year of medical school and ratings of their empathic behavior made by directors of their residency training programs. Top scorers on the JSPE in medical school, compared to Bottom scorers, obtained a significantly higher average rating of empathic behavior in residency 3 years later (p prosocial and helping behavior, it is important for investigators to further enhance our understanding of its correlates and outcomes among health professionals.

  12. Women in Academic Medicine Leadership: Has Anything Changed in 25 Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Paula A; Davidoff, Frank; Levinson, Wendy

    2016-08-01

    Over the past 25 years, the number of women graduating from medical schools in the United States and Canada has increased dramatically to the point where roughly equal numbers of men and women are graduating each year. Despite this growth, women continue to face challenges in moving into academic leadership positions. In this Commentary, the authors share lessons learned from their own careers relevant to women's careers in academic medicine, including aspects of leadership, recruitment, editorship, promotion, and work-life balance. They provide brief synopses of current literature on the personal and social forces that affect women's participation in academic leadership roles. They are persuaded that a deeper understanding of these realities can help create an environment in academic medicine that is generally more supportive of women's participation, and that specifically encourages women in medicine to take on academic leadership positions.

  13. Personality traits measured at baseline can predict academic performance in upper secondary school three years late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosander, Pia; Bäckström, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the ability of personality to predict academic performance in a longitudinal study of a Swedish upper secondary school sample. Academic performance was assessed throughout a three-year period via final grades from the compulsory school and upper secondary school. The Big Five personality factors (Costa & McCrae, ) - particularly Conscientiousness and Neuroticism - were found to predict overall academic performance, after controlling for general intelligence. Results suggest that Conscientiousness, as measured at the age of 16, can explain change in academic performance at the age of 19. The effect of Neuroticism on Conscientiousness indicates that, as regarding getting good grades, it is better to be a bit neurotic than to be stable. The study extends previous work by assessing the relationship between the Big Five and academic performance over a three-year period. The results offer educators avenues for improving educational achievement. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M Al-Mazrou

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels. The GPA of premedical year is a useful predictor of students who need close monitoring and academic support. The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

  15. Resident postgraduate year does not influence rate of complications following inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Oswaldo; Mokdad, Ali A; Imran, Jonathan; Huerta, Sergio

    2017-11-01

    Previous data indicate that patients who undergo surgery with a postgraduate year 3 (PGY-3) resident as the junior surgeon have a lower rate of recurrence compared with PGY-1 and PGY-2 after an open inguinal herniorrhaphy. Lower PGY level was also associated with increased operative time. We hypothesize that when controlling for surgeon, technique, and hernia type, the outcomes for inguinal herniorrhaphy are the same independent of PGY level. A retrospective review of all open unilateral inguinal hernia repairs done by residents who assisted the same senior surgeon at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System was performed. Seven hundred fifty-two open unilateral inguinal hernia were identified: mean patient age = 60.6 ± 12.7 y; mean body mass index = 27.0 ± 10.8 kg/m 2 ; American Society of Anesthesia III-IV = 51%; and Nyhus type 2 = 44.7%, 3a = 41.6%, and 3b = 13.7%. Residents involved were PGY-1 (17.2%), PGY-2/3 (71.1%), and PGY-4/5 (11.7%). Postoperative complications for intern, junior (PGY-2 and PGY-3), and senior residents (PGY-4 and PGY-5) were 4%, 9%, and 6%, respectively (P = 0.14). Compared to interns, junior residents finished the operation 3.9 min faster (95% confidence interval = -7.5, -0.3). There was no time difference between interns and senior residents completing the operations after controlling for hernia type. Logistic regression did not identify PGY level as an independent predictor of complications or recurrence. There was a slight decrease in operative time when the repair was done with junior-level residents. PGY level did not influence outcomes for open, unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy when controlled for hernia type and technique. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Information-seeking behavior during residency is associated with quality of theoretical learning, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice: a strobe-compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3-6; range, 1-10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77-17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33-4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09-4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01-3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46-11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the specialty (OR, 3.33; 95

  17. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46–11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the

  18. Addressing the Academic Gap Between 4- and 6-Year Pharmacy Programs in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Sujin; Song, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangmi; Kwon, Kwangil; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To address the academic gap (or lack of adequate training and programs) between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs and suggest methods for reducing this gap and to evaluate pharmacists’ perceptions of preceptorship.

  19. Residents' views of the role of classroom-based learning in graduate medical education through the lens of academic half days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luke Y C; McDonald, Julie A; Pratt, Daniel D; Wisener, Katherine M; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    To examine the role of classroom-based learning in graduate medical education through the lens of academic half days (AHDs) by exploring residents' perceptions of AHDs' purpose and relevance and the effectiveness of teaching and learning in AHDs. The authors invited a total of 186 residents in three programs (internal medicine, orthopedic surgery, and hematology) at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine to participate in semistructured focus groups from October 2010 to February 2011. Verbatim transcripts of the interviews underwent inductive analysis. Twenty-seven residents across the three programs volunteered to participate. Two major findings emerged. Purpose and relevance of AHDs: Residents believed that AHDs are primarily for knowledge acquisition and should complement clinical learning. Classroom learning facilitated consolidation of clinical experiences with expert clinical reasoning. Social aspects of AHDs were highly valued as an important secondary purpose. Perceived effectiveness of teaching and learning: Case-based teaching engaged residents in critical thinking; active learning was valued. Knowledge retention was considered suboptimal. Perspectives on the concept of AHDs as "protected time" varied in the three programs. Findings suggest that (1) engagement in classroom learning occurs through participation in clinically oriented discussions that highlight expert reasoning processes; (2) formal classroom teaching, which focuses on knowledge acquisition, can enhance informal learning occurring during clinical activity; and (3) social aspects of AHDs, including their role in creating communities of practice in residency programs and in professional identity formation, are an important, underappreciated asset for residency programs.

  20. The social ties that bind: social anxiety and academic achievement across the university years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Christina A; Willoughby, Teena

    2015-05-01

    Given that engagement and integration in university/college are considered key to successful academic achievement, the identifying features of social anxiety, including fear of negative evaluation and distress and avoidance of new or all social situations, may be particularly disadvantageous in the social and evaluative contexts that are integral to university/college life. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the direct effects of social anxiety on academic achievement, as well as investigate an indirect mechanism through which social anxiety might impact on academic achievement, namely, the formation of new social ties in university. The participants were 942 (71.7 % female; M = 19 years at Time 1) students enrolled in a mid-sized university in Southern Ontario, Canada. Students completed annual assessments of social anxiety, social ties, and academic achievement for three consecutive years. The results from an autoregressive cross-lag path analysis indicated that social anxiety had a significant and negative direct relationship with academic achievement. Moreover, the negative indirect effect of social anxiety on academic achievement through social ties was significant, as was the opposing direction of effects (i.e., the indirect effect of academic achievement on social anxiety through social ties). These findings highlight the critical role that social ties appear to play in successful academic outcomes and in alleviating the effects of social anxiety during university/college.

  1. A Longitudinal Study in Learning Preferences and Academic Performance in First Year Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yenya; Gao, Hong; Wofford, Marcia M; Violato, Claudio

    2017-12-18

    This is a longitudinal study of first year medical students that investigates the relationship between the pattern change of the learning preferences and academic performance. Using the visual, auditory, reading-writing, and kinesthetic inventory at the beginning of the first and second year for the same class, it was found that within the first year, 36% of the class remained unimodal (single) modality learners (SS), 14% changed from unimodal to multimodality learners (SM), 27% changed from multimodality to unimodal modality learners (MS) and 21% remained as multimodality learners (MM). Among the academic performance through subsequent didactic blocks from Clinical Anatomy, Cell and Subcellular Processes to Medical Neuroscience during first year, the SM group made more significant improvement compared to the SS group. Semi-structured interview results from the SM group showed that students made this transition between the Clinical Anatomy course and the middle of the Medical Neuroscience course, in an effort to improve their performance. This study suggests that the transition from unimodal to multimodality learning among academically struggling students improved their academic performance in the first year of medical school. Therefore, this may be considered as part of academic advising tools for struggling students to improve their academic performances. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Analysis of Work Assignments After Medical Ethics Workshop for First-Year Residents at Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakda Sathirareuangchai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upon entering the residency training program, all 1st year residents at Siriraj Hospital must join medical ethics workshop held by the Division of Postgraduate Studies. At the end of the workshop, the residents were given a work assignment to write a clinical ethics situation they have encountered in their past practice. Methods: This study is an analysis of content described in the work assignments in order to gain the information regarding common medical ethics dilemmas, which the physicians faced in the early days of practice. Results: 740 work assignments were reviewed. The 4 most common ethical principle mentioned in these assign- ments were autonomy (144, 19.5%, palliative care (133, 18.0%, beneficence (121, 16.4%, and confidentiality (110, 14.9%. More than half of the situations described were during their internship (474, 64.1% and tended to distributed equally among community hospital (39.1%, university hospital (28.0%, and general hospital (24.3%. Conclusion: This study should raise the awareness of the medical educator towards these medical ethics issues during curriculum planning.

  3. The location of displaced New Orleans residents in the year after Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Narayan; Gregory, Jesse

    2014-06-01

    Using individual data from the restricted version of the American Community Survey, we examined the displacement locations of pre-Hurricane Katrina adult residents of New Orleans in the year after the hurricane. More than one-half (53 %) of adults had returned to-or remained in-the New Orleans metropolitan area, with just under one-third of the total returning to the dwelling in which they resided prior to Hurricane Katrina. Among the remainder, Texas was the leading location of displaced residents, with almost 40 % of those living away from the metropolitan area (18 % of the total), followed by other locations in Louisiana (12 %), the South region of the United States other than Louisiana and Texas (12 %), and elsewhere in the United States (5 %). Black adults were considerably more likely than nonblack adults to be living elsewhere in Louisiana, in Texas, and elsewhere in the South. The observed race disparity was not accounted for by any of the demographic or socioeconomic covariates in the multinomial logistic regression models. Consistent with hypothesized effects, we found that following Hurricane Katrina, young adults (aged 25-39) were more likely to move further away from New Orleans and that adults born outside Louisiana were substantially more likely to have relocated away from the state.

  4. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E.; Hopkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. Objective We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. Methods From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Results Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P medicine. Conclusions Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation. PMID:26692969

  5. Change of residence and functional status within three months and one year following hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    those patients who lived alone in their own home at pre-fracture. Implications for Rehabilitation One year after fracture, patients did not recover their previous function, and the activities most affected at the one-year follow-up were: dressing lower body, bathing/showering, transfer bathtub....../shower and walking up/down stairs. After a hip fracture, most recovery of the function happens within the first three months, though some functional activities continue recovering over the first year. Rehabilitation programs cannot be based only on mobility activities, the recovery of other daily living activities......PURPOSE: To study the recovery of patients in terms of 18 activities of daily living and change of residence within the year following a hip fracture. METHOD: This prospective cohort study was carried out in a trauma service of an acute hospital in southern Spain including 159 patients with a hip...

  6. Multi-institutional study of self-reported attitudes and behaviors of general surgery residents about ethical academic practices in test taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignol, Valerie P; Grannan, Kevin; Sabra, John; Cromer, Robert M; Jarman, Benjamin; Dent, Daniel; Sticca, Robert P; Nelson, Timothy M; Kukora, John S; Daley, Brian J; Treat, Robert W; Termuhlen, Paula M

    2013-01-01

    Correlation exists between people who engage in academic dishonesty as students and unethical behavior once in practice. Previously, we assessed the attitudes of general surgery residents and ethical practices in test taking at a single institution. Most residents had not participated in activities they felt were unethical, yet what constituted unethical behavior was unclear. We sought to verify these results in a multi-institutional study. A scenario-based survey describing potentially unethical activities related to the American Board of Surgery In-training Examination (ABSITE) was administered. Participants were asked about their knowledge of or participation in the activities and whether the activity was unethical. Program directors were surveyed about the use of ABSITE results for resident evaluation and promotion. Ten programs participated in the study. The resident response rate was 67% (186/277). Of the respondents, 43% felt that memorizing questions to study for future examinations was unethical and 50% felt that using questions another resident memorized was unethical. Most felt that buying (86%) or selling (79%) questions was unethical. Significantly more senior than junior residents have memorized (30% vs 16%; p = 0.04) or used questions others memorized (33% vs 12%; p = 0.002) to study for future ABSITE examinations and know of other residents who have done so (42% vs 20%; p = 0.004). Most programs used results of the ABSITE in promotion (80%) and set minimum score expectations and consequences (70%). Similar to our single-institution study, residents had not participated in activities they felt to be unethical; however the definition of what constitutes cheating remains unclear. Differences were identified between senior and junior residents with regard to memorizing questions for study. Cheating and unethical behavior is not always clear to the learner and represents an area for further education. © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  7. Virtual Microscopy in Histopathology Training: Changing Student Attitudes in 3 Successive Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Christof A; Firsching, Theresa; Klopfleisch, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Several veterinary faculties have integrated virtual microscopy into their curricula in recent years to improve and refine their teaching techniques. The many advantages of this recent technology are described in the literature, including remote access and an equal and constant slide quality for all students. However, no study has analyzed the change of perception toward virtual microscopy at different time points of students' academic educations. In the present study, veterinary students in 3 academic years were asked for their perspectives and attitudes toward virtual microscopy and conventional light microscopy. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-year veterinary students filled out a questionnaire with 12 questions. The answers revealed that virtual microscopy was overall well accepted by students of all academic years. Most students even suggested that virtual microscopy be implemented more extensively as the modality for final histopathology examinations. Nevertheless, training in the use of light microscopy and associated skills was surprisingly well appreciated. Regardless of their academic year, most students considered these skills important and necessary, and they felt that light microscopy should not be completely replaced. The reasons for this view differed depending on academic year, as the perceived main disadvantage of virtual microscopy varied. Third-year students feared that they would not acquire sufficient light microscopy skills. Fifth-year students considered technical difficulties (i.e., insufficient transmission speed) to be the main disadvantage of this newer teaching modality.

  8. Students' Persistence and Academic Success in a First-Year Professional Bachelor Program: The Influence of Students' Learning Strategies and Academic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Vanthournout, Gert; Gijbels, David; Coertjens, Liesje; Donche, Vincent; Van Petegem, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores whether students' learning strategies and academic motivation predict persistence and academic success in the first year of higher education. Freshmen students in a professional bachelor program in teacher education were questioned on their learning strategy use and motivation at the start and at the end of the academic year. Students' learning strategies were assessed using the inventory of learning styles-SV. Motivation was measured using scales from the self-regu...

  9. ABR Core examination preparation: results of a survey of fourth-year radiology residents who took the 2013 examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anup S; Grajo, Joseph R; Decker, Summer; Heitkamp, Darel E; DeStigter, Kristen K; Mezwa, Duane G; Deitte, Lori

    2015-01-01

    A survey was administered to fourth-year radiology residents after receiving their results from the first American Board of Radiology (ABR) Core examination in 2013. The purpose was to gather information regarding resources and study strategies to share with program directors and future resident classes. An online survey was distributed to examinees nationwide. The survey included free-response and multiple choice questions that covered examination results, perceived value of enumerated study resources, case-based and didactic teaching conferences, board reviews, study materials for noninterpretive skills, multidisciplinary conference attendance, and free-form comments. Two hundred sixty-six of 1186 residents who took the Core examination responded to the survey. Some resources demonstrated a significant difference in perceived value between residents who passed the examination and residents who failed, including internal board reviews (1.10, P multiple choice questions, audience response, and integration of clinical physics and patient safety topics compared to residents who failed. Radiology residents and residency programs have adapted their preparations for the ABR Core examination in a variety of ways. Certain practices and study tools, including daily conferences and internal board reviews, had greater perceived value by residents who passed the examination than by residents who failed. This survey provides insights that can be used to assess and modify current preparation strategies for the ABR Core examination. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing leadership competencies among medical trainees: five-year experience at the Cleveland Clinic with a chief residents' training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, Carol F; Smalling, Susan; Stoller, James K

    2016-10-01

    Challenges in healthcare demand great leadership. In response, leadership training programs have been developed within academic medical centers, business schools, and healthcare organizations; however, we are unaware of any well-developed programs for physicians-in-training. To address this gap, we developed a two-day leadership development course for chief residents (CRs) at the Cleveland Clinic, framed around the concept of emotional intelligence. This paper describes our five-year experience with the CRs leadership program. Since inception, 105 CRs took the course; 81 (77%) completed before-and-after evaluations. Participants indicated that they had relatively little prior knowledge of the concepts that were presented and that the workshop greatly enhanced their familiarity with leadership competencies. Qualitative analysis of open-ended responses indicated that attendees valued the training, especially in conflict resolution and teamwork, and indicated specific action plans for applying these skills. Furthermore, the workshop spurred some participants to express plans to learn more about leadership competencies. This study extends prior experience in offering an emotional intelligence-based leadership workshop for CRs. Though the program is novel, further research is needed to more fully understand the impact of leadership training for CRs and for the institutions and patients they serve. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  12. Addressing the academic gap between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sujin; Song, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangmi; Kwon, Kwangil; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-10-15

    To address the academic gap (or lack of adequate training and programs) between 4- and 6-year pharmacy programs and suggest methods for reducing this gap and to evaluate pharmacists' perceptions of preceptorship. We surveyed a convenience sample of 200 community pharmacists who graduated from a 4-year program who were participating in a continuing education program for clinical pharmacy as organized by the Daejeon branch of the Korea Pharmaceutical Association in 2011. Twenty-one questions were asked about the academic gap, needs for an education program, preceptorship, and medication therapy management services. International precedents were examined through a literature review to glean ideas of how to bridge the academic gap between the 4- and 6-year programs. In total, 132 pharmacists answered the survey (return rate=66.0%). The survey findings included problems caused by the academic gap, high need for an adequate education program, low acceptability of preceptorship, and the possibility of medication therapy management services. US-based, non-traditional PharmD programs and new curriculum-support training in Japan provided examples of how the academic gap has been successfully bridged. Nationwide efforts and government support are urgently required to close the academic gap, and experiential education should be included in transitional programs for 4-year pharmacy program pharmacists.

  13. Effects of integrated dental care on oral treatment needs in residents of nursing homes older than 70 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Paul; Cune, Marco; van der Bilt, Andries; Abbink, Jan; de Putter, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine effects of integrated dental care in older nursing home residents. Methods: In three nursing homes offering integrated dental care, we studied the oral treatment need of 355 residents older than 70 years. To determine effects of integrated care, we discriminated between short-stay

  14. Correlation between tea consumption and prevalence of hypertension among Singaporean Chinese residents aged ⩾40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Yang, J; Zhu, X S; Li, S C; Ho, P C

    2016-01-01

    By a cross-sectional epidemiology study, we attempted to correlate the consumption of tea and/or health supplements, living habits and socio-demographic factors to the prevalence of hypertension among Singaporean Chinese residents. Singaporean Chinese residents aged ⩾40 years were randomly selected and interviewed face-to-face by clinical research assistants. Hypertension was defined as measured systolic blood pressure at least 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure at least 90  mmHg or self-reported history/treatment for hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension among the whole investigated population (N=1184, 58.27% females) was 49.73% and the prevalence increased to 66.47% in the sub-population aged ⩾60 years. High risk of hypertension was associated with age ⩾60 years (odds ratio (OR): 4.15-4.19, P25 kg m(-2), OR: 2.10-2.11, Pcoffee intake (OR: 1.44-1.46, Pcoffee could be a risk factor of hypertension. These findings may provide useful information for health promotion to reduce risk of hypertension and warrant further study to confirm and elucidate such association.

  15. Academic posts at The University of Melbourne - 28 years of history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Vergara, Edward; Daniel, Deepa; Young, Doris

    2011-12-01

    General practice registrars have the opportunity to undertake an academic post during their training. This 12 month part time post provides an opportunity to train in various facets of the emerging area of primary care research. The Department of General Practice (DGP) at The University of Melbourne (UoM) has hosted academic registrars for the past 28 years. Over this time, some important changes have occurred.

  16. Developing reading in a first-year academic literacy course

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATEVG

    and critically with ideas in text and elsewhere; produce well-reasoned ... that knit discourse and signal sequences in texts, such as cause-effect, ... detecting the author's purpose or bias; ..... the ALM104 course become a research site where action research projects may ... PASS/FAIL of the first and later years of study; and.

  17. Changing the formula of residents' work hours in internal medicine: moving from "years in training" to "hours in training".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansi, Ishak A

    2011-03-01

    In a recent report, the Institute of Medicine recommended more restrictions on residents' working hours. Several problems exist with a system that places a weekly limit on resident duty hours: (1) it assumes the presence of a linear relationship between hours of work and patient safety; (2) it fails to consider differences in intensity among programs; and (3) it does not address increases in the scientific content of medicine, and it places the burden of enforcing the duty hour limits on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. An innovative method of calculating credit hours for graduate medical education would shift the focus from "years of residency" to "hours of residency." For example, internal medicine residents would be requested to spend 8640 hours of total training hours (assuming 60 hours per week for 48 weeks annually) instead of the traditional 3 years. This method of counting training hours is used by other professions, such as the Intern Development Program of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. The proposed approach would allow residents and program directors to pace training based on individual capabilities. Standards for resident education should include the average number of patients treated in each setting (inpatient or outpatient). A possible set of "multipliers" based on these parameters, and possibly others such as resident evaluation, is devised to calculate the "final adjusted accredited hours" that count toward graduation. Substituting "years of training" with "hours of training" may resolve many of the concerns with the current residency education model, as well as adapt to the demands of residents' personal lives. It also may allow residents to pace their training according to their capabilities and learning styles, and contribute to reflective learning and better quality education.

  18. Differences between medical student and faculty perceptions of the competencies needed for the first year of residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fürstenberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different guidelines and frameworks like the CanMEDs model or entrustable professional activities (EPAs describe competencies required for successful and professional work of residents. Not all competencies are of equal importance for graduates when they start their residency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of different competencies for a first year resident from the perspective of physicians and medical students. Methods In an online study, 178 of 475 surgeons and internists including residents and attendings and 102 of 728 first and last year undergraduate medical students from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf ranked 25 competencies according to their relevance for entrustment decisions in first year residents. The rankings of the competencies by residents and attendings and by first year and last year medical student were compared. Additionally, the rankings were also compared to the literature. Results Physicians and medical students rated ‘Responsibility’ as the most important competency for first year residents. Physicians ranked ‘Teamwork and collegiality’ and ‘Structure, work planning and priorities’ within the top 10 competencies significantly higher than medical students. The competency ranks between attendings and residents only showed one significant difference between attendings and residents, where ‘Coping with mistakes’, was ranked significantly higher by residents. Medical students ranked ‘Active listening to patients’, ‘Advising patients’ and ‘Handling emotions of patients and their relatives’ significantly higher than physicians. Final year students ranked ‘Structure, work planning and priorities’, ‘Coping with mistakes’, and ‘Verbal communication with colleagues and supervisors’ significantly higher than first year students. Conclusions Even though physicians and medical students agree that ‘Responsibility’ is the most important

  19. Differences between medical student and faculty perceptions of the competencies needed for the first year of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Sophie; Harendza, Sigrid

    2017-11-09

    Different guidelines and frameworks like the CanMEDs model or entrustable professional activities (EPAs) describe competencies required for successful and professional work of residents. Not all competencies are of equal importance for graduates when they start their residency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of different competencies for a first year resident from the perspective of physicians and medical students. In an online study, 178 of 475 surgeons and internists including residents and attendings and 102 of 728 first and last year undergraduate medical students from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf ranked 25 competencies according to their relevance for entrustment decisions in first year residents. The rankings of the competencies by residents and attendings and by first year and last year medical student were compared. Additionally, the rankings were also compared to the literature. Physicians and medical students rated 'Responsibility' as the most important competency for first year residents. Physicians ranked 'Teamwork and collegiality' and 'Structure, work planning and priorities' within the top 10 competencies significantly higher than medical students. The competency ranks between attendings and residents only showed one significant difference between attendings and residents, where 'Coping with mistakes', was ranked significantly higher by residents. Medical students ranked 'Active listening to patients', 'Advising patients' and 'Handling emotions of patients and their relatives' significantly higher than physicians. Final year students ranked 'Structure, work planning and priorities', 'Coping with mistakes', and 'Verbal communication with colleagues and supervisors' significantly higher than first year students. Even though physicians and medical students agree that 'Responsibility' is the most important competency for entrustment decisions in the first year of residency, medical students rate competencies

  20. Associations Between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Overweight With Academic Performance in 12-Year-Old Brazilian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Santana, Carla Caroliny; Farah, Breno Quintella; de Azevedo, Liane Beretta; Hill, James O; Gunnarsdottir, Thrudur; Botero, João Paulo; do Prado, Edna Cristina; do Prado, Wagner Luiz

    2017-05-01

    Obesity has been associated with poor academic achievement, while cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) has been linked to academic success. To investigate whether CRF is associated with academic performance in Brazilian students, independently of body mass index (BMI), fatness and socioeconomic status (SES). 392 5th and 6th grade students (193 girls) (12.11 ± 0.75 years old) were evaluated in 2012. Skinfold thickness measures were performed, and students were classified according to BMI-percentile. CRF was estimated by a 20-meter shuttle run test, and academic achievement by standardized math and Portuguese tests. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between academic performance and CRF, adjusted for SES, skinfold thickness or BMI-percentile. Among girls CRF was associated with higher academic achievement in math (β = 0.146;p = .003) and Portuguese (β = 0.129;p = .004) in crude and adjusted analyses. No significant association was found among boys. BMI was not associated with overall academic performance. There was a weak negative association between skinfold thickness and performance in mathematics in boys (β =- 0.030;p = .04), but not in girls. The results highlight the importance of maintaining high fitness levels in girls throughout adolescence a period commonly associated with reductions in physical activity levels and CRF.

  1. The general surgery chief resident operative experience: 23 years of national ACGME case logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D; Goldin, Adam B; Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-09-01

    The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989-1990 through 2011-2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves.

  2. The academic majors of students taking American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dolliver, Holly; Lindbo, David; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Many papers have been written in recent years discussing the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary aspects of soil science. Therefore, it would make sense that soil science courses would be taken by students in a wide array of academic majors. To investigate this, we collected data from eight different American universities on the declared academic majors of students enrolled in soil science courses over a 10 year time period (2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years). Data was collected for seven different classes taught at the undergraduate level: introduction to soil science, soil fertility, soil management, pedology, soil biology/microbiology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. Overall trends and trends for each class were evaluated. Generally, environmental science and crop science/horticulture/agronomy students were enrolled in soil science courses in the greatest numbers. Environmental science and engineering students showed rapid increases in enrollment over the 10 years of the study, while the number of crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students declined. In the introduction to soil science classes, environmental science and crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students were enrolled in the greatest numbers, while declared soil science majors only made up 6.6% of the average enrollment. The highest enrollments in soil fertility were crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students and other agricultural students (all agricultural majors except crop science, horticulture, agronomy, or soil science). In both the soil management and pedology classes, environmental science and other agricultural students were the largest groups enrolled. Other agricultural students and students from other majors (all majors not otherwise expressly investigated) were the largest enrolled groups in soil biology/microbiology courses, and environmental science and soil science students were the largest enrolled groups in soil chemistry classes. Soil physics was the only class

  3. Psychopathological factors that can influence academic achievement in early adolescence: a three-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltas, Núria; Hernández-Martínez, Carmen; Aparicio, Estefania; Arija, Victoria; Canals, Josefa

    2014-12-30

    This three-phase prospective study investigated psychosocial factors predicting or associated with academic achievement. An initial sample of 1,514 school-age children was assessed with screening tools for emotional problems (Screen for Childhood Anxiety and Related Emotional Disorders; Leyton Obsessional Inventory-Child Version; Children's Depression Inventory). The following year, 562 subjects (risk group/without risk group) were re-assessed and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was assessed. Two years later, 242 subjects were followed, and their parents informed about their academic achievement. Results showed that early depression (phase 1 B = -.130, p = .001; phase 1 + phase 2 B = -.187, p anxiety symptoms (phase 1 + phase 2 B = -1.721, p = .018), and ADHD were predictors of lower academic achievement (phase 1 + phase 2 B = -3.415, p = .005). However, some anxiety symptoms can improve academic achievement (Social phobia B = .216, p = .018; Generalized anxiety B = .313, p academic achievement. We can conclude that in the transition period to adolescence, school-health professionals and teachers need to consider the emotional issues of students to avoid unwanted academic outcomes.

  4. Development and education of academically supernormal children in Mainland China in the last 35 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiannong

    classes for academically gifted children at university, middle school and primary school levels have been set up in China since 1978. Hundreds of high ability students are benefited from the gifted education programs in China. Some essential issues about gifted education in China will be discussed......A sophisticated education system for academically gifted students at university, middle school and primary school levels has been developed since 1978. A statistics-based definition of academically supernormal children was suggested by Chinese psychologists. A series of experiments...... and investigation has been conducted on psychological development of academically supernormal children. Some principles, procedures, and steps of identification, as well as some principles and typical models of education were developed in Mainland China during the last twenty-four years. Dozens of experimental...

  5. Impact of Residency Training Redesign on Residents' Clinical Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Elaine; Eiff, M Patrice; Dexter, Eve; Rinaldo, Jason C B; Marino, Miguel; Garvin, Roger; Douglass, Alan B; Phillips, Robert; Green, Larry A; Carney, Patricia A

    2017-10-01

    The In-training Examination (ITE) is a frequently used method to evaluate family medicine residents' clinical knowledge. We compared family medicine ITE scores among residents who trained in the 14 programs that participated in the Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) Project to national averages over time, and according to educational innovations. The ITE scores of 802 consenting P4 residents who trained in 2007 through 2011 were obtained from the American Board of Family Medicine. The primary analysis involved comparing scores within each academic year (2007 through 2011), according to program year (PGY) for P4 residents to all residents nationally. A secondary analysis compared ITE scores among residents in programs that experimented with length of training and compared scores among residents in programs that offered individualized education options with those that did not. Release of ITE scores was consented to by 95.5% of residents for this study. Scores of P4 residents were higher compared to national scores in each year. For example, in 2011, the mean P4 score for PGY1 was 401.2, compared to the national average of 386. For PGY2, the mean P4 score was 443.1, compared to the national average of 427, and for PGY3, the mean P4 score was 477.0, compared to the national PGY3 score of 456. Scores of residents in programs that experimented with length of training were similar to those in programs that did not. Scores were also similar between residents in programs with and without individualized education options. Family medicine residency programs undergoing substantial educational changes, including experiments in length of training and individualized education, did not appear to experience a negative effect on resident's clinical knowledge, as measured by ITE scores. Further research is needed to study the effect of a wide range of residency training innovations on ITE scores over time.

  6. The English proficiency and academic language skills of Australian bilingual children during the primary school years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennaoui, Kamelia; Nicholls, Ruth Jane; O'Connor, Meredith; Tarasuik, Joanne; Kvalsvig, Amanda; Goldfeld, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests that early proficiency in the language of school instruction is an important predictor of academic success for bilingual children. This study investigated whether English-proficiency at 4-5 years of age predicts academic language and literacy skills among Australian bilingual children at 10-11 years of age, as part of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children ( LSAC, 2012 ). The LSAC comprises a nationally representative clustered cross-sequential sample of Australian children. Data were analysed from a sub-sample of 129 bilingual children from the LSAC Kindergarten cohort (n = 4983), for whom teachers completed the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) checklist (a population measure of early childhood development) and the Academic Rating Scale (ARS) language and literacy subscale. Linear regression analyses revealed that bilingual children who commenced school with stronger English proficiency had higher academic language and literacy scores at the end of primary school (β = 0.45). English proficiency remained a significant predictor, even when accounting for gender and socio-economic disadvantage (β = 0.38). The findings indicate that bilingual children who begin school without English proficiency are at risk of difficulties with academic language and literacy, even after 6 years of schooling. Risk factors need to be identified so early support can be targeted towards the most vulnerable children.

  7. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  8. Academic literacy diagnostic assessment in the first semester of first year at university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorinda Palmer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One vital aspect of the first semester of the first year at university is how academic literacy expectations are made explicit though teaching and assessment practices at the disciplinary level. This paper describes how an academic literacy diagnostic process, and the MASUS tool, was used to ascertain the academic literacy profile of a cohort of undergraduate nursing students [N=569] at the beginning and end of their first semester. Key findings of this quantitative descriptive case study were that only just over half of commencing students possessed appropriate academic literacy skills in all four aspects of the diagnostic and nearly 20% scored in the lowest band—suggesting difficulty with multiple aspects of academic literacy. By the end of semester, 77% of the students who had scored in the lowest band of the MASUS at the beginning of the semester had improved their scores to the middle or highest band, and 73% of them eventually attained a pass or higher grade for the course. The findings of this study suggest that large-scale academic literacy diagnostic assessment, when embedded and contextualized within a course of study, is an effective means of providing the early feedback and targeted support that many commencing university students need.

  9. An Integrated Model of Academic Self-Concept Development: Academic Self-Concept, Grades, Test Scores, and Tracking over 6 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Murayama, Kou; Arens, A. Katrin; Parker, Philip D.; Guo, Jiesi; Dicke, Theresa

    2018-01-01

    Our newly proposed integrated academic self-concept model integrates 3 major theories of academic self-concept formation and developmental perspectives into a unified conceptual and methodological framework. Relations among math self-concept (MSC), school grades, test scores, and school-level contextual effects over 6 years, from the end of…

  10. Academic well-being and smoking among 14- to 17-year-old schoolchildren in six European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinnunen, Jaana M.; Lindfors, Pirjo; Rimpelä, Arja; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Rathmann, Katharina; Perelman, Julian; Federico, Bruno; Richter, Matthias; Kunst, Anton E.; Lorant, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that poor academic performance is related to smoking, but the association between academic well-being and smoking is less known. We measured academic well-being by school burnout and schoolwork engagement and studied their associations with smoking among 14- to 17-year-old

  11. The Impact of Perceived Barriers, Academic Anxiety, and Resource Management Strategies on Achievement in First-Year Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Monica L.; Cassady, Jerrell C.

