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  1. Corticostriatal Plastic Changes in Experimental L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

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    Veronica Ghiglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD, alteration of dopamine- (DA- dependent striatal functions and pulsatile stimulation of DA receptors caused by the discontinuous administration of levodopa (L-DOPA lead to a complex cascade of events affecting the postsynaptic striatal neurons that might account for the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. Experimental models of LID have been widely used and extensively characterized in rodents and electrophysiological studies provided remarkable insights into the inner mechanisms underlying L-DOPA-induced corticostriatal plastic changes. Here we provide an overview of recent findings that represent a further step into the comprehension of mechanisms underlying maladaptive changes of basal ganglia functions in response to L-DOPA and associated to development of LID.

  2. Maladaptive synaptic plasticity in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

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    Qiang Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID in patients with Parkinson disease (PD could be due to maladaptive plasticity of corticostriatal synapses in response to L-DOPA treatment. A series of recent studies has revealed that LID is associated with marked morphological plasticity of striatal dendritic spines, particularly cell type-specific structural plasticity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the striatum. In addition, evidence demonstrating the occurrence of plastic adaptations, including aberrant morphological and functional features, in multiple components of cortico-basal ganglionic circuitry, such as primary motor cortex (M1 and basal ganglia (BG output nuclei. These adaptations have been implicated in the pathophysiology of LID. Here, we briefly review recent studies that have addressed maladaptive plastic changes within the cortico-BG loop in dyskinetic animal models of PD and patients with PD.

  3. Changes in kynurenine pathway metabolism in Parkinson patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

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    Havelund, Jesper F; Andersen, Andreas D; Binzer, Michael; Blaabjerg, Morten; Heegaard, Niels H H; Stenager, Egon; Faergeman, Nils J; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert

    2017-09-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective drug in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease, but chronic use is associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in more than half the patients after 10 years of treatment. L-DOPA treatment may affect tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. Altered levels of kynurenine metabolites can affect glutamatergic transmission and may play a role in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. In this study, we assessed kynurenine metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson's disease patients and controls. Parkinson patients (n = 26) were clinically assessed for severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS) and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (UDysRS). Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected after overnight fasting and 1-2 h after intake of L-DOPA or other anti-Parkinson medication. Metabolites were analyzed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of controls (n = 14), Parkinson patients receiving no L-DOPA (n = 8), patients treated with L-DOPA without dyskinesia (n = 8), and patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (n = 10) using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We observed approximately fourfold increase in the 3-hydroxykynurenine/kynurenic acid ratio in plasma of Parkinson's patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Anthranilic acid levels were decreased in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of this patient group. 5-Hydroxytryptophan levels were twofold increased in all L-DOPA-treated Parkinson's patients. We conclude that a higher 3-hydroxykynurenine/kynurenic acid ratio in plasma may serve as a biomarker for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Longitudinal studies including larger patients cohorts are needed to verify whether the changes observed here may serve as a prognostic marker for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Changes in kynurenine pathway metabolism in Parkinson patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

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    Havelund, Jesper F; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    L-DOPA is the most effective drug in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease, but chronic use is associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in more than half the patients after 10 years of treatment. L-DOPA treatment may affect tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. Altered...... levels of kynurenine metabolites can affect glutamatergic transmission and may play a role in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. In this study we assessed kynurenine metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson's disease patients and controls. Parkinson patients (n=26) were...... clinically assessed for severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS) and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (UDysRS). Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected after overnight fasting and 1-2 hours after intake of L-DOPA or other anti-Parkinson medication. Metabolites were analyzed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid...

  5. A selective phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor reduces l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian monkeys.

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    Beck, Goichi; Maehara, Shunsuke; Chang, Phat Ly; Papa, Stella M

    2018-03-06

    Phosphodiesterase 10A is a member of the phosphodiesterase family whose brain expression is restricted to the striatum. Phosphodiesterase 10A regulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which mediate responses to dopamine receptor activation, and the levels of these cyclic nucleotides are decreased in experimental models of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia. The elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels by phosphodiesterase 10A inhibition may thus be targeted to reduce l-dopa-induced dyskinesia. The present study was aimed at determining the potential antidyskinetic effects of phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors in a primate model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The experiments performed in this model were also intended to provide translational data for the design of future clinical trials. Five MPTP-treated macaques with advanced parkinsonism and reproducible l-dopa-induced dyskinesia were used. MR1916, a selective phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor, at doses 0.0015 to 0.05 mg/kg, subcutaneously, or its vehicle (control test) was coadministered with l-dopa methyl ester acutely (predetermined optimal and suboptimal subcutaneous doses) and oral l-dopa chronically as daily treatment for 5 weeks. Standardized scales were used to assess motor disability and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia by blinded examiners. Pharmacokinetics was also examined. MR1916 consistently reduced l-dopa-induced dyskinesia in acute tests of l-dopa optimal and suboptimal doses. Significant effects were present with every MR1916 dose tested, but the most effective was 0.015 mg/kg. None of the MR1916 doses tested affected the antiparkinsonian action of l-dopa at the optimal dose. The anti-l-dopa-induced dyskinesia effect of MR1916 (0.015 mg/kg, subcutaneously) was sustained with chronic administration, indicating that tolerance did not develop over the 5-week treatment. No adverse effects were observed after MR1916 administration acutely or

