WorldWideScience

Sample records for residence life staff

  1. Life satisfaction of people with intellectual disability living in community residences: perceptions of the residents, their parents and staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Rabinovitz, S

    2003-02-01

    Within the literature on quality of life (QoL), life satisfaction (LS) has emerged as a key variable by which to measure perceived well-being, which is referred to as subjective QoL. The LS self-reports of 93 residents with intellectual disability (ID) living in community-based residences were compared with reports about their LS completed by their staff and parents. The residents were interviewed on their LS by social workers who did not belong to the staff of the interviewee's residence. The instrument used was the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). Staff and parents completed the short version of the LSS. Residents and staff's LS reports were positively correlated. However, significant differences were found between these two groups of informants when the residents were characterized as high functioning, had a low score in challenging behaviour, worked in an integrative employment setting and lived in an apartment. As opposed to staff/resident discrepancies, no differences were found between parents' and residents' LS reports. If residents cannot to be interviewed about their LS, then the parent is the preferred person to respond on behalf of the resident. The current study highlights the importance of including both objective measures (e.g. functional assessment characteristics) and subjective measures (e.g. LS) in order to get a better understanding of the QoL of people with ID.

  2. Constructing the meaning of quality of life for residents in care homes in the Lebanon: perspectives of residents, staff and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adra, Marina Gharibian; Hopton, John; Keady, John

    2015-12-01

    Located in two care homes in Lebanon, the study explores the perspectives of quality of life for a sample of older residents, care staff and family caregivers. Quality of life for older people living in care homes is traditionally reported in the literature as a Westernised construct and so far little is known about its meanings from an Arabic cultural perspective and context. There is also a knowledge gap about the conditions of older people living in care homes in Lebanon. The study was a qualitative exploration of perspectives of quality of life of older residents, care staff and family caregivers. Two care homes for older people situated in Beirut took part in the study. Between 2010 and 2011 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of 20 residents, eight family caregivers and 11 care staff. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Four categories emerged from this analytical process: (i) maintaining family connectedness; (ii) engaging in worthwhile activities; (iii) maintaining and developing significant relationships; and (iv) holding and practicing spiritual beliefs. The emergence of these categories confirmed the complex, interrelated and multidimensional nature of quality of life for residents and other stakeholders. The findings supplement an emerging body of knowledge about the composition of quality of life for older residents in Lebanon. Improving the quality of life of older residents will require action in respect of all of the domains identified in study. Moving nursing practice from task-based care to relationship-centred approaches was seen as pivotal in helping to develop quality of life for residents living in the participating care homes. The findings have implications for education, nursing practice and research in Lebanon and help start an evidence base for care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Care staff training based on person-centered care and dementia care mapping, and its effects on the quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mami; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of care staff training based on person-centered care (PCC) and dementia care mapping (DCM) on the quality of life (QOL) of residents with dementia in a nursing home. An intervention of staff training based on PCC and DCM was conducted with 40 care staff members at a geriatric nursing home. The effects of the staff training on the QOL of residents with dementia were evaluated by the DCM measurements of 40 residents with dementia three times at about one-month intervals (first, baseline; second, pre-intervention; third, post-intervention). The well-being and ill-being values (WIB values) of the residents with dementia measured by DCM were not different between the first and second rounds before the staff training (p = 0.211). Meanwhile, the WIB values increased from the first and second rounds to the third post-intervention round (p = 0.035 and p Staff training based on PCC and DCM could effectively improve the QOL of residents with dementia.

  4. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  5. Impact of Intervention to Improve Nursing Home Resident-Staff Interactions and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christine W; Mills, Whitney L; Pimentel, Camilla B; Palmer, Jennifer A; Allen, Rebecca S; Zhao, Shibei; Wewiorski, Nancy J; Sullivan, Jennifer L; Dillon, Kristen; Clark, Valerie; Berlowitz, Dan R; Snow, Andrea Lynn

    2018-04-30

    For nursing home residents, positive interactions with staff and engagement in daily life contribute meaningfully to quality of life. We sought to improve these aspects of person-centered care in an opportunistic snowball sample of six Veterans Health Administration nursing homes (e.g., Community Living Centers-CLCs) using an intervention that targeted staff behavior change, focusing on improving interactions between residents and staff and thereby ultimately aiming to improve resident engagement. We grounded this mixed-methods study in the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, Behavior (COM-B) model of behavior change. We implemented the intervention by (a) using a set of evidence-based practices for implementing quality improvement and (b) combining primarily CLC-based staff facilitation with some researcher-led facilitation. Validated resident and staff surveys and structured observations collected pre and post intervention, as well as semi-structured staff interviews conducted post intervention, helped assess intervention success. Sixty-two CLC residents and 308 staff members responded to the surveys. Researchers conducted 1,490 discrete observations. Intervention implementation was associated with increased staff communication with residents during the provision of direct care and decreased negative staff interactions with residents. In the 66 interviews, staff consistently credited the intervention with helping them (a) develop awareness of the importance of identifying opportunities for engagement and (b) act to improve the quality of interactions between residents and staff. The intervention proved feasible and influenced staff to make simple enhancements to their behaviors that improved resident-staff interactions and staff-assessed resident engagement.

  6. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  7. Oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martina; Kupfer, Ramona; Reissmann, Daniel R; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Köpke, Sascha

    2016-09-30

    Associations between nursing home residents' oral health status and quality of life, respiratory tract infections, and nutritional status have been reported. Educational interventions for nurses or residents, or both, focusing on knowledge and skills related to oral health management may have the potential to improve residents' oral health. To assess the effects of oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff or residents, or both, to maintain or improve the oral health of nursing home residents. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 18 January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 18 January 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 18 January 2016), CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 18 January 2016), and Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 18 January 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials to 18 January 2016. In addition, we searched reference lists of identified articles and contacted experts in the field. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs comparing oral health educational programmes for nursing staff or residents, or both with usual care or any other oral healthcare intervention. Two review authors independently screened articles retrieved from the searches for relevance, extracted data from included studies, assessed risk of bias for each included study, and evaluated the overall quality of the evidence. We retrieved data about the development and evaluation processes of complex interventions on the basis of the Criteria for Reporting the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in healthcare: revised guideline (CReDECI 2). We contacted authors of relevant studies for additional information. We included nine RCTs involving

  8. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: a study protocol for a cluster randomised trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-01

    Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units.

  9. How nursing home residents develop relationships with peers and staff: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tonya; Bowers, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Social support and social relationships have been repeatedly identified as essential to nursing home resident quality of life. However, little is known about ways residents develop relationships with peers or staff. This study was conducted to explore the ways resident develop relationships with peers and staff in nursing homes. Fifteen cognitively intact nursing home residents from two facilities were interviewed for this grounded theory study. Sampling, interviewing, and analysis occurred in a cyclical process with results at each stage of the study informing decisions about data collection and analysis in the next. Unstructured interviews and field observations were conducted. Data were analyzed with open, axial, and selective coding. Residents developed relationships with peers and staff largely as an unintended consequence of trying to have a life in the nursing home. Having a life was a two-step process. First, life motivations (Being Self and Creating a Positive Atmosphere) influenced resident preferences for daily activities and interaction goals and subsequently their strategies for achieving and establishing both. Second, the strategies residents used for achieving their required daily activities (Passing Time and Getting Needs Met) and interaction goals then influenced the nature of interaction and the subsequent peer or staff response to these interactions. Residents defined relationships as friendly or unfriendly depending on whether peers or staff responded positively or negatively. There was considerable overlap in the ways peer and staff relationships developed and the results highlight the role of peer and staff responsiveness in relationship development. The results provide possible explanations for the success of interventions in the literature designed to improve staff responsiveness to residents. The results suggest that adapting these kinds of interventions for use with peers may also be successful. The conceptual model also presents a number

  10. Nursing home staff's views on residents' dignity: a qualitative interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G.; Pasman, H. Roeline W.; van Gennip, Isis E.; Willems, Dick L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining dignity is an important element of end-of-life care and also of the care given in nursing homes. Factors influencing personal dignity have been studied from both nursing home residents' and staff's perspective. Little is however known about the way nursing home staff perceive and promote

  11. Resident Reactions to Person-Centered Communication by Long-Term Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Sibalija, Jovana; Scotchmer, Emma

    2016-09-01

    Long-term care staff caregivers who are person centered incorporate the life history, preferences, and feelings of residents with dementia during care interactions. Communication is essential for person-centered care. However, little is known about residents' verbal reactions when staff use person-centered communication. Accordingly, this study investigated the impact of person-centered communication and missed opportunities for such communication by staff on resident reactions. Conversations (N = 46) between staff-resident dyads were audio-recorded during routine care tasks over 12 weeks. Staff utterances were coded for person-centered communication and missed opportunities. Resident utterances were coded for positive reactions, such as cooperation, and negative reactions, such as distress. Linear regression analyses revealed that the more staff used person-centered communication, the more likely that residents reacted positively. Additionally, the more missed opportunities in a conversation, the more likely that the residents reacted negatively. Conversation illustrations elaborate on the quantitative findings and implications for staff training are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Do care homes deliver person-centred care? A cross-sectional survey of staff-reported abusive and positive behaviours towards residents from the MARQUE (Managing Agitation and Raising Quality of Life) English national care home survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Claudia; Marston, Louise; Barber, Julie; Livingston, Deborah; Rapaport, Penny; Higgs, Paul; Livingston, Gill

    2018-01-01

    There are widespread concerns about abuse of care home residents. We report, in the largest care home survey, prevalence of staff anonymously-reported, perpetrated/witnessed abusive behaviours towards care home residents over 3 months. We also report positive care behaviours. 1544 staff in 92 English care home units completed the revised Modified Conflict Tactics Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Most staff reported positive care behaviours, but specific person-centred activities were sometimes infrequent. Many care home staff were never or almost never aware of a resident being taken out of the home for their enjoyment (34%, n = 520); or an activity planned around a resident's interests (15%, n = 234). 763 (51%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 47% to 54%) of care home staff reported carrying out or observing potentially abusive or neglectful behaviours at least sometimes in the preceding 3 months; some abuse was reported as happening "at least sometimes" in 91/92 care homes. Neglect was most frequently reported: making a resident wait for care (n = 399, 26%), avoiding a resident with challenging behaviour (n = 391, 25%), giving residents insufficient time for food (n = 297, 19%), and taking insufficient care when moving residents (n = 169, 11%). 1.1% of staff reported physical and 5% verbal abuse. More staff reported abusive/neglectful behaviour in homes with higher staff burnout-depersonalisation scores (adjusted odds ratio 1.191, CI 1.052-1.349). Staff anonymous reports of abusive behaviour and neglect could be used to monitor care quality, as cases currently reported are probably tip of the iceberg, and be an outcome in intervention studies.

  13. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-14

    Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods\\/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in relation to scale

  14. Effectiveness of a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Fionnuala

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in

  15. Nursing home staff members' subjective frames of reference on residents' achievement of ego integrity: A Q-methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun-Young; Chang, Sung-Ok

    2018-01-01

    To discover the structure of the frames of reference for nursing home staff members' subjective judgment of residents' achievement of ego integrity. Q-methodology was applied. Twenty-eight staff members who were working in a nursing home sorted 34 Q-statements into the shape of a normal distribution. A centroid factor analysis and varimax rotation, using the PQ-method program, revealed four factors: identifying clues to residents' positive acceptance of their whole life span, identifying residents' ways of enjoying their current life, referencing residents' attitudes and competencies toward harmonious relationships, and identifying residents' integrated efforts to establish self-esteem. These subjective frames of reference need to be investigated in order to improve the relationships with nursing home residents and their quality of life. Consequently, the fundamental monitoring tools to help staff members make subjective judgments can be formed. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  16. Admonitory Behavioral Norms of Campus Housing and Residence Life Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Maureen E.; Hirschy, Amy S.; Braxton, John M.

    2016-01-01

    To protect the welfare of students, staff, and other clients in housing and residence life (HRL), administrators must understand what behaviors are unacceptable. Professionals might make idiosyncratic and unconstrained decisions when there is no conduct code or set of informal rules. Informal rules may become norms comprising normative structures…

  17. Staff attitudes and reactions towards residents' masturbation in Spanish long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo; Celdrán, Montserrat; Fabà, Josep

    2016-03-01

    To explore staff attitudes and reactions towards masturbation in long-term care facilities. Staff attitudes and reactions towards the expression of sexuality in long-term care facilities may be influenced by the nature of the sexual behaviour being expressed. Staff attitudes towards masturbation, a common sexual behaviour in such settings, have gone largely unexplored so far. An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative research design. Fifty-three staff members working in five different long-term care facilities participated in the study. They were asked about what they would think, how they would react, and what possible reactions they might expect from workmates if they entered a room and found a resident masturbating. The majority of participants considered that masturbation was acceptable and avoiding interference was by far the most common reaction, although other reactions also arose. When asked about reactions attributed to workmates, mentions to reprimanding the resident and gossiping/joking about the issue were more frequent than acceptance. The discrepancy between professionals' own reported attitudes and those attributed to workmates suggests the existence of widespread negative reactions towards sexual activity in later life. In the light of these results, we underline the necessity of developing explicit policies regarding sexual issues. Formal training offered to staff would also help to recognise and preserve resident's sexual rights and needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Exploratory Investigation of Communication Management in Residential-Aged Care: A Comparison of Staff Knowledge, Documentation and Observed Resident-Staff Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michelle K.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high prevalence of communication difficulty among older people living in residential-aged care. Such functional deficits can have a negative impact on resident quality of life, staff workplace satisfaction and the provision of quality care. Systematic research investigating the nature of communication management in…

  19. Interior design preferences of residents, families, and staff in two nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D B; Goldman, L E; Woodman, S A

    1985-01-01

    facility because inevitably, in spite of the active rehabilitation efforts of the entire treatment team, the condition of patients eventually will worsen. Thus, an attractive lively setting can prove beneficial to those who visit and work in the nursing home. Effective long-term care, which includes attention to the physical environment, should be concerned with the triad of residents, their families, and staff. Awareness that interior design does indeed impact on overall quality of life should lead the nursing home administrator to collaborate with residents, staff, and families and to share their input with professional design consultants.

  20. Conflict between nursing home staff and residents' families: does it increase burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Jill Suitor, J; Pillemer, Karl

    2009-09-01

    In this study, the authors examine the influence of conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents on staff burnout. Data were collected from interviews with a representative sample of 655 nursing home nurses and nursing assistants. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that conflict with family members increases staff burnout and decreases staff satisfaction. Staff and family conflict increases when staff members feel they do not have enough time to complete required tasks. Level of conflict decreases when staff perceive that family members have care expectations that are similar to their own. Interestingly, staff who have personal experience as family caregivers are more likely to report conflict with family members of residents, a result that necessitates further study. Staff burnout and dissatisfaction affects both individuals and organizations. Policy that addresses staff and family interaction can have an important place in the design and delivery of long-term care.

  1. [Quality of work life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klijn, Tatiana Maria Paravic

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with aspects that are related to work, quality of life, and its relationship with the nursing staff within the Mexican context. Professionals in health areas present alterations that are commonly overlooked and barely dealt with, especially when the person is a woman and, the care they give to patients, families, and/or friends, or community members, precede their own self care. In the case of institutions or work areas, even when the job provides human beings with several benefits, it usually lacks the proper conditions to perform the job, carries negatives aspects or pathological conditions, all which can relate to poor levels of Quality of Life at Work. Members of the nursing team need to perform their work in the best possible conditions in order to maintain their physical and mental health.

  2. What Residence Hall Staff Need to Know about Dealing with Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bonita; Towns, James E.

    1984-01-01

    Emphasizes the responsibility for residence hall staff to understand the grief process. An adaptation of Kubler-Ross's stages of death has produced helpful techniques for successfully accepting the death. Through understanding these principles, staff can become aware of the grief process and can assist residents. (JAC)

  3. Hope, Laughter, and Humor in Residents and Staff at an Assisted Living Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westburg, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Assesses and compares hope levels and laughter and humor experiences of 24 elderly residents and 21 staff at an assisted living facility. Residents and staff reported numerous benefits from humor and laughing, but differences arose between the two groups about the source and frequency of humor and laughter. Implications for mental health…

  4. How much do residential aged care staff members know about the nutritional needs of residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Elizabeth; O'Reilly, Maria; Strange, Elise; Franklin, Sara; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    Undernutrition, weight loss and dehydration are major clinical issues for people with dementia in residential care, with excessive weight loss contributing to increased risk of frailty, immobility, illness and premature morbidity. This paper discusses a nutritional knowledge and attitudes survey conducted as part of a larger project focused on improving nutritional intake of people with dementia within a residential care facility in Brisbane, Australia. The specific aims of the survey were to identify (i) knowledge of the nutritional needs of aged care facility residents; (ii) mealtime practices; and (iii) attitudes towards mealtime practices and organisation. A survey based on those used in other healthcare settings was completed by 76 staff members. The survey included questions about nutritional knowledge, opinions of the food service, frequency of feeding assistance provided and feeding assessment practices. Nutritional knowledge scores ranged from 1 to 9 of a possible 10, with a mean score of 4.67. While 76% of respondents correctly identified risk factors associated with malnutrition in nursing home residents, only 38% of participants correctly identified the need for increased protein and energy in residents with pressure ulcers, and just 15% exhibited correct knowledge of fluid requirements. Further, while nutritional assessment was considered an important part of practice by 83% of respondents, just 53% indicated that they actually carried out such assessments. Identified barriers to promoting optimal nutrition included insufficient time to observe residents (56%); being unaware of residents' feeding issues (46%); poor knowledge of nutritional assessments (44%); and unappetising appearance of food served (57%). An important step towards improving health and quality of life for residents of aged care facilities would be to enhance staff nutritional awareness and assessment skills. This should be carried out through increased attention to both preservice

  5. The ties that bind? Social networks of nursing staff and staff’s behaviour towards residents with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A.P.A. van; Wagner, C.; Frijters, D.H.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated social networks of nursing staff and staff's behaviour towards residents with dementia. We focused on two types of networks: communication networks among staff, and networks between nursing staff and relatives/acquaintances of residents. Data was collected in 37 long-term

  6. Negotiated risk and resident autonomy: Frontline care staff perspectives on culture change in long term care in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Emily

    2016-08-12

    Regulating risk, freedom of action, and autonomy in decision making are problems shared by both caregivers and residents in long term care settings, and may become the subject of tension and constant negotiation. This study focuses on long term care staff and management perceptions of day to day life in a care community which has gone through a culture change transition, where small residentially scaled households replace large instutional models of care. In each household, the setting is considered to be home for the 8-12 residents, creating a major shift of roles for the caregivers; they are, in essence, coming into a home rather than institutional environment as a place of work. This potentially changes the dynamics of both patterns of work for caregivers and patterns of daily living for residents. Participant observations and care staff interviews. Several key themes emrged which include: teamwork; the culture of care; regulating risk; the physical environment and care staff empowerment. An unexpected outcome was the consensus among care staff that it is they who feel at home while working in the care households, leading to empowerment in their work roles and a deeper understanding of the importance of their role in the lives of the residents.

  7. Nursing staff stress from challenging behaviour of residents with dementia: a concept analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelhof, T.J.G.M.; Schoonhoven, L.; Gaal, B.G. van; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Provide insight into the concept of stress in the context of challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia and its causes and consequences. BACKGROUND: Challenging behaviour is frequent in residents with dementia, but consequences for nursing staff are unclear. INTRODUCTION:

  8. Evaluation of surgical resident staff knowledge of cancer pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Inadequate knowledge and expertise are major contributing factors to poor pain management in the cancer patient. This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of formal teaching on pain management on the current practice of the resident surgeons at the University College Hospital (UCH). Ibadan. Method: ...

  9. Ethical challenges in nursing homes--staff's opinions and experiences with systematic ethics meetings with participation of residents' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg; Schmidt, Gerda; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Heller, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Many ethical problems exist in nursing homes. These include, for example, decision-making in end-of-life care, use of restraints and a lack of resources. The aim of the present study was to investigate nursing home staffs' opinions and experiences with ethical challenges and to find out which types of ethical challenges and dilemmas occur and are being discussed in nursing homes. The study used a two-tiered approach, using a questionnaire on ethical challenges and systematic ethics work, given to all employees of a Norwegian nursing home including nonmedical personnel, and a registration of systematic ethics discussions from an Austrian model of good clinical practice. Ninety-one per cent of the nursing home staff described ethical problems as a burden. Ninety per cent experienced ethical problems in their daily work. The top three ethical challenges reported by the nursing home staff were as follows: lack of resources (79%), end-of-life issues (39%) and coercion (33%). To improve systematic ethics work, most employees suggested ethics education (86%) and time for ethics discussion (82%). Of 33 documented ethics meetings from Austria during a 1-year period, 29 were prospective resident ethics meetings where decisions for a resident had to be made. Agreement about a solution was reached in all 29 cases, and this consensus was put into practice in all cases. Residents did not participate in the meetings, while relatives participated in a majority of case discussions. In many cases, the main topic was end-of-life care and life-prolonging treatment. Lack of resources, end-of-life issues and coercion were ethical challenges most often reported by nursing home staff. The staff would appreciate systematic ethics work to aid decision-making. Resident ethics meetings can help to reach consensus in decision-making for nursing home patients. In the future, residents' participation should be encouraged whenever possible. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring

  10. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Teaching Women with Intellectual Disabilities to Identify and Report Inappropriate Staff-to-Resident Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollman, Jessica R.; Davis, Paula K.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of behavioral skills training in teaching 2 adult women with mild intellectual disabilities to report inappropriate staff-to-resident interactions. The reporting skill included making a self-advocacy response, walking away, and reporting the interaction. Participants' performance was measured during baseline,…

  12. Understanding Sexual Freedom and Autonomy in Assisted Living: Discourse of Residents' Rights Among Staff and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmon, Christina; Burgess, Elisabeth O; Bender, Alexis A; Moorhead, James R

    2017-05-01

    In contrast to nursing homes, assisted living (AL) facilities emphasize independence and autonomy as part of their mission. However, we do not know to what extent this extends to sexual freedom and autonomy. Using grounded theory methodology and symbolic interactionism, we examine how staff and administrators in AL facilities discuss residents' rights to sexual freedom and how this influences the environment of AL. Staff and administrators engage in a contradictory discourse of residents' rights that simultaneously affirms the philosophy of AL while behaving in ways that create an environment of surveillance and undermine those rights. A discourse of residents' rights masks a significant conflict between autonomy and protection in regards to sexual freedom in AL. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Staff relations and work-life balance: course outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A; Durrance, D; Couger, G

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the American workforce have intensified the need for veterinary medical education regarding staff relations and work-life balance. A 20-hour, one-week elective course was offered to junior veterinary students in order to provide a forum for lecture and discussion covering topics such as team building, conflict resolution, stress management, and work-life balance. Instructors are master's level counselors.

  14. Pain management intervention targeting nursing staff and general practitioners: Pain intensity, consequences and clinical relevance for nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Dagmar; Budnick, Andrea; Kuhnert, Ronny; Kalinowski, Sonja; Könner, Franziska; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2017-10-01

    Although chronic pain is common in older adults, its treatment is frequently inappropriate. This problem is particularly prevalent in nursing home residents. We therefore developed an intervention to optimize pain management and evaluated its effects on pain intensity and pain interference with function in nursing home residents in Germany. In a cluster-randomized controlled intervention, 195 residents of 12 Berlin nursing homes who were affected by pain were surveyed at three points of measurement. A modified German version of the Brief Pain Inventory was used to assess pain sites, pain intensity and pain interference with function in various domains of life. The intervention consisted of separate training measures for nursing staff and treating physicians. The primary objective of reducing the mean pain intensity by 2 points was not achieved, partly because the mean pain intensity at baseline was relatively low. However, marginal reductions in pain were observed in the longitudinal assessment at 6-month follow up. The intervention and control groups differed significantly in the intensity sum score and in the domain of walking. Furthermore, the proportion of respondents with pain scores >0 on three pain intensity items decreased significantly. Given the multifocal nature of the pain experienced by nursing home residents, improving the pain situation of this vulnerable group is a major challenge. To achieve meaningful effects not only in pain intensity, but especially in pain interference with function, training measures for nursing staff and physicians need to be intensified, and long-term implementation appears necessary. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1534-1543. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Field-based generation and social validation managers and staff competencies for small community residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousand, J S; Burchard, S N; Hasazi, J E

    1986-01-01

    Characteristics and competencies for four staff positions in community residences for individuals with mental retardation were identified utilizing multiple empirical and deductive methods with field-based practitioners and field-based experts. The more commonly used competency generation methods of expert opinion and job performance analysis generated a high degree of knowledge and skill-based competencies similar to course curricula. Competencies generated by incumbent practitioners through open-ended methods of personal structured interview and critical incident analysis were ones which related to personal style, interpersonal interaction, and humanistic orientation. Although seldom included in staff, paraprofessional, or professional training curricula, these latter competencies include those identified by Carl Rogers as essential for developing an effective helping relationship in a therapeutic situation (i.e., showing liking, interest, and respect for the clients; being able to communicate positive regard to the client). Of 21 core competency statements selected as prerequisites to employment for all four staff positions, the majority (17 of 21) represented interpersonal skills important to working with others, including responsiveness to resident needs, personal valuation of persons with mental retardation, and normalization principles.

  16. Men's Identity Development: Issues and Implications for Residence Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David A.; Livingston, Wade G.; Havice, Pamela A.; Cawthon, Tony W.

    2012-01-01

    Young men struggle with privilege and oppression in college and university residence halls just as they do in other educational and social contexts. While discussions and research about adolescent and adult identity development continue, little attention has focused on how a male student's identity development can impact residence life cultures on…

  17. Organizational climate and self-efficacy as predictors of staff strain in caring for dementia residents: A mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantzas, Gery C; McCabe, Marita P; Mellor, David; Von Treuer, Kathryn; Davison, Tanya E; O'Connor, Daniel; Haselden, Rachel; Konis, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    To date, no research has investigated how the organizational climate of aged care influences the self-efficacy of staff in caring for residents with dementia, or, how self-efficacy is associated with the strain experienced by staff. This study sought to investigate the extent to which the self-efficacy of aged care staff mediates the association between organizational climate variables (such as autonomy, trusting and supportive workplace relations, and the recognition of competence and ability, and perceptions of workplace pressure) and staff strain. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented in which 255 residential aged care staff recruited across aged care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Staff completed self-report measures of organizational climate, self-efficacy, and strains in caring for residents with dementia. Indirect effects analyses using bootstrapping indicated that self-efficacy of staff mediated the association between the organizational climate variables of autonomy, trust, support, pressure, and staff strain. The findings of this study emphasize that the aged care sector needs to target organizational climate variables that enhance the self-efficacy of staff, and that this in turn, can help ameliorate the strain experienced by staff caring for residents experiencing dementia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. [Life project of residents and institutional approach in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanut, Corinne

    The life project in a nursing home involves all the players concerned: first of all, the resident, then the caregivers, the families and the institution. This unifying tool, organised around the elderly, helps to develop collective competencies, favours the integration of new residents and reassures families. This article presents a nursing home's experience of setting up a life project. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of small-scale, homelike facilities for older people with dementia on residents, family caregivers and staff: design of a longitudinal, quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Hamers, Jan P H

    2009-01-20

    Small-scale and homelike facilities for older people with dementia are rising in current dementia care. In these facilities, a small number of residents live together and form a household with staff. Normal, daily life and social participation are emphasized. It is expected that these facilities improve residents' quality of life. Moreover, it may have a positive influence on staff's job satisfaction and families involvement and satisfaction with care. However, effects of these small-scale and homelike facilities have hardly been investigated. Since the number of people with dementia increases, and institutional long-term care is more and more organized in small-scale and homelike facilities, more research into effects is necessary. This paper presents the design of a study investigating effects of small-scale living facilities in the Netherlands on residents, family caregivers and nursing staff. A longitudinal, quasi-experimental study is carried out, in which 2 dementia care settings are compared: small-scale living facilities and regular psychogeriatric wards in traditional nursing homes. Data is collected from residents, their family caregivers and nursing staff at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Approximately 2 weeks prior to baseline measurement, residents are screened on cognition and activities of daily living (ADL). Based on this screening profile, residents in psychogeriatric wards are matched to residents living in small-scale living facilities. The primary outcome measure for residents is quality of life. In addition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, depressive symptoms and social engagement are assessed. Involvement with care, perceived burden and satisfaction with care provision are primary outcome variables for family caregivers. The primary outcomes for nursing staff are job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, job characteristics social support, autonomy and workload are measured. A process evaluation is performed to investigate to

  20. A model for the future. Certified nurse-midwives replace residents and house staff in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, L A; Hanson, L

    1998-01-01

    In one model of the future, certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) replace most obstetric residents and house staff in hospitals. This model offers numerous benefits, such as cost containment and quality outcomes. Furthermore, its application could open opportunities for educating CNMs and residents in a truly collaborative model in an educational setting and begin to balance the ratio of physicians to CNMs in the care of low-risk populations. This model was used with some success in the late 1980s to early 1990s at an inner-city Midwestern medical center. By definition, CNMs are educated in the two disciplines of nursing and midwifery and possess evidence of certification according to the requirements of the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM, 1978). Nurse-midwifery practice is the independent management of care of normal newborns and women, antepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, and/or gynecologically. Certified Nurse Midwifery practice occurs within a health care system that provides for medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral (ACNM, 1978). Physician and CNM roles differ. Certified nurse-midwives focus on supporting the process of normal birth, whereas physicians focus more on the management of complications. There are data that suggest that CNM outcomes are equivalent to those of physicians (American Nurses Association, 1992; Thompson, 1986; Wilson, 1989); that CNM costs are less than those of physicians (Bell & Mills, 1989; Cherry & Foster, 1982; Gravely & Littlefield, 1992; Rooks, 1986); and that the cost of educating CNMs is much less than the cost of educating physicians (Safriet, 1992). Within an environment of health care reform and cost containment, CNMs can replace residents and house staff in hospitals in the care of low-risk clients and work in consultation with physicians for the care of high-risk clients. This article compares medical education and nurse-midwifery education, reviews nurse-midwifery outcome data, and discusses

  1. The Quality of Life of Palliative Care Staff: A Personal Construct Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared palliative care staff with staff from burn and neonatal units and with mature age general nursing trainees at end of training. Found that palliative care staff expressed better quality of life, in terms of significantly less anxiety and depression, as well as more good feelings than other staff groups. (Author/NB)

  2. [Burnout and quality of life in medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Miranda, Sergio Emilio; Rodríguez-Gallardo, Gisela Bethsabé; Jiménez-Bernardino, Carlos Alberto; Guerrero-Quintero, Laura Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    burnout and quality of life are poorly studied phenomena in postgraduate students, and its effects are unknown. The aim was to investigate the relationship between quality of life and burnout in medical residents. a longitudinal study was performed. We included medical residents who began their postgraduate studies in 2010. The Spanish version of the Quality of Life Profile for the Chronically Ill (PLC, according to its initials in German), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory specific to physicians were applied at the beginning, and six and 12 months later. Descriptive statistics were used for nominal variables. Chi-square and ANOVA were applied to numerical variables. we included 45 residents, the average age was 26.9 ± 2.93 years, 18 (40 %) were female and 27 (60 %) were male. The PLC survey found significant decrease in four of the six scales assessed in the three measurements. The Maslach Burnout Inventory found high levels of emotional exhaustion in the three tests, low levels of depersonalization and low personal gains at the beginning, rising at six and 12 months. The most affected specialty was Internal Medicine. burnout and impaired quality of life for residents exist in postgraduate physicians and it is maintained during the first year of residency.

  3. Demographics, Interests, and Quality of Life of Canadian Neurosurgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio-Morin, Christian; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Dakson, Ayoub; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Tso, Michael K; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Fortin, David

    2018-03-01

    Neurosurgical residents face a unique combination of challenges, including long duty hours, technically challenging cases, and uncertain employment prospects. We sought to assess the demographics, interests, career goals, self-rated happiness, and overall well-being of Canadian neurosurgery residents. A cross-sectional survey was developed and sent through the Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative to every resident enrolled in a Canadian neurosurgery program as of April 1, 2016. We analyzed 76 completed surveys of 146 eligible residents (52% response rate). The median age was 29 years, with 76% of respondents being males. The most popular subspecialties of interest for fellowship were spine, oncology, and open vascular neurosurgery. The most frequent self-reported number of worked hours per week was the 80- to 89-hour range. The majority of respondents reported a high level of happiness as well as stress. Sense of accomplishment and fatigue were reported as average to high and overall quality of life was low for 19%, average for 49%, and high for 32%. Satisfaction with work-life balance was average for 44% of respondents and was the only tested domain in which significant dissatisfaction was identified (18%). Overall, respondents were highly satisfied with their choice of specialty, choice of program, surgical exposure, and work environment; however, intimidation was reported in 36% of respondents and depression by 17%. Despite a challenging residency and high workload, the majority of Canadian neurosurgery residents are happy and satisfied with their choice of specialty and program. However, work-life balance, employability, resident intimidation, and depression were identified as areas of active concern.

  4. [Habermas' and Giddens' modernization theories applied to homes for the aged and to somatic nursing homes. The long road toward greater equivalence between residents and staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belderok, J J

    1997-12-01

    The situation in homes for the elderly and nursing homes is for the residents both alarming and tragic. Recent Dutch legislation supports the movement towards more self-determination and autonomy for the residents. The staff are dedicated to making the living situation as good as possible for the residents. Nevertheless many publications describe how the dependence and helplessness of the residents stil continue. In this paper this helplessness is placed within the broader framework of modern society by application of Habermas' theory of communicative action and Giddens' structuration theory. Both theories show that the key to improve dependent making structures should be sought principally in the behaviour of both staff and residents. Habermas offers a perspective to more equivalent communicative action between residents and staff. Giddens draws attention to the knowledgeability of residents, with which they should be able to interact on an equal basis with professionals. This presupposes much dedication of both staff and residents.

  5. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    OpenAIRE

    Dooremalen, A.M.C.; van Hoof, J.; Weffers, H.T.G.; Wetzels, M.H.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in Science & Technology 1(3): 90-105

  6. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Dooremalen; J. van Hoof; H.T.G. Weffers; M.H. Wetzels; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in

  7. Implementing the Namaste Care Program for residents with advanced dementia: exploring the perceptions of families and staff in UK care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacpoole, Min; Hockley, Jo; Thompsell, Amanda; Simard, Joyce; Volicer, Ladislav

    2017-10-01

    Increasing numbers of older people with advanced dementia are cared for in care homes. No cure is available, so research focused on improving quality of life and quality of care for people with dementia is needed to support them to live and die well. The Namaste Care programme is a multi-dimensional care program with sensory, psycho-social and spiritual components intended to enhance quality of life and quality of care for people with advanced dementia. The aim of the study was to establish whether the Namaste Care program can be implemented in UK care homes; and what effect Namaste Care has on the quality of life of residents with advanced dementia, their families and staff. This article explores the qualitative findings of the study, reporting the effect of the programme on the families of people with advanced dementia and care home staff, and presenting their perceptions of change in care. An organisational action research methodology was used. Focus groups and interviews were undertaken pre/post implementation of the Namaste Care program. The researcher kept a reflective diary recording data on the process of change. A comments book was available to staff and relatives in each care home. Data was analysed thematically within each care home and then across all care homes. Six care homes were recruited in south London: one withdrew before the study was underway. Of the five remaining care homes, four achieved a full Namaste Care program. One care home did not achieve the full program during the study, and another discontinued Namaste Care when the study ended. Every home experienced management disruption during the study. Namaste Care challenged normal routinised care for older people with advanced dementia. The characteristics of care uncovered before Namaste was implemented were: chaos and confusion, rushing around, lack of trust, and rewarding care. After the programme was implemented these perceptions were transformed, and themes of calmness, reaching out to

  8. [What and how to evaluate clinical-surgical competence. The resident and staff surgeon perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Sánchez, Carlos Roberto; Chávez-Vizcarra, Paola; Barragán-Ávila, María Cristina; Parra-Acosta, Haydee; Herrera-Mendoza, Renzo Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation is a means for significant and rigorous improvement of the educational process. Therefore, competence evaluation should allow assessing the complex activity of medical care, as well as improving the training process. This is the case in the evaluation process of clinical-surgical competences. A cross-sectional study was designed to measure knowledge about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences for the General Surgery residency program at the Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH). A 55-item questionnaire divided into six sections was used (perception, planning, practice, function, instruments and strategies, and overall evaluation), with a six level Likert scale, performing a descriptive, correlation and comparative analysis, with a significance level of 0.001. In both groups perception of evaluation was considered as a further qualification. As regards tools, the best known was the written examination. As regards function, evaluation was considered as a further administrative requirement. In the correlation analysis, evaluation was perceived as qualification and was significantly associated with measurement, assessment and accreditation. In the comparative analysis between residents and staff surgeons, a significant difference was found as regards the perception of the evaluation as a measurement of knowledge (Student t test: p=0.04). The results provide information about the concept we have about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences, considering it as a measure of learning achievement for a socially required certification. There is confusion as regards the perception of evaluation, its function, goals and scopes as benefit for those evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Fay Low

    Full Text Available We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes.Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure.Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain-oral health (3 studies, hygiene and infection control (3 studies, nutrition (2 studies, nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies, depression (2 studies appropriate prescribing (7 studies, reduction of physical restraints (3 studies, management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies, falls reduction and prevention (11 studies, quality improvement (9 studies, philosophy of care (10 studies and other (5 studies. No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy. Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics.Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex. Interventionists should consider barriers and

  10. Exploratory study of Australian aged care staff knowledge and attitudes of later life sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Hui; Jones, Cindy; Osborne, Debora

    2017-06-01

    To explore aged care staff knowledge and attitudes towards later life sexuality and attitudes about intimacy in people with dementia. Fifty-two care staff working in two aged care facilities with secure dementia care units were recruited. Knowledge and attitudes on later life sexuality and attitudes towards later life sexuality in people with dementia were surveyed using the Aging Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Scale and the selected eight items of the Staff Attitudes about Intimacy and Dementia, respectively. The results indicated that aged care staff knowledge of later life sexuality is inadequate, but attitudes towards later life sexuality and about intimacy and dementia were relatively permissive. Improving aged care staff knowledge of later life sexuality is needed. Continuing education and training should provide to support the expression of later life sexuality including those with dementia. © 2017 AJA Inc.

  11. Examining the Relationships among Coaching Staff Diversity, Perceptions of Diversity, Value Congruence, and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, George B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among coaching staff diversity, perceptions of diversity, value congruence, and life satisfaction. Data were collected from 71 coaching staffs (N = 196 coaches). Observed path analysis was used to examine the study predictions. Results indicate that actual staff diversity was positively…

  12. Application of WHOQOL-BREF in measuring quality of life in health-care staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gholami

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings from this study confirm that the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire is a reliable instrument to measure quality of life in health-care staff. From the data, it appears that Neyshabur health-care staff has WHOQOL-BREF scores that might be considered to indicate a relatively moderate quality of life.

  13. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-09-01

    The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. A network of helping: Generalized reciprocity and cooperative behavior in response to peer and staff affirmations and corrections among therapeutic community residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doogan, Nathan J; Warren, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Clinical theory in therapeutic communities (TCs) for substance abuse treatment emphasizes the importance of peer interactions in bringing about change. This implies that residents will respond in a more prosocial manner to peer versus staff intervention and that residents will interact in such a way as to maintain cooperation. The data consist of electronic records of peer and staff affirmations and corrections at four corrections-based therapeutic community units. We treat the data as a directed social network of affirmations. We sampled 100 resident days from each unit (n = 400) and used a generalized linear mixed effects network time series model to analyze the predictors of sending and receiving affirmations and corrections. The model allowed us to control for characteristics of individuals as well as network-related dependencies. Residents show generalized reciprocity following peer affirmations, but not following staff affirmations. Residents did not respond to peer corrections by increasing affirmations, but responded to staff corrections by decreasing affirmations. Residents directly reciprocated peer affirmations. Residents were more likely to affirm a peer whom they had recently corrected. Residents were homophilous with respect to race, age and program entry time. This analysis demonstrates that TC residents react more prosocially to behavioral intervention by peers than by staff. Further, the community exhibits generalized and direct reciprocity, mechanisms known to foster cooperation in groups. Multiple forms of homophily influence resident interactions. These findings validate TC clinical theory while suggesting paths to improved outcomes.

  15. Perceived Social Support And Life Satisfaction Of Residents In A Nursing Home In Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Çimen, Mesut; Akbolat, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This study was conducted to identify the factors that affect the perception of social support and life satisfaction of selected nursing home residents in Turkey, using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). 80 residents participated in the study. Results of univariate analyses indicated that family-based perceived social support of nursing home residents is significantly higher in married residents and in residents...

  16. The impact of oral health on the quality of life of nursing home residents

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Jessie; Ntouva, Antiopi; Read, Andrew; Murdoch, Mandy; Ola, Dennis; Tsakos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Background Good oral health in older residents of nursing homes is important for general health and quality of life. Very few studies have assessed how oral symptoms affect residents? quality of life. Objective To assess the clinical and subjective oral health, including oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL), and the association of oral symptoms with OHRQoL in older people residing in nursing homes in Islington, London. Method Overall, 325 residents from nine nursing homes were clinica...

  17. Program of social protection for Chornobyl nuclear power plant staff and Slavutich town residents in the aftermath of the plant shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to solve social issues related to ChNPP shutdown, the Ukrainian Government approved 'Program of Social Protection for Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant Staff and Slavutich Town Residents in Aftermath of Plant Shutdown' on 29 November 2000. The Program Objective is to ensure social protection and support of well being of ChNPP staff and Slavutich town residents after the plant shutdown. Preserve and develop town infrastructure. Create compensatory jobs; efficiently manage human resources; provide social allowances and guarantees to the ChNPP staff that is being released, and Slavutich town residents

  18. Family Satisfaction With Nursing Home Care: The Role of Facility Characteristics and Resident Quality-of-Life Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Tetyana P.; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Held, Robert; Kane, Robert L.

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the factor structure of a new family satisfaction with nursing home care instrument and determines the relationship of resident quality of life (QOL) and facility characteristics with family satisfaction. Data sources include (1) family satisfaction interviews (n = 16,790 family members), (2) multidimensional survey of resident QOL (n = 13,433 residents), and (3) facility characteristics (n = 376 facilities). We used factor analysis to identify domains of family satisfaction and multivariate analyses to identify the role of facility-level characteristics and resident QOL on facility-mean values of family satisfaction. Four distinct domains were identified for family satisfaction: “care,” “staff,” “environment,” and “food.” Chain affiliation, higher resident acuity, more deficiencies, and large size were all associated with less family satisfaction, and resident QOL was a significant (albeit weak) predictor of family satisfaction. Results suggest that family member satisfaction is distinct from resident QOL but is associated with resident QOL and facility characteristics. PMID:26534835

  19. Collaborating with Public Housing Residents and Staff to Improve Health: A Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Devon; Hartman, Ann Michelle; Briggs, Joyce; Biederman, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    This study described the health behaviors and barriers and facilitators of those behaviors in elderly and/or disabled residents of public housing. A mixed-methods design was used. Residents (N = 88) completed a survey with validated measures of health behaviors. A sub-sample (N = 16) participated in three focus groups. Residents scored worse than population norms on the majority of behaviors measured. Qualitative results framed in an ecological model indicated the majority of facilitators and barriers to health behaviors were perceived as occurring at the intrapersonal and interpersonal levels. Interventions to promote health should consider the unique barriers and facilitators to health behaviors among residents.

  20. Care staff perspective on use of texture modified food in care home residents with dysphagia and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austbø Holteng, Lise Birgitte; Frøiland, Christina Tølbøl; Corbett, Anne; Testad, Ingelin

    2017-10-01

    Dysphagia and dementia are conditions, which combined, can lead to complications for the person and require good nutritional care. There is very little evidence-based literature regarding nutritional care for people with dysphagia and dementia. It is clear that care staff plays a vital role, and that communication and informed decision-making are critical to the process, yet little is known regarding the use of available interventions such as texture modified food (TMF), and their acceptability and feasibility for care staff and residents. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of care staff when providing nutritional care for people with dysphagia and dementia, and their impressions and experience of using TMF as a new intervention for nutrition. This was a qualitative study with an inductive approach, which aimed to explore the experience of care staff using TMF in a care home setting. Data were collected using focus group interviews, an approach which is validated as a means of supporting and developing the understanding of a phenomenon, through interactions and discussions in the group. Participants were care staff working in a care home setting in Norway. Twelve participants were recruited to this study across two focus groups. The cohort included four nurses, six practical nurses, one nurse assistants and one student nurse. Four main categories emerged from the focus group discussions regarding the use of TMF. These were: (I) emotional strain; (II) deficient nutritional care; (III) increased self-efficacy with use of TMF; (IV) better nutritional care with TMF. Use of TMF to improve nutritional care for people with dysphagia appears to have merit for both residents and care staff, and should be considered as a means of improving nutritional care for people with dementia in care homes. Minimizing feeding difficulties and increasing nutritional intake is an important goal when caring for this vulnerable group of people, and there is a

  1. End-of-Life Care Education for Psychiatric Residents: Attitudes, Preparedness, and Conceptualizations of Dignity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Glendon R.; Hodges, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined psychiatric residents' attitudes, perceived preparedness, experiences, and needs in end-of-life care education. They also examined how residents conceptualized good end-of-life care and dignity. Methods: The authors conducted an electronic survey of 116 psychiatric residents at the University of Toronto. The survey…

  2. Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos. ... Abstract. Work-life balance is associated with the maintenance of stability in both one's professional and personal life. It is key to the welfare and, subsequently, job satisfaction and productivity of employees. It is against this understanding that this study ...

  3. Work-Life: Policy and Practice Impacting LG Faculty and Staff in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Sunny L.; Hornsby, Eunice Ellen

    2008-01-01

    The work-life policies and benefits practices of public universities and the extent to which lesbian and gay (LG) faculty, staff and families receive different work-life benefits than their heterosexual married counterparts are examined. The analysis was conducted by searching university work-life benefits websites. Major benefits for domestic…

  4. Residential aged care residents and components of end of life care in an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Laurence Jee Peng; Crawford, Gregory Brian

    2018-06-09

    With ageing of Australians, the numbers of residential aged care (RAC) residents is rising. This places a spotlight on decisions about appropriate care for this population, including hospitalisation and end-of-life (EOL) care. The aim was to study a sample of RAC residents who attended and died in hospital, to quantify measurable components of EOL care so as to describe the extent of palliative care required. A retrospective case-note review of hospital records was conducted in Adelaide, Australia. Participants were 109 RAC residents who attended from July 2013 to June 2014 and died in hospital. Measurements were advance care planning, health care input from the RAC facilities to hospital and components of EOL care. Residents with and without advanced dementia were compared. Advance care directives (ACDs) were present from 11 to 50%, and advance care plans (ACPs) at 60%. There were more ACPs, resuscitation orders (for/against) and do-not-hospitalise orders in residents with advanced dementia than those without. General practitioner (GP) and extended care paramedic (ECP) input on decisions for hospital transfer were 30% and 1 %. Mean hospital stay to death was 5.2 days. For residents admitted under non-palliative care teams, specialist palliative care (SPC) was needed for phone advice in 5%, consultation in 45%, transfer to palliative care unit in 37%, and takeover by SPC team in 19%. Mean number of documented goals-of-care discussions with family/caregiver was 1.7. In the last 3 days of life, the mean daily number of doses of EOL medications was 4.2. Continuous subcutaneous infusion was commenced in 35%. Staff in RAC need to be adequately resourced to make complex decisions about whether to transfer to hospital. RAC nurses are mainly making these decisions as GP and ECP input were suboptimal. Ways to support nurses and optimise decision-making are needed. Advance care planning can be improved, especially documentation of EOL wishes and hospitalisation orders. By

  5. Resident and Staff Satisfaction of Pediatric Graduate Medical Education Training on Transition to Adult Care of Medically Complex Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Matthew; Cole, Brandon; Flake, Eric; Roy, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    This study aims to describe the quantity and satisfaction current residents and experienced pediatricians have with graduate medical education on transitioning medically complex patients to adult care. There is an increasing need for transitioning medically complex adolescents to adult care. Over 90% now live into adulthood and require transition to adult healthcare providers. The 2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs found that only 40% of youth 12-17 yr receive the necessary services to appropriately transition to adult care. Prospective, descriptive, anonymous, web-based survey of pediatric residents and staff pediatricians at Army pediatric residency training programs was sent in March 2017. Questions focused on assessing knowledge of transition of care, satisfaction with transition training, and amount of education on transition received during graduate medical education training. Of the 145 responders (310 potential responders, 47% response rate), transition was deemed important with a score of 4.3 out of 5. The comfort level with transition was rated 2.6/5 with only 4.2% of participants receiving formal education during residency. The most commonly perceived barriers to implementing a curriculum were time constraints and available resources. Of the five knowledge assessment questions, three had a correct response rate of less than 1/3. The findings show the disparity between the presence of and perceived need for a formal curriculum on transitioning complex pediatric patients to adult care. This study also highlighted the knowledge gap of the transition process for novice and experienced pediatricians alike.

  6. Positive well-being and work-life balance among UK railway staff

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Jialin; Smith, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Failure to manage the well-being and work-life balance of railway workers\\ud may result in an increased risk to train safety and employees’ health. This article\\ud reports the findings of a study that measured positive well-being and\\ud work-life balance, and identified the factors affecting these among UK railway\\ud staff. On the whole, staff who perceived high levels of control and support had\\ud a better work-life balance and an increased sense of well-being. A positive\\ud personality was ...

  7. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownie S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonya Brownie, Susan NancarrowSchool of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff.Methods: We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes.Results: The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4. The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents' levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses' sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an

  8. A Cluster-Randomised Trial of Staff Education to Improve the Quality of Life of People with Dementia Living in Residential Care: The DIRECT Study

    OpenAIRE

    Beer, Christopher; Horner, Barbara; Flicker, Leon; Scherer, Samuel; Lautenschlager, Nicola T.; Bretland, Nick; Flett, Penelope; Schaper, Frank; Almeida, Osvaldo P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT) was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 ...

  9. Exploring Staff Clinical Knowledge and Practice with LGBT Residents in Long-Term Care: A Grounded Theory of Cultural Competency and Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Weston V; Vacha-Haase, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature shows that LGBT residents are likely to face suboptimal care in LTC facilities due to prejudice and discriminatory policies. The aim of this project was to assess the LGBT cultural competency of staff working in LTC facilities, identify their current training needs, and develop a framework for understanding LGBT cultural competency among LTC staff and providers. This grounded theory study comprised data from focus groups of interdisciplinary staff from three LTC facilities. Results suggested that LTC staff struggle with how to be sensitive to LGBT residents' needs. Tension appeared to exist between wanting to provide an equal standard of care to all LTC residents and fearing they would show "favoritism" or "special treatment," which might be viewed as unprofessional. Participants indicated training could help to address the ambivalence they experience about providing sensitive care to subpopulations of residents who face stigma and oppression. LTC staff stand to benefit from cultural competency training focused on LGBT residents. Training should be not only informational in nature, but also facilitate greater self-awareness and self-efficacy with respect to providing care to LGBT people.