    2017-01-01

    The current study explored the impact of internal and external barriers (e.g., academic anxiety, employment) that place subgroups of college students at risk for academic failure in the first year. The mitigating potential of academic resource management strategies (e.g., time-study environment) was also examined. In a sample of 885 first-semester…

  12. Curriculum scholars: Embedding learning and teaching scholarship in first year academic identities. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This practice report details an institutional innovation designed to enhance academic capacities for curriculum development, with a particular focus on the first year experience (FYE. The authors discuss the appointment of “Curriculum Scholars” in each of the faculties at James Cook University. This innovation can be seen as an example of third generation responses to the challenges of the first year in higher education (FYHE (Kift, Nelson & Clarke, 2010. The report  discusses the question of academic identity and the tension between a discipline-specific identity and identification with the scholarship of teaching and learning. The authors argue that this tension may have significant implications for the success of third generation approaches to the FYE. This tension is the focus of a multi-method research project being developed by the authors. The autoethnographical dimension of this project is described, inviting participants to reflect on their own journeys as academics engaged in learning and teaching.

  13. Fifth-year internal medicine residents in Spain: A survey on education, assessment of competencies and job perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macía-Rodríguez, C; López Reboiro, M L; Martín Iglesias, D; González-Munera, A; Moreno Diaz, J; Montaño Martínez, A; Ortiz Llauradó, G; Demelo-Rodríguez, P; Muñoz Muñoz, C; Salgado Ordoñez, F

    2018-06-14

    Specialist training is based on the gradual acquisition of expertise, skills and responsibilities. The aim of this study is to determine the opinion of residents regarding their training. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study based on an online survey of 5th-year residents during February and March 2017. A total of 194 residents (62.8% of the total) responded to the survey, 62.9% of whom were women and 50% of whom were younger than 30years, representing hospitals from all levels and from the 17 autonomous communities. More than 80% of the residents choose the specialty once again and believed that the duration of the residence was appropriate; however, 76.3% would eliminate some of their rotations. Most of the residents did not know the objectives of each rotation, and 37.1% felt they were not adequately supervised. Some 82.5% would change the evaluation system, and 68.0% would favour performing an excellence test. Most of the residents had published at least one article or performed one presentation at a congress; however, only 27.8% had completed a doctoral thesis. Although 74.7% of the internists believed they would find employment, only 28.4% had an offer 1month after completing their residence. The residents are satisfied with their training, although there is still a deficit in supervision and dissatisfaction with the method of assessing their knowledge and the precarious job market during the first year for specialists. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  14. Profiling first-year students in STEM programs based on autonomous motivation and academic self-concept and relationship with academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level.

  15. Profiling First-Year Students in STEM Programs Based on Autonomous Motivation and Academic Self-Concept and Relationship with Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level. PMID:25390942

  16. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  17. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo, E-mail: lfaggioni@sirm.org [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Paolicchi, Fabio [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Bastiani, Luca [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Guido, Davide [Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Caramella, Davide [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  18. Academic Performance and Pass Rates: Comparison of Three First-Year Life Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. T.

    2009-01-01

    First year students' academic performance in three Life Science courses (Botany, Zoology and Bioscience) was compared. Pass rates, as well as the means and distributions of final marks were analysed. Of the three components (coursework, practical and theory examinations) contributing to the final mark of each course, students performed best in the…

  19. Relationship of Peer Mentoring to Academic Success and Social Engagement for First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brenda O.

    2013-01-01

    A correlational explanatory research design examined the relationship between peer mentoring, academic success and social engagement of first year college students participating in a peer mentoring program at a research one university in the southeastern United States. One hundred thirty-eight participants from the peer mentoring program responded…

  20. Academic achievement of final-year medical students on a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic achievement of final-year medical students on a rural clinical platform: Can we dispel the myths? ... African Journal of Health Professions Education ... Background: There is a growing body of literature relating to the establishment of rural clinical training platforms for medical students describing many positive ...

  1. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and their First-year Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien; Deinum, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students’ motivational profiles and their achievement. 755 students in the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences participated in the study. Data on academic motivation was collected before the start of the program, data on achievement at

  2. Depressive Symptomatology and Academic Achievement among First-Year College Students: The Role of Effort Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Güler; Horne, Sharon G.; Granda, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    We conducted 2 studies to determine whether the relationship between depressive symptomatology and college GPA is mediated by effort regulation and to understand how depressive symptomatology upon entry to college affects students' adjustment and academic achievement later in the first year of college. In Study 1, we found that the relationship…

  3. Varicella Immunization Requirements for US Colleges: 2014-2015 Academic Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jessica; Marin, Mona; Leino, Victor; Even, Susan; Bialek, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information on varicella prematriculation requirements in US colleges for undergraduate students during the 2014-2015 academic year. Participants: Health care professionals and member schools of the American College Health Association (ACHA). Methods: An electronic survey was sent to ACHA members regarding school…

  4. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and their First-year Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien; Deinum, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students’ motivational profiles and their achievement. 755 students in the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences participated in the study. Data on academic motivation was collected before the start of the program, data on achievement at

  5. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents: Five-Year Experience at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Arvind; Hoda, Syed T; Crawford, James M

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  6. Emotional Condition and Physical Activity of First-year Female Students at Medical College During the Academic Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Semenova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective isto establish emotional state changes among female students during the academic year regarding available physical activity. Material & methods: the study involved 65 first year femalestudents of medical college at Danylo Halytskyi Lviv National Medical University.  To achieve the tasks set the study relied on the following methods: analysis and synthesis of scientific and technical literature, pedagogical observation, methods of mathematical statistics (t-Student test for independent samples, SAN method. Results: no reliable differences found when comparing indicators of activity and mood at the beginning and end of the academic year. The obtained results of the survey indicate medium and high evaluationof SAN categories at low levels of physical activity. Conclusions: state of health, activity and mood levelswere rated with middle and high scoresbyfemale students. SAN evaluation dynamics has been lowering during the academic year, and the activity level of female students was significantly lower than that ofstate of health as well as mood. The resulting index of activity level as emotional characteristic largely reflects low physical activity of female students.

  7. Students' Persistence and Academic Success in a First-Year Professional Bachelor Program: The Influence of Students' Learning Strategies and Academic Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Vanthournout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores whether students' learning strategies and academic motivation predict persistence and academic success in the first year of higher education. Freshmen students in a professional bachelor program in teacher education were questioned on their learning strategy use and motivation at the start and at the end of the academic year. Students' learning strategies were assessed using the inventory of learning styles-SV. Motivation was measured using scales from the self-regulation questionnaire and the academic motivation scale. Gender and students' prior education were incorporated as control variables. Logistic regression analyses and general linear modelling were applied to predict persistence and academic success, respectively. In each case a stepwise approach in data analysis was used. Results on persistence indicate that lack of regulation and amotivation at the start of the year are significant predictors. For academic success, results showed that relating and structuring, lack of regulation, and lack of motivation at the end of the year are meaningful predictors. Overall, our study demonstrates that learning strategies and motivation have a moderate explanatory value regarding academic success and persistence, and that these effects remain even after controlling for the influence of background variables.

  8. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  9. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education.

  10. Psychobiological responses at the beginning and the end of an academic year in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Serrano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Evidence shows that work stress increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Emotional, cardiovascular and endocrine responses are affected by day-to-day experience. Perceived stress, negative mood, heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP increase in working periods. Cortisol (C response is not so clear, there being contradictory results. The main purpose is to study stress markers in two working days in teachers. Moreover, we evaluate the role of gender in stress markers in 49 school teachers. Perceived stress, mood, BP, HR, and C were measured at the beginning and at the end of an academic year. Results show that psychological and heart rate responses to a working day were different at the end of the year, increasing, especially in men. BP and C responses descended at the end of the year. In conclusion, an academic year could affect negatively to the emotional state and heart rate of teachers.

  11. A retrospective review of required projects in systems-based practice in a single anesthesiology residency: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Emerick, Trent D; Patel, Rita M

    2015-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has emphasized in its core competencies and more recently, in its Milestones Project, that residents understand the importance of systems-based practice (SBP). The objectives of the study are to evaluate the quality of residents' SBP projects and to determine the degrees that were subsequently implemented. A retrospective educational observational study. A university-based anesthesiology training institution. One hundred forty-nine anesthesiology residents in their final (postgraduate year 4) year of training who completed SBP projects for the last 10 years (2004-2013). A structured SBP course was provided for postgraduate year 4 anesthesiology residents with deadlines set such as project identification, data collection, and proposal draft. Each resident's written SBP proposal received inputs by 2 members of the department executive steering committee. The SBP projects concluded with oral presentations by each resident to the department executive steering committee, who provided overall scores. All SBP projects were categorized into 7 categories: safety initiatives, economic analysis, process analysis, policy change recommendations, education initiatives, teamwork/communication, and operating room efficiency. Evaluation scores using a Likert scale (1-9, where 9 is the best) were analyzed. The rate of implementation of project ideas within the department based on the presentations to the executive committee was examined. Of 149 projects, policy change recommendations was the most frequently chosen category (46 projects; 30.9%), followed by process analysis (36 projects; 24.2%). The overall evaluation score was 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD). A total of 53 projects (35.6%) were implemented in the department. There was no statistical difference between SBPs with implementation vs SBPs without implementation in terms of evaluation scores, year of the presentation, or categories. This SBP project has given residents the

  12. Good-quality diet in the early years may have a positive effect on academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaradi, Anett; Li, Jianghong; Foster, Jonathan K; Hickling, Siobhan; Jacques, Angela; O'Sullivan, Therese A; Oddy, Wendy H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between early diet and academic performance during childhood. Participants were from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study (n = 2287). Frequency of consumption of food and beverages was collected at the one-, two- and three-year follow-ups, using a 24-hour food recall. Diet scores were developed from the number of eating occasions. The Western Australian Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (WALNA) data from grades five (age 10) and seven (age 12) were linked to the Raine study using The Western Australian Data Linkage System. The association between diet scores and WALNA scores was assessed using multivariate linear regression models. A higher (i.e. better quality) diet score at one year of age was associated with significantly higher scores in mathematics, reading, writing and spelling at both grades five and seven. Associations were observed between a higher diet score at two years and academic scores for mathematics, writing and spelling at grade seven. Higher dairy consumption at ages one, two and three, and higher fruit consumption at age one were associated with higher academic scores at all ages. Quality of early diet may be a predictor for later academic achievement. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Relationship between Internet Use and Academic Procrastination of EFL Learners across Years of Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at exploring the relationship between Internet use and academic procrastination of a group of EFL learners across years of study (freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The study was conducted in two phases. First, a pilot study was conducted among 30 representative university students in order to check the reliability and validity of the main instrument utilized, i.e. a questionnaire. After that, the piloted questionnaire was distributed among 380 undergraduates studying at the University of Guilan, Kharazmi University, and Ferdowsi University. Results of Spearman Rank Order Test at the .01 level of significance revealed a medium positive relationship (rho= +.47 between Internet use and academic procrastination of the participating students. Furthermore, the results of Kruskal Wallis Test at the significance level of .05 indicated that there is a significant difference in both Internet use (sig=.029, p≤ .05 and academic procrastination (sig=.007, p≤ .05 of learners across different years of study, with freshmen being the pioneer in this respect. However, the results of another Kruskal Wallis Test run on data concerning areas of academic procrastination did not reveal any statistically significant difference among learners across years of study. The implications of the findings for EFL instructors and learners are discussed

  14. Poor academic performance: A perspective of final year diagnostic radiography students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gqweta, Ntokozo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: A study was conducted on final year diagnostic radiography students at a University of Technology in Durban. The aim of the study was to investigate the final year diagnostic radiography students' opinions and views on academic performance in order to inform teaching and learning methods. The objectives were: •To explore the students' opinions regarding poor performance. •To identify strategies to improve academic performance. Method: A qualitative, interpretive approach was used to explain and understand the students' lived experiences of their academic performances. A short open ended questionnaire was administered to a cohort of final diagnostic radiography students following feedback on a written assessment. Questionnaire responses were then manually captured and analyzed. Results: Five (5) themes were identified that could possibly be associated with poor academic performance. These themes were, poor preparation, lack of independent study, difficulty in understanding learning content and misinterpretation of assessment questions, inefficient studying techniques as well as perceived improvement strategies. Conclusion: Students identified their inadequate preparation and the lack of dedicated independent studying as the main reasons for poor performance. Students preferred to be taught in an assessment oriented manner. However their identified improvement strategies were aligned with the learner centred approach.

  15. First-year university students’ receptive and productive use of academic vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores academic vocabulary knowledge, operationalised through the Academic Word List, among first-year higher education students. Both receptive and productive knowledge and the proportion between the two are examined. Results show that while receptive knowledge is readily acquired by first-year students, productive knowledge lags behind and remains problematic. This entails that receptive knowledge is much larger than productive knowledge, which confirms earlier indications that receptive vocabulary knowledge is larger than productive knowledge for both academic vocabulary (Zhou 2010 and general vocabulary (cf. Laufer 1998, Webb 2008, among others. Furthermore, results reveal that the ratio between receptive and productive knowledge is slightly above 50%, which lends empirical support to previous findings that the ratio between the two aspects of vocabulary knowledge can be anywhere between 50% and 80% (Milton 2009. This finding is extended here to academic vocabulary; complementing Zhou’s (2010 study that investigated the relationship between the two aspects of vocabulary knowledge without examining the ratio between them. On the basis of these results, approaches that could potentially contribute to fostering productive knowledge growth are discussed. Avenues worth exploring to gain further insight into the relationship between receptive and productive knowledge are also suggested.

  16. Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder in temporary settlement residents 1 year after the Sichuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhang; Ma, Ning; Yang, Lei; Agho, Kingsley; Stevens, Garry; Raphael, Beverley; Cui, Lijun; Liu, Yongqiao; Yan, Baoping; Ma, Hong; Yu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    The authors sought to determine the prevalence and risk factors for major depressive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors living in temporary accommodation in the Yongxing settlement in Mianyang city 1 year after the Sichuan earthquake for further interventions. They interviewed 182 residents, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and a self-report questionnaire. The 12-month prevalence of depressive disorder and PTSD were 48.9% and 39.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that bereaved survivors were 5.51 times (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.14-14.22) more likely to report PTSD and 2.42 times (AOR = 2.42; 95%CI =1.00-5.48) more likely to report depressive disorder than nonbereaved survivors. Older age and receipt of government financial support were significantly associated with 12-month PTSD. Depressive disorder 12 months after the earthquake was associated with receipt of government financial support, pre-earthquake physical illness, single marital status, being currently employed, and Han ethnicity. © 2013 APJPH.

  17. The Impact of Intrusive Advising on Academic Self Efficacy Beliefs in First-Year Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lauren Kemner

    2010-01-01

    First-year retention rates have seen minimal gains as high numbers of first-year students are leaving college due to insufficient academic skills and inability to adjust to the academic and social life of college. Programs that provide strategies to improve the transition from high school to college and that help develop skills to facilitate…

  18. A comparison of risk and protective factors related to suicide ideation among residents and specialists in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneroth, Mari; Gustafsson Sendén, Marie; Løvseth, Lise T; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Fridner, Ann

    2014-03-22

    Physicians have an elevated risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts, which might be due to work-related factors. However, the hierarchical work positions as well as work-related health differ among resident and specialist physicians. As such, the correlates of suicide ideation may also vary between these two groups. In the present study, work- and health-related factors and their association with suicidal thoughts among residents (n=234) and specialists (n=813) working at a university hospital were examined using cross-sectional data. Logistic regression analysis showed that having supportive meetings was associated with a lower level of suicide ideation among specialists (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94), while an empowering leadership was related to a lower level of suicide ideation among residents (OR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.32-0.94). Having been harassed at work was associated with suicidal ideation among specialists (OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.31-3.91). In addition, sickness presenteeism and work disengagement were associated with suicide ideation in both groups of physicians. These findings suggest that different workplace interventions are needed to prevent suicide ideation in residents and specialists.

  19. Condiciones motivacionales internas y rendimiento académico de residentes venezolanos en Medicina General Integral Internal motivational conditions and academic performance in Venezuelan residents of Integral General Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliocha Batista Silva

    2010-03-01

    area and it was conducted at the end of the first academic year (2006 of residents from the "Barrio Adentro" Cuban mission, Monagas state, Venezuela. The sample included 59 subjects. Tool used was the Academic Motivational Questionnaire in its specific and supported category in the Motivational Theory fulfilling the ethical requirement for biomedical researches. We used the R correlation coefficient to measure the strength of the relation among the internal motivational conditions and the academic performance. Results: in group there was a high and homogenous qualification average. Within the factors characterizing the internal motivational conditions the power and the recognition had the higher values expressed as a deep interest of residents in these components. These same factors had a statistically significant correlation with the academic performance. Conclusions: included in the internal motivational factors those with more strength to drive residents to maintain a good academic performance were the power and the recognition. It is essential to organize courses and activities directed to develop the motivation in these students in relation to its achievement, an important factor in the internal motivational conditions.

  20. Pathology Residency Programme of a Developing Country--Landscape of Last 25 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ali, Natasha; Kayani, Naila

    2016-01-01

    We report the evolution of a residency programme in Pathology from a developing country. This article highlights the historical perspective of our application procedure, the number of inductions, the programme framework, acheivements and limitations.

  1. The relationship between long working hours and depression among first-year residents in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Ryoko; Seo, Emiko; Maeno, Takami; Ito, Makoto; Sanuki, Masaru; Maeno, Tetsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Background:In Japan, some residents develop mental health problems. In previous studies, it was reported thatlong working hours might be a cause of stress reaction such as depression. There were some reports thatcompared residents with 80 or more working hours with those with less than 80 working hours. However, manyresidents are practically detained for extra-long time, designated as 100 h or more per week, for medical practice,training, self-study, etc. There have been few reports on extra-...

  2. System-justifying ideologies and academic outcomes among first-year Latino college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Laurie T; Mars, Dustin E; Eccleston, Collette

    2011-10-01

    The present study examines the relationship between system-justifying ideologies and academic outcomes among 78 first-year Latino college students (21 men, 57 women, mean age = 18.1 years) attending a moderately selective West Coast university. Endorsement of system-justifying ideologies was negatively associated with grade point average (GPA); however it was positively associated with feelings of belonging at the university. In addition, system-justifying ideologies were negatively associated with perceptions of personal discrimination. In contrast, ethnic identity centrality was unrelated to GPA, feelings of belonging, and perceptions of personal discrimination once the relationship between system-justifying ideologies and these outcomes was statistically taken into account. The results of the present study suggest that endorsement of system-justifying ideologies may be a double-edged sword for Latino college students, involving trade-offs between academic success and feelings of belonging.

  3. The relationship between academic performance and recreation use among first-year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Slade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-care activities, including exercise, may be neglected by medical students in response to increasing academic demands. Low levels of exercise among medical students may have ripple effects on patient care and counseling. This study investigates the reciprocal role of recreation use and academic performance among first-year medical students. Methods: We combined retrospective administrative data from four cohorts of first-year medical students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2006 to 2010 (n=408. We estimated regression models to clarify the role of changes in recreation use before examinations on changes in academic performance, and vice versa. Results: The use of recreation facilities by first-year medical students was highly skewed. We found that changes in recreation use before an exam were positively associated with changes in exam performance, and vice versa. Students who make large decreases in their recreation use are likely to decrease their exam scores, rather than increase them. Discussion: Students who make decreases in their recreation, on average, are likely to decrease their exam scores. These findings suggest that medical students may be able to boost their achievement through wellness interventions, even if they are struggling with exams. We find no evidence that decreasing wellness activities will help improve exam performance.

  4. 30 years later: Social Representations about AIDS and sexual practices of rural towns residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Francisca Marina de Souza Freire; Santos, José Anderson Galdino; Loredanna, Stedile; Araújo, Eunice; Saldanha, Ana Alayde Werba; Silva, Josevânia da

    2016-06-01

    In the 30 years of the AIDS pandemic in Brazil, it is recognized the HIV virus internalization of the phenomenon as a challenge to care and current health policies. In this sense, it aimed to verify sex practices and social representations that rural towns residents have about the disease. Attended by 789 people, men and women, between 18 and 90 years old, residents in 41 towns with fewer than 11,000 inhabitants in the state of Paraiba / Brazil. Data were collected by a questionnaire and the free association of words test. The results showed low concern about disease, perception of invulnerability to HIV infection and not using condoms during sexual intercourse, and confidence in the major reason related partner. Also showed endure derogatory and stereotypical representations, revealing that still persist in rural areas, beliefs and representations concerning the beginning of the epidemic. From these findings, it is possible to point out deficiencies in the care provided by the health services in these localities, which may result in increased vulnerability of this population to diseases, so there is the need to intensify information campaigns and intervention. The results reveal the existence of three different types of modes of learning health literacy skills in informal context: : i) learning that takes place in action, in achieving daily tasks; ii) learning processes that result from problem solving; iii) learning that occurs in an unplanned manner, resulting from accidental circumstances and, in some cases, devoid of intentionality. Nos 30 anos da pandemia da Aids no Brasil, reconhece-se o fenômeno da interiorização do vírus HIV como um desafio ao cuidado e às politicas de saúde atuais. Neste sentido, objetivou-se conhecer práticas sexuais e as representações sociais que residentes de cidades rurais têm acerca da doença. Participaram 789 pessoas, homens e mulheres, entre 18 e 90 anos de idade, residentes em 41 cidades com menos de 11.000 habitantes

  5. Consultants' opinion on a new practice-based assessment programme for first-year residents in anaesthesiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, C; ØStergaard, D; Scherpbier, A

    2002-01-01

    for first-year residency in anaesthesiology appears to be appropriate regarding the range of competencies assessed, the appropriateness as a basis for pass/fail decisions, and regarding the content of the tests used for pass/fail decisions. Further studies are needed to assess the feasibility...

  6. A five-year study of residents of a special hostel for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, R B; Hobbs, M S; Hyndman, J

    1992-03-01

    In order to consider whether admission to a special hostel was a desirable policy in view of the likelihood of subsequent transfer to a nursing home, this study compared the time spent by residents in a special hostel with the period in a nursing home after they were transferred out of the hostel. We also estimated the number of nursing home places necessary for residents who were transferred and studied the reasons for transfer. The setting was a special hostel in Perth, Western Australia, for 36 people with moderate or severe dementia. The periods spent in the hostel or a nursing home were calculated for all residents admitted between 1985 and 1990. Forty-two of the 84 residents admitted during the study period were transferred to nursing homes. About two thirds of the total time in the two institutions was spent in the hostel. The two principal reasons necessitating transfer to a nursing home were advancing dementia and the addition of a physical impairment. Because a major proportion of the care of selected people with dementia (who can no longer remain at home) can be undertaken in a special hostel, this facility should be included with standard hostel and nursing home in arrangements for institutional care. Between 20 and 25 nursing home places are necessary for residents transferred from a hostel of this size.

  7. 10 Years Later: Lessons Learned from an Academic Multidisciplinary Cosmetic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenny T; Nayar, Harry S; Rao, Venkat K

    2017-09-01

    In 2006, a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-accredited multidisciplinary academic ambulatory surgery center was established with the goal of delivering high-quality, efficient reconstructive, and cosmetic services in an academic setting. We review our decade-long experience since its establishment. Clinical and financial data from 2006 to 2016 are reviewed. All cosmetic procedures, including both minimally invasive and operative cases, are included. Data are compared to nationally published reports. Nearly 3,500 cosmetic surgeries and 10,000 minimally invasive procedures were performed. Compared with national averages, surgical volume in abdominoplasty is high, whereas rhinoplasty and breast augmentation is low. Regarding trend data, breast augmentation volume has decreased by 25%, whereas minimally invasive procedural volume continues to grow and is comparable with national reports. Similarly, where surgical revenue remains steady, minimally invasive revenue has increased significantly. The majority of surgical cases (70%) are reconstructive in nature and insurance-based. Payer mix is 71% private insurance, 18% Medicare and Medicaid, and 11% self-pay. Despite year-over-year revenue increases, net profit in 2015 was $6,120. Rent and anesthesia costs exceed national averages, and employee salary and wages are the highest expenditure. Although the creation of our academic cosmetic ambulatory surgery center has greatly increased the overall volume of cosmetic surgery performed at the University of Wisconsin, the majority of surgical volume and revenue is reconstructive. As is seen nationwide, minimally invasive cosmetic procedures represent our most rapidly expanding revenue stream.

  8. [Urinary iodine levels and its influencing factors among residents over age of 15 years in Shenzhen City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiqi; Xu, Jian; He, Shan; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaoheng

    2014-11-01

    To understand the status of iodine nutrition and the affective factors of urinary iodine concentration among residents over age of 15 years in Shenzhen City. Totally 8152 residents from 73 communities were selected with stratified cluster random sampling. The morning urinary iodine was determined and the dietary assessment of iodine using a food frequency questionnaire were carried out. The range of urinary iodine was 9. 65 - 4039.09 μg/L and the median of urinary iodine was 194.59 μg/L among the residents. The percentages of the residents with urinary iodine iodine between different gender (P = 0.0001), the medians of urinary iodine of men (201.32 μg/L) was slightly higher. There was no significant difference in urinary iodine levels (186.59 - 197.44 μg/L) among all age groups, the medians of urinary iodine of all age groups were within the recommended adequate intake. Along with the increase in age, the medians of urinary iodine of all age groups was gradually decreased. Sex, alcohol consumption and daily dietary iodine intake was significant in the final regression model. The iodine nutrition of residents in Shenzhen City was in good condition, populations with low or high iodine still exist. The monitoring is needed and the influencing factors of the urine iodine levels need much exploration.

  9. EXPLORING THE BEST WAYS TO SUPPORT FIRST YEAR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Perez del Aguila

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This article presents the findings of an action research project carried out in 2012 with 12 first-year university students taking ‘Education Studies’ in a university in England. The aim of the project was to explore the best ways to support students’ academic writing skills. The literature review highlights the challenges students encounter when trying to learn the discourse of adiscipline; and in the light of this examination, a reflection on the strengths and weaknesses of my own practice provides the context for carrying out an action research project. The teaching intervention was assessed using the following methods of data collection: questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with students, and content analysis of my own feedback on student’s final assignments. The outcomes of the research demonstrate that students’ difficulties with their academic writing are related to their struggle to understand specialized concepts, theories and methods of the discipline.

  10. Female authorship in major academic gastroenterology journals: a look over 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Michelle T; Leszczynski, Ania; Thompson, Katherine D; Wasan, Sharmeel K; Calderwood, Audrey H

    2015-01-01

    Authorship in peer-reviewed medical journals is a marker for success in academic medicine. To determine the representation of female physicians among authors of original research in U.S. gastroenterology journals. Retrospective. All first and senior U.S. authors of original research published in the years 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012 in the following journals: Gastroenterology, Hepatology, American Journal of Gastroenterology, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (CGH), and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (GIE). The percentage of female first and senior authors compared with the percentage of women practicing in academic gastroenterology. We evaluated 6490 articles, of which 2275 original research articles and 455 editorials were eligible for inclusion. Author gender was determined for 98.5% of the 3792 authors. Overall, female first authors increased from 9.1±2.9% in 1992 to 29.3±4.9% in 2012 (Pgender gap. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of mother tongue on construction of notes and first-year academic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Dukhan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify whether there are any differences in the quality of the notes constructed in English between students for whom English is a first language and those for whom it is a second language. Subsequently we assessed whether this difference, if any, affected their grades. Unsurprisingly, the first-language students produced better structured and more detailed notes; they also performed better academically than their second-language peers. However, when students were provided with training that focused on using writing as a means to promote critical thinking, there was an improvement in the personalisation of their notes. The improvement in grades was significant for second-language students. Thus the university has a pivotal role to play in preparing students for academic success by providing them with supportive measures to aid their transition into first year.

  12. Current perspectives on chief residents in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Christopher H; Rachal, James; Breitbach, Jill; Higgins, Michael; Warner, Carolynn; Bobo, William

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine qualitative data from outgoing chief residents in psychiatry from the 2004-2005 academic year to 1) determine common characteristics between programs, 2) examine the residents' perspectives on their experiences, and 3) determine their common leadership qualities. The authors sent out self-report surveys via e-mail to 89 outgoing chief residents who attended the APA/Lilly Chief Resident Executive Leadership Program. Fifty-three (60%) chief residents responded. Although most chief residents are senior residents, over 20% are in their third postgraduate year. Two-thirds of programs have more than one chief resident each year. Most chief residents believe that their "participating" leadership style, existing leadership skills, and interpersonal skills contributed to their overall positive experiences. Successfully performing duties as a chief resident entails functioning in a variety of roles and demands attention to leadership qualities of the individual. Developing existing leadership skills, clarifying expectations, and providing mentorship to chief residents will ensure successful transition into practice, and the advancement of the field of psychiatry.

  13. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reoperations after first lumbar disc herniation surgery; a special interest on residives during a 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautiainen Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall rate of operations after recurrent lumbar disc herniation has been shown to be 3–11%. However, little is known about the rate of residives. Thus the aim of this study was to explore the cumulative rates of re-operations and especially residive disc herniations at the same side and level as the primary disc herniation after first lumbar disc herniation surgery and the factors that influence the risk of re-operations over a five year follow-up study. Methods 166 virgin lumbar disc herniation patients (mean age 42 years, 57% males were studied. Data on patients' initial disc operations and type and timing of re-operations during the follow-up were collected from patient files. Back and leg pain on visual analog scale and employment status were collected by questionnaires. Results The cumulative rate of re-operations for lumbar disc herniation was 10.2% (95% Cl 6.0 to 15.1. The rate of residives at initial site was 7.4% (95% Cl 3.7 to 11.3 and rate of lumbar disc herniations at other sites was 3.1% (95% Cl 0.6 to 6.2. The occurrence of residive lumbar disc herniations was evenly distributed across the 5 years. Neither age, gender, preoperative symptoms, physical activity nor employment had effect on the probability of re-operation. Conclusion Seven percent of the lumbar disc patients had a residive lumbar disc operation within five years of their first operation. No specific factors influencing the risk for re-operation were found.

  15. Hydraulic residence time and iron removal in a wetland receiving ferruginous mine water over a 4 year period from commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusin, F M; Jarvis, A P; Gandy, C J

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) has been conducted for the UK Coal Authority's mine water treatment wetland at Lambley, Northumberland, to determine the hydraulic performance of the wetland over a period of approximately 4 years since site commissioning. The wetland RTD was evaluated in accordance with moment analysis and modelled based on a tanks-in-series (TIS) model to yield the hydraulic characteristics of system performance. Greater hydraulic performance was seen during the second site monitoring after 21 months of site operation i.e. longer hydraulic residence time to reflect overall system hydraulic efficiency, compared to wetland performance during its early operation. Further monitoring of residence time during the third year of wetland operation indicated a slight reduction in hydraulic residence time, thus a lower system hydraulic efficiency. In contrast, performance during the fourth year of wetland operation exhibited an improved overall system hydraulic efficiency, suggesting the influence of reed growth over the lifetime of such systems on hydraulic performance. Interestingly, the same pattern was found for iron (which is the primary pollutant of concern in ferruginous mine waters) removal efficiency of the wetland system from the second to fourth year of wetland operation. This may therefore, reflect the maturity of reeds for maintaining efficient flow distribution across the wetland to retain a longer residence time and significant fractions of water involved to enhance the extent of treatment received for iron attenuation. Further monitoring will be conducted to establish whether such performance is maintained, or whether efficiency decreases over time due to accumulation of dead plant material within the wetland cells.

  16. A Study about the Academic Integrity of Second-Year Aviation Students in U.S. Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asim, Muhammad; Chambers, Cheryl; González, Ramón-Osvaldo; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Walter, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the influence of an ethics course on the academic integrity of second-year college students enrolled in an aviation program in the United States and their beliefs about following Federal Aviation Regulations standards. Academic integrity is defined by three variables: beliefs about not cheating, beliefs about exhibiting moral…

  17. Generation Psy: Student Characteristics and Academic Achievement in a Three-Year Problem-Based Learning Bachelor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Bjorn B.; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.; Smeets, Guus; van der Molen, Henk T.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous impact of demographic, personality, intelligence, and (prior) study performance factors on students' academic achievement in a three-year academic problem-based psychology program. Information regarding students' gender, age, nationality, pre-university education, high school grades, Big Five personality…

  18. Investigating the Relationship among Test Anxiety, Gender, Academic Achievement and Years of Study: A Case of Iranian EFL University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    The construct of anxiety plays a major role in one's life. One of these anxieties is test anxiety or apprehension over academic evaluation. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between gender, academic achievement, years of study and levels of test anxiety. This investigation is a descriptive analytic study and was done…

  19. Assessment of first-year post-graduate residents: Usefulness of multiple tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ying Yang

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: The strong correlations between 360-degree evaluation and small-scale OSCE+DOPS+IM-ITE®-composited scores suggested that both methods were measuring the same quality. Our results showed that the small-scale OSCE, when associated with both the DOPS and IM-ITE®, could be an important assessment method for PGY1 residents.

  20. Students' Sense of Community in Residence Halls, Social Integration, and First-Year Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.

    1997-01-01

    Used concepts from community psychology literature to elaborate a revised version of Tinto's model of individual student departure. Employed a longitudinal analysis of 718 college students. Results indicate that students' sense of community in their residence halls was a source of social integration and a precursor to student departure decisions.…

  1. What Is New in Medical Student and Resident Education?: Best Articles From the Past Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nathan S

    2016-07-01

    This month we focus on current research in medical student and resident education. Dr. Fox discusses four recent publications, which are concluded with a "bottom line" that is the take-home message. The complete reference for each can be found in Box 1 on this page, along with direct links to the abstracts.