  6. Nociceptive Response to L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Hemiparkinsonian Rats.

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    Nascimento, G C; Bariotto-Dos-Santos, K; Leite-Panissi, C R A; Del-Bel, E A; Bortolanza, M

    2018-04-02

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly identified to present clinical and diagnostic importance for Parkinson's disease (PD). The multifactorial origin of pain in PD makes this symptom of great complexity. The dopamine precursor, L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine), the classic therapy for PD, seems to be effective in pain threshold; however, there are no studies correlating L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) and nociception development in experimental Parkinsonism. Here, we first investigated nociceptive responses in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease to a hind paw-induced persistent inflammation. Further, the effect of L-DOPA on nociception behavior at different times of treatment was investigated. Pain threshold was determined using von Frey and Hot Plate/Tail Flick tests. Dyskinesia was measured by abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) induced by L-DOPA administration. This data is consistent to show that 6-OHDA-lesioned rats had reduced nociceptive thresholds compared to non-lesioned rats. Additionally, when these rats were exposed to a persistent inflammatory challenge, we observed increased hypernociceptive responses, namely hyperalgesia. L-DOPA treatment alleviated pain responses on days 1 and 7 of treatment, but not on day 15. During that period, we observed an inverse relationship between LID and nociception threshold in these rats, with a high LID rate corresponding to a reduced nociception threshold. Interestingly, pain responses resulting from CFA-induced inflammation were significantly enhanced during established dyskinesia. These data suggest a pro-algesic effect of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, which is confirmed by the correlation founded here between AIMs and nociceptive indexes. In conclusion, our results are consistent with the notion that central dopaminergic mechanism is directly involved in nociceptive responses in Parkinsonism condition.

  7. Presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: the findings, the debate, the therapeutic implications.

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    M Angela eCenci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine precursor L-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson´s disease (PD for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes during the progression of PD, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements and motor fluctuations within a few years of L-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal dopamine transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large dopamine swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma L-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in dopamine transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the dopamine transporter, aberrant release of dopamine from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from dopamine play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  8. Presynaptic Mechanisms of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: The Findings, the Debate, and the Therapeutic Implications.

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    Cenci, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) precursor l-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes with disease progression, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements) and motor fluctuations within a few years of l-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal DA transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large DA swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma l-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in DA transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the DA transporter, aberrant release of DA from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from DA) play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  9. Regulation of Pleiotrophin and Fyn in the striatum of rats undergoing L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

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    Gomez, Gimena; Saborido, Mariano D; Bernardi, M Alejandra; Gershanik, Oscar S; Taravini, Irene R; Ferrario, Juan E

    2018-02-14

    L-DOPA is the gold standard pharmacological therapy for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, its long-term use is associated with the emergence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of LID is crucial for the development of newer and more effective therapeutic approaches. In previous publications, we have shown that Pleiotrophin (PTN), a developmentally regulated trophic factor, is up-regulated by L-DOPA in the striatum of dopamine denervated rats. We have also shown that both mRNA and protein levels of RPTPζ/β, a PTN receptor, were upregulated in the same experimental condition and expressed in striatal medium spiny neurons. The PTN-RPTPζ/β intracellular pathway has not been fully explored and it might be implicated in the striatal plastic changes triggered by L-DOPA treatment. RPTPζ/β is part of the postsynaptic density zone and modulates Fyn, a Src tyrosine kinase that regulates the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor and has been singled out as a key molecule in the development of LID. In this study, we evaluated the changes in PTN and Fyn protein levels and Fyn phosphorylation status in the 6-OHDA rat model of PD rendered dyskinetic with L-DOPA. We found an increase in the number of PTN immunoreactive neurons, no changes in the amount of total Fyn but a significant increase in Fyn phosphorylation in the dorsolateral striatum of dyskinetic rats. Our results support the idea that both PTN and Fyn may be involved in the development of LID, further contributing to the understanding of its molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Untangling cortico-striatal connectivity and cross-frequency coupling in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

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    Jovana eBelic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats in order to study the features directly related to pathological states such as parkinsonian state and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We analysed the spectral characteristics of the obtained signals and observed that during dyskinesia the most prominent feature was a relative power increase in the high gamma frequency range at around 80 Hz, while for the parkinsonian state it was in the beta frequency range. Here we show that during both pathological states effective connectivity in terms of Granger causality is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. In the case of dyskinesia, we also found a high increase in effective connectivity at 80 Hz. In order to further understand the 80- Hz phenomenon, we performed cross-frequency analysis and observed characteristic patterns in the case of dyskinesia but not in the case of the parkinsonian state or the healthy state. We noted a large decrease in the modulation of the amplitude at 80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations (up to ~10 Hz across both structures in the case of dyskinesia. This may suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of the recorded network and the group of neurons active at ~80 Hz.