  10. Quality of life during orthopaedic training and academic practice. Part 1: orthopaedic surgery residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, M Catherine; Sotile, Wayne; Sotile, Mary O; Rubash, Harry; Barrack, Robert L

    2009-10-01

    A pilot study of two academic training programs revealed concerning levels of resident burnout and psychological dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to determine the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty on a national scale and to identify risk factors for decompensation. Three hundred and eighty-four orthopaedic residents and 264 full-time orthopaedic faculty members completed a voluntary, anonymous survey consisting of three validated instruments (the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale) and question sets assessing demographic information, relationship issues, stress reactions/management, and work/life balance. High levels of burnout were seen in 56% of the residents and 28% of the faculty members. Burnout risk was greatest among second-postgraduate-year residents and residents in training programs with six or more residents per postgraduate year. Sixteen percent of residents and 19% of faculty members reported symptoms of psychological distress. Sleep deprivation was common among the residents and correlated positively with every distress measure. Faculty reported greater levels of stress but greater satisfaction with work and work/life balance. A number of factors, such as making time for hobbies and limiting alcohol use, correlated with decreased dysfunction for both residents and faculty. Despite reporting high levels of job satisfaction, orthopaedic residents and faculty are at risk for burnout and distress. Identification of protective factors and risk factors may provide guidance to improve the quality of life of academic orthopaedic surgeons in training and beyond.

  11. Ten years after the IOM report: Engaging residents in quality and patient safety by creating a House Staff Quality Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischut, Peter M; Evans, Adam S; Nugent, William C; Faggiani, Susan L; Lazar, Eliot J; Liebowitz, Richard S; Forese, Laura L; Kerr, Gregory E

    2011-01-01

    Ten years after the 1999 Institute of Medicine report, it is clear that despite significant progress, much remains to be done to improve quality and patient safety (QPS). Recognizing the critical role of postgraduate trainees, an innovative approach was developed at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center to engage residents in QPS by creating a Housestaff Quality Council (HQC). HQC leaders and representatives from each clinical department communicate and partner regularly with hospital administration and other key departments to address interdisciplinary quality improvement (QI). In support of the mission to improve patient care and safety, QI initiatives included attaining greater than 90% compliance with medication reconciliation and reduction in the use of paper laboratory orders by more than 70%. A patient safety awareness campaign is expected to evolve into a transparent environment where house staff can openly discuss patient safety issues to improve the quality of care.

  12. Faculty staff-guided versus self-guided ultrasound training for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, George A; Kelmenson, Daniel A; Noble, Vicki E; Murray, Alice F; Currier, Paul F

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonography is of growing importance within internal medicine (IM), but the optimal method of training doctors to use it is uncertain. In this study, the authors provide the first objective comparison of two approaches to training IM residents in ultrasonography. In this randomised trial, a simulation-based ultrasound training curriculum was implemented during IM intern orientation at a tertiary care teaching hospital. All 72 incoming interns attended a lecture and were given access to online modules. Interns were then randomly assigned to a 4-hour faculty-guided (FG) or self-guided (SG) ultrasound training session in a simulation laboratory with both human and manikin models. Interns were asked to self-assess their competence in ultrasonography and underwent an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess their competence in basic and procedurally oriented ultrasound tasks. The primary outcome was the score on the OSCE. Faculty-guided training was superior to self-guided training based on the OSCE scores. Subjects in the FG training group achieved significantly higher OSCE scores on the two subsets of task completion (0.9-point difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.54; p = 0.008) and ultrasound image quality (2.43-point difference, 95% CI 1.5-3.36; p training groups demonstrated an increase in self-assessed competence after their respective training sessions and there was little difference between the groups. Subjects rated the FG training group much more favourably than the SG training group. Both FG and SG ultrasound training curricula can improve the self-reported competence of IM interns in ultrasonography. However, FG training was superior to SG training in both skills acquisition and intern preference. Incorporating mandatory ultrasound training into IM residencies can address the perceived need for ultrasound training, improve confidence and procedural skills, and may enhance patient safety. However, the optimal training method

  13. A cluster-randomised trial of staff education to improve the quality of life of people with dementia living in residential care: the DIRECT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Beer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 years and older with Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 24, their GPs and facility staff participated. Flexible education designed to meet the perceived needs of learners was delivered to GPs and care facility staff in intervention groups. The primary outcome of the study was self-rated quality of life of participants with dementia, measured using the QOL-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD at 4 weeks and 6 months after the conclusion of the intervention. Analysis accounted for the effect of clustering by using multi-level regression analysis. Education of GPs or care facility staff did not affect the primary outcome at either 4 weeks or 6 months. In a post hoc analysis excluding facilities in which fewer than 50% of staff attended an education session, self-rated QOL-AD scores were 6.14 points (adjusted 95%CI 1.14, 11.15 higher at four-week follow-up among residents in facilities randomly assigned to the education intervention. CONCLUSION: The education intervention directed at care facilities or GPs did not improve the quality of life ratings of participants with dementia as a group. This may be explained by the poor adherence to the intervention programme, as participants with dementia living in facilities where staff participated at least minimally seemed to benefit. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12607000417482.

  14. A cluster-randomised trial of staff education to improve the quality of life of people with dementia living in residential care: the DIRECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Christopher; Horner, Barbara; Flicker, Leon; Scherer, Samuel; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Bretland, Nick; Flett, Penelope; Schaper, Frank; Almeida, Osvaldo P

    2011-01-01

    The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT) was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 years and older with Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 24, their GPs and facility staff participated. Flexible education designed to meet the perceived needs of learners was delivered to GPs and care facility staff in intervention groups. The primary outcome of the study was self-rated quality of life of participants with dementia, measured using the QOL-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD) at 4 weeks and 6 months after the conclusion of the intervention. Analysis accounted for the effect of clustering by using multi-level regression analysis. Education of GPs or care facility staff did not affect the primary outcome at either 4 weeks or 6 months. In a post hoc analysis excluding facilities in which fewer than 50% of staff attended an education session, self-rated QOL-AD scores were 6.14 points (adjusted 95%CI 1.14, 11.15) higher at four-week follow-up among residents in facilities randomly assigned to the education intervention. The education intervention directed at care facilities or GPs did not improve the quality of life ratings of participants with dementia as a group. This may be explained by the poor adherence to the intervention programme, as participants with dementia living in facilities where staff participated at least minimally seemed to benefit. ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12607000417482.

  15. The role of staff in health promotion in community residences for people with intellectual disabilities: variation in views among managers and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Helena; Wihlman, Ulla

    2011-09-01

    Managers and caregivers in community residences for people with intellectual disabilities are expected both to promote residents' health and to support their autonomy. The aim of this article was to explore variation in views among managers and caregivers on the role of staff in health promotion. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews with six managers and six caregivers. The analysis used a phenomenographic approach to categorize variation in views. We identified five qualitatively different main categories of roles staff play in health promotion: the parent, the manipulator, the coach, the educator and the libertarian. In addition lifestyle-related risk factors for ill-health and barriers to a healthy lifestyle were analysed and described using qualitative content analysis. The results highlight the ethical conflict that faces staff trying to support a healthy lifestyle as well as the autonomy of the residents.

  16. Application of WHOQOL-BREF in Measuring Quality of Life in Health-Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Ali; Jahromi, Leila Moosavi; Zarei, Esmail; Dehghan, Azizallah

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of Neyshabur health-care staff and some factors associated with it with use of WHOQOL-BREF scale. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 522 staff of Neyshabur health-care centers from May to July 2011. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was applied to examine the internal consistency of WHOQOL-BREF scale; Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the level of agreement between different domains of WHOQOL-BREF. Paired t-test was used to compare difference between score means of different domains. T-independent test was performed for group analysis and Multiple Linear Regression was used to control confounding effects. In this study, a good internal consistency (α = 0.925) for WHOQOL-BREF and its four domains was observed. The highest and the lowest mean scores of WHOQOL-BREF domains was found for physical health domain (Mean = 15.26) and environmental health domain (Mean = 13.09) respectively. Backward multiple linear regression revealed that existence chronic disease in staff was significantly associated with four domains of WHOQOL-BREF, education years was associated with two domains (Psychological and Environmental) and sex was associated with psychological domain (P instrument to measure quality of life in health-care staff. From the data, it appears that Neyshabur health-care staff has WHOQOL-BREF scores that might be considered to indicate a relatively moderate quality of life.

  17. Do interventions with staff in long-term residential facilities improve quality of care or quality for life people with dementia? A systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Mike; Anderson, Katrina; MacPherson, Sarah; Blair, Annaliese

    2016-12-01

    Common sense suggests and research indicates relationships between staff factors in residential dementia care and quality of life (QOL) for residents, with poor care increasing suffering. However, we do not have a coherent picture of which staff interventions have an impact on quality of care (QOC) or resident QOL. A comprehensive search of 20 years' peer-reviewed literature using Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane, Campbell Collaboration identified 4,760 studies meriting full text review. Forty-six met the inclusion criteria, namely interventions in long-term facilities helping staff develop their capacity to provide better care and/or QOL for residents with dementia. Thirty-five other papers comprised an associated predictor review. Conclusions from these limited data are further compromised because nine studies failed to measure effects on residents and only half assessed effects after the project team withdrew. Of these, excellent studies produced change over the medium (3-4 months) or longer term, including reduction in challenging behavior and restraint use but this applied only to a minority. A number of studies failed to measure effects on QOC, limiting conclusions about mechanisms underlying change. In general, level of intervention required depended on the target. For outcomes like restraint use, structured education sessions with some support appear adequate. Programs to reduce pain require more support. For complicated issues like challenging behavior and increasing co-operation in showering, detailed, supportive, on-site interventions are required. Improvements in restraint and staff/resident interactions were the most promising findings. (Review registration number: PROSPERO 2014:CRD42014015224).

  18. Resident challenges with daily life in Chinese long-term care facilities: A qualitative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuting; Scales, Kezia; Anderson, Ruth A; Wu, Bei; Corazzini, Kirsten N

    As traditional family-based care in China declines, the demand for residential care increases. Knowledge of residents' experiences with long-term care (LTC) facilities is essential to improving quality of care. This pilot study aimed to describe residents' experiences in LTC facilities, particularly as it related to physical function. Semi-structured open-ended interviews were conducted in two facilities with residents stratified by three functional levels (n = 5). Directed content analysis was guided by the Adaptive Leadership Framework. A two-cycle coding approach was used with a first-cycle descriptive coding and second-cycle dramaturgical coding. Interviews provided examples of challenges faced by residents in meeting their daily care needs. Five themes emerged: staff care, care from family members, physical environment, other residents in the facility, and personal strategies. Findings demonstrate the significance of organizational context for care quality and reveal foci for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [End-of-life care in a Spanish Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: staff and parental evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarro García, A; Dorao Martínez-Romillo, P; Moraleda, S; López, P; Moreno, T; San-José, B; Martínez Biarge, M; Tapia Moreno, R; Ruza-Tarrío, F

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate end-of-life care in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Retrospective study developed in a PICU. 41 workers from the PICU and parents of 26 deceased children (from 2001 to 2005). A questionnaire was designed to investigate end-of-life care. An age parents were with their children at the time of death; 64 % of all parents consider this "positive", and 13 % consider it "negative". Forty per cent of staff stated that it is "positive" for parents to be by the side of their child at the time of death, and 52 % do not know. Seventy-three per cent of staff, but only 29 % of parents want further professional psychological support for parents. Twenty per cent of children died following withdrawal of life support. The most important factors for this decision were the possibility of survival and quality of life. The majority (73 %) of caregivers express the view that often, this decision should be taken earlier. Analysis of staff opinions underlines the importance of the way news is communicated, the timing of withdrawal of life support, and the need for psychological support. Parents emphasized the role of the family during time spent in a PICU and during the last moments.

  20. The effect of laughter therapy on the quality of life of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Nilgun; Kublay, Gulumser

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of Laughter therapy on the quality of life of nursing home residents. By improving the quality of life of residents living in nursing homes and allowing them to have a healthier existence, their lives can be extended. Therefore, interventions impacting the quality of life of older adults are of critical importance. Quasi-experimental design. The study was conducted between 2 March - 25 May 2015. The experimental group was composed of 32 nursing home residents from one nursing home, while the control group consisted of 33 nursing home residents from another nursing home in the capital city of Turkey. Laughter therapy was applied with nursing home residents of the experimental group two days per week (21 sessions in total). A socio-demographic form and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used for data collection. After the laughter therapy intervention, general and subscales (physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional and spiritual health) quality-of-life scores of residents in the experimental group significantly increased in comparison with the pretest. Laughter therapy improved the quality of life of nursing home residents. Therefore, nursing home management should integrate laughter therapy into health care and laughter therapy should be provided as a routine nursing intervention. The results indicated that the laughter therapy programme had a positive effect on the quality of life of nursing home residents. Nurses can use laughter therapy as an intervention to improve quality of life of nursing home residents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Relationship Between Psychological Resilience and Life Satisfaction of University Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze ÜLKER TÜMLÜ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between academic staff psychological resilience and life satisfaction. The research is a descriptive study in relational survey model. The study group includes 94 faculty members chosen randomly in 2011-2012 academic years in Kastamonu University. As a data collection instruments, life satisfaction scale developed by Diener et al in 1985, adapted to Turkish by Köker in 1991 and Connor and Davidson Resilience Scale/CD-RISC developed by Connor and Davidson in 2003, adapted to Turkish by Karaırmak in 2010, were used. In the study correlation method was used in order to determine the relationship between resilience and life satisfaction, regression analysis was used in order to determine whether the resilience predict life satisfaction. In addition, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used in the analysis of resilience in terms of age, gender, marital status, degree, years of service and years of service at the university in the study. When the outcomes were evaluated, a significant, positive relationship was found between life satisfaction and resilience. The psychological resilience predicts life satisfaction in a meaningful way and resilience explains 7% of the total variance about life satisfaction. In addition, resilience levels of the university academic staff does not differ meaningfully from the gender, age, marital status, degree, years of service and years of service at university.

  2. Consistent assignment of nursing staff to residents in nursing homes: a critical review of conceptual and methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tonya; Nolet, Kimberly; Bowers, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Consistent assignment of nursing staff to residents is promoted by a number of national organizations as a strategy for improving nursing home quality and is included in pay for performance schedules in several states. However, research has shown inconsistent effects of consistent assignment on quality outcomes. In order to advance the state of the science of research on consistent assignment and inform current practice and policy, a literature review was conducted to critique conceptual and methodological understandings of consistent assignment. Twenty original research reports of consistent assignment in nursing homes were found through a variety of search strategies. Consistent assignment was conceptualized and operationalized in multiple ways with little overlap from study to study. There was a lack of established methods to measure consistent assignment. Methodological limitations included a lack of control and statistical analyses of group differences in experimental-level studies, small sample sizes, lack of attention to confounds in multicomponent interventions, and outcomes that were not theoretically linked. Future research should focus on developing a conceptual understanding of consistent assignment focused on definition, measurement, and links to outcomes. To inform current policies, testing consistent assignment should include attention to contexts within and levels at which it is most effective. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2013.

  3. Work-Related Quality of Life of US General Surgery Residents: Is It Really so Bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Muhammad H; Hussain, Lala R; Williams, Kristen N; Grannan, Kevin J

    The quality of working life of US surgical residents has not been studied, and given the complexity of interaction between work and personal life there is a need to assess this interaction. We utilized a validated Work Related Quality of Life (WRQoL) questionnaire to evaluate the perceived work-related quality of life of general surgery residents, using a large, nationally representative sample in the United States. Between January 2016 and March 2016, all US general surgery residents enrolled in an ACGME general surgery training program were invited to participate. The WRQoL scale measures perceived quality of life covering six domains: General Well-Being (GWB), Home-Work Interface (HWI), Job and Career Satisfaction (JCS), Control at Work (CAW), Working Conditions (WCS) and Stress at Work (SAW). After excluding for missing data, the final analysis included 738 residents. The average age was 30 (±3) years, of whom 287 (38.9%) were female, 272 (36.9%) were from a community hospital, and 477 (64.6%) were juniors (postgraduate year ≤ 3). Demographically, the respondents matched expected percentages. When male and female residents were compared, males had statistically better HWI (pseniors. There were no differences between university and community residents in any of the domains of WRQoL. Although residents were more stressed than other professions but the overall WRQoL was comparable. The nature of surgical residency and a surgical career may in fact be more "stressful" than other professions, yet may not translate into a worsened Quality of Life. Our findings suggest further study is needed to elucidate why female residents have or experience a lower perceived WRQoL than their male colleagues. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Economic impact analysis of an end-of-life programme for nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, W-S Kelvin; Raj, Anusha Govinda; Tan, Woan Shin; Ng, Charis Wei Ling; Heng, Bee Hoon; Leong, Ian Yi-Onn

    2014-05-01

    Due to limited end-of-life discussions and the absence of palliative care, hospitalisations are frequent at the end of life among nursing home residents in Singapore, resulting in high health-care costs. Our objective was to evaluate the economic impact of Project Care at the End-of-Life for Residents in homes for the Elderly (CARE) programme on nursing home residents compared to usual end-of-life care. DESIGN AND SETTINGS/PARTICIPANTS: Project CARE was introduced in seven nursing homes to provide advance care planning and palliative care for residents identified to be at risk of dying within 1 year. The cases consisted of nursing home residents enrolled in the Project CARE programme for at least 3 months. A historical group of nursing home residents not in any end-of-life care programme was chosen as the matched controls. Cost differences between the two groups were analysed over the last 3 months and final month of life. The final sample comprised 48 Project CARE cases and 197 controls. Compared to the controls, the cases were older with more comorbidities and higher nursing needs. After risk adjustment, Project CARE cases demonstrated per-resident cost savings of SGD$7129 (confidence interval: SGD$4544-SGD$9714) over the last 3 months of life and SGD$3703 (confidence interval: SGD$1848-SGD$5557) over the last month of life (US$1 = SGD$1.3). This study demonstrated substantial savings associated with an end-of-life programme. With a significant proportion of the population in Singapore requiring nursing home care in the near future, these results could assist policymakers and health-care providers in decision-making on allocation of health-care resources.

  5. Meaning in life: the perspective of long-term care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Darlene; Moore, Sharon L; Getzlaf, Beverley A

    2012-07-01

    A qualitative approach was used in the exploration of meaning in life for long-term care (LTC) residents. This hermeneutic phenomenological study, as described by van Manen, was conducted using semi-structured interviews with 11 LTC residents from a rural region in Atlantic Canada. Four themes emerged as enhancing meaning in life for the residents in this study: Connectedness, Survival Despite Declining Functional Capacity, Engaging in "Normal" Activities, and Seeking a Place of Refuge. In this article, we describe the emerging themes and the implications for LTC education, practice, and future research. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Survey of Quality of Life and Influencing Factors in Alborz University of Medical Sciences Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Quality of life is a concept beyond the physical health. It is an important index in health research that its independent quantification as an important outcome is essential. Work environment consists of physical, mental and social stimuli and each of these factors can cause stress. These stresses and pressures have inappropriate effects on physical–emotional welfare, health and its function. Therefore, this study was performed on the Faculty of Medicine of Karaj staffs in 1390 to investigate their quality of life and the governing factors. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive and sectional study, a group of 100 of Faculty of Medicine and of Alborz University of Medical Sciences employees were participated. Sampling was done as census. Data collection was performed by means of the questionnaire of standard of quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF and the questionnaire of demographic information collected. Results: The results show that 51 percent of the employees have reported their quality of life in the average range and 6% in poor range. Furthermore, in the physical aspect of quality of life, 34% of the results are good, 59% moderate and the remaining 7% are poor. Likewise, in the quality of life from psychological aspect, 33% of the results are good, 64 percent moderate, and only 3% are poor. The data for the social relationships aspect are 28% good, 59% moderate, and 13% poor. Finally, in the quality of life from environmental health aspect, 36% of the staffs reported good, 55% moderate, and 9% poor condition. Pearson’s test results show that there is a meaningful correlation between the quality of life and the lower number of children, and also increasing years of service (P=0.00. However, the quality of life does not show any significant relationship with age and income. ANOVA test results indicate that there is a significant relationship between quality of life and the type of employment (P=0.017. Conclusion: Quality

  7. The effects of tourism impacts upon Quality of Life of residents in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyungmi

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates how tourism affects the quality of life of residents in tourism destinations that vary in the stage of development. The proposed model in this study structurally depicts that satisfaction with life in general derives from the satisfaction with particular life domains. Overall life satisfaction is derived from material well-being, which includes the consumer's sense of well being as it is related to material possessions, community well-being, emotional well-being, and h...

  8. Resident Perspectives on Work-Life Policies and Implications for Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westercamp, Nicole; Wang, Raziya S; Fassiotto, Magali

    2018-02-01

    As resident burnout increases, there is a need for better awareness, resources, and interventions. Challenges in balancing work and life priorities have been implicated in contributing to physician burnout. Institutional work-life policies (WLPs) are critical tools to meet work-life needs. This study investigates the influence of WLPs on residents' experiences. The authors emailed a SurveyMonkey link to the APA chief resident and Minority Fellow listservs and directly to 94 psychiatry program directors and 52 fellowship directors nationwide to distribute a survey to residents regarding WLP use and barriers, as well as burnout. Estimated response rate was 12-23%. The authors assessed the anonymous responses using SPSS to evaluate for relationships between awareness of WLPs, perceptions/barriers surrounding their usage, and burnout. The authors analyzed 255 responses. Awareness and use of policies ranged from 2 to 33%. A prominent barrier to WLPs is that use results in shifting workload to co-residents (48% agree). Respondents who perceived leadership to view use of WLPs as a sign of weakness (16% agree) were less likely to use WLPs (t (89) = -3.52, p burnout (41%) perceived vastly higher barriers to using WLPs as compared to those without burnout. This study supports the need for further investigation of WLPs to mitigate resident burnout and identifies important perceived barriers that affect the use of WLPs including low awareness, potential for shifting workload to co-residents, and negative perceptions of leadership attitudes toward WLPs.

  9. Interrelationships between romance, life quality, and medical training of female residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jung Wang

    2012-08-01

    Conclusion: Romance and quality of life were significantly influenced by the pattern of medical training in female residents. Setting duty-hour limits and initiating a new hobby were determined to be potentially beneficial to their quality of life and attitudes toward romance.

  10. Interrelationships between romance, life quality, and medical training of female residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Kan-Lin; Chang, Chin-Sung; Wu, Chih-Hsing

    2012-08-01

    For the past 30 years, there has been a steady increase in the number of female physicians, but the relationship between their romantic lives and their pattern of training has been inadequately reported. This study was designed to investigate the interrelationships between medical training, quality of life, and the attitudes that female residents have toward romance. Of the 106 female medical residents at our medical center in 2009, a total of 78 residents (73.6%) were enrolled for the study. Structured questionnaires (Cronbach α = 0.878), which included questions about female resident quality of life, attitude toward spousal choice, and the impact of programmed professional medical training, were self-administered through an anonymous process. Female residents, especially ward-care specialists, were determined to have excessively long working hours (84.6% > 88 work hours/week), insufficient and irregular sleep (44.9%), and inadequate personal time (73.1% friends, differences in values, and work-related stress. Those presumptive factors influencing romance between the assumed partner being a doctor or a "nondoctor" were significantly different with regard to lack of time (p = 0.002), values (p work-related stress (p life were significantly influenced by the pattern of medical training in female residents. Setting duty-hour limits and initiating a new hobby were determined to be potentially beneficial to their quality of life and attitudes toward romance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Using life cycle assessment in design for environment education of product development staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, H. [Vaisala Oyj, Helsinki (Finland); Kaipainen, J.; Ristolainen, E.; Valkama, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Electronics, Tampere (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The environmental information of the whole life cycle of a product is needed in design for environment (DfE). Therefore, LCA results are possible starting points for the DfE, but the results need to be summarized for a company staff in DfE education. The reliability of results must be taken into consideration, particularly when going into the details of a product. Those issues were examined when the manufacturing phase of the product of Vaisala company was assessed using two different LCA software tools and inventory databases. Differences between the methods and data had an influence on differences of the results. Comparing of those differences helped to show the main reliability issues of LCA for the staff. It was found out that as a background the LCA results were sufficient, whereas LCA based design rules needed further simplification of the results. In that connection, reliability issues and increased subjectivity must be emphasized. (orig.)

  12. The impact of oral health on the quality of life of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jessie; Ntouva, Antiopi; Read, Andrew; Murdoch, Mandy; Ola, Dennis; Tsakos, Georgios

    2015-07-15

    Good oral health in older residents of nursing homes is important for general health and quality of life. Very few studies have assessed how oral symptoms affect residents' quality of life. To assess the clinical and subjective oral health, including oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL), and the association of oral symptoms with OHRQoL in older people residing in nursing homes in Islington, London. Overall, 325 residents from nine nursing homes were clinically examined and 180 residents were interviewed to assess their oral symptoms and their OHRQoL using the OIDP measure. Managers and carers working in the homes were also interviewed. Almost two thirds of the sample were dentate (64.5%). 61.3% of dentate and 50.9% of edentate residents reported problems such as dry mouth, sore cracked lips, broken teeth and toothache and ill-fitting dentures. Oral health impacted considerably upon resident's OHRQoL; 20.2% of dentate and 30.9% of edentate reported at least one oral impact in the past 6 months. Sensitive teeth, toothache, bleeding gums, dry mouth and loose natural teeth among the dentate and loose or ill-fitting dentures among the edentate were strongly associated with higher prevalence of oral impacts even after adjusting for demographic and socio-economic factors, and for the number of teeth (dentate only). The burden of oral conditions was considerable. Oral symptoms were very common and were strongly associated with residents' worse OHRQoL. Health promotion programmes are important to help residents maintain an acceptable level of oral health and function.

  13. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  14. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  15. Residents Look Forward to New Lease on Life Post SARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JessyZhang

    2003-01-01

    A new craze has taken over Beijing: people of all ages can be found playing badminton on the sidewalks, in parks and virtually any open space theycan find. Thanks to SARS, taking up outdoor sports seems to be a hobby that is high on everyone's agenda. This is of course, just one small positive impact of SARS. After weathering the disaster, a few silver linings are emerging in the country's social life, economy and even administrative governance as the Eastern giant struggles to get on its feet.

  16. External Hand Forces Exerted by Long-Term Care Staff to Push Floor-Based Lifts: Effects of Flooring System and Resident Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Chantelle C; Korall, Alexandra M B; Russell, Colin M; Feldman, Fabio; Robinovitch, Stephen N; Mackey, Dawn C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of flooring type and resident weight on external hand forces required to push floor-based lifts in long-term care (LTC). Novel compliant flooring is designed to reduce fall-related injuries among LTC residents but may increase forces required for staff to perform pushing tasks. A motorized lift may offset the effect of flooring on push forces. Fourteen female LTC staff performed straight-line pushes with two floor-based lifts (conventional, motor driven) loaded with passengers of average and 90th-percentile resident weights over four flooring systems (concrete+vinyl, compliant+vinyl, concrete+carpet, compliant+carpet). Initial and sustained push forces were measured by a handlebar-mounted triaxial load cell and compared to participant-specific tolerance limits. Participants rated pushing difficulty. Novel compliant flooring increased initial and sustained push forces and subjective ratings compared to concrete flooring. Compared to the conventional lift, the motor-driven lift substantially reduced initial and sustained push forces and perceived difficulty of pushing for all four floors and both resident weights. Participants exerted forces above published tolerance limits only when using the conventional lift on the carpet conditions (concrete+carpet, compliant+carpet). With the motor-driven lift only, resident weight did not affect push forces. Novel compliant flooring increased linear push forces generated by LTC staff using floor-based lifts, but forces did not exceed tolerance limits when pushing over compliant+vinyl. The motor-driven lift substantially reduced push forces compared to the conventional lift. Results may help to address risk of work-related musculoskeletal injury, especially in locations with novel compliant flooring. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  17. [Gender influence on health related quality of life among resident physicians working in an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Prada, María; González-Cabrera, Joaquín; Torres G, Francisco; Iribar-Ibabe, Concepción; María Peinado, José

    2014-02-01

    The high emotional burden of physicians working in emergency departments may affect their quality of life perception. To evaluate health related quality of life among resident physicians performing shifts at an emergency department. Seventy one physicians aged 26,3 ± 1,7 years (47 women), working as residents in an emergency department, answered the short version of the Short-Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36®). This questionnaire analyses eight domains: physical function, body pain, general health, vitality, social function, emotional role and mental health. Women had a significantly worse perception than a reference population in four dimensions of the SF-36, especially mental health and social functioning. Men had scores similar to the reference population. Among women, vitality is the best predictor of mental health and social functioning. Women working as residents in an emergency department have a worse perception of their quality of life than men performing the same job.

  18. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Health-related profile and quality of life among nursing home residents: does pain matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Wan, Vanessa T C; Vong, Sinfia K S

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to explore the health-related profile and quality of life among older persons living with and without pain in nursing homes. Ten nursing homes were approached, and 535 older persons were invited to join the study from 2009 to 2011. The nursing home residents' demographic information and information regarding their pain situation and the use of oral analgesic drug and nondrug therapy among the older residents with chronic pain were also collected. Residents' physical health (using the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Elderly Mobility Scores); psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and loneliness (using the Happiness Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale); and quality of life were investigated. Among the 535 nursing home residents, 396 (74%) of them suffered from pain, with mean pain scores of 4.09 ± 2.19, indicating medium pain intensity a remaining 139 (26%) reported no pain. The location of pain was mainly in the knees, back and shoulders. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of the no-pain group (p nursing home residents' pain affected both their psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, and depression, and their physical quality of life. Nevertheless, only one-half of the older persons with pain used oral analgesic drug or nondrug therapy to relieve their pain. Pain had a significant impact on their mobility and ADL, was positively correlated with happiness and life satisfaction, and was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression. Pain management is a high priority in elderly care; as such, innovative and interdisciplinary strategies are necessary to enhance quality of life particularly for older persons living in nursing homes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. What do Japanese residents learn from treating dying patients? The implications for training in end-of-life care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Arai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How medical residents’ experiences with care for dying patients affect their emotional well-being, their learning outcomes, and the formation of their professional identities is not fully understood. We examine residents’ emotional states and learning occurring during the provision of care to dying patients and specifically discuss the impact of providing end-of-life (EOL care on professional identity formation. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 residents who had graduated in the last 3 to 5 years. Thematic theoretical analysis was applied, and key themes were developed based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. Results Eight key themes emerged from the analysis. The residents experienced dilemmas in confronting the reality of medical uncertainty as well as a disruption of emotional state and self-efficacy. Although the residents felt a sense of helplessness and guilt, they were able to reflect on strategies for handling medical care that focused on patients and that required a truly sincere attitude. They also contemplated the importance of palliative care and communication with patients, patients’ family members and medical staff. Building on these experiences, the residents rebuilt a sense of awareness that allowed them to directly engage with the type of medical care that they are likely to be called upon to perform in the future as the population continues to age. Conclusions This study revealed Japanese residents’ perceptions, emotions and learning processes in caring for dying patients by applying Kolb’s experiential learning theory. The findings of this study may illuminate valuable pieces of knowledge for future education in EOL care.

  1. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RESORT LIFE CYCLE AND RESIDENTS' PERCEPTION AND ATTITUDE--A Case Study of Putuo Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-zhong; LU Lin; ZHANG Guang-sheng; LU Song; XUAN Guo-fu

    2004-01-01

    The change in residents' perception and attitude and resort life cycle are the basic problems in the course of resort evolution. This thesis sets up the dynamic model of residents'perception and attitude, analyzes the linkage between residents' perception and attitude and the influential factors of resort life cycle, and finally, with a case study of Putuo Mountain, preliminarily discusses the relationship between resort life cycle and residents'perception and attitude. The research findings show that, although within development stage of life cycle, Putuo Mountain has already presented some signs of mature stage. The on-the-spot survey also indicates that, the local residents'positive perception is stronger than their negative perception. But compared with residents in some other coastal resorts such as Haikou and Sanya, negative perception of residents in Putuo Mountain is more evident, as the result of the smaller tourism carrying capacity in Putuo Mountain. There are some influential factors that have great impact on tourism carrying capacity in Putuo Mountain: tourist-resident number ratio, residents' benefit-cost ratio and characteristics of tourism resources. And the less influential factors are residents' demographic character, tourist behavioral character and cultural differences between local residents and tourists. Therefore, effective measures should be taken to adjust the structure of tourism product for the purpose of expanding tourism carrying capacity, lowering its pressure, lessening residents' environmental cost and enhancing their positive perception, which is the most essential prerequisite for the maturation of life cycle in Putuo Mountain.

  2. Job Satisfaction, Recruitment, and Retention of Entry-Level Residence Life and Housing Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Denise L.

    2012-01-01

    Most workers aspire to jobs where they are highly satisfied. This satisfaction may come from remuneration, opportunities for advancement, the work itself, or other factors. Studies have shown that job satisfaction has the potential to reduce absenteeism and employee turnover, but we still know little about the specific satisfaction levels of…

  3. [Construction of abridged life table for health evaluation of local resident using Excel program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingsha; Wang, Feng; Li, Xiaozhen; Yang, Jian; Yu, Shouyi; Hu, Jun

    2012-05-01

    To provide an easy computational tool for evaluating the health condition of local residents. An abridged life table was programmed by applying mathematical functions and formula in Excel program and tested with the real study data to evaluate the results computed. The Excel was capable of computing group death probability of age in the life table ((n)q(x)), number of survivors (l(x)), number of death ((n)d(x)), survival per person-year ((n)L(x)), survival total per person-year (T(x)) and life expectancy (e(x)). The calculated results were consistent with those by SAS. The abridged life table constructed using Microsoft Excel can conveniently and accurately calculate the relevant indices for evaluating the health condition of the residents.

  4. Quality of life, burnout, educational debt, and medical knowledge among internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Colin P; Shanafelt, Tait D; Kolars, Joseph C

    2011-09-07

    Physician distress is common and has been associated with negative effects on patient care. However, factors associated with resident distress and well-being have not been well described at a national level. To measure well-being in a national sample of internal medicine residents and to evaluate relationships with demographics, educational debt, and medical knowledge. Study of internal medicine residents using data collected on 2008 and 2009 Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) scores and the 2008 IM-ITE survey. Participants were 16,394 residents, representing 74.1% of all eligible US internal medicine residents in the 2008-2009 academic year. This total included 7743 US medical graduates and 8571 international medical graduates. Quality of life (QOL) and symptoms of burnout were assessed, as were year of training, sex, medical school location, educational debt, and IM-ITE score reported as percentage of correct responses. Quality of life was rated "as bad as it can be" or "somewhat bad" by 2402 of 16,187 responding residents (14.8%). Overall burnout and high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were reported by 8343 of 16,192 (51.5%), 7394 of 16,154 (45.8%), and 4541 of 15,737 (28.9%) responding residents, respectively. In multivariable models, burnout was less common among international medical graduates than among US medical graduates (45.1% vs 58.7%; odds ratio, 0.70 [99% CI, 0.63-0.77]; P $200,000 relative to no debt). Residents reporting QOL "as bad as it can be" and emotional exhaustion symptoms daily had mean IM-ITE scores 2.7 points (99% CI, 1.2-4.3; P ITE scores 5.0 points (99% CI, 4.4-5.6; P ITE scores.

  5. Quality of life in boarding houses and hostels: a residents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, M E; Muller, J J; Winocur, S; Barling, N

    2001-08-01

    In the last forty years deinstitutionalization has transferred the care of people with a serious mental illness from the psychiatric hospitals to community based facilities. More recently it has been questioned whether these new facilities offer the anticipated benefits of quality of life. This study examines the Quality of Life (QOL) of people diagnosed with schizophrenia living in two different accommodation facilities, hostels and boarding houses. QOL is examined from the resident's perspective. Lehman's (1988b) QOL Interview was used to measure objective, subjective, and global QOL of 60 participants in three hostels and two boarding house clusters. Hostel and boarding house data were compared and results showed that residents preferred boarding house accommodation. Overall, residents of both accommodation facilities reported satisfaction with QOL, and indicated that they regard them as asylum or sanctuary from the outside world.

  6. Identifying Inviolable Behavioral Norms of Campus Housing and Residence Life Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschy, Amy S.; Wilson, Maureen E.; Braxton, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Housing and residence life (HRL) administrators who lack knowledge about accepted professional behaviors risk violating normative boundaries, likely jeopardizing themselves or their clients (e.g., students, parents, colleagues). The purpose of this survey study was to understand if a normative structure exists for the administrative role…

  7. Does Cognitive Impairment Influence Quality of Life among Nursing Home Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Clark, Daniel; Perkins, Anthony; Arling, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the relationship between cognitive status and quality of life (QOL) of Minnesota nursing home (NH) residents and the relationship between conventional or Alzheimer's special care unit (SCU) placement and QOL. The study may inform development of dementia-specific quality measures. Design and Methods: Data for analyses came…

  8. Determinants of quality of life in nursing home residents with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.B.; Zuidema, S.U.; Jonghe, J.F. de; Verhey, F.R.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The goal of this study is to assess the relationship between quality of life (QoL), neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), psychotropic drug use (PDU) and patient characteristics in a large group of nursing home residents with dementia. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study included 288

  9. An "education for life" requirement to promote lifelong learning in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman A

    2010-12-01

    Lifelong learning is an integral component of practice-based learning and improvement. Physicians need to be lifelong learners to provide timely, efficient, and state-of-the-art patient care in an environment where knowledge, technology, and social requirements are rapidly changing. To assess graduates' self-reported perception of the usefulness of a residency program requirement to submit a narrative report describing their planned educational modalities for their future continued medical learning ("Education for Life" requirement), and to compare the modalities residents intended to use with their reported educational activities. Data was compiled from the Education for Life reports submitted by internal medicine residents at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga from 1998 to 2000, and from a survey sent to the same 27 graduates 2 to 4 years later from 2000 to 2004. Twenty-four surveys (89%) were returned. Of the responding graduates, 58% (14/24) found the Education for Life requirement useful for their future continued medical learning. Graduates intended to keep up with a mean of 3.4 educational modalities, and they reported keeping up with 4.2. In a multivariable analysis, the number of modalities graduates used was significantly associated with the number they had planned to use before graduation (P  =  .04) but not with their career choice of subspecialization. The majority of residents found the Education for Life requirement useful for their future continued medical learning. Graduates, regardless of specialty, reported using more modalities for continuing their medical education than they thought they would as residents. Considering lifelong learning early in training and then requiring residents to identify ways to practice lifelong learning as a requirement for graduation may be dispositive.

  10. Analysing the effect of area of residence over the life course in multilevel epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Oyvind; Leyland, Alastair H

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present multilevel models of individuals' residential history at multiple time points through the life course and their application and discuss some advantages and disadvantages for their use in epidemiological studies. Literature review of research using longitudinal multilevel models in studies of neighbourhood effects, statistical multilevel models that take individuals' residential history into account, and the application of these models in the Oslo mortality study. Measures of variance have been used to investigate the contextual impact of membership to collectives, such as area of residence, at several time points. The few longitudinal multilevel models that have been used suggest that early life area of residence may have an effect on mortality independently of residence later in life although the proportion of variation attributable to area level is small compared to individual level. The following multilevel models have been developed: simple multilevel models for each year separately, a multiple membership model, a cross-classified model, and finally a correlated cross-classified model. These models have different assumptions regarding the timing of influence through the life course. To fully recognise the origin of adult chronic diseases, factors at all stages of the life course at both individual and area level needs to be considered in order to avoid biased estimates. Important challenges in making life course residential data available for research and assessing how changing administrative coding over time reflect contextual impact need to be overcome before these models can be implemented as normal practice in multilevel epidemiology.

  11. Long and short hospice stays among nursing home residents at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskamp, Haiden A; Stevenson, David G; Grabowski, David C; Brennan, Eric; Keating, Nancy L

    2010-08-01

    To identify characteristics of nursing homes and residents associated with particularly long or short hospice stays. Observational study using administrative data on resident characteristics and hospice utilization from a large regional hospice linked with publicly available data on nursing home characteristics. A total of 13,479 residents who enrolled in hospice during 2001-2008. Logistic regression models of the probability of a long (>180 days) or very short (stay, adjusting for nursing home characteristics, a measure of nursing home quality developed using Minimum Data Set Quality Indicator/Quality Measures data, and resident characteristics. Nursing home characteristics were not statistically significant predictors of long stays. The probability of a short stay increased with the facility's nurse staffing ratio and decreased with the share of residents covered by Medicaid. Men (relative to women) and blacks (relative to whites) were less likely to have a long stay and more likely to have a short stay, while those 70 years or younger (relative to those 81-90) and residents with Alzheimer's disease/dementia were more likely to have long stays and less likely to have short stays. Fourteen percent of hospice users were discharged before death because they failed to meet Medicare hospice eligibility criteria, and these residents had longer lengths of stay, on average. Few facility characteristics were associated with very long or very short hospice stays. However, high rates of discharge before death that may reflect a less predictable life trajectory of nursing home residents suggests that further evaluation of the hospice benefit for nursing home residents may be needed.

  12. Work-Related Quality of Life among Medical Residents at a University Hospital in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsila, Nattamon; Chaiear, Naesinee; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Tiamkao, Somsak

    2015-12-01

    1) To assess work-related quality of life (WRQOL) among medical residents at a university hospital in northeast Thailand. 2) To determine the strength of the association between personal and working condition components and WRQOL among medical residents. A descriptive study was used to describe the WRQOL among medical residents. The study population comprised of all 375 residents affiliated with the university hospital. The Thai version of a self-administered work-related quality of life scale-2 was used for data collection. Testing the reliability revealed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.908. Questionnaires were completed by 259 of 375 (68.3%). The study found that the mean rating by residents for overall WRQOL was 113.8 out of 170 (SD 14.8). Most rated WRQOL as moderate (76.6%). The seven sub-factors were rated as moderate to high for employee engagement and control at work, moderate for home/work interface, general well-being and working conditions, high-moderate for job career satisfaction, and low-moderate for stress at work. Relationships between the personal and working condition components and WRQOL were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Residents in minor specialties had a higher WRQOL than those in major specialties (OR 2.522, 95% CI: 1.37, 4.63). Residents who had less than eight duty shifts/week had a higher WRQOL than those with more than eight duty shifts/week (OR 2.263, 95% CI: 1.16, 4.41). Similarly, residents working with less than 80 hours/week had a higher WRQOL than those working more than 80 hours/week (OR 2.344, 95% CI: 1.17, 4.72). A subgroup analyzes of those working in minor specialties showed the trend that working less than eight shifts/month and working less than 80 hours/week had the potential association with good quality of work-life (QWL). This phenomenon is presented in the subgroup analyses of those working in major specialties. Therefore, working hours and number of shifts might have played important role in contributing good QWL

  13. Life events during surgical residency have different effects on women and men over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michelle M; Yeo, Heather L; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-08-01

    Women represent half of medical school graduates in the United States. Our aim was to characterize the effects of marriage and childbirth on the experiences of surgery residents. This was a prospective, longitudinal study of categorical general surgery residents between 2008 and 2010. Outcomes included changes in faculty and peer relationships, work-life balance, financial security, and career goals over time. We included 4,028 residents. Compared with men, women in postgraduate years (PGYs) 1 through 5 were less likely to be married (28.2% to 47.3% vs 49.6% to 67.6%) or have children (4.6% to 18.0% vs 19.0% to 45.8%) (P < .001). Women who married during PGY1 to PGY3 became worried about performing in front of senior residents (P = .005); men who married were more likely to be happy at work (P = .005). Women who had a first child during PGY1 to PGY3 were more likely to feel overwhelmed (P = .008) and worry about financial security (P = .03) than other women. Men who had a child were more likely to feel supported by faculty (P = .004), but they experienced more family strain (P = .008) compared to childless men. Marriage and childbirth are associated with divergent changes in career experiences for women and men. Women lag behind their male peers in these life events from start to finish of residency. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experiences and Opinions Related to End-of-Life Discussion: From Oncologists' and Resident Physicians' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Kim, Shinmi; Kim, JinShil; Keam, Bhumsuk; Heo, Dae Seog; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Bong-Seog; Kim, Jee Hyun; Chang, Hye Jung; Baek, Sun Kyung

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to explore how oncologists and resident physicians practice end-of-life (EOL) discussions and to solicit their opinions on EOL discussions as a means to improve the quality of EOL care. A survey questionnaire was developed to explore the experiences and opinions about EOL discussions among oncologists and residents. Descriptive statistics, the t test, and the chisquare test were performed for the analyses. A total of 147 oncologists and 229 residents participated in this study. The study respondents reported diverse definitions of "terminal state," and mostrespondents tried to disclose the patient's condition to the patient and/or family members. Both groups were involved in EOL care discussions, with a rather low satisfaction level (57.82/100). The best timing to initiate discussionwas consideredwhen metastasis or disease recurrence occurred orwhen withdrawal of chemotherapy was anticipated. Furthermore, the study respondents suggested that patients and their family members should be included in the EOL discussion. Medical, legal, and ethical knowledge and communication difficulties along with practical issues were revealed as barriers and facilitators for EOL discussion. This study explored various perspectives of oncologists and resident physicians for EOL discussion. Since the Life-Sustaining-Treatment Decision-Making Act will be implemented shortly in Korea, now is the time for oncologists and residents to prepare themselves by acquiring legal knowledge and communication skills. To achieve this, education, training, and clinical tools for healthcare professionals are required.

  15. Crucial aspects promoting meaning and purpose in life: perceptions of nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorunn Drageset

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meaning and purpose in life are fundamental to human beings. In changing times, with an aging population and increased life expectancy, the need for health care services and long-term care is likely to grow. More deeply understanding how older long-term care residents perceive meaning and purpose in life is critical for improving the quality of care and the residents’ quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore crucial aspects promoting nursing home residents’ experience of meaning and purpose in everyday life. Method An exploratory hermeneutical design with qualitative interviews for collecting data. Results Four key experiences were found to promote meaning and purpose in life: 1 physical and mental well-being, 2 belonging and recognition, 3 personally treasured activities and 4 spiritual closeness and connectedness. Conclusion In supporting meaning and purpose in life of nursing home residents, the residents’ everyday well-being should be a central focus of care and facilitate personally treasured activities. Focused attention should also be given to the meaning-making power of experiencing belonging, recognition and spiritual connectedness.

  16. Exposure of mental health nurses to violence associated with job stress, life satisfaction, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Kostistky, Hava; Barnoy, Dor; Filshtinsky, Vivian; Bluvstein, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Workplace violence towards health workers in hospitals and in mental health units in particular is increasing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of exposure to violence, job stress, staff resilience, and post-traumatic growth (PTG) on the life satisfaction of mental health nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. The sample consisted of mental health nurses (n = 118) working in a large mental health centre in Israel. Verbal violence by patients was reported by 88.1% of the nurses, and 58.4% experienced physical violence in the past year. Physical and verbal violence towards nurses was correlated with job stress, and life satisfaction was correlated with PTG and staff resilience. Linear regression analyses indicated that life satisfaction was mainly affected by PTG, staff resilience, and job stress, and less by exposure to verbal and physical violence. The present study is the first to show that, although mental health nurses are frequently exposed to violence, their life satisfaction is affected more by staff resilience, PTG, and job stress than by workplace violence. Therefore, it is recommended that intervention programmes that contribute to PTG and staff resilience, as well as those that reduce job stress among mental health nurses, be explored and implemented. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Detecting depression in the aged: is there concordance between screening tools and the perceptions of nursing home staff and residents? A pilot study in a rural aged care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Luke; Reid, Alexander; Wilson, Jessica; Levesque, Janelle; Driver, Brian

    2007-08-01

    Recognition of depression in the elderly is exacerbated in rural and remote regions by a lack of mental health specialists. In nursing homes, screening tools have been advocated to circumvent the variable reliability of both nursing staff and residents in recognising depression. Debate concerning the utility of screening tools abounds. Previous research has neglected concordance between screening tools, nursing staff and residents in recognising depression. The present study aimed to determine if there was a significant difference in the proportion of depressed residents identified by recognition sources, and assessed the level of chance corrected agreement between sources. One hundred and two residents of aged care facilities in Wagga Wagga, Australia, mean age of 85.19 +/- 7.09 years. Residents were interviewed within their residential aged care facility. Cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Residents, nursing staff, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-12R) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and nursing staff professional opinion were not significantly different; however, both measures were significantly different to the resident measures (GDS-12R and resident opinion). Kappa statistic analysis of outcome measures revealed, at best, no more than a moderate level of chance corrected agreement between said sources. It is tentatively argued that the different sources might correspond to qualitatively different 'depression' constructs, and that health professionals who are concerned with depression in the elderly be aware of the disparity between, and subsequently consider, a variety of recognition sources.

  18. Self-rostering can improve work-life balance and staff retention in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Renee; Holme, Annie

    2018-03-08

    Renee Barrett, Staff Nurse, ITU, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, renee.barrett@gosh.nhs.uk , and Annie Holme, Lecturer, King's College London, look at how e-rostering can benefit health organisations and staff.

  19. Markers of Impaired Decision Making in Nursing Home Residents: Assessment by Nursing Home Staff in a Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Kevin M; Rosenberg, Paul B; Pirard, Sandrine; Bogunovic, Olivera; Spira, Adam P

    2015-07-01

    Many nursing home residents have cognitive impairment that affects their decision making. In order to identify potential markers of impaired decision making, we investigated the association between a range of nursing home resident characteristics and impaired decision making in a population-based sample. Participants were 13,013 residents in the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. We used logistic regression to determine the association between resident characteristics (ie, gender, age, race, mood, recent pain, falls, fractures, or hospitalizations, length of stay, number of activities of daily living (ADL) requiring help, and diagnoses of dementia, anxiety disorders, and depression) and impaired (vs independent) decision making. After controlling for depression and anxiety diagnoses, as well as gender, age, race, and recent hospitalization or pain, characteristics associated with impaired decision making included depressed, sad, or anxious mood ["mild" odds ratio (OR) = 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-1.58; "severe" OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 2.27-3.20); diagnosed dementia or living on a dementia hall (OR = 5.07, 95% CI = 4.52-5.67); number of ADL requiring assistance (with 5 ADL, OR = 10.69, 95% CI = 6.82-16.75); length of nursing home stay [101-365 days (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.36-1.89); 366 days-2 years (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.34-1.90); >2 years (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.92-2.63)]; and history of falls or fractures in the last 6 months (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.07-1.32)]. Residents reporting pain in the last week were less likely to have impaired decision making (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.52-0.66). We found several independent markers of impaired decision making in nursing home residents, including depressed, sad, or anxious mood (independent of depression or anxiety diagnosis); dementia; and greater need for ADL assistance. Some of these factors, in particular mood, are modifiable and addressing them may help improve decision making. These markers should be explored

  20. Quality of Life in Rural Communities: Residents Living Near to Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Khairuddin; Mohamed Shaffril, Hayrol Azril; Md. Yassin, Sulaiman; Abu Samah, Asnarulkhadi; Hamzah, Azimi; Abu Samah, Bahaman

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to identify the quality of life (QoL) among communities residing near the Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers in Malaysia. This quantitative study used a constructed questionnaire as main tool to collect data on the QoL of river communities. A total of 240 villagers were selected as respondents. The results indicated that the dimensions of settlement, safety, involvement and social relationships, as well as education scored highest, while dimensions of physical env...