  2. A 4-Year Curriculum on Substance Use Disorders for Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Rocco; Sanders, Kathy; Greenfield, Shelly F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe an addiction psychiatry curriculum integrated in a general psychiatry training program to demonstrate comprehensive and practical approaches to educating general psychiatric residents on the recognition and treatment of substance use disorders. Methods: The Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Hospital adult…

  3. Education fees: Indexation of the amounts for accommodation, meals and school transport for the 2010-2011 academic year

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    At its meeting on 21 September 2010, the Standing Concertation Committee approved the calculated indexation of the amounts for accommodation, meals and school transport for the 2010-2011 academic year. Accommodation fees for the 2010-2011 academic year will be paid in the form of a lump sum of 537 CHF per month (paid at the rate of 100%). The amount used for the calculation of meal payments will be 18 CHF per meal (paid at the rate of 75%). The ceiling for school transport fees has been set at 615 CHF for the 2010-2011 academic year. Education Fees Service Tel. 72862 / 71421

  4. Education fees: Indexation of the amounts for accommodation, meals and school transport for the 2011-2012 academic year

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    At its meeting on 1 September 2011, the Standing Concertation Committee approved the calculated indexation of the amounts for accommodation, meals and school transport for the 2011-2012 academic year.  Accommodation fees for the 2011-2012 academic year will be paid in the form of a lump sum of 545 CHF per month (paid at the rate of 100%). The amount used for the calculation of meal payments will be 18.50 CHF per meal (paid at the rate of 75%). The ceiling for school transport fees has been set at 627 CHF for the 2011-2012 academic year. Education Fees Service Tel. 72862 / 71421

  5. A participative evaluation model to refine academic support for first year Indigenous higher education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Rossingh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluative approach designed to provide a cycle of continuous improvement to retain Indigenous students during their first year of higher education.   The evaluation model operates in conjunction with a student academic enrichment program that is premised on valuing and respecting each student's background and life experience whilst building capability for learning success.  Data collected will be used for continual improvement of a newly developed innovative academic enrichment program that caters to the needs of Indigenous students.  The defining mechanisms of the model for measuring the first year experience are particularly meaningful for the Australian Centre For Indigenous Knowledges and Education as it moves into its inaugural year of operation in 2012. This preeminent time requires a flexible model to receive timely feedback in a reflexive environment where students guide the process as they continue their journey of accumulating knowledge and leave behind their contribution in shaping the landscape for future first year Indigenous students.  

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF THE INFORMATION COMPETENCE OF THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY: TWENTY YEARS AFTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glosiene, Audrone

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years ago, reading culture, library skills’ development used to be one of the core directions in research and teaching policy of the Department of Library Science at Vilnius University. Lateron, the topic was marginalized and today we return to the field that meanwhile has developed huge knowledge and experience base worldwide. A stimulus for the return was participation in BIBLIONOVA project. The aim of the article is to present a holistic approach towards information competency development in a modern academic institution. Prescriptive approach based on information literacy standards proved to be limited and not always effective in the academic environment.Information competency development is problem-specific, domain-specific, and disciplinespecific. It is interrelated with critical thinking, analytical skills as well as creativity and computerliteracy skills. Holistically, information competency development is an integral part of university’s life-long learning strategy. Critical success factors for information competency development areopen and problem-based learning and cooperative, inclusive strategies of the whole university. Academic libraries continue to play a major role in the process but the connections with faculty and administration in the process are of major importance.

  7. Family conflict and academic performance of first-year Asian American undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrassa, Nazneen F; Syed, Moin; Su, Jenny; Lee, Richard M

    2011-10-01

    This three-study investigation examined risk and protective factors for poor academic performance among Asian American first-year undergraduates. Students were surveyed prior to starting college and their GPA was collected after their first semester in college. Family conflict as a significant risk factor for poor academic performance was examined in all three studies. The results indicate that higher family conflict prior to college was related to lower first-semester college GPA, after controlling for standardized test scores and high school rank (Studies 1-3). Even though psychological distress was related to both family conflict and GPA, it did not mediate the relationship between family conflict and GPA (Studies 2 and 3). In terms of protective factors, the results indicate that life satisfaction buffered the negative effects of family conflict on first-semester college GPA (Study 3). Together, these findings support the need to take into account family variables and psychological well-being in the academic performance of Asian American students as they transition from high school to college.

  8. Learning approaches as predictors of academic performance in first year health and science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Weaver, Roslyn; Chang, Sungwon; Koch, Jane; Bhathal, Ragbir; Khoo, Cheang; Wilson, Ian

    2013-07-01

    To compare health and science students' demographic characteristics and learning approaches across different disciplines, and to examine the relationship between learning approaches and academic performance. While there is increasing recognition of a need to foster learning approaches that improve the quality of student learning, little is known about students' learning approaches across different disciplines, and their relationships with academic performance. Prospective, correlational design. Using a survey design, a total of 919 first year health and science students studying in a university located in the western region of Sydney from the following disciplines were recruited to participate in the study - i) Nursing: n = 476, ii) Engineering: n = 75, iii) Medicine: n = 77, iv) Health Sciences: n = 204, and v) Medicinal Chemistry: n = 87. Although there was no statistically significant difference in the use of surface learning among the five discipline groups, there were wide variations in the use of deep learning approach. Furthermore, older students and those with English as an additional language were more likely to use deep learning approach. Controlling for hours spent in paid work during term-time and English language usage, both surface learning approach (β = -0.13, p = 0.001) and deep learning approach (β = 0.11, p = 0.009) emerged as independent and significant predictors of academic performance. Findings from this study provide further empirical evidence that underscore the importance for faculty to use teaching methods that foster deep instead of surface learning approaches, to improve the quality of student learning and academic performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fostering Academic Success of First-Year Students: Exploring the Roles of Motivation, Race, and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roksa, Josipa; Whitley, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Although academic motivation is an important predictor of academic success, we show that being academically motivated is not equally beneficial for everyone. More specifically, the results indicate that African American students benefit less from being academically motivated than do their White peers, particularly when they report interacting with…

  10. Tobacco consumption among pediatric residents in Argentina. Current prevalence and trend over the past 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Emiliano; Ferrero, Fernando; Castaños, Claudio; Blengini, María Teresa; Durán, Pablo; Moreno, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Pediatricians are in a strategic position to prevent smoking. To estimate the prevalence of smoking among pediatric residents, analyze associated factors, describe preventive actions, and assess the differences observed over the past decade. Cross-sectional study with a self-administered, anonymous survey conducted among pediatric residents from eight Argentine hospitals. Smoking habit, associated factors, and attitude towards patients' or their parents' smoking were evaluated; results were compared to those obtained in 2002. Out of 448 surveyed physicians, 20.1% smoked. There were no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers in terms of gender, having children, number of on-call shifts, and having a supervisor who smokes. Having a parent who smoked was a risk factor for tobacco use only among women (OR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.09-3.61; p = 0.01). Surveyed residents living with a couple had a lower smoking rate (OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.34-0.96; p = 0.03). Only 18.1% referred having an active behavior towards smoking patients, no differences were observed between smokers and non-smokers. In addition, there were no differences in smoking prevalence from 2002, but there was a higher rate of residents who advised their patients (32.4% versus 26.1%; p smoking (37.7% versus 18.6%; p parents who smoke was very low. In spite of official policies, tobacco use in this group has not changed over the past decade, but there was an increase in the rate of those who received information during their training and of those who advised their patients of smoking risks.

  11. Research Plan of the Operations Research Center and Department of Systems Engineering for the Academic Year 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwinn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    ...) for the Academic Year 04-05. The research plan includes a statement of purpose for research which supports DSE and the ORCEN, a description of the two organizations, a list of the key personnel responsible for executing the plan...

  12. Annual Report of the Department of Systems Engineering and the Operations Research Center for the Academic Year 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwinn, Michael J., Jr; McGinnis, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    ...) for the Academic Year 04-05. The annual research report includes a statement of purpose for research which supports DSE and the ORCEN, a description of the two organizations, a list of the key personnel responsible for executing...

  13. Proposals for improving the mother tongue from the orientation of the academic year` s group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgen Arelys Ferrer-Miyares

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When graduating from the university students must demonstrate that they master the Spanish language that allows them the development of a coherent, fluid and expressive oral and written comunication with a good spelling and calligraphy. For achieving a positive result, it is essential to assume a stance of analysis, internalization and reflection. It depends on how the student, profesor and group year face this pedagogical challenge that can only be beat with perseverance, interest, knowledges and team work. The aim of this project is to socialize the experiences achieved from the orientation done by the academic year`s group that made posible an adequate treatment to the improvement of students` mother tongue.

  14. Academic achievement, depression and anxiety during medical education predict the styles of success in a medical career: a 10-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, Maciej; Tartas, Malgorzata; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Budzinski, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    Our study investigated the styles of success in the medical career in young physicians, in comparison with the same subjects examined 4-10 years earlier. The participants were first studied when they applied to the medical university (1999). Questionnaires were sent to all students each year (2000-2005). Fifty-four medical doctors participated in the first phase of the study completed a questionnaire four years after graduation. The current questionnaire included measures of burnout, satisfaction with medicine as a career, quality of life (QOL) and postgraduate examination results. Previous questionnaires had included measures of academic achievement, depression and anxiety. We can describe three different styles of success, which can be predicted during medical education. Physicians with the best professional competence have the lowest income. However, physicians with the lowest professional competence gain the highest income. Those with the highest QOL (general well-being and life satisfaction) have the lowest professional stress and vulnerability to burnout. Anxiety and academic achievement (during the second and fourth year of study) are the significant predictors of specific style belonging. Our results may be useful to medical school admissions and resident selection committees to identify candidates at risk for less satisfaction or less competence.

  15. Gender trends in dental leadership and academics: a twenty-two-year observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Kongkiatkamon, Suchada; Ross, Sasha; Prasad, Soni; Koerber, Anne; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gender disparities in dental leadership and academics in the United States. Nine journals that represent the dental specialties and high published impact factors were selected to analyze the percentage of female dentists' first and senior authorship for the years 1986, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2008. Data on appointment status and female deanship were collected from the American Dental Association (ADA) survey, and the trends were studied. The proportion of female presidents in ADA-recognized specialty organizations was also calculated. Overall, the increase in first female authorship was not statistically significant, but the increase of last female authorship was statistically significant in a linear trend over the years. The percentage of tenured female faculty members and female deans in U.S. dental schools increased by factors of 1.7 and 9, respectively, during the study period. However, female involvement in professional organizations was limited. Findings from this study indicate that female participation in authorship and leadership has increased over time. Nevertheless, females are still a minority in dental academics and leadership.

  16. Academic Career Selection and Retention in Radiation Oncology: The Joint Center for Radiation Therapy Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Chen, M.-H.; Harris, Jay R.; Recht, Abram; Stevenson, Mary Ann; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The United States healthcare system has witnessed declining reimbursement and increasing documentation requirements for longer than 10 years. These have decreased the time available to academic faculty for teaching and mentorship. The impact of these changes on the career choices of residents is unknown. The purpose of this report was to determine whether changes have occurred during the past decade in the proportion of radiation oncology trainees from a single institution entering and staying in academic medicine. Methods and Materials: We performed a review of the resident employment experience of Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents graduating during 13 recent consecutive years (n = 48 residents). The outcomes analyzed were the initial selection of an academic vs. nonacademic career and career changes during the first 3 years after graduation. Results: Of the 48 residents, 65% pursued an academic career immediately after graduation, and 44% remained in academics at the last follow-up, after a median of 6 years. A later graduation year was associated with a decrease in the proportion of graduates immediately entering academic medicine (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.94). However, the retention rate at 3 years of those who did immediately enter academics increased with a later graduation year (p = 0.03). Conclusion: During a period marked by notable changes in the academic healthcare environment, the proportion of graduating Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents pursuing academic careers has been declining; however, despite this decline, the retention rates in academia have increased

  17. Resident and student education in otolaryngology: A 10-year update on e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Hsueh, Wayne D; Gibber, Marc J

    2017-07-01

    E-learning, in its most rudimentary form, is the use of Internet-based resources for teaching and learning purposes. In surgical specialties, this definition encompasses the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, and online tutorials, as well as standardized video and imaging. As new technological frontiers rapidly emerge within otolaryngology, e-learning may be an effective alternative to traditional teaching. Here we present a systematic review of the literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning for otolaryngology education and a discussion of the relevance of these programs for both medical students and residents within the field. Systematic review. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Twelve studies met inclusion criteria. These studies measured a range of outcomes from basic science anatomical knowledge to clinically relevant endpoints such as diagnostic accuracy. Nearly all of the studies reported greater satisfaction and/or significantly increased objective knowledge using the e-learning intervention compared to traditional techniques. E-learning proves to be a powerful alternative to standard teaching techniques within otolaryngology education for both residents and medical students. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs and accessing long-term knowledge retention using these innovative platforms. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E219-E224, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada

  19. Multi year observations reveal variability in residence of a tropical Demersal Fish, Lethrinus nebulosus: implications for spatial management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Pillans

    Full Text Available Off the Ningaloo coast of North West Western Australia, Spangled Emperor Lethrinus nebulosus are among the most highly targeted recreational fish species. The Ningaloo Reef Marine Park comprises an area of 4,566 km2 of which 34% is protected from fishing by 18 no-take sanctuary zones ranging in size from 0.08-44.8 km2. To better understand Spangled Emperor movements and the adequacy of sanctuary zones within the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park for this species, 84 Spangled Emperor of a broad spectrum of maturity and sex were tagged using internal acoustic tags in a range of lagoon and reef slope habitats both inside and adjacent to the Mangrove Bay Sanctuary zone. Kernel Utilisation Distribution (KUD was calculated for 39 resident individuals that were detected for more than 30 days. There was no relationship with fish size and movement or site fidelity. Average home range (95% KUD for residents was 8.5±0.5 km2 compared to average sanctuary zone size of 30 km2. Calculated home range was stable over time resulting in resident animals tagged inside the sanctuary zone spending ∼80% of time within the sanctuary boundaries. The number of fish remaining within the array of receivers declined steadily over time and after one year more than 60% of tagged fish had moved outside the sanctuary zone and also beyond the 28 km2 array of receivers. Long term monitoring identified the importance of shifting home range and was essential for understanding overall residency within protected areas and also for identifying spawning related movements. This study indicates that despite exhibiting stable and small home ranges over periods of one to two years, more than half the population of spangled emperor move at scales greater than average sanctuary size within the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park.

  20. Students' Perceptions toward Academic Competencies: The Case of German First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Dana-Kristin; Ifenthaler, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Students often enter higher education academically unprepared and with unrealistic perceptions and expectations regarding academic competencies for their studies. However, preparedness and realistic perceptions are important factors for student retention. With regard to a proposed model of five academic competencies (time management, learning…

  1. Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: Academic Year 2015-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Jamshidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Academic satisfaction is considered one of the most important factors affecting academic achievement among students. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between academic satisfaction and academic achievement among students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with 346 student participants using stratified random sampling. The research instrument included the Student Academic Satisfaction Questionnaire, the Academic Performance Rating Scale, and student grade point average (GPA. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. A 0.05 significance level was used for statistical tests. Results: The mean score of academic satisfaction among students was 50.7 ± 9.8 and the academic satisfaction level was moderate in 46.2% of the students. Comparing the academic satisfaction level in different fields of study, students in health (58.5%, nursing (67.5%, and paramedics (51.1% reported a moderate satisfaction level and students in midwifery (84.2%, pharmacology (53.5%, medicine (69.3%, and dentistry (55.5% recorded a high satisfaction level (P < 0.05. There was also a significant and positive correlation between academic satisfaction and academic achievement (P = 0.001, r = 0.02. Conclusion: Academic satisfaction among the 46.2% students that reported a moderate level was far from the ideal level. The relationship between academic satisfaction and academic achievement also indicated that creating motivation among students and increasing their levels of satisfaction could provide the grounds for academic achievement among them as much as possible.

  2. Pediatric dermatology training during residency: a survey of the 2014 graduating residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Alaleh; Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Friedman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of pediatric dermatology is considered a core competency of dermatology training and should be expected of all practicing dermatologists. While the numbers of both pediatric dermatology fellowships and board certified pediatric dermatologists in the workforce have increased over the years, recent reports suggest that there is a gap in pediatric dermatology education during dermatology residency. The goal of this study is to assess the current state of pediatric education during residency, as well as the clinical experience, satisfaction and expectations of graduating dermatology residents. A 31-question self-report survey was distributed electronically to 294 third-year dermatology residents with questions pertaining to demographics, didactic education, resident experience in pediatric dermatology training, satisfaction with pediatric training and future plans. One hundred and twenty-three residents responded (41.8% response rate) representing approximately 29.1% of the total number of graduating residents. 69 (56.1%) residents reported academic time specifically devoted to pediatric dermatology, the majority (79.7%) of which was led by pediatric dermatologists. 82% of residents reported dedicated pediatric dermatology clinics at their program. 86.8% of respondents felt that their training in pediatric dermatology will allow them to confidently see pediatric dermatology patients in practice. This survey highlights a promising state of pediatric dermatology training among current graduating dermatology residents. The majority of current graduating dermatology residents are satisfied with their pediatric dermatology education, feel confident treating pediatric patients, and plan to see pediatric patients in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  4. Residence Hall Student Satisfaction with Interim Alcohol Policy. Office for Student Affairs Research Bulletin; v15 n4 Jul74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabourg, Deborah; And Others

    At the beginning of the 1973-74 academic year alcohol usage was officially permitted for the first time in residence halls at the Twin Cities Campus of the University of Minnesota. To determine residents' perceptions of the effects of the change in drinking policy, interviews were conducted with 49 current dormitory residents, who had also lived…

  5. Advanced engineering design program at the University of Illinois for the 1987-1988 academic year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivier, Kenneth R.; Lembeck, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The participation of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the NASA/USRA Universities Advanced Engineering Design Program (Space) is reviewed for the 1987 to 88 academic year. The University's design project was the Manned Marsplane and Delivery System. In the spring of 1988 semester, 107 students were enrolled in the Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering Departments' undergraduate Aerospace Vehicle Design course. These students were divided into an aircraft section (responsible for the Marsplane design), and a spacecraft section (responsible for the Delivery System Design). The design results are presented in Final Design Reports, copies of which are attached. In addition, five students presented a summary of the design results at the Program's Summer Conference.

  6. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Burt, Lindsay M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Morris, Zachary S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Walker, Amanda J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Miller, Seth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Bhavsar, Shripal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Integris Cancer Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Mohindra, Pranshu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kim, Miranda B. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. Conclusions: This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period

  7. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Burt, Lindsay M; Mancini, Brandon R; Morris, Zachary S; Walker, Amanda J; Miller, Seth M; Bhavsar, Shripal; Mohindra, Pranshu; Kim, Miranda B; Kharofa, Jordan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period. This analysis may serve as a valuable tool for those seeking to

  8. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Burt, Lindsay M.; Mancini, Brandon R.; Morris, Zachary S.; Walker, Amanda J.; Miller, Seth M.; Bhavsar, Shripal; Mohindra, Pranshu; Kim, Miranda B.; Kharofa, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. Conclusions: This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period. This

  9. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  10. Two-year outcomes of the Early Risers prevention trial with formerly homeless families residing in supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Lee, Susanne; Morrell, Nicole; August, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    This article reports 2-year outcomes from a cluster randomized, controlled trial of the Early Risers (ER) program implemented as a selective preventive intervention in supportive housing settings for homeless families. Based on the goals of this comprehensive prevention program, we predicted that intervention participants receiving ER services would show improvement in parenting and child outcomes relative to families in treatment-as-usual sites. The sample included 270 children in 161 families, residing in 15 supportive housing sites; multimethod, multi-informant assessments conducted at baseline and yearly thereafter included parent and teacher report of child adjustment, parent report of parenting self-efficacy, and parent-child observations that yielded scores of effective parenting practices. Data were modeled in HLM7 (4-level model accounting for nesting of children within families and families within housing sites). Two years' postbaseline, intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses indicated that parents in the ER group showed significantly improved parenting self-efficacy, and parent report indicated significant reductions in ER group children's depression. No main effects of ITT were shown for observed parenting effectiveness. However, over time, average levels of parenting self-efficacy predicted observed effective parenting practices, and observed effective parenting practices predicted improvements in both teacher- and parent-report of child adjustment. This is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate prevention effects of a program for homeless families residing in family supportive housing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. California Library Statistics, 2009: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 from Public, Academic, Special and County Law Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Ira, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Each year the State Library sends annual report forms to California's public, academic, special, state agency, and county law libraries. Statistical data from those reports are tabulated in this publication, with directory listings published in the companion volume, "California Library Directory." For this fiscal year, 389 libraries of…

  12. California Library Statistics, 2005: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 from Public, Academic, Special and County Law Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Ira, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Each year the State Library sends annual report forms to California's academic, public, special, state agency, and county law libraries. Statistical data from those reports are tabulated in this publication, with directory listings published in the companion volume, California Library Directory. For this fiscal year four hundred and eight…

  13. The Effects of Maternal Postnatal Depression and Child Sex on Academic Performance at Age 16 Years: A Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lynne; Arteche, Adriane; Fearon, Pasco; Halligan, Sarah; Croudace, Tim; Cooper, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: Postnatal depression (PND) is associated with poor cognitive functioning in infancy and the early school years; long-term effects on academic outcome are not known. Method: Children of postnatally depressed (N = 50) and non-depressed mothers (N = 39), studied from infancy, were followed up at 16 years. We examined the effects on…

  14. Behavioral and Academic Progress of Children Displaying Substantive ADHD Behaviors in Special Education: A 1-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutjesdijk, Regina; Scholte, Evert M; Swaab, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Exploring differences in behavioral and academic progress between children displaying substantive ADHD behaviors (M age of 9.4 years) in special schools (n = 38) and in inclusive education (n = 26). The contribution of pedagogical strategies to positive outcomes was also examined. Measurements used were the Teachers' Report Form, the Social Emotional Questionnaire, assessments of academic achievement, and the Pedagogical Methods Questionnaire. Mixed-model ANOVAs and Pearson's correlations were used to analyze the data. Significant progress was found regarding disorder-specific problem behavior and in all academic areas, but no interaction effect was found between time and setting. Correlations indicated that positive behavior reinforcement and emotional support are the pedagogical strategies that contributed most to behavioral adaptation. Children displaying substantive ADHD behaviors in both groups develop equally well in the areas of behavioral and academic functioning where significant progress was found. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Challenges in the First Year of Teaching: Lessons Learned in an Elementary Education Resident Teacher Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourneau, Bonni

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the first years of teaching are a challenge for all beginning teachers. According to the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future's study (2010) first-year teacher attrition has been steadily increasing and many leave the profession even before they are proficient educators who know how to work with colleagues to…

  16. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Novice medical students: individual patterns in the use of learning strategies and how they change during the first academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabry, Götz; Giesler, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Adequate use of different learning strategies is one of the most important prerequisites of academic success. The actual use of learning strategies is the result of an interaction between individual and situational variables. Against this background we conducted a longitudinal study with first year medical students to investigate whether individuals show different patterns in their use of learning strategies and whether these patterns change during the first academic year. Medical students (N=175, 58% female) were surveyed three times in their first academic year regarding their use of learning strategies. A hierarchical cluster analysis (Ward) was conducted in order to identify groups of students with different patterns of learning strategies. We identified four different patterns in approaches to learning among novice medical students ("easy-going", "flexible", "problematic" and "hardworking" learners). Compared to their peers, the problematic learners had the worst final school grades. In addition changes in the use of learning strategies were identified, most of them occurred during the first term. Students start their academic studies with different patterns of learning strategies; the characteristics of these patterns change during the first academic year. Further research is necessary to better understand how individual and situational variables determine students' learning.

  18. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisden, W. T.; Canessa, S.

    2013-01-01

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of 14C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of ∼500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of 14C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of ‘bomb 14C’ incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point 14C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C (‘passive fraction’), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  19. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baisden, W.T.; Canessa, S.

    2013-01-01

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of 14 C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of ∼500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of 14 C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of ‘bomb 14 C’ incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point 14 C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C (‘passive fraction’), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  20. Using 50 years of soil radiocarbon data to identify optimal approaches for estimating soil carbon residence times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisden, W.T., E-mail: t.baisden@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, P.O. Box 31312, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Canessa, S. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, P.O. Box 31312, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2013-01-15

    In 1959, Athol Rafter began a substantial programme of systematically monitoring the flow of {sup 14}C produced by atmospheric thermonuclear tests through organic matter in New Zealand soils under stable land use. A database of {approx}500 soil radiocarbon measurements spanning 50 years has now been compiled, and is used here to identify optimal approaches for soil C-cycle studies. Our results confirm the potential of {sup 14}C to determine residence times, by estimating the amount of 'bomb {sup 14}C' incorporated. High-resolution time series confirm this approach is appropriate, and emphasise that residence times can be calculated routinely with two or more time points as little as 10 years apart. This approach is generally robust to the key assumptions that can create large errors when single time-point {sup 14}C measurements are modelled. The three most critical assumptions relate to: (1) the distribution of turnover times, and particularly the proportion of old C ('passive fraction'), (2) the lag time between photosynthesis and C entering the modelled pool, (3) changes in the rates of C input. When carrying out approaches using robust assumptions on time-series samples, multiple soil layers can be aggregated using a mixing equation. Where good archived samples are available, AMS measurements can develop useful understanding for calibrating models of the soil C cycle at regional to continental scales with sample numbers on the order of hundreds rather than thousands. Sample preparation laboratories and AMS facilities can play an important role in coordinating the efficient delivery of robust calculated residence times for soil carbon.

  1. [Educative strategy evaluation to improve critical reading skills on clinical research texts in second year gyneco-obstetrics residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza Lira, Sebastián; Arce Herrera, Rosa María; González González, Patricia

    2007-11-01

    The educative models and strategies to achieve a significant learning have a wide variety. The development of clinical aptitude for clinical research papers lecture has an important place to maintain the physician actualized and for resident formation. To evaluate the degree of development of the aptitude for the reading of clinical research articles in 2nd grade residents of the gynecology and obstetrics speciality alter an educative strategy. In 16 2nd year gynecology and obstetrics residents, a previously validated instrument was applied for the evaluation of critical lecture of clinical research articles in general medicine previous and after and educative strategy. Statistical analysis was with Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Also Wilcoxon test was used to assess the differences between baseline and final results. The median of age was 27 (24-31) years, gender 56.3% women and 43.8% men. A statistically significant increase in global score was observed after the educative strategy. After it only there was a significant increase in the indicator to interpret. After evaluating the domain degrees according to the indicator to interpret, in baseline evaluation it predominated the very low level and at the final evaluation the very low and low levels. In the indicator to judge at baseline the majority were in the very low level, and at the end in very low and low levels. According to the indicator to propose at baseline all were in the level expected by hazard, and at the end a minimal proportion was at very low level. These results traduce a discrete improvement in critical lecture process, which makes to consider the educative strategy that was used, since the objective to improve critical lecture capacity was not achieved.

  2. Mobility of academic staff from Faculty of Social Sciences at Charles University in years 2011- 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Gregáňová, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is analysing of the mobility of academic staff from the Faculty of Social Sciences in period 2011- 2015. The main aim of thesis will be exploration of the mobility of academic staff of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Charles University, focuses on the individual academic degrees and different institutions inside of faculty. The first sub-objective will analyse the usability offered by the mobility of academic staff and their interest. As another sub-goal I chos...

  3. [Study on smoking attributed death and effects of smoking cessation in residents aged 35-79 years in Tianjin, 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Wang, D Z; Zhang, H; Xu, Z L; Xue, X D; Jiang, G H

    2017-11-10

    Objective: To analyze the influence of smoking on deaths in residents aged 35-79 years and the effects of smoking cessation in Tianjin. Methods: The data of 39 499 death cases aged 35-79 years in 2016 in Tianjin were collected, the risks for deaths caused by smoking related diseases and excess deaths as well as effects of smoking cessation were analyzed after adjusting 5 year old age group, education level and marital status. Results: Among the 39 499 deaths cases, 1 589 (13.56%) were caused by smoking, the percentage of the excess mortality of lung cancer caused by smoking was highest (47.60%); the risk of death due to lung cancer in smokers was 2.75 times higher than that in non-smokers (95 %CI : 2.47-3.06). Among the female deaths, 183 (7.29%) were caused by smoking, the percentage of the excess mortality of lung cancer was highest (28.90%); and the risk of death of lung cancer in smokers was 4.04 times higher than that in non-smokers (95 %CI : 3.49-4.68). The OR for disease in ex-smokers was 0.80 compared with 1.00 in smokers (95 %CI : 0.72-0.90). The OR in males who had quitted smoking for ≥10 years was lower (0.74, 95 %CI : 0.63-0.86) than that in those who had quitted smoking for 1-9 years (0.85, 95 %CI : 0.74-0.98), but the difference was not significant. Conclusion: Smoking is one of the most important risk factors for deaths in residents in Tianjin. Smoking cessation can benefit people's health.

  4. Peripartum hysterectomy: two years experience at Nelson Mandela Academic hospital, Mthatha, Eastern Cape South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandabwa, J N; Businge, C; Longo-Mbenza, B; Mdaka, M L; Kiondo, P

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage is the leading direct cause of maternal mortality in South Africa. To determine the incidence, indications, associations and maternal outcomes of emergency peripartum hysterectomies. A descriptive and retrospective analysis of patients who had peripartum hysterectomy between 1(st) February 2007 and 31(st) January 2009 in Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital at Mthatha city. The incidence of 0.95% of peripartum hysterectomies (n=63 or 9.5/1000 births) increased with the increasing maternal age from 0.121% at age of less than 20 years to 0.5% at age more or equal to 30 years. Similarly the incidence increased with parity from 0.332% for Primiparity to 0.468% at parity of four or more. The indications for the operation were uterine atony 19/63 (30.2%), secondary haemorrhage/puerperal sepsis 17/63 (27%) and ruptured uterus 16/63 (23.4%). The main intra operative complication was haemorrhage 13/63 (20.6%). Repeat laparotomy was done in 10/63 (15%) of patients due to haemorrhage. Admission to intensive care unit was 25/63 (39.7%). The case specific mortality rate was of 19 % (n=12). The main causes of death were hypovolaemic shock and septicemia. The incidence of peripartum hysterectomies was high and was associated with ruptured uterus and puerperal sepsis which are preventable.

  5. Screening for psychological distress among High School Graduates Accepted for Enrollment at Alexandria Faculty of Medicine: Academic year 2016/2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Hassan Diab

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental and psychological health of adolescents in general and prospective medical students in particular is a priority area to investigate as it affects wellbeing of the future doctors. Objectives: The current research was conducted to screen first year medical students accepted for enrollment at Alexandria Faculty of Medicine to identify those with a high probability of having psychological distress before the start of academic courses as well as explore the sources of stress among them.Methods.A cross sectional survey of 779 high school graduates accepted for admission to Alexandria Faculty of medicine was conducted. Participants were approached on the days of obligatory pre-enrollment medical examination. The translated Arabic version of DASS 21 questionnaire was used to screen students for three negative emotional symptoms namely depression, anxiety and stress. Inquiry about age, sex, residency and type of high school was added. Results: More than a tenth of studied medical students (12.6% suffered from severe or profound stress and 29.1% of them had mild to moderate stress. Moreover, one fifth (20% of studied students were severely anxious and less than one third (29.3% had mild to moderate anxiety. Severe and profound depression was diagnosed among 14.3% of students whereas, 18.7% them were moderately depressed. No association was found between any of studied negative emotional symptoms and the students' educational background or their residency. Conclusion: Nearly half of the prospective medical students might have some sort of psychological distress before starting their study in the Faculty of Medicine. They should be investigated to verify diagnosis and start intervention to minimize its adverse effects on academic performance and advancement at the faculty. Stress management courses should be considered for all medical students. Keywords: Psychological distress, Prospective medical students, Adolescents' psychological

  6. Examining the relationship of ethnicity, gender and social cognitive factors with the academic achievement of first-year engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Bruce Henry

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships of social cognitive factors and their influence on the academic performance of first-year engineering students. The nine social cognitive variables identified were under the groupings of personal support, occupational self-efficacy, academic self-efficacy, vocational interests, coping, encouragement, discouragement, outcome expectations, and perceived stress. The primary student participants in this study were first-year engineering students from underrepresented groups which include African American, Hispanic American students and women. With this in mind, the researcher sought to examine the interactive influence of race/ethnicity and gender based on the aforementioned social cognitive factors. Differences in academic performance (university GPA of first-year undergraduate engineering students) were analyzed by ethnicity and gender. There was a main effect for ethnicity only. Gender was found not to be significant. Hispanics were not found to be significantly different in their GPAs than Whites but Blacks were found to have lower GPAs than Whites. Also, Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between and among the nine identified social cognitive variables. The data from the analysis uncovered ten significant correlations which were as follows: occupational self-efficacy and academic self-efficacy, occupational self-efficacy and vocational interest, occupational self-efficacy and perceived stress, academic self-efficacy and encouragement, academic self-efficacy and outcome expectations, academic self-efficacy and perceived stress, vocational interest and outcome expectations, discouragement and encouragement, coping and perceived stress, outcome expectations and perceived stress. Next, a Pearson correlation coefficient was utilized to examine the relationship between academic performance (college GPA) of first-year undergraduate engineering students and the nine identified

  7. Gender Differences in First-Year College Students' Academic Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, António M.; Alfonso, Sonia; Araújo, Alexandra M.; Deaño, Manuel; Costa, Alexandra R.; Conde, Ângeles; Almeida, Leandro S.

    2018-01-01

    Based on a multidimensional definition of academic expectations (AEs), the authors examine students' AE component scores across countries and genders. Two samples (343 Portuguese and 358 Spanish students) completed the Academic Perceptions Questionnaire (APQ) six months after enrolling in their universities. Factorial invariance was ensured across…

  8. Noncognitive Variables to Predict Academic Success among Junior Year Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ellen M. T.

    2017-01-01

    An equitable predictor of academic success is needed as nursing education strives toward comprehensive preparation of diverse nursing students. The purpose of this study was to discover how Sedlacek's (2004a) Noncognitive Questionnaire (NCQ) and Duckworth & Quinn's (2009) Grit-S predicted baccalaureate nursing student academic performance and…

  9. Academic Reading ability of first-year students: what's high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both groups were administered a pre-test and post-test of academic reading ability. The dependent variable was academic reading ability and the independent variables were matric grade and prior exposure. Two measures of reading ability were used, namely a reading comprehension and a cloze passage. An analysis of ...

  10. Executive Functioning Predicts Academic Achievement in Middle School: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, William Ellery; Tournaki, Nelly; Blackman, Sheldon; Zilinski, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Executive functioning (EF) is a strong predictor of children's and adolescents' academic performance. Although research indicates that EF can increase during childhood and adolescence, few studies have tracked the effect of EF on academic performance throughout the middle school grades. EF was measured at the end of Grades 6-9 through 21 teachers'…

  11. Contemporary Development of Academic Reference Librarianship in the United States: A 44-Year Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanrong; Tang, Yingqi; Knight, Carley

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes job advertisements to identify the contemporary development of academic reference librarianship in the United States. Results show that more job openings, higher educational backgrounds, more duties & responsibilities, and variety of titles were assigned to academic reference librarian positions from 1966 through 2009.…

  12. Emotional intelligence and academic performance in first and final year medical students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon How; Zain, Azhar Md; Hassan, Faezah

    2013-03-27

    Research on emotional intelligence (EI) suggests that it is associated with more pro-social behavior, better academic performance and improved empathy towards patients. In medical education and clinical practice, EI has been related to higher academic achievement and improved doctor-patient relationships. This study examined the effect of EI on academic performance in first- and final-year medical students in Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study using an objectively-scored measure of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Academic performance of medical school students was measured using continuous assessment (CA) and final examination (FE) results. The first- and final-year students were invited to participate during their second semester. Students answered a paper-based demographic questionnaire and completed the online MSCEIT on their own. Relationships between the total MSCEIT score to academic performance were examined using multivariate analyses. A total of 163 (84 year one and 79 year five) medical students participated (response rate of 66.0%). The gender and ethnic distribution were representative of the student population. The total EI score was a predictor of good overall CA (OR 1.01), a negative predictor of poor result in overall CA (OR 0.97), a predictor of the good overall FE result (OR 1.07) and was significantly related to the final-year FE marks (adjusted R(2) = 0.43). Medical students who were more emotionally intelligent performed better in both the continuous assessments and the final professional examination. Therefore, it is possible that emotional skill development may enhance medical students' academic performance.