  11. Case Reports Showing a Long-Term Effect of Subanesthetic Ketamine Infusion in Reducing L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesias

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    Scott J. Sherman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is an FDA-approved drug with a known safety profile. Low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment has led to long-term reduction of treatment-resistant depression and of chronic pain states. We report on low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD patients by 5 case studies and show a long-lasting therapeutic benefit to reduce L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID, improve on time, and reduce depression. Based on the literature we hypothesize that low-dose ketamine may act as a ‘chemical deep brain stimulation', by desynchronizing hypersynchronous oscillatory brain activity, including in the basal ganglia and the motor cortex. The presented PD case reports indicate tolerability, safety and long-term beneficial effects of low-dose ketamine infusion that should be further investigated in a properly controlled prospective clinical trial for treatment of LID, as well as the prevalent nonmotor features pain and depression in PD patients.

  12. Sequential analysis: manganese, catecholamines, and L-dopa induced dyskinesia. [Cat's brain

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    Papavasiliou, P S; Miller, S T; Cotzias, G C; Kraner, H W; Hsieh, R S

    1975-01-01

    The paper specifies methodology for the sequential determination of manganese and catecholamines in selfsame brain samples and shows correlations between them. Small samples were obtained from five regions of brain of cats that had received either saline or levodopa. The doses of levodopa were varied so that although all animals reacted, some developed dyskinesia while others did not. Each sample was first analyzed nondestructively for manganese and then destructively for dopa and dopamine; thus errors inherent in analyzing separate samples, due to the structural heterogeneity of the brain, were avoided. Statistically significant correlations were found (1) between levodopa-induced dyskinesia and the concentrations of dopamine and manganese in some of the regions analysed, and (2) between the concentrations of dopamine and of manganese in the caudates of the cats receiving the highest doses of levodopa. (auth)

  13. Gypenosides attenuate the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Shin, Keon Sung; Zhao, Ting Ting; Park, Keun Hong; Park, Hyun Jin; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Chong Kil; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-04-21

    Gypenosides (GPS) and ethanol extract of Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP-EX) show anxiolytic effects on affective disorders in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Long-term administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) leads to the development of severe motor side effects such as L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia (LID) in PD. The present study investigated the effects of GPS and GP-EX on LID in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of PD. Daily administration of L-DOPA (25 mg/kg) in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD for 22 days induced expression of LID, which was determined by the body and locomotive AIMs scores and contralateral rotational behaviors. However, co-treatments of GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) or GP-EX (50 mg/kg) with L-DOPA significantly attenuated the development of LID without compromising the anti-parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA. In addition, the increases in ∆FosB expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats induced by L-DOPA administration were significantly reduced by co-treatment with GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) or GP-EX (50 mg/kg). These results suggest that GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) and GP-EX (50 mg/kg) effectively attenuate the development of LID by modulating the biomarker activities of ∆FosB expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. GPS and GP-EX will be useful adjuvant therapeutics for LID in PD.

  14. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals elevated nigral levels of dynorphin neuropeptides in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rat model of Parkinson's disease.

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    Anna Ljungdahl

    Full Text Available L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is a troublesome complication of L-DOPA pharmacotherapy of Parkinson's disease and has been associated with disturbed brain opioid transmission. However, so far the results of clinical and preclinical studies on the effects of opioids agonists and antagonists have been contradictory at best. Prodynorphin mRNA levels correlate well with the severity of dyskinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however the identities of the actual neuroactive opioid effectors in their target basal ganglia output structures have not yet been determined. For the first time MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry (IMS was used for unbiased assessment and topographical elucidation of prodynorphin-derived peptides in the substantia nigra of a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia. Nigral levels of dynorphin B and alpha-neoendorphin strongly correlated with the severity of dyskinesia. Even if dynorphin peptide levels were elevated in both the medial and lateral part of the substantia nigra, MALDI IMS analysis revealed that the most prominent changes were localized to the lateral part of the substantia nigra. MALDI IMS is advantageous compared with traditional molecular methods, such as radioimmunoassay, in that neither the molecular identity analyzed, nor the specific localization needs to be predetermined. Indeed, MALDI IMS revealed that the bioconverted metabolite leu-enkephalin-arg also correlated positively with severity of dyskinesia. Multiplexing DynB and leu-enkephalin-arg ion images revealed small (0.25 by 0.5 mm nigral subregions with complementing ion intensities, indicating localized peptide release followed by bioconversion. The nigral dynorphins associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia were not those with high affinity to kappa opioid receptors, but consisted of shorter peptides, mainly dynorphin B and alpha-neoendorphin that are known to bind and activate mu and delta opioid receptors

  15. The Role of Primary Motor Cortex (M1) Glutamate and GABA Signaling in l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinsonian Rats.