  1. Citizen and Resident Satisfaction with Public Services in Qatar : And the impact on quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Benmansour, Nada Abdelkader , [بن منصور، ندى عبد القادر

    2016-01-01

    In Qatar notable differences in public service satisfaction exist across individual state services, across nationality groupings, and across demographic categories. Among all citizens and residents, however, there is an empirical link between satisfaction with state services and overall perceptions of quality of life. Policymakers should thus study efforts to collect regular and systematic data on the performance of key public institutions, including through the collection of consumer feedbac...

  2. The relationship between building design and residents' quality of life in extra care housing schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell, Alison; McKee, Kevin; Torrington, Judith; Barnes, Sarah; Darton, Robin; Netten, Ann; Lewis, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Well-designed housing is recognised as being an important factor in promoting a good quality of life. Specialised housing models incorporating care services, such as extra care housing (ECH) schemes are seen as enabling older people to maintain a good quality of life despite increasing health problems that can accompany ageing. Despite the variation in ECH building design little is known about the impact of ECH building design on the quality of life of building users. The evaluation of older people's living environments (EVOLVE) study collected cross-sectional data on building design and quality of life in 23 ECH schemes in England, UK. Residents' quality of life was assessed using the schedule for the evaluation of individual quality of life-direct weighting (SEIQoL-DW) and on the four domains of control, autonomy, self-realisation and pleasure on the CASP-19. Building design was measured on 12 user-related domains by means of a new tool; the EVOLVE tool. Using multilevel linear regression, significant associations were found between several aspects of building design and quality of life. Furthermore, there was evidence that the relationship between building design and quality of life was partly mediated by the dependency of participants and scheme size (number of living units). Our findings suggest that good quality building design in ECH can support the quality of life of residents, but that designing features that support the needs of both relatively independent and frail users is problematic, with the needs of highly dependent users not currently supported as well as could be hoped by ECH schemes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Perspective of intensive care nursing staff on the limitation of life support treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallès-Fructuoso, O; Ruiz-de Pablo, B; Fernández-Plaza, M; Fuentes-Milà, V; Vallès-Fructuoso, O; Martínez-Estalella, G

    To determine the perspective of intensive care nursing staff on the limitation of life support treatment (LLST) in the Intensive Care Units. An exploratory qualitative study was carried out by applying the theory of Strauss and Corbin as the analysis tool. Constructivist paradigm. Nursing staff from three Intensive Care Units of Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. Convenience sampling to reach theoretical saturation of data. Data collection through semi-structured interview recorded prior to informed consent. Rigor and quality criteria (reliability, credibility, transferability), and authenticity criteria: reflexivity. Demographic data was analysed using Excel. A total of 28 interviews were conducted. The mean age of the nurses was 35.6 years, with a mean seniority of 11.46 years of working in ICU. A minority of nurses (21.46%) had received basic training in bioethics. The large majority (85.7%) believe that LLST is not a common practice due to therapeutic cruelty and poor management with it. There is a correlation with the technical concepts; but among the main ethical problems is the decision to apply LLST. Nurses recognise that the decision on applying LLST depends on medical consensus with relatives, and they believe that their opinion is not considered. Their objective is trying to avoid suffering, and assist in providing a dignified death and support to relatives. There is still a paternalistic pattern between the doctor and patient relationship, where the doctor makes the decision and then agrees with the relatives to apply LLST. Organ failure and poor prognosis are the most important criteria for applying LLST. It is necessary to develop a guide for applying LLST, emphasising the involvement of nurses, patients, and their relatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional unit, technological dynamics, and scaling properties for the life cycle energy of residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijia, Stephane; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Williams, Eric

    2012-02-07

    Prior LCA studies take the operational phase to include all energy use within a residence, implying a functional unit of all household activities, but then exclude related supply chains such as production of food, appliances, and household chemicals. We argue that bounding the functional unit to provision of a climate controlled space better focuses the LCA on the building, rather than activities that occur within a building. The second issue explored in this article is how technological change in the operational phase affects life cycle energy. Heating and cooling equipment is replaced at least several times over the lifetime of a residence; improved efficiency of newer equipment affects life cycle energy use. The third objective is to construct parametric models to describe LCA results for a family of related products. We explore these three issues through a case study of energy use of residences: one-story and two-story detached homes, 1,500-3,500 square feet in area, located in Phoenix, Arizona, built in 2002 and retired in 2051. With a restricted functional unit and accounting for technological progress, approximately 30% of a building's life cycle energy can be attributed to materials and construction, compared to 0.4-11% in previous studies.

  5. Quality of life of nursing-home residents with dementia subject to surveillance technology versus physical restraints: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Boekhorst, S; Depla, M F I A; Francke, A L; Twisk, J W R; Zwijsen, S A; Hertogh, C M P M

    2013-04-01

    As physical restraints should only be used in exceptional cases, there is an urgent need for alternatives to restraint use. Surveillance technology could be such an alternative. This study explored whether nursing-home residents with dementia subjected to surveillance technology had better quality of life scores for mood, behavioral and societal dimensions than residents with physical restraints. Quality of life was assessed longitudinally, with three measurements in six psychogeriatric nursing homes of residents with surveillance technology (n = 170) and residents with physical restraints (n = 22). QUALIDEM subscales were used to measure five dimensions of quality of life. Multilevel longitudinal univariate and multivariate regression techniques were used to analyze the data. Because physical restraints were almost exclusively used in residents with low activities of daily living (ADL) independency (18 of the 22), we restricted the regression analyses to residents with a Barthel Index score ≤ 5 (overall n = 53). Univariate results showed that highly ADL-dependent residents with surveillance technology had significantly more positive affect than highly ADL-dependent residents with physical restraints. However, this difference proved to be no longer significant after adjustment for the confounders: age, sex and stage of dementia. Quality of life of highly ADL-dependent nursing-home residents with dementia seems to be unrelated to the use of surveillance technology as opposed to physical restraints. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Domains of quality of life of people with profound multiple disabilities : The perspective of parents and direct support staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petry, K; Maes, B; Vlaskamp, C

    Background This study considered the general validity of the basic domains of quality of life that appear in theoretical models, in relation to people with profound multiple disabilities. The authors examined how parents and direct support staff operationalized these basic domains for people with

  7. Swiss residents' speciality choices – impact of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Thomas

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical specialities chosen by doctors for their careers play an important part in the development of health-care services. This study aimed to investigate the influence of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goal aspirations on the choice of medical speciality. Methods As part of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates on career development, 522 fourth-year residents were asked in what speciality they wanted to qualify. They also assessed their career motivation and life goal aspirations. Data concerning personality traits such as sense of coherence, self-esteem, and gender role orientation were collected at the first assessment, four years earlier, in their final year of medical school. Data analyses were conducted by univariate and multivariate analyses of variance and covariance. Results In their fourth year of residency 439 (84.1% participants had made their speciality choice. Of these, 45 (8.6% subjects aspired to primary care, 126 (24.1% to internal medicine, 68 (13.0% to surgical specialities, 31 (5.9% to gynaecology & obstetrics (G&O, 40 (7.7% to anaesthesiology/intensive care, 44 (8.4% to paediatrics, 25 (4.8% to psychiatry and 60 (11.5% to other specialities. Female residents tended to choose G&O, paediatrics, and anaesthesiology, males more often surgical specialities; the other specialities did not show gender-relevant differences of frequency distribution. Gender had the strongest significant influence on speciality choice, followed by career motivation, personality traits, and life goals. Multivariate analyses of covariance indicated that career motivation and life goals mediated the influence of personality on career choice. Personality traits were no longer significant after controlling for career motivation and life goals as covariates. The effect of gender remained significant after controlling for personality traits, career motivation and life goals. Conclusion

  8. What effects have resident work-hour changes had on education, quality of life, and safety? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Staheli, Greg; LeClere, Lance; Andersone, Diana; McCormick, Frank

    2015-05-01

    More than 15 years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified medical error as a problem worthy of greater attention; in the wake of the IOM report, numerous changes were made to regulations to limit residents' duty hours. However, the effect of resident work-hour changes remains controversial within the field of orthopaedics. We performed a systematic review to determine whether work-hour restrictions have measurably influenced quality-of-life measures, operative and technical skill development, resident surgical education, patient care outcomes (including mortality, morbidity, adverse events, sentinel events, complications), and surgeon and resident attitudes (such as perceived effect on learning and training experiences, personal benefit, direct clinical experience, clinical preparedness). We performed a systematic review of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and Google Scholar using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Inclusion criteria were any English language peer-reviewed articles that analyzed the effect(s) of orthopaedic surgery resident work-hour restrictions on patient safety, resident education, resident/surgeon quality of life, resident technical operative skill development, and resident surgeon attitudes toward work-hour restrictions. Eleven studies met study inclusion criteria. One study was a prospective analysis, whereas 10 studies were of level IV evidence (review of surgical case logs) or survey results. Within our identified studies, there was some support for improved resident quality of life, improved resident sleep and less fatigue, a perceived negative impact on surgical operative and technical skill, and conflicting evidence on the topic of resident education, patient outcomes, and variable attitudes toward the work-hour changes. There is a paucity of high-level or clear evidence evaluating the effect of the changes to resident work

  9. Keeping our charm: residents, growth, and quality of life issues in a small but growing Texas coastal community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaying Lu; Michael A. Schuett

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed residents' perceptions of quality of life, conservation, and growth in a small, fast-growing coastal community. Data were collected from an on-site survey in Aransas County, TX, from 2006 to 2007. Results show that the residents are concerned about preserving their natural resources, maintaining a small-town atmosphere in their community, and...

  10. Retrospective and Prospective Evaluations of Environmental Quality under Urban Renewal as Determinants of Residents' Subjective Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Leung, Kwan-kwok

    2008-01-01

    Claims about the impacts of environmental quality associated with urban renewal on the resident's subjective quality of life are more speculative than empirically grounded. To clarify the impacts of environmental quality under urban renewal, this study surveyed 876 residents living in housing surrounding seven urban renewal sites in Hong Kong. It…

  11. Quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klinj, Tatiana Paravic; Carrillo, Katia Lorena Saenz

    2016-08-08

    to determine the quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public institutions in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. quantitative, correlational, cross-sectional, and comparative. We used a probabilistic sample of 345 nurses with data collected in 2013 using an instrument created by the authors to gather bio-socio-demographic data and the CVT-GOHISALO instrument with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.95. SPSS 15 was used to analyze the data. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to calculate the normality of the data; the medians were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test with the significance level set at 0.05. the average overall quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff was 207.31 (DE 41.74), indicating a moderate level. The quality of life in the workplace was higher for people with permanent contracts (p=0.007) who did not engage in other remunerative activities (p=0.046). Differences in the quality of life in the workplace were observed depending on the institution where the subjects worked (p=0.001). the nursing staff perceives itself as having a moderate-level quality of life in the workplace. This level was determined in the statistical analysis based on the type of contract, whether the person performed other remunerated activities, and the institution where the person worked. determinar el nivel de calidad de vida en el trabajo del personal de enfermería de instituciones públicas en Hermosillo, Sonora, México. cuantitativo, correlacional, transversal y comparativo. Muestreo probabilístico, de 345 enfermeras, datos recolectados en 2013, a través de instrumentos que recogen datos biososiodemográficos; creado por las autoras y CVT -GOHISALO con Alpha de Cronbach de 0.95. Para el análisis de datos se usó SPSS 15, para conocer la normalidad de los datos se utilizó Kolmogorov- Smirnov, se compararon medianas con U de Mann Whitney y Kruskal-Wallis, nivel de significancia admitido 0.05. promedio de calidad de vida en el trabajo

  12. The association between quality of care and quality of life in long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Sulgi; Nakagawa, Shunichi; Lung, John; Choi, Jong Bum; Ryu, Woo Sang; Min, Too Jae; Shin, Hyun Phil; Kim, Kyudam; Yoo, Ji Won

    2014-03-01

    To assess the overall quality of life of long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition, to examine whether the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's Nursing Home Compare 5-star quality rating system reflects the overall quality of life of such residents, and to examine whether residents' demographics and clinical characteristics affect their quality of life. Quality of life was measured using the Participant Outcomes and Status Measures-Nursing Facility survey, which has 10 sections and 63 items. Total scores range from 20 (lowest possible quality of life) to 100 (highest). Long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition (n = 316) were interviewed. The average quality- of-life score was 71.4 (SD: 7.6; range: 45.1-93.0). Multilevel regression models revealed that quality of life was associated with physical impairment (parameter estimate = -0.728; P = .04) and depression (parameter estimate = -3.015; P = .01) but not Nursing Home Compare's overall star rating (parameter estimate = 0.683; P = .12) and not pain (parameter estimate = -0.705; P = .47). The 5-star quality rating system did not reflect the quality of life of long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition. Notably, pain was not associated with quality of life, but physical impairment and depression were. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Communication About Advance Directives and End-of-Life Care Options Among Internal Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ramona L.; Tindall, Kate; Xuan, Lei; Paulk, M. Elizabeth; Halm, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite increasing awareness about the importance of discussing end-of-life (EOL) care options with terminally ill patients and families, many physicians remain uncomfortable with these discussions. Objective The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of and comfort with EOL care discussions among a group of internal medicine residents and the extent to which comfort with these discussions has improved over time. Methods In 2013, internal medicine residents at a large academic medical center were asked to participate in an on-line survey that assessed their attitudes and experiences with discussing EOL care with terminally-ill patients. These results were compared to data from a similar survey residents in the same program completed in 2006. Results Eighty-three (50%) residents completed the 2013 survey. About half (52%) felt strongly that they were able to have open, honest discussions with patients and families, while 71% felt conflicted about whether CPR was in the patient’s best interest. About half (53%) felt strongly that it was okay for them to tell a patient/family member whether or not CPR was a good idea for them. Compared to 2006 respondents, the 2013 cohort felt they had more lectures about EOL communication, and had watched an attending have an EOL discussion more often. Conclusions Modest improvements were made over time in trainees’ exposure to EOL discussions; however, many residents remain uncomfortable and conflicted with having EOL care discussions with their patients. More effective training approaches in EOL communication are needed to train the next generation of internists. PMID:24418692

  14. Communication About Advance Directives and End-of-Life Care Options Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ramona L; Tindall, Kate; Xuan, Lei; Paulk, M Elizabeth; Halm, Ethan A

    2015-05-01

    Despite increasing awareness about the importance of discussing end-of-life (EOL) care options with terminally ill patients and families, many physicians remain uncomfortable with these discussions. The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of and comfort with EOL care discussions among a group of internal medicine residents and the extent to which comfort with these discussions has improved over time. In 2013, internal medicine residents at a large academic medical center were asked to participate in an on-line survey that assessed their attitudes and experiences with discussing EOL care with terminally-ill patients. These results were compared to data from a similar survey residents in the same program completed in 2006. Eighty-three (50%) residents completed the 2013 survey. About half (52%) felt strongly that they were able to have open, honest discussions with patients and families, while 71% felt conflicted about whether CPR was in the patient's best interest. About half (53%) felt strongly that it was okay for them to tell a patient/family member whether or not CPR was a good idea for them. Compared to 2006 respondents, the 2013 cohort felt they had more lectures about EOL communication, and had watched an attending have an EOL discussion more often. Modest improvements were made over time in trainees' exposure to EOL discussions; however, many residents remain uncomfortable and conflicted with having EOL care discussions with their patients. More effective training approaches in EOL communication are needed to train the next generation of internists. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Euthanasia, assisted suicide and end-of-life care: attitudes of students, residents and attending physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rivera, José; Cruz, Juan; Jaume-Anselmi, Francisco

    2006-12-01

    Attitudes in regard to end-of life issues are evolving in Western societies. We have sought to trace this evolution in the relatively homogeneous cultural setting of Puerto Rico. One hundred fifty-two medical students, 62 medical residents and 84 members of three medical faculties were asked whether in terminally ill patients they: 1) would support a request for euthanasia(E); 2) if legalized, would engage in, would oppose or would not be opposed to others engaging physician-assisted suicide(PAS); 3) would consider ethical to prescribe full doses of drugs needed to alleviate pain, even if they knew it would hasten death; 4) would agree to limit certain resources for the terminally ill. Gender and religious affiliation were also requested. Twenty-eight percent of the students, 26% of the residents and 31% of the faculty supported E. Only 13% of the students, 18% of the residents and 11% of the faculty would engage in PAS. Men were more willing than women to acquiesce to a request for E or PAS. Religious affiliation or its absence did not influence the support or opposition to E and PAS. If it would hasten death, 86% of the residents, but only 65% of the faculty considered ethical to prescribe the dose of drugs needed to alleviate pain. More than 2/3 of the students, residents and faculty favored the limiting of certain resources for the terminally ill. In our cultural and medical environment, men are more willing than women to engage in E or PAS. The attitude towards E and PAS is not influenced by religious affiliation. If it hastens death, some still consider unethical to prescribe full doses of drugs needed to alleviate pain in the dying patient.

  16. Human coronavirus OC43 causes influenza-like illness in residents and staff of aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, C. J.; Clothier, H. J.; Seccull, A.; Tran, T.; Catton, M. C.; Lambert, S. B.; Druce, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Three outbreaks of respiratory illness associated with human coronavirus HCoV-OC43 infection occurred in geographically unrelated aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia during August and September 2002. On clinical and epidemiological grounds the outbreaks were first thought to be caused by influenza virus. HCoV-OC43 was detected by RT-PCR in 16 out of 27 (59%) specimens and was the only virus detected at the time of sampling. Common clinical manifestations were cough (74%), rhinorrhoea (59%) and sore throat (53%). Attack rates and symptoms were similar in residents and staff across the facilities. HCoV-OC43 was also detected in surveillance and diagnostic respiratory samples in the same months. These outbreaks establish this virus as a cause of morbidity in aged-care facilities and add to increasing evidence of the significance of coronavirus infections. PMID:15816152

  17. Work/Life Boundary Management in an Integrative Environment: A Study of Residence Life Professionals who Live at Their Place of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Pressley Robinson, IV

    2013-01-01

    How individuals manage work/life boundaries when they live at the place they work, as opposed to working from home, is a gap in both work/life literature and in higher education literature. An obvious example from higher education is the resident life professional that lives in the residential facility that she or he oversees. Living in a…

  18. Training and certification program of the operating staff for a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Prior to beginning a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system, a need was identified for a training and certification program to qualify an operating staff for conducting the test. The staff was responsible for operating and maintaining the test facility, monitoring and ensuring crew safety, and implementing procedures to ensure effective mission performance with good data collection and analysis. The training program was designed to ensure that each operating staff member was capable of performing his assigned function and was sufficiently cross-trained to serve at certain other positions on a contingency basis. Complicating the training program were budget and schedule limitations, and the high level of sophistication of test systems.

  19. Impact on house staff evaluation scores when changing from a Dreyfus- to a Milestone-based evaluation model: one internal medicine residency program's findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Karen A; Balwan, Sandy; Cacace, Frank; Katona, Kyle; Sunday, Suzanne; Chaudhry, Saima

    2014-01-01

    As graduate medical education (GME) moves into the Next Accreditation System (NAS), programs must take a critical look at their current models of evaluation and assess how well they align with reporting outcomes. Our objective was to assess the impact on house staff evaluation scores when transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model of evaluation to a Milestone-based model of evaluation. Milestones are a key component of the NAS. We analyzed all end of rotation evaluations of house staff completed by faculty for academic years 2010-2011 (pre-Dreyfus model) and 2011-2012 (post-Milestone model) in one large university-based internal medicine residency training program. Main measures included change in PGY-level average score; slope, range, and separation of average scores across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. Transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model to a Milestone-based model resulted in a larger separation in the scores between our three post-graduate year classes, a steeper progression of scores in the PGY-1 class, a wider use of the 5-point scale on our global end of rotation evaluation form, and a downward shift in the PGY-1 scores and an upward shift in the PGY-3 scores. For faculty trained in both models of assessment, the Milestone-based model had greater discriminatory ability as evidenced by the larger separation in the scores for all the classes, in particular the PGY-1 class.

  20. Resident Support for Tourism Development in Rural Midwestern (USA Communities: Perceived Tourism Impacts and Community Quality of Life Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Pin Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Local residents play an important role in the process of sustainable development in tourism. Resident support for tourism development contributes to the health of tourism industry and successful community development. Therefore, it is in the best interest of local residents, the tourism industry, and tourists, that residents have a positive outlook on and positive experiences with tourism development. In order to understand resident support for tourism development from tourism impacts and community quality of life perspective within the rural communities of Orange County, Indiana, USA, this study has examined a proposed structural model which incorporates eight latent variables: (a six types of positive and negative tourism impacts serve as exogenous latent variables; (b tourism-related community quality of life (TCQOL is proposed as the mediating variable; and (c resident support for tourism development is the ultimate dependent variable. The results show that both sociocultural and environmental benefits contribute to the host community’s living experience. Economic and sociocultural benefits, negative sociocultural and environmental impacts, and TCQOL influence resident support for tourism development. This study identified specific tourism impacts that affect TCQOL and resident support for local tourism development. This study affirms that community quality of life (QOL serves an effective predictor of support for tourism development.

  1. Striving for work-life balance: effect of marriage and children on the experience of 4402 US general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael C; Yeo, Heather; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-03-01

    To determine how marital status and having children impact US general surgical residents' attitudes toward training and personal life. There is a paucity of research describing how family and children affect the experience of general surgery residents. Cross-sectional survey involving all US categorical general surgery residents. Responses were evaluated by resident/program characteristics. Statistical analysis included the χ test and hierarchical logistic regression modeling. A total of 4402 residents were included (82.4% response rate) and categorized as married, single, or other (separated/divorced/widowed). Men were more likely to be married (57.8% vs 37.9%, P work (P work (P work hours caused strain on family life (P work (P = 0.001), were happy at work (P = 0.001), and reported a good program fit (P = 0.034), but had strain on family life (P work [odds ratio (OR): 1.22, P = 0.035], yet feeling that work caused family strain (OR: 1.66, P work (OR: 0.81, P = 0.007). Residents who were married or parents reported greater satisfaction and work-life conflict. The complex effects of family on surgical residents should inform programs to target support mechanisms for their trainees.

  2. The effect of staff training on agitation and use of restraint in nursing home residents with dementia: a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testad, Ingelin; Ballard, Clive; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Aarsland, Dag

    2010-01-01

    Agitation is common in dementia and is associated with use of restraints and use of psychotropic drugs. The aim of this study was to determine whether an education and supervision intervention could reduce agitation and the use of restraints and antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes. Four Norwegian nursing homes were randomly allocated to receive either treatment as usual or an intervention consisting of a 2-day educational seminar and monthly group guidance for 6 months. One hundred forty-five residents with dementia (based on medical records and corroborated with a Functional Assessment Staging score >or= 4) completed baseline and 6-month intervention assessments and were included in the analyses. The co-primary outcome measures were the proportion of residents subject to interactional restraint and the severity of agitation using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Patients were assessed at baseline, immediately after completion of the intervention at 6 months, and 12 months after baseline. Comparison of change in the 2 groups was made using repeated-measures analysis of variance (CMAI) and Mann-Whitney test (restraints). The study was conducted from 2003 to 2004. The proportion of residents starting new restraint was lower in the intervention than in the control group at 6-month evaluation (P = .02), but no statistically significant differences were found at 12-month assessment (P = .57). The total CMAI score declined from baseline to 6 and 12 months' follow-up in the intervention homes compared to a small increase in the control homes (F2,176 = 3.46, P = .034). There were no statistically significant differences in use of antipsychotic drugs. A brief 2-day staff education program followed by continued monthly guidance was able both to improve quality of care by reducing the frequency of interactional restraints and to reduce severity of agitation. ©Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Place of residence as a factor differentiating physical activity in the life style of Ukrainian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergier, Józef; Bergier, Barbara; Tsos, Anatolii

    2016-12-23

    Determining the state of physical activity of societies as an important component of a health promoting life style is a very up-to-date problem. Studies of physical activity among students, the future elites in their environments, become of increasing importance. An important problem is the recognition of factors differentiating this activity on the example of place of residence. For this purpose, the study covered 2,125 students (60.8% females and 39.2% males) from the National Institute in Lutsk, Ukraine, aged 17-22 (mean age: 20.4). The method of a diagnostic survey was applied which included the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). The following measures of physical activity according to the place of residence (rural area, small town with a population up to 100,000; medium-size town - 100,000-200,000 inhabitants; large city - over 200,000) were taken into consideration: level of physical activity, self-reported physical fitness, sports disciplines practiced by the respondents, and those which they would like to practice, and the BMI, and leisure time possessed. The study showed that the place of residence positively differentiated physical activity among students from medium-size towns and rural areas, compared to their contemporaries from small towns and large cities. Significant differences were also found with respect to the BMI, which was significantly less favourable among respondents from the rural environment. However, no differences were observed between the place of residence for leisure time, self-reported physical activity, and forms of physical activity practiced, and those which the respondents would like to practice.

  4. Life-sustaining support: ethical, cultural, and spiritual conflicts. Part II: Staff support--a neonatal case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutts, Amy; Schloemann, Johanna

    2002-06-01

    As medical knowledge and technology continue to increase, so will the ability to provide life-sustaining support to patients who otherwise would not survive. Along with these advances comes the responsibility of not only meeting the clinical needs of our patients, but also of understanding how the family's culture and spirituality will affect their perception of the situation and their decision-making process. As the U.S. continues to become a more culturally diverse society, health care professionals will need to make changes in their practice to meet the psychosocial needs of their patients and respect their treatment decisions. Part I of this series (April 2002) discussed how the cultural and spiritual belief systems of Baby S's family affected their decision-making processes and also their ability to cope with the impending death of their infant. The development of a culturally competent health care team can help bridge the gap between culturally diverse individuals. This article addresses the following questions: 1. What legal alternatives are available to the staff to protect the patient from suffering associated with the continuation of futile life-sustaining support? 2. What conflicts might the staff experience as a result of the continuation of futile life-sustaining support? 3. What efforts can be made to support members of the staff? 4. What can be done to prepare others in the health care professions to deal more effectively with ethical/cultural issues?

  5. Quality of life of residents living in a city hosting mega-sport events: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzner, Rebecca; Koenigstorfer, Joerg

    2016-10-21

    It remains unknown whether and when the hosting of mega-sport events increases quality of life of host city residents. The aim of this study is to assess the changes in quality of life of host city residents over the course of hosting a mega-sport event until three months after the event, depending on residents' perception of the atmosphere during the event. The study was conducted in Rio de Janeiro, one of the host cities of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in soccer. Participants were recruited from a Brazilian market research agency's panel and surveyed online. The WHOQOL-BREF was used to measure quality of life of residents of Rio de Janeiro (n = 281) in three waves in the context of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Perceived atmosphere at the event was measured via an established scale. Piecewise latent growth models were used to analyze individual changes in the four domains of quality of life per se and depending on perceived atmosphere. There was no change in quality of life with respect to physical, social, psychological, and environmental health for all participants during the course of the event. However, residents who perceived a positive atmosphere rated the social and environmental domains of quality of life more positively right after the end (vs. at the beginning) of the World Cup. This increase sustained until three months after the event. Physical health (particularly at high levels of perceived atmosphere) and psychological health decreased from right after the event until three months after. There was no positive effect of the hosting of the mega-sport event on the four quality of life domains of the panel members (who were residents of a city hosting a mega-sport event) per se. The individual changes in quality of life vary by perception of atmosphere and by domain of quality of life.

  6. [The pediatric patient at the end-of-life. A challenge for its identification and treatment. A survey in pediatricians and medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Olvera-González, Héctor; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Angel

    2011-01-01

    Identification of pediatric patients at the end-of-life is not easy because criteria used are based on adults' criteria. In this survey we explore the children end-of-life definition pediatricians have, as well as to determine which interventions they use when caring a patient at end-of-life. Tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Staff pediatricians (SP) and medical residents (MR). A self-administrated questionnaire was built and validated. It contains five vignettes of pediatric patients: Two with WHO criteria for an end-of-life condition (EC) and three without an end-of-life condition (NEC). PARTICIPANTS identified each patient with or without an end-of-life condition, and which palliative actions they would perform accordingly Their responses were recorded in a 4-option Likert scale. Ordinal regression was used to assess if some of the participants' characteristics were related to the identification of an end-of-life condition. Response rate was 84.2% (128/152); of whom 63 were SP and 65 MR. EC cases were well identified in 90 and 93%, while NEC in 30 and 40%, respectively Palliative actions were more according in EC patients, but around 20% would not provide them. Among NEC patients, there were more disparities of palliative actions to be delivered, and it was statistically significantly. Ordinal regression showed that some participants' characteristics are associated to the appropriate identification of end-of-life patients; however, these factors were not consistent across the five scenarios. Among pediatricians, criteria of end-of-life conditions are not well established, neither the palliative actions. Educational interventions are needed to improve the quality of life of these children.

  7. Impact on house staff evaluation scores when changing from a Dreyfus- to a Milestone-based evaluation model: one internal medicine residency program's findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Friedman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As graduate medical education (GME moves into the Next Accreditation System (NAS, programs must take a critical look at their current models of evaluation and assess how well they align with reporting outcomes. Our objective was to assess the impact on house staff evaluation scores when transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model of evaluation to a Milestone-based model of evaluation. Milestones are a key component of the NAS. Method: We analyzed all end of rotation evaluations of house staff completed by faculty for academic years 2010–2011 (pre-Dreyfus model and 2011–2012 (post-Milestone model in one large university-based internal medicine residency training program. Main measures included change in PGY-level average score; slope, range, and separation of average scores across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME competencies. Results: Transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model to a Milestone-based model resulted in a larger separation in the scores between our three post-graduate year classes, a steeper progression of scores in the PGY-1 class, a wider use of the 5-point scale on our global end of rotation evaluation form, and a downward shift in the PGY-1 scores and an upward shift in the PGY-3 scores. Conclusions: For faculty trained in both models of assessment, the Milestone-based model had greater discriminatory ability as evidenced by the larger separation in the scores for all the classes, in particular the PGY-1 class.

  8. Staff perceptions of end-of-life care in the acute care setting: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Karen; Clark, Jean; Marshall, Bridget; Allan, Simon

    2011-05-01

    Understanding current end of life (EOL) care delivery in acute care is an important prerequisite to positively influencing practice, and published New Zealand (NZ) and international data are limited. Therefore, staff perceptions of EOL care in the hospital setting were investigated via survey. This article presents key findings. A total of 610 staff members in a 194-bed regional hospital were surveyed regarding their perceptions of EOL care, which yielded a response rate of 29% with 179 surveys returned. Respondents were from medical, nursing, and allied health staff working in medical, surgical, elder health, and a regional cancer treatment service. Responses to Likert scale statements regarding the Care of the dying, Communication, Teamwork, Documentation, Attitudes to death and dying in the workplace, and Barriers to the care of patients, their whānau (a NZ Māori word that refers to extended family or family group), and families frequently contrasted with additional and explanatory comments. The thematic analysis of written text identified five themes: The reality of care, The team dynamic, The direction of care, Knowledge and education, and Environmental and organizational factors. The quality and timeliness of EOL care was significantly influenced by the elements informing the themes and the pervasive nature and importance of communication. Meeting the needs of dying patients in acute care was complex but a significant priority for staff.

  9. Saúde e qualidade de vida de médicos residentes Health and quality of life of medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Garcia Lourenção

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Discutir sobre saúde e qualidade de vida de médicos residentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo de revisão bibliográfica no qual se realizou a análise de conteúdo do assunto enfocado. A fonte de busca foi a Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS, por meio da BIREME (Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, nas Bases Eletrônicas Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrietal System On-Line, Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, SciELO (Scientific Eletronic Library On Line e pelo endereço eletrônico scholar.google.com.br. Os descritores utilizados foram: qualidade de vida, estresse, internato e residência. Realizou-se o ordenamento e a análise da bibliografia científica, de modo a avaliar e discutir aspectos apresentados nos estudos com relação à temática, considerando a distribuição das publicações segundo país de origem, o período de publicação, a fonte e o título, o foco de estudo e as principais conclusões. RESULTADOS: As publicações analisadas abordam aspectos importantes como incidências elevadas de Burnout, estresse, depressão, fadiga e sono entre os residentes; dificuldade de enfrentamento; relação entre carga horária de trabalho e qualidade de vida; necessidade de melhorias na legislação da residência médica para melhorar as condições de trabalho e aprendizado. CONCLUSÃO: A implementação de programas de assistência aos residentes produz melhorias na qualidade da capacitação profissional e na qualidade de vida pessoal, melhorando o relacionamento com os pacientes. Apesar de estressante, a residência médica é uma experiência enriquecedora, que propicia o desenvolvimento profissional e pessoal dos jovens médicos.OBJECTIVE: This article highlights the relationship between health and quality of life among the resident medical staff. METHODS: A review was carried out to analyze the content of the relationship under study. Sources for

  10. Ethnographic Exploration of Elderly Residents' Perceptions and Utilization of Health Care to Improve Their Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Ziya Tabatabaei; Azimi Bin Hj Hamzah; Fatemeh Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    The increase in proportion of older people in Malaysia has led to a significant growth of health care demands. The aim of this study is to explore how perceived health care needs influence on quality of life among elderly Malay residents who reside in a Malaysian residential home. This study employed a method known as ethnographic research from May 2011 to January 2012. Four data collection strategies were selected as the main data-collecting tools including participant observation, field not...

  11. Quality of Life in Rural Communities: Residents Living Near to Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers, Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairuddin Idris

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to identify the quality of life (QoL among communities residing near the Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers in Malaysia. This quantitative study used a constructed questionnaire as main tool to collect data on the QoL of river communities. A total of 240 villagers were selected as respondents. The results indicated that the dimensions of settlement, safety, involvement and social relationships, as well as education scored highest, while dimensions of physical environment, financial and job security yielded moderate scores. Dimensions of infrastructure facilities yielded a low mean score. Recommendations are provided, in the hope that our results may be useful for strategies that could enhance QoL of these river communities.

  12. Quality of Life in Rural Communities: Residents Living Near to Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Khairuddin; Mohamed Shaffril, Hayrol Azril; Md Yassin, Sulaiman; Abu Samah, Asnarulkhadi; Hamzah, Azimi; Abu Samah, Bahaman

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to identify the quality of life (QoL) among communities residing near the Tembeling, Pahang and Muar Rivers in Malaysia. This quantitative study used a constructed questionnaire as main tool to collect data on the QoL of river communities. A total of 240 villagers were selected as respondents. The results indicated that the dimensions of settlement, safety, involvement and social relationships, as well as education scored highest, while dimensions of physical environment, financial and job security yielded moderate scores. Dimensions of infrastructure facilities yielded a low mean score. Recommendations are provided, in the hope that our results may be useful for strategies that could enhance QoL of these river communities.

  13. Improving the quality of life of aged care residents through the joy of food: The Lantern Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Cherie; Dwonczyk, Marcia; Skinner, Jan; Isenring, Liz

    2018-03-23

    Mealtimes directly impact the quality of life of residents in aged care. The objective of The Lantern Project is to improve the dining experience of aged care residents to reduce malnutrition risk through improving dietary intake, meal. A transdisciplinary team of aged care professionals and resident advocates was formed as a collaboration collectively known as The Lantern Project. This paper outlines the journey and timeline of The Lantern Project collaboration since its inception and the interplay between the monthly stakeholder meetings and inter-related research projects demonstrating improved outcomes. Transdisciplinary collaboration offers well-grounded benefits and realistic strategies sensitive to the complexity of the aged care setting. © 2018 AJA Inc.

  14. Negotiating end-of-life decision making: a comparison of Japanese and U.S. residents' approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Baback B; Matsumura, Shinji; Etzioni, Shiri; Asch, Steven M; Rosenfeld, Kenneth E; Shiojiri, Toshiaki; Balingit, Peter P; Lorenz, Karl A

    2005-07-01

    To compare Japanese and U.S. resident physicians' attitudes, clinical experiences, and emotional responses regarding making disclosures to patients facing incurable illnesses. From September 2003 to June 2004, the authors used a ten-item self-administered anonymous questionnaire in a cross-sectional survey of 103 internal medicine residents at two U.S. sites in Los Angeles, California, and 244 general medical practice residents at five Japanese sites in Central Honshu, Kyushu, Okinawa, Japan. The Japanese residents were more likely to favor including the family in disclosing diagnosis (95% versus 45%, pguilt about these behaviors. The residents' approaches to end-of-life decision making reflect known cultural preferences related to the role of patients and their families. Although Japanese trainees were more likely to endorse the role of the family, they expressed greater uncertainty about their approach. Difficulty and uncertainty in end-of-life decision making were common among both the Japanese and U.S. residents. Both groups would benefit from ethical training to negotiate diverse, changing norms regarding end-of-life decision making.

  15. Residents of poor nations have a greater sense of meaning in life than residents of wealthy nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Diener, Ed

    2014-02-01

    Using Gallup World Poll data, we examined the role of societal wealth for meaning in life across 132 nations. Although life satisfaction was substantially higher in wealthy nations than in poor nations, meaning in life was higher in poor nations than in wealthy nations. In part, meaning in life was higher in poor nations because people in those nations were more religious. The mediating role of religiosity remained significant after we controlled for potential third variables, such as education, fertility rate, and individualism. As Frankl (1963) stated in Man's Search for Meaning, it appears that meaning can be attained even under objectively dire living conditions, and religiosity plays an important role in this search.

  16. A STUDY ON WORK-LIFE BALANCE OF NURSING STAFF WORKING IN PRIVATE HOSPITALS IN PALAYAMKOTTAI

    OpenAIRE

    G.Suguna; C.Eugine Franco

    2017-01-01

    At present every successful employee has to pass through the dilemma of work life balance in personal and professional life. For the sake of leading a successful life, people do not hesitate to give extra time for achieving the objectives of life. In the process of getting extra mileage in their professional life they have to make a lot of compromise and sometimes mental piece also gets distorted. We have 24 hours at our disposal to deal with and it is up to us how to schedule and plan the sa...

  17. Mortality and hospitalization at the end of life in newly admitted nursing home residents with and without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Katharina; Hoffmann, Falk

    2018-05-02

    The proportion of deaths occurring in nursing homes is increasing and end of life hospitalizations in residents are common. This study aimed to obtain the time from nursing home admission to death and the frequency of hospitalizations prior to death among residents with and without dementia. This retrospective cohort study analyzed claims data of 127,227 nursing home residents aged 65 years and older newly admitted to a nursing home between 2010 and 2014. We analyzed hospitalizations during the last year of life and assessed mortality rates per 100 person-years. Factors potentially associated with time to death were analyzed in Cox proportional hazard models. The median time from nursing home admission to death was 777 and 635 days in residents with and without dementia, respectively. Being male, older age and a higher level of care decreased the survival time. Sex and age had a higher influence on survival time in residents with dementia, whereas level of care was found to have a higher influence in residents without dementia. Half of the residents of both groups were hospitalized during the last month and about 37% during the last week before death. Leading causes of hospitalizations were infections (with dementia: 20.6% vs. without dementia: 17.2%) and cardiovascular diseases (with dementia: 16.6% vs. without dementia: 19.0%). A high proportion of residents with and without dementia are hospitalized shortly before death. There should be an open debate about the appropriateness of hospitalizing nursing home residents especially those with dementia near death.

  18. Resilience and professional quality of life in staff working with people with intellectual disabilities and offending behavior in community based and institutional settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Søndenaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staff in forensic services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID are expected to deal with a wide range of emotional challenges when providing care. The potential impact of this demanding work has not been systematically explored previously. This article explores the professional quality of life (QoL and the resilience (hardiness of the staff in this setting. The Professional QoL questionnaire and the Disposional Resilience Scale were completed by staff (n=85, 80% response rate in the Norwegian forensic service for ID offenders. Responses from staff working in institutional settings were compared to those from staff in local community services. Staff in the local community services had higher resilience scores compared to the staff in the institutional setting, (t=2.19; P<0.05. However in the other QoL and resilience domains there were no differences between the staff in the two settings. The greater sense of resilient control among community staff may be a function of both the number of service users they work with and the institutional demands they face. Even though these participants worked with relatively high risk clients, they did not report significantly impaired quality of life compared to other occupations.

  19. The association of neuropsychiatric symptoms and environment with quality of life in assisted living residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samus, Quincy M; Rosenblatt, Adam; Steele, Cynthia; Baker, Alva; Harper, Michael; Brandt, Jason; Mayer, Lawrence; Rabins, Peter V; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2005-10-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether neuropsychiatric symptoms and environmental characteristics are associated with quality of life in assisted living residents with dementia. We used a cross-sectional study of 134 residents from 22 facilities and employed the Alzheimer's Disease-Related Quality of Life Scale and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. A scale was developed to capture the homelike climate of each facility. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the relationship of neuropsychiatric symptoms and homelike climate with quality of life, controlling for sociodemographics, cognition, functional dependence, and physical health. Exploratory analyses and graphical techniques were employed to test for environmental-level moderating effects. Agitation, depression, apathy, and irritability were significant predictors of quality of life, explaining 29% of the variance. Neither facility size nor homelike environment was significantly associated with quality of life in univariate analyses. Size of facility moderated the relationship between agitation and quality of life. Neuropsychiatric symptoms impair quality of life in residents with dementia. Further research should investigate the role of other environmental aspects.

  20. Life stage differences in resident coping with restart of the Three Mile Island nuclear generating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince-Embury, S.; Rooney, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A study of residents who remained in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) immediately following the restart of the nuclear generating plant revealed that older residents employed a more emotion-focused coping style in the face of this event than did younger residents. Coping style was, however, unrelated to the level of psychological symptoms for these older residents, whereas demographic variables were related. Among younger residents, on the other hand, coping style was related to the level of psychological symptoms, whereas demographic variables were not. Among younger residents, emotion-focused coping was associated with more symptoms and problem-focused coping was associated with fewer symptoms, contradicting previous findings among TMI area residents

  1. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Cetrano, Gaia; Tedeschi, Federico; Rabbi, Laura; Gosetti, Giorgio; Lora, Antonio; Lamonaca, Dario; Manthorpe, Jill; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners.METHODS: Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compas...

  2. PATIENTS WITH END STAGE CANCER: LIFE HISTORY, PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL ASPECTS, RELATIONSHIP WITH THE NURSING STAFF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanete Ribeiro do Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the cancers most feared by women for its high incidence and its psychological effects that affect the perception of sexuality and self-image. Objective: To identify the difficulties of nursing professionals in the treatment of patients with cancer, from the standpoint of a terminally ill patient of breast cancer. Methodology: This is a case study of a patient who is in the terminal stages of breast cancer. We carried out the survey of literature in journals indexed the databases LILACS and SciELO Open Access and English, on terminally ill cancer. Results: Feelings of loneliness and sadness were softened and smoothed by the attitude and disposition of nursing professionals. In moments of intervention needs of physical care, nursing care was provided. Conclusion: The nursing staff has always demonstrated skills in treating patients with cancer, providing quality care, humane and comprehensive, meeting all your needs biopsicoespiritual.

  3. Academic and Resident Radiation Oncologists' Attitudes and Intentions Regarding Radiation Therapy near the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Shane; Dosoretz, Arie P; Yu, James B; Evans, Suzanne B; Decker, Roy H

    2016-02-01

    There has been increasing scrutiny about cancer treatment for patients very near the end of life (EoL), yet a substantial number receive palliative radiation therapy (RT) in this setting. Our aim was to document the attitudes and intentions of thought leaders and trainees in giving RT near the EoL. We distributed an anonymous survey to 473 radiation oncologists and residents. The survey examined the clinical and psychosocial factors considered as well as intentions and expectations in the delivery of RT near the EoL. Factors surrounding unfinished treatment courses, and the formative factors that shape opinions about RT at the EoL were also explored. We received 139 responses (29%). Eighty-nine percent of respondents worked at academic institutions. The factors that respondents most often consider very or extremely important to offer RT near the EoL were the preference of the patient to be treated (94%), the ability to tolerate treatment (88%), and palliative intent (70%). After instances when their patients were unable to complete treatment near the EoL, 42% of respondents said they would prescribe a shorter treatment the next time they see a similar patient. Personal experience (71%) was most often listed as very or extremely important in shaping their opinions about RT near the EoL. Survey respondents, 89% of whom were academic radiation oncologists, have a positive view of palliative RT near the EoL. They favor shorter fractionation for patients near the EoL. Personal experience is most important in shaping practices and attitudes.

  4. Quality of life among residents in a sub-urban area. Case study: Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, Oliver Ling Hoon; Mahbot, Norseha Mohd; Asma Aqmalina Hadzaman, Nur; Azyyati Marzukhi, Marlyana; Abdullah, Jamalunlaili

    2018-02-01

    Along with the sub-urbanisation, people working in urban can stay in the sub-urban areas. Sub-urban housing areas provide cheaper and larger houses and more greenery environment. However, the residents are required to travel in longer distance. The effect on Quality of Life (QOL) due to the migration to sub-urban areas may not be positive even with the better environmental quality and lower direct housing cost. Puncak Alam, a new sub-urban area in Selangor, Malaysia had been chosen as the study area to examine the change of QOL among the residents after they moved into the study area. Through a questionnaire survey, the satisfaction of residents on the various aspects/indicators of QOL were examined. Through the statistical analysis, it is found that slightly more than half of the respondents felt that the QOL was dropped after they were moved to the study area. The sub-urban area did provide better quality for their residents. It had increased respondents’ satisfaction on most of the indicators in the aspects of economic, social and physical. However, due to the decreasing of satisfaction in job opportunities, family life, social activities, safety, and transportation system, most of the respondents were felt that their QOL were dropped.

  5. [Exploring life-experience of the staff and volunteers assisting pediatric patients in end-of-life situations] [Article in Italian] • I vissuti dello staff e dei volontari che assistono pazienti pediatrici terminali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosapia Lauro Grotto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of guidelines for palliative care in the paediatric settings is judged to be still incomplete and characterized by many controversial issues; in order to explore the life-experience of individual health care professionals, we proposed a semi-structured questionnaire with open questions on end-of-life procedures to the staff members of the Paediatric Onco-hematology Ward of the University of Padua, of the Oncology Ward and in the Home Assistance Module of the Giannetta Gaslini Hospital, Genoa, both in Italy. This paper will focus on the responses provided to the third question: “In your opinion, can inducing the suspension of the state of consciousness be counted among end-of-life procedures? If so, how and when?”. Staff members were found to face challenging interactions at at least three levels: within the professional team, with respect to the parents and with respect to the adolescent patients. Among the most complex issues raised by the participants we found the moral distress sometimes experienced by nurses with respect to the decisions assumed by doctors, as stated by a nurse: “Everything is subjective in those 24 hours  (… and you are to do or not do certain things and it makes you feel distressed”. Second, it emerged that the relationship with the parents becomes very challenging when the two are not in agreement: “The father wants to give the morphine, but the mother secretly closes the drip”. Finally, the relationship of trust with the adolescent patients is under threat when they ‘want to know’ while parents seem to be unable to tolerate this degree of painful but essential self-consciousness in their ‘child’: “He locked me in the room and asked, ‘Am I dying?’, and I wanted to die at that point…”. Our study shows that health care professionals require not just guidelines but a tailor-made training and support which integrate much deeply the therapeutic as well as the moral and

  6. Style of Life and Student Personnel Policy in College Residence Halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Julie E.

    1969-01-01

    Doctoral dissertation, Dimensions of Conformity and Evasion in Residence Halls for University Women: A Sociological Analysis of Normative Behavior in a Large-Scale Social Organization, 1962, University of Illinois, Urbana.

  7. Resident reflections on end-of-life education: a mixed-methods study of the 3 Wishes Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centofanti, J; Swinton, M; Dionne, J; Barefah, A; Boyle, A; Woods, A; Shears, M; Heels-Ansdell, D; Cook, D

    2016-03-31

    The objectives of this study were to describe residents' experiences with end-of-life (EOL) education during a rotation in the intensive care unit (ICU), and to understand the possible influence of the 3 Wishes Project. We enrolled dying patients, their families and 1-3 of their clinicians in the 3 Wishes Project, eliciting and honouring a set of 3 wishes to bring peace to the final days of a critically ill patient's life, and ease the grieving process for families. We conducted semistructured interviews with 33 residents who had cared for 50 dying patients to understand their experiences with the project. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, then analysed using a qualitative descriptive approach. 21-bed medical surgical ICU in a tertiary care, university-affiliated hospital. 33 residents participated from internal medicine (24, 72.7%), anaesthesia (8, 24.2%) and laboratory medicine (1, 3.0%) programmes in postgraduate years 1-3. 3 categories and associated themes emerged. (1) EOL care is a challenging component of training in that (a) death in the ICU can invoke helplessness, (b) EOL education is inadequate, (c) personal connections with dying patients is difficult in the ICU and (d) EOL skills are valued by residents. (2) The project reframes the dying process for residents by (a) humanising this aspect of practice, (b) identifying that family engagement is central to the dying process, (c) increasing emotional responsiveness and (d) showing that care shifts, not stops. (3) The project offers experiential education by (a) intentional role modelling, (b) facilitating EOL dialogue, (c) empowering residents to care in a tangible way and (d) encouraging reflection. For residents, the 3 Wishes Project integrated many forms of active learning for residents. Practice-based rather than classroom-based programmes may engage trainees to develop EOL skills transferable to other settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  8. The effects of group reminiscence therapy on depression, self esteem, and life satisfaction of elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Hsing-Yuan; Wu, Chiu-Yen; Jin, Suh-Fen; Chu, Tsung-Lan; Huang, Tzu-Shin; Clark, Mary Jo

    2006-03-01

    The need to provide quality mental health care for elders in nursing home settings has been a critical issue, as the aging population grows rapidly and institutional care becomes a necessity for some elders. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to describe the effect of participation in reminiscence group therapy on older nursing home residents' depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants who met the study criteria. Residents of one ward were assigned to the reminiscence therapy group intervention, while residents of the other ward served as controls. Nine weekly one-hour sessions were designed to elicit reminiscence as group therapy for 12 elders in the experimental group. Another 12 elders were recruited for a control group matched to experimental subjects on relevant criteria. Depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were measured one week before and after the therapy. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 10.0) was used to analyze data. Results indicated that group reminiscence therapy significantly improved self-esteem, although effects on depression and life satisfaction were not significant. Reminiscence groups could enhance elders' social interaction with one another in nursing home settings and become support groups for participants. The model we created here can serve as a reference for future application in institutional care.