  13. Analysis of refractive error in visual impairment among residents aged 40 years and above in Dongguan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the prevalence rate of visual impairment caused by refractive error among residents aged 40 years and above, and the influence factors of vision correction. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological survey of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy among residents aged 40 and above in Guangdong Province, Hengli Town, Dongguan City from 2011 to 2012. At the same time, according to World Health Organization(WHO, according to the daily life vision, 0.05≤visual ability RESULTS: The prevalence rate of visual impairment was 7.90%(707/8 952. The prevalence rate of visual impairment caused by refractive error was 5.57%(499/8 952, accounted for visual impairment of 70.58%(499/707. The prevalence rate of correction of refractive error among visual impairment was 5.36%(480/8 952, accounting for visual impairment of 67.89%(480/707. The prevalence rate of visual impairment uncorrected was 0.21%(19/8 952, accounting for visual impairment of 2.69%(19/707. By χ2 test, with the increase of age, the rate of visual impairment caused by refractive error was significantly decreased(PPP>0.05. The rate of visual impairment can be corrected decreases with age, from 92.1% to 49.1%, there was a statistically significant difference(PPP>0.05. CONCLUSION: Through the development of refractive error correction of positive, can make the daily life of visual impairment in about 2/3 of patients improve eyesight and improve the quality of life of residents.

  14. NATIONAL POLICY FOR ACADEMIC MOBILITY IN RUSSIA AND THE BRICS COUNTRIES: 20 YEARS OF THE BOLOGNA PROCESS IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Teplyakov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the Russian Federal Education Programmes from the aspect of their impact on student and academic staff mobility. The subject of the analysis is the programmes adopted for the period 2000 to 2020 and their implementation reports. A cluster of academic mobility forms compiled by the authors is based on two groups: academic staff and students. The forms of academic staff mobility have been identified as: (1 a migration flow: outward and incoming; and (2 purpose: teaching and research. The forms of student mobility have been identified as: (1 migration flow: outward and incoming; and (2 purpose: credit mobility and degree mobility. The cluster is based on the National Reports on the Implementation of the Bologna Process by different countries from 2012 to 2015 and the Russian Federal Education Programmes. The analysis finds that academic mobility in Russia has been an indicator of the development of education programmes for almost 20 years. During this period, the government’s approach to academic mobility has undergone a change from a simple reference as an expected result to the establishing of quantitative indicators. The four quantitative indicators of academic mobility have been in place since 2000. As a result of the analysis, the authors conclude that among the forms of student mobility the most developed is the incoming degree mobility of international students. The student outward credit mobility is the least developed of the four indicators. In the current situation, it is necessary to reform and liberalise the recognition of study abroad periods for Russian students. Without reform, it will be difficult to achieve the target set by the government to have 6 percent of students studying abroad for at least one semester by 2020. The data for 2016 show that only a few higher education institutions have approached the target. The authors also identify problems relating to academic staff mobility.

  15. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  16. Can Medical School Performance Predict Residency Performance? Resident Selection and Predictors of Successful Performance in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, Hindi E.; Hueppchen, Nancy A.; Bienstock, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    Background During the evaluation process, Residency Admissions Committees typically gather data on objective and subjective measures of a medical student's performance through the Electronic Residency Application Service, including medical school grades, standardized test scores, research achievements, nonacademic accomplishments, letters of recommendation, the dean's letter, and personal statements. Using these data to identify which medical students are likely to become successful residents in an academic residency program in obstetrics and gynecology is difficult and to date, not well studied. Objective To determine whether objective information in medical students' applications can help predict resident success. Method We performed a retrospective cohort study of all residents who matched into the Johns Hopkins University residency program in obstetrics and gynecology between 1994 and 2004 and entered the program through the National Resident Matching Program as a postgraduate year-1 resident. Residents were independently evaluated by faculty and ranked in 4 groups according to perceived level of success. Applications from residents in the highest and lowest group were abstracted. Groups were compared using the Fisher exact test and the Student t test. Results Seventy-five residents met inclusion criteria and 29 residents were ranked in the highest and lowest quartiles (15 in highest, 14 in lowest). Univariate analysis identified no variables as consistent predictors of resident success. Conclusion In a program designed to train academic obstetrician-gynecologists, objective data from medical students' applications did not correlate with successful resident performance in our obstetrics-gynecology residency program. We need to continue our search for evaluation criteria that can accurately and reliably select the medical students that are best fit for our specialty. PMID:21976076

  17. Changing the Formula of Residents' Work Hours in Internal Medicine: Moving From “Years in Training” to “Hours in Training”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansi, Ishak A

    2011-01-01

    Background In a recent report, the Institute of Medicine recommended more restrictions on residents' working hours. Several problems exist with a system that places a weekly limit on resident duty hours: (1) it assumes the presence of a linear relationship between hours of work and patient safety; (2) it fails to consider differences in intensity among programs; and (3) it does not address increases in the scientific content of medicine, and it places the burden of enforcing the duty hour limits on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Proposal An innovative method of calculating credit hours for graduate medical education would shift the focus from “years of residency” to “hours of residency.” For example, internal medicine residents would be requested to spend 8640 hours of total training hours (assuming 60 hours per week for 48 weeks annually) instead of the traditional 3 years. This method of counting training hours is used by other professions, such as the Intern Development Program of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. The proposed approach would allow residents and program directors to pace training based on individual capabilities. Standards for resident education should include the average number of patients treated in each setting (inpatient or outpatient). A possible set of “multipliers” based on these parameters, and possibly others such as resident evaluation, is devised to calculate the “final adjusted accredited hours” that count toward graduation. Anticipated Benefits Substituting “years of training” with “hours of training” may resolve many of the concerns with the current residency education model, as well as adapt to the demands of residents' personal lives. It also may allow residents to pace their training according to their capabilities and learning styles, and contribute to reflective learning and better quality education. PMID:22379516

  18. Academic Well-Being, Mathematics Performance, and Educational Aspirations in Lower Secondary Education: Changes Within a School Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widlund, Anna; Tuominen, Heta; Korhonen, Johan

    2018-01-01

    It has been suggested that both performance and academic well-being play a role in adolescent students' educational attainment and school dropout. In this study, we therefore examined, first, what kinds of academic well-being (i.e., school burnout, schoolwork engagement, and mathematics self-concept) and mathematics performance profiles can be identified among lower secondary school students ( N grade 7 = 583, N grade 9 = 497); second, how stable these profiles are across one school year during the seventh and ninth grades; and, third, how students with different academic well-being and mathematics performance profiles differ with respect to their educational aspirations. By means of latent profile analyses, three groups of students in seventh grade: thriving (34%), average (51%), and negative academic well-being (15%) and four groups of students in ninth grade: thriving (25%), average (50%), negative academic well-being (18%), and low-performing (7%) with distinct well-being and mathematics performance profiles were identified. Configural frequency analyses revealed that the profiles were relatively stable across one school year; 60% of the students displayed identical profiles over time. The thriving students reported the highest educational aspirations compared to the other groups. In addition, the low-performing students in the ninth grade had the lowest educational aspirations just before the transition to upper secondary school. Practical implications as well as directions for future research are discussed.

  19. Academic Well-Being, Mathematics Performance, and Educational Aspirations in Lower Secondary Education: Changes Within a School Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Widlund

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that both performance and academic well-being play a role in adolescent students’ educational attainment and school dropout. In this study, we therefore examined, first, what kinds of academic well-being (i.e., school burnout, schoolwork engagement, and mathematics self-concept and mathematics performance profiles can be identified among lower secondary school students (Ngrade 7 = 583, Ngrade 9 = 497; second, how stable these profiles are across one school year during the seventh and ninth grades; and, third, how students with different academic well-being and mathematics performance profiles differ with respect to their educational aspirations. By means of latent profile analyses, three groups of students in seventh grade: thriving (34%, average (51%, and negative academic well-being (15% and four groups of students in ninth grade: thriving (25%, average (50%, negative academic well-being (18%, and low-performing (7% with distinct well-being and mathematics performance profiles were identified. Configural frequency analyses revealed that the profiles were relatively stable across one school year; 60% of the students displayed identical profiles over time. The thriving students reported the highest educational aspirations compared to the other groups. In addition, the low-performing students in the ninth grade had the lowest educational aspirations just before the transition to upper secondary school. Practical implications as well as directions for future research are discussed.

  20. Academic Well-Being, Mathematics Performance, and Educational Aspirations in Lower Secondary Education: Changes Within a School Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widlund, Anna; Tuominen, Heta; Korhonen, Johan

    2018-01-01

    It has been suggested that both performance and academic well-being play a role in adolescent students’ educational attainment and school dropout. In this study, we therefore examined, first, what kinds of academic well-being (i.e., school burnout, schoolwork engagement, and mathematics self-concept) and mathematics performance profiles can be identified among lower secondary school students (Ngrade 7 = 583, Ngrade 9 = 497); second, how stable these profiles are across one school year during the seventh and ninth grades; and, third, how students with different academic well-being and mathematics performance profiles differ with respect to their educational aspirations. By means of latent profile analyses, three groups of students in seventh grade: thriving (34%), average (51%), and negative academic well-being (15%) and four groups of students in ninth grade: thriving (25%), average (50%), negative academic well-being (18%), and low-performing (7%) with distinct well-being and mathematics performance profiles were identified. Configural frequency analyses revealed that the profiles were relatively stable across one school year; 60% of the students displayed identical profiles over time. The thriving students reported the highest educational aspirations compared to the other groups. In addition, the low-performing students in the ninth grade had the lowest educational aspirations just before the transition to upper secondary school. Practical implications as well as directions for future research are discussed. PMID:29593603

  1. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang LF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe.Methods: This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents.Results: Findings from this chart review include: 28.8% of the prescribed medications were not effective for the documented condition, 26.3% of the prescribed doses were incorrect, and 44.5% of the drugs prescribed were not the least expensive alternative.Discussion: This preliminary study suggests a need for a focused intervention with family medicine residents regarding inappropriate polypharmacy issues with older patients.

  2. Coping Self-Efficacy and Academic Stress among Hispanic First-Year College Students: The Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.; Watson, April A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the role that emotional intelligence plays in moderating the relationship between academic stress and coping self-efficacy among a sample of 125 Hispanic 1st-year college students enrolled at a medium-size, southern Hispanic-serving institution. Results of a 2-stage hierarchical multiple regression analysis…

  3. Attitudes about Help-Seeking Mediate the Relation between Parent Attachment and Academic Adjustment in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous studies have documented an association between parent attachment and college student adjustment, less is known about the mechanisms that underlie this relation. Accordingly, this short-term longitudinal study examined first-year college students' attitudes about academic help-seeking as one possible mechanism. As predicted,…

  4. College Students' Experiences of Childhood Developmental Traumatic Stress: Resilience, First-Year Academic Performance, and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnekrans, Allison K.; Calmes, Stephanie A.; Laux, John M.; Roseman, Christopher P.; Piazza, Nick J.; Reynolds, Jennifer L.; Harmening, Debra; Scott, Holly L.

    2018-01-01

    Developmental trauma--distressing childhood experiences that include mistreatment, interpersonal violence, abuse, assault, and neglect--is associated with substance use and poor academic performance. The authors investigated the links between developmental trauma, grade point average, substance use, and resilience among first-year college students…

  5. Digital Storytelling for Enhancing Student Academic Achievement, Critical Thinking, and Learning Motivation: A Year-Long Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting C.; Wu, Wan-Chi I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of Digital storytelling (DST) on the academic achievement, critical thinking, and learning motivation of senior high school students learning English as a foreign language. The one-year study adopted a pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design involving 110 10th grade students in two English…

  6. Afterschool School Triathlon Training for 11- to 14-Year Old Girls: Influences on Academic Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatz, Jennifer; Kelly, Angela M.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of a Transformation through Triathlon after school programme in promoting health status, academic motivation and socioemotional development in at-risk girls aged 11-14 years attending middle school in the USA. Design: A phenomenological approach was employed with elements of grounded theory to analyse…

  7. Teacher Ratings of Academic Achievement of Children between 6 and 12 Years Old from Intact and Non-Intact Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molepo, Lephodisa S.; Maunganidze, Levison; Mudhovozi, Pilot; Sodi, Tholene

    2010-01-01

    We investigated teacher ratings of the impact of parental divorce on academic achievement of children between 6 and 12 years old up to 12 months after their parents divorced. A purposive sample of 120 children attending four different primary schools in a small South African town took part in the study. One third (n = 40) of the children had…

  8. Academic Performance of First-Year Students at a College of Pharmacy in East Tennessee: Models for Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Cheri Whitehead

    2013-01-01

    With the increase of students applying to pharmacy programs, it is imperative that admissions committees choose appropriate measures to analyze student readiness. The purpose of this research was to identify significant factors that predict the academic performance, defined as grade point average (GPA) at the end of the first professional year, of…

  9. Social Adjustment, Academic Adjustment, and the Ability to Identify Emotion in Facial Expressions of 7-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Stephanie; Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The authors aimed to examine the possible association between (a) accurately reading emotion in facial expressions and (b) social and academic competence among elementary school-aged children. Participants were 840 7-year-old children who completed a test of the ability to read emotion in facial expressions. Teachers rated children's social and…

  10. A Year in the Life: Academic Coaching and the Role of Collaboration in a Rural Ohio School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sara Lohrman

    2012-01-01

    This year-long qualitative case study provides an analysis of the work of a math coach as she built collaborative partnerships in a rural Appalachian school. Academic coaches provide embedded professional development and the theoretical hope of improving teachers' instructional abilities and thereby raising student achievement. As rural schools…

  11. An Intervention to Improve Academic Literacies in a First Year University Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin Kelly-Laubscher

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa there are many students, especially those from previously underrepresented groups at university, who successfully gain access to university but do not succeed in completing their degree either within the prescribed time or at all.  One of the barriers to student success at university is the difficulty these students have in accessing the literacy practices of the disciplines.  Therefore, within a first year biology course at a South African University, an intervention that focused on the academic literacy practices in biology was introduced. The intervention was designed around the assignment of writing a lab report. This paper describes this intervention and how it impacted on one student’s journey from learning science at school to learning science at university.  A literacy history interview and ‘talk around text’ interviews were used to assess the student’s experience of the intervention. Comparison of the student’s first and final drafts of the report revealed changes in the style and format of his writing. These changes in his report writing as well as in his attitude and motivation for writing the report were facilitated by a better understanding of the expectations of writing in university biology. This understanding was mediated largely through the modelling and deconstruction of the expected genre. This highlights not only the importance of providing first year students with examples of the genres they are  expected to be writing but also the facilitation of their engagement with these new genres. Without these kinds of intervention many students are unlikely to gain access to disciplinary ways of learning and writing, which ultimately may lead to their exclusion from university.

  12. Ten years after the IOM report: Engaging residents in quality and patient safety by creating a House Staff Quality Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischut, Peter M; Evans, Adam S; Nugent, William C; Faggiani, Susan L; Lazar, Eliot J; Liebowitz, Richard S; Forese, Laura L; Kerr, Gregory E

    2011-01-01

    Ten years after the 1999 Institute of Medicine report, it is clear that despite significant progress, much remains to be done to improve quality and patient safety (QPS). Recognizing the critical role of postgraduate trainees, an innovative approach was developed at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center to engage residents in QPS by creating a Housestaff Quality Council (HQC). HQC leaders and representatives from each clinical department communicate and partner regularly with hospital administration and other key departments to address interdisciplinary quality improvement (QI). In support of the mission to improve patient care and safety, QI initiatives included attaining greater than 90% compliance with medication reconciliation and reduction in the use of paper laboratory orders by more than 70%. A patient safety awareness campaign is expected to evolve into a transparent environment where house staff can openly discuss patient safety issues to improve the quality of care.

  13. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  14. Gender trends in authorship of spine-related academic literature-a 39-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, David C; Jain, Deeptee; Ouyang, David

    2017-11-01

    Despite recent advances in gender equity in medicine, the representation of women in orthopedic and neurosurgery remains particularly low. Furthermore, compared with their male colleagues, female faculty members are less likely to publish research, limiting opportunities in the academic promotion process. Understanding disparities in research productivity provides insight into the "gender gap" in the spine surgeon workforce. This study aims to determine the representation and longevity of female physician-investigators among the authors of five spine-related research journals from 1978 to 2016. This is a retrospective bibliometric review. The authors of original research articles from five prominent spine-related journals (European Spine Journal, The Spine Journal, Spine, Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques, and Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine) were extracted from PubMed. For authors with a complete first name listed, gender was determined by matching first name using an online database containing 216,286 distinct names across 79 countries and 89 languages. The proportion of female first and senior authors was determined during the time periods 1978 to 1994, 1995 to 1999, 2000 to 2004, 2005 to 2009, and 2010 to 2016. The authors who had their first paper published between 2000 and 2009 were included in additional analyses for publication count and longevity (whether additional articles were published 5 years after first publication). Student t test, chi-square analysis, and Cochran-Armitage trend test were used to determine significance between groups. From 1978 to 2016, 28,882 original research articles were published in the five spine-related journals. A total of 24,334 abstracts (90.9%) had first names listed, identifying 120,723 authors, in total of which 100,286 were successfully matched to a gender. A total of 33,480 unique authors were identified (female authors: 31.8%). Female representation increased for first and senior authors from 6.5% and 4

  15. The relationship between internal medicine residency graduate performance on the ABIM certifying examination, yearly in-service training examinations, and the USMLE Step 1 examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Cynthia; Jackson, Jeffrey L; Frank, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To explore the relationship between United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores, yearly in-service training exam (ITE) scores, and passing the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination (ABIM-CE). The authors conducted a retrospective database review of internal medicine residents from the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2004 through 2012. Residents' USMLE Step 1, ITE, and ABIM-CE scores were extracted. Pearson rho, chi-square, and logistic regression were used to determine whether relationships existed between the scores and if Step 1 and ITE scores correlate with passing the ABIM-CE. There were 241 residents, who participated in 728 annual ITEs. There were Step 1 scores for 195 (81%) residents and ABIM-CE scores for 183 (76%). Step 1 and ABIM-CE scores had a modest correlation (rho: 0.59), as did ITE and ABIM-CE scores (rho: 0.48-0.67). Failing Step 1 or being in the bottom ITE quartile during any year of testing markedly increased likelihood of failing the boards (Step 1: relative risk [RR]: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.0-5.9; first-year residents' RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0-1.6; second-year residents' RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.5; third-year residents' RR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.5). USMLE Step 1 and ITE scores have a modest correlation with board scores. Failing Step 1 or scoring in the bottom quartile of the ITE increased the risk of failing the boards. What effective intervention, if any, program directors may use with at-risk residents is a question deserving further research.

  16. Nasopharyngeal Carriage of Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Serotypes Indentified among Nursing Home Residents in Comparison to the Elderly and Patients Younger than 65 Years Living in Domestic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolšek-Šušteršič, Maja; Beg Krasnič, Andreja; Mioč, Verica; Paragi, Metka; Rifel, Janez

    2017-09-01

    In Slovenia, there is little data available on pneumococcal vaccination rates and no data on asymptomatic NPCR and serotypes in the population of nursing home residents in comparison to the elderly living in domestic environment, therefore the goal was to gain these data. A cross sectional epidemiological study was performed. Nasopharyngeal swabs from 151 nursing home residents, 150 elderly living in domestic environment, and 38 adults less than 65 years old were collected twice (in two consecutive years). The swabs were analysed for pneumococcal identification and serotyping. Patient data were collected from medical files and medical history. No statistically significant differences in NPCR were seen between compared groups in two consecutive years. An average NPCR in two consecutive years in nursing home residents was 1.45%, in the elderly living in domestic environment 0.85%, and in adults less than 65 years old 7.05%. Serotypes identified among nursing home residents were 6B and 9N, among the group of elderly living in domestic environment, 6A and among adults less than 65 years old, 35F, 18C and 3. Pneumococcal vaccination rates were low (3.3% in nursing home residents, 6% in the elderly from domestic environment and 0% in the group of adults less than 65 years old). Our data suggests that NPCR and the proportion of people vaccinated with pneumococcal vaccine among the elderly are low. We identified different serotypes in all groups, only one person was a chronic carrier (serotype 35F).

  17. Sense of coherence, self-regulated learning and academic performance in first year nursing students: A cluster analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Ramjan, Lucie M; van den Nieuwenhuizen, Simon; Metcalfe, Lauren; Chang, Sungwon; Everett, Bronwyn

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the relationship between nursing students' sense of coherence, self-regulated learning and academic performance in bioscience. While there is increasing recognition of a need to foster students' self-regulated learning, little is known about the relationship of psychological strengths, particularly sense of coherence and academic performance. Using a prospective, correlational design, 563 first year nursing students completed the three dimensions of sense of coherence scale - comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness, and five components of self-regulated learning strategy - elaboration, organisation, rehearsal, self-efficacy and task value. Cluster analysis was used to group respondents into three clusters, based on their sense of coherence subscale scores. Although there were no sociodemographic differences in sense of coherence subscale scores, those with higher sense of coherence were more likely to adopt self-regulated learning strategies. Furthermore, academic grades collected at the end of semester revealed that higher sense of coherence was consistently related to achieving higher academic grades across all four units of study. Students with higher sense of coherence were more self-regulated in their learning approach. More importantly, the study suggests that sense of coherence may be an explanatory factor for students' successful adaptation and transition in higher education, as indicated by the positive relationship of sense of coherence to academic performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep quantity, quality, and insomnia symptoms of medical students during clinical years. Relationship with stress and academic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A. Alsaggaf; Siraj O. Wali; Roah A. Merdad; Leena A. Merdad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine sleep habits and sleep quality in medical students during their clinical years using validated measures; and to investigate associations with academic performance and psychological stress. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, medical students (n=320) were randomly selected from a list of all enrolled clinical-year students in a Saudi medical school from 2011-2012. Students filled a questionnaire including demographic and lifestyle factors, Pittsburgh Sleep Qual...

  19. Evaluation of clinical teaching quality in competency-based residency training in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Vaižgėlienė

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Resident evaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teachers’ age, gender, year of residency training, type of teachers’ academic position and whether or not a clinical teacher performed self-evaluation. Development of CBME should be focused on the continuous evaluation of quality, clinical teachers educational support and the implementation of e-portfolio.

  20. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  1. Changes in the number of resident publications after inception of the 80-hour work week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith D; Weinraub, Barbara; Mehta, Samir

    2010-08-01

    Since the inception of resident work-hour regulations, there has been considerable concern regarding the influence of decreased work hours on graduate medical education. In particular, it is unclear whether implementation of work-hour restrictions has influenced resident academic performance as defined by quantity of peer-reviewed publications while participating in graduate medical education. We determined the impact of work-hour changes on resident involvement in the number of published clinical studies, laboratory research, case reports, and review articles. We conducted a PubMed literature search of 139 consecutive orthopaedic surgery residents (789 total resident-years) at one institution from academic years 1995-1996 to 2008-2009. This represented a continuous timeline before and after implementation of work-hour restrictions. The number of resident publications before and after implementation of work-hour changes was compared. There was a greater probability of peer review authorship in any given resident-year after work-hour changes than before. Average publications per resident-year increased for total articles, clinical articles, case reports, and reviews. There was an increased rate of publications in which the resident was the first author. Since implementation of work-hour changes, total resident publications and publications per resident-year have increased.

  2. Surgical resident education: what is the department's price for commitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meara, Michael P; Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Witherington, Mitzi; Haisch, Carl; Rotondo, Michael F; Schenarts, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    The current recession has impacted all aspects of our economy. Some residency programs have experienced faculty salary cuts, furlough days, and cessation of funding for travel to academic meetings. This milieu forced many residency programs to reevaluate their commitment to resident education, particularly for those expenses not provided for by Direct Medical Education (DME) and Indirect Medical Education (IME) funds. The purpose of this study was to determine what price a Department of Surgery pays to fulfill its commitment to resident education. A financial analysis of 1 academic year was performed for all expenses not covered by DME or IME funds and is paid for by the faculty practice plan. These expenses were categorized and further analyzed to determine the funds required for resident-related scholarly activity. A university-based general surgery residency program. Twenty-eight surgical residents and a program coordinator. The departmental faculty provided $153,141 during 1 academic year to support the educational mission of the residency. This amount is in addition to the $1.6 million in faculty time, $850,000 provided by the federal government in terms of DME funds, and $14 million of IME funds, which are distributed on an institutional basis. Resident presentations at scientific meetings accounted for $49,672, and program coordinator costs of $44,190 accounted for nearly two-thirds of this funding. The departmental faculty committed $6400 per categorical resident. In addition to DME and IME funds, a department of surgery must commit significant additional monies to meet the educational goals of surgical residency. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Academic achievement over 8 years among children who met modified criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder at 4-6 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massetti, Greta M; Lahey, Benjamin B; Pelham, William E; Loney, Jan; Ehrhardt, Ashley; Lee, Steve S; Kipp, Heidi

    2008-04-01

    The predictive validity of symptom criteria for different subtypes of ADHD among children who were impaired in at least one setting in early childhood was examined. Academic achievement was assessed seven times over 8 years in 125 children who met symptom criteria for ADHD at 4-6 years of age and in 130 demographically-matched non-referred comparison children. When intelligence and other confounds were controlled, children who met modified criteria for the predominantly inattentive subtype of ADHD in wave 1 had lower reading, spelling, and mathematics scores over time than both comparison children and children who met modified criteria for the other subtypes of ADHD. In some analyses, children who met modified criteria for the combined type had somewhat lower mathematics scores than comparison children. The robust academic deficits relative to intelligence in the inattentive group in this age range suggest either that inattention results in academic underachievement or that some children in the inattentive group have learning disabilities that cause secondary symptoms of inattention. Unexpectedly, wave 1 internalizing (anxiety and depression) symptoms independently predicted deficits in academic achievement controlling ADHD, intelligence, and other predictors.

  4. Correlation among academic performance, recurrent abdominal pain and other factors in Year-6 urban primary-school children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, C C M; Omar, A; Arul Phillips, J

    2003-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the extent to which recurrent abdominal pain and other factors were associated with academic achievement among Year-6 (12 years of age) schoolchildren. The present study was a cross-sectional survey conducted from September to November 2001. Schoolchildren were recruited from primary schools that were selected randomly from a list of all primary schools in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, using random sampling numbers. Information concerning recurrent abdominal pain, socio-economic status, life events, demographic and other details was obtained using a combination of questionnaires and interviews. Academic achievement was assessed using a score based on the Malaysian Primary School Achievement Examination. An overall score at or above the mean was taken to indicate high academic achievement while a score below the mean indicated poor academic achievement. A total of 1971 children were studied (958 boys and 1013 girls: 1047 Malays, 513 Chinese and 411 Indians). Of these children, 456 (23.1%) fulfilled the criteria for recurrent abdominal pain. Using the method of binary logistic regression analysis, the following factors were found to be independently associated with poor academic performance: a low socio-economic status (odds ratio (OR) 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.35); male sex (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.26-2.05); the death of a close relative (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.73-2.85); the divorce or separation of parents (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.73-5.40); the commencement of work by the mother (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.02-1.76); hospitalization of the child in the 12 months prior to the study (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.12-3.01); lack of health-care consultation (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.36-2.36); missing breakfast (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.07-2.02); and lack of kindergarten education (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.04-1.75). Many factors, such as socio-economic status and recent life events, were associated with poor academic performance. Recurrent abdominal pain did not correlate

  5. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-04-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing.

  6. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. Methods A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. Results In total 415 (51 % residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p Residents highly valued their colleagues (67%, program directors (60% and external psychiatrist/psychologist (49% as well-being resources. Over one third of residents wished to have a career counselor (39% and financial counselor (38%. Conclusion Many Albertan residents experience significant stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  7. Rheumatologic care of nursing home residents with rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the year before and after nursing home admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Ramos, Andres; Albrecht, Katinka; Zink, Angela; Hoffmann, Falk

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate health care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after admission to nursing homes. Data of a German health insurance fund from persons with diagnostic codes of RA, aged ≥65 years, admitted to a nursing home between 2010 and 2014 and continuously insured 1 year before and after admission were used. The proportion of patients with ≥1 rheumatologist visit and ≥1 prescription of biologic or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs or csDMARDs), glucocorticoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the year before and after admission were calculated. Predictors of rheumatologic care after admission were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. Of 75,697 nursing home residents, 2485 (3.3%) had RA (90.5% female, mean age 83.8). Treatment by rheumatologists and prescription of antirheumatic drugs decreased significantly in the year after admission (rheumatologic visits: 17.6 to 9.1%, bDMARDs: 2.1 to 1.5%, csDMARDs: 22.5 to 16.5%, glucocorticoids: 46.5 to 43.1%, NSAIDs: 47.4 to 38.5%). 60.2% of patients in rheumatologic care received csDMARDs compared with 14.5% without rheumatologic care. Rheumatologic care before admission to a nursing home strongly predicted rheumatologic care thereafter (OR 33.8, 95%-CI 23.2-49.2). Younger age and lower care level (reflecting need of help) were also associated with a higher chance of rheumatologic care. Rheumatologic care is already infrequent in old patients with RA and further decreases after admission to a nursing home. Patients without rheumatologic care are at high risk of insufficient treatment for their RA. Admission to a nursing home further increases this risk.

  8. An Internet-Based Radiology Course in Medical School: Comparison of Academic Performance of Students on Campus Versus Those With Absenteeism Due to Residency Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Andrew George; Deas, Deborah; Lyons, Paul Eric

    2018-05-18

    Imaging and its optimal use are imperative to the practice of medicine, yet many students don't receive a formal education in radiology. Concurrently, students look for ways to take time away from medical school for residency interviewing. Web-based instruction provides an opportunity to combine these imperatives using online modalities. A largely Web-based course in radiology during the 4th year of medical school was evaluated both for its acceptance to students who needed to be away from campus for interviews, and its effectiveness on a nationally administered standardized test. All students were placed into a structured program utilizing online videos, online modules, online textbook assignments, and live interactive online lectures. Over half of the course could be completed away from campus. The Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology test exam bank was used as a final exam to evaluate medical knowledge. Positive student feedback included the freedom to travel for interviews, hands-on ultrasound training, interactive teaching sessions, and quality Web-based learning modules. Negative feedback included taking quizzes in-person, a perceived outdated online textbook, and physically shadowing hospital technicians. Most students elected to take the course during the interview months of October through January. The Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology final exam results (70.5%) were not significantly different than the national cohort (70%) who took the course in-person. Test scores from students taking the course during interview travel months were not significantly different from students who took the course before (P=.30) or after (P=.34) the interview season. Students desire to learn radiology and often choose to do so when they need to be away from campus during the fall of their 4th year of study to accomplish their residency interviews. Web-based education in radiology allows students' interview traveling and radiology course

  9. Preliminary Evidence of a Relationship between the Use of Online Learning and Academic Performance in a South African First-Year University Accounting Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Abdel K.; Essop, Ahmed; Carmichael, Teresa; Steyn, Blanche

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the use of online learning resources and academic performance in an Accounting 1 course conducted at a South African Higher Education Institution. The study employed a quantitative analysis over three academic years comparing the collection of end of year marks and the time spent online. The results…

  10. 26 CFR 1.871-13 - Taxation of individuals for taxable year of change of U.S. citizenship or residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of individuals for taxable year of change of U.S. citizenship or residence. 1.871-13 Section 1.871-13 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Foreign Corporations § 1.871-13 Taxation of individuals for taxable year of change of U.S. citizenship or...

  11. An Analysis of Publication Productivity During Residency for 1506 Neurosurgical Residents and 117 Residency Departments in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nickalus R; Saad, Hassan; Oravec, Chesney S; Norrdahl, Sebastian P; Fraser, Brittany; Wallace, David; Lillard, Jock C; Motiwala, Mustafa; Nguyen, Vincent N; Lee, Siang Liao; Jones, Anna V; Ajmera, Sonia; Kalakoti, Piyush; Dave, Pooja; Moore, Kenneth A; Akinduro, Olutomi; Nyenwe, Emmanuel; Vaughn, Brandy; Michael, L Madison; Klimo, Paul

    2018-05-30

    Bibliometrics is defined as the study of statistical and mathematical methods used to quantitatively analyze scientific literature. The application of bibliometrics in neurosurgery continues to evolve. To calculate a number of publication productivity measures for almost all neurosurgical residents and departments within North America. These measures were correlated with survey results on the educational environment within residency programs. During May to June 2017, data were collected from departmental websites and Scopus to compose a bibliometric database of neurosurgical residents and residency programs. Data related to authorship value and study content were collected on all articles published by residents. A survey of residency program research and educational environment was administered to program directors and coordinators; results were compared with resident academic productivity. The median number of publications in residency was 3; median h-index and Resident index were 1 and 0.17 during residency, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in academic productivity among male neurosurgical residents compared with females. The majority of articles published were tier 1 clinical articles. Residency program research support was significantly associated with increased resident productivity (P productivity. This study represents the most comprehensive bibliometric assessment of neurosurgical resident academic productivity during training to date. New benchmarks for individual and department academic productivity are provided. A supportive research environment for neurosurgical residents is associated with increased academic productivity, but a scholarly activity requirement was, surprisingly, not shown to have a positive effect.

  12. Text messaging among residents and faculty in a university general surgery residency program: prevalence, purpose, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Galante, Joseph M; Bold, Richard J; Canter, Robert J; Martinez, Steve R

    2013-01-01

    There is little information about the use of text messaging (texting) devices among resident and faculty physicians for patient-related care (PRC). To determine the prevalence, frequency, purpose, and concerns regarding texting among resident and attending surgeons and to identify factors associated with PRC texting. E-mail survey. University medical center and its affiliated hospitals. Surgery resident and attending staff. Prevalence, frequency, purpose, and concerns regarding patient-related care text messaging. Overall, 73 (65%) surveyed physicians responded, including 45 resident (66%) and 28 attending surgeons (62%). All respondents owned a texting device. Majority of surgery residents (88%) and attendings (71%) texted residents, whereas only 59% of residents and 65% of attendings texted other faculty. Most resident to resident text occurred at a frequency of 3-5 times/d (43%) compared with most attending to resident texts, which occurred 1-2 times/d (33%). Most resident to attending (25%) and attending to attending (30%) texts occurred 1-2 times/d. Among those that texted, PRC was the most frequently reported purpose for resident to resident (46%), resident to attending (64%), attending to resident (82%), and attending to other attending staff (60%) texting. Texting was the most preferred method to communicate about routine PRC (47% of residents vs 44% of attendings). Age (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.79-0.95; p = 0.003), but not sex, specialty/clinical rotation, academic rank, or postgraduate year (PGY) level predicted PRC texting. Most resident and attending staff surveyed utilize texting, mostly for PRC. Texting was preferred for communicating routine PRC information. Our data may facilitate the development of guidelines for the appropriate use of PRC texting. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Academic Motivation of the First-Year University Students and the Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseoglu, Yaman

    2013-01-01

    The Self Determination Theory has identified various types of motivation along a continuum from weakest to strongest. Yet, until recently, no reliable method existed to measure accurately the strength of motivation along this continuum. Vallerand et al. (1992) developed the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) to measure the validity of the Self…

  14. Eleven Years of Primary Health Care Delivery in an Academic Nursing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Baisch, Mary Jo; Lundeen, Sally P.; Bell-Calvin, Jean; Kelber, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Client visits to an academic community nursing center (n=25,495) were coded and analyzed. Results show expansion of nursing practice and services, strong case management, and management of illness care. The usefulness of computerized clinical documentation system and of the Lundeen conceptional model of community nursing care was demonstrated.…

  15. 10 Years Later: Lessons Learned from an Academic Multidisciplinary Cosmetic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny T. Chen, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion:. Although the creation of our academic cosmetic ambulatory surgery center has greatly increased the overall volume of cosmetic surgery performed at the University of Wisconsin, the majority of surgical volume and revenue is reconstructive. As is seen nationwide, minimally invasive cosmetic procedures represent our most rapidly expanding revenue stream.

  16. Secondary Teachers' Reflections from a Year of Professional Learning Related to Academic Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Hannah; Crowley, Kimberly; Townsend, Dianna R.; Barone, Diane

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the changing beliefs and practices of 25 secondary teachers participating in a yearlong professional learning (PL) partnership. To demonstrate differences in teachers' approaches to and understandings resulting from that PL, the authors looked more closely at three teachers and found that their ideas about academic language…

  17. A year of mentoring in academic medicine: case report and qualitative analysis of fifteen hours of meetings between a junior and senior faculty member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatin, Joseph S; Lipkin, Mack; Rubin, Alan S; Schachter, Allison; Nathan, Michael; Kalet, Adina

    2004-05-01

    We describe a specific mentoring approach in an academic general internal medicine setting by audiotaping and transcribing all mentoring sessions in the year. In advance, the mentor recorded his model. During the year, the mentee kept a process journal. Qualitative analysis revealed development of an intimate relationship based on empathy, trust, and honesty. The mentor's model was explicitly intended to develop independence, initiative, improved thinking, skills, and self-reflection. The mentor's methods included extensive and varied use of questioning, active listening, standard setting, and frequent feedback. During the mentoring, the mentee evolved as a teacher, enhanced the creativity in his teaching, and matured as a person. Specific accomplishments included a national workshop on professional writing, an innovative approach to inpatient attending, a new teaching skills curriculum for a residency program, and this study. A mentoring model stressing safety, intimacy, honesty, setting of high standards, praxis, and detailed planning and feedback was associated with mentee excitement, personal and professional growth and development, concrete accomplishments, and a commitment to teaching.

  18. Academic attainment and special educational needs in extremely preterm children at 11 years of age: the EPICure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S; Hennessy, E; Smith, R; Trikic, R; Wolke, D; Marlow, N

    2009-07-01

    To assess academic attainment and special educational needs (SEN) in extremely preterm children in middle childhood. Of 307 extremely preterm (special school. In mainstream schools, 105 (57%) extremely preterm children had SEN (OR 10; 6 to 18) and 103 (55%) required SEN resource provision (OR 10; 6 to 18). Teachers rated 50% of extremely preterm children as having below average attainment compared with 5% of classmates (OR 18; 8 to 41). Extremely preterm children who entered compulsory education an academic year early due to preterm birth had similar academic attainment but required more SEN support (OR 2; 1.0 to 3.6). Extremely preterm survivors remain at high risk for learning impairments and poor academic attainment in middle childhood. A significant proportion require full-time specialist education and over half of those attending mainstream schools require additional health or educational resources to access the national curriculum. The prevalence and impact of SEN are likely to increase as these children approach the transition to secondary school.

  19. Mental health status of newly Admitted students of Mazandaran university of medical sciences in 1999-2000 Academic year.

    OpenAIRE

    S.H.Hosseini; S.E.Mousavi

    2000-01-01

    SummaryBackground and purpose: Major changes occur in an individuals life after his acceptance in the university which cloud be considered as every important period of his life. This new condition is stressful and can affect the newly admitted student’s mental health. In this article we analyze the mental health status of newly admitted students to Mazandaran university of medical sciences in the academic year 1999-2000.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study all the newl...

  20. 20 Years of Publications on Relationship Marketing in Brazil: An Analysis of the 1992 Academic Production a 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Lima Faria

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work, using as sample the ENANPAD`s annals and the periodics RAE and RAUSP, analyzed the academic production on relationship marketing from 1992 to 2012. For this, we used, as basis methodological, six aspects observed in the study de Almeida, Lopes and Pereira (2006, which provided comparisons of results, allowing to build an overview of 20 years of research on relationship marketing in Brazil.    

  1. [Preschool familial environment and academic difficulties: A 10-year follow-up from kindergarten to middle school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara-Costa, H; Pulgar, S; Cusin, F; Dellatolas, G

    2016-02-01

    The persistence of academic difficulties from childhood through adulthood has led researchers to focus on the identification of the early factors influencing children's subsequent achievement in order to improve the efficient screening of children who might be at risk of school failure. The foundations of academic achievement can be accurately traced back to the preschool years prior to children's entry in formal schooling and are largely influenced by environmental determinants. Importantly, some environmental conditions act as early risk factors undermining children's later academic achievement due to the well-established relation between underachievement and exposure to moderate to high levels of environmental risk. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the longitudinal effects of environment-level factors (sociodemographic and family characteristics) and early risk exposure at kindergarten on children's subsequent academic achievement at the end of middle school (grade 9). The sample of analysis comprised 654 kindergarteners aged 5-6 years (2001-2002 school year) followed through the end of middle school when they were aged 14-15 years (2010-2011 school year). At kindergarten, assessment included questionnaire-based measures of sociodemographic and family background characteristics. These included an original set of information pertaining to family background including parental nationality, education level, history of reading difficulties, type of early childcare, family situation, family size, and language-based bedtime routines, as well as individual-level factors such as children's first language, medical history, language delay, birth weight, age of walking onset, and gestation period. At grade 9, outcome measures were composed of children's results in the national evaluations performed at the end of middle school ("Diplôme National du Brevet"), or history of repetition for a second year of the same class. The results indicated that all family

  2. Prevalence of Gingivitis in a Group of 35- to 70-Year-Olds Residing in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Boneta, Augusto R; Encarnación, Angeliz; Rivas-Tumanyan, Sona; Berríos-Ouslán, Beatriz C; García-Godoy, Bayardo; Murillo, Margarita; Diaz-Nicolas, Jomar; Lugo, Ferdinand; Toro, Milagros J

    2017-09-01

    Gingivitis, an inflammation of the gingival tissues, typically progresses to periodontitis. The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of gingivitis in 35- to 70-year-olds residing in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and assess the differences in gingivitis distribution between age and gender groups. A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted with a sample of patients from a private practice and patients/employees of the Puerto Rico Medical Center. Participants completed a medical history questionnaire and received soft/hard tissue and gingival assessments based on a modified Löe-Silness index. Descriptive statistics were employed to estimate the overall gingivitis prevalence, severity (mild, moderate, severe), and mean gingival index (GI). Bleeding on probing (BOP) prevalence and the mean percentage of BOP sites were calculated by gender and age. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between age, gender, and severity in 3 categories; multivariate logistic regression was used for having >=40% sites with BOP (vs. having Puerto Rico than in the US.

  3. Undernutrition and Its Correlates among Children of 3–9 Years of Age Residing in Slum Areas of Bhubaneswar, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sai Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Undernutrition among children is a major public health concern worldwide, more prevalent in Asia and Africa. It manifests itself in various forms such as wasting or stunting or underweight and retards physical and mental development, increases susceptibility to infection, and reduces educational attainment and productivity. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of wasting, stunting, and underweight and determine its associates among slum children of 3–9 years of age, residing in Bhubaneswar city, India. After obtaining informed consent, a total of 249 children from 249 households were studied and their parents/guardians were interviewed to collect all relevant information. 23.3%, 57.4%, and 45.4% of children were found to have wasting, stunting, and underweight, respectively. Variables like birth order of child, period of initiation of breastfeeding and mother's education were found to be strong predictors of wasting, whereas toilet facility in household and practice of drinking water storage were significantly associated with stunting among slum children as revealed in multiple regression analysis. Thus, a multipronged approach is needed such as giving priority to improve education for slum community especially for women, creating awareness regarding benefits of early initiation of breastfeeding, small family size, and proper storage of drinking water, and providing toilet facility in slum households which could improve the nutritional status of slum children. PMID:25580460

  4. Undernutrition and its correlates among children of 3-9 years of age residing in slum areas of Bhubaneswar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Ansuman; Das, Sai Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Undernutrition among children is a major public health concern worldwide, more prevalent in Asia and Africa. It manifests itself in various forms such as wasting or stunting or underweight and retards physical and mental development, increases susceptibility to infection, and reduces educational attainment and productivity. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of wasting, stunting, and underweight and determine its associates among slum children of 3-9 years of age, residing in Bhubaneswar city, India. After obtaining informed consent, a total of 249 children from 249 households were studied and their parents/guardians were interviewed to collect all relevant information. 23.3%, 57.4%, and 45.4% of children were found to have wasting, stunting, and underweight, respectively. Variables like birth order of child, period of initiation of breastfeeding and mother's education were found to be strong predictors of wasting, whereas toilet facility in household and practice of drinking water storage were significantly associated with stunting among slum children as revealed in multiple regression analysis. Thus, a multipronged approach is needed such as giving priority to improve education for slum community especially for women, creating awareness regarding benefits of early initiation of breastfeeding, small family size, and proper storage of drinking water, and providing toilet facility in slum households which could improve the nutritional status of slum children.

  5. The "gender gap" in authorship of academic medical literature--a 35-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Guancial, Elizabeth A; Worobey, Cynthia Cooper; Henault, Lori E; Chang, Yuchiao; Starr, Rebecca; Tarbell, Nancy J; Hylek, Elaine M

    2006-07-20

    Participation of women in the medical profession has increased during the past four decades, but issues of concern persist regarding disparities between the sexes in academic medicine. Advancement is largely driven by peer-reviewed original research, so we sought to determine the representation of female physician-investigators among the authors of selected publications during the past 35 years. Original articles from six prominent medical journals--the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the Annals of Internal Medicine (Ann Intern Med), the Annals of Surgery (Ann Surg), Obstetrics & Gynecology (Obstet Gynecol), and the Journal of Pediatrics (J Pediatr)--were categorized according to the sex of both the first and the senior (last listed) author. Sex was also determined for the authors of guest editorials in NEJM and JAMA. Data were collected for the years 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2004. The analysis was restricted to authors from U.S. institutions holding M.D. degrees. The sex was determined for 98.5 percent of the 7249 U.S. authors of original research with M.D. degrees. The proportion of first authors who were women increased from 5.9 percent in 1970 to 29.3 percent in 2004 (P<0.001), and the proportion of senior authors who were women increased from 3.7 percent to 19.3 percent (P<0.001) during the same period. The proportion of authors who were women increased most sharply in Obstet Gynecol (from 6.7 percent of first authors and 6.8 percent of senior authors in 1970 to 40.7 percent of first authors and 28.0 percent of senior authors in 2004) and J Pediatr (from 15.0 percent of first authors and 4.3 percent of senior authors in 1970 to 38.9 percent of first authors and 38.0 percent of senior authors in 2004) and remained low in Ann Surg (from 2.3 percent of first authors and 0.7 percent of senior authors in 1970 to 16.7 percent of first authors and 6.7 percent of senior authors in 2004). In 2004, 11

  6. Academic language in early childhood interactions : a longitudinal study of 3- to 6-year-old Dutch monolingual children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrichs, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines academic language in early childhood. It covers children’s exposure to academic language in early childhood, children’s early production of academic language, the development of academic language proficiency and the co-construction of academic language by children and adults.The

  7. Emotional intelligence as a predictor of academic performance in first-year accelerated graduate entry nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ritin; Salamonson, Yenna; Griffiths, Rhonda

    2012-12-01

    To examine the association between trait emotional intelligence and learning strategies and their influence on academic performance among first-year accelerated nursing students. The study used a prospective survey design. A sample size of 81 students (100% response rate) who undertook the accelerated nursing course at a large university in Sydney participated in the study. Emotional intelligence was measured using the adapted version of the 144-item Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire. Four subscales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were used to measure extrinsic goal motivation, peer learning, help seeking and critical thinking among the students. The grade point average score obtained at the end of six months was used to measure academic achievement. The results demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between emotional intelligence scores and critical thinking (r = 0.41; p peer learning (r = 0.32; p academic achievement (β = 0.25; p = 0.023). In addition to their learning styles, higher levels of awareness and understanding of their own emotions have a positive impact on students' academic achievement. Higher emotional intelligence may lead students to pursue their interests more vigorously and think more expansively about subjects of interest, which could be an explanatory factor for higher academic performance in this group of nursing students. The concepts of emotional intelligence are central to clinical practice as nurses need to know how to deal with their own emotions as well as provide emotional support to patients and their families. It is therefore essential that these skills are developed among student nurses to enhance the quality of their clinical practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Differential use of learning strategies in first-year higher education: the impact of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donche, Vincent; De Maeyer, Sven; Coertjens, Liesje; Van Daal, Tine; Van Petegem, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Although the evidence in support of the variability of students' learning strategies has expanded in recent years, less is known about the explanatory base of these individual differences in terms of the joint influences of personal and contextual characteristics. Previous studies have often investigated how student learning is associated with either personal or contextual factors. This study takes an integrative research perspective into account and examines the joint effects of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies on students' learning strategies in a same educational context in first-year higher education. In this study, 1,126 undergraduate students and 90 lecturers from eight professional bachelor programmes in a university college participated. Self-report measures were used to measure students' personality, academic motivation, and learning strategies. Students' processing and regulation strategies are mapped using the Inventory of Learning Styles. Key characteristics of more content-focused versus learning-focused teaching strategies were measured. Multivariate multi-level analysis was used to take the nested data structure and interrelatedness of learning strategies into account. Different personality traits (openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism) and academic motivation (amotivation, autonomous, and controlled motivation) were found to be independently associated with student learning strategies. Besides these student characteristics, also teaching strategies were found to be directly associated with learning strategies. The study makes clear that the impact of teaching strategies on learning strategies in first-year higher education cannot be overlooked nor overinterpreted, due to the importance of students' personality and academic motivation which also partly explain why students learn the way they do. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Developmental Delays in Executive Function from 3 to 5 Years of Age Predict Kindergarten Academic Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Michael T; Magnus, Brooke; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Blair, Clancy B

    Substantial evidence has established that individual differences in executive function (EF) in early childhood are uniquely predictive of children's academic readiness at school entry. The current study tested whether growth trajectories of EF across the early childhood period could be used to identify a subset of children who were at pronounced risk for academic impairment in kindergarten. Using data that were collected at the age 3, 4, and 5 home assessments in the Family Life Project ( N = 1,120), growth mixture models were used to identify 9% of children who exhibited impaired EF performance (i.e., persistently low levels of EF that did not show expected improvements across time). Compared to children who exhibited typical trajectories of EF, the delayed group exhibited substantial impairments in multiple indicators of academic readiness in kindergarten (Cohen's ds = 0.9-2.7; odds ratios = 9.8-23.8). Although reduced in magnitude following control for a range of socioeconomic and cognitive (general intelligence screener, receptive vocabulary) covariates, moderate-sized group differences remained (Cohen's ds = 0.2-2.4; odds ratios = 3.9-5.4). Results are discussed with respect to the use of repeated measures of EF as a method of early identification, as well as the resulting translational implications of doing so.

  10. Status of anesthesiology resident research education in the United States: structured education programs increase resident research productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shireen; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; McCarthy, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The enhancement of resident research education has been proposed to increase the number of academic anesthesiologists with the skills and knowledge to conduct meaningful research. Program directors (PDs) of the U.S. anesthesiology residency programs were surveyed to evaluate the status of research education during residency training and to test the hypothesis that structured programs result in greater resident research productivity based on resident publications. Survey responses were solicited from 131 anesthesiology residency PDs. Seventy-four percent of PDs responded to the survey. Questions evaluated department demographic information, the extent of faculty research activity, research resources and research funding in the department, the characteristics of resident research education and resident research productivity, departmental support for resident research, and perceived barriers to resident research education. Thirty-two percent of programs had a structured resident research education program. Structured programs were more likely to be curriculum based, require resident participation in a research project, and provide specific training in presentation and writing skills. Productivity expectations were similar between structured and nonstructured programs. Forty percent of structured programs had > 20% of trainees with a publication in the last 2 years compared with 14% of departments with unstructured programs (difference, 26%; 99% confidence interval [CI], 8%-51%; P = 0.01). The percentage of programs that had research rotations for ≥2 months was not different between the structured and the nonstructured programs. A research rotation of >2 months did not increase the percentage of residents who had published an article within the last 2 months compared with a research rotation of 20% of residents with a publication in the last 2 years compared with 36% in programs with >20% of faculty involvement (difference, 21%; 99% CI, -4% to 46%; P = 0.03). Our

  11. Attitudes of anesthesiology residents toward critical care medicine training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, C G; McLafferty, C L

    1993-09-01

    The number of anesthesiology residents pursuing critical care medicine (CCM) fellowship training has been decreasing in recent years. A significant number of training positions remain unfilled each year. Possible causes of this decline were evaluated by surveying residents regarding their attitudes toward practice and training in CCM. All 38 anesthesiology programs having accredited CCM fellowships were surveyed. Four of these and one program without CCM fellowships were used to develop the survey instrument. Four programs without CCM fellowships and 34 programs with CCM fellowships make up the survey group. Returned were 640 surveys from 37 (97%) programs accounting for over 30% of the possible residents. Resident interest in pursuing CCM training decreased as year of residency increased (P questions suggested resident concerns with the following: stress of chronic care, financial consequences of additional year of training, ICU call frequency and load, ICU role ambiguity, and shared decision-making in the ICU. A recurring question was, "Are there jobs (outside of academics) for anesthesiologist intensivists?" Most residents knew a CCM anesthesiologist they admired and knew that there were unfilled fellowship positions available. Defining the job market, improving curriculum and teaching, supporting deferment of student loans, and introducing residents and medical students to the ICU earlier may increase the interest in CCM practice among anesthesiology residents.

  12. Spatiotemporal Determinants of Urban Leptospirosis Transmission: Four-Year Prospective Cohort Study of Slum Residents in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E Hagan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat-borne leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease in urban slum settlements for which there are no adequate control measures. The challenge in elucidating risk factors and informing approaches for prevention is the complex and heterogeneous environment within slums, which vary at fine spatial scales and influence transmission of the bacterial agent.We performed a prospective study of 2,003 slum residents in the city of Salvador, Brazil during a four-year period (2003-2007 and used a spatiotemporal modelling approach to delineate the dynamics of leptospiral transmission. Household interviews and Geographical Information System surveys were performed annually to evaluate risk exposures and environmental transmission sources. We completed annual serosurveys to ascertain leptospiral infection based on serological evidence. Among the 1,730 (86% individuals who completed at least one year of follow-up, the infection rate was 35.4 (95% CI, 30.7-40.6 per 1,000 annual follow-up events. Male gender, illiteracy, and age were independently associated with infection risk. Environmental risk factors included rat infestation (OR 1.46, 95% CI, 1.00-2.16, contact with mud (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.17-2.17 and lower household elevation (OR 0.92 per 10m increase in elevation, 95% CI 0.82-1.04. The spatial distribution of infection risk was highly heterogeneous and varied across small scales. Fixed effects in the spatiotemporal model accounted for the majority of the spatial variation in risk, but there was a significant residual component that was best explained by the spatial random effect. Although infection risk varied between years, the spatial distribution of risk associated with fixed and random effects did not vary temporally. Specific "hot-spots" consistently had higher transmission risk during study years.The risk for leptospiral infection in urban slums is determined in large part by structural features, both social and environmental. Our findings

  13. Spatiotemporal Determinants of Urban Leptospirosis Transmission: Four-Year Prospective Cohort Study of Slum Residents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, José E; Moraga, Paula; Costa, Federico; Capian, Nicolas; Ribeiro, Guilherme S; Wunder, Elsio A; Felzemburgh, Ridalva D M; Reis, Renato B; Nery, Nivison; Santana, Francisco S; Fraga, Deborah; Dos Santos, Balbino L; Santos, Andréia C; Queiroz, Adriano; Tassinari, Wagner; Carvalho, Marilia S; Reis, Mitermayer G; Diggle, Peter J; Ko, Albert I

    2016-01-01

    Rat-borne leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease in urban slum settlements for which there are no adequate control measures. The challenge in elucidating risk factors and informing approaches for prevention is the complex and heterogeneous environment within slums, which vary at fine spatial scales and influence transmission of the bacterial agent. We performed a prospective study of 2,003 slum residents in the city of Salvador, Brazil during a four-year period (2003-2007) and used a spatiotemporal modelling approach to delineate the dynamics of leptospiral transmission. Household interviews and Geographical Information System surveys were performed annually to evaluate risk exposures and environmental transmission sources. We completed annual serosurveys to ascertain leptospiral infection based on serological evidence. Among the 1,730 (86%) individuals who completed at least one year of follow-up, the infection rate was 35.4 (95% CI, 30.7-40.6) per 1,000 annual follow-up events. Male gender, illiteracy, and age were independently associated with infection risk. Environmental risk factors included rat infestation (OR 1.46, 95% CI, 1.00-2.16), contact with mud (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.17-2.17) and lower household elevation (OR 0.92 per 10m increase in elevation, 95% CI 0.82-1.04). The spatial distribution of infection risk was highly heterogeneous and varied across small scales. Fixed effects in the spatiotemporal model accounted for the majority of the spatial variation in risk, but there was a significant residual component that was best explained by the spatial random effect. Although infection risk varied between years, the spatial distribution of risk associated with fixed and random effects did not vary temporally. Specific "hot-spots" consistently had higher transmission risk during study years. The risk for leptospiral infection in urban slums is determined in large part by structural features, both social and environmental. Our findings indicate that

  14. Admissions Criteria as Predictors of Academic Performance in a Three-Year Pharmacy Program at a Historically Black Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jayesh R.; Purnell, Miriam; Lang, Lynn A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the ability of University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy’s admissions criteria to predict students’ academic performance in a 3-year pharmacy program and to analyze transferability to African-American students. Methods. Statistical analyses were conducted on retrospective data for 174 students. Didactic and experiential scores were used as measures of academic performance. Results. Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), grade point average (GPA), interview, and observational scores combined with previous pharmacy experience and biochemistry coursework predicted the students' academic performance except second-year (P2) experiential performance. For African-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT writing subtests, while the experiential performance positively correlated with previous pharmacy experience and observational score. For nonAfrican-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT multiple-choice subtests, and experiential performance with interview score. The prerequisite GPA positively correlated with both of the student subgroups’ didactic performance. Conclusion. Both PCAT and GPA were predictors of didactic performance, especially in nonAfrican-Americans. Pharmacy experience and observational scores were predictors of experiential performance, especially in African-Americans. PMID:26941432

  15. Important Skills for Internship and the Fourth-Year Medical School Courses to Acquire Them: A National Survey of Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anne G; Harrell, Heather E; Weissman, Arlene; Smith, Cynthia D; Dupras, Denise; Kane, Gregory C

    2016-06-01

    To obtain feedback from internal medicine residents, a key stakeholder group, regarding both the skills needed for internship and the fourth-year medical school courses that prepared them for residency. This feedback could inform fourth-year curriculum redesign efforts. All internal medicine residents taking the 2013-2014 Internal Medicine In-Training Examination were asked to rank the importance of learning 10 predefined skills prior to internship and to use a dropdown menu of 11 common fourth-year courses to rank the 3 most helpful in preparing for internship. The predefined skills were chosen based on a review of the literature, a national subinternship curriculum, and expert consensus. Chi-square statistics were used to test for differences in responses between training levels. Of the 24,820 internal medicine residents who completed the exam, 20,484 (83%) completed the survey, had complete identification numbers, and consented to have their responses used for research. The three skills most frequently rated as very important were identifying when to seek additional help and expertise, prioritizing clinical tasks and managing time efficiently, and communicating with other providers around care transitions. The subinternship/acting internship was most often selected as being the most helpful course in preparing for internship. These findings indicate which skills and fourth-year medical school courses internal medicine residents found most helpful in preparing for internship and confirm the findings of prior studies highlighting the perceived value of subinternships. Internal medicine residents and medical educators agree on the skills students should learn prior to internship.

  16. Graduating 4th year radiology residents' perception of optimal imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma: a pilot study from four U.S. universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine; Semelka, Richard C.; Altun, Ersan; Thomas, Sarah L., E-mail: richsem@med.unc.ed [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Balci, N. Cem [Saint Louis University, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Hussain, Shahid M. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Martin, Diego R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Our purpose was to assess 4th year radiology residents' perception of the optimal imaging modality to investigate neoplasm and trauma. Materials and methods: twenty-seven 4th year radiology residents from four residency programs were surveyed. They were asked about the best imaging modality to evaluate the brain and spine, lungs, abdomen, and the musculoskeletal system. Imaging modalities available were MRI, CT, ultrasound, PET, and Xray. All findings were compared to the ACR appropriateness criteria. Results: MRI was chosen as the best imaging modality to evaluate brain, spine, abdominal, and musculoskeletal neoplasm in 96.3%, 100%, 70.4%, and 63% of residents, respectively. CT was chosen by 88.9% to evaluate neoplasm of the lung. Optimal imaging modality to evaluate trauma was CT for brain injuries (100%), spine (92.6%), lung (96.3%), abdomen (92.6%), and major musculoskeletal trauma (74.1%); MRI was chosen for sports injury (96.3%). There was agreement with ACR appropriateness criteria. Conclusion: residents' perception of the best imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma concurred with the appropriateness criteria by the ACR. (author)

  17. Preventing and responding to complaints of sexual harassment in an academic health center: a 10-year review from the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Connie L; Smith, Daniel W; Raymond, John R; Greenberg, Raymond S; Crouch, Rosalie K

    2010-04-01

    There is a high incidence of sexual harassment and gender discrimination in academic health center (AHC) settings according to multiple surveys of medical students. Therefore, it is incumbent on AHCs to develop programs both to educate faculty, residents, and students and to handle complaints of possible episodes of sexual harassment or gender discrimination. Despite the apparent high prevalence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment, and the importance of handling complaints of gender discrimination and sexual harassment in a prompt, consistent, and rational manner, there are few descriptions of programs that address those concerns in AHCs.Herein, the authors describe their experiences in dealing with complaints of sexual harassment and gender discrimination for a 10-year period of time (late 1997 to early 2007) at the Medical University of South Carolina, through an Office of Gender Equity. They describe their complaint process, components of their prevention training, and the outcomes of 115 complaints. Key elements of their policies are highlighted. The authors offer an approach that could serve as a model for other AHCs.

  18. Residents' experiences of abuse, discrimination and sexual harassment during residency training. McMaster University Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Liutkus, J F; Risdon, C L; Griffith, L E; Guyatt, G H; Walter, S D

    1996-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault, and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation, and to examine the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment in residency training programs. Self-administered questionnaire. McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. Residents in seven residency training programs during the academic year from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents 186 (82.7%) returned a completed questionnaire, and 50% of the respondents were women. Prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation experienced by residents during medical training, prevalence and residents' perceived frequency of sexual harassment. Psychological abuse was reported by 50% of the residents. Some of the respondents reported physical assault, mostly by patients and their family members (14.7% reported assaults by male patients and family members, 9.8% reported assaults by female patients and family members), 5.4% of the female respondents reported assault by male supervising physicians. Discrimination on the basis of gender was reported to be common and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (p sexual orientation. Most of the respondents experienced sexual harassment, especially in the form of sexist jokes, flirtation and unwanted compliments on their dress or figure. On average, 40% of the respondents, especially women (p sexual harassment to someone (p sexual harassment were embarassment (reported by 24.0%), anger (by 23.4%) and frustration (20.8%). Psychological abuse, discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual harassment are commonly experienced by residents in training programs. A direct, progressive, multidisciplinary approach is needed to label and address these problems.

  19. Anticholinergic Medication Burden and 5-Year Risk of Hospitalization and Death in Nursing Home Elderly Residents With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrano, Davide L; La Carpia, Domenico; Grande, Giulia; Casucci, Paola; Bacelli, Tiziana; Bernabei, Roberto; Onder, Graziano

    2016-11-01

    To assess the association of the anticholinergic medication burden with hospitalization and mortality in nursing home elderly patients and to investigate the role of coronary artery disease (CAD). Longitudinal (5-year) retrospective observational study. Nursing homes in Italy. A total of 3761 nursing home older residents. A comprehensive clinical and functional assessment was carried out through the interRAI long-term care facility instrument. The anticholinergic burden was assessed through the anticholinergic cognitive burden (ACB) scale. Occurrence of hospitalization/all-cause mortality was the primary composite outcome. First hospitalization and all-cause mortality were the secondary outcomes of the study. Hazard ratios (HRs) and subdistribution HRs were obtained through Cox and competing risk (death as competing event for hospitalization) models. Within the sample (mean age 83 ± 7 years; 72% females) the incidence rate of the primary outcome was 10/100 person-year. After adjusting for potential confounders and compared with participants with an ACB of 0, those with an ACB of 1 [HR 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.90] and ABC of 2+ (HR 1.41; 95% CI 1.11-1.79) presented an increased risk of developing the primary outcome. After stratification, the risk for the primary outcome increased along with the anticholinergic burden, only for participants affected by CAD (HR 1.53; 95% CI 0.94-2.50 and HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.09-2.68 for the ACB of 1 and ACB of 2+ groups). An ACB score of 2+ was marginally associated with first hospitalization, considering death as a competing risk, only for those with CAD (subdistribution HR 3.47; 95% CI 0.99-12.3). Anticholinergic medication burden is associated to hospitalization and all-cause mortality in institutionalized older adults. CAD increases such risk. The effectiveness and safety profile of complex drug regimens should be reconsidered in this population. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long

  20. Challenges in contemporary academic neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, the ideal academic neurosurgeon has been a "quadruple threat," with excellence in clinical work, teaching, research, and administration. This tradition was best exemplified in Harvey Cushing, who developed the field of neurosurgery 90 years ago. This paradigm will probably have to change as academic neurosurgeons face major challenges. In patient care, these include increasing regulatory control, increasing malpractice costs, consolidation of expensive care in academic centers, and decreasing reimbursement; in resident teaching, work hour limitations and a changing resident culture; in research, the increasing dominance of basic scientists in governmental funding decisions and decreased involvement of neurosurgeons in scientific review committees; and in administration, problems of relationships in the workplace, patient safety, and employment compliance in an increasingly bureaucratic system. To meet these challenges, the new academic neurosurgeon will probably not be a quadruple threat personally but will be part of a quadruple threat in a department and institution. Neurosurgeons in such a setting will have to work with hospital, medical school, and national and international groups to address malpractice, reimbursement, subspecialization, and training problems; find supplemental sources of income through grants, development funds, and hospital support; lead in the development of multidisciplinary centers for neuroscience, brain tumor, spine, and other initiatives; and focus on training leaders for hospital, regional, and national groups to reconfigure neurosurgery. Collaboration, flexibility, and leadership will be characteristic of the academic neurosurgeon in this new era.

  1. Relationship between self-assessed masticatory disability and 9-year mortality in a cohort of community-residing elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Hideki; Takatorige, Toshio; Tatara, Kozo

    2005-01-01

    To examine the relationship between self-assessed masticatory disability and mortality. Prospective. Community based. Total of 1,405 randomly selected people aged 65 and older living in Settsu, Osaka Prefecture, in October 1992. Data on health status as indicated by disability scores, history of health management, self-assessed masticatory ability, and psychosocial conditions were collected by means of interviews during home visits at the time of enrollment. Nine-year follow-up was completed for 1,245 (88.6%; 398 deceased and 847 alive). Self-assessed masticatory disability was significantly associated with being 75 and older, having overall disability, not using dental health checks or general health checks, not participating in social activities, not feeling that life is worth living (no ikigai), and finding relationships with people difficult. As for the association between self-assessed masticatory disability and mortality, the estimated survival rate for those with self-assessed masticatory disability was lower than that for those without for each group stratified by sex and age (65-74 and >or=75), and the equality of survival curves according to self-assessed masticatory disability was significant for each group. After controlling for potential predictors of mortality, self-assessed masticatory disability remained as a significant predictor of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio=1.63, 95% confidence interval=1.30-2.03, P<.001). These results indicate that self-assessed masticatory disability may be associated with a greater risk of mortality in community-residing elderly people.