  9. Linking Spiritual and Religious Coping With the Quality of Life of Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Magalhães Vitorino BSN, MSc

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study examined the effect of Positive and Negative Spiritual and Religious Coping (SRC upon older Brazilian’s quality of life (QOL. Method: A secondary analysis of data collected from 77 nursing home residents (NHRs; M age = 76.56 and 326 community-dwelling residents (CDRs; M age = 67.22 years was conducted. Participants had completed the Brief SRC, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF and World Health Organization Quality of Life-OLD (WHOQOL-OLD. A General Linear Model regression analysis was undertaken to assess the effects of SRC upon 10 aspects of participants’ QOL. Results: Positive ( F = 6.714, df = 10, p < .001 as opposed to Negative ( F = 1.194, df = 10, p = .294 SRC was significantly associated with QOL. Positive SRC was more strongly associated with NHR’s physical, psychological, and environmental QOL, and their perceived sensory abilities, autonomy, and opportunities for intimacy. Conclusion: Positive SRC behaviors per se were significantly associated with QOL ratings across both study samples. The effect size of Positive SRC was much larger among NHRs across six aspects of QOL. Place of residence (POR in relation to SRC and QOL in older age warrants further study.

  10. [Life quality parameters in prenosologic evaluation of health state in residents of protective measures area near objects of storage and destruction of chemical weapons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, V L; Nechaeva, E N

    2014-01-01

    The article presents results of life quality assessment and subjective evaluation data on health state, used for prenosologic evaluation of health state in residents of protective measures area near objects of storage and destruction of chemical weapons. Considering specific features of residence near potentially dangerous objects, the authors conducted qualitative evaluation of satisfaction with various life facets, with taking into account the objects specificity, established correlation between life quality and self-evaluation of health with factors influencing public health state.

  11. [Quality of working life and burnout among nursing staff in Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Denise Rodrigues Costa; Paladini, Márcia; Biato, Cleonice; Pais, Juliana Domingues; Oliveira, Adelaine Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the quality of working life (QWL) and the presence of burnout among nursing professionals working at Intensive Care Units. The sample was composed of 53 nursing professionals from a university hospital located in the city of Londrina-PR, Brazil. Three instruments were used for data collection: socio-demographic and professional characterization, Visual Analogue Scale for QWL and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data was collected from April to August, 2009. Among the participants, most were auxiliary nurses (52.8%), women (66.0%) and married (67.9%). The average age was of 42.4 years. Regarding assessment of QWL, the average score obtained for the total sample was 71.1 (SD=15.5), showing that workers were satisfied with their QWL. The average for Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment dimensions was 11.4 (SD=7.7), 4.6 (SD=4.1) and 25.0 (SD=5.9), respectively. The QWL for the total sample showed significant association only with Emotional Exhaustion (p=0.000).

  12. Widespread use of internet, applications, and social media in the professional life of urology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Johannes; Borgmann, Hendrik; Baunacke, Martin; Boehm, Katharina; Hanske, Julian; Macneily, Andrew; Meyer, Christian; Nestler, Tim; Schmid, Marianne; Huber, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    Digital media have revolutionized communication and information dissemination in healthcare. We aimed to quantify and evaluate professional digital media use among urology residents. We designed a 17-item survey to assess usage and perceived usefulness of digital media, as well as communication type and device type and distributed it via email to 143 Canadian and 721 German urology residents. In total, 58 (41% response rate) residents from Canada and 170 (24% response rate) from Germany reported professional usage rates of 100% on the internet, 89% on apps, and 46% on social media (SoMe). For professional use, residents spent a median of 30 minutes per day on the internet, 10 minutes on apps, and 15 minutes on SoMe. 100% rated the internet, 89% apps, and 31% SoMe as useful for clinical practice. Most (94%) used digital media for communication with colleagues and 23% for communication with patients. Digital media use was allocated to desktop computers (55%) and mobile devices (45%). Canadian residents had higher usage rates of apps (96% vs. 86%; p=0.042) and SoMe (65% vs. 39%; p=0.002) and longer daily usage times for the internet, apps, and SoMe than German residents (pmedia are an integral part of the daily professional practice of urology residents, reflected by high usage rates and perceived usefulness of the internet and apps, and the growing importance of SoMe. Urologists should strive to progressively exhaust the vast potential of digital media for academic and clinical practice.

  13. Widespread use of internet, applications, and social media in the professional life of urology residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Johannes; Borgmann, Hendrik; Baunacke, Martin; Boehm, Katharina; Hanske, Julian; MacNeily, Andrew; Meyer, Christian; Nestler, Tim; Schmid, Marianne; Huber, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Digital media have revolutionized communication and information dissemination in healthcare. We aimed to quantify and evaluate professional digital media use among urology residents. Methods We designed a 17-item survey to assess usage and perceived usefulness of digital media, as well as communication type and device type and distributed it via email to 143 Canadian and 721 German urology residents. Results In total, 58 (41% response rate) residents from Canada and 170 (24% response rate) from Germany reported professional usage rates of 100% on the internet, 89% on apps, and 46% on social media (SoMe). For professional use, residents spent a median of 30 minutes per day on the internet, 10 minutes on apps, and 15 minutes on SoMe. 100% rated the internet, 89% apps, and 31% SoMe as useful for clinical practice. Most (94%) used digital media for communication with colleagues and 23% for communication with patients. Digital media use was allocated to desktop computers (55%) and mobile devices (45%). Canadian residents had higher usage rates of apps (96% vs. 86%; p=0.042) and SoMe (65% vs. 39%; p=0.002) and longer daily usage times for the internet, apps, and SoMe than German residents (pmedia are an integral part of the daily professional practice of urology residents, reflected by high usage rates and perceived usefulness of the internet and apps, and the growing importance of SoMe. Urologists should strive to progressively exhaust the vast potential of digital media for academic and clinical practice. PMID:29382458

  14. The use of potentially inappropriate medications and changes in quality of life among older nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Aqqad S MH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sana’ MH Al Aqqad, Li Li Chen, Asrul Akmal Shafie, Mohamed Azmi Hassali, Balamurugan Tangiisuran Pharmacy Practice Research Group, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia Background: Nursing home residents are mainly older people with multiple diseases and taking multiple medications. The quality use of medication and its association with health related quality of life (HRQoL have not been reported in Malaysia. This study aims to investigate the association between the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs and the changes observed in the HRQoL among older nursing home residents. Methods: A prospective follow up study was conducted at four nongovernmental organization nursing homes in Penang, Malaysia. Older residents (≥65 years old taking at least one prescribed medication were included. Residents with PIMs were identified by using Screening Tool of Older Person's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP criteria. HRQoL was assessed using EuroQol-5 dimension (EQ-5D and EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS at baseline and after a 3-month follow up. The association of PIMs with HRQoL was analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The median age of the 211 participants was 77 years (interquartile range 72–82 years and the median number of prescription medicines was four (interquartile range three to six. The prevalence of PIMs was 23.7% and 18.6% at baseline and 3 months later, respectively. The most commonly prescribed PIMs in decreasing order were first generation antihistamine, prescriptions of duplicate drug class, glibenclamide with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and anticholinergic to treat extrapyramidal side effects of neuroleptic medications. At baseline, there was no significant difference among residents with or without PIMs in each bracket of EQ-5D, EQ-5D index, or EQ-VAS scores. Comparison of the differences in the mean score index of EQ-5D between baseline and after 3 months

  15. From Leros asylum to community-based facilities: levels of functioning and quality of life among hostel residents in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissi, A; Barry, M M

    1997-01-01

    The pattern of mental health care in Greece is undergoing a major transformation. The Leros Projects I and II supported the development of 13 community hostels located throughout the Greek mainland. These hostels provide residential care to more than 100 former psychiatric inpatients, mainly from Leros asylum. The present study evaluates the impact of the resettlement process on the residents' perceived quality of life (QoL) together with an examination of the residents' psychiatric and behavioural functioning four years after the move from hospital. The target sample (n = 99) comprised of individuals who may be considered 'chronic' psychiatric patients with a long history of institutionalisation and many are socially deprived with few family ties. The residents' functioning profile indicates a range of different levels of abilities. The QoL findings show that the majority of residents (70%) perceived the movement from the traditional hospital regime to the community hostels as being a positive change and expressed their satisfaction (74%) with the new living situation. This study demonstrates that even the most dependent, chronic psychiatric patients in Greece can be maintained in community settings and are able to articulate generally reliable and valid responses concerning the impact of service changes.

  16. Factors Related to Life satisfaction, Meaning of life, Religiosity and Death Anxiety in Health Care Staff and Students: A Cross Sectional Study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Death is beyond one's personal control, generates great concern and anxiety, among human beings. Studies exploring the association between religious attitudes and death attitudes in adolescents and young adults in postmodern society are scarce. This study examines the relationship between five dimensions of attitude toward death (fear of death, death avoidance, neutral acceptance, approach acceptance, and escape acceptance, death anxiety, life satisfaction and meaning, religiosity and selected personal factors among health care staff and students in three teaching hospitals. A total of 230 adolescents and adults both sexes who were willing participated. Diener et al Satisfaction with Life, Steger et al Meaning of Life Questionnaire; Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, Wong's Death Attitude Profile-R and a religious attitude scale were administered. Findings showed students' search for meaning was higher than faculty. An unusual finding of higher Approach acceptance death attitude in students emerged. Correlation analysis revealed that presence of meaning was related to greater life satisfaction in both groups. It was further related to higher religiosity in both groups and higher neutral acceptance of death and lesser death anxiety in students alone. In both groups search for meaning was positively associated with death anxiety. Faculty's search for meaning was positively associated with negative death attitudes and surprisingly one positive death attitude. Death anxiety was more with faculty's advancing age, and was also more when both groups held negative death attitudes. Religiosity was positively associated with death anxiety in students. Further, religiosity was not only positively associated with positive death attitudes of approach acceptance (both groups and neutral acceptance (faculty but also with negative attitude of death avoidance (faculty. Death anxiety was more despite both groups embracing approach acceptance death attitude indicating

  17. Perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms at the end of life : A focus group study of staff members and institutional stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Franziska A; Heckel, Maria; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Adelhardt, Thomas; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2018-03-16

    There is a lack of research into how hospital staff and institutional stakeholders (i. e. institutional representatives from public health authorities, hospital hygiene, and the departments of microbiology, palliative care, and geriatrics) engage with patients who are carriers of multidrug-resistant organisms and receiving end-of-life care. Knowledge of their experiences, workload, and needs should be considered in dealing with hospitalized carriers of multidrug-resistant organisms as well as staff education. This study explored and compared staff members' and stakeholders' perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms and on provision of end-of-life care to carrier patients. In this study four focus groups consisting of hospital staff members and institutional stakeholders were formed within a mixed-methods parent study in a palliative care unit at a university clinic and a geriatric ward of a Catholic and academic teaching hospital. Participants discussed results from staff and stakeholder interviews from a former study phase. Data were analyzed according to Grounded Theory and perspectives of staff members and institutional stakeholders were compared and contrasted. Key issues debated by staff members (N = 19) and institutional stakeholders (N = 10) were 1) the additional workload, 2) reasons for uncertainty about handling carrier patients, 3) the format of continuing education, and 4) the preferred management approach for dealing with multidrug-resistant organism carrier patients. Although similar barriers (e. g. colleagues' ambiguous opinions) were identified, both groups drew different conclusions concerning the management of these barriers. While institutional stakeholders recommended making decisions on hygiene measures under consideration of the specific patient situation, staff members preferred the use of standardized hygiene measures which should be applied uniformly to all patients. Staff members and institutional stakeholders

  18. ALARM, a life saving training program for inpatient mental health care staff. Tallinn, Estland (27-30 augustus 2014) : Oral presentation European Symposium on Suicide and Suicidal Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienke Kool

    2014-01-01

    Oral presentation European Symposium on Suicide and Suicidal Behaviour. Titel: ALARM, a life saving training program for inpatient mental health care staff. Tallinn, Estland (27-30 augustus 2014) Introduction Despite precautions, suicide does happen. Sometimes patients are found while attempting

  19. Examining the Transition to a Four-Day School Week and Investigating Post-Change Faculty/Staff Work-Life Balance: A Community College Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    This single descriptive embedded case study examined the process of implementing a four-day work/school week at a community college and investigated post-change faculty/staff work-life balance. All of the students attending this college live at home. The change was implemented due to state funding shortfalls, increasing college utility expenses…

  20. Adaptation of the Recent Life Changes Questionnaire (RLCQ) to measure stressful life events in adults residing in an urban megapolis in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artani, Azmina; Bhamani, Shireen Shehzad; Azam, Iqbal; AbdulSultan, Moiz; Khoja, Adeel; Kamal, Ayeesha K

    2017-05-05

    Contextually relevant stressful life events are integral to the quantification of stress. None such measures have been adapted for the Pakistani population. The RLCQ developed by Richard Rahe measures stress of an individual through recording the experience of life changing events. We used qualitative methodology in order to identify contextually relevant stressors in an open ended format, using serial in-depth interviews until thematic saturation of reported stressful life events was achieved. In our next phase of adaptation, our objective was to scale each item on the questionnaire, so as to weigh each of these identified events, in terms of severity of stress. This scaling exercise was performed on 200 random participants residing in the four communities of Karachi namely Kharadar, Dhorajee, Gulshan and Garden. For analysis of the scaled tool, exploratory factor analysis was used to inform structuring. Finally, to complete the process of adaption, content and face validity exercises were performed. Content validity by subject expert review and face validity was performed by translation and back translation of the adapted RLCQ. This yielded our final adapted tool. Stressful life events emerging from the qualitative phase of the study reflect daily life stressors arising from the unstable socio-political environment. Some such events were public harassment, robbery/theft, missed life opportunities due to nepotism, extortion and threats, being a victim of state sponsored brutality, lack of electricity, water, sanitation, fuel, destruction due to natural disasters and direct or media based exposure to suicide bombing in the city. Personal or societal based relevant stressors included male child preference, having an unmarried middle aged daughter, lack of empowerment and respect reported by females. The finally adapted RLCQ incorporated "Environmental Stress" as a new category. The processes of qualitative methodology, in depth interview, community based scaling and

  1. [Work satisfaction, quality of life and leisure time of residents at the Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheba, Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Asaf; Perry, Zvi; Reuveni, Haim; Toker, Asaf

    2009-02-01

    Work dissatisfaction among physicians worldwide continues to rise over the last few decades, mainly due to declining professional prestige, tack of self fulfillment, time pressure and tack of leisure time. Physicians' burnout is a major result of dissatisfaction, causing doctors to leave the medical profession, and to provide lower quality of care. To examine the work satisfaction, quality of life and leisure time of residents in the Soroka University Medical Center. A validated questionnaire was delivered during the second half of 2004 to 252 residents in the Soroka University Medical Center The data was analyzed using the SPSS 12 for windows program. Descriptive analysis, parametric Students' T Test [where pleisure time. Further attention must be given to these matters--a step which will eventually improve patient care, and delay, to some extent, the burnout of physicians.

  2. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes . Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC).

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A SIX SIGMA RATING SCALE FOR MEASURING THE QUALITY OF WORK LIFE OF TEACHING STAFF WORKING IN SAUDI UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Vijay Subbarayalu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education institutions in Saudi Arabia is currently performing several evaluations by both students and teaching staff as a measure to improve the quality by understanding the perception of its stakeholders. In order to retain the best and efficient work force to carry out the teaching roles in these universities, the Quality of Work Life (QoWL prevailing in these Educational institutions needs to be studied. Accordingly, this study was conducted among the teaching staff of the University of Dammam [UOD] to capture their experiences related to various aspects of the QoWL. The teaching staff opinion was captured through a pre-tested QoWL questionnaire and the data were analyzed through six sigma analytical tool using the Poisson distribution model. From the non-conformance level captured through the responses from the faculty/teaching staff about the various aspects of quality of work life prevailing in their respective colleges, the corresponding sigma rating for each component of QoWL was calculated. Subsequently, an innovative six point quality rating system was established for each sigma values. The overall opinion of teaching staff about the QoWL prevailing at UOD is rated as "Adaptable" signifying that there is room for further improvement and appropriate strategies need to be employed to improve it.

  4. The use of potentially inappropriate medications and changes in quality of life among older nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aqqad, Saná M H; Chen, Li Li; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Nursing home residents are mainly older people with multiple diseases and taking multiple medications. The quality use of medication and its association with health related quality of life (HRQoL) have not been reported in Malaysia. This study aims to investigate the association between the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and the changes observed in the HRQoL among older nursing home residents. A prospective follow up study was conducted at four nongovernmental organization nursing homes in Penang, Malaysia. Older residents (≥65 years old) taking at least one prescribed medication were included. Residents with PIMs were identified by using Screening Tool of Older Person's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria. HRQoL was assessed using EuroQol-5 dimension (EQ-5D) and EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) at baseline and after a 3-month follow up. The association of PIMs with HRQoL was analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. The median age of the 211 participants was 77 years (interquartile range 72-82 years) and the median number of prescription medicines was four (interquartile range three to six). The prevalence of PIMs was 23.7% and 18.6% at baseline and 3 months later, respectively. The most commonly prescribed PIMs in decreasing order were first generation antihistamine, prescriptions of duplicate drug class, glibenclamide with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and anticholinergic to treat extrapyramidal side effects of neuroleptic medications. At baseline, there was no significant difference among residents with or without PIMs in each bracket of EQ-5D, EQ-5D index, or EQ-VAS scores. Comparison of the differences in the mean score index of EQ-5D between baseline and after 3 months also showed no statistically significant differences. PIMs were found to be relatively common among older nursing home residents. However, no significant changes were observed in HRQoL among these residents. Further studies with a bigger sample size and

  5. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Roman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003 were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well.

  6. Quality of Life of the Elderly Residing in Zahedan (South East of Iran

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    Maryam Seraji

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: In the study conducted it was found that the quality of life among the elderly was moderate and that the status of social performance was better than their physical health. It was also found that there was no significant relationship between educational level and quality of life. It was found that the quality of life was low, especially in elderly women; hence more attention needs to be paid to them.

  7. Hipocrates (2014. Real life of a resident at a public hospital

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    Emilio PINTOR HOLGUIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It describes Benjamin´s first weeks of work as a new resident of Internal Medicine in a public hospital in Paris. Next to him, an experienced Algerian physician; Abdel, performs his practices of validation. Main problems with these two doctors are described: doubts, decision making, camaraderie, bioethical and liability problems as well as problems derived from public health system budgets. All mixed with short ironic and comic scenes that sometimes reach surrealism.

  8. The relationship between workplace violence, perceptions of safety, and Professional Quality of Life among emergency department staff members in a Level 1 Trauma Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Darcy; Henry, Melissa

    2018-02-02

    Emergency department staff members are frequently exposed to workplace violence which may have physical, psychological, and workforce related consequences. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between exposure to workplace violence, tolerance to violence, expectations of violence, perceptions of workplace safety, and Professional Quality of Life (compassion satisfaction - CS, burnout - BO, secondary traumatic stress - STS) among emergency department staff members. A cross-sectional design was used to survey all emergency department staff members from a suburban Level 1 Trauma Centre in the western United States. All three dimensions of Professional Quality of Life were associated with exposure to non-physical patient violence including: general threats (CS p = .012, BO p = .001, STS p = .035), name calling (CS p = .041, BO p = .021, STS p = .018), and threats of lawsuit (CS p = .001, BO p = .001, STS p = .02). Tolerance to violence was associated with BO (p = .004) and CS (p = .001); perception of safety was associated with BO (p = .018). Exposure to non-physical workplace violence can significantly impact staff members' compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Greater attention should be paid to the effect of non-physical workplace violence. Additionally, addressing tolerance to violence and perceptions of safety in the workplace may impact Professional Quality of Life. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral health-related quality of life and prosthetic status of nursing home residents with or without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Anna-Luisa; Hassel, Alexander Jochen; Schröder, Johannes; Rammelsberg, Peter; Zenthöfer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the effect of prosthetic status on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of nursing home residents with or without dementia. The study was performed in 14 nursing homes across the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. All eligible participants were included, and general and medical information and information about their dental and prosthetic statuses were collected. The Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) was administered to evaluate OHRQoL. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) served to classify participants into living or not living with dementia according to the established cutoff value for dementia (MMSE health was also similar in both groups ( P >0.05). The number of teeth (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0), the type of prosthetic status (OR: 6.5), and denture-related treatment needs (OR: 2.4) were the major factors significantly affecting OHRQoL ( P nursing home residents is substantially compromised. Several prosthetic treatment needs for residents living with or without dementia were identified. Edentulism without tooth replacement and having <5 teeth resulted in an increased risk of substantially compromised OHRQoL. Further studies should be conducted to determine whether improvements in prosthetic status can increase OHRQoL.

  10. Home visits by family physicians during the end-of-life: Does patient income or residence play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Grace

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a growing trend for those with advanced cancer to die at home, there is a corresponding increase in need for primary medical care in that setting. Yet those with lower incomes and in rural regions are often challenged to have their health care needs met. This study examined the association between patient income and residence and the receipt of Family Physician (FP home visits during the end-of-life among patients with cancer. Methods Data Sources/Study Setting. Secondary analysis of linked population-based data. Information pertaining to all patients who died due to lung, colorectal, breast or prostate cancer between 1992 and 1997 (N = 7,212 in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia (NS was extracted from three administrative health databases and from Statistics Canada census records. Study Design. An ecological measure of income ('neighbourhood' median household income was developed using census information. Multivariate logistic regression was then used to assess the association of income with the receipt of at least one home visit from a FP among all subjects and by region of residency during the end-of-life. Covariates in the initial multivariate model included patient demographics and alternative health services information such as total days spent as a hospital inpatient. Data Extraction Methods. Encrypted patient health card numbers were used to link all administrative health databases whereas the postal code was the link to Statistics Canada census information. Results Over 45% of all subjects received at least one home visit (n = 3265. Compared to those from low income areas, the log odds of receiving at least one home visit was significantly greater among subjects who reside in middle to high income neighbourhoods (for the highest income quintile, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15, 1.64; for upper-middle income, adjusted OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.02, 1.39; for middle income

  11. Latitude of residence and position in time zone are predictors of cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and life expectancy at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenkov, Mikhail F

    2011-03-01

    According to the hypothesis of circadian disruption, external factors that disturb the function of the circadian system can raise the risk of malignant neoplasm and reduce life span. Recent work has shown that the functionality of the circadian system is dependent not only on latitude of residence but also on the region's position in the time zone. The purpose of the present research was to examine the influence of latitude and time zone on cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and life expectancy at birth. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was carried out on residents of 59 regions of the European part of the Russian Federation (EPRF) using age-standardized parameters (per 100,000) of cancer incidence (CI), cancer mortality (CM), and life expectancy at birth (LE, yrs) as dependent variables. The geographical coordinates (latitude and position in the time zone) of the regions were used as independent variables, controlling for the level of economic development in the regions. The same analysis was carried out for LE in 31 regions in China. Latitude was the strongest predictor of LE in the EPRF population; it explained 48% and 45% of the variability in LE of women and men, respectively. Position within the time zone accounted for an additional 4% and 3% variability of LE in women and men, respectively. The highest values for LE were observed in the southeast of the EPRF. In China, latitude was not a predictor of LE, whereas position in the time zone explained 15% and 18% of the LE variability in women and men, respectively. The highest values of LE were observed in the eastern regions of China. Both latitude and position within the time zone were predictors for CI and CM of the EPRF population. Latitude was the best predictor of stomach CI and CM; this predictor explained 46% and 50% of the variability, respectively. Position within the time zone was the best predictor of female breast CM; it explained 15% of the variability. In most cases, CI and CM increased

  12. General cognitive status among Baby boomers and pre-boomers in Taiwan: the interplay between mid-life socioeconomic status and city residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Chi

    2017-05-25

    This study seeks to assess the interaction between mid-life socioeconomic status (SES) and city residence on the cognitive status of Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers in Taiwan, a non-Western society with a distinct cultural and family context, taking apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene polymophism and life stressors into consideration. The data used was from the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study (SEBAS) collected in Taiwan during 2006, this involved 1245 individuals from 23 communities and used multilevel regression. General cognitive status was assessed by ten questions via personal interviews. The questions were part of the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, a 10-item free-recall and immediate recall test. Mid-life SES was defined by education and major mid-life occupation of the participant and/or their partner. Mid-life SES was positively associated with cognitive status among both Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers, even after adjusting for APOE polymorphism and stressor covariates. For Baby Boomers, city residents were more likely than town residents to show better cognition (β = 1.47, p interaction effect between mid-life SES and city residence was observed (β = -2.12, p < 0.01). While both the Baby Boomer and pre-Boomer cohorts who lived with a partner were reported better cognition, the effects of depressive symptoms and ethnicity differed by cohort. Having a high level of mid-life SES and living with a partner are associated with better cognition for both cohort groups. An interplay effect between mid-life SES and place of residence on cognition was only found for Baby Boomers. On the other hand, being psychologically depressed was associated with poorer cognition among pre-Boomers. These results underscore the specific roles of mid-life SES, city residence, and life stressors with regard to the cognitive status of Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers in Taiwan.

  13. Classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses in end-of-life care for health and social care staff: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, David; Jackson, Georgina; O'Brien, Terri; Yates, Sue; Duxbury, Joy

    2013-03-01

    Staff from a range of health and social care professions report deficits in their knowledge and skills when providing end-of-life and palliative care, and education and training has been advocated at a range of levels. To review the literature related to classroom-based and distance learning education and training initiatives for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care, in terms of their target audience, extent, modes of delivery, content and teaching and learning strategies, and to identify the most effective educational strategies for enhancing care. A systematic review of the literature evaluating classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care. Online databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO between January 2000 and July 2010. Studies were selected that discussed specific education and training initiatives and included pre-and post-test evaluation of participants' learning. 30 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority reported successful outcomes, though there were some exceptions. Level of prior experience and availability of practice reinforcement influenced learning. Participative and interactive learning strategies were predominantly used along with discussion of case scenarios. Multi-professional learning was infrequently reported and service user and carer input to curriculum development and delivery was reported in only one study. Classroom-based education and training is useful for enhancing professionals' skills and perceived preparedness for delivering end-of-life care but should be reinforced by actual practice experience.

  14. Differences in health-related quality of life between older nursing home residents without cognitive impairment and the general population of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Natvig, Gerd Karin; Eide, Geir Egil; Clipp, Elizabeth C; Bondevik, Margareth; Nortvedt, Monica W; Nygaard, Harald A

    2008-05-01

    To advance the understanding of health-related quality of life among older nursing home residents by assessing their health-related quality of life and comparing this with norms from the general population. The study used a two-group cross-sectional comparative design. The samples comprised 227 nursing home residents aged 65-102 years with at least six months' residence and a representative population sample of 1137 Norwegian citizens aged 65-102 years. All nursing home residents had a Clinical Dementia Rating Scale score > or =0.5 and were capable of conversing. The respondents provided demographic information and were surveyed using the SF-36 Health Survey. We used univariate and multivariate linear models to identify possible differences in health-related quality of life between the nursing home residents and the general population, controlled for age, sex, marital status and education. After adjustment for age, group, sex, marital status and education, the nursing home residents scored significantly higher on bodily pain and on physical and emotional role limitation and significantly lower on the other SF-36 subscales, except social functioning, with the largest differences for physical functioning (mean nursing home 23.2 and mean general population 62.9). The general population scores on all subscales generally increased with increasing education but not among the nursing home residents. The mean SF-36 scale scores differed markedly between the nursing home residents and the general population, with the nursing home residents generally scoring lower. The association with background variables known to be related to health-related quality of life differed between the groups. Healthcare professionals should increase attention to health-related quality of life among nursing home residents, periodically assess health-related quality of life and consider interventions that may improve health-related quality of life in older institutionalised populations. This study

  15. Staff preparedness for providing palliative and end-of-life care in long-term care homes: Instrument development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Helen Yl; Chun, Gloria Km; Man, C W; Leung, Edward Mf

    2018-05-01

    Although much attention has been on integrating the palliative care approach into services of long-term care homes for older people living with frailty and progressive diseases, little is known about the staff preparedness for these new initiatives. The present study aimed to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument for measuring care home staff preparedness in providing palliative and end-of-life care. A 16-item instrument, covering perceived knowledge, skill and psychological readiness, was developed. A total of 247 staff members of different ranks from four care homes participated in the study. Exploratory factor analysis using the principal component analysis extraction method with varimax rotation was carried out for initial validation. Known group comparison was carried out to examine its discriminant validity. Reliability of the instrument was assessed based on test-retest reliability of a subsample of 20 participants and the Cronbach's alpha of the items. Exploratory factor analysis showed that the instrument yielded a three-factor solution, which cumulatively accounted for 68.5% of the total variance. Three subscales, namely, willingness, capability and resilience, showed high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. It also showed good discriminant validity between staff members of professional and non-professional groups. This is a brief, valid and reliable scale for measuring care home staff preparedness for providing palliative and end-of-life care. It can be used to identify their concerns and training needs in providing palliative and end-of-life care, and as an outcome measure to evaluate the effects of interventional studies for capacity building in this regard. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 745-749. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff...... members were interviewed about the residents' activities of Daily Living, behavioural problems, orientation in surroundings and communication skills, and asked if the resident had an organic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that most strongly determined staff assessment...... as under-labelling of residents, a tendency that will affect communication with medical personnel and may lead to inadequate or wrong medical treatment and to negative performance as well as negative role expectations in everyday life in nursing homes....

  17. Effect of workload on quality of work life among staff of the teaching hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (2014

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    S. Marzban

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of work life is the reaction of employees to their work specially the individual results at work and mental health that affects their personal experience and work results. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of workload on quality of work life in staff of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Methods: This analytical study was conducted in 530 staff of four hospitals affiliated to the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences that were selected by Cochrane sampling method during 2014. The measurement tools were demographic questionnaire, Walton's quality of work life questionnaire (including 32 questions and eight dimensions, and the NASA TLX workload scale. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean scores of quality of work life and workload were 48.21±13.34 and 64.70±11.44, respectively. There was negative significant correlation between workload and quality of work life (r= -0.0161. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that high workload is one of the most important factors of reduced quality of work life that can be reduced through proper organization and planning.

  18. Explaining the Relationship between Empowerment and Work Life Quality: A Case Study on the Staff of Social Security Hospital of Zahedan city

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    Zanyar Sheikhepoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of work life has an important role in increasing labor productivity and consequently the efficiency and effectiveness of large organizations. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between empowerment (as the independent variables and the quality of work life of employees (as the dependent variable. Method:This study was conducted in a descriptive correlated manner; the population consisted of the Zahedan city hospital’s nursing staff (n=132 selected using accessible sampling methods. They filled out the empowerment and quality of work life questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaires was confirmed through Cronbach’s alpha; furthermore, the questionnaires were prepared with a high content validity and construct validity. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression test. Results: The results showed that empowerment and its factors (sense of independence, sense of effectiveness, feeling of being meaningful and trusted among colleagues at 99% confidence level and feeling of competence at 95% confidence level had a significant positive correlation with the quality of their working life. Second, empowerment factors predicted 29% of the variance in employees’ quality of work life. Conclusion: Considering the obtained results, it is recommended that to empower their employees more than ever, the managers try more to promote them, have more skillful staff, and help employees experience working life quality .

  19. Permanent resident

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    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  20. Older adults' attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life: a pilot study interviewing residents of two continuing care communities

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    Walter Louise C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individualized decision making has been recommended for cancer screening decisions in older adults. Because older adults' preferences are central to individualized decisions, we assessed older adults' perspectives about continuing cancer screening later in life. Methods Face to face interviews with 116 residents age 70 or over from two long-term care retirement communities. Interview content included questions about whether participants had discussed cancer screening with their physicians since turning age 70, their attitudes about information important for individualized decisions, and their attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life. Results Forty-nine percent of participants reported that they had an opportunity to discuss cancer screening with their physician since turning age 70; 89% would have preferred to have had these discussions. Sixty-two percent believed their own life expectancy was not important for decision making, and 48% preferred not to discuss life expectancy. Attitudes about continuing cancer screening were favorable. Most participants reported that they would continue screening throughout their lives and 43% would consider getting screened even if their doctors recommended against it. Only 13% thought that they would not live long enough to benefit from cancer screening tests. Factors important to consider stopping include: age, deteriorating or poor health, concerns about the effectiveness of the tests, and doctors recommendations. Conclusion This select group of older adults held positive attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life, and many may have had unrealistic expectations. Individualized decision making could help clarify how life expectancy affects the potential survival benefits of cancer screening. Future research is needed to determine whether educating older adults about the importance of longevity in screening decisions would be acceptable, affect older adults

  1. Hollywood's Representations of College Women and the Implications for Housing and Residence Life Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara; Donahoo, Saran

    2015-01-01

    Students enter college with preconceived ideas about what their experience of college life will be like. Since the first Hollywood film about college, movies have contributed to society's perceptions of what it means to be a college student. Contrary to the images promoted by higher education marketing departments, Hollywood's portrayals…

  2. Acute empathy decline among resident physician trainees on a hematology-oncology ward: an exploratory analysis of house staff empathy, distress, and patient death exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Malone, Adriana K; Roth, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    A reason for empathy decline during medical training has not been fully elucidated. Empathy may decrease acutely during an inpatient hematology-oncology rotation because of the acuity of death exposures. This study aimed to explore physician trainee empathy, distress, death exposures, and their attributed meaning for the trainee. Internal medicine interns and residents at a single academic center were evaluated before and after hematology-oncology ward rotations using Interpersonal Reactivity Index for empathy, previously cited reasons for empathy decline, Impact of Event Scale-Revised for distress, death exposures (no. of dying patients cared for) and attributed sense of meaning (yes/no) (post-rotation). Fifty-six trainees completed both pre-rotation and post-rotation questionnaires (58% response). Empathy averaged 58.9 (SD 12.0) before and 56.8 (SD 11.1) after the rotation (2.1 point decrease) (p = 0.018). Distress was elevated but did not change significantly during the rotation. Residents cared for 4.28 dying patients. Seventy-three percent reported that death was the most stressful event during the rotation, yet 68% reported that they derived a sense of meaning from caring for dying patients. Empathy and distress scales were positively correlated before the rotation (r = 0.277, p = 0.041) but not after (r = .059, p = 0.69). This study suggests that an acute drop in empathy can occur over several weeks in residents rotating through inpatient hematology-oncology, similar to empathy decline associated with years of training in other studies. Empathy decline may be associated with elevated distress and death exposures on the hematology-oncology ward and should be explored further in other medical training environments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Simulation-Based Program to Train Medical Residents to Lead and Perform Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela S.; Belforti, Raquel K.; Langlois, Gerard; Rothberg, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical residents are often responsible for leading and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation; however, their levels of expertise and comfort as leaders of advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) teams vary widely. While the current American Heart Association ACLS course provides education in recommended resuscitative protocols, training in leadership skills is insufficient. In this article, we describe the design and implementation in our institution of a formative curriculum aimed at improving residents’ readiness for being leaders of ACLS teams using human patient simulation. Human patient simulation refers to a variety of technologies using mannequins with realistic features, which allows learners to practice through scenarios without putting patients at risk. We discuss the limitations of the program and the challenges encountered in implementation. We also provide a description of the initiation and organization of the program. Case scenarios and assessment tools are provided. Description of the Institutional Training Program Our simulation-based training curriculum consists of 8 simulated patient scenarios during four 1-hour sessions. Postgraduate year–2 and 3 internal medicine residents participate in this program in teams of 4. Assessment tools are utilized only for formative evaluation. Debriefing is used as a teaching strategy for the individual resident leader of the ACLS team to facilitate learning and improve performance. To evaluate the impact of the curriculum, we administered a survey before and after the intervention. The survey consisted of 10 questions answered on a 5-point Likert scale, which addressed residents’ confidence in leading ACLS teams, management of the equipment, and management of cardiac rhythms. Respondents’ mean presimulation (ie, baseline) and postsimulation (outcome) scores were compared using a 2-sample t test. Residents’ overall confidence score improved from 2.8 to 3.9 (P simulation-based training

  4. A Study to Assess Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Hand Hygiene amongst Residents and Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Health Care Setting of Bhopal City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Kaore, Navin Chandra M; Ramnani, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Borle, Amod; Kaushal, Rituja

    2014-08-01

    Infection due to hospital-acquired microbes is an evolving problem worldwide, and horizontal transmission of bacterial organism continues to cause a high nosocomial infection rate in health care settings. Most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of health care workers.The application of hand hygiene is effective in reducing infection rates. To assess the level of knowledge and attitude regarding hand hygiene practices amongst the health care professionals and to identify areas of gaps in their knowledge and attitude. A cross-sectional study. A total 160 respondents were studied about their knowledge and attitude towards hand hygiene practices and significant difference with a p-value of 0.0025 was observed regarding most frequent source of germs responsible for health care associated infections among resident and nurses. A significant difference with p-value of 0.0001 & 0.04 was observed in colonization due to jewellery and artificial nail among the study groups. The attitude regarding correct hand hygiene practices to be followed at all times was found to be better among nurses (62.5%) as compared to residents (21.3%) which was found to be highly significant with p-value hand hygiene practices among the health care workers to provide the current knowledge in the area with a behavioral change in attitudes and practices leading to reduction of nosocomial infections.

  5. Length of stay for older adults residing in nursing homes at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne; Conell-Price, Jessamyn; Covinsky, Kenneth; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Chang, Anna; Boscardin, W John; Smith, Alexander K

    2010-09-01

    To describe lengths of stay of nursing home decedents. Retrospective cohort study. The Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative survey of U.S. adults aged 50 and older. One thousand eight hundred seventeen nursing home residents who died between 1992 and 2006. The primary outcome was length of stay, defined as the number of months between nursing home admission and date of death. Covariates were demographic, social, and clinical factors drawn from the HRS interview conducted closest to the date of nursing home admission. The mean age of decedents was 83.3 ± 9.0; 59.1% were female, and 81.5% were white. Median and mean length of stay before death were 5 months (interquartile range 1-20) and 13.7 ± 18.4 months, respectively. Fifty-three percent died within 6 months of placement. Large differences in median length of stay were observed according to sex (men, 3 months vs women, 8 months) and net worth (highest quartile, 3 months vs lowest quartile, 9 months) (all P home lengths of stay are brief for the majority of decedents. Lengths of stay varied markedly according to factors related to social support. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Resident Support for Tourism Development in Rural Midwestern (USA) Communities: Perceived Tourism Impacts and Community Quality of Life Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Pin Yu; Shu Tian Cole; Charles Chancellor

    2018-01-01

    Local residents play an important role in the process of sustainable development in tourism. Resident support for tourism development contributes to the health of tourism industry and successful community development. Therefore, it is in the best interest of local residents, the tourism industry, and tourists, that residents have a positive outlook on and positive experiences with tourism development. In order to understand resident support for tourism development from tourism impacts and com...

  7. Japan's policy of promoting end-of-life care in nursing homes: impact on facility and resident characteristics associated with the site of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of the policy to encourage nursing homes to provide end-of-life care by comparing facility and resident variables associated with dying within the nursing home and not in hospitals, and by comparing life sustaining treatment (LST) respectively provided. Questionnaires mailed to an 11% random sample of 653 nursing homes in 2009. Facility characteristics from 371 nursing homes (57%) and resident characteristics of the 1158 who had been discharged due to death were obtained from 241 facilities (37%). Facility characteristics related to dying in nursing homes were their policy of providing end-of-life care and physicians being based in home care supporting clinics. Resident characteristics related were not having pneumonia as the cause of death, the family's preference of the nursing home as the site of death and agreement within the family. Preferences on the use of LST were adhered more in residents who had died in nursing homes. Although the percentage of residents dying within the facility has increased, the nursing home as a site of death still composes only 3.2% of the total. To increase the latter, nursing homes should refocus their function to providing end-of-life care to those not preferring aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impacts of Tourism Development on Stakeholders\\' Quality of Life (QOL): A comparison between community residents and employed residents in the hospitality and tourism industry

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Eunju

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to determine the relationship between the effects of tourism and stakeholders\\' quality of life. Specifically, the research investigates stakeholders\\' perception of the impact of tourism on their life domains, their satisfaction with life domains, and their overall life satisfaction. The relationships among these three components are examined. Depending on the types of stakeholders, their perceptions of and attitudes toward the impact of tourism and q...

  9. Enhancing pediatric safety: assessing and improving resident competency in life-threatening events with a computer-based interactive resuscitation tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Catherine; Gaca, Ana M.; Frush, Donald P.; Ancarana, Anjanette; Hohenhaus, Sue; Seelinger, Terry A.; Frush, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Though rare, allergic reactions occur as a result of administration of low osmolality nonionic iodinated contrast material to pediatric patients. Currently available resuscitation aids are inadequate in guiding radiologists' initial management of such reactions. To compare radiology resident competency with and without a computer-based interactive resuscitation tool in the management of life-threatening events in pediatric patients. The study was approved by the IRB. Radiology residents (n=19; 14 male, 5 female; 19 certified in basic life support/advanced cardiac life support; 1 certified in pediatric advanced life support) were videotaped during two simulated 5-min anaphylaxis scenarios involving 18-month-old and 8-year-old mannequins (order randomized). No advance warning was given. In half of the scenarios, a computer-based interactive resuscitation tool with a response-driven decision tree was available to residents (order randomized). Competency measures included: calling a code, administering oxygen and epinephrine, and correctly dosing epinephrine. Residents performed significantly more essential interventions with the computer-based resuscitation tool than without (72/76 vs. 49/76, P<0.001). Significantly more residents appropriately dosed epinephrine with the tool than without (17/19 vs. 1/19; P<0.001). More residents called a code with the tool than without (17/19 vs. 14/19; P = 0.08). A learning effect was present: average times to call a code, request oxygen, and administer epinephrine were shorter in the second scenario (129 vs. 93 s, P=0.24; 52 vs. 30 s, P<0.001; 152 vs. 82 s, P=0.025, respectively). All the trainees found the resuscitation tool helpful and potentially useful in a true pediatric emergency. A computer-based interactive resuscitation tool significantly improved resident performance in managing pediatric emergencies in the radiology department. (orig.)

  10. Variation in Spring Nearshore Resident Fish Species Composition and Life Histories in the Lower San Joaquin Watershed and Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing freshwater to human populations while protecting or rehabilitating ecosystem health is a significant challenge to water resource managers and requires accurate knowledge of aquatic resources. Previous studies of fish assemblages in the San Francisco Estuary and watershed have focused on specific habitat types, water bodies, or geographic subregions. In this study, we use seining data from two monitoring programs to provide an integrated view of spring nearshore resident fish species composition and life history characteristics in five regions: the San Joaquin River, the upper Sacramento River, the lower Sacramento River, the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (North Delta, and the Interior Delta. Data for the period March-May from 1994 to 2002, showed that spring species composition of the San Joaquin River was very different from the other four regions. Total catch in the San Joaquin River was dominated by small, short-lived batch spawning alien species (93%, particularly red shiner Cyprinella lutrensis (>75% of total catch. The upper and lower Sacramento River were very similar in species composition and life history characteristics and less dominated by alien fish (

  11. Effect of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program on Cafeterias and on Manager and Staff Member Knowledge and Practice, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari-Thapa, Janani; Bennett, Ashley; Keong, Farrah; Palmer, Wendy; Hardy, Trisha; Welsh, Jean

    The goal of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program is to promote healthy eating in school cafeterias in Georgia by training school nutrition managers and staff members to implement changes in the cafeteria to nudge children to make healthier choices. The objective of our study was to evaluate program effect on (1) school nutrition manager and staff member knowledge of evidence-based strategies and their self-efficacy to make positive changes, (2) the school cafeteria environment, and (3) National School Lunch Program participation. We assessed changes in participant knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy by administering a survey before and after training (February-July 2015); a follow-up survey (3 school months posttraining) assessed changes in the cafeteria. A total of 842 school nutrition managers and staff members were trained and completed pre- and posttraining surveys; 325 managers completed the follow-up survey. We used cafeteria records from a subsample of the first schools trained (40 intervention and 40 control) to assess National School Lunch Program participation. From pretraining to posttraining, we found a significant increase in manager and staff member (n = 842) knowledge of strategies for enhancing taste perception through the use of creative menu item names (from 78% to 95%, P managers (n = 325) reported increased use of evidence-based serving strategies: visibility (from 84% to 96% for placing healthy options in >2 locations, P managers and staff members in Smarter Lunchrooms Movement techniques may be an effective way to make changes in the school cafeteria environment to encourage healthier choices among students. Additional studies allowing time for more complex changes to be implemented are needed to assess the full effect of the program.

  12. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  13. Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Fadi T; Deckelbaum, Dan; Sauve, Alexandre; Khwaja, Kosar; Razek, Tarek; Fata, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training. We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions. Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life. The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Person-centered care and engagement via technology of residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anita M Y; Loi, Samantha M; Westphal, Alissa; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-12-01

    Touchscreen technology (TT) is a resource that can improve the quality of life of residents with dementia, and care staff, in residential aged care facilities (RACF) through a person-centered care approach. To enable the use of TTs to engage and benefit people with dementia in RACFs, education is needed to explore how these devices may be used, what facilitates use, and how to address barriers. We sought to provide education and explore RACF staff views and barriers on using TT to engage their residents with dementia. An educational session on using TT with residents with dementia was given to staff from three long-term RACFs in Melbourne, Australia. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 17 staff members (personal care attendants, registered nurses, enrolled nurses, allied health clinicians, and domestic staff) who attended were administered questionnaires pre- and post-sessions. As a result of the education seminar, they were significantly more confident in their ability to use TT devices with residents. TT, and education to staff about its use with residents with dementia, is a useful strategy to enhance RACF staff knowledge and confidence, thereby enhancing the use of technology in RACFs in order to improve care standards in people with dementia.

  15. Does Recognition of Meaning in Life Confer Resiliency to Suicide Ideation Among Community-Residing Older Adults? A Longitudinal Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Marnin J; Flett, Gordon L

    2016-06-01

    To test a theoretical model of the onset and/or exacerbation of late-life suicide ideation, incorporating consideration of risk, resiliency, and precipitating factors. A longitudinal study investigating whether recognition of meaning in life (MIL) at baseline confers resiliency to the onset and/or exacerbation of suicide ideation over a 6- to 22-month period of follow-up, controlling for baseline depression, self-rated health, and physical functioning, and for frequency and intensity of intervening daily hassles. Mental health research offices in an urban academic health sciences center. 173 community-residing older adults (mean: 73.9 years, SD: 6.1 years, range: 65-93 years) recruited from health, wellness, and interest programs, and from newspaper ads and flyers posted in London, Ontario, a mid-sized Canadian city. A total of 126 (73%) completed follow-up assessments. Participants completed a demographics form, a cognitive screen, and measures of suicide ideation and of risk (depressive symptom severity, self-rated health problems, and physical functioning) and potential resiliency (recognition of MIL) factors at baseline and follow-up assessment points, and a measure of intervening daily hassles. MIL at baseline was negatively associated with the onset and/or exacerbation of suicide ideation over time, controlling for risk factors and intervening precipitating factors. The extent and relative significance of this finding differed with the manner in which MIL and suicide ideation were operationalized. Study findings add to a growing body of knowledge suggesting that MIL may play an important role in promoting mental health and well-being and potentially conferring resiliency to contemplations of suicide in later life. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The dialectical movement between deprivation and preservation of a person's life space: A question of nursing home residents' dignity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæteren, Berit; Tolo Heggestad, Anne Kari; Høy, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to answer the question "What do nursing home residents do themselves in order to maintain their dignity?" Twenty-eight residents, 8 men and 20 women, aged 62 to 103 years, from 6 different nursing homes in Scandinavia were interviewed. The results showed that the residents...

  17. University life and pandemic influenza: Attitudes and intended behaviour of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacIntyre C Raina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a pandemic young adults are more likely to be infected, increasing the potential for Universities to be explosive disease outbreak centres. Outbreak management is essential to reduce the impact in both the institution and the surrounding community. Through the use of an online survey, we aimed to measure the perceptions and responses of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009 at a major university in Sydney, Australia. Methods The survey was available online from 29 June to 30 September 2009. The sample included academic staff, general staff and students of the University. Results A total of 2882 surveys were completed. Nearly all respondents (99.6%, 2870/2882 were aware of the Australian pandemic situation and 64.2% (1851/2882 reported either "no anxiety" or "disinterest." Asian-born respondents were significantly (p Conclusions Responses to a pandemic are subject to change in its pre-, early and mid-outbreak stages. Lessons for these institutions in preparation for a second wave and future disease outbreaks include the need to promote positive public health behaviours amongst young people and students.