  2. A Qualitative Analysis of Stress and Relaxation Themes Contributing to Burnout in First-Year Psychiatry and Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Nicole M; Chaukos, Deanna; Vestal, Heather; Chad-Friedman, Emma F; Denninger, John W; Borba, Christina P C

    2018-05-14

    Qualitative research on trainee well-being can add nuance to the understanding of propagators of burnout, and the role for interventions aimed at supporting well-being. This qualitative study was conducted to identify (i) situations and environments that cause stress for trainees, (ii) stress-reducing activities that trainees utilize, and (iii) whether trainees who report distress (high burnout and depression scores) describe different stressors and relaxation factors than those who do not. The study was conducted with a convenience sample of first-year medicine and psychiatry residents at a large urban teaching hospital. Participants were asked to complete electronic stress and relaxation diaries daily for 1 week. Diary entries were coded for recurrent themes. Participants were screened for burnout and depression. Codes were compared by subgroup based on baseline burnout and depression status to elucidate if specific themes emerged in these subgroups. Study sample included 51 interns. Sixteen (16/50, 32%) screened positive for burnout and three (3/50, 14%) had a positive depression screen. The most common stressors related to aspects of the learning environment, compounded by feeling under-equipped, overwhelmed, or out of time. The majority of relaxation activities involved social connection, food, other comforts, and occurred outside of the hospital environment. This study reveals that interns (regardless of burnout or depression screen) identify stressors that derive primarily from organizational, interpersonal, and cultural experiences of the learning environment; whereas relaxation themes are diversely represented across realms (home, leisure, social, health), though emphasize activities that occur outside of the work place.

  3. "The university didn't actually tell us this is what you have to do": Social inclusion through embedding of academic skills in first year professional courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Goldingay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The widening participation agenda means that students will be entering degree courses with increasingly diverse needs, particularly with respect to the academic skills necessary for successful tertiary study in Australia. This paper presents findings from a mixed methods project investigating first year social work students’ perceived role in academic skills and their development. Students expressed the perception that academic skill requirements and how they would be assessed should be made explicit, and identified a stigma associated with accessing study support services. The paper concludes that an intentional design strategy, such as embedding academic skills into the curriculum, helps bridge the different expectations between academics and students in the teaching and learning of academic skills, and hence constitutes a socially inclusive strategy to teaching professional courses such as social work, within higher education.  Recommendations to enhance the success and sustainability of such an initiative in the current higher education environment are offered.

  4. Urology Residents' Experience and Attitude Toward Surgical Simulation: Presenting our 4-Year Experience With a Multi-institutional, Multi-modality Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Alexander K; Sherer, Benjamin A; Yura, Emily; Kielb, Stephanie; Kocjancic, Ervin; Eggener, Scott; Turk, Thomas; Park, Sangtae; Psutka, Sarah; Abern, Michael; Latchamsetty, Kalyan C; Coogan, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the Urological resident's attitude and experience with surgical simulation in residency education using a multi-institutional, multi-modality model. Residents from 6 area urology training programs rotated through simulation stations in 4 consecutive sessions from 2014 to 2017. Workshops included GreenLight photovaporization of the prostate, ureteroscopic stone extraction, laparoscopic peg transfer, 3-dimensional laparoscopy rope pass, transobturator sling placement, intravesical injection, high definition video system trainer, vasectomy, and Urolift. Faculty members provided teaching assistance, objective scoring, and verbal feedback. Participants completed a nonvalidated questionnaire evaluating utility of the workshop and soliciting suggestions for improvement. Sixty-three of 75 participants (84%) (postgraduate years 1-6) completed the exit questionnaire. Median rating of exercise usefulness on a scale of 1-10 ranged from 7.5 to 9. On a scale of 0-10, cumulative median scores of the course remained high over 4 years: time limit per station (9; interquartile range [IQR] 2), faculty instruction (9, IQR 2), ease of use (9, IQR 2), face validity (8, IQR 3), and overall course (9, IQR 2). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in rating of domains between postgraduate years. Sixty-seven percent (42/63) believe that simulation training should be a requirement of Urology residency. Ninety-seven percent (63/65) viewed the laboratory as beneficial to their education. This workshop model is a valuable training experience for residents. Most participants believe that surgical simulation is beneficial and should be a requirement for Urology residency. High ratings of usefulness for each exercise demonstrated excellent face validity provided by the course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Would you be surprised if this patient died?: Preliminary exploration of first and second year residents' approach to care decisions in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong John D

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How physicians approach decision-making when caring for critically ill patients is poorly understood. This study aims to explore how residents think about prognosis and approach care decisions when caring for seriously ill, hospitalized patients. Methods Qualitative study where we conducted structured discussions with first and second year internal medicine residents (n = 8 caring for critically ill patients during Medical Intensive Care Unit Ethics and Discharge Planning Rounds. Residents were asked to respond to questions beginning with "Would you be surprised if this patient died?" Results An equal number of residents responded that they would (n = 4 or would not (n = 4 be surprised if their patient died. Reasons for being surprised included the rapid onset of an acute illness, reversible disease, improving clinical course and the patient's prior survival under similar circumstances. Residents reported no surprise with worsening clinical course. Based on the realization that their patient might die, residents cited potential changes in management that included clarifying treatment goals, improving communication with families, spending more time with patients and ordering fewer laboratory tests. Perceived or implied barriers to changes in management included limited time, competing clinical priorities, "not knowing" a patient, limited knowledge and experience, presence of diagnostic or prognostic uncertainty and unclear treatment goals. Conclusions These junior-level residents appear to rely on clinical course, among other factors, when assessing prognosis and the possibility for death in severely ill patients. Further investigation is needed to understand how these factors impact decision-making and whether perceived barriers to changes in patient management influence approaches to care.

  6. English language proficiency and academic performance: A study of a medical preparatory year program in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Thalamkandathil, Nazer; Parupalli, Srinivas Rao; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Balaha, Magdy Hassan; Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hamad

    2015-01-01

    All medical schools in Saudi Arabia have English as the primary official medium of instruction. Most of the high school education, however, is delivered in Arabic and hence the transition to an English based learning environment tends to be difficult for some students. Our study aims to correlate English language proficiency with academic performance among medical students in their preparatory year. A cross-sectional study design was used. Test scores of 103 preparatory year students (54 female and 49 male) were analyzed after the students completed an English language course and medical introductory course in their preparatory year. The total score obtained in the English course assessment was compared to each component of the medical content assessment. A significantly positive correlation (Spearman's Rho, at 0.01 levels) was seen between the scores of the English exam and the written exam (P English exam score was not obtained for the other components of the medical assessment, namely; student assignments, presentations and portfolios. English language proficiency is an important factor in determining academic proficiency of medical students in our college at the preparatory year level.

  7. Drug consumption among medical students in São Paulo, Brazil: influences of gender and academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lucio Garcia de; Barroso, Lucia Pereira; Wagner, Gabriela Arantes; Ponce, Julio de Carvalho; Malbergier, André; Stempliuk, Vladimir de Andrade; Andrade, Arthur Guerra de

    2009-09-01

    To analyze alcohol, tobacco and other drug use among medical students. Over a five-year period (1996-2001), we evaluated 457 students at the Universidade de São Paulo School of Medicine, located in São Paulo, Brazil. The students participated by filling out an anonymous questionnaire on drug use (lifetime, previous 12 months and previous 30 days). The influence that gender and academic year have on drug use was also analyzed. During the study period, there was an increase in the use of illicit drugs, especially inhalants and amphetamines, among the medical students evaluated. Drug use (except that of marijuana and inhalants) was comparable between the genders, and academic year was an important influencing factor. Increased inhalant use was observed among the medical students, especially among males and students in the early undergraduate years. This is suggestive of a specific behavioral pattern among medical students. Our findings corroborate those of previous studies. Inhalant use is on the rise among medical students at the Universidade de São Paulo School of Medicine. Because of the negative health effects of illicit drug use, further studies are needed in order to deepen the understanding of this phenomenon and to facilitate the development of preventive measures.

  8. Academic outcomes in Asian children aged 8-11 years with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder treated with atomoxetine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Luis; Singh, Pritibha; Harrison, Gavan; Huang, Yu-Shu; Jin, Xingming; Cho, Soo Churl

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between changes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) core symptoms and changes in academic outcome of Asian children treated with atomoxetine. This open-label study enrolled patients aged 8-11 years with DSM-IV-TR-defined ADHD, who were naïve to ADHD medications and met the symptomatic severity threshold of 1.5 standard deviations above the age and gender norm for the ADHDRS-IV-Parent:Inv (ADHDRS) total score. Data collection occurred for 24 weeks and included academic outcome, measured by the school grade average (SGA). Of 228 patients enrolled from China (n = 82), Taiwan (n = 76), and Korea (n = 70), 77.2% completed the study. Statistically significant (P < 0.001) baseline to last observation improvements in ADHDRS and SGA scores were observed. However, no linear correlation between change in ADHDRS total score and SGA (-0.083, P = 0.293) was observed. Despite significant independent improvements in core ADHD symptoms and academic grades over 24 weeks, the mean improvements observed in these measures did not appear to be correlated.

  9. Medical Students' Use of Different Coping Strategies and Relationship With Academic Performance in Preclinical and Clinical Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jocelyn H; Stansfield, R Brent; Belmonte, David C; Purkiss, Joel A; Reddy, Rishindra M; House, Joseph B; Santen, Sally A

    2018-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical students' coping abilities are important for academic success and emotional health. The authors explored differences in students' use of active, problem-solving strategies and emotional, inwardly directed approaches; the change in coping strategies used during medical school; and coping strategy impact on performance. One hundred eighty-three students completed the Ways of Coping Scale at matriculation and end of the 2nd and 3rd years. Frequency of each of 8 ways of coping, changes in coping strategy use over time, and relationship of coping method with preclinical and clinical scores were calculated. Students varied widely in use of coping mechanisms. Over time, students shifted to using emotional strategies more frequently while decreasing their use of active strategies. Coping strategies were unrelated to preclinical academic performance (R 2 = .09, adjusted R 2 = .04, ns) but were related to clinical performance (R 2 = .23, adjusted R 2 = .18, p performance and emotional methods associated with lower performance. Insights: Students decreased use of active coping strategies and increased use of emotional coping strategies over time, but emotional strategies were associated with poorer clinical academic performance. These shifts in coping methods may be detrimental to student performance and learning. Improving students' ability to cope should be an educational priority.

  10. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  11. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  12. The Predictive Value of Preschool Language Assessments on Academic Achievement: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study of Icelandic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdóttir, Jóhanna T; Björnsdóttir, Amalía; Símonardóttir, Ingibjörg

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between language knowledge at 5 years of age and later academic achievement throughout compulsory school in Iceland. Between 1997 and 1998, 267 Icelandic preschool children aged from 5;4 (years;months) to 5;10 were tested with the HLJÓM-2 (an Icelandic test of phonological awareness; Símonardóttir, Einarsdóttir, & Björnsdóttir, 2002) and the Icelandic version of the Test of Language Development-Primary: Second Edition (TOLD-2P; oral comprehension tasks; Símonardóttir, Guðmundsson, Skúlason, & Pétursdóttir, 1995). In 2011 these individuals, now aged 18-19 years, were contacted again. Of the original 267 participants, 221 (83%) gave permission to link their results from the preschool language assessments with their performance on national tests in 4th, 7th, and 10th grades. The results showed strong correlation between phonological awareness (as measured by the HLJÓM-2) and academic achievement (Icelandic and mathematics) in 4th, 7th, and 10th grades. There was also a significant but lower correlation with oral comprehension skills, as measured with the TOLD-2P. Regression analysis showed that the preschool oral-language assessments in phonological awareness and oral comprehension explained between 35% and 43% of variability in scores on national tests in Icelandic and between 20% and 39% of variability in scores in mathematics. Preschool language knowledge is a reliable predictor of later academic achievement.

  13. EFFECTS OF SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES ON THE ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE FIRST YEAR BSED STUDENTS OF NAVAL STATE UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Rotilles Vicera, Ed. D*

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of social networking sites on the academic performance of the students as related to the socio-demographic characteristics, social networking site usage and social network addiction. As to the socio-demographic characteristics, the respondents' age ranged from 15-17 years old or 70% of the total number of respondents. A big proportion of 70% were females. Most of the respondents were single with 98%. Their family income ranged from P5,000-9,999 with 4...

  14. Transferable skills of incoming medical students and their development over the first academic year: The United Arab Emirates experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; Shaban, Sami; Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, it is being recognised in higher and medical education that learners should be adequately prepared for the unpredictable nature of professional practice. Several generic or transferable skills or capabilities (e.g., communication, information handling) that will enable graduates to function in an ever-changing professional world have been identified. Using a validated inventory comprising six categories of transferable skills, three cohorts of incoming male and female medical students at a Gulf university documented their level of practice and confidence for 31 skills. The exercise was repeated a year later. New medical students identified computer and organisational skills and the ability to manage their learning as strengths, but scores for technical and numeracy, information handling and presentation and communication skills suggested that learners generally required guidance. A year later, despite considerable self-reported information handling and communication skills development, learners generally did not consider themselves self-sufficient. A significant gender difference emerged, with incoming males reporting less experience and confidence in many skills. This gap was reduced but did not disappear over the first academic year. An audit such as this may be useful for identifying individual skills levels as well as providing insight into shortcomings in the academic programme in terms of opportunities for transferable skills development.

  15. Measuring the ambiguity tolerance of medical students: a cross-sectional study from the first to sixth academic years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenstein, Anne; Ligges, Sandra; Brouwer, Britta; Marschall, Bernhard; Friederichs, Hendrik

    2014-01-09

    Tolerance of ambiguity, or the extent to which ambiguous situations are perceived as desirable, is an important component of the attitudes and behaviors of medical students. However, few studies have compared this trait across the years of medical school. General practitioners are considered to have a higher ambiguity tolerance than specialists. We compared ambiguity tolerance between general practitioners and medical students. We designed a cross-sectional study to evaluate the ambiguity tolerance of 622 medical students in the first to sixth academic years. We compared this with the ambiguity tolerance of 30 general practitioners. We used the inventory for measuring ambiguity tolerance (IMA) developed by Reis (1997), which includes three measures of ambiguity tolerance: openness to new experiences, social conflicts, and perception of insoluble problems. We obtained a total of 564 complete data sets (return rate 90.1%) from medical students and 29 questionnaires (return rate 96.7%) from general practitioners. In relation to the reference groups defined by Reis (1997), medical students had poor ambiguity tolerance on all three scales. No differences were found between those in the first and the sixth academic years, although we did observe gender-specific differences in ambiguity tolerance. We found no differences in ambiguity tolerance between general practitioners and medical students. The ambiguity tolerance of the students that we assessed was below average, and appeared to be stable throughout the course of their studies. In contrast to our expectations, the general practitioners did not have a higher level of ambiguity tolerance than the students did.

  16. Sleep quantity, quality, and insomnia symptoms of medical students during clinical years. Relationship with stress and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaggaf, Mohammed A; Wali, Siraj O; Merdad, Roah A; Merdad, Leena A

    2016-02-01

    To determine sleep habits and sleep quality in medical students during their clinical years using validated measures; and to investigate associations with academic performance and psychological stress. In this cross-sectional study, medical students (n=320) were randomly selected from a list of all enrolled clinical-year students in a Saudi medical school from 2011-2012. Students filled a questionnaire including demographic and lifestyle factors, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Students acquired on average, 5.8 hours of sleep each night, with an average bedtime at 01:53. Approximately 8% reported acquiring sleep during the day, and not during nighttime. Poor sleep quality was present in 30%, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in 40%, and insomnia symptoms in 33% of students. Multivariable regression models revealed significant associations between stress, poor sleep quality, and EDS. Poorer academic performance and stress were associated with symptoms of insomnia. Sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, and EDS are common among clinical years medical students. High levels of stress and the pressure of maintaining grade point averages may be influencing their quality of sleep.

  17. Sleep quantity, quality, and insomnia symptoms of medical students during clinical years. Relationship with stress and academic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Alsaggaf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine sleep habits and sleep quality in medical students during their clinical years using validated measures; and to investigate associations with academic performance and psychological stress. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, medical students (n=320 were randomly selected from a list of all enrolled clinical-year students in a Saudi medical school from 2011-2012. Students filled a questionnaire including demographic and lifestyle factors, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Results: Students acquired on average, 5.8 hours of sleep each night, with an average bedtime at 01:53. Approximately 8% reported acquiring sleep during the day, and not during nighttime. Poor sleep quality was present in 30%, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS in 40%, and insomnia symptoms in 33% of students. Multivariable regression models revealed significant associations between stress, poor sleep quality, and EDS. Poorer academic performance and stress were associated with symptoms of insomnia. Conclusion: Sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, and EDS are common among clinical years medical students. High levels of stress and the pressure of maintaining grade point averages may be influencing their quality of sleep.

  18. Abstracts of Research Project Reports by Naval Dental Clinic First- and Second-Year Residents - June 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    W6 1 December 193 TECHNICAL REPORT 111/ 0 ’I~u ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH PROJECT REPORTS BY NAVAL DENTAL CLZUC IRST- AND SEcon-TEu RESIDENTS - JUNE 1983 by...no signs, symptoms, or history of myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, or posterior bite collapse. An isokinetic

  19. Exploring Inquiry in the Third Space: Case Studies of a Year in an Urban Teacher-Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Emily J.; Taylor, Monica; Onore, Cynthia; Strom, Kathryn; Abrams, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Using case studies, we describe what happens from novice to apprentice when preservice teachers learn to teach in an urban teacher-residency (UTR) program with a focus on inquiry. Our UTR operates within a "third space" in teacher education, seeking to realign traditional power relationships and to create an alternate arena where the…

  20. Validation of the behavior and concept based assessment of professionalism competence in postgraduate first-year residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ying Yang

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: The current study suggests that the p-OSCE, p-360° evaluation, and p-mini-CEX are feasible methods for evaluating professionalism in clinical training of PGY1 residents. Combination of the above three evaluations, participation, and support from multiple constituencies and multiple representatives provides good reliability and adds credibility in the assessment of professionalism competence.

  1. How much guidance is given in the operating room? Factors influencing faculty self-reports, resident perceptions, and faculty/resident agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeck, Laura; Williams, Reed G; Choi, Jennifer; Schmitz, Connie C; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Dunnington, Gary L

    2014-10-01

    Guidance in the operating room impacts resident confidence and ability to function independently. The purpose of this study was to explore attending surgeon guidance practices in the operating room as reported by faculty members themselves and by junior and senior residents. This was an exploratory, cross-sectional survey research study involving 91 categorical residents and 82 clinical faculty members at two academic general surgery training programs. A series of analyses of variance along with descriptive statistics were performed to understand the impact of resident training year, program, and surgeon characteristics (sex and type of surgery performed routinely) on guidance practices. Resident level (junior versus senior) significantly impacted the amount of guidance given as reported by faculty and as perceived by residents. Within each program, junior residents perceived less guidance than faculty reported giving. For senior guidance practices, however, the differences between faculty and resident practices varied by program. In terms of the effects of surgeon practice type (mostly general versus mostly complex cases), residents at both institutions felt they were more supervised closely by the faculty who perform mostly complex cases. More autonomy is given to senior than to junior residents. Additionally, faculty report a greater amount of change in their guidance practices over the training period than residents perceive. Faculty and resident agreement about the need for guidance and for autonomy are important for achieving the goals of residency training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RELATED VOCATIONAL INTEREST TO LEARNING AND ENTREPRENEURIAL LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT WITH ENTREPRENEURSHIP INTEREST ON THE STUDENS AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING ISLAMIC VOCATIONAL SCHOOL YOGYAKARTA ACADEMIC YEAR 2013/2014

    OpenAIRE

    Choiruddin Nurcholis Suwondo; Subagyo Subagyo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study (1) to determine whether there is a positive relationship between vocational interest to learning with entrepreneurship interest on the studens Automotive Engineering Islamic Vocational School Yogyakarta Academic Year 2013/2014; (2) to determine whether there is a positive relationship between entrepreneurial learning achivement with entrepreneurship interest on the studens Automotive Engineering Islamic Vocational School Yogyakarta Academic Year 2013/2014; (3) to det...

  3. The impact of social media on the academic performance of second year medical students at College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Tawfeeq Alahmar

    2016-01-01

    Social media applications and their use among students have witnessed dramatic increase in the last decade and data on their effect on students academic performance are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of social media on the academic performance and grades of second year medical students at the College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq. Second year medical students (n=57) completed online questionnaire about the type of social media they use frequently, time...

  4. Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the Military Service Academies: Academic Program Year 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    mentoring. This year, USMA will look at a “grey talk” capability similar to YouTube to share information. - Status: Complete. USMA should ensure that...anxiety, withdrawal, guilt, and depression . For more information, please see: ACADEMIC PROGRAM YEAR 2013-2014 REPORT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND...assault are also known to experience higher rates of depression , anxiety, PTSD, and substance abuse compared to non-victimized persons. ACADEMIC PROGRAM

  5. Department of Petroleum Engineering and Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering annual report, 1990--1991 academic year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The Department of Petroleum Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is one of more than 20 such departments in the United States and more than 40 worldwide. The department has more than 20 faculty members and, as of the fall of 1990, 146 undergraduate and 156 graduate students. During the 1990--91 academic year, undergraduate enrollment is up slightly from the several downturns that began in 1986; graduate enrollment continues to increase, significantly in the number of Ph.D. candidates enrolled. The 1990--91 academic year was one of consolidation of gains. A remote teaching program in the Midland-Odessa area was initiated. During 1991, the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (CPGE) continued its large, diversified research activities related to oil, gas and geopressured/geothermal energy production, energy and mineral resources analysis, and added new research projects in other areas such as groundwater remediation. Many of these research projects included interdisciplinary efforts involving faculty, research scientists and graduate students in chemistry, mathematics, geology, geophysics, engineering mechanics, chemical engineering, microbiology and other disciplines. Several projects were undertaken in cooperation with either the Bureau of Economic Geology or the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin. Collaborative research projects with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rice University, and Sandia National Laboratory were also initiated. About 43 companies from seven countries around the world continued to provide the largest portion of research funding to CPGE.

  6. Department of Petroleum Engineering and Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering annual report, 1990--1991 academic year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Petroleum Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is one of more than 20 such departments in the United States and more than 40 worldwide. The department has more than 20 faculty members and, as of the fall of 1990, 146 undergraduate and 156 graduate students. During the 1990--91 academic year, undergraduate enrollment is up slightly from the several downturns that began in 1986; graduate enrollment continues to increase, significantly in the number of Ph.D. candidates enrolled. The 1990--91 academic year was one of consolidation of gains. A remote teaching program in the Midland-Odessa area was initiated. During 1991, the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (CPGE) continued its large, diversified research activities related to oil, gas and geopressured/geothermal energy production, energy and mineral resources analysis, and added new research projects in other areas such as groundwater remediation. Many of these research projects included interdisciplinary efforts involving faculty, research scientists and graduate students in chemistry, mathematics, geology, geophysics, engineering mechanics, chemical engineering, microbiology and other disciplines. Several projects were undertaken in cooperation with either the Bureau of Economic Geology or the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin. Collaborative research projects with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rice University, and Sandia National Laboratory were also initiated. About 43 companies from seven countries around the world continued to provide the largest portion of research funding to CPGE.

  7. Cognition, academic progress, behavior and self-concept at 14 years of very low birth weight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, A L; Kelly, E A; Doyle, L W; Callanan, C

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare cognition, academic progress, behavior, and self-concept children of very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight 2,499 g). At 14 years of age, 130 (84.4%) of 154 VLBW and 42 (70.0%) of 60 NBW children were assessed. Ten VLBW children and one NBW child who had cerebral palsy were excluded. VLBW children scored at a significantly lower level on all three composite scales of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd Edition. VLBW children were also significantly disadvantaged on more specific cognitive processes, including tests of visual processing and visual memory and on subtests reflecting learning and problem solving. Only in arithmetic was a difference between the groups discerned on tests of achievement. Significantly more VLBW children were rated by teachers as socially rejected and by their parents as having learning problems at school. VLBW children had significantly reduced self-esteem. VLBW children had more cognitive, academic, and behavioral problems and lower self-esteem at 14 years of age than NBW control subjects.

  8. Comparison of stress and burnout among anesthesia and surgical residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, K; Sahni, N; Padhy, S K; Mathew, P J

    2017-10-23

    The residents undergoing training at hospitals in our country face challenges in terms of infrastructure and high workload with undefined working hours. The aim of the study was to compare the stress and burnout levels in trainee doctors doing residency in surgical fields and anesthesia at a tertiary care academic center in North India. A comparative, observational study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. After Ethics Committee approval, 200 residents (100 each from surgical branches and anesthesia) were required to fill a questionnaire with information about age, sex, year of residency, marital status, and the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire-12. Burnout and perceived stress were compared between residents of anesthesia and surgical specialties. Residents of both surgical and anesthesia branches scored high in perceived stress, namely 21 and 18, respectively. The score was significantly higher in surgical residents (P = 0.03) and increased progressively with the year of residency. The majority of residents (90% surgical, 80% anesthesia) felt that they were being overloaded with work. However, only 20%-30% of respondents felt that there was lack of development of individual skills and still fewer (<10%) reported giving up in view of difficulties. There is high level of stress and overload dimension of burnout among the residents of anesthesia and surgical branches at our tertiary care academic institution and the surgical residents score marginally higher than anesthesia residents.

  9. Preparing Residents for Teaching Careers: The Faculty for Tomorrow Resident Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Gordon, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Progress toward growing the primary care workforce is at risk of being derailed by an emerging crisis: a critical shortage of family medicine faculty. In response to the faculty shortage, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) launched a 2-year initiative called "Faculty for Tomorrow" (F4T). The F4T Task Force created a workshop designed to increase residents' interest in, and prepare them for, careers in academic family medicine. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of this workshop. Participants were family medicine residents who preregistered for and attended the F4T Resident Workshop at the 2016 STFM Annual Spring Conference. The intervention was a full-day, 9-hour preconference workshop delivered by a multi-institutional faculty team. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and immediately after the workshop. Data collected included demographics, residency program characteristics, future career plans, self-reported confidence in skills, and general knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. A total of 75 participants attended the workshop. The proportion of those who were "extremely likely" to pursue a career in academic family medicine increased from 58% to 72%. Participants reported statistically significant improvements in their confidence in clinical teaching, providing feedback to learners, writing an effective CV, knowledge about the structure of academic family medicine, and knowledge about applying for a faculty position. The STFM F4T Resident Workshop was effective at increasing participants' interest in academic careers, as well as self-reported confidence in skills and knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. The data collected from participants regarding their career plans may inform future interventions.

  10. A Cross-sectional Investigation on Risk Factors of Lung Cancer for Residents over 40 Years Old in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojiang CHEN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective In the previous studies, we have designed the Self-evaluation Scoring Questionnaire for High-risk Individuals of Lung Cancer. In order to make a better understanding of the status of risk factors of lung cancer for residents in Chengdu, we carried out the investigation from June 2009 to December 2009. Methods With the stratified random sampling method, eligible residents were included and their risk factors of lung cancer were collected with the Self-evaluation Scoring Questionnaire for High-risk Individuals of Lung Cancer. Results According to the criteria of the questionnaire, 21.34% of the population were at high risk of lung cancer. The smoking rate for male was 48.58%, higher than that of 2.65% for female. About 5.39% of male smokers began smoking before 15 years old. The average daily tobacco consumption in the most population was less than 20 pieces, with a duration between 20 to 40 years. However, there were 11.34% of all women suffered from passive smoking, and another 15.30% and 5.86% of residents were exposed to cooking fumes, minerals or asbestos. As for the previous illness history, 0.77%-18.08% of individuals have connective tissue diseases, pulmonary tuberculosis, emphysema and others. Finally, 4.91% of residents endured the long-term mental depression, and 7.24% had a positive family history of tumors. Conclusion The status of risk factors for lung cancer among residents in Chengdu was not optimistic. It should be paid more attention to tobacco control and environmental improvement to improve people's health.

  11. Long-term outcomes of performing a postdoctoral research fellowship during general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M; Klingensmith, Mary E; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-04-01

    To determine whether dedicated research time during surgical residency leads to funding following postgraduate training. Unlike other medical specialties, a significant number of general surgery residents spend 1 to 3 years in dedicated laboratory research during their training. The impact this has on obtaining peer reviewed research funding after residency is unknown. Survey of all graduates of an academic general surgery resident program from 1990 to 2005 (n = 105). Seventy-five (71%) of survey recipients responded, of which 66 performed protected research during residency. Fifty-one currently perform research (mean effort, 26%; range, 2%-75%). Twenty-three respondents who performed research during residency (35%) subsequently received independent faculty funding. Thirteen respondents (20%) obtained NIH grants following residency training. The number of papers authored during resident research was associated with obtaining subsequent faculty grant support (9.3 vs. 5.2, P = 0.02). Faculty funding was associated with obtaining independent research support during residency (42% vs. 17%, P = 0.04). NIH-funded respondents spent more combined years in research before and during residency (3.7 vs. 2.8, P = 0.02). Academic surgeons rated research fellowships more relevant to their current job than private practitioners (4.3 vs. 3.4 by Likert scale, P < 0.05). Both groups considered research a worthwhile use of their time during residency (4.5 vs. 4.1, P = not significant). A large number of surgical trainees who perform a research fellowship in the middle of residency subsequently become funded investigators in this single-center survey. The likelihood of obtaining funding after residency is related to productivity and obtaining grant support during residency as well as cumulative years of research prior to obtaining a faculty position.

  12. From Industry to Generativity: The First 12 Years of the Association for Academic Psychiatry Master Educator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitzstein, Sean M; Seritan, Andreea L; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Randall, Melinda; Kablinger, Anita; Lieff, Susan; Azzam, Amin

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a mixed-methods evaluation of the first 12 years of the Association for Academic Psychiatry (AAP) Master Educator (ME) program, developed in 2003 to help academic psychiatrists hone their skills as educators. Participants attend two 3-h workshops at the annual meeting, organized in 3-year cycles, for a total of 18 h. Core topics include assessment, curriculum design, and program evaluation. Overall session rating scores from 2003 to 2014 were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A 20-question survey was sent to 58 program graduates in October 2014, exploring participant perspectives on the impact of the ME program on their careers and on the educational programs they were affiliated with. Survey responses were analyzed quantitatively (for multiple choice questions) and qualitatively (for open-ended questions). The mean overall session scores ranged between 4.1 and 4.9 (on a Likert-type scale of 1-5) for each 3-year cycle. Twenty-nine graduates completed the survey (50 % response rate). Survey responses indicated a positive perception of the impact of the ME program on participants' careers. Most respondents noted improvement in their teaching methods and curriculum development skills and being able to link educational theory with their individual practices. There was a significant increase in perceived confidence, leadership, and further contributions to their educational milieu. Fifteen (52 %) participants also reported generative behaviors that directly impacted others, such as developing new programs, enhancing existing programs at their institutions, or contributing to national educational efforts. The AAP ME program has demonstrated significant benefit over its 12 years of existence. This program represents one strategy to sustain and grow an international community of like-minded educators working to develop their own and future generations' skills in providing high-quality education in psychiatry.

  13. ACGME proposes dropping the 16 hour resident shift limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME is proposing that first-year residents would no longer be limited to 16-hour shifts during the 2017-2018 academic year under a controversial proposal released today (1. Instead, individual residency programs could assign first-year trainees to shifts as long as 28 hours, the current limit for all other residents. The 28-hour maximum includes 4 transitional hours that's designed in part to help residents improve continuity of care. The plan to revise training requirements does not change other rules designed to protect all residents from overwork. including the maximum80 hours per week. The ACGME capped the shifts of first-year residents at 16 hours in 2011 as a part of an ongoing effort to make trainee schedules more humane and avoid clinical errors caused by sleep deprivation. ACGME CEO Thomas Nasca, MD, told Medscape Medical News that the problem arises largely from first-year residents not being ...

  14. A Cohort-based Learning Community Enhances Academic Success and Satisfaction with University Experience for First-Year Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey A. Goldman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of a successful cohort-based learning communities program for first-year undergraduate students shows that students in the program perform better academically and also report a higher level of satisfaction with their university experience than students who are not in the program. Students enrolled in arts and science at the University of Toronto, who take several large-enrolment courses in their first year, may optionally participate in the First-Year Learning Communities (FLC program, designed to assist with the academic and social transition from high school to university. In this Freshman Interest Group model of learning community, the curriculum across the clustered courses is not linked. The FLC program was assessed over a five-year period, using student academic records and self-reported survey data. This paper also provides details on program design and implementation.L’évaluation d’un programme de communautés d’apprentissage fondées sur les cohortes pour les étudiants de première année du premier cycle qui a obtenu du succès montre que ceux qui sont inscrits à ce programme ont de meilleurs résultats scolaires et sont plus satisfaits de leur expérience universitaire que les autres. Les étudiants inscrits en arts et sciences à l’Université de Toronto, qui suivent plusieurs cours de première année où il y a de nombreux inscrits, peuvent participer au programme de communautés d’apprentissage la première année (CAPA qui vise à les aider à effectuer la transition entre l’école secondaire et l’université sur le plan scolaire et social. Dans ce modèle de communautés d’apprentissage destiné au groupe d’intérêts particuliers des étudiants de première année, il n’y a pas de lien entre les programmes d’études des participants. Les chercheurs ont évalué le programme pendant cinq ans à partir des dossiers scolaires des étudiants et des données d’un sondage réalisé auprès d

  15. Fellowship and career path preferences in residents of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Justin S; Ossoff, Robert H; Johns, Michael M

    2011-04-01

    Assess fellowship and academic/private practice career track preferences in residents of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. Cross-sectional survey. A total of 1,364 U.S. otolaryngology residents were surveyed. Questions addressed demographics, work hours and sleep, fellowship preference, and career track preference (academic/private practice). Trends in fellowship and career track preference were analyzed by year of clinical otolaryngology training. Data were additionally analyzed after stratification by sex. The response rate was 50%. The desire to complete a fellowship declined from 62% (year 2) to 58% (year 5), whereas the desire to not complete a fellowship increased from 31% (year 2) to 41% (year 5). Fellowship interest increased for rhinology and head and neck surgery by training year, whereas interest declined for neurotology and facial plastics. Expectation of an academic path increased from 29% (year 2) to 38% (year 5), whereas expectation of private practice declined slightly from 59% (year 2) to 57% (year 5). Women were initially more interested in both completing a fellowship (69% women, 60% men) and academics (40% women, 27% men). At the end of training, these sex differences were eliminated or reversed (59% men, 54% women for fellowship; 39% men, 35% women for academics). Residents interested in pursuing fellowship or academics reported working 2 hr/week more than those interested in no fellowship or private practice, respectively (P career track preferences suggest trends that may be useful to residency/fellowship program directors and residents making career choices. Inequalities producing differences according to sex should be addressed. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Admissions and Plebe Year Data as Indicators of Academic Success in Engineering Majors at the United States Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristof, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    This research analyzes the relationship between academic success in high school and at the freshman collegiate level and academic performance in engineering majors at the United States Naval Academy (USNA...