  18. Attitudes toward euthanasia, assisted suicide and termination of life-sustaining treatment of Puerto Rican medical students, medical residents, and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Rivera, J; Rodríguez, R; Otero Igaravidez, Y

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the opinion of Puerto Rican medical students, residents and internal medicine faculty as to the appropriateness of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide and end-of-life management. Survey using a 16-item questionnaire answered within a two-month period in the fall of 1996. Rounds or faculty meetings at teaching hospitals located in the north, south and southwest of the island of Puerto Rico. There were 424 participants. The questionnaires of 279 medical students, 75 medical residents, and 35 internal medicine faculty members were analyzed. Thirty-five questionnaires, which were incomplete or answered by non-Puerto Rican participants, were excluded. Frequency of support of active euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment with informed consent was determined. Whether it was ethical to prescribe full doses of drugs needed to alleviate pain even if it would hasten death, or agree to limit or restrict resources for the terminally ill was also determined. Forty per cent of the students, 33% of the residents, and 20% of the faculty supported euthanasia. If physician-assisted suicide were legalized, 50 per cent of the students, 43 per cent of the residents and 45 percent of the faculty would not be opposed to it. Sixty-eight per cent of the students, 67 per cent of the residents and 88 per cent of the faculty would support withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment for dying patients with informed consent. Seventy-nine per cent of residents, 80 per cent of the faculty but only 54 per cent of medical students would prescribe full doses of drugs needed to alleviate pain in dying patients even if they would hasten death. Thirty-six per cent of the residents and faculty would agree to limit the use of medical resources for the terminally ill but only sixteen per cent of medical students would do so. The acceptance of euthanasia was inversely proportional to the clinical experience of the respondents: 40

  19. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetrano, Gaia; Tedeschi, Federico; Rabbi, Laura; Gosetti, Giorgio; Lora, Antonio; Lamonaca, Dario; Manthorpe, Jill; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2017-11-21

    Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners. Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction, and the Quality of Working Life Questionnaire. The latter was used to collect socio-demographics, occupational characteristics and 13 indicators of quality of working life. Multiple regressions controlling for other variables were undertaken to predict Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction. Four hundred questionnaires were completed. In bivariate analyses, experiencing more ergonomic problems, perceiving risks for the future, a higher impact of work on life, and lower levels of trust and of perceived quality of meetings were associated with poorer outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed that (a) ergonomic problems and impact of work on life predicted higher levels of both Compassion Fatigue and Burnout; (b) impact of life on work was associated with Compassion Fatigue and lower levels of trust and perceiving more risks for the future with Burnout only; (c) perceived quality of meetings, need of training, and perceiving no risks for the future predicted higher levels of Compassion Satisfaction. In order to provide adequate mental health services, service providers need to give their employees adequate ergonomic conditions, giving special attention to time pressures. Building trustful relationships with management and within the teams is also crucial. Training and meetings are other important targets for potential improvement. Additionally, insecurity about the future should be addressed as it can affect both Burnout and Compassion Satisfaction. Finally

  20. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Cetrano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners. Methods Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction, and the Quality of Working Life Questionnaire. The latter was used to collect socio-demographics, occupational characteristics and 13 indicators of quality of working life. Multiple regressions controlling for other variables were undertaken to predict Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction. Results Four hundred questionnaires were completed. In bivariate analyses, experiencing more ergonomic problems, perceiving risks for the future, a higher impact of work on life, and lower levels of trust and of perceived quality of meetings were associated with poorer outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed that (a ergonomic problems and impact of work on life predicted higher levels of both Compassion Fatigue and Burnout; (b impact of life on work was associated with Compassion Fatigue and lower levels of trust and perceiving more risks for the future with Burnout only; (c perceived quality of meetings, need of training, and perceiving no risks for the future predicted higher levels of Compassion Satisfaction. Conclusions In order to provide adequate mental health services, service providers need to give their employees adequate ergonomic conditions, giving special attention to time pressures. Building trustful relationships with management and within the teams is also crucial. Training and meetings are other important targets for potential improvement. Additionally, insecurity about the future should be addressed as it can

  1. Needs and challenges of daily life for people with Down syndrome residing in the city of Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, M; Biasini, G; Calignano, M T; Celani, G; De Grossi, G; Digilio, M C; Fermariello, C C; Loffredo, G; Luchino, F; Marchese, A; Mazotti, S; Menghi, B; Razzano, C; Tiano, C; Zambon Hobart, A; Zampino, G; Zuccalà, G

    2011-08-01

    Population-based surveys on the quality of life of people with Down syndrome (DS) are difficult to perform because of ethical and legal policies regarding privacy and confidential information, but they are essential for service planning. Little is known about the sample size and variability of quality of life of people with DS living in the city of Rome, which has a population of 2.7 million inhabitants. The aim of the present study is to explore the needs and challenges in health, social integration and daily life, of people with DS living in Rome. A cross-sectional, census-based survey was conducted in 2006. All family doctors (3016 in total) of the National Health Service were involved by the Statistical Bureau of the Municipality of Rome. As per the census, every resident citizen is registered with a family doctor and every person with disabilities is coded. Associations for Down Syndrome encouraged their members to participate in the research. Questionnaires were completed by families of people with DS, in accordance with privacy laws. An initial survey, conducted via a letter and a telephone contact with family doctors, identified 884 people with DS residing in the city of Rome. Data on the medical and social conditions of 518 people with DS, ranging in age from 0 to 64 years, were collected. Some 88% of these were living with their original family; 82.1% had one or more siblings, and 19.5% had lost one or both parents. A full 100% of children with DS were enrolled in the public school system. This ensures that they are fully occupied and entirely integrated in society. After secondary school there is a lack of opportunities. Thus, only 10% of adults were working with a regular contract. A mere 42.2% of people with DS aged 25-30 were involved in some form of regular activity (although not always on a daily basis). After the age of 30, the percentage of people demonstrating decline in function increased sharply, while disability-related support decreased. In

  2. A Study Identifying and Validating Competencies Needed for Mid-Managers That Work in Housing and Residence Life at Colleges and Universities in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Hassel Andre

    2016-01-01

    The researcher identified a gap in the knowledge of competencies needed for midmanagers that work in housing and residence life at the southeast colleges and universities in the United States. The purpose of this study was to identify and develop a consensus on competencies needed by mid-managers. The review of the literature describes and…

  3. The Determinants of Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents with Young-Onset Dementia and the Differences between Dementia Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelhof, Britt; Bakker, C.; Van Duinen-van den Ijssel, Jeannette C L; Zwijsen, Sandra A; Smalbrugge, Martin; Verhey, Frans R. J.; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopnnans, Raymond T. C. M.

    Aims: The aims of this study are to (1) explore the determinants of quality of life (QoL) in nursing home residents with young-onset dementia (YOD), (2) investigate whether there are differences between dementia subtypes (Alzheimer dementia, vascular/mixed dementia, frontotemporal dementia, other)

  4. Patterns of dignity-related distress at the end of life: a cross-sectional study of patients with advanced cancer and care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sue; Davies, Joanna M; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-10-01

    To provide effective palliative care in different settings, it is important to understand and identify the sources of dignity-related distress experienced by people nearing the end of life. To describe and compare the sources of dignity-related distress reported by cancer patients and care home residents. Secondary analysis of merged data. Participants completed the Patient Dignity Inventory (assessing 25 sources of dignity-related distress) and measures of quality of life and depression. A total of 45 adult patients with advanced cancer referred to hospital-based palliative care teams in London, United Kingdom, and 60 residents living in one of 15 care homes in London. Care home residents were older and had poorer functioning. Both groups reported a wide range of dignity-related problems. Although the number or problems reported on the Patient Dignity Inventory was similar for the two groups (mean (standard deviation): 5.9 (5.5) for cancer patients and 4.1 (4.3) for care home residents, p = 0.07), there was a tendency for more cancer patients to report some existential problems. Experiencing physically distressing symptoms and functional limitations were prevalent problems for both groups. Patient Dignity Inventory problems were associated with poorer performance status and functioning for residents, with age and cognitive impairment for cancer patients and with poorer quality of life and depression for both groups. Although characteristics of the samples differed, similarities in the dignity-related problems reported by cancer patients and care home residents support research suggesting a common pathway towards death for malignant and non-malignant disease. A wider understanding of the sources of dignity-related distress would help clinicians provide more effective end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charice S. Chan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQL for nursing home residents is important, however, the concept of quality of life is broad, encompasses many domains and is difficult to assess in people with dementia. Basic activities of daily living (ADL are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS and Functional Independence Measure (FIM instrument. We examined the relationship between HRQL and ADL to assess the future possibility of ADL dependency level serving as a surrogate measure of HRQL in residents with dementia. To assess ADL, measures derived from the RAI-MDS and FIM data were gathered for 111 residents at the beginning of our study and at 6-month follow-up. Higher scores for independence in ADL were correlated with higher scores for a disease-specific HRQL measure, the Quality of Life—Alzheimer’s Disease Scale. Preliminary evidence suggests that FIM-assessed ADL is associated with HRQL for these residents. The associations of the dressing and toileting items with HRQL were particularly strong. This finding suggests the importance of ADL function in HRQL. The RAI-MDS ADL scales should be used with caution to evaluate HRQL.

  6. Modeling and evaluating evidence-based continuing education program in nursing home dementia care (MEDCED)--training of care home staff to reduce use of restraint in care home residents with dementia. A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testad, Ingelin; Mekki, Tone Elin; Førland, Oddvar; Øye, Christine; Tveit, Eva Marie; Jacobsen, Frode; Kirkevold, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a tailored 7-month training intervention "Trust Before Restraint," in reducing use of restraint, agitation, and antipsychotic medications in care home residents with dementia. This is a single-blind cluster randomized controlled trial in 24 care homes within the Western Norway Regional Health Authority 2011-2013. From 24 care homes, 274 residents were included in the study, with 118 in the intervention group and 156 in the control group. Use of restraint was significantly reduced in both the intervention group and the control group despite unexpected low baseline, with a tendency to a greater reduction in the control group. There was a significant reduction in Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory score in both the intervention group and the follow-up group with a slightly higher reduction in the control group, although this did not reach significance and a small nonsignificant increase in use of antipsychotics (14.1-17.7%) and antidepressants (35.9-38.4%) in both groups. This study reports on the statistically significant reduction in use of restraint in care homes, both prior and during the 7-month intervention periods, in both intervention and control groups. When interpreted within the context of the current climate of educational initiatives to reduce restraint and a greater focus on the importance of person-centered care, the study also highlights the potential success achieved with national training programs for care staff and should be further evaluated to inform future training initiatives both in Norway and internationally. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Hydration and nutrition at the end of life: a systematic review of emotional impact, perceptions, and decision-making among patients, family, and health care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, M I; Shand, B; Bonati, P; Palma, A; Maldonado, A; Taboada, P; Nervi, F

    2012-09-01

    Decrease in oral intake, weight loss, and muscular weakness in the last phases of a terminal illness, particularly in the context of the cachexia-anorexia syndrome, can be an important source of anxiety for the triad of patient, family, and health staff. The present literature review examines the emotional impact of reduced oral intake as well as perceptions and attitudes toward assisted nutrition and hydration for terminally ill patients(1) at the end of life, among patients, family, and health care staff. We have identified the ways in which emotional and cultural factors influence decision-making about assisted nutrition and hydration. Lack of information and misperceptions of medically assisted nutrition and hydration can play a predominant role in the decision to begin or suspend nutritional or hydration support. Our literature review reveals that these social, emotional, and clinical misperception elements should be considered in the decision-making processes to help the triad develop functional forms of care at this final stage of life. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A population-based study on health-related quality of life among urban community residents in Shenyang, Northeast of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tian; Ding, Yan-wei; Sun, Yan; He, Yi-Ni; Qi, Dian-Jun; Wu, Ying; Wu, Bin; Lang, Lang; Yu, Kai; Zhao, Xin; Zhu, Liang-liang; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Xiao-Song

    2015-09-19

    Due to the rising standard of living environment and advances in public health and medical care in China, it has been a tendency in recent years that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been increasingly acknowledged in community health management. However, large-scale population-based study on evaluating HQRoL in northeast of China was not conducted. This article aims to investigate the HRQoL in community residents in Northeast China and explore the associated factors. Stratified multiple-stage sampling method was used in the cross-sectional survey to investigate HRQoL of community residents in northeast of China. Univariate analysis and multiple linear regressions were used to analyze the factors associated to HRQoL of the community residents. The results were confirmed that HRQoL in general population was well performed for the first time in northeast of China in a large scale population. Community residents had better mental health than physical health. The factors influencing HRQoL included gender, age, educational level, marital status, ethnic group, chronic disease status, having breakfast frequency weekly and sleep quality. However, drinking and smoking habits did not affect residents' HRQoL. In this study, the result of the large-scale survey was satisfactory in northeast of China, providing HRQoL status of community residents. Policies on specific health management in community public health would emphasize on lifestyle behaviors especially eating habits in order to improving HRQoL.

  9. The role of social relationships among elderly community-dwelling and nursing-home residents: findings from a quality of life study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scocco, Paolo; Nassuato, Mario

    2017-07-01

    In Western countries, older adults' needs are often managed through institutionalization. Based on the assumption that quality of life, particularly social relationships, may be perceived differently according to residential setting, the aims of this study were to compare World Health Organization Quality of Life brief version (WHOQOL-BREF) scores of elderly community-dwelling residents and nursing home residents. A sample of 207 older adults (135 community-dwelling residents, 72 nursing home residents) was evaluated with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), WHOQOL-BREF, and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Nursing home residents achieved lower WHOQOL-BREF scores on the physical health scale only (P = 0.002). In a linear regression model, physical score correlated negatively with GDS score (P = 0.0001) and Mini-Mental State Examination score (P = 0.04), but positively with male gender (P = 0.02) and community-dwelling residence (P = 0.001); psychological score correlated negatively with GDS score (P = 0.0001) and being married (P = 0.03), but positively with male gender (P = 0.009) and being unmarried (P = 0.03). The social relationships score correlated negatively with the GDS score (P = 0.0001) and male gender (P = 0.02), but positively with high education level (P = 0.04). The environment score negatively correlated with GDS score (P = 0.0001). In a logistic regression model, living in a nursing home correlated with female gender (P = 0.001), age (P = 0.0001), a lower physical score (P = 0.0001), and a higher social relationships score (P = 0.02). Depressive symptoms correlated with low scores in all WHOQOL-BREF domains. The variables that correlated with living conditions in a nursing home were older age, male gender, lower physical domain scores, and higher social relationship scores. Opportunities for socialization in nursing homes may thus improve perception of quality of life in this domain. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  10. Psychiatry residents in a milieu participatory democracy: a resident's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersten, D

    1978-11-01

    Psychiatry residents respond with a variety of coping mechanisms to the lack of traditional structure in a milieu participatory democracy. To incorporate themselves into the system they must accept such democratic ideals as equality among staff and patients, group decision making, and free self-expression and give up some of their traditional ideas about staff and patient roles, treatment modalities, and the therapeutic environment. The author was a first-year resident in psychiatry on a university hospital inpatient therapeutic community; he discusses the conflicts between residents, who often adopt a "we-they" attitude, and the permanent staff, whose protectiveness of the ward community reflects their personal commitment to its ideals.

  11. Quality of life and educational benefit among orthopedic surgery residents: a prospective, multicentre comparison of the night float and the standard call systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrai, Ali; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Stojimirovic, Dan; Schemitsch, Emil H; Yee, Albert; Kraemer, William

    2011-02-01

    Given recent evolving guidelines regarding postcall clinical relief of residents and emphasis on quality of life, novel strategies are required for implementing call schedules. The night float system has been used by some institutions as a strategy to decrease the burden of call on resident quality of life in level-1 trauma centres. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in quality of life, work-related stressors and educational experience between orthopedic surgery residents in the night float and standard call systems at 2 level-1 trauma centres. We conducted a prospective cohort study at 2 level-1 trauma hospitals comprising a standard call (1 night in 4) group and a night float (5 14-hour shifts [5 pm-7 am] from Monday to Friday) group for each hospital. Over the course of a 6-month rotation, each resident completed 3 weeks of night float. The remainder of the time on the trauma service consists of clinical duties from 6:30 am to 5:30 pm on a daily basis and intermittent coverage of weekend call only. Residents completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) general quality-of-life questionnaire, as well as questionnaires on stress level and educational experience before the rotation (baseline) and at 2, 4 and 6 months. We performed an analysis of covariance to compare between-group differences using the baseline scores as covariates and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests (nonparametric) to determine if the residents' SF-36 scores were different from the age- and sex-matched Canadian norms. We analyzed predictors of resident quality of life using multivariable mixed models. Seven residents were in the standard call group and 9 in the night float group, for a total of 16 residents (all men, mean age 35.1 yr). Controlling for between-group differences at baseline, residents on the night float rotation had significantly lower role physical, bodily pain, social function and physical component scale scores over the 6-month observation period. Compared

  12. Staff assignment practices in nursing homes: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna; Straker, Jane K; Manning, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    Consistent assignment, whereby nursing home staff members, particularly certified nurse aides, are assigned to the same residents on most shifts, is increasingly viewed as a cornerstone of culture change in nursing homes. It has been advocated as a best-care model that increases residents' quality of life while contributing to a more stable frontline staff. Given these potential benefits, consistent assignment is now widely viewed as superior to rotating assignment, an alternative staffing model that aims to distribute care burden more fairly among staff and ensure that workers are familiar with most residents. Despite favorable anecdotal reports about the benefits of consistent assignment, the research literature reports mixed and sometimes contradictory findings for this staffing practice. This article reviews the research pertaining to staff assignment practices in nursing homes. Reviewed here are 13 reports on experimental trials (6 reports), evaluation research (4 reports), and nursing home surveys (3 reports). The review reveals broad diversity in staffing practices and raises questions that challenge popular assumptions about consistent assignment. The article closes with a discussion of the research, policy, and practice implications of the research findings.

  13. The effect of quality circles on job satisfaction and quality of work-life of staff in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Karampourian, Arezou; Beiranvand, Shoorangiz; Pournia, Yadollah

    2013-10-01

    Quality circles, as a participatory management technique, offer one alternative for dealing with frustration and discontent of today's workers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of implementation of quality circles on nurses' quality of work-life and job satisfaction. In this study, two emergency medical services (EMS) of Hamedan province were selected and randomly assigned as the experimental and control groups. After the experimental group was trained and quality circles were established in this group, the levels of quality of work-life and job satisfaction were measured in the two groups. Then, the statistical analyses were performed using t-test. After the intervention, the results showed significant differences between the scores of motivational factors (p=0.001), the total scores of job satisfaction (p=0.003), and the scores of some quality of work life (QWL) conceptual categories including the use and development of capacities (p=0.008), the total space of life (p=0.003), and the total scores of QWL (p=0.031) in the experimental group compared to those in the control group. This study confirms the effectiveness of quality circles in improving quality of work-life and job satisfaction of nurses working in EMS, and offers their application as a management method that can be used by EMS managers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Postural stability and quality of life after guided and self-training among older adults residing in an institutional setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuunainen E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Eeva Tuunainen,1 Jyrki Rasku,1 Pirkko Jäntti,2 Päivi Moisio-Vilenius,3 Erja Mäkinen,3 Esko Toppila,4 Ilmari Pyykkö1 1Department of Otolaryngology, Section of Hearing and Balance Research Unit, University of Tampere and University Hospital of Tampere, Finland; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Hatanpää City Hospital, Tampere, Finland; 3Koukkuniemi Residential Home, Tampere, Finland; 4Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: To evaluate whether rehabilitation of muscle force or balance improves postural stability and quality of life (QoL, and whether self-administered training is comparable with guided training among older adults residing in an institutional setting. Patients and methods: A randomized, prospective intervention study was undertaken among 55 elderly patients. Three intervention groups were evaluated: a muscle force training group; a balance and muscle force training group; and a self-administered training group. Each group underwent 1-hour-long training sessions, twice a week, for 3 months. Postural stability was measured at onset, after 3 months, and after 6 months. Time-domain-dependent body sway variables were calculated. The fall rate was evaluated for 3 years. General health related quality of life (HRQoL was measured with a 15D instrument. Postural stability was used as a primary outcome, with QoL and falls used as secondary outcomes. Results: Muscle force trainees were able to undertake training, progressing towards more strenuous exercises. In posturography, the number of spiky oscillations was reduced after training, and stationary fields of torque moments of the ankle increased, providing better postural stability in all groups; in particular, the zero crossing rate of weight signal and the number of low variability episodes in the stabilogram were improved after training. While no difference was found between different training groups in posturography outcomes, a reduction of fall rate

  15. Health outcomes and quality of life of residents of shared-housing arrangements compared to residents of special care units - results of the Berlin DeWeGE-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Ostermann, Karin; Worch, Andreas; Fischer, Thomas; Wulff, Ines; Gräske, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    To compare different health outcomes as well as quality of life (QoL) between people with dementia living in shared-housing arrangements (SHA) and special care units (SCU) in nursing homes. Often situated in large apartments in mostly urban settings, SHA are a specific German kind of small-scale living facilities for older care-dependent persons, predominantly suffering from dementia. SHA are completely disconnected from traditional nursing homes. In a longitudinal design, all new residents of SHA and SCU suffering with dementia in Berlin were surveyed for one year. They were assessed when they moved into the SHA or SCU and again 6 and 12 months later. We surveyed physical and psychological health outcomes including ADL-functioning (Barthel), neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia (NPI) and challenging behaviour (Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory) as well as QoL (Qualidem). Fifty-six persons (43 women, 13 men) were recruited into the longitudinal study. The average age was 82·5 years at admission, participants mostly had a moderate level of cognitive impairment (mean Mini Mental State Examination = 13·3), prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms was high. During the one-year follow-up, analyses show a significant decrease in cognitive abilities but also of neuropsychiatric symptoms in both groups. In SHA, QoL increases on average during the one-year study period. Both types of facilities attract slightly different populations according to our data. Comparison of SHA residents to SCU residents documented no significant beneficial effects of settings in terms of health outcomes. As no clear advantage of either SHA or SCU in nursing homes can be demonstrated for residents with dementia who move in newly, it is impossible to give a clear evidence-based recommendation and the decision for one setting or the other can be made according solely to personal preference of the resident. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  17. Creating a Learning Environment to Promote Food Sustainability Issues in Primary Schools? Staff Perceptions of Implementing the Food for Life Partnership Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Orme

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the role that schools can play in promoting education for sustainable development (ESD, and evidence is emerging that schools can be influential in the emerging agenda around the ecological, ethical and social aspects of food, diet and nutrition. With regard to such food sustainability issues, this paper analyses the role of the Food for Life Partnership national programme in supporting garden and farm-based learning activities in 55 primary schools in England, UK. Using a mixed methods approach, the study examined the programme’s implementation through staff perceptions and a range of school change indicators. The study found that the programme delivery was associated with widespread institutional reforms. According to staff, implementation of the programme provided a range of opportunities for pupils to learn about food production and sustainability, but addressing these issues was challenging for teachers and raised a number of questions concerned with effective, equitable and on-going implementation. At a pedagogical level, teachers also reflected on conceptually challenging aspects of food sustainability as a topic for primary school education. The study identified ways that ESD programmes could support schools to think about and implement learning opportunities as well as identifying significant barriers related to resourcing such programmes.

  18. The prevalence of urinary incontinence and its impact on quality of life among the university female staff in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Skaal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary incontinence (UI is a common problem among females and has been associated with significant decreased quality of  life. Few  women  seek  help  for  this  condition  with  only  a  few  who consult physiotherapy treatment.Purpose: To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence and its impact on quality of life among the university women in South Africa.Method:  A  quantitative  cross-sectional  study design  with  145  women  ran-domly selected from the university. A questionnaire was used to determine UI Diagnosis; Impact on Qol and treatment seeking tendencies. BMI was meas-ured objectively. ethical clearance was obtained from University. Data was analysed using SPSS 17.0Results:  Forty  six(32%  women  reported  to  having  UI.  Risk  factors  associated  with  UI  included  age,  race,  and  obesity. UI had a significant negative impact on quality of life and only 4.4% of participants with UI consulted physio-therapy for this condition.Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of UI among the women at this university with a significant impact on quality of life.The role of Physiotherapy in management of UI has been demonstrated and there is therefore a need to empower women with non-invasive treatment options, like physiotherapy.

  19. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  20. [Motivation and satisfaction of residents in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, T; Buxel, H; Benzing, F

    2010-08-01

    To address the increasing shortage of qualified residents, which leads to further discontent and additional on-call rotations for the remaining physicians, an analysis of the current situation was performed. Stress in the daily working routine, not enough free time, too little pay, or too little compensatory time off for overtime as well as inadequate options for continuing education were reported to be the main elements of dissatisfaction. The economic pressure of day-to-day work continues to define the physician's role and places demands on the medical staff by burdening them with nonmedical and administrative tasks.The major causes mentioned were staff shortage and lack of support provided by supervisors and the administration. For this reason, human resource development should be considered a strategic and central goal. This requires a normative, cross-functional approach at all levels of management and inclusion of personnel departments in the strategic processes of the hospital. The most important aspects for resident satisfaction were the work environment, acceptable work-life balance and remuneration, compensation for overtime, and quality of available continuing education, which is often rated as being insufficient.Effective strategies to improve the motivation of residents comprise offering opportunities for structured continuing education, optimizing the everyday work processes, and involving employees in social networks. The establishment of feedback strategies, including recognition of residents' achievements, will help to ensure their loyalty and identification with their clinic. This can serve as a preventive measure to offset any potential willingness to change jobs.

  1. Exploring innovative solutions for quality of life and care of bed-ridden nursing home residents through codesign sessions

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, Mart; Dooremalen, A.M.C.; Overdiep, R.A.; Nieboer, M.E.; Eyck, A.M.E.; Van Gorkom, P.J.L.M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E.L.M.; Aarts, S.; Vissers-Luijcks, C.; Van Der Voort, C.S.; Moonen, M.J.G.A.; Van De Vrande, H.A.; Van Dijck-Heinen, C.J.M.L.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study i...

  2. Exploring Innovative Solutions for Quality of Life and Care of Bed-Ridden Nursing Home Residents through Codesign Sessions

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, M. H.; Dooremalen, A. M. C.; Overdiep, R. A.; Nieboer, M. E.; Eyck, A. M. E.; van Gorkom, P. J. L. M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E. L. M.; Aarts, S.; Vissers-Luijcks, C.; van der Voort, C. S.; Moonen, M. J. G. A.; van de Vrande, H. A.; van Dijck-Heinen, C. J. M. L.; Wouters, E. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study i...

  3. Effects of supervised whole body vibration exercise on fall risk factors, functional dependence and health-related quality of life in nursing home residents aged 80+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barbosa, Francisco; del Pozo-Cruz, Jesús; del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Alfonso-Rosa, Rosa M; Rogers, Michael E; Zhang, Yanxin

    2014-12-01

    To test the feasibility and effectiveness of whole-body vibration (WBV) therapy on fall risk, functional dependence and health-related quality of life in nursing home residents aged 80+ years. Twenty-nine 80-95 years old volunteers, nursing home residents were randomized to an eight-week WBV intervention group) (n=15) or control group (n=14). Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test. Lower limb performance was evaluated using the 30-s Chair Sit to Stand (30-s CSTS) test. Postural stability was measured using a force platform. The Barthel Index was used to assess functional dependence and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate Health-Related Quality of Life. All outcome measures were assessed at baseline and at a follow-up after 8 weeks. At the 8-week follow up, TUG test (p<0.001), 30-s CSTS number of times (p=0.006), EQ-5Dmobility (p<0.001), EQ-5DVAS (p<0.014), EQ-5Dutility (p<0.001) and Barthel index (p=0.003) improved in the WBV intervention group when compared to the control group. An 8-week WBV-based intervention in a nursing home setting is effective in reducing fall risk factors and quality of life in nursing home residents aged 80+. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Does the care dependency of nursing home residents influence their health-related quality of life?-A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabali, Manuela; Ostermann, Thomas; Jeschke, Elke; Dassen, Theo; Heinze, Cornelia

    2013-03-11

    Studies on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are missing for nursing home residents independent from their health conditions or interventions after admission. Our aim was to analyse if the care dependency of nursing home residents influence their HRQOL and to describe HRQOL of nursing home residents at the time of admission. Eleven German nursing homes were randomly selected for a cross-sectional multicentre study from April 2008 until December 2009. HRQOL was measured with the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) in the six domains "Physical Mobility", "Energy", "Pain", "Social Isolation", "Emotional Reaction" and "Sleep". Domain scores range from zero (good subjective health status) to 100 (poor subjective health status). Care dependency was evaluated using the Care Dependency Scale, age, sex, cognitive status and diseases were documented by the research assistants. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to quantify the influence of care dependency on HRQOL. 120 residents were included in total. HRQOL was mostly reduced in the domains "Physical Mobility" and "Energy" (mean scores >43.0), while impairment differences in the domains "Pain", "Social Isolation", "Emotional Reaction" and "Sleep" were only moderate (≤25.0). HRQOL was not influenced by the age. Women (n = 85) had a significantly poorer HRQOL in the domain "Pain" than men (mean score women: 29.5 ± 31.5; males: 14.9 ± 17.2; p = 0.011). Care dependency had an influence on the domain "Sleep" (ß = -0.195, p = 0.031), while the other domains were not influenced by care dependency. Residents with a low care dependency scored significantly lower (better HRQOL) in the domain "Sleep" than residents with a high care dependency (mean score 15.3; SD ± 19.0 versus mean score 32.8 SD ± 33.2; p dependency has no influence on the HRQOL from the nursing home residents' perspective apart from the domain "Sleep". High care dependency residents have a lower HRQOL in the

  5. Self rating of health is associated with stressful life events, social support and residency in East and West Berlin shortly after the fall of the wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, T; Schaub, R; Hiestermann, A; Kirschner, W; Robra, B P

    2000-08-01

    To compare the health status and factors influencing the health of populations that had previously lived under different political systems. Cross sectional health and social survey using postal interviews. The relation between self reported health and psychosocial factors (stressful life events, social support, education, health promoting life style and health endangering behaviour) was investigated. To determine East-West differences a logistic regression model including interaction terms was fitted. East and West Berlin shortly after reunification 1991. Representative sample of 4430 Berlin residents aged 18 years and over (response rate 63%). Of all respondents, 15.4% rated their health as unsatisfactory. Residents of East Berlin rated their health more frequently as unsatisfactory than residents of West Berlin (Or(age adjusted)= 1.29, 95%CI 1.08, 1.52), these differences occurred predominantly in the over 60 years age group. Logistic regression showed significant independent effects of stressful life events, social support, education, and health promoting life style on self rated health. The effects of education and health promoting life style were observed to be more pronounced in the western part of Berlin. Old age and female sex showed a stronger association with unsatisfactory health status in the eastern part of Berlin. For subjects aged over 60 years there was evidence that living in the former East Berlin had an adverse effect on health compared with West Berlin. The impact of education and a health promoting lifestyle on self rated health seemed to be weaker in a former socialist society compared with that of a Western democracy. This study supports an "additive model" rather than a "buffering model" in explaining the effects of psychosocial factors on health.

  6. Exploring Innovative Solutions for Quality of Life and Care of Bed-Ridden Nursing Home Residents through Codesign Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Hoof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden residents. This exploration was conducted through a combination of participatory action research with user-centred design involving 56 professional stakeholders in interactive work sessions. This study identified numerous design solutions, both concepts and products that are available on the marketplace and that on a higher level relate to improvements in resident autonomy and the supply of technological items and architectural features. The methodology chosen can be used to explore the creative potential of stakeholders from the domain of healthcare in product innovation.

  7. Effect of Residence in Temporary Housing After the Great East Japan Earthquake on the Physical Activity and Quality of Life of Older Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Nobuaki; Urabe, Yukio; Onoda, Shuichi; Maeda, Noriaki; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the physical activity level and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between older survivors residing in temporary housing after the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE; temporary housing group) and older individuals residing in their own homes (control group) and to clarify whether mobility function and muscle strength were correlated with physical activity among older temporary housing residents. Subjects were recruited to the temporary housing group (n=64, 19 men and 45 women) or control group (n=64, 33 men and 31 women) according to their residence. Physical activity was assessed by the number of walking steps determined by using a triaxial accelerometer, mobility function by the Timed Up and Go test, muscle strength by the grasping power test, and HRQOL by the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form Survey v2. In the temporary housing group, reduced physical activity and correlation between physical activity and mobility function in men, and muscle strength in both men and women, were observed. There was no significant difference in HRQOL between groups except for bodily pain in women. Support for older evacuees should focus on maintaining their physical activity level as well as on HRQOL to avoid deterioration of health in these survivors. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:701-710).

  8. Correlation between Health Correlates and Quality of Working Life in the Staff of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mafi mahvash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Quality of working life (QWL is an important issue and examination of the spects that can affect it causes promotion of individual and organizational productivity. This study was conducted to investigate correlation between health correlates and the QWL in the emloyees of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch. Methods: This descriptive-correlational study with regression analysis was conducted on 130 nonteaching employees of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch selected by convenience sampling with reference to the number of the studied variables (spiritual, physical, mental, social, and environmental health. The participants filled out demographic, health-promoting behaviors, and QWL questionnaires. Data were analyzed by SPSS using descriptive and inferential statistical tests especially multivariate regression. Results: Among health components, physical health (r=0.55 and mental health (r=0.50 had the highest correlation with total QWL score. The amount of explained variance in criterion variable (QWL by the regression model was 40%. Table of coefficients demonstrated that the scores for mental health and spiritual health had greater contribution in the model than other health aspects. Physical health, psychological health, spiritual health, and environmental health explained 29%, 45%, 37%, and 21% variance in QWL, respectively. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated positive correlation between health aspects and QWL. Because the university employees spend a great deal of time at work and the quality of their work affects the entire organization, this finding can be useful to guide policy-makers and health experts in developing preventive and intervention programs in the future for promotion of the employees' health and organization.

  9. Developing relationships between care staff and people with dementia through Music Therapy and Dance Movement Therapy: A preliminary phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhuish, Ruth; Beuzeboc, Catherine; Guzmán, Azucena

    2017-04-01

    Background There is an increasing focus on providing effective psychosocial interventions to improve quality of life in dementia care. This study aims to explore the attitudes and perceptions of staff who participated regularly in Music Therapy (MT) and Dance Movement Therapy (DMT) groups for residents with dementia in a nursing home. Method In-depth interviews were conducted with seven members of care home staff. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results A representation modelling the impact of MT and DMT in a nursing care home. Three main themes were identified. 1) Discovering residents' skills and feelings; 2) Learning from the therapists to change approaches to care practice with subthemes: time, space and pace, choice, following the residents' lead; 3) Connection between staff and residents. Conclusion The model indicated that both interventions performed in parallel helped staff to discover residents' skills and feelings. Although it is a small sample size, this study strongly suggests that MT and DMT can have a positive influence in helping care staff to provide a meaningful care environment.

  10. Quality of life of nursing-home residents with dementia subject ot surveillance technology versus physical restraints: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Boekhorst, S.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Francke, A.L.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Zwijsen, S.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective As physical restraints should only be used in exceptional cases, there is an urgent need for alternatives to restraint use. Surveillance technology could be such an alternative. This study explored whether nursing-home residents with dementia subjected to surveillance technology had better

  11. Quality of life of nursing-home residents with dementia subject to surveillance technology versus physical restraints: an explorative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, S. te; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Francke, A.L.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Zwijsen, S.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: As physical restraints should only be used in exceptional cases, there is an urgent need for alternatives to restraint use. Surveillance technology could be such an alternative. This study explored whether nursing-home residents with dementia subjected to surveillance technology had

  12. Exploring innovative solutions for quality of life and care of bed-ridden nursing home residents through codesign sessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoof, J.; Wetzels, Mart; Dooremalen, A.M.C.; Overdiep, R.A.; Nieboer, M.E.; Eyck, A.M.E.; Van Gorkom, P.J.L.M.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E.L.M.; Aarts, S.; Vissers-Luijcks, C.; Van Der Voort, C.S.; Moonen, M.J.G.A.; Van De Vrande, H.A.; Van Dijck-Heinen, C.J.M.L.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Bed-ridden nursing home residents are in need of environments which are homelike and facilitate the provision of care. Design guidance for this group of older people is limited. This study concerned the exploration and generation of innovative environmental enrichment scenarios for bed-ridden

  13. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  14. Outcomes by area of residence deprivation in a cohort of oral cancer patients: Survival, health-related quality of life, and place of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylands, Joseph; Lowe, Derek; Rogers, Simon N

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer patients from lower socio-economic backgrounds have worse outcomes of survival and health related quality of life. The mechanism of cause is not fully understood. The purpose of the paper is to report treatment selection, survival, health related quality of life, cause and place of death in relation to deprivation status. 553 patients treated for oral cancer between 2008 and 2012 were identified from records at University hospital. Mortality was tracked via the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and health-related quality of life was measured using the University Washington quality of life questionnaire (UW-QoLv4). Postcodes of residence at diagnosis were used to obtain index of multiple deprivation (IMD) 2010 scores. Nearly half of the sample (47%) lived in the 'most deprived' IMD 2010 quartile of residential areas in England and such patients when treated with curative intent using surgery with or without adjuvant radiotherapy had worse survival than patients living elsewhere, p=0.01 after adjusting for pathological staging and age group. There were no notable differences by IMD group in cancer being mentioned anywhere in part 1 or part 2 of the death certificate or in place of death. After adjustment for patient and clinical factors patients residing in more deprived areas had worse quality of life outcomes in regard to social-emotional functioning and overall quality of life but not in regard to physical oral function. Addressing inequalities in health care related to deprivation is a priority for patients with oral cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of a Simulation-Based Communication Workshop on Resident Preparedness for End-of-Life Communication in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Markin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although residents frequently lead end-of-life (EOL discussions in the intensive care unit (ICU, training in EOL care during residency has been required only recently, and few educational interventions target EOL communication in the ICU. This study evaluated a simulation-based intervention designed to improve resident EOL communication skills with families in the ICU. Methods. Thirty-four second-year internal medicine residents at a large urban teaching hospital participated in small group sessions with faculty trained in the “VitalTalk” method. A Likert-type scale questionnaire measured self-assessed preparedness before, immediately following, and approximately 9 months after intervention. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank-sum analysis. Results. Self-assessed preparedness significantly improved for all categories surveyed (preintervention mean; postintervention mean; p value, including discussing bad news (3.3; 4.2; p<0.01, conducting a family conference (3.1; 4.1; p<0.01, discussing treatment options (3.2; 3.9; p<0.01, discussing discontinuing ICU treatments (2.9; 3.5; p<0.01, and expressing empathy (3.9; 4.5; p<0.01. Improvement persisted at follow-up for all items except “expressing empathy.” Residents rated the educational quality highly. Conclusion. This study provides evidence that brief simulation-based interventions can produce lasting improvements in residents’ confidence to discuss EOL care with family members of patients in the ICU.

  16. Medición de la calidad de vida en médicos residentes Measurement of the quality of life in the residents doctors

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    S.E. Prieto-Miranda

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Durante los estudios de especialidad el médico residente afronta niveles de estrés superiores a la población general afectándolo profesional y personalmente, por lo que cuestionamos por qué los estudios de residencia modifican la calidad de vida de los médicos residentes que los cursan. Sujetos y métodos. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, comparativo, entre febrero de 2006 y febrero de 2007. Se aplicó el módulo central del cuestionario PECVEC a dos grupos de residentes: un grupo de residentes que iniciaba su especialidad y un año después, y a otro grupo que ya tenía más de un año realizando estudios de especialidad; se incluyeron residentes tanto de especialidades medicas como quirúrgicas que aceptaron participar. Los datos se capturaron en el programa SPSS v. 15. Se utilizó estadística descriptiva para variables sociodemográficas, t de Student para comparar la calidad de vida entre residentes y especialidad cursada. La calidad de vida se clasificó como 'muy buena' de 3,1 a 4, 'buena' de 2,1 a 3, 'regular' de 1,1 a 2 y 'mala' entre 0 y 1. Resultados. En el primer grupo se incluyeron 54 residentes, sólo 45 residentes completaron las encuestas al ingreso y un año después, y se excluyó a 9 por no completar la segunda evaluación; el segundo grupo incluyó a 62 residentes de segundo y tercer año que tenían más de un año realizando estudios de especialidad. Se encontró que después de un año de especialidad en las seis escalas evaluadas se presentó un descenso de la calidad de vida, cayendo de 'muy buena' (3,18 a 'buena' (2,73, p Introduction. During specialty studies, the resident doctor faces higher stress levels than the normal population, affecting him/her professionally and personally, hence we ask the question: do the residency studies modify the quality of life of the resident doctors who are taking the specialty? Subjects and methods. A descriptive, comparative study was carried out in February

  17. The impact of social support and sense of coherence on health-related quality of life among nursing home residents--a questionnaire survey in Bergen, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Eide, Geir Egil; Nygaard, Harald A; Bondevik, Margareth; Nortvedt, Monica W; Natvig, Gerd Karin

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the association between social support and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among nursing home residents and whether the sense of coherence (SOC) modifies the effect of social support on health-related quality of life. The main aims of this study were to determine the relationship between social support and HRQOL and to investigate whether the SOC modifies the effect of social support on HRQOL. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design. All 30 nursing homes in Bergen in western Norway. Two hundred and twenty-seven mentally intact long-term nursing home residents 65 years and older. Data were obtained through face-to-face interviews using the SF-36 Health Survey, Social Provisions Scale and Sense of Coherence Scale. Possible relationships between the Social Provisions Scale and the eight SF-36 subdimensions were analysed using multiple linear regression while controlling for age, sex, marital status, education and comorbid illness. Interactions between the Sense of Coherence Scale and Social Provisions Scale were investigated. Attachment affected the mental health subdimension (p=0.001), opportunity for nurturance affected social functioning (p=0.003) and reassurance of worth affected vitality (p=0.001) after adjustment for demographic variables and comorbid illness. After the analysis included the sense of coherence, nurturance still significantly affected social functioning and reassurance of worth still significantly affected vitality. No interaction with sense of coherence was found, and sense of coherence significantly affected all SF-36 subdimensions. The opportunity to provide nurturance for others appears to be important for social functioning, and sense of competence and sense of self-esteem appear to be important for vitality. Further, the residents' relationships with significant others comprise an important component of mental health. Finally, independent of the level of sense of coherence, social support is an

  18. Changes in Prescribing Symptomatic and Preventive Medications in the Last Year of Life in Older Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Helene G.; Taxis, Katja; Pont, Lisa G.

    2018-01-01

    Background At the end of life goals of care change from disease prevention to symptomatic control, however little is known about the patterns of medication prescribing at this stage. Objectives To explore changes in prescribing of symptomatic and preventive medication in the last year of life in

  19. A comparative analysis of health-related quality of life for residents of U.S. counties with and without coal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Keith J; Hendryx, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We compared health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in mining and non-mining counties in and out of Appalachia using the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. Dependent variables included self-rated health, the number of poor physical and mental health days, the number of activity limitation days (in the last 30 days), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthy Days Index. Independent variables included the presence of coal mining, Appalachian region residence, metropolitan status, primary care physician supply, and BRFSS behavioral (e.g., smoking, body mass index, and alcohol consumption) and demographic (e.g., age, gender, race, and income) variables. We compared dependent variables across a four-category variable: Appalachia (yes/ no) and coal mining (yes/no). We used SUDAAN Multilog and multiple linear regression models with post-hoc least-squares means to test for Appalachian coal-mining effects after adjusting for covariates. Residents of coal-mining counties inside and outside of Appalachia reported significantly fewer healthy days for both physical and mental health, and poorer self-rated health (p mining counties, but disparities were greatest for people residing in Appalachian coal-mining areas. Furthermore, results remained consistent in separate analyses by gender and age. Coal-mining areas are characterized by greater socioeconomic disadvantage, riskier health behaviors, and environmental degradation that are associated with reduced HRQOL.

  20. Comparison of self-esteem and quality of life between residents of old people's home and the elders living at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Pluzarić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research on self-esteem and quality of life has been so far predominantly focused on younger age groups. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the differences regarding self-esteem and quality of life between the residents of old people's home and the elders living at home. Methods: A questionnaire used in the survey inquired about socio-demographic data and the respondents' activities. It included the respondents' self-esteem assessment, based on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES, the assessment of quality of life, based on the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS and the assessment of their functional abilities. The purposive sample included 204 respondents. The research was conducted from November 2012 to March 2013. Results: The respondents in both groups expressed equal satisfaction with life (p = 0.846. The respondents who live in their own home demonstrate higher self-esteem than those who live in old people's home (difference in mean scores of the RSES was 3.4; 95 % CI for the difference from 1.0 to 5.8; t-test for independent samples, p = 0.005. Results of the study suggest that the respondents with higher self-esteem are more satisfied with their life (p = 0.537, p < 0.001. Discussion and conclusion: Self-esteem has to be recognised as a factor associated with the quality of life and should therefore be included in the care of the elderly. Timely and adequate interventions may prevent the decline in quality of life, which requires adequate training of health personnel and family members, and the public awareness.

  1. Association between social capital and quality of life among urban residents in less developed cities of western China: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Yang, Shujuan; Liu, Xiang; Ren, Xiaohui; Liu, Danping; Li, Ningxiu

    2018-01-01

    China has experienced rapid urbanization over the past several decades. Social capital is considered a vital human resource, and quality of life (QoL) is an important measure of human health embedded in a physical, mental, and social context. No studies have reported on the association between social capital and QoL in Chinese urban residents. We performed a cross-sectional study to investigate social capital in urban community residents of West China, and its relationship with QoL.Our study was carried out between June and July of 2015. A total of 1136 households were surveyed. The Chinese-translated version of the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and social capital questionnaire were used to evaluate people's QoL and social capital. Associations between QoL and social capital were evaluated by 3 logistic regression analyses.A total of 1136 adult participants aged 18 years and older completed the questionnaire. Young residents were more likely to have lower second (SC2), third (SC3), and fourth (SC4) dimensions of social capital. Migrants and residents with higher education levels and high incomes showed lower SC1 and SC2 relative to other participants, and employed residents had relatively low SC1. Unmarried residents had lower SC2 and SC3. Without adjustment for potential confounding factors, participants with higher SC2 had higher average scores for mental components (MCS) of QoL [odds ratio (OR) = 1.48, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.09-2.02], and the same was seen for SC3 (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.24-2.34). After adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES) and risk factors, SC2 and SC3 were still significantly associated with MCS. Social capital was not significantly associated with physical components of QoL in any of the 3 logistic regression models.In conclusion, social capital is related to MCS of QoL, and increasing it may be an effective way to promote health.

  2. Communication skills training in a nursing home: Effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sprangers (Suzan); K. Dijkstra (Katinka); A. Romijn-Luijten (Anna)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEffective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home

  3. Sense of coherence as a resource in relation to health-related quality of life among mentally intact nursing home residents – a questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondevik Margareth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sense of coherence (SOC is a strong determinant of positive health and successful coping. For older people living in the community or staying in a hospital, SOC has been shown to be associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Studies focusing on this aspect among nursing home (NH residents have been limited. This study investigated the relationship between SOC and HRQOL among older people living in NHs in Bergen, Norway. Methods Based on the salutogenic theoretical framework, we used a descriptive correlation design using personal interviews. We collected data from 227 mentally intact NH residents for 14 months in 2004–2005. The residents' HRQOL and coping ability were measured using the SF-36 Health Survey and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13, respectively. We analyzed possible relationships between the SOC-13 variables and SF-36 subdimensions, controlling for age, sex, marital status, education and comorbidity, and investigated interactions between the SOC and demographic variables by using multiple regression. Results SOC scores were significantly correlated with all SF-36 subscales: the strongest with mental health (r = 0.61 and the weakest with bodily pain (r = 0.28. These did not change substantially after adjusting for the associations with demographic variables and comorbidity. SOC-13 did not interact significantly with the other covariates. Conclusion These findings suggest that more coping resources improve HRQOL. This may indicate the importance of strengthening the residents' SOC to improve the perceived HRQOL. Such knowledge may help the international community in developing nursing regimens to improve HRQOL for older people living in NHs.

  4. Application of behavior-based ergonomics therapies to improve quality of life and reduce medication usage for Alzheimer's/dementia residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowrey, Corinne; Parikh, Pratik J; Bharwani, Govind; Bharwani, Meena

    2013-02-01

    Behavior-based ergonomics therapy (BBET) has been proposed in the past as a viable individualized non-pharmacological intervention to manage challenging behaviors and promote engagement among long-term care residents diagnosed with Alzheimer's/dementia. We evaluate the effect of BBET on quality of life and behavioral medication usage in an 18-bed dementia care unit at a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community in West Central Ohio. Comparing a target cohort during the 6-month pre-implementation period with the 6-month post-implementation period, our study indicates that BBET appears to have a positive impact on the resident's quality of life and also appears to correlate with behavioral medical reduction. For instance, the number of days with behavioral episodes decreased by 53%, the total Minimum Data Set (MDS) mood counts decreased by 70%, and the total MDS behavior counts decreased by 65%. From a medication usage standpoint, the number of pro re nata (PRN) Ativan doses decreased by 57%.

  5. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  6. Easy, Efficient, and Mobile Way to Train Microsurgical Skills During Busy Life of Neurosurgical Residency in Resource-Challenged Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotarinen, Antti; Niemelä, Mika; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai

    2017-11-01

    Residents' lives are hectic-it is hard to find a place and time for training basic and advanced microsurgical skills. Surgical instruments and sutures can be purchased (or loaned from another department), but the most expensive and space-occupying device is the microscope. In developing countries, microscopes are used where they are needed most, in operating rooms. Furthermore, a conventional microscope is not portable. For all of these reasons, the availability of microscopes for training microsurgery is limited. We used a coffee cup and smartphone (CCS) as a training device instead of a microscope. The coffee cup was the base, and the smartphone functioned to magnify, illuminate, and visualize objects. We measured 2 residents' performance on end-to-end artificial bypass before and after 5 days of CCS-based training. We were able to quickly set up the environment for practicing microsurgical skills in any surrounding. After 5 days of training with CCS we could see significant development of microsurgical performance with a conventional microscope as well. The learning curve was dependent on baseline performance. CCS is efficient, mobile, and easy to set up. Even though our smartphone-based training was in 2 dimensions, we could improve our microsurgical performance with conventional microscopes, which have 3-dimensional capability. CCS also provides an easy method to record one's microsurgical training. CCS improved both of the subjects' microsurgical performance, making it a good alternative for a traditional microscope. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Living and dying: responsibility for end-of-life care in care homes without on-site nursing provision - a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Handley, M; Goodman, C; Froggatt, K; Mathie, E; Gage, H; Manthorpe, J; Barclay, S; Crang, C; Iliffe, S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the expectations and experiences of end-of-life care of older people resident in care homes, and how care home staff and the healthcare practitioners who visited the care home interpreted their role. A mixed-method design was used. The everyday experience of 121 residents from six care homes in the East of England were tracked; 63 residents, 30 care home staff with assorted roles and 19 National Health Service staff from different disciplines were intervie...

  8. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reasons for living, meaning in life, and suicide ideation: investigating the roles of key positive psychological factors in reducing suicide risk in community-residing older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Marnin J; Neufeld, Eva; Flett, Gordon L

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the roles of reasons for living (RFL) and meaning in life (MIL) in potentially promoting mental health and well-being and protecting against suicide ideation among community-residing older adults and to investigate the psychometric properties of the Reasons for Living Scale-Older Adult version (RFL-OA). Of 173 older adults initially recruited into a longitudinal study on late-life suicide ideation, 109 completed the RFL-OA and measures of cognitive and physical functioning and positive and negative psychological factors at a two-year follow-up assessment. We tested a model in which RFL and MIL protect against suicide ideation, controlling for demographic and clinical factors. We also assessed the psychometric properties of the RFL-OA in community-residing older adults, investigating its internal consistency and its convergent (MIL, perceived social support, and life satisfaction), divergent (loneliness, depressive symptom severity, and suicide ideation), and discriminant validity (cognitive and physical functioning). RFL-OA scores explained significant variance in suicide ideation, controlling for age, sex, depressive symptom severity, and loneliness. MIL explained significant unique variance in suicide ideation, controlling for these factors and RFL, and MIL significantly mediated the association between RFL and suicide ideation. Psychometric analyses indicated strong internal consistency (α = .94), convergent, divergent, and discriminant validity for the RFL-OA relative to positive and negative psychological factors and cognitive and physical functioning. These findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting merit in investigating positive psychological factors together with negative factors when assessing suicide risk and planning psychological services for older adults.