  17. Modeling Hourly Resident Productivity in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua W; Henning, Daniel J; Strouse, Connie S; Chiu, David T; Nathanson, Larry A; Sanchez, Leon D

    2017-08-01

    Resident productivity, defined as new patients per hour, carries important implications for emergency department operations. In high-volume academic centers, essential staffing decisions can be made on the assumption that residents see patients at a static rate. However, it is unclear whether this model mirrors reality; previous studies have not rigorously examined whether productivity changes over time. We examine residents' productivity across shifts to determine whether it remained consistent. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in an urban academic hospital with a 3-year emergency medicine training program in which residents acquire patients ad libitum throughout their shift. Time stamps of all patient encounters were automatically logged. A linear mixed model was constructed to predict productivity per shift hour. A total of 14,364 8- and 9-hour shifts were worked by 75 residents between July 1, 2010, and June 20, 2015. This comprised 6,127 (42.7%) postgraduate year (PGY) 1 shifts, 7,236 (50.4%) PGY-2 shifts, and 998 (6.9%) PGY-3 nonsupervisory shifts (Table 1). Overall, residents treated a mean of 10.1 patients per shift (SD 3.2), with most patients at Emergency Severity Index level 3 or more acute (93.8%). In the initial hour, residents treated a mean of 2.14 patients (SD 1.2), and every subsequent hour was associated with a significant decrease, with the largest in the second, third, and final hours. Emergency medicine resident productivity during a single shift follows a reliable pattern that decreases significantly hourly, a pattern preserved across PGY years and types of shifts. This suggests that resident productivity is a dynamic process, which should be considered in staffing decisions and studied further. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early predictors of first-year academic success at university : Pre-university effort, pre-university self-efficacy, and pre-university reasons for attending university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpen, Sanne G.A.; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H.Adriaan; Severiens, Sabine E.; Arends, Lidia R.

    Given the large number of dropouts in the 1st year at university, it is important to identify early predictors of 1st-year academic success. The present study (n = 453 first-year students) contributes to literature on the transition from secondary to higher education by investigating how the

  19. Early Predictors of First-Year Academic Success at University: Pre-University Effort, Pre-University Self-Efficacy, and Pre-University Reasons for Attending University

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herpen, Sanne G. A.; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan; Severiens, Sabine E.; Arends, Lidia R.

    2017-01-01

    Given the large number of dropouts in the 1st year at university, it is important to identify early predictors of 1st-year academic success. The present study (n = 453 first-year students) contributes to literature on the transition from secondary to higher education by investigating how the non-cognitive factors "pre-university" effort…

  20. Identification of at-risk students and strategies to improve academic success in first year health programs. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gerard Pearson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to university is a difficult process for many students, having a negative impact on their academic performance, ultimately resulting in failure or withdrawal from one or more courses in their first semester. This practice report describes a profile analysis and readiness assessment designed to identify students at high academic risk. Students so identified were offered additional workshops to address assumed knowledge and academic skills. Attendance at the workshops correlated with improved academic outcomes.

  1. The basic data for residents aged 16 years or older who received a comprehensive health check examinations in 2011-2012 as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey after the great East Japan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Satoh, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Akira; Ohtsuru, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Kamiya, Kenji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To assist in the long-term health management of residents and evaluate health impacts after the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Fukushima Prefecture, the Fukushima prefectural government decided to conduct the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This report describes the results for residents aged 16 years or older who received the health check examinations and evaluates the data obtained from 2011 and 2012. The target group consisted of residents aged 16 years or older who had lived in the evacuation zone. The health check examinations were performed on receipt of an application for a health check examination from any of the residents. The examinations, including measurements of height, weight, abdominal circumference/body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, biochemical laboratory findings, and peripheral blood findings, were performed as required. 1) A total of 56,399 (30.9%) and 47,009 (25.4%) residents aged 16 years or older received health checks in 2011 and 2012, respectively. 2) In both years, a number of male and female residents in the 16-39 year age group were found to suffer obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, or liver dysfunction, and the prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia among residents increased with age. Furthermore, the proportion of residents with hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities or renal dysfunction was higher in those aged 40 years or older. 3) The frequencies of obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidemia among residents in 2012 were lower than those in 2011. However, the prevalence of liver dysfunction, hyperuricemia, glucose metabolic abnormalities and renal dysfunction among residents was higher in 2012 than in 2011. These results suggested the number of residents who had lived in the evacuation zone with obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, liver dysfunction, hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities, or renal dysfunction increased with age in all age groups

  2. The Canadian general surgery resident: defining current challenges for surgical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Corey; Labossière, Joseph; Rommens, Kenton; Birch, Daniel W

    2012-08-01

    Surgery training programs in Canada and the United States have recognized the need to modify current models of training and education. The shifting demographic of surgery trainees, lifestyle issues and an increased trend toward subspecialization are the major influences. To guide these important educational initiatives, a contemporary profile of Canadian general surgery residents and their impressions of training in Canada is required. We developed and distributed a questionnaire to residents in each Canadian general surgery training program, and residents responded during dedicated teaching time. In all, 186 surveys were returned for analysis (62% response rate). The average age of Canadian general surgery residents is 30 years, 38% are women, 41% are married, 18% have dependants younger than 18 years and 41% plan to add to or start a family during residency. Most (87%) residents plan to pursue postgraduate education. On completion of training, 74% of residents plan to stay in Canada and 49% want to practice in an academic setting. Almost half (42%) of residents identify a poor balance between work and personal life during residency. Forty-seven percent of respondents have appropriate access to mentorship, whereas 37% describe suitable access to career guidance and 40% identify the availability of appropriate social supports. Just over half (54%) believe the stress level during residency is manageable. This survey provides a profile of contemporary Canadian general surgery residents. Important challenges within the residency system are identified. Program directors and chairs of surgery are encouraged to recognize these challenges and intervene where appropriate.

  3. Using a natural abilities battery for academic and career guidance: a ten-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corrie C; Harvey, Stephen B; Stiles, Dori

    2011-01-01

    Over a period of 10 years, first-year students from 11 consecutive veterinary classes conducted a self-assessment using a natural abilities survey. The present study analyzes the data compiled from students' self-assessment results. As a group, veterinary students are exceptional problem solvers, either through inductive or deductive reasoning, and have strong spatial relations capacities. Veterinary students have a range of learning styles with design memory being the primary vehicle for information delivery and tonal memory being the least frequently used style overall. Information gained on each student's natural abilities can be used to guide effective career decision making and enhance prospects for long-term career satisfaction.

  4. Academic performance of fnal year medical students at kerbala medical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Al Alak

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion The present study aimed at a correct in depth analysis of the evaluation process and an examination of Kerbala Medical College graduates in two successive years. The results found were very helpful in pointing out the main shortcomings and strength in the examination stations.

  5. When the Spaniels Conquered Central America: Academic English and First Year Composition Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yosei

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the findings of an on-line survey completed by 222 FYC (First Year Composition) instructors at universities and community colleges across the United States along with supplemental information derived from multiple open-ended interviews with seven FYC instructors in Arizona. Both survey and interview questions were…

  6. The Decline of Print: Ten Years of Print Serial Use in a Small Academic Medical Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Karen Thompson

    2006-01-01

    Tracking use of print journals over a ten-year period has allowed The University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine Library an essential tool for more accurate collection development, for both print and electronic selection. This lengthy study has provided usage statistics for purchasing decisions regarding electronic subscriptions still…

  7. Within-Year Changes in Children's Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Orientations: Contextual Predictors and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpus, Jennifer Henderlong; McClintic-Gilbert, Megan S.; Hayenga, Amynta O.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the nature, timing, and correlates of motivational change among a large sample (N = 1051) of third- through eighth-grade students. Analyses of within-year changes in students' motivational orientations revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations decreased from fall to spring, with declines…

  8. Academic Life at the Franchise: Faculty Culture in a Rural Two-Year Branch Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, John R.; Strange, C. Carney

    2003-01-01

    This case study of faculty culture focused on the dynamics of a small, rural, two-year branch campus of a large state university. It reports descriptive themes concerning the isolation and rural location of the campus, its diminutive size, faculty role perspectives, and factors related to faculty role implementation. It provides a portrait of this…

  9. Declining Academic Fields in U.S. Four-Year Colleges and Universities, 1970-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brint, Steven; Proctor, Kristopher; Mulligan, Kerry; Rotondi, Matthew B.; Hanneman, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This research identifies 22 fields that declined in absolute numbers and/or prevalence over a 35-year period. Most were basic fields in the arts and sciences. Steep declines were evident only in a few fields, notably European languages and literatures. Larger, higher status, and historically liberal arts oriented institutions were less likely to…

  10. Alcohol Consumption and Academic Retention in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Gary; Lonbaken, Barb

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to identify relationships between alcohol consumption and first-to-second-year student retention among college students. Methods: 820 students in general education courses completed an online wellness assessment at four separate time points, including questions related to alcohol consumption. Data were analyzed…

  11. Supporting Geoscience Students at Two-Year Colleges: Career Preparation and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Layou, K.; Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-year colleges play an important role in developing a competent and creative geoscience workforce, teaching science to pre-service K-12 teachers, producing earth-science literate citizens, and providing a foundation for broadening participation in the geosciences. The Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) project has developed web resources for geoscience faculty on the preparation and support of students in two-year colleges (2YCs). Online resources developed from two topical workshops and several national, regional, and local workshops around the country focus on two main categories: Career Preparation and Workforce Development, and Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges. The Career Preparation and Workforce Development resources were developed to help faculty make the case that careers in the geosciences provide a range of possibilities for students and to support preparation for the geoscience workforce and for transfer to four-year programs as geoscience majors. Many two-year college students are unaware of geoscience career opportunities and these materials help illuminate possible futures for them. Resources include an overview of what geoscientists do; profiles of possible careers along with the preparation necessary to qualify for them; geoscience employer perspectives about jobs and the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes they are looking for in their employees; employment trends in sectors of the economy that employ geoscience professionals; examples of geotechnician workforce programs (e.g. Advanced Technological Education Centers, environmental technology programs, marine technician programs); and career resources available from professional societies. The website also provides information to support student recruitment into the geosciences and facilitate student transfer to geoscience programs at four- year colleges and universities, including sections on advising support before

  12. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. PMID:27731845

  13. Impact of a structured surgical curriculum on ophthalmic resident cataract surgery complication rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gina M; Oetting, Thomas A; Lee, Andrew G; Grignon, Connie; Greenlee, Emily; Johnson, A Tim; Beaver, Hilary A; Carter, Keith

    2009-11-01

    To determine whether institution of a structured surgical curriculum for ophthalmology residents decreased the rate of sentinel surgical complications. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Des Moines, Iowa, USA. A retrospective review was performed of third-year ophthalmic resident quality-assurance surgical outcomes data at a single residency-training site from 1998 to 2008. The primary outcome measure was defined as a sentinel event; that is, a posterior capsule tear (with or without vitreous loss) or vitreous loss (from any cause) occurring during a resident-performed case. The study population was divided into 2 groups. Group 1 comprised surgical cases of residents trained before the surgical curriculum change (academic years 1998 to 2003) and Group 2, surgical cases of residents trained with the enhanced curriculum (academic years 2004 to 2008). Data from 1 year (academic year 2003 to 2004) were excluded because the transition to the enhanced curriculum occurred during that period. The data were analyzed and adjusted for surgical experience. In Group 1 (before institution of surgical curriculum), there were 823 cases with 59 sentinel complications. In Group 2 (after institution of surgical curriculum), there were 1009 cases with 38 sentinel complications. There was a statistically significant reduction in the sentinel complication rate, from 7.17% before the curriculum changes to 3.77% with the enhanced curriculum (P = .001, unpaired 2-tailed t test). Implementation of a structured surgical curriculum resulted in a statistically significant reduction in sentinel event complications, even after adjusting for surgical experience.

  14. Family, peer, and neighborhood influences on academic achievement among African-American adolescents: one-year prospective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, N A; Cauce, A M; Friedman, R J; Mason, C A

    1996-06-01

    Using a 1-year prospective design, this study examined the influence of family status variables (family income, parental education, family structure), parenting variables (maternal support and restrictive control), peer support, and neighborhood risk on the school performance of 120 African American junior high school students. In addition to main effects of these variables, neighborhood risk was examined as a moderator of the effects of parenting and peer support. Family status variables were not predictive of adolescent school performance as indexed by self-reported grade point average. Maternal support at Time 1 was prospectively related to adolescent grades at Time 2. Neighborhood risk was related to lower grades, while peer support predicted better grades in the prospective analyses. Neighborhood risk also moderated the effects of maternal restrictive control and peer support on adolescent grades in prospective analyses. These findings highlight the importance of an ecological approach to the problem of academic underachievement within the African American Community.

  15. Negative Impact of Troublesome Peer Interactions and Authoritarian Parenting Style on Academic Performance of a 15 year Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samruddhi Karnik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period of great turbulence characterized by cognitive, emotional, social and physical changes. Family environment and role of peers is extremely crucial in the development of an adolescent. Presenting here is a brief case of 15 year old boy who was referred for counseling by his parents for lack of concentration in studies. In the counseling sessions with the boy and his parents it was found that the boy was psychologically disturbed as he was teased at school by his peers. In addition his father had an authoritarian parenting style which was adding to his troubles resulting in low academic scores. The boy’s scores on “The Study Habits Inventory” were lower, indicating poor study habits which includes study concentration. The counsellors used an eclectic approach for the boy and his parents, to develop a healthy family environment, which improved his self-esteem and study habits.

  16. College Success: First Year Seminar's Effectiveness on Freshmen Academic and Social Integration, Impact on Academic Achievement and Retention at a Southern Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Tarun

    2011-01-01

    Increasing student retention and improving graduation rates continues to remain a critical issue for undergraduate institutions. Previous research suggests that student attrition is predominantly voluntary, and is influenced by institutional characteristics. The importance of academic and social integration as a strategy to reduce attrition is…

  17. Surgical resident education in patient safety: where can we improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Luke R; Levy, Shauna M; Kellagher, Caroline M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Thomas, Eric J; Kao, Lillian S; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, KuoJen

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication and patient safety practices are paramount in health care. Surgical residents play an integral role in the perioperative team, yet their perceptions of patient safety remain unclear. We hypothesized that surgical residents perceive the perioperative environment as more unsafe than their faculty and operating room staff despite completing a required safety curriculum. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and perioperative nurses in a large academic children's hospital participated in multifaceted, physician-led workshops aimed at enhancing communication and safety culture over a 3-y period. All general surgery residents from the same academic center completed a hospital-based online safety curriculum only. All groups subsequently completed the psychometrically validated safety attitudes questionnaire to evaluate three domains: safety culture, teamwork, and speaking up. Results reflect the percent of respondents who slightly or strongly agreed. Chi-square analysis was performed. Sixty-three of 84 perioperative personnel (75%) and 48 of 52 surgical residents (92%) completed the safety attitudes questionnaire. A higher percentage of perioperative personnel perceived a safer environment than the surgical residents in all three domains, which was significantly higher for safety culture (68% versus 46%, P = 0.03). When stratified into two groups, junior residents (postgraduate years 1-2) and senior residents (postgraduate years 3-5) had lower scores for all three domains, but the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical residents' perceptions of perioperative safety remain suboptimal. With an enhanced safety curriculum, perioperative staff demonstrated higher perceptions of safety compared with residents who participated in an online-only curriculum. Optimal surgical education on patient safety remains unknown but should require a dedicated, systematic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rewiew of history lessons during 2001-2012 academic year by the external assessors

    OpenAIRE

    Survutaitė, Dalia; Vaičekauskienė, Snieguolė

    2012-01-01

    Recently a lot of attention has been paid to the search of education innovation and modernization. However in the educational environment empirical data analysis and evaluation of subjects of general education of educational practice are rarely found. This article analyzes quality characteristics of history lessons for years 5-12 in the educational practice, reports of external evaluation of the quality of the activities of country's different general education schools were used. Data interpr...

  19. Competency Assessment in Family Medicine Residency: Observations, Knowledge-Based Examinations, and Advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Fang, Bo; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-12-01

    The Family Medicine (FM) Milestones are competency-based assessments of residents in key dimensions relevant to practice in the specialty. Residency programs use the milestones in semiannual reviews of resident performance from the time of entry into the program to graduation. Using a national sample, we investigated the relationship of FM competency-based assessments to resident progress and the complementarity of milestones with knowledge-based assessments in FM residencies. We used midyear and end-of-year milestone ratings for all FM residents in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs during academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. The milestones contain 22 items across 6 competencies. We created a summative index across the milestones. The American Board of Family Medicine database provided resident demographics and in-training examination (ITE) scores. We linked information to the milestone data. The sample encompassed 6630 FM residents. The summative milestone index increased, on average, for each cohort (postgraduate year 1 [PGY-1] to PGY-2 and PGY-2 to PGY-3) at each assessment. The correlation between the milestone index that excluded the medical knowledge milestone and ITE scores was r  = .195 ( P  ITE scores and composite milestone assessments were higher for residents who advanced than for those who did not. Competency-based assessment using the milestones for FM residents seems to be a viable multidimensional tool to assess the successful progression of residents.

  20. Financial Contribution of Residents When Billing as "Junior Associates" in the "Surgical Firm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Jeremy; Pratt, Sarah; Stanek, Stephen; Zelenock, Gerald; Nazzal, Munier

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing number of proposals to change the way Graduate Medical Education is funded. This study attempts to estimate the potential financial contribution of surgical residents using an alternative funding mechanism similar to that used by law firms, which would allow surgery departments to bill for resident activity as "junior associates." Following 24 residents over a period of 12 weeks, we were able to estimate the annual revenue that they generated from operating room procedures, independent consultations, patient management, and minor procedures using Medicare reimbursement rates. The appropriate first assistant modifier was used to calculate the operating room procedure fees, but full price was used to calculate the revenue for minor procedures, patient management, and consultations done independently. We adjusted for vacation time and academic activities. Including postgraduate year 1 residents, the estimated yearly revenue generated per resident in first assistant operative services was $33,305.67. For minor procedures, patient management, and independent consultations, the estimated yearly revenue per resident was $37,350.66. The total estimated financial contribution per resident per year was $70,656.33. Excluding postgraduate year 1 residents, as most states require completion of the intern year before full licensure, the estimated yearly revenue generated per resident in first assistant operative services was $38,914.56. For minor procedures, patient management, and independent consultations, the estimated yearly revenue per resident was $55,957.33. The total estimated financial contribution per resident per year was $94,871.89. Residents provide a significant service to hospitals. If resident activity was compensated at the level of supervised "junior associates" of a surgery department, more than 75% of the direct educational costs of training could be offset. Furthermore, we believe this value is underestimated. Given the foreseeable

  1. Academic substance and location: The national technical university of Athens' five-year program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spyrou, Kostas J.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2014-01-01

    The National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) established a small Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering in 1969, within the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Today, it is organized in four divisions, ship design and maritime transport, ship and marine...... hydrodynamics, marine structures, and marine engineering. To be awarded an engineering diploma in Greece, one has to spend a minimum of five years. The program at NTUA has also 10 semesters, out of which nine are dedicated to course study while the tenth is spend on the writing of a thesis. There is no tuition...

  2. Integrating e-Learning and Classroom Learning; Four Years of Asynchronous Learning to Improve Academic Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Rienties

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In an ever-changing world, competencies to process information efficiently are essential. However, several researchers indicate that graduates have limited abilities to solve complex problems in reality. In this paper, a possible solution to increase competences in effective searching, analysing and comparing information is provided. In a blended-learning environment, students had to share information before coming to class. The results of an analysis of four consecutive years of computersupported learning in a master-course indicate that students are willing to share information when conditions are favourable. In addition, a specific redesign of the task, control and social dimension let to increased knowledge sharing. Future research is necessary to assess whether this also has increased performance.

  3. Looking beyond Grades: Comparing Self-Esteem and Perceived Academic Control as Predictors of First-Year College Students' Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.; Renaud, Robert D.; Hladkyj, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has found perceived academic control (PAC) to be a better predictor of first-year college students' grades than self-esteem; however, it is uncertain which construct is more important for students' well-being. The current study compared PAC and self-esteem on first-year college students' emotions, perceived stress, and…

  4. Using Multiple Sources of Data to Gauge Outcome Differences between Academic-Themed and Transition-Themed First-Year Seminars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Ryan J.; Bjerke, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Students in two different types of first-year experience seminar courses at a moderately sized public university were compared using a large variety of measures--both direct and indirect. One of these first-year experience types was a three-credit academic-themed course offered in sections with variable content; the other was a two-credit…

  5. Pre-entry Characteristics, Perceived Social Support, Adjustment and Academic Achievement in First-Year Spanish University Students: A Path Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, María Soledad; Tinajero, Carolina; Páramo, María Fernanda

    2017-11-17

    Transition to university is a multifactorial process to which scarce consideration has been given in Spain, despite this being one of the countries with the highest rates of academic failure and attrition within the European Union. The present study proposes an empirical model for predicting Spanish students' academic achievement at university by considering pre-entry characteristics, perceived social support and adaptation to university, in a sample of 300 traditional first-year university students. The findings of the path analysis showed that pre-university achievement and academic and personal-emotional adjustment were direct predictors of academic achievement. Furthermore, gender, parents' education and family support were indirect predictors of academic achievement, mediated by pre-university grades and adjustment to university. The current findings supporting evidence that academic achievement in first-year Spanish students is the cumulative effect of pre-entry characteristics and process variables, key factors that should be taken into account in designing intervention strategies involving families and that establish stronger links between research findings and university policies.

  6. Evaluation of clinical skills for first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and objective structured clinical evaluation as a tool of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate specialities require a combination of knowledge and clinical skills. The internship year is less structured. Clinical and practical skills that are picked up during training are not well regulated and the impact is not assessed. In this study, we assessed knowledge and skills using objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Aim: To evaluate the clinical skills of new first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and OSCE as a tool for assessment. Settings and Design: Observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty new first-year surgical residents (10 each in 2008 and 2009 participated in a detailed structured orientation programme conducted over a period of 7 days. Clinically important topics and skills expected at this level (e.g., suturing, wound care etc. were covered. The programme was preceded by an OSCE to test pre-programme knowledge (the "pre-test". The questions were validated by senior department staff. A post-programme OSCE (the "post-test" helped to evaluate the change in clinical skill level brought about by the orientation programme. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxson matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Passing performance was achieved by all participants in both pre- and post-tests. Following the orientation programme, significant improvement was seen in tasks testing the psychomotor and cognitive domains. (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0401, respectively. Overall reliability of the OSCE was found to be 0.7026 (Cronbach′s coefficient alpha. Conclusions: This study highlighted the lacunae in current internship training, especially for skill-based tasks. There is a need for universal inclusion of structured orientation programmes in the training of first-year residents. OSCE is a reliable, valid and effective method for the assessment of clinical skills.

  7. Changes in Perceived Supervision Quality After Introduction of Competency-Based Orthopedic Residency Training: A National 6-Year Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vendeloo, Stefan N; Brand, Paul L P; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Verheyen, Cees C P M

    2018-04-27

    To evaluate the perceived quality of the learning environment, before and after introduction of competency-based postgraduate orthopedic education. From 2009 to 2014, we conducted annual surveys among Dutch orthopedic residents. The validated Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT, 50 items on 11 subscales) was used to assess the quality of the learning environment. Scores range from 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). Dynamic cohort follow-up study. All Dutch orthopedic residents were surveyed during annual compulsory courses. Over the 6-year period, 641 responses were obtained (response rate 92%). Scores for "supervision" (95% CI for difference 0.06-0.28, p = 0.002) and "coaching and assessment" (95% CI 0.11-0.35, p < 0.001) improved significantly after introduction of competency-based training. There was no significant change in score on the other subscales of the D-RECT. After the introduction of some of the core components of competency-based postgraduate orthopedic education the perceived quality of "supervision" and "coaching and assessment" improved significantly. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Recent Pathology Residency Graduate Job Search Experience: A Synthesis of 5 Years of College of American Pathologists Job Market Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratzinger, Dita; Johnson, Kristen A; Brissette, Mark D; Cohen, David; Rojiani, Amyn M; Conran, Richard M; Hoffman, Robert D; Post, Miriam D; McCloskey, Cindy B; Roberts, Cory A; Domen, Ronald E; Talbert, Michael L; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2018-04-01

    - Pathology residents and fellows tailor their training and job search strategies to an actively evolving specialty in the setting of scientific and technical advances and simultaneous changes in health care economics. - To assess the experience and outcome of the job search process of pathologists searching for their first non-fellowship position. - The College of American Pathologists (CAP) Graduate Medical Education Committee has during the past 5 years sent an annual job search survey each June to CAP junior members and fellows in practice 3 years or less who have actively searched for a non-fellowship position. - Job market indicators including job interviews, job offers, positions accepted, and job satisfaction have remained stable during the 5 years of the survey. Most survey respondents who had applied for at least 1 position had accepted a position at the time of the survey, and most applicants who had accepted a position were satisfied or very satisfied. However, most attested that finding a non-fellowship position was difficult. Despite a perceived push toward subspecialization in surgical pathology, the reported number of fellowships completed was stable. Respondent demographics were not associated with job search success with 1 significant exception: international medical school graduate respondents reported greater perceived difficulty in finding a position, and indeed, fewer reported having accepted a position. - Pathology residents and fellows seeking their first position have faced a relatively stable job market during the last 5 years, with most accepting positions with which they were satisfied.

  9. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  10. The European Urology Residents Education Programme Hands-on Training Format: 4 Years of Hands-on Training Improvements from the European School of Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Bhaskar K; Van Cleynenbreugel, Ben; Gozen, Ali; Palou, Jaun; Barmoshe, Sas; Biyani, Shekhar; Gaya, Josep M; Hellawell, Giles; Pini, Gio; Oscar, Faba R; Sanchez Salas, Rafael; Macek, Petr; Skolarikos, Andreas; Wagner, Christian; Eret, Viktor; Haensel, Stephen; Siena, Giampaolo; Schmidt, Marek; Klitsch, Max; Vesely, Stepan; Ploumidis, Achilles; Proietti, Silvia; Kamphuis, Guido; Tokas, Theodore; Geraghty, Rob; Veneziano, Dominico

    2018-03-14

    The European School of Urology (ESU) started the European Urology Residents Education Programme (EUREP) in 2003 for final year urology residents, with hands-on training (HOT) added later in 2007. To assess the geographical reach of EUREP, trainee demographics, and individual quality feedback in relation to annual methodology improvements in HOT. From September 2014 to October 2017 (four EUREP courses) several new features have been applied to the HOT format of the EUREP course: 1:1 training sessions (2015), fixed 60-min time slots (2016), and standardised teaching methodology (2017). The resulting EUREP HOT format was verified by collecting and prospectively analysing the following data: total number of participants attending different HOT courses; participants' age; country of origin; and feedback obtained annually. A total of 796 participants from 54 countries participated in 1450 HOT sessions over the last 4 yr. This included 294 (20%) ureteroscopy (URS) sessions, 237 (16.5%) transurethral resection (TUR) sessions, 840 (58%) basic laparoscopic sessions, and 79 (5.5%) intermediate laparoscopic sessions. While 712 residents (89%) were from Europe, 84 (11%) were from non-European nations. Of the European residents, most came from Italy (16%), Germany (15%), Spain (15%), and Romania (8%). Feedback for the basic laparoscopic session showed a constant improvement in scores over the last 4 yr, with the highest scores achieved last year. This included feedback on improvements in tutor rating (p=0.017), organisation (ptraining curriculum with wet laboratory or cadaveric courses in this format, although these could be performed in other training centres in conjunction with EUREP. The EUREP trainee demographics show that the purpose of the course is being achieved, with excellent feedback reported. While European trainees dominate the demographics, participation from a number of non-European countries suggests continued ESU collaboration with other national societies and

  11. A serious game skills competition increases voluntary usage and proficiency of a virtual reality laparoscopic simulator during first-year surgical residents' simulation curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Beheiry, Mostafa; McCreery, Greig; Schlachta, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a serious game skills competition on voluntary usage of a laparoscopic simulator among first-year surgical residents' standard simulation curriculum. With research ethics board approval, informed consent was obtained from first-year surgical residents enrolled in an introductory surgical simulation curriculum. The class of 2013 served as a control cohort following the standard curriculum which mandates completion of six laparoscopic simulator skill tasks. For the 2014 competition cohort, the only change introduced was the biweekly and monthly posting of a leader board of the top three and ten fastest peg transfer times. Entry surveys were administered assessing attitudes towards simulation-based training and competition. Cohorts were observed for 5 months. There were 24 and 25 residents in the control and competition cohorts, respectively. The competition cohort overwhelmingly (76 %) stated that they were not motivated to deliberate practice by competition. Median total simulator usage time was 132 min (IQR = 214) in the competition cohort compared to 89 (IQR = 170) in the control cohort. The competition cohort completed their course requirements significantly earlier than the control cohort (χ 2  = 6.5, p = 0.01). There was a significantly greater proportion of residents continuing to use the simulator voluntarily after completing their course requirements in the competition cohort (44 vs. 4 %; p = 0.002). Residents in the competition cohort were significantly faster at peg transfer (194 ± 66 vs. 233 ± 53 s, 95 % CI of difference = 4-74 s; p = 0.03) and significantly decreased their completion time by 33 ± 54 s (95 % CI 10-56 s; paired t test, p = 0.007). A simple serious games skills competition increased voluntary usage and performance on a laparoscopic simulator, despite a majority of participants reporting they were not motivated by competition. Future directions should

  12. [Correlations between the dimensions of clinical learning environments from the perspective of medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui Sutton, Alicia; Flores Hernández, Fernando; Gutiérrez Barreto, Samuel; Castro Ramírez, Senyasen; Lavalle Montalvo, Carlos; Vilar Puig, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish correlations between the dimensions of clinical learning environments (ACA) considering variables like: health institutions, hospital offices, specialty, and year of residency. 4,189 doctors were evaluated through an online survey in 2012. The results revealed that the dimension of "educational processes" correlated best with others; specialties with the best ACA from the view of the medical residents were Internal Medicine and Surgery; and the third year residents had less favorable perceptions of their ACA. The pursuance of the academic program is relevant to physicians in training and teachers play an important role in the educational process.

  13. Graduating med-peds residents' interest in part-time employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Amy L; Kaelber, David C; Melgar, Thomas A; Chamberlain, John; Cull, William; Robbins, Brett W

    2011-01-01

    As part-time work is becoming more popular among the primary care specialties, we examined the demographic descriptors of med-peds residents seeking and finding part-time employment upon completion of residency training. As part of the 2006 annual American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Graduating Med-Peds Residents Survey, we surveyed the graduating residents of all med-peds programs about their interest in and plans for part-time employment. A total of 199 (60%) of the residents responded. Of the resident respondents applying for nonfellowship jobs, 19% sought part-time positions and 10% actually accepted a part-time position. Female residents were significantly more likely than male residents to apply for part-time jobs (26% vs. 7%, P = .034). Sixty percent of female residents immediately seeking work and 58% of those going on to fellowship reported an interest in arranging a part-time or reduced-hours position at some point in the next 5 years. Part-time employment among med-peds residents applying for nonfellowship positions after graduation is similar to the current incidence of part-time employment in other fields of primary care. A much higher percentage of med-peds residents are interested in arranging part-time work within 5 years after graduation. This strong interest in part-time work has many implications for the primary care workforce. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bidirectional Associations between Peer Victimization and Functions of Aggression in Middle Childhood: Further Evaluation across Informants and Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, John L; Fite, Paula J; Pederson, Casey A

    2018-01-01

    The current 3-wave study examined bidirectional associations between peer victimization and functions of aggression across informants over a 1-year period in middle childhood, with attention to potential gender differences. Participants included 198 children (51% girls) in the third and fourth grades and their homeroom teachers. Peer victimization was assessed using both child- and teacher-reports, and teachers provided ratings of reactive and proactive aggression. Cross-classified multilevel cross-lagged models indicated that child-reports, but not teacher-reports, of peer victimization predicted higher levels of reactive aggression within and across academic years. Further, reactive aggression predicted subsequent increases in child- and teacher-reports of peer victimization across each wave of data. Several gender differences, particularly in the crossed paths between proactive aggression and peer victimization, also emerged. Whereas peer victimization was found to partially account for the stability of reactive aggression over time, reactive aggression did not account for the stability of peer victimization. Taken together with previous research, the current findings suggest that child-reports of peer victimization may help identify youth who are risk for exhibiting increased reactive aggression over time. Further, they highlight the need to target reactively aggressive behavior for the prevention of peer victimization in middle childhood.

  15. Distinguishing between casual talk and academic talk beginning in the preschool years: an important consideration for speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleeck, Anne

    2014-11-01

    The need for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to consider an academic talk (AT) register in addition to an everyday casual talk (CT) register of oral language with children beginning in the preschool years is presented, the AT and CT registers are distinguished in a comprehensive manner, ideas regarding AT language assessment are proposed, and suggestions for fostering children's skills with the AT register are offered. Extant research and scholarship from a wide variety of disciplines are integrated and organized. The author discusses the role of the SLP in supporting AT skills beginning in the preschool years and the added risk of difficulties with the AT register for children with language impairment who are from diverse backgrounds. Two broad categories-social-interactive and cognitive-that give rise to linguistic features that differentiate between the CT and AT registers are deduced from extant scholarship. SLPs should consider children's competence with the AT register as they work to prepare preschoolers and older children for the language demands of school.

  16. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology research grant program: factors associated with publication and advancement in academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Seth D; Dellon, Evan S; Bright, Stephanie D; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2009-05-01

    The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Demographic data, the year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient's institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. A similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred with 255 of the 368 awards (69%) for 1983-2006 [corrected]. Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of the 313 awardees over the same period, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions [corrected]. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (P academics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of investigation, publication, and academic career development in the field of gastroenterology.