  10. The effects of movement stimulation on activities of daily living performance and quality of life in nursing home residents with dementia: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henskens M

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Marinda Henskens,1 Ilse M Nauta,2 Katja T Drost,3 Erik JA Scherder1 1Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3tanteLouise, Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands Background: Nursing home (NH residents with dementia experience a reduced quality of life (QoL, in part, due to a dependence in performing activities of daily living (ADL. Stimulating movement is associated with improvements in ADL performance. Therefore, movement stimulating interventions, such as ADL training and exercise, focus on optimizing ADL performance to improve QoL. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of three movement stimulating interventions on QoL and ADL performance in NH residents with dementia. Methods: In this 6-month double parallel randomized controlled trial, the effects of ADL training, a multicomponent aerobic and strength exercise training, and a combined ADL and exercise training were analyzed in 87 NH residents with dementia. The Global Deterioration Scale was used to classify the severity of dementia. Participants were screened at baseline using the 6 minute walk test and Mini-Mental State Examination. The Qualidem, and the Care Dependency Scale and Erlangen ADL test were evaluated at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months to measure QoL and ADL, respectively. Multilevel analyses were adjusted for baseline performance, age, and gender. Results: A 6-month ADL training positively affected overall QoL (p = 0.004 and multiple aspects of QoL, including care relationship (p = 0.004, positive self-image (p = 0.002, and feeling at home (p = 0.001, compared to care-as-usual. No benefits were observed of exercise on QoL. No benefits were observed of a combined ADL and exercise intervention on QoL. No effects were found of the three movement interventions on ADL performance. Conclusion: The results indicate

  11. Health-related quality of life predictors during medical residency in a random, stratified sample of residents Preditores de qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde durante a residência médica em uma amostra randomizada e estratificada de médicos residentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Costa Mosca Macedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life during the first three years of training and identify its association with sociodemographicoccupational characteristics, leisure time and health habits. METHOD: A cross-sectional study with a random sample of 128 residents stratified by year of training was conducted. The Medical Outcome Study -short form 36 was administered. Mann-Whitney tests were carried out to compare percentile distributions of the eight quality of life domains, according to sociodemographic variables, and a multiple linear regression analysis was performed, followed by a validity checking for the resulting models. RESULTS: The physical component presented higher quality of life medians than the mental component. Comparisons between the three years showed that in almost all domains the quality of life scores of the second year residents were higher than the first year residents (p OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida do médico residente durante os três anos do treinamento e identificar sua associação com as características sociodemográficas-ocupacionais, tempo de lazer e hábitos de saúde. MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo transversal com amostra randomizada de 128 residentes, estratificada por ano de residência. O Medical Outcome Study-Short Form 36 foi aplicado; as distribuições percentis dos domínios de qualidade de vida de acordo com variáveis sociodemográficas foram analisadas pelo teste de Mann-Whitney e regressão linear múltipla, bem como estudo de validação pós-regressão. RESULTADOS: O componente físico da qualidade de vida apresentou medianas mais altas do que o mental. Comparações entre os três anos mostraram que quase todos os domínios de qualidade de vida tiveram escores maiores no segundo do que no primeiro ano (p < 0,01; em relação ao componente mental observamos maiores escores no terceiro ano do que nos demais (p < 0,01. Preditores de maior qualidade de vida foram: estar no segundo ou

  12. Quality of Life (QoL) Survey in Hong Kong: Understanding the Importance of Housing Environment and Needs of Residents from Different Housing Sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Zhonghua; Xie, Xiaohuan; Lu, Yi; Khoshbakht, Maryam

    2018-01-27

    This study presents a Quality of Life (QoL) survey to understand the influence of the housing environment and needs of residents from different housing sectors. The research focuses on Hong Kong where living conditions have become the main affect for people's QoL. Through a household survey using a standard instrument "Word Health Organisation (WHO) Quality of Life-BREF", the article found that among the four WHO QoL domains (Physical Health, Psychological Health, Social Relations And Environment), Environment, particularly its constitute aspect housing environment was the most influential factor for overall quality of life for the public rental housing sector where low-income people live. This research also found that different groups of people have differing needs of their housing environments: the low-income group needs better location and privacy while the medium and high-income groups need better architectural quality. Based on differentiating their needs and wants, this research argues for prioritizing the low-income group's needs for effectively improving their QoL.

  13. Factors promoting resident deaths at aged care facilities in Japan: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kentaro; Ogata, Yasuko; Kashiwagi, Masayo

    2018-03-01

    Due to an increasingly ageing population, the Japanese government has promoted elderly deaths in aged care facilities. However, existing facilities were not designed to provide resident end-of-life care and the proportion of aged care facility deaths is currently less than 10%. Consequently, the present review evaluated the factors that promote aged care facility resident deaths in Japan from individual- and facility-level perspectives to exploring factors associated with increased resident deaths. To achieve this, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Ichushi databases were searched on 23 January 2016. Influential factors were reviewed for two healthcare services (insourcing and outsourcing facilities) as well as external healthcare agencies operating outside facilities. Of the original 2324 studies retrieved, 42 were included in analysis. Of these studies, five focused on insourcing, two on outsourcing, seven on external agencies and observed facility/agency-level factors. The other 28 studies identified individual-level factors related to death in aged care facilities. The present review found that at both facility and individual levels, in-facility resident deaths were associated with healthcare service provision, confirmation of resident/family end-of-life care preference and staff education. Additionally, while outsourcing facilities did not require employment of physicians/nursing staff to accommodate resident death, these facilities required visits by physicians and nursing staff from external healthcare agencies as well as residents' healthcare input. This review also found few studies examining outsourcing facilities. The number of healthcare outsourcing facilities is rapidly increasing as a result of the Japanese government's new tax incentives. Consequently, there may be an increase in elderly deaths in outsourcing healthcare facilities. Accordingly, it is necessary to identify the factors associated with residents' deaths at outsourcing facilities.

  14. "Fit and fabulous": mixed-methods research on processes, perceptions, and outcomes of a yearlong gym program with assisted-living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Mary Ann; LeCompte, Michelle; Ramel, Lisa

    2014-04-01

    This study's mixed-methods design sought to understand how to encourage assisted-living (AL) residents to initiate and continue exercise in a gym setting. Ten residents participated in this yearlong program. Processes developed and perceived benefits were understood through interviews and observations. Changes in active time, lower body strength, and workload were evaluated using direct measures. Findings indicated that AL residents regularly used exercise machines (mean participation = 53.8%) and increased active time and lower body strength (p = .02) when adequately prepared and supported. Participants prioritized gym time and developed pride and ownership in the program. They described themselves as exercisers and developed a sense of belonging to their new home. Friendships with one another, staff, and university partners were nurtured in the gym setting. When provided space, equipment, trained staff, and additional resource support, AL residents' quality of life and life satisfaction were enhanced in several domains.

  15. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  16. Stress and coping among orthopaedic surgery residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, M Catherine; Sotile, Wayne; Sotile, Mary O; Rubash, Harry; Barrack, Robert L

    2004-07-01

    Evaluations of physicians and residents have revealed concerning levels of psychosocial dysfunction. The purposes of this study were to determine the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty and to identify the risk factors for decompensation. Twenty-one orthopaedic residents and twenty-five full-time orthopaedic faculty completed a 102-question voluntary, anonymous survey. The survey consisted of three validated instruments, i.e., the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale; and three novel question sets addressing background and demographic information, stress reaction and management, and the balance between work and home life. Descriptive statistics, pairwise correlations, simple t tests, and Pearson and nonparametric Spearman correlations were calculated. The simple correlation coefficient was used to assess bivariate relationships. The mean overall quality-of-life score, on a scale of 0 to 4 points, was 2.5 points for residents compared with 3.6 points for faculty members. Residents reported considerable burnout, showing a high level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and an average level of personal achievement, whereas faculty reported minimal burnout, showing a low level of emotional exhaustion (p burnout and psychiatric morbidity correlated with weekly work hours; conflict between the commitments of work and home life; discord with faculty, nursing staff, and senior residents; debt load; and work-related stress. Protective factors included being a parent, spending time with a spouse, having a physician father, and deriving satisfaction from discussing concerns with colleagues, friends, and family. In pursuit of our goal of determining the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty, we identified a large disparity between the two groups. The resident group reported much greater levels of dysfunction particularly with regard to burnout and psychiatric morbidity

  17. Life concerns of elderly people living at home determined as by Community General Support Center staff: implications for organizing a more effective integrated community care system. The Kurihara Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Junko; Meguro, Kenichi; Sato, Yuko; Chiba, Yumiko

    2014-09-01

    In Japan, the integrated community care system aims to enable people to continue to live in their homes. Based on the concept, one of the activities of a Community General Support Center (CGSC) is to provide preventive intervention based on a Community Support Program. Currently, a Basic Checklist (BC) is sent to elderly people to identify persons appropriate for a Secondary Prevention Program. To find people who had not responded to the BC, CGSC staff evaluated the files of 592 subjects who had participated in the Kurihara Project to identify activities they cannot do that they did in the past, decreased activity levels at home, loss of interaction with people other than their family, and the need for medical interventions. This information was classified, when applicable, into the following categories: (A) 'no life concerns'; (B) 'undecided'; and (C) 'life concerns'. The relationships between these classifications and clinical information, certified need for long-term care, and items on the BC were examined. The numbers of subjects in categories A, B, and C were 291, 42, and 186, respectively. Life concerns were related to scores on the Clinical Dementia Rating, global cognitive function, depressive state, and apathy. Most items on the BC were not associated with classification into category C, but ≥25% of the subjects had life concerns related to these items. Assessment of life concerns by the CGSC staff has clinical validity. The results suggest that there are people who do not respond to the checklist or apply for Long-Term Care Insurance, meaning that they 'hide' in the community, probably due to apathy or depressive state. To organize a more effective integrated community care system, the CGSC staff should focus mainly on preventive care. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  18. Burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being among US neurology residents and fellows in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kerry H; Shanafelt, Tait D; Keran, Christopher M; Busis, Neil A; Foster, Laura A; Molano, Jennifer Rose V; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Ratliff, Jeffrey B; Schwarz, Heidi B; Sloan, Jeff A; Cascino, Terrence L

    2017-08-01

    To study prevalence of and factors contributing to burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurology residents and fellows. A total of 938 US American Academy of Neurology member neurology residents and fellows were surveyed using standardized measures of burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being from January 19 to March 21, 2016. Response rate was 37.7% (354/938); about 2/3 of responders were residents and 1/3 were fellows. Median age of participants was 32 years and 51.1% were female. Seventy-three percent of residents and 55% of fellows had at least one symptom of burnout, the difference largely related to higher scores for depersonalization among residents. For residents, greater satisfaction with work-life balance, meaning in work, and older age were associated with lower risk of burnout; for fellows, greater satisfaction with work-life balance and effective support staff were associated with lower risk of burnout. Trainees experiencing burnout were less likely to report career satisfaction. Career satisfaction was more likely among those reporting meaning in work and more likely for those working in the Midwest compared with the Northeast region. Burnout is common in neurology residents and fellows. Lack of work-life balance and lack of meaning in work were associated with reduced career satisfaction and increased risk of burnout. These results should inform approaches to reduce burnout and promote career satisfaction and well-being in US neurology trainees. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Supporting Regional Aged Care Nursing Staff to Manage Residents' Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia, in Real Time, Using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA): A Pilot Site 'End-User Attitudes' Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Britt; Clinnick, Lisa; Chesler, Jessica; Stranieri, Andrew; Bignold, Adam; Dazeley, Richard; McLaren, Suzanne; Lauder, Sue; Balasubramanian, Venki

    2018-01-01

    This regional pilot site 'end-user attitudes' study explored nurses' experiences and impressions of using the Nurses' Behavioural Assistant (NBA) (a knowledge-based, interactive ehealth system) to assist them to better respond to behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and will be reported here. Focus groups were conducted, followed by a four-week pilot site 'end-user attitudes' trial of the NBA at a regional aged care residential facility (ACRF). Brief interviews were conducted with consenting nursing staff. Focus group feedback (N = 10) required only minor cosmetic changes to the NBA prototype. Post pilot site end-user interview data (N = 10) indicated that the regional ACRF nurses were positive and enthusiastic about the NBA, however several issues were also identified. Overall the results supported the utility of the NBA to promote a person centred care approach to managing BPSD. Slight modifications may be required to maximise its uptake across all ACRF nursing staff.

  20. Physical aggressive resident behavior during hygienic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell Miller, M

    1997-05-01

    Management of aggressive behavior has been identified as a concern for nursing staff who provide institutional care for cognitively impaired elderly. The Omnibus Reconciliation Act (OBRA '87) mandates a trial reduction in the use of chemical and physical restraints, and the development of nursing interventions for the management of behavioral disorders of institutionalized cognitively impaired elderly. Most skilled nursing facilities, however, are limited in their ability to provide environmental and behavioral programs to manage aggressive patient behavior. For the purposes of this study, physically aggressive behavior was identified as threatened or actual aggressive patient contact which has taken place between a patient and a member of the nursing staff. This study explored the nursing staff's responses to patient physical aggression and the effects that physical aggression had on them and on nursing practice from the perspective of the nursing staff. Nursing staff employed on one Dementia Special Care Unit (DSCU) were invited to participate. Interviews with nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative descriptive methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Nursing staff reported that they were subjected to aggressive patient behaviors ranging from verbal threats to actual physical violence. Nursing staff reported that showering a resident was the activity of daily living most likely to provoke patient to staff physical aggression. The findings revealed geropsychiatric nursing practices for the management of physically aggressive residents, and offered recommendations for improving the safety of nursing staff and residents on a secured DSCU.

  1. Living and dying: responsibility for end-of-life care in care homes without on-site nursing provision - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Melanie; Goodman, Claire; Froggatt, Katherine; Mathie, Elspeth; Gage, Heather; Manthorpe, Jill; Barclay, Stephen; Crang, Clare; Iliffe, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the expectations and experiences of end-of-life care of older people resident in care homes, and how care home staff and the healthcare practitioners who visited the care home interpreted their role. A mixed-method design was used. The everyday experience of 121 residents from six care homes in the East of England were tracked; 63 residents, 30 care home staff with assorted roles and 19 National Health Service staff from different disciplines were interviewed. The review of care home notes demonstrated that residents had a wide range of healthcare problems. Length of time in the care homes, functional ability or episodes of ill-health were not necessarily meaningful indicators to staff that a resident was about to die. General Practitioner and district nursing services provided a frequent but episodic service to individual residents. There were two recurring themes that affected how staff engaged with the process of advance care planning with residents; 'talking about dying' and 'integrating living and dying'. All participants stated that they were committed to providing end-of-life care and supporting residents to die in the care home, if wanted. However, the process was complicated by an ongoing lack of clarity about roles and responsibilities in providing end-of-life care, doubts from care home and primary healthcare staff about their capacity to work together when residents' trajectories to death were unclear. The findings suggest that to support this population, there is a need for a pattern of working between health and care staff that can encourage review and discussion between multiple participants over sustained periods of time. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Changes in the personal dignity of nursing home residents: a longitudinal qualitative interview study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska G Oosterveld-Vlug

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most nursing home residents spend the remainder of their life, until death, within a nursing home. As preserving dignity is an important aim of the care given here, insight into the way residents experience their dignity throughout their entire admission period is valuable. AIM: To investigate if and how nursing home residents' personal dignity changes over the course of time, and what contributes to this. DESIGN: A longitudinal qualitative study. METHODS: Multiple in-depth interviews, with an interval of six months, were carried out with 22 purposively sampled nursing home residents of the general medical wards of four nursing homes in The Netherlands. Transcripts were analyzed following the principles of thematic analysis. RESULTS: From admission onwards, some residents experienced an improved sense of dignity, while others experienced a downward trend, a fluctuating one or no change at all. Two mechanisms were especially important for a nursing home resident to maintain or regain personal dignity: the feeling that one is in control of his life and the feeling that one is regarded as a worthwhile person. The acquirement of both feelings could be supported by 1 finding a way to cope with one's situation; 2 getting acquainted with the new living structures in the nursing home and therefore feeling more at ease; 3 physical improvement (with or without an electric wheelchair; 4 being socially involved with nursing home staff, other residents and relatives; and 5 being amongst disabled others and therefore less prone to exposures of disrespect from the outer world. CONCLUSION: Although the direction in which a resident's personal dignity develops is also dependent on one's character and coping capacities, nursing home staff can contribute to dignity by creating optimal conditions to help a nursing home resident recover feelings of control and of being regarded as a worthwhile person.

  3. Changes in the personal dignity of nursing home residents: a longitudinal qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Pasman, H Roeline W; van Gennip, Isis E; Willems, Dick L; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2013-01-01

    Most nursing home residents spend the remainder of their life, until death, within a nursing home. As preserving dignity is an important aim of the care given here, insight into the way residents experience their dignity throughout their entire admission period is valuable. To investigate if and how nursing home residents' personal dignity changes over the course of time, and what contributes to this. A longitudinal qualitative study. Multiple in-depth interviews, with an interval of six months, were carried out with 22 purposively sampled nursing home residents of the general medical wards of four nursing homes in The Netherlands. Transcripts were analyzed following the principles of thematic analysis. From admission onwards, some residents experienced an improved sense of dignity, while others experienced a downward trend, a fluctuating one or no change at all. Two mechanisms were especially important for a nursing home resident to maintain or regain personal dignity: the feeling that one is in control of his life and the feeling that one is regarded as a worthwhile person. The acquirement of both feelings could be supported by 1) finding a way to cope with one's situation; 2) getting acquainted with the new living structures in the nursing home and therefore feeling more at ease; 3) physical improvement (with or without an electric wheelchair); 4) being socially involved with nursing home staff, other residents and relatives; and 5) being amongst disabled others and therefore less prone to exposures of disrespect from the outer world. Although the direction in which a resident's personal dignity develops is also dependent on one's character and coping capacities, nursing home staff can contribute to dignity by creating optimal conditions to help a nursing home resident recover feelings of control and of being regarded as a worthwhile person.

  4. On Becoming Batman: An Ethnographic Examination of Hero Imagery in Early-Career Residential Life Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Danielle K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency response is an essential function of all residential life staff, but particularly for resident assistants serving on the front line. This organizational ethnography examined the role that professional identity played for early-career residential life practitioners engaged in emergency management. The data elucidated heroism as a…

  5. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  6. [Survey on the applicability of SF-36 version-2 (SF-36v2) in assessment quality of life among urban residents in Chengdu city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longchao; Liu, Zhijun; He, Yan; Li, Ningxiu; Liu, Danping

    2014-05-01

    To explore the psychometric performances and applicability of SF-36v2 in assessment quality of life among urban residents in Chengdu. During Oct. to Dec., 2012, 2 186 adult urban residents with clear mind and well self-express were recruited in the study by multistage stratified cluster sampling method in Chengdu urban area. The survey questionnaires included general health condition and quality of life, which was adopted the SF-36v2. Internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability and construct validity were all analyzed as indicators of the psychometric performance. The survey released 2 186 questionnaires, with 2 182 ones returned and 2 178(99.8%) met the data standard. The scores of 8 scales in SF-36v2, including physical function (PF), role-physical (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health (GH), vitality (VT), social function (SF), role-emotion (RE) and mental health (MH), were 89.15 ± 17.56, 85.18 ± 22.52, 76.64 ± 17.80, 64.13 ± 19.56, 70.39 ± 17.31, 86.43 ± 17.35, 87.79 ± 19.24 and 80.61 ± 13.49, respectively; the floor effects were 0.28%, 0.41%, 0.23%, 0.28%, 0.09%, 0.05%, 0.14% and 0.23%, respectively; and the ceiling effects were 51.38%, 60.60%, 58.08%, 0.83%, 2.94%, 50.32%, 64.00% and 3.95%, respectively. The item-convergent validities were all achieved the standard (r = 0.40) except the item MH5 (Have you been happy?), and the total scaling success rate of item-convergent validity was 97.14%. The scales' success rates of item-discriminant validities for the SF, VT and MH scales were 93.75%, 56.25% and 97.50% respectively, while the rates of others were 100.00% and the total success rate was 96.43%. The internal reliability ranged from 0.724 to 0.974 across all the scales, except for SF (r = 0.603) and VT (r = 0.697). The two-week test-retest reliability ranged from 0.610 to 0.845. Within factor analysis, two common factors were confirmed, separately representing physical health and mental health, altogether contributing 64.4% of the

  7. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  8. Evaluation of the 'Ladder to the Moon, Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme' staff training: Two quasi-experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Swinson, Tom; Orrell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the CCSEP on care home staff in two care settings for older people in one nursing home and one residential home. Care homes provide personal care and accommodation for older people. The English Dementia Strategy aims to improve the quality of service provision for people with dementia. This includes specific mention of improving the quality of life in care homes and as such includes objectives related to developing the workforce knowledge and skills. The Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP) is a staff training approach based on the Positive Psychology framework that uses theatre- and film-based activities. This study used a wait-list controlled design. However, the data analysis plan was amended to reflect difficulties in data collection, and a quasi-experimental case study approach was consequently utilised. Outcome measures for staff attitudes and beliefs were as follows: Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff; Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire; Job Satisfaction Index; Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory; and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The Quality of Interaction Schedule (QUIS) was used to observe changes in staff-resident interaction. Fifty staff in two care homes completed the questionnaires and forty-one undertook formal CCSEP training. In Home A (nursing home), there was no significant change in any of the measures. In Home B (residential home), the QUIS showed an increase in positive interactions post intervention; a significant increase in the Building Relationship subscale of Sense of Competence; and a significant increase in staff sense of hopefulness towards people with dementia. The Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory showed a significant decrease post-intervention. The intervention did not significantly affect the happiness or job satisfaction of care home staff. The results of this study provide tentative evidence about the efficacy of this staff training

  9. Association Between the Nursing Home Minimum Data Set for Vision and Vision-Targeted Health-Related Quality of Life in Nursing Home Residents as Assessed by Certified Nursing Assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Swanson

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: Ratings by CNAs on the vision-targeted quality of life of nursing home residents under their care is in general agreement with the MDS category assigned by the nurse coordinator. However, CNA ratings are largely homogeneous in the adequate vision to moderately impaired categories.

  10. Agency, Social and Healthcare Supports for Adults with Intellectual Disability at the End of Life in Out-of-Home, Non-Institutional Community Residences in Western Nations: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Teresa T.; Savage, Teresa A.; Gehlert, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Background: The nature and quality of end-of-life care received by adults with intellectual disabilities in out-of-home, non-institutional community agency residences in Western nations is not well understood. Method: A range of databases and search engines were used to locate conceptual, clinical and research articles from relevant peer-reviewed…

  11. Communication skills training in a nursing home: effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangers, Suzan; Dijkstra, Katinka; Romijn-Luijten, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Effective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home staff and nursing home residents with dementia. These studies have shown that communication skills training can improve nursing aides’ communication with nursing home residents. However, these studies tended to be time-consuming and fairly difficult to implement. Moreover, these studies focused on the communicative benefits for the nursing home residents and their well-being, while benefits and well-being for the nursing aides were neglected. The current study focused on implementing a brief communication skills training program to improve nursing aides’ (N=24) communication with residents with dementia (N=26) in a nursing home. The effects of the training on nursing aides’ communication, caregiver distress, and job satisfaction and residents’ psychopathology and agitation were assessed relative to a control group condition. Nursing aides in the intervention group were individually trained to communicate effectively with residents during morning care by using short instructions, positive speech, and biographical statements. Mixed ANOVAs showed that, after training, nursing aides in the intervention group experienced less caregiver distress. Additionally, the number of short instructions and instances of positive speech increased. Providing nursing aides with helpful feedback during care aids communication and reduces caregiver burden, even with a brief intervention that requires limited time investments for nursing home staff. PMID:25653513

  12. Health-related quality of life in residents aged 18 years and older with and without disease: findings from the First Provincial Health Services Survey of Hunan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Lingling; Tian, Danping; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Li; Deng, Jing; Ning, Peishan; Hu, Guoqing

    2017-09-03

    Published research has not considered acute diseases and injuries in assessing the impact of varying disease counts on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We used Chinese value sets of EQ-5D-3L to examine the relationship between the number of diseases individuals had (including chronic diseases, acute diseases and injuries) and their HRQoL. A total of 19 387 individuals aged 18 years and older were included in the study. Using data from the First Provincial Health Services Survey of Hunan, China, HRQoL was assessed with the EQ-5D-3L scale, a standardized instrument developed by the EuroQoL group. The EQ-5D-3L utility score was calculated using the Chinese EQ-5D-3L value set. This survey coded disease using the list of 133 conditions that was defined by the First Provincial Health Services Survey of Hunan, China, based on the 10th International Classification of Diseases. 126 conditions were disease-related and were therefore included in data analysis. Of 15 245 respondents, urban residents and male constituted 53.0% and 48.2%, respectively. 19.3% of respondents had one disease and 5.0% had at least two diseases. Of the five dimensions of the EQ-5D-3L, the pain/discomfort dimension had the highest proportion of moderate or serious problems among the respondents (14.4%, 95% CI 10.5% to 18.2%). The average Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and utility score were 78.0 (95% CI 76.9 to 79.1) and 0.958 (95% CI 0.946 to 0.970), respectively. Residents with 1 and ≥2 diseases had higher proportions of moderate or serious problems in five dimensions of the EQ-5D-3L scale during the previous 2 weeks than those without disease after controlling for location (urban/rural), sex, age, education level and household income, respectively (adjusted ORs: 3.1-3.7 and 4.4-6.6, respectively). The mean of the EQ VAS score was 8.4 and 13.6 points lower in respondents with 1 and ≥2 diseases than in respondents without disease; the corresponding mean score difference was 0

  13. Ethnographic analysis of everyday ethics in the care of nursing home residents with dementia: a taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, B A

    2001-01-01

    The concept of everyday ethics was used to emphasize the moral basis of ordinary issues of daily living affecting quality of life for nursing home residents with dementia. To critically examine ethical issues of daily living affecting nursing home residents with dementia and to construct a descriptive taxonomy inductively derived from ethnographic fieldwork data. Combined anthropological methods of participant observation and in-depth interviewing were used in the natural setting of a 147-bed, voluntary, not-for-profit nursing home. Experiences of 30 residents, their family members, and nursing home staff were explored. In addition, the records of 10 ethics committee cases involving residents with dementia further enlarged the database. The taxonomy of everyday ethical issues includes the following four domains: (a) learning the limits of intervention; (b) tempering the culture of surveillance and restraint; (c) preserving the integrity of the individual; and (d) defining community norms and values. Each is representative of constellations of concerns that are grounded in the cultural and moral environment of the nursing home. Results highlight the challenges of recognizing the ethical in the ordinary, and of resolving everyday issues in ways that enhance quality of life for residents with dementia and those (family and staff) who care for them.

  14. Health and life style-related determinants of survival rate in the male residents of the city of Łódź

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Śmigielski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article presents a selected part of an analysis of health- and lifestyle-related determinants of the longevity of male residents of the city of Łódź. The WHO strategy for the European region assumes that the term ‘lifestyle' refers to the way of life based on the association between conditions of life understood in a broad sense and individual patterns of behaviour determined by socio-cultural factors and individual features. On this basis, the aim of this study is to identify the multiple statistical relationships on the mortality of men living in Łódź, particularly the influence of the following variables on the probability of survival: age, subjective health assessment, nutritional habits, alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking. Materials and Methods: The study sample (1004 respondents was selected, and the study was carried out, based on the standards of the CINDI WHO Programme. The investigations included socio-demographic data, health status, lifestyle and anthropometric measurements. Results: From the results of the first- study performed in Poland of the longevity of men with identified risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, it has been found that: 1 Tobacco smoking has a negative influence on male longevity; 2 Alcohol consumed in moderate amounts favours male longevity; 3 The level of physical activity observed among the studied men was too low to affect longevity; 4 A diet rich in fish and consumption of yellow cheese are positive predictors of longevity, while additional use of table salt at meals and consumption of sweets (cakes are negative ones. Conclusions: Risky lifestyles and a reluctance to abandon them are responsible for a shorter lifespan among men in Poland. Reducing this difference between women and men is a real challenge for public health professionals and preventive medicine specialists.

  15. Health and life style-related determinants of survival rate in the male residents of the city of Łódź.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigielski, Janusz; Bielecki, Wojciech; Drygas, Wojciech

    2013-06-01

    The article presents a selected part of an analysis of health- and lifestyle-related determinants of the longevity of male residents of the city of Łódź. The WHO strategy for the European region assumes that the term' lifestyle' refers to the way of life based on the association between conditions of life understood in a broad sense and individual patterns of behaviour determined by socio-cultural factors and individual features. On this basis, the aim of this study is to identify the multiple statistical relationships on the mortality of men living in Łódź, particularly the influence of the following variables on the probability of survival: age, subjective health assessment, nutritional habits, alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking. The study sample (1004 respondents) was selected, and the study was carried out, based on the standards of the CINDI WHO Programme. The investigations included socio-demographic data, health status, lifestyle and anthropometric measurements. From the results of the first-study performed in Poland of the longevity of men with identified risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, it has been found that: 1) Tobacco smoking has a negative influence on male longevity; 2) Alcohol consumed in moderate amounts favours male longevity; 3) The level of physical activity observed among the studied men was too low to affect longevity; 4) A diet rich in fish and consumption of yellow cheese are positive predictors of longevity, while additional use of table salt at meals and consumption of sweets (cakes) are negative ones. Risky lifestyles and a reluctance to abandon them are responsible for a shorter lifespan among men in Poland. Reducing this difference between women and men is a real challenge for public health professionals and preventive medicine specialists.

  16. Effect of animal-assisted interventions on depression, agitation and quality of life in nursing home residents suffering from cognitive impairment or dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christine; Pedersen, Ingeborg; Bergland, Astrid; Enders-Slegers, Marie-José; Patil, Grete; Ihlebaek, Camilla

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home residents is known to be very high, with depression and agitation being the most common symptoms. The possible effects of a 12-week intervention with animal-assisted activities (AAA) in nursing homes were studied. The primary outcomes related to depression, agitation and quality of life (QoL). A prospective, cluster randomized multicentre trial with a follow-up measurement 3 months after end of intervention was used. Inclusion criteria were men and women aged 65 years or older, with a diagnosis of dementia or having a cognitive deficit. Ten nursing homes were randomized to either AAA with a dog or a control group with treatment as usual. In total, 58 participants were recruited: 28 in the intervention group and 30 in the control group. The intervention consisted of a 30-min session with AAA twice weekly for 12 weeks in groups of three to six participants, led by a qualified dog handler. Norwegian versions of the Cornell Scale for Depression, the Brief Agitation Rating Scale and the Quality of Life in Late-stage Dementia scale were used. A significant effect on depression and QoL was found for participants with severe dementia at follow-up. For QoL, a significant effect of AAA was also found immediately after the intervention. No effects on agitation were found. Animal-assisted activities may have a positive effect on symptoms of depression and QoL in older people with dementia, especially those in a late stage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Adaptation of a nursing home culture change research instrument for frontline staff quality improvement use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christine W; Palmer, Jennifer A; Mills, Whitney L; Pimentel, Camilla B; Allen, Rebecca S; Wewiorski, Nancy J; Dillon, Kristen R; Snow, A Lynn

    2017-08-01

    Enhanced interpersonal relationships and meaningful resident engagement in daily life are central to nursing home cultural transformation, yet these critical components of person-centered care may be difficult for frontline staff to measure using traditional research instruments. To address the need for easy-to-use instruments to help nursing home staff members evaluate and improve person-centered care, the psychometric method of cognitive-based interviewing was used to adapt a structured observation instrument originally developed for researchers and nursing home surveyors. Twenty-eight staff members from 2 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes participated in 1 of 3 rounds of cognitive-based interviews, using the instrument in real-life situations. Modifications to the original instrument were guided by a cognitive processing model of instrument refinement. Following 2 rounds of cognitive interviews, pretesting of the revised instrument, and another round of cognitive interviews, the resulting set of 3 short instruments mirrored the concepts of the original longer instrument but were significantly easier for frontline staff to understand and use. Final results indicated frontline staff found the revised instruments feasible to use and clinically relevant in measuring and improving the lived experience of a changing culture. This article provides a framework for developing or adapting other measurement tools for frontline culture change efforts in nursing homes, in addition to reporting on a practical set of instruments to measure aspects of person-centered care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Residents with mild cognitive decline and family members report health students 'enhance capacity of care' and bring 'a new breath of life' in two aged care facilities in Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Annear, Michael J; Bell, Erica J; Palmer, Andrew J; Robinson, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    Care provided by student doctors and nurses is well received by patients in hospital and primary care settings. Whether the same is true for aged care residents of nursing homes with mild cognitive decline and their family members is unknown. To investigate the perspectives of aged care residents with mild cognitive decline and their family members on interdisciplinary student placements in two residential aged care facilities (RACF) in Tasmania. A mixed methods design was employed with both qualitative and quantitative data collected. All participants were interviewed and completed a questionnaire on residents' quality of life, during or after a period of student placements in each facility (October-November, 2012). Qualitative data were coded for themes following a grounded theory approach, and quantitative data were analysed using SPSS. Twenty-one participants (13 residents and 8 family members) were recruited. Four themes were identified from the qualitative data and included (i) increased social interaction and facility vibrancy; (ii) community service and personal development, (iii) vulnerability and sensitivity (learning to care) and (iv) increased capacity and the confidence of enhanced care. Residents' quality of life was reported to be mostly good in the presence of the students, despite their high care needs. Residents with mild cognitive decline and their family members perceive a wide array of benefits of student provided care in RACFs including increased social interaction. Future quantitative research should focus on whether changes in care occur for residents as a result of student involvement. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Hospice Use and Pain Management in Elderly Nursing Home Residents With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Tjia, Jennifer; Lapane, Kate L

    2017-03-01

    Pain management is suboptimal in nursing homes. To estimate the extent to which receipt of hospice in nursing homes (NHs) increases the receipt of pain management for residents with cancer at the end of life. Study participants included Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who were NH residents in the last 90 days of life in 2011-2012 (n = 78,160). Residents in pain on hospice were matched to like residents without hospice by facility, type of pain assessment (self-report/staff assessment), and weeks until death (9064 matched strata, 16,968 unique residents). Minimum Data Set 3.0 provided information on residents' pain prevalence and receipt of pain management (scheduled analgesics, as needed [pro re nata {PRN}] medication, nonpharmacologic interventions). We developed conditional logistic models to estimate the association between hospice use and pain management, stratified by self-reported and staff-assessed pain. We found that pain prevalence was higher in residents using hospice versus those without hospice (e.g., residents who self-reported pain: hospice: 59.9%, 95% CIs = 59.3%-60.5%; nonhospice: 50.0%, 95% CI = 49.4%-50.6%). In matched analyses, untreated pain was uncommon (self-reported pain: 2.9% and 5.6% in hospice users and nonusers, respectively). Hospice use was associated with receipt of scheduled analgesics (self-reported: adjusted odds ratio = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.73-1.971) and PRN medication (self-reported: adjusted odds ratio = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.20-1.43). Pain prevalence and the association between hospice and pain management were similar in residents with staff-assessed pain. Untreated pain at the end of life among residents with cancer in NHs is unusual. Hospice is associated with increased pain management among those with documented pain. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The stress of residency: recognizing the signs of depression and suicide in you and your fellow residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Mark S; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra R; Gillespie, Colleen; Pachter, H Leon

    2013-02-01

    Stress, depression, and suicide are universal but frequently unrecognized issues for women and men in residency training. Stress affects cognitive and psychomotor performance both inside and outside of the operating room. Stress impairs the 2 key components of a surgeon's responsibilities: intellectual judgment and technical skill. We hypothesized that the recognition of depression, substance abuse, failing personal relationships, and potential suicide is poor among surgeons. If residents can recognize the signs of stress, depression, and suicide among colleagues, we believe it will not only improve their quality of life but also may preserve it. We first determined baseline resident knowledge of the signs of surgical stress including fatigue; burn out; depression; physician suicide; drug and alcohol abuse; and their effects on family, friends, and relationships. We then developed a curriculum to identify these signs in first, second, third, and fourth year surgical residents were identified as the target learners. The major topics discussed were depression; physician suicide; drug and alcohol abuse; and the effects of stress on family, friends, and our goals. Secondary objectives included identifying major sources of stress, general self-awareness, understanding professional choices, and creating a framework to manage stress. Residents participated in an interactive seminar with a surgical facilitator. Before and after the seminar, a multiple-choice test was administered with questions to assess knowledge of the signs of stress (eg, fatigue, burn out, and depression). Twenty-one residents participated in this study. Seventeen completed the pretest, and 21 participated in the interactive seminar and completed the post-test. The pretest revealed that surgical residents were correct in 46.8% (standard deviation [SD] = 25.4%) of their responses. The postseminar test showed an improvement to 89.7% (SD = 6.1%, P abuse, divorce, and suicide, educating house staff about

  1. Are mangroves in arid environments isolated systems? Life-history and evidence of dietary contribution from inwelling in a mangrove-resident shrimp species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maslamani, I.; Walton, M. E. M.; Kennedy, H. A.; Al-Mohannadi, M.; Le Vay, L.

    2013-06-01

    The Arabian Gulf represents one of the more northerly extremes of mangrove distribution in the Indo-Pacific, and is populated only by Avicennia marina, due to its tolerance of high salinity and wide temperature extremes. Recent studies suggest that in the arid coastal environment of the western Arabian Gulf, export of carbon and nitrogen from mangroves to adjacent habitats may be limited, though it is not clear if this is due to low productivity or physical factors such as the lack of freshwater flow and the tidal regime. Although seagrass and macroalgal habitats are relatively much more dominant by area, with only small pockets of mangrove around the edges of embayments, it is not evident if inwelling from these habitats support mangrove fauna. Year-round sampling in mangroves at Al-Khor, Qatar, indicates that Palaemon khori, an endemic shrimp species, is strongly associated with mangroves throughout its post-settlement life cycle, from recruitment as small 9-10 mm juveniles through to mating and egg production. Rapid post-recruitment growth (k = 1.8, L∞ = 42 mm for females, k = 1.5, L∞ = 35 mm for male) means that most individuals reached adult size in the first few months after settlement, with reproduction occurring in the following spring. As might be expected from year-round residence in the mangrove, dual 13C and 15N isotope analysis indicated a strong contribution of mangroves to shrimp tissue growth (Mean and 95% confidence range, 37% and 27-48%), but with a weaker significant contribution from particulate organic matter (20% and 1-37%), mangrove epiphytes (16% and 2-33%) and seagrasses (9% and 0.2-18%). Other primary producers contribute the remaining 18% to shrimp nutrition but the 95% confidence ranges include zero, suggesting possibly non-significant roles in supporting the shrimp population. This dietary information supports the view that fauna resident within arid mangrove systems are mainly dependent on localised retention and cycling of

  2. The Relationship between Spiritual Well-being and Quality of Life and Optimism on the Staff of Arak University of Medical Sciences 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Jafari Poor

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study showed that spiritual well-being had a significant positive relationship with Quality of life and Optimism. There were no significant differences between Spiritual well-being, Optimism, and Quality of life and age, gender, and years of service.

  3. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonstad Kåre

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  4. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors. PMID:19371413

  5. 'From activating towards caring': shifts in care approaches at the end of life of people with intellectual disabilities; a qualitative study of the perspectives of relatives, care-staff and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkema, Nienke; de Veer, Anke J E; Hertogh, Cees M P M; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-07-25

    Professionals and relatives increasingly have to deal with people with intellectual disabilities (ID) who are in need of end-of-life care. This is a specific type of care that may require a different approach to the focus on participation that currently characterizes the care for people with ID. This paper describes the shifts in care approaches and attitudes that relatives and professionals perceive as the death of a person with ID approaches, as well as the values underlying these shifts. A qualitative design was used to reconstruct the cases of twelve recently deceased people with ID. Relatives and professionals who were closest to the person at the end of their life were interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data were analyzed inductively, using elements of thematic analysis. Five shifts were found: 1) adapting to a new strategy of comforting care, taking over tasks and symptom relief, 2) interweaving of emotional and professional involvement, 3) stronger reliance on the joint interpretation of signals expressing distress and pain, 4) magnified feeling of responsibility in medical decisions, 5) intensified caring relationship between 'two families': relatives and care staff. Six relational values were behind these shifts: 'being there' for the person with ID, 'being responsive' to the person's needs, 'reflection' on their own emotions and caring relationships, 'attentiveness' to the ID person's wishes and expressions of distress, 'responsibility' for taking joint decisions in the best interests of the person, and 'openness to cooperation and sharing' the care with others. End-of-life care for people with ID involves curtailing expectations of participation and skill acquirement, and an increase in teamwork featuring intensified comforting care, symptom management and medical decision making. Three caring relationships need to be fostered: the relationship with the person with ID, relationships among professionals and the relationship between

  6. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  7. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  8. Implementation of personalized music listening for assisted living residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly; Liu, Winston W; Goltz, Daniel; Fixsen, Emma; Kirchner, Stephen; Hu, Janice; White, Heidi

    2018-05-03

    Personalized music listening (PML) has been touted as a safe and inexpensive means of improving the quality of life, mood, and behavior of persons with dementia. A PML program was implemented in an assisted living facility and evaluated across the five dimensions of the RE-AIM framework: reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. The first 17 residents invited to participate were enrolled and followed over eight months. Effectiveness was evident in staff-reported mood improvement in 62% of encounters. Adoption was evident in qualitative feedback collected from medication technicians. Implementation was facilitated by low costs, engagement of external volunteers, highlighting outcomes that are relevant to staff, and attention to playlists over time. Maintenance required continued engagement of volunteers, ongoing fundraising, attention to facility staff engagement, and iterative adjustments to the program framework as staffing changes occurred. PML was found to be a meaningful intervention that is possible at a reasonable cost. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determinants of staff commitment to hip protectors in long-term care: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korall, Alexandra M B; Loughin, Thomas M; Feldman, Fabio; Cameron, Ian D; Leung, Pet Ming; Sims-Gould, Joanie; Godin, Judith; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    2018-06-01

    respect between residents and staff and perceived contribution to quality of life of the residents they serve (100%; 0.10; 0.05, 0.15), and frequency of transformational leadership practices by respondents' primary supervisors (100%; 0.01; 0.01, 0.02). We provide novel insight into the factors governing staff commitment to hip protectors in long-term care. Targeting of these factors could improve acceptance and adherence with hip protectors, thereby contributing to enhanced effectiveness of hip protectors to prevent hip fractures in long-term care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Research Staff | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer/Editor /Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  11. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  12. Pioneering partnerships: Resident involvement from multiple perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; Abma, T.A.; Boelsma, F.; Woelders, S.

    2013-01-01

    Resident involvement in residential care homes is a challenge due to shortcomings of consumerist and formal approaches such as resident councils. The PARTNER approach aims to involve residents through collective action to improve their community life and wellbeing. The purpose of this article is to

  13. Promoting a healthy diet and physical activity in adults with intellectual disabilities living in community residences: Design and evaluation of a cluster-randomized intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wihlman Ulla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adults with intellectual disabilities have poor dietary habits, low physical activity and weight disturbances. This study protocol describes the design and evaluation of a health intervention aiming to improve diet and physical activity in this target group. In Sweden, adults with intellectual disabilities often live in community residences where the staff has insufficient education regarding the special health needs of residents. No published lifestyle interventions have simultaneously targeted both residents and staff. Methods/Design The intervention is designed to suit the ordinary work routines of community residences. It is based on social cognitive theory and takes 12-15 months to complete. The intervention includes three components: 1 Ten health education sessions for residents in their homes; 2 the appointment of a health ambassador among the staff in each residence and formation of a network; and 3 a study circle for staff in each residence. The intervention is implemented by consultation with managers, training of health educators, and coaching of health ambassadors. Fidelity is assessed based on the participation of residents and staff in the intervention activities. The study design is a cluster-randomised trial with physical activity as primary outcome objectively assessed by pedometry. Secondary outcomes are dietary quality assessed by digital photography, measured weight, height and waist circumference, and quality of life assessed by a quality of life scale. Intermediate outcomes are changes in work routines in the residences assessed by a questionnaire to managers. Adults with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities living in community residences in Stockholm County are eligible for inclusion. Multilevel analysis is used to evaluate effects on primary and secondary outcomes. The impact of the intervention on work routines in community residences is analysed by ordinal regression analysis. Barriers and

  14. Preparedness for End of Life-a Survey of Jerusalem District Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaulov, Adir; Frankel, Meir; Rubinow, Alan; Maaravi, Yoram; Brezis, Mayer

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care in nursing homes. Survey and semistructured interviews. Jerusalem district nursing homes. Staff members of 28 long-term care and skilled nursing facilities in the Jerusalem area in Israel of various ethnic, religious, and administrative affiliations (N = 207). Qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews and statistical analysis of questionnaires. Most staff members reported that EOL preferences were unknown for more than 90% of residents and that fewer than 10% had a healthcare proxy. Most staff members recalled conducting fewer than five EOL conversations over the past year with residents or family members and could recall fewer than five cases in which a resident was allowed to die in the nursing home. According to staff opinions the prevalence of tube feeding was estimated at greater than 10%, initiated because of aspiration, malnutrition, and understaffing, often against family's preferences. More than 25% of staff members believed that pain management was inadequate. Knowledge about management of chronic pain was poor in half of nurses and nearly one-third of physicians. Most staff would rather not receive the treatments they administered to residents. Nursing homes in Jerusalem lack competency for quality EOL care, and there are multiple psychological, training, and policy challenges to improvement. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROGRAM OF EMPOWERMENT OF THE WOMEN RESIDING AT THE COASTAL AREA OF AMPENAN DISTRICT, MATARAM CITY, LOMBOK IMPLEMENTED IN THE FORM OF LIFE SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Listiawati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The program of the empowerment of the women living in Mataram City implemented inthe form of life skills including vocational skill, social skill, and personal skill has been carriedout since 2001. In reality, the attempts already made could not improve the well-being of thewomen in Mataram City in general and the women living along the coastal area of Ampenan,South Ampenan District and Banjar District in particular. Based on the background mentionedabove, the researcher was interested in exploring the effectiveness of the program of theempowerment provided in the form life skills. Three problems are formulated in this research.They are (1 how effective the implementation of the empowerment program of the womenresiding at the coastal area of Ampenan District was?; (2 what factors contributed to theeffectiveness of the empowerment program of the women residing at the coastal area?; (3 whatwere the effects and meanings of the effectiveness of the empowerment program of the womenresiding at the coastal area? The theories employed to answer the problems formulated above arethe theory of post feminism by Ann Brooks, the theory of social practice by Bourdieu and thetheory of power/knowledge by Foucault. The theories were eclectically applied. The qualitativemethod was employed in this study and the data needed were collected by the techniques ofobservation, in-depth interview, Focus Group Discussion (hereon abbreviated to FGD,documentation and library research.The results of the study show that (1 the program of the empowerment of the womenliving in the coastal area was ineffective; (2 the factors which contributed to the effectivenessof the empowerment of the women living along the coastal area are economic capital, culturalcapital, socio culture and symbolic culture; (3 the effects of the effectiveness of theempowerment program were on the skills acquired, the income earned, the independenceacquired, the environment where they live and their pattern

  17. Evaluation of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for life and a cognitive behavioural therapy stress-management workshop to improve healthcare staff stress: study protocol for two randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Clara; Gu, Jenny; Pitman, Nikki; Chapman, Cavita; Kuyken, Willem; Whittington, Adrian

    2018-04-02

    Healthcare workers experience higher levels of work-related stress and higher rates of sickness absence than workers in other sectors. Psychological approaches have potential in providing healthcare workers with the knowledge and skills to recognise stress and to manage stress effectively. The strongest evidence for effectiveness in reducing stress in the workplace is for stress-management courses based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) principles and mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs). However, research examining effects of these interventions on sickness absence (an objective indicator of stress) and compassion for others (an indicator of patient care) is limited, as is research on brief CBT stress-management courses (which may be more widely accessible) and on MBIs adapted for workplace settings. This protocol is for two randomised controlled trials with participant preference between the two trials and 1:1 allocation to intervention or wait-list within the preferred choice. The first trial is examining a one-day CBT stress-management workshop and the second trial an 8-session Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Life (MBCT-L) course, with both trials comparing intervention to wait-list. The primary outcome for both trials is stress post-intervention with secondary outcomes being sickness absence, compassion for others, depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, wellbeing, work-related burnout, self-compassion, presenteeism, and mindfulness (MBCT-L only). Both trials aim to recruit 234 staff working in the National Health Service in the UK. This trial will examine whether a one-day CBT stress-management workshop and an 8-session MBCT-L course are effective at reducing healthcare staff stress and other mental health outcomes compared to wait-list, and, whether these interventions are effective at reducing sickness absence and presenteeism and at enhancing wellbeing, self-compassion, mindfulness and compassion for others. Findings will help inform

  18. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Live a life in residential care : The importance of social climate for the well-being of adolescents in care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leipoldt, Jonathan David; Rimehaug, Tormod; Harder, A.T.; Kayed, Nanna; Grietens, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Troubled youngsters in residential youth care (RYC) institutions live their daily life in and around the institutions with other disturbed youngsters and different staff members. The effect that this emerging social climate has on residents in RYC institutions is not very clear and sometimes

  20. Medication reconciliation in nursing homes: thematic differences between RN and LPN staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsmeier, Amy A; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill R; Pepper, Ginette A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe medication reconciliation practices in nursing homes with a specific focus on nursing staff involvement in the process. The study was conducted in eight Midwestern nursing homes and included 46 onsite observations of resident transfers to the nursing home. Informal interviews of nursing staff performing medication reconciliation were conducted during each observation. Findings suggest nursing home nursing staff, including both RN and licensed practical nurse (LPN) staff, were primarily responsible for performing medication reconciliation; however, these staff often varied in how they processed resident transfer information to identify medication order discrepancies. Patterns of differences were found related to their perceptions about medication reconciliation, as well as their actions when performing the process. RN staff were more often focused on resident safety and putting the "big picture" together, whereas LPN staff were more often focused on the administrative assignment and "completing the task." Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Decision Factors Nurses Use to Assess Pain in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Todd B; Parish, Abby; Mion, Lorraine C

    2015-10-01

    Nurses caring for older people with various psychiatric illnesses face many obstacles when treating pain. One setting with a high percentage of psychiatric conditions is long-term care where more than half of residents have some form of dementia, and behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSDs) may mimic behavioral displays of pain. Furthermore, two-thirds of nursing home residents have pain. Thus, many nursing home residents with dementia have pain that may be confounded by BSDs. Since many people with dementia are at risk for poor pain management, determining current methods in which nurses assess and manage pain in nursing home residents will aid in recognizing potential barriers to using current pain management guidelines and help develop strategies to enhance nurses' assessment and management of pain in this vulnerable population. The aim of this study was to explore nursing home nurses' cues and practices to identify and alleviate pain in nursing home residents with dementia. Nurses use the constructs of 'comfort' and 'quality of life' as key components in their overall pain assessment strategy in people with dementia. Indeed, the extensive process they use involving frequent reassessment and application of interventions is geared towards "appearance of comfort." Nurses reported difficulty in ascertaining whether a person with dementia was in pain, and they expressed further difficulty determining the intensity associated with resident pain. Nurses further reported that residents with dementia who are not well know by the staff were are greater risk of poor pain management. It was not unusual for nurses to discuss the importance of conflict resolution among family members as well as allowing for open expression of family's concerns. Nurses had to focus not only on the resident's comfort, but also the families' level of comfort with pain management, especially at the end-of-life. Findings support further use and development of discomfort behavior scales to help

  2. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Novel Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire for Food Service Staff of Aged Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M; Hamilton, J; Scupham, R; Matwiejczyk, L; Prichard, I; Farrer, O; Yaxley, A

    2018-01-01

    -retest reliability coefficients ranged from 0.276 to 0.826 dependent on domain, with test-retest reliability established in seven domains at r>0.4; an exception was "reliability" at r=0.276. The newly developed Flinders FSSQFSAC has acceptable validity and reliability and thereby the potential to measure satisfaction of food service staff working in residential aged care homes, identify areas for strategic change, measure improvements and in turn, improve the satisfaction and quality of life of both food service staff and residents of aged care homes.

  3. The concept of an information analytical system monitoring of radiation situation and social-hygienic life conditions for residents in the areas influenced by Mayak production association (MPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsova, E.M.; Kravtsova, O.S.

    1996-01-01

    The development of computerized informational-analytical system is started with the purpose to organize monitoring and to estimate radiation effect on population residing in the zone affected by MPA (1992). The data base includes a special information block containing social-economic characteristics. A specific feature of the method used to create the data base is the focus on the family connections. Currently the block meant for registration of environmental monitoring, in residential areas around Mayak plants has been developed most completely

  4. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  5. Research Staff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis Associate Lab Director-Bio research to accomplish the objectives of the Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office, and to serve as a spokesperson for the bioenergy research effort at NREL, both internally and externally. This

  6. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  7. Text messaging among residents and faculty in a university general surgery residency program: prevalence, purpose, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Galante, Joseph M; Bold, Richard J; Canter, Robert J; Martinez, Steve R

    2013-01-01

    There is little information about the use of text messaging (texting) devices among resident and faculty physicians for patient-related care (PRC). To determine the prevalence, frequency, purpose, and concerns regarding texting among resident and attending surgeons and to identify factors associated with PRC texting. E-mail survey. University medical center and its affiliated hospitals. Surgery resident and attending staff. Prevalence, frequency, purpose, and concerns regarding patient-related care text messaging. Overall, 73 (65%) surveyed physicians responded, including 45 resident (66%) and 28 attending surgeons (62%). All respondents owned a texting device. Majority of surgery residents (88%) and attendings (71%) texted residents, whereas only 59% of residents and 65% of attendings texted other faculty. Most resident to resident text occurred at a frequency of 3-5 times/d (43%) compared with most attending to resident texts, which occurred 1-2 times/d (33%). Most resident to attending (25%) and attending to attending (30%) texts occurred 1-2 times/d. Among those that texted, PRC was the most frequently reported purpose for resident to resident (46%), resident to attending (64%), attending to resident (82%), and attending to other attending staff (60%) texting. Texting was the most preferred method to communicate about routine PRC (47% of residents vs 44% of attendings). Age (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.79-0.95; p = 0.003), but not sex, specialty/clinical rotation, academic rank, or postgraduate year (PGY) level predicted PRC texting. Most resident and attending staff surveyed utilize texting, mostly for PRC. Texting was preferred for communicating routine PRC information. Our data may facilitate the development of guidelines for the appropriate use of PRC texting. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...... depends on the actual stand allocation but also on the number of zones and the layout of these. A mathematical model of the problem is proposed, which integrates the stand allocation and the staff scheduling. A heuristic solution method is developed and applied on a real case from British Airways, London...

  9. New staff contract policy

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  10. Roles of Communication Problems and Communication Strategies on Resident-Related Role Demand and Role Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Lee, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of dementia-related communication difficulties and communication strategies used by staff on resident-related indicators of role demand and role satisfaction. Formal/paid long-term care staff caregivers (N = 109) of residents with dementia completed questionnaires on dementia-related communication difficulties, communication strategies, role demand (ie, residents make unreasonable demands), and role satisfaction (measured by relationship closeness and influence over residents). Three types of communication strategies were included: (a) effective repair strategies, (b) completing actions by oneself, and (c) tuning out or ignoring the resident. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that communication problems were positively linked with role demand. Repair strategies were positively linked with relationship closeness and influence over residents. Completing actions by oneself was positively linked to role demand and influence over residents, whereas tuning out was negatively linked with influence over residents. The findings underscore that effective caregiver communication skills are essential in enhancing staff-resident relationships.

  11. What Health and Aged Care Culture Change Models Mean for Residents and Their Families: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Parker, Deborah; Brown Wilson, Christine; Gibson, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    A range of commercialized programs are increasingly being adopted which involve broad culture change within care organizations to implement person-centered care. These claim a range of benefits for clients; however, the published evidence for client and family outcomes from culture change is inconclusive and the evidence for these specific models is difficult to identify. The purpose of this review was to identify and evaluate the peer-reviewed evidence regarding consumer outcomes for these subscription-based models. The review followed the Joanna Briggs Institute procedure. The review considered peer-reviewed literature that reported on studies conducted with health and aged care services, their staff, and consumers, addressed subscription-based person-centered culture change models, and were published in English up to and including 2015. The review identified 19 articles of sufficient quality that reported evidence relating to consumer outcomes and experience. Resident outcomes and family and resident satisfaction and experiences were mixed. Findings suggest potential benefits for some outcomes, particularly related to quality of life and psychiatric symptoms, staff engagement, and functional ability. Although residents and families identified some improvements in residents' lives, both also identified problematic aspects of the change related to staff adjustment and staff time. Outcomes for these models are at best comparable with traditional care with limited suggestions that they result in poorer outcomes and sufficient potential for benefits to warrant further investigation. Although these models may have the potential to benefit residents, the implementation of person-centered principles may affect the outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Advantage and choice: social relationships and staff assistance in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Stephanie; Street, Debra

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES. To understand how "cumulative inequality" (CI), expressed as individual advantage and choice, and "external social supports" contribute to the quality of social relationships and perceptions of staff assistance for older individuals in different assisted living (AL) settings. Data are from 429 cognitively intact AL residents aged 60 years and older interviewed for the Florida Study of Assisted Living. Bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses show how individual advantage and choice and external social networks influence respondents' social relationships and staff assistance in AL. Controlling for resident and facility characteristics, being able to pay privately enhances resident satisfaction with staff assistance and having control over the move to AL is positively associated with perceptions of staff relationships and assistance. Maintaining contact with pre-AL friends predicts quality of coresident relationships, as does family contact. Regular contact with family buffers some of the disadvantages associated with CI for perceptions of staff relationships but not perceptions of staff assistance. Discussion. Individual advantage and choice influence the quality of staff relationships and assistance for AL residents but matter little for coresident relationships. External social relationships buffer some of the risks associated with CI for perceptions of staff relationships but not perceived quality of staff assistance. Findings highlight outcomes associated with CI, including predictable risks that disadvantaged elders face in particular types of AL settings, differential advantages others enjoy that influence positive perceptions of staff relationships and staff assistance, and the enduring importance of supportive social relationships.

  13. Optimisation of staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Marshall, N.W.; Rawlings, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose received by staff, but it is particularly important in interventional radiology. Staff doses may be reduced by minimizing the fluoroscopic screening time and number of images, compatible with the clinical objective of the procedure. Staff may also move to different positions in the room in an attempt to reduce doses. Finally, staff should wear appropriate protective clothing to reduce their occupational doses. This paper will concentrate on the optimization of personal shielding in interventional radiology. The effect of changing the lead equivalence of various protective devices on effective dose to staff has been studied by modeling the exposure of staff to realistic scattered radiation. Both overcouch x-ray tube/undercouch image intensified and overcouch image intensifier/undercouch x-ray tube geometries were simulated. It was deduced from this simulation that increasing the lead apron thickness from 0.35 mm lead to 0.5 mm lead had only a small reducing effect. By contrast, wearing a lead rubber thyroid shield or face mask is a superior means of reducing the effective dose to staff. Standing back from the couch when the x-ray tube is emitting radiation is another good method of reducing doses, being better than exchanging a 0.35 mm lead apron for a 0.5 mm apron. In summary, it is always preferable to shield more organs than to increase the thickness of the lead apron. (author)

  14. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  15. Self rating of health is associated with stressful life events, social support and residency in East and West Berlin shortly after the fall of the wall

    OpenAIRE

    Hillen, T.; Schaub, R.; Hiestermann, A.; Kirschner, W.; Robra, B.

    2000-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To compare the health status and factors influencing the health of populations that had previously lived under different political systems.
DESIGN—Cross sectional health and social survey using postal interviews. The relation between self reported health and psychosocial factors (stressful life events, social support, education, health promoting life style and health endangering behaviour) was investigated. To determine East-West differences a logistic regression model includi...

  16. Effect of occupational mobility and health status on life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations: logistic diagonal mobility models analysis of cross-sectional data on eight Chinese provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Life satisfaction research in China is in development, requiring new perspectives for enrichment. In China, occupational mobility is accompanied by changes in economic liberalization and the emergence of occupational stratification. On the whole, however, occupational mobility has rarely been used as an independent variable. Health status is always used as the observed or dependent variable in studies of the phenomenon and its influencing factors. A research gap still exists for enriching this field. Methods The data used in this study were obtained from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). The study included nine provinces in China. The survey was conducted from 1989 to 2009.Every survey involved approximately 4400 families or 19,000 individual samples and parts of community data. Results First, we built a 5 × 5 social mobility table and calculated life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations in each table. Second, gender, age, marital status, education level, annual income and hukou, health status, occupational mobility were used as independent variables. Lastly, we used logistic diagonal mobility models to analyze the relationship between life satisfaction and the variables. Model 1 was the basic model, which consisted of the standard model and controlled variables and excluded drift variables. Model 2 was the total model, which consisted of all variables of interest in this study. Model 3 was the screening model, which excluded the insignificant drift effect index in Model 2. Conclusion From the perspective of the analysis of controlled variables, health conditions, direction, and distance of occupational mobility significantly affected life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations. (1) From the perspective of health status, respondents who have not been sick or injured had better life satisfaction than those who had been sick or injured. (2) From the perspective of occupational mobility direction

  17. Effect of occupational mobility and health status on life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations: logistic diagonal mobility models analysis of cross-sectional data on eight Chinese provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Lu, Peiyi

    2014-02-08

    Life satisfaction research in China is in development, requiring new perspectives for enrichment. In China, occupational mobility is accompanied by changes in economic liberalization and the emergence of occupational stratification. On the whole, however, occupational mobility has rarely been used as an independent variable. Health status is always used as the observed or dependent variable in studies of the phenomenon and its influencing factors. A research gap still exists for enriching this field. The data used in this study were obtained from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). The study included nine provinces in China. The survey was conducted from 1989 to 2009.Every survey involved approximately 4400 families or 19,000 individual samples and parts of community data. First, we built a 5 × 5 social mobility table and calculated life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations in each table. Second, gender, age, marital status, education level, annual income and hukou, health status, occupational mobility were used as independent variables. Lastly, we used logistic diagonal mobility models to analyze the relationship between life satisfaction and the variables. Model 1 was the basic model, which consisted of the standard model and controlled variables and excluded drift variables. Model 2 was the total model, which consisted of all variables of interest in this study. Model 3 was the screening model, which excluded the insignificant drift effect index in Model 2. From the perspective of the analysis of controlled variables, health conditions, direction, and distance of occupational mobility significantly affected life satisfaction of Chinese residents of different occupations. (1) From the perspective of health status, respondents who have not been sick or injured had better life satisfaction than those who had been sick or injured. (2) From the perspective of occupational mobility direction, the coefficients of occupational

  18. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  19. Staff Performance Analysis: A Method for Identifying Brigade Staff Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, Laura

    1997-01-01

    ... members of conventional mounted brigade staff. Initial analysis of performance requirements in existing documentation revealed that the performance specifications were not sufficiently detailed for brigade battle staffs...

  20. Assessment of life quality in patients with bronchial asthma residing in Krakow in the areas of varying concentrations of particulate matter (PM10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ścibor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Asthma is a chronic disease, from which more and more people in the world suffer. It is connected with many bothersome symptoms and limitations, which result in decreased quality of life for the patient. Environmental and individual aspects do not necessarily affect individuals in the same way, so it is necessary to determine which factors have predominantly impacted on an individual, in order to minimize their impact and to take better control over treatment of asthma. The aim of this research was to compare the quality of life among patients with bronchial asthma living in Krakow in the areas where they get exposed to varying concentrations of particulate matter (PM10. Material and methods. The study included 98 adults diagnosed with bronchial asthma. The research was conducted using the AQLQ poll. PM10 concentration was measured in several Malopolska Air Pollution Monitoring Stations located throughout the city. Results. Analyzing the quality of life in the view of symptoms, activity limitations and emotional well being, there was a substantial statistical difference observed in people occupying the areas with different PM10 concentrations. No significant statistical difference was observed in the frequency of asthma symptoms caused by the environmental stimuli between the 2 discussed groups. One group of patients who came to the allergy clinic for control of asthma symptoms and the second group who live in the vicinity of the monitoring stations measuring PM10 concentrations. Conclusions. For many of the cases, the quality of life was not worse for patients with asthma living in an area with slightly elevated concentrations of PM10, and sometimes paradoxically the quality of life was improved. These results show that PM10 concentrations do not correlate with quality of life of asthma patients.

  1. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Schnapp, Benjamin H.; Slovis, Benjamin H.; Shah, Anar D.; Fant, Abra L.; Gisondi, Michael A.; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lech, Christie A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) iscommon. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with thesevolatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergencymedicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods: This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at mul...

  2. Effects of two feedback interventions on end-of-life outcomes in nursing home residents with dementia: A cluster-randomized controlled three-armed trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, J.A.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Soest-Poortvliet, M.C. van; Anema, J.R.; Achterberg, W.P.; Steen, J.T. van der

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increased attention for palliative care in dementia, recent studies found burdensome symptoms and unmet family caregiver needs in the last phase of life. Feedback is being used to improve the quality of palliative care, but we do not know how effective it is. AIM: To assess the

  3. Is the Quality of Life in the Kentucky Mountains Improving? The Opinions of Community "Knowledgeables" and Ordinary Residents in Four Eastern Kentucky Counties, RS-39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, A. Lee; Gabbard, Anne V.

    As part of a larger study aimed at assessing how local people view recent changes and development programs in four Eastern Kentucky counties (Harlan, Perry, Whitley, and Wolfe), a survey on perceived quality of life was conducted. Data were derived from personal interviews with selected local leaders (varying from 21 to 33 interviews per county)…

  4. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  5. Qualidade de vida e sintomas depressivos em residentes de enfermagem Calidad de vida y sintomas depresivos en residentes de enfermería Quality of life and depressive symptoms in nursing residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfábio Pimentel Franco

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a qualidade de vida e a prevalência de disforia/sintomas depressivos nos residentes de enfermagem de uma Escola Paulista de Medicina. Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, descritivo e transversal com 68 residentes de enfermagem do primeiro e do segundo ano de residência de todas as áreas de especialidade, através da aplicação da versão brasileira do questionário de qualidade de vida SF-36 (Medical Outcomes Study 36 - Item Short-Form Health Survey e da versão brasileira do Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB. Os aspectos relacionados à qualidade de vida mostraram-se comprometidos no componente mental do SF-36: aspectos emocionais, vitalidade e saúde mental. Houve prevalência de disforia/depressão em 27,9% dos residentes de enfermagem.El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la calidad de vida y la prevalencia de disforia/síntomas depresivos en los residentes de enfermería de una escuela de Medicina en São Paulo, Brasil. Este es un estudio exploratorio, descriptivo y transversal con 68 Residentes de Enfermería del primer y segundo año de residencia de todas las áreas de especialidad, por medio de la aplicación de la versión brasileña del instrumento de calidad de vida SF-36 (Medical Outcomes Study 36 - Item Short-Form Health Survey y de la versión brasileña del Inventario de Depresión de Beck (IDB. Los aspectos relacionados a calidad de vida se mostraron comprometidos en el componente mental de la SF-36: aspectos emocionales, vitalidad y salud mental. Observamos prevalencia de disforia/depresión en el 27,9%.This study aimed to evaluate quality of life and prevalence of dysphoria/depressive symptoms in nursing residents at a medical school in São Paulo, Brazil. An exploratory, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out, involving 68 nursing residents from the first and second year of residency from all specialty areas, by applying the Brazilian version of the quality of

  6. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  7. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  8. Medication Refusal: Resident Rights, Administration Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Danielle R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2017-12-01

    Occasionally, residents actively or passively refuse to take medications. Residents may refuse medication for a number of reasons, including religious beliefs, dietary restrictions, misunderstandings, cognitive impairment, desire to self-harm, or simple inconvenience. This action creates a unique situation for pharmacists and long-term facility staff, especially if patients have dementia. Residents have the legal right to refuse medications, and long-term care facilities need to employ a process to resolve disagreement between the health care team that recommends the medication and the resident who refuses it. In some cases, simple interventions like selecting a different medication or scheduling medications in a different time can address and resolve the resident's objection. If the medical team and the resident cannot resolve their disagreement, often an ethics consultation is helpful. Documenting the resident's refusal to take any or all medications, the health care team's actions and any other outcomes are important. Residents' beliefs may change over time, and the health care team needs to be prepared to revisit the issue as necessary.

  9. Uptake of health checks by residents from the Danish social housing sector - a register-based cross-sectional study of patient characteristics in the 'Your Life - Your Health' program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bruun; Sandbaek, Annelli; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor uptake among socio-economically disadvantaged and susceptible populations is a well-known challenge of general health check interventions, and is widely cited as one of the reasons for the lack of population level effects seen in many studies. We report on patient characteristics...... Life - Your Health' program. The analyses consisted of 1) descriptive analysis of the characteristics of attenders/non-attenders, 2) unadjusted and adjusted Poisson regression to examine associations of patient characteristics and uptake of health checks, and 3) decision tree analyses (CHAID......) to examine interaction and homogeneity in patient characteristics among attenders. RESULTS: Of the overall population 30% attended. In a nested cohort of people residing in a particularly deprived social housing settlement, 25% attended. Further, in the overall population, we found an association between...

  10. Research Staff | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff desc Greg Wilson Center Director Dr. Greg Wilson is the Director of @nrel.gov 303-384-6649 Bosco, Nicholas Staff Scientist Nick.Bosco@nrel.gov 303-384-6337 Braunecker, Wade IV-Physics Michael.Deceglie@nrel.gov 303-384-6104 Deline, Chris Staff Engineer Chris.Deline@nrel.gov

  11. Relationship between speaking English as a second language and agitation in people with dementia living in care homes: Results from the MARQUE (Managing Agitation and Raising Quality of life) English national care home survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C; Rapaport, P; Robertson, S; Marston, L; Barber, J; Manela, M; Livingston, G

    2018-03-01

    As not speaking English as a first language may lead to increased difficulties in communication with staff and other residents, we (1) tested our primary hypotheses that care home residents with dementia speaking English as a second language experience more agitation and overall neuropsychiatric symptoms, and (2) explored qualitatively how staff consider that residents' language, ethnicity, and culture might impact on how they manage agitation. We interviewed staff, residents with dementia, and their family carers from 86 care homes (2014-2015) about resident's neuropsychiatric symptoms, agitation, life quality, and dementia severity. We qualitatively interviewed 25 staff. Seventy-one out of 1420 (5%) of care home residents with dementia interviewed spoke English as a second language. After controlling for dementia severity, age, and sex, and accounting for care home and staff proxy clustering, speaking English as a second language compared with as a first language was associated with significantly higher Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (adjusted difference in means 8.3, 95% confidence interval 4.1 to 12.5) and Neuropsychiatric inventory scores (4.1, 0.65 to 7.5). Staff narratives described how linguistic and culturally isolating being in a care home where no residents or staff share your culture or language could be for people with dementia, and how this sometimes caused or worsened agitation. Considering a person with dementia's need to be understood when selecting a care home and developing technology resources to enable dementia-friendly translation services could be important strategies for reducing distress of people with dementia from minority ethnic groups who live in care homes. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Residents' engagement in everyday activities and its association with thriving in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Sabine; Lindkvist, Marie; Wimo, Anders; Juthberg, Christina; Bergland, Ådel; Edvardsson, David

    2017-08-01

    To describe the prevalence of everyday activity engagement for older people in nursing homes and the extent to which engagement in everyday activities is associated with thriving. Research into residents' engagement in everyday activities in nursing homes has focused primarily on associations with quality of life and prevention and management of neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, the mere absence of symptoms does not necessarily guarantee experiences of well-being. The concept of thriving encapsulates and explores experiences of well-being in relation to the place where a person lives. A cross-sectional survey. A national survey of 172 Swedish nursing homes (2013-2014). Resident (n = 4831) symptoms, activities and thriving were assessed by staff using a study survey based on established questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, simple and multiple linear regression, and linear stepwise multiple regression were performed. The most commonly occurring everyday activities were receiving hugs and physical touch, talking to relatives/friends and receiving visitors, having conversation with staff not related to care and grooming. The least commonly occurring everyday activities were going to the cinema, participating in an educational program, visiting a restaurant and doing everyday chores. Positive associations were found between activity engagement and thriving, where engagement in an activity program, dressing nicely and spending time with someone the resident likes had the strongest positive association with resident thriving. Engagement in everyday activities can support personhood and thriving and can be conceptualized and implemented as nursing interventions to enable residents to thrive in nursing homes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  14. Uptake of health checks by residents from the Danish social housing sector - a register-based cross-sectional study of patient characteristics in the 'Your Life - Your Health' program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lars Bruun; Sandbaek, Annelli; Thomsen, Janus Laust; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    2018-05-02

    Poor uptake among socio-economically disadvantaged and susceptible populations is a well-known challenge of general health check interventions, and is widely cited as one of the reasons for the lack of population level effects seen in many studies. We report on patient characteristics among attendees and non-attendees of health checks made available to residents in the social housing sector of the municipality of Aarhus. We focus on this general population, as well as a particular sub-group living in an exceptionally deprived social housing area, and discuss the properties of intervention uptake that we need to be aware of to qualify and compare the effects of general versus targeted health checks in socially deprived areas. Cross-sectionally in a sample of 6650 residents of the Aarhus social housing sector who were invited for a health check in the first year of the 'Your Life - Your Health' program. The analyses consisted of 1) descriptive analysis of the characteristics of attenders/non-attenders, 2) unadjusted and adjusted Poisson regression to examine associations of patient characteristics and uptake of health checks, and 3) decision tree analyses (CHAID) to examine interaction and homogeneity in patient characteristics among attenders. Of the overall population 30% attended. In a nested cohort of people residing in a particularly deprived social housing settlement, 25% attended. Further, in the overall population, we found an association between the likelihood of taking up a health check and age, sex, country of origin, educational attainment, cohabitation, occupational status, and past medical treatment. In the nested cohort the association between uptake and medical treatment was non-significant, while the association between uptake and occupation was limited to people who were employed. These results resonate with past evidence on health check attendance. Attendance in the 'Your Life - Your Health' program is higher among people of a higher socio

  15. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fifth Chief of Staff Division, namely Finance, is the end result of ... 1946 was able to report in 1948 that there had ... the same time however, the Secretary referred ... mended that because 'the existing dual arrange- ... tigate the division of functions in the Department. ... randum discussing the different arguments sur-.

  16. Staff Development Redesigned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Contends that staff development, supposedly designed to assist teachers, has instead colluded with forces to continue their colonization. Since teachers are not taking charge of their profession and participating actively in educational change, certain actions must be taken to lighten their nonprofessional workload and to build a professional…

  17. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), France. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  18. Institutionalizing Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, William F.

    Three years ago, Golden West College (GWC) decided to make a major commitment to staff development as a means of revitalizing the college. This commitment was evidenced through the creation of the position of Dean of Educational Development, who is responsible solely for serving faculty needs; the Educational Development Center, which houses the…

  19. ["Gender-specific needs of nursing home residents" : Focus on personal hygiene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinger, J; Dummert, S

    2016-12-01

    Residential nursing homes are specialized in dealing with people in need of care and are required to respect their dignity and right to self-determination. This includes the respectful handling of gender-specific needs and wishes of residents. Personal hygiene is one important area to which this applies. This study was carried out to investigate residents' gender-specific perception of life and care in nursing homes. This article focuses on unspecific and gender-specific needs in the area of personal hygiene, seeking to identify where changes are needed. Structured interviews were conducted in four nursing homes with a total of ten male and ten female residents without cognitive impairments. Content analysis and description of findings proceeded in two stages: interviewees' experiences of everyday life and care were first reconstructed before gender-specific aspects were analyzed. Both universal and gender-specific needs were identified in the area of personal hygiene. The gender-unspecific wish for respect for dignity and privacy was in some cases neglected. A need for meaningful communication and respectful relationships was also gender-unspecific. Gender-specific wishes related in particular to the gender of persons assisting with or conducting personal hygiene measures. In addition to improved perception and consideration of gender-specific needs, it is also necessary to adapt nursing in residential institutions more closely to the individual needs of residents. Further research is needed in relation to the perspectives of nursing staff and the development of participatory methods for involving residents in shaping everyday life in residential institutions.

  20. Bullying in Senior Living Facilities: Perspectives of Long-Term Care Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Felicia J; Buchanan, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-01

    Resident-to-resident bullying has attracted attention in the media, but little empirical literature exists related to the topic of senior bullying. The aim of the current study was to better understand resident-to-resident bullying from the perspective of staff who work with older adults. Forty-five long-term care staff members were interviewed regarding their observations of bullying. Results indicate that most staff members have observed bullying. Verbal bullying was the most observed type of bullying, but social bullying was also prevalent. Victims and perpetrators were reported to commonly have cognitive and physical disabilities. More than one half of participants had not received formal training and only 21% reported their facility had a formal policy to address bullying. The implications of these results support the need for detailed policies and training programs for staff to effectively intervene when bullying occurs. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(7), 34-41.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  2. Comparison of caregivers', residents', and community-dwelling spouses' opinions about expressing sexuality in an institutional setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, M C; Bol, N; Woodbury, M G; Beaton, C; Janke, C

    1999-04-01

    Opinions regarding the appropriateness of elderly residents' sexual behaviors in a chronic care hospital and how to respond to inappropriate behaviors were surveyed. Study participation was open to all staff (N = 1,205), eligible residents (N = 182) and community-dwelling spouses (N = 103). Participation rates were 40% (residents), 42% (spouses), 34% (nursing staff), 50% (allied health staff), and 22% (support staff). Staff completed the questionnaire independently, while residents and spouses were offered self-completion or a structured interview. Almost all selected the interview. Residents and spouses were less tolerant than staff of residents' masturbating, engaging in sexual relationships, viewing sexual materials, and making sexual approaches to staff. Privacy was the primary determinant of appropriateness for behaviors for all groups. Staff and spouses were more likely to endorse counseling when behaviors were perceived as inappropriate than residents. Nurses endorsed counseling less frequently than allied health professionals and support staff. Nurses were more likely to have been approached sexually by a resident. Differences of opinion are interpreted in terms of cohort influences on values and contextual influences on behavior.

  3. [Part-time residency training in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, Dana; Levi, Baruch; Borow, Malke; Ashkenazi, Shai; Lindner, Arie

    2012-08-01

    Full-time work has long been perceived as a cornerstone of medical residency, the consensus being that a resident must apply the bulk of his time and attention to his professional training. Demographic and cultural changes that have taken place over the last several years, specifically the rise in the number of female doctors and the importance of leisure time to the younger generation, have intensified the need to find new and innovative ways to deal with the plight of the resident population. One idea, already in effect in many Western countries, is the institution of part-time residency programs. The possibility of fulfilling residency requirements on a part-time basis is intended to assist medical residents in integrating their professional development with their personal and family life, without compromising the quality of their training. A number of research studies conducted over the last several years in countries that allow part-time residency, among them the United States, England and Switzerland, aimed to examine the quality of part-time training. The various studies evinced a high level of satisfaction from the program both by the residents themselves and their supervisors, and in many aspects those doing residency part-time received higher appraisals than their full-time colleagues. Some of the residents polled noted that they would have totally foregone the practice of medicine had there not been an option to complete residency part-time. In light of the experience throughout the world and the changing landscape in Israel, the Scientific Council of the Israeli Medical Association decided to examine the issue and its various aspects, and weighed all the considerations in favor and against part-time residency. Recently, the Scientific Council approved the launch of a pilot program to allow part-time residency in several fields that were carefully selected according to specific criteria. Once the Ministry of Health completes the LegisLation process, part

  4. Peer training of safety-related skills to institutional staff: benefits for trainers and trainees.

    OpenAIRE

    van Den Pol, R A; Reid, D H; Fuqua, R W

    1983-01-01

    A peer training program, in which experienced staff trained new staff, was evaluated as a method for teaching and maintaining safety-related caregiver skills in an institutional setting for the developmentally disabled. Three sets of safety-type skills were assessed in simulated emergency situations: responding to facility fires, managing aggressive attacks by residents, and assisting residents during convulsive seizures. Using a multiple-baseline research design, results indicated that the p...

  5. Effectiveness of interventions to improve family-staff relationships in the care of people with dementia in residential aged care: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mynhi; Pachana, Nancy A; Beattie, Elizabeth; Fielding, Elaine; Ramis, Mary-Anne

    2015-11-01

    in duration, unfamiliar, unpredictable and ambiguous. In the later stages of dementia, many family caregivers relocate their relative to a residential aged care facility, most often when the burden of care outweighs the means of the caregiver. This is especially likely when the person with dementia ages, and has lower cognitive function increased limitations in activities in daily living and poorer self-related health. As a result, approximately 50% of all persons aged 65 years or over admitted into residential aged care facilities have dementia.The relocation of a relative into a residential aged care facility can be complex and distressing for family caregivers. While relocation alleviates many issues for the family caregiver, it does not consequently reduce their stress. The stress experienced by the family caregivers who remain involved post-relocation often continues and may even worsen. This is because family caregivers are uncertain about how to transition from a direct caregiving role to a more indirect, supportive interpersonal role, and may be provided with little support from care staff in this regard. Although family caregivers experience a new form of stress post-relocation, family involvement in residential aged care settings has been shown to be beneficial to residents with dementia, their families and care staff.Family involvement is widely acknowledged to provide the resident physical and emotional healing, optimal well-being, and the sustainment of quality of life. Family caregivers benefit from improved satisfaction with the facility and experiences of care, and greater well-being. Care staff benefit from enhanced job satisfaction and greater motivation to remain in their job. The key to these positive outcomes is effective communication and strong relationships between care staff and family caregivers.Effective communication between care staff and family caregivers is crucial for residents with dementia. This is because residents with cognitive

  6. Implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in Ontario long-term care homes: Recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants' perceptions of policy and practice issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducak, Kate; Denton, Margaret; Elliot, Gail

    2018-01-01

    Montessori-based activities use a person-centred approach to benefit persons living with dementia by increasing their participation in, and enjoyment of, daily life. This study investigated recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants' perceptions of factors that affected implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. Qualitative data were obtained during semi-structured telephone interviews with 17 participants who worked in these homes. A political economy of aging perspective guided thematic data analysis. Barriers such as insufficient funding and negative attitudes towards activities reinforced a task-oriented biomedical model of care. Various forms of support and understanding helped put Montessori Methods for Dementia™ into practice as a person-centred care program, thus reportedly improving the quality of life of residents living with dementia, staff and family members. These results demonstrate that when Montessori Methods for Dementia™ approaches are learned and understood by staff they can be used as practical interventions for long-term care residents living with dementia.

  7. Improving the Quality of Staff and Participant Interaction in an Acquired Brain Injury Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guercio, John M.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Weekly observations of direct-care staff in a facility for persons with brain injury yielded less than optimal interactional style with facility residents. Following an observational baseline, staff were asked to self-rate a 15-min video sample of their interaction behavior with participants on their unit. They were then asked to compare their…

  8. Directorate of Management - Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGB Official March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J-7 J-8 Personal Staff Inspector General Judge Advocate General Officer Management Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  9. Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  10. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Rosocha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a well-known method from statistical thermodynamics. We define hard constraints, which are linked to legal and working regulations, and minimize the violations of soft constraints, which are related to the quality of work, psychic, and work-life balance of staff.Findings: On a sample of 60 physicians and nurses from gynecology department we generated monthly schedules and optimized their preferences in terms of soft constraints. Our results indicate that the final value of objective function optimized by proposed algorithm is more than 18-times better in violations of soft constraints than initially generated random schedule that satisfied hard constraints.Research Limitation/implication: Even though the global optimality of final outcome is not guaranteed, desirable solutionwas obtained in reasonable time. Originality/Value of paper: We show that designed algorithm is able to successfully generate schedules regarding hard and soft constraints. Moreover, presented method is significantly faster than standard schedule generation and is able to effectively reschedule due to the local neighborhood search characteristics of simulated annealing.

  11. Changes in Personal Relationships During Residency and Their Effects on Resident Wellness: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Marcus; Lam, Michelle; Wu, Diana; Veinot, Paula; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Residency poses challenges for residents' personal relationships. Research suggests residents rely on family and friends for support during their training. The authors explored the impact of residency demands on residents' personal relationships and the effects changes in those relationships could have on their wellness. The authors used a constructivist grounded theory approach. In 2012-2014, they conducted semistructured interviews with a purposive and theoretical sample of 16 Canadian residents from various specialties and training levels. Data analysis occurred concurrently with data collection, allowing authors to use a constant comparative approach to explore emergent themes. Transcripts were coded; codes were organized into categories and then themes to develop a substantive theory. Residents perceived their relationships to be influenced by their evolving professional identity: Although personal relationships were important, being a doctor superseded them. Participants suggested they were forced to adapt their personal relationships, which resulted in the evolution of a hierarchy of relationships that was reinforced by the work-life imbalance imposed by their training. This poor work-life balance seemed to result in relationship issues and diminish residents' wellness. Participants applied coping mechanisms to manage the conflict arising from the adaptation and protect their relationships. To minimize the effects of identity dissonance, some gravitated toward relationships with others who shared their professional identity or sought social comparison as affirmation. Erosion of personal relationships could affect resident wellness and lead to burnout. Educators must consider how educational programs impact relationships and the subsequent effects on resident wellness.

  12. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  13. Remediation of problematic residents--A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Nasir I; Ahmed, Aadil; Stewart, Michael G; Miller, Robert H; Choi, Sukgi S

    2016-04-01

    Despite careful selection processes, residency programs face the challenge of training residents who fall below minimal performance standards. Poor performance of a resident can endanger both patient safety and the reputation of the residency program. It is important, therefore, for a program to identify such residents and implement strategies for their successful remediation. The purpose of our study was to gather information on evaluation and remediation strategies employed by different otolaryngology programs. Cross-sectional survey. We conducted a national survey, sending a questionnaire to the program directors of 106 otolaryngology residency programs. We collected information on demographics of the program, identification of problematic residents, and remediation strategies. The response rate was 74.5%, with a 2% cumulative incidence of problematic residents in otolaryngology programs during the past 10 years. The most frequently reported deficiencies of problematic residents were unprofessional behavior with colleagues/staff (38%), insufficient medical knowledge (37%), and poor clinical judgment (34%). Personal or professional stress was the most frequently identified underlying problem (70.5%). Remediation efforts included general counseling (78%), frequent feedback sessions (73%), assignment of a mentor (58%), and extra didactics (47%). These remediation efforts failed to produce improvement in 23% of the identified residents, ultimately leading to their dismissal. The apparent deficiencies, underlying causes, and remediation strategies vary among otolaryngology residency programs. Based on the results of this survey, we offer recommendations for the early identification of problematic residents and a standardized remediation plan. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. An intervention targeting fundamental values among caregivers at residential facilities: effects of a cluster-randomized controlled trial on residents' self-reported empowerment, person-centered climate and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Charlotte; Silén, Marit; Skytt, Bernice; Engström, Maria

    2016-07-07

    In Sweden the national fundamental values for care of older people state that care should ensure that they can live in dignity and with a sense of well-being. Our hypothesis was that a caregiver intervention targeting the national fundamental values would improve perceived empowerment, person-centered climate and life satisfaction among older people living in residential facilities. The study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial with a pre- and one post-test design, conducted in 27 units (17 study units) at 12 residential facilities for older people in five municipalities in central Sweden. The units in each municipality were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The caregiver intervention was carried out using an interpretative approach with eight guided face-to-face seminars, where self-reflection and dialogue were used. Data were collected using questionnaires. The number of residents was 43 (78 %) in the intervention group and 37 (71 %) in the control group. The Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were performed to detect differences between groups and Wilcoxon signed rank tests to explore differences in change over time within groups. Furthermore, generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to study effects of the intervention controlling for clustering effects. Primary outcome measures were empowerment, person-centered climate and life satisfaction. In the intervention group, improvements at follow-up were found in residents' self-reported empowerment (n = 42; p = 0.001, Median difference 4.0, 95 % CI 1.5;6.0), person-centered climate (n = 42; p ≤0.001, Median difference 8.0, 95 % CI 4.5;11.4) and life satisfaction regarding the factor quality of everyday activities (n = 40; p = 0.033, Median difference 9.7, 95 % CI 1.0;21.9) while disempowerment decreased (n = 43; p = 0.018, Median difference -1.3, 95 % CI -2.0;0.0). In the control group person-centered climate decreased (n = 37; p

  15. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, Benjamin H; Slovis, Benjamin H; Shah, Anar D; Fant, Abra L; Gisondi, Michael A; Shah, Kaushal H; Lech, Christie A

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe "Occasionally," "Seldom" or "Never" while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts.

  16. Research Staff | Water Power | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the water power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer /Editor/Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  17. Preliminary Report of a Pilot Tele-Health Palliative Care and Bioethics Program for Residents in Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean O’Mahony

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently about 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, many with poorly controlled pain and other symptoms, with minimal provisions for psychosocial support. New models are necessary to lessen structural and process barriers to give effective end-of-life care in nursing homes. Objectives: 1 To extend hospital-based Bioethics Consultation Services (BCS and Palliative Care Services (PCS at Montefiore Medical Center (MMC in the Bronx to two local Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs, Morningside House Aging in America (MSH using direct face-to-face consultations and Beth Abraham Health Systems (BAHS via video consultations (VC; 2 Achieve improvements in quality of life and comfort for elderly residents and their families; 2a Improve the level of practice and increase staff satisfaction with palliative care content-related knowledge and bioethical analysis. Methods: We report preliminary findings of this two group quasi experimental project with results of pre- and post- tests rating content-related knowledge in aspects of end-of-life care for staff. Select pre-test and post-test questions were given to physicians and other staff, but were re-configured for, registered and licensed practice nurses, social workers, and certified nursing assistants from the End-of-Life Physician Education Resource Center (EPERC. Patient, family, and staff ratings of the quality of palliative care were measured with a Palliative Outcomes Scale (POS one week prior to and post consultation. Results: 72 staff attended in-services; 53 completed pre-tests and 49 post-tests. Overall knowledge scores increased for 9 of the 16 items that were analyzed. There were improvements in knowledge scores in 12 of 16 items tested for staff content related knowledge which were statistically significant in regard to management of cancer pain from 63.8% to 81.5% (p = 0.03 and a trend to significance for assessment and management of delirium from 31.6% to 61.9% (p = 0.073. Seventy five POS

  18. Working conditions, work life and quality of life of the temporary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Working conditions, work life and quality of life of the temporary support staff ... and expectations of the temporary support staff with regard to their working ... conditions mainly as unpleasant, but that they adapted because of the team spirit.

  19. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  20. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  1. Difficult relationships--interactions between family members and staff in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, S

    2000-01-01

    Staff of long-term care facilities and family members have a common responsibility to ensure the best course of treatment and everyday care for residents who often cannot speak for themselves. Understanding the difference between instrumental and preservative care, and who the proper agent is to provide care in each category will not only improve staff/family interactions, but residential care in general. The Resident Enrichment and Activity Program improves the family/staff relationship obliquely by involving family in social activities; the Family Involvement in Care program, and the Patterns in Caregiving program directly target the relationship and involve the facility's administration to effect policy change.

  2. Natural course of care dependency in residents of long-term care facilities: prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caljouw, Monique A A; Cools, Herman J M; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2014-05-22

    Insight in the natural course of care dependency of vulnerable older persons in long-term care facilities (LTCF) is essential to organize and optimize individual tailored care. We examined changes in care dependency in LTCF residents over two 6-month periods, explored the possible predictive factors of change and the effect of care dependency on mortality. A prospective follow-up study in 21 Dutch long-term care facilities. 890 LTCF residents, median age 84 (Interquartile range 79-88) years participated. At baseline, 6 and 12 months, care dependency was assessed by the nursing staff with the Care Dependency Scale (CDS), range 15-75 points. Since the median CDS score differed between men and women (47.5 vs. 43.0, P = 0.013), CDS groups (low, middle and high) were based on gender-specific 33% of CDS scores at baseline and 6 months. At baseline, the CDS groups differed in median length of stay on the ward, urine incontinence and dementia (all P dependency status, predicted an increase in care dependency over time. The majority of residents were stable in their care dependency status over two subsequent 6-month periods. Highly care dependent residents showed an increased mortality risk. Awareness of the natural course of care dependency is essential to residents and their formal and informal caregivers when considering therapeutic and end-of-life care options.

  3. Motherhood during residency training: challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Allyn; Gold, Michelle; Jensen, Phyllis; Jedrzkiewicz, Michelle

    2005-07-01

    To determine what factors enable or impede women in a Canadian family medicine residency program from combining motherhood with residency training. To determine how policies can support these women, given that in recent decades the number of female family medicine residents has increased. Qualitative study using in-person interviews. McMaster University Family Medicine Residency Program. Twenty-one of 27 family medicine residents taking maternity leave between 1994 and 1999. Semistructured interviews. The research team reviewed transcripts of audiotaped interviews for emerging themes; consensus was reached on content and meaning. NVIVO software was used for data analysis. Long hours, unpredictable work demands, guilt because absences from work increase workload for colleagues, and residents' high expectations of themselves cause pregnant residents severe stress. This stress continues upon return to work; finding adequate child care is an added stress. Residents report receiving less support from colleagues and supervisors upon return to work; they associate this with no longer being visibly pregnant. Physically demanding training rotations put additional strain on pregnant residents and those newly returned to work. Flexibility in scheduling rotations can help accommodate needs at home. Providing breaks, privacy, and refrigerators at work can help maintain breastfeeding. Allowing residents to remain involved in academic and clinical work during maternity leave helps maintain clinical skills, build new knowledge, and promote peer support. Pregnancy during residency training is common and becoming more common. Training programs can successfully enhance the experience of motherhood during residency by providing flexibility at work to facilitate a healthy balance among the competing demands of family, work, and student life.

  4. Staff Stress and Burnout in Intellectual Disability Services: Work Stress Theory and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Jason; Hastings, Richard; Noone, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Background: Staff in intellectual disability services can be at risk of stress and burnout at work. Given that staff well-being has implications for the quality of life of the staff themselves and people with intellectual disabilities themselves, this is an important research and practical topic. In this paper, we review work stress theories that…

  5. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  6. Reduction of energy essential to human life by 70%. Environment-friendly residence `ED-1` utilizing the sunlight effectively; Seikatsu ni hitsuyona energy no 70% sakugen. Taiyoko riyo no kankyo kyosei jutaku ED-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This paper presents the environment-friendly residence `ED-1` utilizing the sunlight effectively. ED-1 of 97m{sup 2} in first floor area and 81m{sup 2} in second one has, on its roof, the photovoltaic power generation system, the solar hot water collector which supplies hot water by circulating heated antifreezing solution into a hot storage tank, and the solar hot wind collector which largely contributes to energy saving together with a hot room named an S unit on the first floor. The small S unit faced toward the south adjacent to a dining room is made of timber and thermal insulation glass. The S unit stores heat in a floor by taking the sunlight into a room in winter, while enhances a heating effect by discharging stored heat in nighttime. In some cases, duct circulation of heated wind is possible. Solar radiation of 90% can be removed by outside glass fiber screen of the S unit together with double glazing coated by special metal film. Roof material is superior in heat insulation, air tightness and energy saving, while floor material in sound insulation and heat storage. The target for reducing energy essential to human life by 70% was thus nearly achieved. 1 fig.

  7. Feasibility of a web-based dementia feeding skills training program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Amella, Elaine J; Zapka, Jane; Mueller, Martina; Beck, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Nursing home (NH) staff do not receive adequate training for providing feeding assistance to residents with dementia who exhibit aversive feeding behaviors (e.g., clamping mouth shut). The result is often low meal intake for these residents. This feasibility study tested a web-based dementia feeding skills program for staff in two United States NHs. Randomly assigned, the intervention staff received web-based dementia feeding skills training with coaching. Both groups participated in web-based pre-/post-tests assessing staff knowledge and self-efficacy; and meal observations measured NH staff and resident feeding behaviors, time for meal assistance, and meal intake. Aversive feeding behaviors increased in both groups of residents; however, the intervention NH staff increased the amount of time spent providing assistance and meal intake doubled. In the control group, less time was spent providing assistance and meal intake decreased. This study suggests that training staff to use current clinical practice guidelines improves meal intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Planning a Health Residence for Prison Security Measures, Tuscany (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfido, Eugenio; Colombai, Renato; Scarpa, Franco; Totaro, Michele; Tani, Luca; Baldini, Claudio; Baggiani, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Health Residences for Prison Security Measures are facilities hosting psychotic persons who have committed crimes and providing them with personalized rehabilitation and treatment plans to promote their reinstatement in society. The aim of this study was to describe the criteria for planning and designing a prison health residence in the Tuscany region (Italy), to be managed by the regional healthcare service, in line with current regulations, with dedicated staff for providing specific treatment plans and programmes.

  9. Evaluating the Staff at Enterprise: Several Theoretical and Methodological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girman Alla P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at generalizing and systematizing various knowledge, related to evaluation of staff, on a common theoretical-methodological basis. Concept, objectives, directions, methods, and indicators for evaluating staff in the contemporary economy were analyzed. The topicality of using the theoretical developments on staff evaluation in actual practice of functioning of enterprises has been substantiated. A new approach to the procedure of evaluation of the total human resource of enterprise, based on the life cycle of organization, has been proposed. On the basis of the proposed scientific algorithmic step-by-step approach to the evaluation of staff, managers of companies can design their own models for staff evaluation, develop its separate elements. Prospects for further researches in this direction involve relation of staff evaluation to the life cycle of employee no less than the life cycle of enterprise. Management of the life cycle of employee represents methods for management of his development that would change the level of the employee’s professional maturity as result of a system impact.

  10. Satisfacción vital y su relación con otras variables psicosociales en población española residente en Alemania (Life satisfaction and its connection with other psycho-social variables in Spanish residents in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Vallejo-Martín

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed the psychosocial variables related to life satisfaction in a population of Spanish residents in Germany. The psychosocial variables were as follows: social support, self-esteem, job satisfaction, and attachment to and identification with the place of residence. Sociodemographic factors were also considered: job position, level of ability in the German language, monthly income, and perceived social class. The sample comprised 206 participants. The results showed that the participants had medium or medium-high scores on all the psychosocial variables and that there were significant correlations between them.Regarding the sociodemographic factors, although no significant association was found between life satisfaction and having a job, significant associations were found between life satisfaction and the other factors. Of these factors, perceived social class had the biggest effect. The results also showed that intrinsic job satisfaction, perceived social class, attachment to the place of residence, and self-esteem predicted life satisfaction (explaining 55.5% of variance. These results are in contrast with other studies on life satisfaction in immigrant populations.

  11. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  12. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jacob; Tango, Jennifer; Walker, Ian; Waranch, Chris; McKamie, Joshua; Poonja, Zafrina; Messman, Anne

    2018-03-01

    Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank - an online resident community - conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module "Self-Care Series" focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module "Clinical Care Series" focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness.

  13. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Arnold

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods: A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank – an online resident community – conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Results: Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module “Self-Care Series” focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module “Clinical Care Series” focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. Conclusion: The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness.

  14. The Consequences of Emotional Burnout Among Correctional Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Lambert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of past correctional staff burnout studies have focused on the possible antecedents of job burnout. Far fewer studies have been published on the possible outcomes of burnout among correctional staff. This study examined the effects of the emotional exhaustion dimension of burnout on life satisfaction, support for treatment, support for punishment, absenteeism, views on use of sick leave, and turnover intent among 272 staff at a state-run Midwestern maximum security prison. Ordinary least squares (OLS regression analysis of survey data indicated that emotional burnout had significant negative associations with life satisfaction and support for treatment and significant positive relationships with support for punishment, absenteeism, views on use of sick leave (i.e., a right to be used however the employee wishes, and turnover intent. The results indicate that job burnout has negative outcomes for both staff and correctional institutions.

  15. Training on the clock: family medicine residency directors' responses to resident duty hours reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lars E; Johnson, Hillary; Pugno, Perry A; Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L

    2006-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 2003 restrictions on resident duty hours (RDH) raised concerns among educators about potential negative impacts on residents' training. In the early wake of these restrictions, little is known about how RDH reform impacts training in primary care. The authors surveyed family medicine (FM) residency program directors (PDs) for their perceptions of the impact of RDH regulations on training in primary care. All PDs of 472 FM residency programs were asked via list-serve to complete an anonymous Internet-based survey in the fall of 2004. The survey solicited PDs' opinions about changes in staff and in residents' training experiences with respect to implementation of RDH regulations. Descriptive and qualitative analyses were conducted. There were 369 partial and 328 complete responses, for a response rate of 69% (328/472). Effects of the RDH regulations are varied. Fifty percent of FMPDs report increased patient-care duties for attendings, whereas 42% report no increase. Nearly 80% of programs hired no additional staff. Sixty percent of programs eliminated postcall clinics, and nearly 40% implemented a night-float system. Administrative hassles and losses of professionalism, educational opportunity, and continuity of care were common concerns, but a sizeable minority feel that residents will be better off under the new regulations. Many FMPDs cited increased faculty burden and the risk of lower-quality educational experiences for their trainees. Innovations for increasing the effectiveness of teaching may ultimately compensate for lost educational time. If not, alternatives such as extending the length of residency must be considered.