  17. erceptions of U.S. Academic Library Services of First-year Graduate Students from Taiwan—A Photo-elicitation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Chen Lin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study investigating international students’ perceptions of U.S. academic libraries, a qualitative method, photo-elicitation, is for the first time used to study how previous library experiences influence international students’ current perceptions of U.S. academic libraries. This study focuses on four dimensions of library service including access to information, affect of service, library as place, and personal control; these four dimensions are adapted from the LibQUAL+™, a web-based survey tool used among academic libraries for measuring users’ perceptions of library services.Five first-year graduate students from Taiwan were interviewed about how they perceived the library services of Center for Instructional Materials and Computing (CIMC, an academic library serving the students and faculty of School of Education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The findings of this study confirm the findings of previous studies both on international students’ in U.S. academic libraries and on photo-elicitation studies, and add empirical examples and insights for the claims in the limited body of research on international students in U.S. academic libraries. [Article content in Chinese

  18. Sleep Disturbance and Short Sleep as Risk Factors for Depression and Perceived Medical Errors in First-Year Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Arnedt, J Todd; Song, Peter X; Guille, Constance; Sen, Srijan

    2017-03-01

    While short and poor quality sleep among training physicians has long been recognized as problematic, the longitudinal relationships among sleep, work hours, mood, and work performance are not well understood. Here, we prospectively characterize the risk of depression and medical errors based on preinternship sleep disturbance, internship-related sleep duration, and duty hours. Survey data from 1215 nondepressed interns were collected at preinternship baseline, then 3 and 6 months into internship. We examined how preinternship sleep quality and internship sleep and work hours affected risk of depression at 3 months, per the Patient Health Questionnaire 9. We then examined the impact of sleep loss and work hours on depression persistence from 3 to 6 months. Finally, we compared self-reported errors among interns based on nightly sleep duration (≤6 hr vs. >6 hr), weekly work hours (Poorly sleeping trainees obtained less sleep and were at elevated risk of depression in the first months of internship. Short sleep (≤6 hr nightly) during internship mediated the relationship between sleep disturbance and depression risk, and sleep loss led to a chronic course for depression. Depression rates were highest among interns with both sleep disturbance and short sleep. Elevated medical error rates were reported by physicians sleeping ≤6 hr per night, working ≥ 70 weekly hours, and who were acutely or chronically depressed. Sleep disturbance and internship-enforced short sleep increase risk of depression development and chronicity and medical errors. Interventions targeting sleep problems prior to and during residency hold promise for curbing depression rates and improving patient care. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

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    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  20. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Pugliano, Gina; Roberts, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA), residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP) program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE), also assess competency in several clinical domains. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009. Methods The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component) were merged and analyzed for relationships. Results Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings. Discussion A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA

  1. Is There a Return on a Children's Hospital's Investment in a Pediatric Residency's Community Health Track? A Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Cara; Cora-Bramble, Denice; Ottolini, Mary; Agrawal, Dewesh

    2018-04-01

    Academic Medical Centers incur significant expenses associated with training residents and caring for underserved populations. No previous studies have analyzed hospital-level graduate medical education economics for pediatric residency training. Using data from the 2010-2011 academic year, we quantified total direct costs per year for training 12 community health track (CHT) residents. Utilizing sensitivity analyses, we estimated revenues generated by residents in inpatient and outpatient settings. The total yearly direct cost of training 12 CHT residents was $922,640 including salaries, benefits, and administrative costs. The estimated additional yearly inpatient net revenue from attending-resident clinical teams compared to attendingonly service was $109,452. For primary care clinics, the estimated yearly revenue differential of resident-preceptor teams was $455,940, compared to attending-only clinics. The replacement cost of 12 CHT residents with advanced practitioners was $457,596 per year.This study suggests there is positive return on a children's hospital's investment in a CHT.

  2. Height for age z score and cognitive function are associated with Academic performance among school children aged 8-11 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Demewoz; Nigatu, Dabere; Gashaw, Ketema; Demelash, Habtamu

    2016-01-01

    Academic achievement of school age children can be affected by several factors such as nutritional status, demographics, and socioeconomic factors. Though evidence about the magnitude of malnutrition is well established in Ethiopia, there is a paucity of evidence about the association of nutritional status with academic performance among the nation's school age children. Hence, this study aimed to determine how nutritional status and cognitive function are associated with academic performance of school children in Goba town, South East Ethiopia. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 131 school age students from primary schools in Goba town enrolled during the 2013/2014 academic year. The nutritional status of students was assessed by anthropometric measurement, while the cognitive assessment was measured by the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (KABC-II) and Ravens colored progressive matrices (Raven's CPM) tests. The academic performance of the school children was measured by collecting the preceding semester academic result from the school record. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariable linear regression were used in the statistical analysis. This study found a statistically significant positive association between all cognitive test scores and average academic performance except for number recall (p = 0.12) and hand movements (p = 0.08). The correlation between all cognitive test scores and mathematics score was found positive and statistically significant (p academic subjects among school age children (ß = 0.53; 95 % CI: 0.11-0.95). A single unit change of age resulted 3.23 unit change in average score of all academic subjects among school age children (ß = 3.23; 95 % CI: 1.20-5.27). Nutritional status (height for age Z score) and wealth could be modifiable factors to improve academic performance of school age children. Moreover, interventions to improve nutrition for mothers and children may be

  3. Academic Outcomes 2 Years After Working Memory Training for Children With Low Working Memory: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gehan; Quach, Jon; Spencer-Smith, Megan; Anderson, Peter J; Gathercole, Susan; Gold, Lisa; Sia, Kah-Ling; Mensah, Fiona; Rickards, Field; Ainley, John; Wake, Melissa

    2016-05-02

    Working memory training may help children with attention and learning difficulties, but robust evidence from population-level randomized controlled clinical trials is lacking. To test whether a computerized adaptive working memory intervention program improves long-term academic outcomes of children 6 to 7 years of age with low working memory compared with usual classroom teaching. Population-based randomized controlled clinical trial of first graders from 44 schools in Melbourne, Australia, who underwent a verbal and visuospatial working memory screening. Children were classified as having low working memory if their scores were below the 15th percentile on either the Backward Digit Recall or Mister X subtest from the Automated Working Memory Assessment, or if their scores were below the 25th percentile on both. These children were randomly assigned by an independent statistician to either an intervention or a control arm using a concealed computerized random number sequence. Researchers were blinded to group assignment at time of screening. We conducted our trial from March 1, 2012, to February 1, 2015; our final analysis was on October 30, 2015. We used intention-to-treat analyses. Cogmed working memory training, comprising 20 to 25 training sessions of 45 minutes' duration at school. Directly assessed (at 12 and 24 months) academic outcomes (reading, math, and spelling scores as primary outcomes) and working memory (also assessed at 6 months); parent-, teacher-, and child-reported behavioral and social-emotional functioning and quality of life; and intervention costs. Of 1723 children screened (mean [SD] age, 6.9 [0.4] years), 226 were randomized to each arm (452 total), with 90% retention at 1 year and 88% retention at 2 years; 90.3% of children in the intervention arm completed at least 20 sessions. Of the 4 short-term and working memory outcomes, 1 outcome (visuospatial short-term memory) benefited the children at 6 months (effect size, 0.43 [95% CI, 0

  4. Resident Self-Assessment and Learning Goal Development: Evaluation of Resident-Reported Competence and Future Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Paterniti, Debora A; Tancredi, Daniel J; Burke, Ann E; Trimm, R Franklin; Guillot, Ann; Guralnick, Susan; Mahan, John D

    2015-01-01

    To determine incidence of learning goals by competency area and to assess which goals fall into competency areas with lower self-assessment scores. Cross-sectional analysis of existing deidentified American Academy of Pediatrics' PediaLink individualized learning plan data for the academic year 2009-2010. Residents self-assessed competencies in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas and wrote learning goals. Textual responses for goals were mapped to 6 ACGME competency areas, future practice, or personal attributes. Adjusted mean differences and associations were estimated using multiple linear and logistic regression. A total of 2254 residents reported 6078 goals. Residents self-assessed their systems-based practice (51.8) and medical knowledge (53.0) competencies lowest and professionalism (68.9) and interpersonal and communication skills (62.2) highest. Residents were most likely to identify goals involving medical knowledge (70.5%) and patient care (50.5%) and least likely to write goals on systems-based practice (11.0%) and professionalism (6.9%). In logistic regression analysis adjusting for postgraduate year (PGY), gender, and degree type (MD/DO), resident-reported goal area showed no association with the learner's relative self-assessment score for that competency area. In the conditional logistic regression analysis, with each learner serving as his or her own control, senior residents (PGY2/3+s) who rated themselves relatively lower in a competency area were more likely to write a learning goal in that area than were PGY1s. Senior residents appear to develop better skills and/or motivation to explicitly turn self-assessed learning gaps into learning goals, suggesting that individualized learning plans may help improve self-regulated learning during residency. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Precision Radiology Residency Training: Special Distinction Tracks for Noninterpretative Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth; Solnes, Lilja; Horton, Karen M; Johnson, Pamela T

    2018-06-01

    The role of a radiologist has expanded beyond the tripartite mission of patient care, education, and research to include cross-specialty consultation for patient management, innovative solutions to improve health-care quality and safety, device design, and policy advocacy. As such, radiology residency programs should incorporate formalized training to prepare residents for these various professional roles. Since the 2015-2016 academic year, five training tracks focused on noninterpretative skills have been integrated into our residency training program: Clinician Educator, Quality Improvement, Entrepreneurship/Innovation, Health Policy Advocacy, and High-Value Care. Each track is longitudinal, with a set of requirements throughout the residents' training necessary to achieve certification at graduation. To date nine residents have participated in the programs, including two who received distinction in two separate tracks. Residents in each of the tracks have implemented successful initiatives related to the focus area. As such, these tracks enrich training by ensuring that residents make meaningful contributions to the department and institution during their training and disseminate successful initiatives through presentation at national meetings and publications. The duration of a radiology residency and resources available in an academic center provide opportunities for residency program directors to advance residents' skills in important noninterpretative components of radiology practice. Regardless of whether residents pursue academic medicine or private practice, these skills are necessary for graduates to become valuable members of a radiology practice and serve as national leaders in the field of radiology. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Can changes in the distributions of resident birds in China over the past 50 years be attributed to climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianguo; Zhang, Guobin

    2015-06-01

    The distributions of bird species have changed over the past 50 years in China. To evaluate whether the changes can be attributed to the changing climate, we analyzed the distributions of 20 subspecies of resident birds in relation to climate change. Long-term records of bird distributions, gray relational analysis, fuzzy-set classification techniques, and attribution methods were used. Among the 20 subspecies of resident birds, the northern limits of over half of the subspecies have shifted northward since the 1960s, and most changes have been related to the thermal index. Driven by climate change over the past 50 years, the suitable range and latitude or longitude of the distribution centers of certain birds have exhibited increased fluctuations. The northern boundaries of over half of the subspecies have shifted northward compared with those in the 1960s. The consistency between the observed and predicted changes in the range limits was quite high for some subspecies. The changes in the northern boundaries or the latitudes of the centers of distribution of nearly half of the subspecies can be attributed to climate change. The results suggest that climate change has affected the distributions of particular birds. The method used to attribute changes in bird distributions to climate change may also be effective for other animals.

  7. Can changes in the distributions of resident birds in China over the past 50 years be attributed to climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianguo; Zhang, Guobin

    2015-01-01

    The distributions of bird species have changed over the past 50 years in China. To evaluate whether the changes can be attributed to the changing climate, we analyzed the distributions of 20 subspecies of resident birds in relation to climate change. Long-term records of bird distributions, gray relational analysis, fuzzy-set classification techniques, and attribution methods were used. Among the 20 subspecies of resident birds, the northern limits of over half of the subspecies have shifted northward since the 1960s, and most changes have been related to the thermal index. Driven by climate change over the past 50 years, the suitable range and latitude or longitude of the distribution centers of certain birds have exhibited increased fluctuations. The northern boundaries of over half of the subspecies have shifted northward compared with those in the 1960s. The consistency between the observed and predicted changes in the range limits was quite high for some subspecies. The changes in the northern boundaries or the latitudes of the centers of distribution of nearly half of the subspecies can be attributed to climate change. The results suggest that climate change has affected the distributions of particular birds. The method used to attribute changes in bird distributions to climate change may also be effective for other animals. PMID:26078858

  8. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P adverse outcome. Mean (SD) in-training examination scores did not significantly change from 2010 to 2013 for first-year residents (499.7 [ 85.2] to 500.5 [84.2], P = .99), for residents from other postgraduate years, or for first-time examinees taking the written or oral board

  9. The State of Mental Health of Students of Tehran Medical Sciences University in The Academic Year 2010-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monavar Moradian Sorkhkalaee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Students are the most dynamic people in the society and their health is to a great extent a prerequisite for the health of most individuals in the society. This study was conducted to investigate the state of mental health and factors which influence it in the students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Health Services.Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was conducted on 400 students of Tehran Medical Sciences University in the academic year 2010-2011. The number of studied subjects was determined according to the student population of each faculty and questionnaires were randomly distributed among them. The data collection tool in this study was the standard GHQ28 questionnaire. After collecting the data, analysis was done using SPSS.18 software, Chi-square test, T-test, and Regression Logestic.Results: 25.52% of the attendants were healthy and 75.47% had suspected mental disorders. Also, regarding depression, 75.53% of people suffered from mental disorders and 25.46% were healthy.Conclusion: According to the achieved results, it seems that studying at university, facing educational problems and the existing conditions at university cause an increase in the rate of mental disorder among the students of Medical Sciences University.

  10. Study to Evaluate Two Dosage Regimens of Vitamin D Through an Academic Year in Middle School Girls: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shajari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is an essential hormone for growth and development of bones in children. There is a lot of evidence for deficiency of this vitamin in Middle East females. This study conduct to find a way to combat deficiency in girls during rapid growth phase of puberty in academic year. One hundred and two Middle School girls who had not consumed any vitamins supplement have been participated in this randomized clinical trial. They allocated randomly in two case groups who received 50,000 or 100,000 IU vitamin D3 in October and three months later in January or in control group who received vitamin E. At the end of winter blood samples for 25-hydroxyvitamin D were checked. The mean of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were 5.5±1.5 ng/ml, 15.2±6 ng/ml, 23.0±6.8 ng/ml in control, 50,000 and 100,000 IU vitamin D groups respectively (P0.05. Urine calcium/creatinin ratio was equal in case and control groups (P>0.05. 100,000 IU of vitamin D3 every three months (equal to 800IU/day can raise 25-hydroxyvitamin D above 12 ng/ml in all cases but for area with high prevalence of sever deficiency, dosage more than 100,000 IU every three months or shorter interval recommended to achieve optimal level.

  11. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Present at the creation: the founding and formative years of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Susan

    2003-04-01

    The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) was founded in 1978 with the goal of strengthening academic health sciences libraries and increasing their participation nationally in efforts to improve medical education. A primary objective of the organization was to achieve a formal relationship with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) through membership in the Council of Academic Societies (CAS). Initial steps in establishing AAHSL are examined, including its efforts to join CAS. The author pays tribute to AAHSL's founders, in particular Gerald Oppenheimer, without whose vision and leadership AAHSL would not have been formed.

  13. Exploring the Academic and Social Experiences of Latino Engineering Community College Transfer Students at a 4-Year Institution: A Qualitative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, LaTesha R.

    As the number of historically underrepresented populations transfer from community college to university to pursue baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), little research exists about the challenges and successes Latino students experience as they transition from 2-year colleges to 4-year universities. Thus, institutions of higher education have limited insight to inform their policies, practices, and strategic planning in developing effective sources of support, services, and programs for underrepresented students in STEM disciplines. This qualitative research study explored the academic and social experiences of 14 Latino engineering community college transfer students at one university. Specifically, this study examined the lived experiences of minority community college transfer students' transition into and persistence at a 4-year institution. The conceptual framework applied to this study was Schlossberg's Transition Theory, which analyzed the participant's social and academic experiences that led to their successful transition from community college to university. Three themes emerged from the narrative data analysis: (a) Academic Experiences, (b) Social Experiences, and (c) Sources of Support. The findings indicate that engineering community college transfer students experience many challenges in their transition into and persistence at 4-year institutions. Some of the challenges include lack of academic preparedness, environmental challenges, lack of time management skills and faculty serving the role as institutional agents.

  14. Teacher self-efficacy and its effects on classroom processes, student academic adjustment, and teacher well-being : A synthesis of 40 years of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, M.; Koomen, H.M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study integrates 40 years of teacher self-efficacy (TSE) research to explore the consequences of TSE for the quality of classroom processes, students’ academic adjustment, and teachers’ psychological well-being. Via a criteria-based review approach, 165 eligible articles were included for

  15. Cross-Cultural Generalizability of Year in School Effects: Negative Effects of Acceleration and Positive Effects of Retention on Academic Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    Given that the Big-Fish-Little-Pond-Effect, the negative effect of school-average achievement on academic self-concept, is one of the most robust findings in educational psychology (Marsh, Seaton et al., 2007), this research extends the theoretical model, based on social comparison theory, to study relative year in school effects (e.g., being 1…

  16. The Effects of Advance Graphic Organizers Strategy Intervention on Academic Achievement, Self Efficacy, and Motivation to Learn Social Studies in Learning Disabled Second Year Prep Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using advance graphic organizers on academic achievement, self efficacy, and motivation to learn social studies in learning disabled second year prep students. A total of 60 students identified with LD were invited to participate. The sample was randomly divided into two groups; experimental (n = 30, 23 boys,…

  17. Humor and College Adjustment: The Predictive Nature of Humor, Academic Achievement, Authoritative Parenting Styles on the Initial Adjustment of Male and Female First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Gregory P.; Andrews, David W.

    2003-01-01

    A self-report questionnaire on academic achievement, birth order, and family structure; the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire; the Parental Authority Questionnaire; and the Coping Humor Scale were administered to 257 first-year college students. Researchers examined the relationships among (a) authoritative parenting style, (b) family…

  18. Impact of Communication on Parents' and First-Year College Students' Ratings of Student Academic, Emotional, and Social Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogan, Lissa; Freedle, Agata; Ringenberg, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of parents' and students' communication patterns on students' social, emotional, and academic adjustment to college. It matched 118 pairs of parents and students (n = 236) and asked them to report their frequency and mode of communication, as well as the first-year students' perceived adjustment to college. The…

  19. Two-Year Comparison of Transfer and Native Student Academic Performance: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Fall 1986 Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Linda M.; Abbed, Nejla

    In 1989, a two-year study was completed comparing the academic progress of community college transfers, senior college transfers, and continuing juniors (natives) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). The study samples were comprised of 673 former community college students and 393 senior college transfers who entered UIUC in…

  20. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  1. Utility of the CORD ECG Database in Evaluating ECG Interpretation by Emergency Medicine Residents

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    Wong, Hubert E

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Electrocardiograph (ECG interpretation is a vital component of Emergency Medicine (EM resident education, but few studies have formally examined ECG teaching methods used in residency training. Recently, the Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD developed an Internet database of 395 ECGs that have been extensively peer-reviewed to incorporate all findings and abnormalities. We examined the efficacy of this database in assessing EM residents' skills in ECG interpretation. METHODS: We used the CORD ECG database to evaluate residents at our academic three-year EM residency. Thirteen residents participated, including four first-year, four second-year, and five third-year residents. Twenty ECGs were selected using 14 search criteria representing a broad range of abnormalities, including infarction, rhythm, and conduction abnormalities. Exams were scored based on all abnormalities and findings listed in the teaching points accompanying each ECG. We assigned points to each abnormal finding based on clinical relevance. RESULTS: Out of a total of 183 points in our clinically weighted scoring system, first-year residents scored an average of 99 points (54.1% [9 1- 1191, second-year residents 11 1 points (60.4% [97-1261, and third-year residents 130 points (7 1.0% [94- 1501, p = 0.12. Clinically relevant abnormalities, including anterior and inferior myocardial infarctions, were most frequently diagnosed correctly, while posterior infarction was more frequently missed. Rhythm abnormalities including ventricular and supraventricular tachycardias were most frequently diagnosed correctly, while conduction abnormalities including left bundle branch block and atrioventricular (AV block were more frequently missed. CONCLUSION: The CORD database represents a valuable resource in the assessment and teaching of ECG skills, allowing more precise identification of areas upon which instruction should be further focused or individually tailored. Our

  2. Changes in Prescribing Symptomatic and Preventive Medications in the Last Year of Life in Older Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Helene G.; Taxis, Katja; Pont, Lisa G.

    2018-01-01

    Background At the end of life goals of care change from disease prevention to symptomatic control, however little is known about the patterns of medication prescribing at this stage. Objectives To explore changes in prescribing of symptomatic and preventive medication in the last year of life in

  3. Prevalence of Substance Abuse among High School Students in 2015-2016 Academic Year in Yazd City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Vakili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Substance abuse is a common problem and a major public health dilemma with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, due to the increase of drug abuse in recent years, especially among young people and its complications, including loss of life, unwanted pregnancy, suicide commitment, as well as violence and given that our country has a young population, so the present study, aimed to investigate the substance abuse among the students in Yazd, a central city in Iran. Materials and methods: In this cross sectional study 1020 students studying in high school (the first period - the second period were investigated in the 2015-2016 academic year in the city of Yazd. Multi-stage sampling method using cluster and stratified sampling was used. Information were collected through a standardized questionnaire based on World Health Organization method known as Global school-based student health survey (GSHS which was translated to Persian. After completion of the questionnaire by students, the collected data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16 and through statistical tests of significance. Results: The results showed 18.1% of students had at least one history of drug use. 9.5% of students had a history of cannabis use, 12.5% had a history of amphetamines use, 10.8% had a history of taking psychotropic pills, 12.2% had a history of heroin use, 12.9% had a history of opium use, and finally, 9.6% had a history of crack use. There was no significant association between parents education and drug abuse in students. Conclusion: According to high prevalence and diversity of substance abuse among students, recommend educational program in school and parents supervision. Promotion of parents and teachers knowledge about symptoms of abuse is needed. Family support of adolescents is effective for prevention. 

  4. Cost of Incremental Expansion of an Existing Family Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkin, Evan A; Newton, Warren P; Toomey, Brian; Lingley, Ronald; Page, Cristen P

    2017-07-01

    Expanding residency training programs to address shortages in the primary care workforce is challenged by the present graduate medical education (GME) environment. The Medicare funding cap on new GME positions and reductions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Teaching Health Center (THC) GME program require innovative solutions to support primary care residency expansion. Sparse literature exists to assist in predicting the actual cost of incremental expansion of a family medicine residency program without federal or state GME support. In 2011 a collaboration to develop a community health center (CHC) academic medical partnership (CHAMP), was formed and created a THC as a training site for expansion of an existing family medicine residency program. The cost of expansion was a critical factor as no Federal GME funding or HRSA THC GME program support was available. Initial start-up costs were supported by a federal grant and local foundations. Careful financial analysis of the expansion has provided actual costs per resident of the incremental expansion of the residencyRESULTS: The CHAMP created a new THC and expanded the residency from eight to ten residents per year. The cost of expansion was approximately $72,000 per resident per year. The cost of incremental expansion of our residency program in the CHAMP model was more than 50% less than that of the recently reported cost of training in the HRSA THC GME program.

  5. [Two-and-a-half year follow-up study of strategy factors in successful learning to predict academic achievements in medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Ok; Lee, Sang Yeoup; Baek, Sunyong; Woo, Jae Seok; Im, Sun Ju; Yune, So Jung; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung

    2015-06-01

    We performed a two-and-a-half year follow-up study of strategy factors in successful learning to predict academic achievements in medical education. Strategy factors in successful learning were identified using a content analysis of open-ended responses from 30 medical students who were ranked in the top 10 of their class. Core words were selected among their responses in each category and the frequency of the words were counted. Then, a factors survey was conducted among year 2 students, before the second semester. Finally, we performed an analysis to assess the association between the factors score and academic achievement for the same students 2.5 years later. The core words were "planning and execution," "daily reviews" in the study schedule category; "focusing in class" and "taking notes" among class-related category; and "lecture notes," "previous exams or papers," and "textbooks" in the primary self-learning resources category. There were associations between the factors scores for study planning and execution, focusing in class, and taking notes and academic achievement, representing the second year second semester credit score, third year written exam scores and fourth year written and skill exam scores. Study planning was only one independent variable to predict fourth year summative written exam scores. In a two-and-a-half year follow-up study, associations were founded between academic achievement and the factors scores for study planning and execution, focusing in class, and taking notes. Study planning as only one independent variable is useful for predicting fourth year summative written exam score.

  6. Paleoparasitological evidence of pinworm (Enterobius vermicularis) infection in a female adolescent residing in ancient Tehran (Iran) 7000 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknazhad, Niloofar; Mowlavi, Gholamreza; Dupouy Camet, Jean; Jelodar, Mohammad Esmaeili; Mobedi, Iraj; Makki, Mahsasadat; Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Sarlak, Siamak; Najafi, Faezeh

    2016-01-22

    The Molavi street archeological site south of Tehran accidentally provided a unique opportunity for paleoparasitological studies in Iran. A female skeleton was unearthed and evaluated to be 7000 years old. Soil samples were collected around the pelvic and sacrum bones. Careful microscopic investigation of rehydrated soil samples revealed the presence of one Enterobius vermicularis egg attached to the skeleton sacral region. The present finding likely represents the oldest evidence of a human pinworm infection in Asia.

  7. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  8. Orthopaedic Resident Practice Management and Health Policy Education: Evaluation of Experience and Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stautberg Iii, Eugene F; Romero, Jose; Bender, Sean; DeHart, Marc

    2018-04-11

    Introduction Practice management and health policy have generally not been considered integral to orthopaedic resident education. Our objective was to evaluate residents' current experience and knowledge, formal training, and desire for further education in practice management and health policy. Methods We developed a 29-question survey that was divided into three sections: practice management, initial employment opportunity, and health policy. Within each section, questions were directed at a resident's current experience and knowledge, formal training, and interest in further education. The survey was distributed at the end of the academic year through an Internet-based survey tool (www.surveymonkey.com) to orthopaedic residents representing multiple programs and all postgraduate years. Results The survey was distributed to 121 residents representing eight residency programs. Of those, 87 residents responded, resulting in a 72% response rate. All postgraduate years were represented. Regarding practice management, 66% had "no confidence" or "some confidence" in coding clinical encounters. When asked if practice models, finance management, and coding should be taught in residency, 95%, 93%, and 97% responded "yes," respectively. When evaluating first employment opportunities, the three most important factors were location, operating room block time, and call. Regarding health policy, 28% were "moderately familiar" or "very familiar" with the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, and 72% were "not familiar" or "somewhat familiar" with bundled payments for arthroplasty. Finally, when asked if yearly lectures in political activities would enhance resident education, 90% responded "yes." Discussion and conclusion Regarding practice management, the survey suggests that current orthopaedic residents are not familiar with basic topics, do not receive formal training, and want further education. The survey suggests that residents also receive minimal training in health policy

  9. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  10. Evaluating the effect of emergency residency training on productivity in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Daniel J; McGillicuddy, Daniel C; Sanchez, Leon D

    2013-09-01

    Resident productivity, defined as patients seen per unit time, is one measure that is used to assess the performance and educational progress of residents in the emergency department (ED). One published study suggested that emergency residency training (EM) does not improve productivity compared with that in other specialties, including internal medicine (IM). This study assesses how EM and IM trainees perform in the ED and illustrates how resident productivity changes through the academic year. A retrospective review of attending physicians and residents working 8-h shifts in the higher acuity zone of a large-volume, tertiary, academic health care center was performed for July 2009, October 2009, January 2010, and April 2010. The total number of patients seen primarily and admitted during each shift was recorded. ED volume was approximated by the number of patients seen by the attending physician, and acuity was approximated by admission rate. A mixed model regression assessed the impact of year and type of residency training (e.g., EM1, EM2, IM1, and IM2), ED volume, and acuity on resident productivity (number of patients per shift). The study was granted waiver of informed consent by our institutional review board. We reviewed 936 shifts. After adjusting for acuity and ED volume, the EM1 group had a significant increase in patients per shift over the year, from 6.11 in July to 10.3 in April (p increased productivity significantly. The first EM training year leads to a significant change in productivity that separates EM from IM residents. This contradicts the previous assertion that non-EM residents have the same productivity as EM residents in the ED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Are trajectories of self-regulation abilities from ages 2-3 to 6-7 associated with academic achievement in the early school years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, A C P; Chittleborough, C R; Mittinty, M N; Miller-Lewis, L R; Sawyer, M G; Sullivan, T; Lynch, J W

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the association between two key aspects of self-regulation, 'task attentiveness' and 'emotional regulation' assessed from ages 2-3 to 6-7 years, and academic achievement when children were aged 6-7 years. Participants (n = 3410) were children in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Parents rated children's task attentiveness and emotional regulation abilities when children were aged 2-3, 4-5 and 6-7. Academic achievement was assessed using the Academic Rating Scale completed by teachers. Linear regression models were used to estimate the association between developmental trajectories (i.e. rate of change per year) of task attentiveness and emotional regulation, and academic achievement at 6-7 years. Improvements in task attentiveness between 2-3 and 6-7 years, adjusted for baseline levels of task attentiveness, child and family confounders, and children's receptive vocabulary and non-verbal reasoning skills at age 6-7 were associated with greater teacher-rated literacy [B = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.04-0.06] and maths achievement (B = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.03-0.06) at 6-7 years. Improvements in emotional regulation, adjusting for baseline levels and covariates, were also associated with better teacher-rated literacy (B = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.01-0.04) but not with maths achievement (B = 0.01, 95% CI = -0.01-0.02) at 6-7 years. For literacy, improvements in task attentiveness had a stronger association with achievement at 6-7 years than improvements in emotional regulation. Our study shows that improved trajectories of task attentiveness from ages 2-3 to 6-7 years are associated with improved literacy and maths achievement during the early school years. Trajectories of improving emotional regulation showed smaller effects on academic outcomes. Results suggest that interventions that improve task attentiveness when children are aged 2-3 to 6-7 years have the potential to improve literacy and maths achievement during

  12. [Preventive practices of the residents over 25 years of age in Monterrey and its metropolitan area (Mexico)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Elizondo, M F; Villarreal-Ríos, E; Salinas-Martínez, A M; Núñez-Rocha, G M

    2004-01-01

    Chronic and degenerative disorders are the leading causes of morbidity-mortality in Mexico, as a result of which the Health Sector has implemented preventive and suitable detection measures. The use of the health services is a dynamic behavior on the part of the population. In order for people to use these preventive measures, the barriers to accessing these services must be lessened. Hence, the objective of this study was that of ascertaining the use of the services for the detection of diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, cervical-uterine and breast cancer and tetanus and diphtheria toxoide vaccinations. The sample size was that of 254 individuals age 25 and over living in Monterrey or in the greater Monterrey metropolitan area. Those having employed preventive measures during the year immediately prior to the study were taken into account with regard to the use of preventive measures. The analysis consisted of descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis. Over 60% of the population was female, the average age being 42.3 + 14 years of age, three fourths of the population being on the social security rolls. A total 37% mentioned having undergone the diabetes test, and 44.5 the test for high blood pressure, while 31.1% had been vaccinated with the tetanus and diphtheria toxoide. Regarding specifically female checkups, 34.3% of all females had undergone the corresponding cervical-uterine cancer test, 29.5% having been screened for breast cancer. No relationship was found to exist between the use of measures and family histories and the perception of the importance of the checks. The use of preventive measures fall below some international standards. Individuals exposed to the risk must be sought in order to fittingly detect any chronic disorder.

  13. Resident interest and factors involved in entering a pediatric pulmonary fellowship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershan William M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known about interest in pediatric pulmonology among pediatric residents. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine at this institution: 1 the level of pediatric resident interest in pursuing a pulmonary fellowship, 2 potential factors involved in development of such interest, 3 whether the presence of a pulmonary fellowship program affects such interest. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all 52 pediatric residents at this institution in 1992 and to all 59 pediatric residents and 14 combined internal medicine/pediatrics residents in 2002, following development of a pulmonary fellowship program. Results Response rates were 79% in 1992 and 86% in 2002. Eight of the 43 responders in 1992 (19% had considered doing a pulmonary fellowship compared to 7 of 63 (11% in 2002. The highest ranked factors given by the residents who had considered a fellowship included wanting to continue one's education after residency, enjoying caring for pulmonary patients, and liking pulmonary physiology and the pulmonary faculty. Major factors listed by residents who had not considered a pulmonary fellowship included not enjoying the tracheostomy/ventilator population and chronic pulmonary patients in general, and a desire to enter general pediatrics or another fellowship. Most residents during both survey periods believed that they would be in non-academic or academic general pediatrics in 5 years. Only 1 of the 106 responding residents (~1% anticipated becoming a pediatric pulmonologist. Conclusions Although many pediatric residents consider enrolling in a pulmonary fellowship (~10–20% here, few (~1% here will actually pursue a career in pediatric pulmonology. The presence of a pulmonary fellowship program did not significantly alter resident interest, though other confounding factors may be involved.

  14. Mortality among residents of shelters, rooming houses, and hotels in Canada: 11 year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Stephen W; Wilkins, Russell; Tjepkema, Michael; O'Campo, Patricia J; Dunn, James R

    2009-10-26

    To examine mortality in a representative nationwide sample of homeless and marginally housed people living in shelters, rooming houses, and hotels. Follow-up study. Canada 1991-2001. 15 100 homeless and marginally housed people enumerated in 1991 census. Age specific and age standardised mortality rates, remaining life expectancies at age 25, and probabilities of survival from age 25 to 75. Data were compared with data from the poorest and richest income fifths as well as with data for the entire cohort Of the homeless and marginally housed people, 3280 died. Mortality rates among these people were substantially higher than rates in the poorest income fifth, with the highest rate ratios seen at younger ages. Among those who were homeless or marginally housed, the probability of survival to age 75 was 32% (95% confidence interval 30% to 34%) in men and 60% (56% to 63%) in women. Remaining life expectancy at age 25 was 42 years (42 to 43) and 52 years (50 to 53), respectively. Compared with the entire cohort, mortality rate ratios for men and women, respectively, were 11.5 (8.8 to 15.0) and 9.2 (5.5 to 15.2) for drug related deaths, 6.4 (5.3 to 7.7) and 8.2 (5.0 to 13.4) for alcohol related deaths, 4.8 (3.9 to 5.9) and 3.8 (2.7 to 5.4) for mental disorders, and 2.3 (1.8 to 3.1) and 5.6 (3.2 to 9.6) for suicide. For both sexes, the largest differences in mortality rates were for smoking related diseases, ischaemic heart disease, and respiratory diseases. Living in shelters, rooming houses, and hotels is associated with muc