  16. Training Nonnursing Staff to Assist with Nutritional Care Delivery in Nursing Homes: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Hollingsworth, Emily K; Long, Emily A; Liu, Xulei; Shotwell, Matthew S; Keeler, Emmett; An, Ruopeng; Silver, Heidi J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect and cost-effectiveness of training nonnursing staff to provide feeding assistance for nutritionally at-risk nursing home (NH) residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Five community NHs. Long-stay NH residents with an order for caloric supplementation (N = 122). Research staff provided an 8-hour training curriculum to nonnursing staff. Trained staff were assigned to between-meal supplement or snack delivery for the intervention group; the control group received usual care. Research staff used standardized observations and weighed-intake methods to measure frequency of between-meal delivery, staff assistance time, and resident caloric intake. Fifty staff (mean 10 per site) completed training. The intervention had a significant effect on between-meal caloric intake (F = 56.29, P staff time to provide assistance. It is cost effective to train nonnursing staff to provide caloric supplementation, and this practice has a positive effect on residents' between-meal intake. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Staff training program of CANDU projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When AECL opened a project office Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training programs were initiated, general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions, and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (author)

  18. Change and predictors of change in social skills of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L; Kadlec, Helena; Reid, Colin

    2014-02-01

    Social skills are of primary importance for those with dementia and their care providers, yet we know little about the extent to which basic social skills can be maintained over time and the predictors of change. A total of 18 nursing homes with 149 newly admitted residents with moderate to severe dementia, 195 direct care staff, and 135 family members, in British Columbia, Canada, contributed data on change in social skills from admission to 6 months and 1 year later. Three-quarters of residents maintained or improved their basic social skills during both the time periods. Decline was explained primarily by cognitive status at the time of admission, notably present orientation. However, staff-to-resident communication becomes more important over time. Social skills appear to present an opportunity to maintain interaction with these residents. The findings also suggest that a focus on the present orientation before and following admission and on staff-to-resident communication may be beneficial.

  19. Understanding Resident Performance, Mindfulness, and Communication in Critical Care Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Kevin; Fields-Elswick, Katelyn; Bernard, Andrew C

    screen and identify residents with inaccurate self-assessments. Residents open to feedback will improve faster and develop awareness toward situations and interactions with patients, colleagues, attending physicians, and staff. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of adding additional providers to resident workload and the resident experience on a medical consultation rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Michele; Linson, Eric; Suneja, Manish; Kuperman, Ethan F

    2017-02-22

    Excellence in Graduate Medical Education requires the right clinical environment with an appropriate workload where residents have enough patients to gain proficiency in medicine with optimal time for reflection. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has focused more on work hours rather than workload; however, high resident workload has been associated with lower resident participation in education and fatigue-related errors. Recognizing the potential risks associated with high resident workload and being mindful of the costs of reducing resident workload, we sought to reduce residents' workload by adding an advanced practice provider (APP) to the surgical comanagement service (SCM) and study its effect on resident satisfaction and perceived educational value of the rotation. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 and 2015, an additional faculty member was added to the SCM rotation. In FY 2014, the faculty member was a staff physician, and in FY 2015, the faculty member was an APP.. Resident workload was assessed using billing data. We measured residents' perceptions of the rotation using an anonymous electronic survey tool. We compared FY2014-2015 data to the baseline FY2013. The number of patients seen per resident per day decreased from 8.0(SD 3.3) in FY2013 to 5.0(SD 1.9) in FY2014 (p value of the rotation (40.0%, 72.2%, 72.6% in FY2013, 2014, 2015 respectively, p perceived educational value and clinical experience of a medical consultation rotation.

  1. Sources of Stress and Support for the Pregnant Resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Sharon T.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of women physicians elicited 373 responses from women who had experienced pregnancy during residency. Respondents indicated that major sources of stress included frequency of call, fatigue, long hours, and too little time with partner. Women medical staff were perceived as supportive. Maternity leave of less than 6 weeks was felt to be…

  2. Nursing Home - Pain - Percentage of Residents Reporting Pain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Adequate pain management is an important indicator of quality of care and quality of life. Nursing home staff should check patients regularly to see if they are...

  3. Resident Choice and the Survey Process: The Need for Standardized Observation and Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, John F.; Bertrand, Rosanna; Hurd, Donna; White, Alan; Squires, David; Feuerberg, Marvin; Hickey, Kelly; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a standardized observation protocol to determine if nursing home (NH) staff offer choice to residents during 3 morning activities of daily living (ADL) and compare the observational data with deficiency statements cited by state survey staff. Design and Methods: Morning ADL care was observed in 20 NHs in 5 states by research…

  4. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Feasibility of Psychological First Aid for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa M; Bruce, Martha L; Hyer, Kathryn; Mills, Whitney L; Vongxaiburana, Elizabeth; Polivka-West, Lumarie

    2009-07-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the pilot study were to modify existing psychological first aid (PFA) materials so they would be appropriate for use with institutionalized elders, evaluate the feasibility of using nursing home staff to deliver the intervention to residents, and solicit feedback from residents about the intervention. The STORM Study, an acronym for "services for treating older residents' mental health", is the first step in the development of an evidence-based disaster mental health intervention for this vulnerable and underserved population. METHOD: Demographic characteristics were collected on participating residents and staff. Program evaluation forms were completed by staff participants during the pilot test and nurse training session. Staff and resident discussion groups were conducted during the pilot test to collect qualitative data on the use of PFA in nursing homes. RESULTS: Results demonstrate the feasibility of the PFA program to train staff to provide residents with PFA during disasters. CONCLUSIONS: Future research should focus on whether PFA improves coping and reduces stress in disaster exposed nursing home residents.

  5. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  6. The problem of bias when nursing facility staff administer customer satisfaction surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodlewsky, R Tamara; Decker, Frederic H

    2002-10-01

    Customer satisfaction instruments are being used with increasing frequency to assess and monitor residents' assessments of quality of care in nursing facilities. There is no standard protocol, however, for how or by whom the instruments should be administered when anonymous, written responses are not feasible. Researchers often use outside interviewers to assess satisfaction, but cost considerations may limit the extent to which facilities are able to hire outside interviewers on a regular basis. This study was designed to investigate the existence and extent of any bias caused by staff administering customer satisfaction surveys. Customer satisfaction data were collected in 1998 from 265 residents in 21 nursing facilities in North Dakota. Half the residents in each facility were interviewed by staff members and the other half by outside consultants; scores were compared by interviewer type. In addition to a tabulation of raw scores, ordinary least-squares analysis with facility fixed effects was used to control for resident characteristics and unmeasured facility-level factors that could influence scores. Significant positive bias was found when staff members interviewed residents. The bias was not limited to questions directly affecting staff responsibilities but applied across all types of issues. The bias was robust under varying constructions of satisfaction and dissatisfaction. A uniform method of survey administration appears to be important if satisfaction data are to be used to compare facilities. Bias is an important factor that should be considered and weighed against the costs of obtaining outside interviewers when assessing customer satisfaction among long term care residents.

  7. Personal Therapy in Psychiatry Residency Training: A National Survey of Canadian Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou, George; Halli, Priyanka; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2016-02-01

    The authors collected nationally representative data on Canadian residents' experiences with and perspectives on personal psychotherapy in their psychiatric training. A 43-item questionnaire was distributed electronically to all current psychiatry residents in Canada (N = 839). Four hundred residents from every program across Canada returned the survey (response rate 47.7%). The prevalence of personal therapy at any time was 55.3%, with 42.8% receiving personal therapy during residency. Of residents who undertook personal psychotherapy, 59.3% engaged in weekly therapy, 74.1% received psychodynamic psychotherapy, and 81.5% participated in long-term therapy (>1 year). Personal growth, self-understanding, and professional development were the most common reasons for engaging in personal therapy; however, one-third of residents did so to alleviate symptoms of depression, anxiety, or other mental health concerns. Time was the most important factor impeding residents from personal therapy; only 8.8% found stigma to act as a barrier. The vast majority of residents rated their experience with personal therapy as having a positive or very positive impact on their personal life (84.8%) and overall development as psychiatrists (81.8%). For 64% of respondents, personal therapy had an important or very important role in psychiatry residency training. Residents who received personal therapy rated themselves as better able to understand what happens moment by moment during therapy sessions, detect and deal with patients' emotional reactions, and constructively use their personal reactions to patients. Interest in personal therapy remains strong among psychiatry trainees in Canada. Residents who engaged in psychotherapy endorsed greater confidence in psychotherapy and rated their psychotherapy skills more favorably than those who had never been in the patient role, supporting the view of personal therapy as an important adjunct to psychotherapy training during residency.

  8. Decision making about medical interventions in the end-of-life care of people with intellectual disabilities: a national survey of the considerations and beliefs of GPs, ID physicians and care staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkema, N.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Wagemans, A.M.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This paper explores the personal beliefs and specific considerations of professionals regarding decisions about potentially burdensome medical interventions in the end-of-life care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Methods: A survey questionnaire covering decision making

  9. Decision making about medical interventions in the end-of-life care of people with intellectual disabilities: A national survey of the considerations and beliefs of GPs, ID physicians and care staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkema, N.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Wagemans, A.M.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This paper explores the personal beliefs and specific considerations of professionals regarding decisions about potentially burdensome medical interventions in the end-of-life care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Methods: A survey questionnaire covering decision making

  10. Resident Preferences for Program Director Role in Wellness Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Russ C; O'Neal, Richard L; Ewing, Joseph A

    2018-05-01

    Burnout and depression are prevalent among resident physicians, though the supportive role of the program director (PD) is not well defined. To understand the residents' view of the residency program director's role in assessing and promoting resident wellness. A single institution survey of all house staff was conducted in 2017. Rates of burnout and depression were identified via the 2-item Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Patient Health Questionaire-2 (PHQ-2), respectively. Residents then qualified their preferences for various assistance services and for the role of their program directors in assisting them. One-hundred sixty-one of 202 (79.7%) residents completed the survey. The rate of depression was 28%. Rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (2-item MBI) were 44 and 62%, respectively. Only 4% of respondents had used the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) in the prior 12 months. Eighty-two percent of residents were in favor of PDs inquiring about wellness regardless of their job performance and only 1% of residents stated the PD should not inquire about wellness at all. Thirty-three percent of residents reported that they would be likely to contact EAP on their own if they felt unwell. Significantly more residents (62%) reported being more likely to contact EAP if recommended by their PD (33 vs 62%, p assistance were lack of time (65%), lack of knowledge of how to contact EAP (41%), and concerns about appearing weak (35%). Despite a high prevalence of burnout and depression, residents are unlikely to seek help on their own. Program directors have an important role in assessing and promoting the wellness of their residents. The majority of residents wants their PD to inquire about wellness and may be more likely to seek and receive help if recommended and facilitated by their PD.

  11. Current integrated cardiothoracic surgery residents: a Thoracic Surgery Residents Association survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; LaPar, Damien J; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Berfield, Kathleen S; Odell, David D; DeNino, Walter F

    2015-03-01

    After approval by the Thoracic Surgery Residency Review Committee in 2007, 6-year integrated cardiothoracic surgery (I-6) residency programs have gained in popularity. We sought to assess and objectively quantify the level of satisfaction I-6 residents have with their training and to identify areas of improvement for future curriculum development. A completely anonymous, electronic survey was created by the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association that asked the responders to provide demographic information, specialty interest, and lifestyle priorities, and to rate their experience and satisfaction with I-6 residency. The survey was distributed nationwide to all residents in I-6 programs approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Of a total of 88 eligible I-6 residents, 49 completed the survey (55.7%). Career choice satisfaction was high (75.5%), as was overall satisfaction with integrated training (83.7%). The majority (77.6%) were interested in cardiac surgery. Overall, the responders reported sufficient time for life outside of the hospital (57.1%), but experienced conflicts between work obligations and personal life at least sometimes (75.5%). Early exposure to cardiothoracic surgery was reported as the dominant advantage of the I-6 model, whereas variable curriculum structure and unclear expectations along with poor integration with general surgery training ranked highest among perceived disadvantages. Current I-6 residents are largely satisfied with the integrated training model and report a reasonable work/life balance. The focused nature of training is the primary perceived advantage of the integrated pathway. Curriculum variability and poor integration with general surgery training are identified by residents as primary areas of concern. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Social Media in the Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum: Social Media Responses to the Residents' Perspective Article

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, BD; Kobner, S; Trueger, NS; Yiu, S; Lin, M

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. In July to August 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum" by Scott et al. The objective was to describe a 14-day worldwide clinician dialogue about evidence, opinions, and early relevant i...

  13. "Are You as Hard as 50 Cent? Negotiating Race and Masculinity in the Residence Halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Dametraus; Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative study of Black undergraduate men at a predominantly White university in the Midwest, participants shared their experiences in residence halls, including roommate conflicts, interracial tensions, and disagreements with residence hall staff. This article focuses on Black male undergraduates' negotiation of racialized conceptions of…

  14. "Are You as Hard as 50 Cent?" Negotiating Race and Masculinity in the Residence Halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Dametraus; Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative study of Black undergraduate men at a predominantly White university in the Midwest, participants shared their experiences in residence halls, including roommate conflicts, interracial tensions, and disagreements with residence hall staff. This article focuses on Black male undergraduates' negotiation of racialized conceptions of…

  15. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. Methods A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. Results In total 415 (51 % residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p Residents highly valued their colleagues (67%, program directors (60% and external psychiatrist/psychologist (49% as well-being resources. Over one third of residents wished to have a career counselor (39% and financial counselor (38%. Conclusion Many Albertan residents experience significant stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  16. Reproductive Psychiatry Residency Training: A Survey of Psychiatric Residency Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lauren M; MacLean, Joanna V; Barzilay, Erin Murphy; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Miller, Laura; Yang, Sarah Nagle

    2018-04-01

    The reproductive life cycle has unique influences on the phenotypic expression of mental illness in women. Didactic and clinical training focused on these sex-specific influences should be a vital component of the education of future psychiatrists. The authors sought to determine the current state of and attitudes toward reproductive psychiatry in resident education. The authors administered a web-based survey to psychiatry residency training directors. They assessed the availability of both mandated and optional didactic and clinical training experiences in reproductive psychiatry. Fifty residency program directors answered the survey, for a response rate of 28%. More than half of residency program directors (59%) reported requiring some training in reproductive psychiatry. Both the breadth and depth of topics covered varied greatly among programs. Lack of time (48%) and lack of qualified faculty (26%) were the most frequently cited barriers to more training. Only 40% of residency directors surveyed agreed that all residents should be competent in reproductive psychiatry. These findings suggest that specific training in reproductive psychiatry is inconsistent in US residency programs, and that training that does exist varies considerably in clinical time and content. Given that women comprise more than 50% of all psychiatric patients and most women will menstruate, give birth, and undergo menopause, future psychiatrists would benefit from more systematic instruction in this area. The authors propose the development of a national, standardized reproductive psychiatry curriculum to address this gap and aid in producing psychiatrists competent to treat women at all stages of life.

  17. Therapeutic kitchens for residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, J P; Meehan, R A; Calkins, M P

    2001-01-01

    Long-term care facilities are increasingly incorporating some sort of kitchen, often referred to as a therapeutic kitchen, for resident, staff, and family use through remodeling efforts or new construction. A study, consisting of five site visits and a questionnaire mailed to 631 facilities providing dementia care, was conducted to identify physical features that are typically included in therapeutic kitchen design and to explore how these features support daily use in relation to activities programming and food service systems. Findings indicate that universal design features should be incorporated to a greater extent and certain features are more common, reinforce homelike imagery, or enhance safety. Results also suggest that a higher number of residents participate in more recreational activities, such as baking, than they do in household chores, such as meal set-up, and therapeutic kitchens are not always linked to food service systems.

  18. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  19. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand...... in a healthcare system. From our perspective, further sociological and pedagogical investigations in educational cultures across settings and specialties could inform our understanding of and knowledge about pitfalls in residents’ and doctors’ socialization into the healthcare system....

  20. Vigilant at the end of life: family advocacy in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renee R; Wetle, Terrie; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C; Welch, Lisa C

    2010-05-01

    Increasing numbers of Americans die in nursing homes. Little is known about the roles and experiences of family members of persons who die in nursing homes. The authors conducted 54 qualitative telephone interviews of close family or friends of individuals who had spent at least 48 hours in the last month of life in a nursing home. Respondents had earlier participated in a national survey that found 587 of 1578 decedents (37.2%) received end-of-life nursing home care. In qualitative interviews respondents described the last year of life, focusing on the nursing home experience. Interviews were analyzed by a multidisciplinary team to identify key themes of areas of concern. An important interview theme revealed families often felt the need to advocate for their dying relative because of low expectations or experiences with poor quality nursing home care. They noted staff members who did not fully inform them about what to expect in the dying process. Respondents reported burden and gratification in care they themselves provided, which sometimes entailed collaboration with staff. Interviews also identified ways hospice care impacted families, including helping to relieve family burden. End-of-life advocacy takes on increased urgency when those close to the dying resident have concerns about basic care and do not understand the dying course. Enhancing communication, preparing families at the end of life, and better understanding of hospice are likely to increase family trust in nursing home care, improve the care of dying residents, and help reduce family burden.

  1. Awareness of dementia by family carers of nursing home residents dying with dementia: a post-death study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Yolanda W H; Albers, Gwenda; Deliens, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert; Van den Block, Lieve

    2015-01-01

    High-quality palliative care for people with dementia should be patient-centered, family-focused, and include well-informed and shared decision-making, as affirmed in a recent white paper on dementia from the European Association for Palliative Care. To describe how often family carers of nursing home residents who died with dementia are aware that their relative has dementia, and study resident, family carer, and care characteristics associated with awareness. Post-death study using random cluster sampling. Structured questionnaires were completed by family carers, nursing staff, and general practitioners of deceased nursing home residents with dementia in Flanders, Belgium (2010). Of 190 residents who died with dementia, 53.2% of family carers responded. In 28% of cases, family carers indicated they were unaware their relative had dementia. Awareness by family carers was related to more advanced stages of dementia 1 month before death (odds ratio = 5.4), with 48% of family carers being unaware when dementia was mild and 20% unaware when dementia was advanced. The longer the onset of dementia after admission to a nursing home, the less likely family carers were aware (odds ratio = 0.94). Family carers are often unaware that their relative has dementia, that is, in one-fourth of cases of dementia and one-fifth of advanced dementia, posing considerable challenges for optimal care provision and end-of-life decision-making. Considering that family carers of residents who develop dementia later after admission to a nursing home are less likely to be aware, there is room for improving communication strategies toward family carers of nursing home residents. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Checklist for Staff Technology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1997-01-01

    Presents a planning checklist for staff technology training. Includes forming a committee and developing proposals, contacting pertinent people, handling publicity, sending invitations, distributing schedules/registration information, arranging for equipment, purchasing prizes, conducting preliminary checks on equipment and software, ordering…

  3. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  4. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  5. Staff satisfaction and its components in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P; Lee, Andy H

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of staff satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine whether the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e. nursing homes and hostels). A hostel is a low care facility in which residents are more independent, have a lower level of care needs, and receive personal but not nursing care. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to collect the required information, and a stratified random sampling approach was utilized to select facilities. Structural equation modeling was used to examine relationships among satisfaction components. Seventy residential aged care facilities in Western Australia. The sample includes 610 nursing home and 373 hostel care staff. The relationships among satisfaction components are different for nursing home and hostel staff. Professional support is found to have a strong and positive effect on all other aspects of staff satisfaction. The findings lead to an improved understanding of the interrelationship among staff satisfaction components, which has important implications through enhancing professional support. This needs to be recognized and emphasized by managers, care providers, and policy makers so as to maintain stable personnel and continuity of care.

  6. 'From activating towards caring': shifts in care approaches at the end of life of people with intellectual disabilities; a qualitative study of the perspectives of relatives, care-staff and physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkema, N.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professionals and relatives increasingly have to deal with people with intellectual disabilities (ID) who are in need of end-of-life care. This is a specific type of care that may require a different approach to the focus on participation that currently characterizes the care for people

  7. 'From activating towards caring': shifts in care approaches at the end of life of people with intellectual disabilities; a qualitative study of the perspectives of relatives, care-staff and physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkema, N.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professionals and relatives increasingly have to deal with people with intellectual disabilities (ID) who are in need of end-of-life care. This is a specific type of care that may require a different approach to the focus on participation that currently characterizes the care for people

  8. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  9. A staff shortage in Canada?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, P.

    1995-01-01

    Attrition of experienced staff, falling student enrolments and closure of university courses are symptoms of the contraction of the Canadian nuclear industry over the last two decades. It is not alone. A study carried out by Human Resources Development Canada, a government department, to forecast the demand for qualified nuclear staff in Canada over the next 15 years has reached similar conclusions to an OECD/NEA study of its members' future personnel requirements. (author)

  10. Tourism practices of Chinese residents in South Africa | Potgieter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chinese consumers are different due to their cultural background and way of life and this necessitates a conversion of the business model and products offered by leisure and tourism service providers. Very little is known about tourism practices of resident Chinese in South Africa. Research was conducted amongst resident ...

  11. Surgical resident education in patient safety: where can we improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Luke R; Levy, Shauna M; Kellagher, Caroline M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Thomas, Eric J; Kao, Lillian S; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, KuoJen

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication and patient safety practices are paramount in health care. Surgical residents play an integral role in the perioperative team, yet their perceptions of patient safety remain unclear. We hypothesized that surgical residents perceive the perioperative environment as more unsafe than their faculty and operating room staff despite completing a required safety curriculum. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and perioperative nurses in a large academic children's hospital participated in multifaceted, physician-led workshops aimed at enhancing communication and safety culture over a 3-y period. All general surgery residents from the same academic center completed a hospital-based online safety curriculum only. All groups subsequently completed the psychometrically validated safety attitudes questionnaire to evaluate three domains: safety culture, teamwork, and speaking up. Results reflect the percent of respondents who slightly or strongly agreed. Chi-square analysis was performed. Sixty-three of 84 perioperative personnel (75%) and 48 of 52 surgical residents (92%) completed the safety attitudes questionnaire. A higher percentage of perioperative personnel perceived a safer environment than the surgical residents in all three domains, which was significantly higher for safety culture (68% versus 46%, P = 0.03). When stratified into two groups, junior residents (postgraduate years 1-2) and senior residents (postgraduate years 3-5) had lower scores for all three domains, but the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical residents' perceptions of perioperative safety remain suboptimal. With an enhanced safety curriculum, perioperative staff demonstrated higher perceptions of safety compared with residents who participated in an online-only curriculum. Optimal surgical education on patient safety remains unknown but should require a dedicated, systematic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mentor-guided self-directed learning affects resident practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Johnathon M; Ruparel, Raaj K; Graham, Elaina; Zendejas-Mummert, Benjamin; Heller, Stephanie F; Farley, David R; Bingener, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) can be as effective as instructor-led training. It employs less instructional resources and is potentially a more efficient educational approach. Although SDL is encouraged among residents in our surgical training program via 24-hour access to surgical task trainers and online modules, residents report that they seldom practice. We hypothesized that a mentor-guided SDL approach would improve practice habits among our residents. From 2011 to 2013, 12 postgraduate year (PGY)-2 general surgery residents participated in a 6-week minimally invasive surgery (MIS) rotation. At the start of the rotation, residents were asked to practice laparoscopic skills until they reached peak performance in at least 3 consecutive attempts at a task (individual proficiency). Trainees met with the staff surgeon at weeks 3 and 6 to evaluate progress and review a graph of their individual learning curve. All trainees subsequently completed a survey addressing their practice habits and suggestions for improvement of the curriculum. By the end of the rotation, 100% of participants improved in all practiced tasks (p mentor-guided SDL. Additionally, 6 (50%) residents reported that their skill level had improved relative to their peers. Some residents (n = 3) felt that the curriculum could be improved by including task-specific goals and additional practice sessions with the staff surgeon. Mentor-guided SDL stimulated surgical residents to practice with greater frequency. This repeated deliberate practice led to significantly improved MIS skills without significantly increasing the need for faculty-led instruction. Some residents preferred more discrete goal setting and increased mentor guidance. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Schnapp

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods: This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results: A majority of residents (66%, 78/119 reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119 experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119 had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119 reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion: Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts.

  14. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, Benjamin H.; Slovis, Benjamin H.; Shah, Anar D.; Fant, Abra L.; Gisondi, Michael A.; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lech, Christie A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts. PMID:27625721

  15. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  16. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    ... individual staff sections in the brigade command post. The program was designed to deliver training to newly formed, inexperienced staffs conducting the staff functions that support the military decision-making process within the execution phase...

  17. Changes in medicine: residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The most important time in a physician’s educational development is residency, especially the first year. However, residency work and responsibility have come under the scrutiny of a host of agencies and bureaucracies, and therefore, is rapidly changing. Most important in the alphabet soup of regulatory agencies is the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME which accredits residencies and ultimately makes the governing rules.Resident work hours have received much attention and are clearly decreasing. However, the decline in work hours began in the 1970’s before the present political push to decrease work hours. The residency I entered in 1976 had every third night call during the first year resident’s 6-9 months on general medicine or wards. It had changed from every other night the year before. On wards, we normally were in the hospital for our 24 hours of call and followed this with a 10-12 hour day before …

  18. Bibliotherapy and aging phobia among Covenant University staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading is one of life's greatest pleasures and opens the door to culture, knowledge and independence. It can be very therapeutic. This study examines the effect of bibliotherapy on aging phobia among Covenant University academic and senior staff. The result shows that reading of books has influenced positively their ...

  19. Soldiers, Scholars, Diplomats: Educating Strategic Leaders at Foreign Staff Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    philosophers, Sun Tzu , Clausewitz, and even William T. public and personal life. 57 James Lacey, Keep from All Thoughtful Men: How U.S. Economists Won...58 Bibliography ...college? 12. Should more officers be offered the opportunity to attend foreign staff colleges and why? 59 ....~.. Bibliography Atkinson, Carol

  20. A social building? Prison architecture and staff-prisoner relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, K. A.; Dirkzwager, A. J. E.; van der Laan, P. H.; Nieuwbeerta, P.

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between correctional officers and prisoners are crucial to life in prison, and affect prison order and prisoners' well-being. Research on factors influencing staff-prisoner relationships is scarce and has not included the design of prison buildings. This study examined the association

  1. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  2. Toward a Resident Personal Finance Curriculum: Quantifying Resident Financial Circumstances, Needs, and Interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, Ryan; Ernst, Michael; Ahn, James; Tekian, Ara; Shappell, Eric

    2018-04-26

    Introduction Resident financial health has been linked to wellness and resiliency, yet financial literacy among residents is highly variable. While some medical school curricula include budgeting and student loan education, content on managing finances as a resident is usually lacking. We sought to quantitatively assess residents' financial circumstances, needs, and interests to inform the design of a resident personal finance curriculum. Methods Surveys were sent to residents in eight specialties at an academic medical center. Likert-type responses allowed respondents to rate their level of comfort (1 = Very Uncomfortable, 7 = Very Comfortable) and interest (1 = Very Uninterested, 7 = Very Interested) in various personal finance topics including budgeting, loan repayment, disability insurance, life insurance, home buying, and retirement planning. Details regarding financial circumstances, including assets, liabilities, and insurance, were also collected. Results of questions that utilized a Likert-type scale are reported as median (interquartile range). Results Of 346 residents surveyed, 144 (41.6%) responded. Residents were from Internal Medicine (56, 38.9%), Pediatrics (34, 23.6%), Emergency Medicine (18, 12.5%), and other specialties (36, 25.0%). Ninety-one (63.2%) reported educational loans, with an average balance of $191,730. Credit card balances exceeding $3,000 were reported by 11 (7.6%) respondents. One-hundred-two (70.1%) reported emergency savings, but only 65 (45.1%) reported having a retirement account (average balance $27,608). Respondents rated highest comfort levels with budgeting (5[4-6]), and lowest level of comfort with disability insurance (2[2-4]) and home buying (2[2-5]). Interest in learning each topic was high (6[5-7]), with retirement planning (6[5-7]), investing (6[5-7]), and home buying (6[5-7]) the topics of highest interest. Conclusion These results highlight the deficits in personal finance literacy among residents. Future work should

  3. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  4. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  5. Influence of staff infection control training on infection-related quality measures in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjit; Stone, Patricia W; Travers, Jasmine L; Cohen, Catherine C; Herzig, Carolyn T A

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in US nursing home residents. Ongoing training of nursing home staff is vital to the implementation of infection prevention and control processes. Our aim was to describe associations between methods, frequency, and timing of staff infection prevention and control training and infection-related quality measures. In this national survey of nursing homes, timing of staff infection prevention and control training was associated with reduced indwelling urinary catheter use. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  7. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  8. Percepção dos efeitos do trabalho em turnos sobre a saúde e a vida social em funcionários da enfermagem em um hospital universitário do Estado de São Paulo Nursing staff perceptions of the effects of shift work on health and social life at the São Paulo State University hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester de S. Costa

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho em turnos existe desde o início da vida social dos homens, sendo utilizado em diferentes setores, como na indústria de produção de bens de consumo e de serviços. A área da saúde exige o sistema em turnos para manutenção de atividades durante 24 horas. Teve-se como objetivo identificar os sistemas de turnos em funcionários de enfermagem em um hospital universitário, avaliar a percepção sobre os prováveis efeitos do trabalho em turnos em sua saúde e vida social e o grau de participação desses funcionários na forma de organização de sua jornada. Trata-se de uma pesquisa descritiva e exploratória, cujos resultados foram obtidos mediante questionário aplicado a 348 funcionários da enfermagem do Hospital de Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, São Paulo. Dentre os resultados, observou-se que, em sua maioria, eles tinham menos de 40 anos, eram casados, do sexo feminino, com um filho pelo menos, cumprindo uma escala de turnos alternados, com freqüência de revezamento superior a quinze dias e referindo queixas de caráter neuro-psíquico, gastrintestinal e cardiovascular. Houve ainda queixas sobre relacionamento e tempo de convivência. Na maioria das vezes, era pouca a participação do funcionário na forma de organização de sua escala de trabalho.There is a relationship between shift work and the beginning of organized life. Health services require shift work to keep activities running twenty-four hours a day. This study thus aimed to identify nursing staff shift work systems in a university hospital, evaluate health workers' perceptions of the possible effects of shift work on their health and social life, and assess workers' participation in preparing nursing schedules. In terms of materials and methods, this was an exploratory and descriptive study with a sample of 348 nursing staff members, using an appropriate questionnaire. Most were married women under 40 with at least one child, working on

  9. How nursing staff spend their time on activities in a nursing home: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyisia, Esther Naliaka; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David

    2011-09-01

    This article is a report of a study to examine how nursing staff spend their time on activities in a nursing home. Few studies have investigated how nursing staff spend their time on activities in a nursing home. Such information is important for nurse managers in deciding on staff deployment, and for evaluating the effects of changes in nursing practice. A work sampling study with an observational component was undertaken in 2009 with nursing staff at a nursing home. A total of 430 activities were recorded for Registered Nurses, 331 for Endorsed Enrolled Nurses, 5276 for Personal Carers, and 501 for Recreational Activity Officers. Registered Nurses spent 48·4% of their time on communication and 18·1% on medication management. Endorsed Enrolled Nurses spent 37·7% on communication and 29·0% on documentation tasks. Communication was the most time-consuming activity for Recreational Activity Officers and Personal Carers, except that Personal Carers in a high care house spent more time on direct care duties. Hygiene duties and resident interaction were more frequently multitasked by the nursing staff in high care than in low care house. Nursing staff value their face-to-face interaction for successful care delivery. There is need, however, to investigate the effects of this form of communication on quality of care given to residents. Differences in multi-tasked activities between high care and low care houses should be considered when deploying staff in a nursing home. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Training of power station staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusserre, J.

    1993-01-01

    ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE currently operates 51 generating stations with 900 and 1300 MW Pressurized Water Reactors while, only 15 years ago, France possessed only a very small number of such stations. It was therefore vital to set up a major training organization to produce staff capable of starting, controlling and maintaining these facilities with a constant eye to improving quality and safety. Operator and maintenance staff training is based on highly-structured training plans designed to match both the post to be filled and the qualifications possessed by the person who is to fill it. It was essential to set up suitable high-performance training resources to handle this fast growth in staff. These resources are constantly being developed and allow EDF to make steady progress in a large number of areas, varying from the effects of human factors to the procedures to be followed during an accident

  11. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  12. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  13. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  14. The behaviours that dementia care home staff in South Africa find challenging: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Adele; Manthorpe, Jill; Clark, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    Background Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are often the reasons for moving to a care home. Care staff, often with limited dementia training, may have to support residents with distressed behaviour on a daily basis. Evidence about the support of residents with distressed or challenging behaviour in the South African context is lacking. This exploratory study aimed to gain an understanding of what care home staff perceived to be distressed behaviour, their coping strategies and how they learned to work with residents with behavioural symptoms of dementia. Methods An exploratory study was conducted among 17 participants working in four care homes in the Western Cape province of South Africa in 2014. Semi-structured interviews were audio-recorded. Data were analysed thematically. Findings Findings reflected the literature with regard to examples of behavioural symptoms of people with dementia that staff find challenging to manage. Overall, the majority of staff reported holding positive feelings about working with people with dementia. All preferred interpersonal approaches to manage distressed behaviour above medication although a small minority noted the use of medication in some cases. Dementia training was considered by most participants as an unmet need. Conclusion This exploratory study identified care home workers' desires for training about dementia and their preferences for interpersonal as opposed to pharmacological approaches to managing residents' distressed behaviour. The legacy of race and cultural perspectives in South Africa appears to still influence care practice and provision. Staff commitment, their interest in advancing their practice and their aspirations to offer more person-centred care were evident. Dementia training was identified as potentially helpful to care home staff who manage residents' distressed behaviour. Training should be developed in South Africa to promote good practice.

  15. Community Relations - Public Affairs - Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Public Affairs : Community Relations Community Relations The National Guard Bureau Civic Engagement Report National Commission of the Future of the Army White Papers I am the Guard ARNG Media ARNG Public Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  16. Impact of relational coordination on staff and patient outcomes in outpatient surgical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Logan, Caroline; Cronenwett, Jack; Foster, Tina C; Freeman, Richard; Godfrey, Marjorie; Vidal, Dale Collins

    2018-01-05

    Pressures are increasing for clinicians to provide high-quality, efficient care, leading to increased concerns about staff burnout. This study asks whether staff well-being can be achieved in ways that are also beneficial for the patient's experience of care. It explores whether relational coordination can contribute to both staff well-being and patient satisfaction in outpatient surgical clinics where time constraints paired with high needs for information transfer increase both the need for and the challenge of achieving timely and accurate communication. We studied relational coordination among surgeons, nurses, residents, administrators, technicians, and secretaries in 11 outpatient surgical clinics. Data were combined from a staff and a patient survey to conduct a cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares and random effects regression models. Relational coordination among all workgroups was significantly associated with staff outcomes, including job satisfaction, work engagement, and burnout. Relational coordination was also significantly associated with patients' satisfaction with staff and their overall visit, though the association between relational coordination and patients' satisfaction with their providers did not reach statistical significance. Even when patient-staff interactions are relatively brief, as in outpatient settings, high levels of relational coordination among interdependent workgroups contribute to positive outcomes for both staff and patients, and low levels tend to have the opposite effect. Clinical leaders can increase the expectation of positive outcomes for both staff and their patients by implementing interventions to strengthen relational coordination.

  17. 'I have the world's best job' - staff experience of the advantages of caring for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; van der Zijpp, Teatske; McMullan, Christel; McCormack, Brendan; Seers, Kate; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2016-06-01

    Besides a growing demand for safe high-quality care for older people, long-term care (LTC) often struggles to recruit appropriately qualified nursing staff. Understanding what LTC staff value in their work may contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of what can attract staff and support person-centred care. To explore staff experience of the advantages of working in LTC settings for older people. Narrative descriptions of 85 LTC staff in Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden on what they value in their work were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Ethical approval was obtained according to the requirements of each country, and participants provided informed consent prior to the individual interviews. Working in LTC signifies bonding with the older people residing there, their next of kin and the team members. It means autonomy in one's daily tasks amalgamated with being a part of an affirmative team. Participants reported a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment; caring meant consideration and recognition of the older people and the relationships formed, which provided for professional and personal growth. The sharing of compassion between staff and residents indicated reciprocity of the relationship with residents. The findings may be transferable to LTC in general although they address only the positive aspects of caring for older people and only the experiences of those staff who had consented to take part in the study. The findings add to what underpins the quality of care in nursing homes: compassion in the nurse-resident relationship and person-centred care in LTC. They indicate reciprocity in the relations formed that may contribute to the empowerment of older people, but further studies are needed to explore this in more detail. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. The State of Evaluation in Internal Medicine Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Eric; Beasley, Brent W.

    2008-01-01

    Background There are no nationwide data on the methods residency programs are using to assess trainee competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recommended tools that programs can use to evaluate their trainees. It is unknown if programs are adhering to these recommendations. Objective To describe evaluation methods used by our nation’s internal medicine residency programs and assess adherence to ACGME methodological recommendations for evaluation. Design Nationwide survey. Participants All internal medicine programs registered with the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine (APDIM). Measurements Descriptive statistics of programs and tools used to evaluate competence; compliance with ACGME recommended evaluative methods. Results The response rate was 70%. Programs were using an average of 4.2–6.0 tools to evaluate their trainees with heavy reliance on rating forms. Direct observation and practice and data-based tools were used much less frequently. Most programs were using at least 1 of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)’s “most desirable” methods of evaluation for all 6 measures of trainee competence. These programs had higher support staff to resident ratios than programs using less desirable evaluative methods. Conclusions Residency programs are using a large number and variety of tools for evaluating the competence of their trainees. Most are complying with ACGME recommended methods of evaluation especially if the support staff to resident ratio is high. PMID:18612734

  19. Effectiveness of mammography boot camp for radiology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keum Won; Kim, Young Joong; Seo, Jae Young

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate an educational effect of the mammography boot camp (MBC) for radiology residents and analyze affecting factors. Between December 2014 and February 2015, radiology residents in 16 institutions performed the MBC program. We compared the educational effect (score difference between pre- and post-camp test) using 25 case series and analyzed the affecting factors including institution, grades of residents, training periods, presence of sub-specialized breast staff, breast density, and types of cases. The mean scores of 92 residents were 52.80 ± 18.10 and 72.50 ± 12.91 in the pre- and post-camp test, respectively (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference of educational effect according to institution (19.70 ± 16.31), grade, or training period. Although the educational effect of non-trainees was superior to that of trainees (28.10 ± 17.55 vs. 15.90 ± 14.22; p = 0.001), the scores of trainees were higher than those of non-trainees. The diagnostic accuracy showed more improvement in a fatty breast and cases with microcalcifications than compared with others. The MBC showed an effective educational result for radiology residents when interpretating a mammography. It was helpful even for non-trainees. The institution, grades training period, and presence of sub-specialized breast staff did not affect the educational effect

  20. Effectiveness of mammography boot camp for radiology residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keum Won; Kim, Young Joong; Seo, Jae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate an educational effect of the mammography boot camp (MBC) for radiology residents and analyze affecting factors. Between December 2014 and February 2015, radiology residents in 16 institutions performed the MBC program. We compared the educational effect (score difference between pre- and post-camp test) using 25 case series and analyzed the affecting factors including institution, grades of residents, training periods, presence of sub-specialized breast staff, breast density, and types of cases. The mean scores of 92 residents were 52.80 ± 18.10 and 72.50 ± 12.91 in the pre- and post-camp test, respectively (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference of educational effect according to institution (19.70 ± 16.31), grade, or training period. Although the educational effect of non-trainees was superior to that of trainees (28.10 ± 17.55 vs. 15.90 ± 14.22; p = 0.001), the scores of trainees were higher than those of non-trainees. The diagnostic accuracy showed more improvement in a fatty breast and cases with microcalcifications than compared with others. The MBC showed an effective educational result for radiology residents when interpretating a mammography. It was helpful even for non-trainees. The institution, grades training period, and presence of sub-specialized breast staff did not affect the educational effect.

  1. Noninstructional Staff Perceptions of the College Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Molly H.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored staff perception of organizational climate, including the impact of gender on staff interactions with faculty and students and staff perceptions of workplace satisfaction within the community college. The overarching research question guiding this study was, What are noninstructional staff perceptions of the community college…

  2. About the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Blog Instagram Search JCS: Search Search Search JCS: Search Home Media News Photos Videos Publications About The Joint Staff Chairman Vice Chairman

  3. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  4. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  5. Assessing and Increasing Staff Preference for Job Tasks Using Concurrent-Chains Schedules and Probabilistic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Derek D.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.; Campisano, Natalie; Lacourse, Kristen; Azulay, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and improvement of staff members' subjective valuation of nonpreferred work tasks may be one way to increase the quality of staff members' work life. The Task Enjoyment Motivation Protocol (Green, Reid, Passante, & Canipe, 2008) provides a process for supervisors to identify the aversive qualities of nonpreferred job tasks.…

  6. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  7. The Influence of Staff Training on Challenging Behaviour in Individuals with Intellectual Disability: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Alison D.; Dube, Charmayne; Temple, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with intellectual disability engage in challenging behaviour. This can significantly limit quality of life and also negatively impact caregivers (e.g., direct care staff, family caregivers and teachers). Fortunately, efficacious staff training may alleviate some negative side effects of client challenging behaviour. Currently, a…

  8. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Pound, Catherine M; Peddle, Beth; Tokarewicz, Jaclyn; Eady, Kaylee

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians' research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1) critically evaluating research literature, 2) writing a research proposal, 3) submitting an application for research funding, and 4) writing a manuscript. This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents' scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  9. The feasibility of a train-the-trainer approach to end of life care training in care homes: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Andrea; Goodman, Claire; Smeeton, Nigel; Handley, Melanie; Amador, Sarah; Davies, Sue

    2016-01-22

    The ABC End of Life Education Programme trained approximately 3000 care home staff in End of Life (EoL) care. An evaluation that compared this programme with the Gold Standards Framework found that it achieved equivalent outcomes at a lower cost with higher levels of staff satisfaction. To consolidate this learning, a facilitated peer education model that used the ABC materials was piloted. The goal was to create a critical mass of trained staff, mitigate the impact of staff turnover and embed EoL care training within the organisations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a train the trainer (TTT) model to support EoL care in care homes. A mixed method design involved 18 care homes with and without on-site nursing across the East of England. Data collection included a review of care home residents' characteristics and service use (n = 274), decedents' notes n = 150), staff interviews (n = 49), focus groups (n = 3), audio diaries (n = 28) and observations of workshops (n = 3). Seventeen care homes participated. At the end of the TTT programme 28 trainers and 114 learners (56% of the targeted number of learners) had been trained (median per home 6, range 0-13). Three care homes achieved or exceeded the set target of training 12 learners. Trainers ranged from senior care staff to support workers and administrative staff. Results showed a positive association between care home stability, in terms of leadership and staff turnover, and uptake of the programme. Care home ownership, type of care home, size of care home, previous training in EoL care and resident characteristics were not associated with programme completion. Working with facilitators was important to trainers, but insufficient to compensate for organisational turbulence. Variability of uptake was also linked to management support, programme fit with the trainers' roles and responsibilities and their opportunities to work with staff on a daily basis. When

  10. Making tradeoffs between the reasons to leave and reasons to stay employed in long-term care homes: perspectives of licensed nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Boscart, Veronique M; Brown, Maryanne; Bowers, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Turnover of licensed nursing staff in long-term care (LTC) settings (e.g., nursing homes) is a mounting concern and is associated with poor quality of care and low staff morale. Retention and turnover research in LTC have focused primarily on direct care workers (i.e., nurse aides) leaving the issues largely unexplored for licensed nursing staff (i.e., registered nurses and licensed practical nurses). The main objective of this study was to understand factors that influence nurses' intentions to remain employed at their current job. Qualitative descriptive study. Seven nursing homes in Ontario, Canada. A convenience sample of forty-one licensed LTC nurses. Data were collected through focus groups conducted at each of the participating nursing homes. Focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim. Directed content analysis was used to identify and develop themes. Work conditions were a salient element affecting nurses' intention to stay and included impact of regulations on nurse role flexibility and professional judgment, an underfunded system contributing to insufficient resources and staffing, and a lack of supportive leadership. Factors promoting nurses' willingness to stay included the development of meaningful relationships with residents and staff and opportunities for learning and professional development. Nurses also considered personal and life circumstances (e.g., marital status and seniority) when discussing intention to stay. Nurses in this study weighed positive and negative work-related factors as well as personal circumstances to determine their intent to stay. Developing a more individualized approach to address attrition of licensed nurses in LTC may be the most successful strategy for improving retention of highly skilled staff in this sector. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Results of the American Academy of Neurology resident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, W D; Nolte, C M; Matthews, B R; Coleman, M; Corboy, J R

    2011-03-29

    To assess the effect of neurology residency education as trainees advance into independent practice, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) elected to survey all graduating neurology residents at time of graduation and in 3-year cycles thereafter. A 22-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2007. Of 523 eligible residents, 285 (54.5%) responded. Of these, 92% reported good to excellent quality teaching of basic neurology from their faculty; however, 47% noted less than ideal training in basic neuroscience. Two-thirds indicated that the Residency In-service Training Examination was used only as a self-assessment tool, but reports of misuse were made by some residents. After residency, 78% entered fellowships (with 61% choosing a fellowship based on interactions with a mentor at their institution), whereas 20% entered practice directly. After adjustment for the proportion of residents who worked before the duty hour rules were implemented and after their implementation, more than half reported improvement in quality of life (87%), education (60%), and patient care (62%). The majority of international medical graduates reported wanting to stay in the United States to practice rather than return to their country of residence. Neurology residents are generally satisfied with training, and most entered a fellowship. Duty hour implementation may have improved resident quality of life, but reciprocal concerns were raised about impact on patient care and education. Despite the majority of international trainees wishing to stay in the United States, stricter immigration laws may limit their entry into the future neurology workforce.

  12. Motivating Staff, Parents, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cynthia Cavenaugh

    Two motivational theories considered particularly useful in administering early childhood programs are discussed, and guidelines for motivating staff, parents, and children are provided. First, the two-factor theory of motivation within organizations, as outlined by Herzberg (1959), is described. Offered in this section are a list of motivators…

  13. Training Staff for Multicultural Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennison, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses guidelines for training staff in multicultural camp communities. Includes developing an awareness and acceptance of cultural differences, self-awareness, an understanding of the "dynamics of differences," knowledge of the camper's culture, and adaptation of skills. Addresses the importance of integrating multicultural education goals…

  14. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...

  15. Nosocomial infections and staff hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroudi, Dimitra

    2009-03-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major source of morbidity and mortality in hospital settings. The most important defences against nosocomial transmission of viral, bacterial, and other infections are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. The issue is no longer whether hand hygiene is effective, but how to produce a sustained improvement in health workers' compliance.

  16. Elected medical staff leaders: who needs 'em?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R E

    1994-03-01

    Authority, influence, and power are not synonyms. In working with elected medical staff leaders, a physician executive who chooses to exert authority may soon find him- or herself relatively powerless. But one who chooses to downplay authority, to influence through persuasion, and to coach leaders to lead effectively soon generates support for his or her ideas. The need to coax, cajole, explain, persuade, and "seek input" frustrates many leaders in all kinds of organizations. It would be much easier just to order people about. It's so tempting to think: "Who needs 'em? I'm the 'chief physician.' I know what needs to be done. Let's weigh anchor, take her out, and do what it takes to sail those rough, uncharted seas." If you really enjoy sailing a large ship in rough seas without a crew, go right ahead. Or if you think it makes sense to run an organization with only an executive staff and no knowledgeable middle managers, by all means let clinician leaders know that, now that you're aboard, they're just window-dressing. If you can make this approach work, well and good. Your life will be much less complicated, each day will have far fewer frustrations, and progress toward established goals will be much faster. However, given the reality of traditionally thinking physicians, it would be best to keep an up-dated resume in the locked lower left-hand drawer of your desk.

  17. How do I manage and staff for intelligent transportation systems? : thinking outside the box : a cross-cutting study : maximizing project resources and advancing coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) projects often need staff with skills that are not resident in traditional transportation organizations. Therefore, project administrators must sometimes look beyond the usual staffing methods to fill these po...

  18. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  19. Quality of Care in the Nursing Home: Effects of Staff Assignment and Work Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Fairchild, J. Kaci; Scilley, Kay; Hardin, J. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a variety of resident and staff outcomes across two types of staffing patterns, permanent and rotating assignment, and work shift. Although studies have examined these staffing patterns as part of multicomponent intervention packages, few studies have examined the isolated effects of staffing…

  20. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly - Randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, AMH; Kluiter, H; Jongenelis, K; Beekman, ATF; Ormel, J

    Background. Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims. To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents often homes. Method. We

  1. Care staff training in detection of depression in residential homes for the elderly: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisses, A.M.H.; Kluiter, H.; Jongenelis, K.; Pot, A.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Ormel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many people with depression in residential care homes for the elderly do not receive treatment because their depression remains undetected. Aims: To determine the effects of staff training on the detection, treatment and outcome of depression in residents of ten homes. Method: We

  2. Staff members' perceived training needs regarding sexuality in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Celdrán, Montserrat; Fabà, Josep; Serrat, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to ascertain if staff members of residential aged care facilities (RACF) perceive the need for training regarding residents' sexuality, and what, if any, benefits from the training were perceived, and to compare perceived benefits of training between care assistants and professional/managerial staff. Interviews were conducted with 53 staff members of five different RACF in Spain. Their responses to two semistructured questions were transcribed verbatim and submitted to content analysis. Results show that most interviewees said they lacked training about sexuality and aging. Two potential highlighted benefits of the training are knowledge/attitudinal (countering negative attitudes regarding sexuality) and procedural (developing common protocols and tools to manage situations related to sexuality). Care assistants and professional staff agreed on the need for training, though the former emphasized the procedural impact and the latter the knowledge/attitudinal benefits. The results suggest that RACF staff should have an opportunity to receive training on residents' sexuality, as sexual interest and behavior is a key dimension of residents' lives.

  3. An analysis of obituaries in staff magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynderickx, Priscilla C; Dieltjens, Sylvain M

    2016-01-01

    In the literature, extensive attention is given to the content, structure, and style of obituaries in newspapers. Analyses of the demise of colleagues in internal business communications are however nonexistent. This article discusses a bottom-up analysis of 150 obituaries published in Flemish staff magazines--obituaries that mostly focus on the deceased's career and professional qualities. Following analysis, the data were divided in obituaries that are continuous texts and obituaries with a letter format. The differences between the two types lie at different levels: format, content, structure, and language use. Obituaries with a letter format are characterized and determined by three paradoxes: the sender-receiver paradox, life-death paradox, and happiness-sadness paradox.

  4. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teene