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    Lindenbach, David; Conti, Melissa M; Ostock, Corinne Y; George, Jessica A; Goldenberg, Adam A; Melikhov-Sosin, Mitchell; Nuss, Emily E; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-09-21

    Long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA almost always leads to the development of involuntary movements termed l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Whereas hyperdopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia is thought to cause dyskinesia, alterations in primary motor cortex (M1) activity are also prominent during dyskinesia, suggesting that the cortex may represent a therapeutic target. The present study used the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinson's disease to characterize in vivo changes in GABA and glutamate neurotransmission within M1 and determine their contribution to behavioral output. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesion led to parkinsonian motor impairment that was partially reversed by l-DOPA. Among sham-lesioned rats, l-DOPA did not change glutamate or GABA efflux. Likewise, 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not impact GABA or glutamate among rats chronically treated with saline. However, we observed an interaction of lesion and treatment whereby, among lesioned rats, l-DOPA given acutely (1 d) or chronically (14-16 d) reduced glutamate efflux and enhanced GABA efflux. Site-specific microinjections into M1 demonstrated that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was reduced by M1 infusion of a D1 antagonist, an AMPA antagonist, or a GABAA agonist. Overall, the present study demonstrates that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is associated with increased M1 inhibition and that exogenously enhancing M1 inhibition may attenuate dyskinesia, findings that are in agreement with functional imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in human Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our study suggests that increasing M1 inhibitory tone is an endogenous compensatory response designed to limit dyskinesia severity and that potentiating this response is a viable therapeutic strategy. Most Parkinson's disease patients will receive l-DOPA and eventually develop hyperkinetic involuntary movements termed dyskinesia. Such symptoms can be as debilitating as the disease

  16. A Role for Mitogen- and Stress-Activated Kinase 1 in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia and ∆FosB Expression

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    Feyder, Michael; Södersten, Erik; Santini, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 has been implicated in 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID), a motor complication affecting Parkinson's disease patients subjected to standard pharmacotherapy. We examined the involvement...... of mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1), a downstream target of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, and an important regulator of transcription in LID. METHODS: 6-Hydroxydopamine was used to produce a model of Parkinson's disease in MSK1 knockout mice and in ∆FosB- or ∆c......Jun-overexpressing transgenic mice, which were assessed for LID following long-term L-DOPA administration. Biochemical processes were evaluated by Western blotting or immunofluorescence. Histone H3 phosphorylation was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promotor-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction...

  17. Excessive sensitivity to uncertain visual input in L-dopa induced dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease: further implications for cerebellar involvement

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    James eStevenson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When faced with visual uncertainty during motor performance, humans rely more on predictive forward models and proprioception and attribute lesser importance to the ambiguous visual feedback. Though disrupted predictive control is typical of patients with cerebellar disease, sensorimotor deficits associated with the involuntary and often unconscious nature of L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease (PD suggests dyskinetic subjects may also demonstrate impaired predictive motor control. Methods: We investigated the motor performance of 9 dyskinetic and 10 non-dyskinetic PD subjects on and off L-dopa, and of 10 age-matched control subjects, during a large-amplitude, overlearned, visually-guided tracking task. Ambiguous visual feedback was introduced by adding ‘jitter’ to a moving target that followed a Lissajous pattern. Root mean square (RMS tracking error was calculated, and ANOVA, robust multivariate linear regression and linear dynamical system analyses were used to determine the contribution of speed and ambiguity to tracking performance. Results: Increasing target ambiguity and speed contributed significantly more to the RMS error of dyskinetic subjects off medication. L-dopa improved the RMS tracking performance of both PD groups. At higher speeds, controls and PDs without dyskinesia were able to effectively de-weight ambiguous visual information. Conclusions: PDs’ visually-guided motor performance degrades with visual jitter and speed of movement to a greater degree compared to age-matched controls. However, there are fundamental differences in PDs with and without dyskinesia: subjects without dyskinesia are generally slow, and less responsive to dynamic changes in motor task requirements but, PDs with dyskinesia there was a trade-off between overall performance and inappropriate reliance on ambiguous visual feedback. This is likely associated with functional changes in posterior parietal-ponto-cerebellar pathways.

  18. Targeting the D1-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex reduces L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson’s rats

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    Song L

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lu Song,1,* Zhanzhao Zhang,2,* Rongguo Hu,1 Jie Cheng,1 Lin Li,1 Qinyi Fan,1 Na Wu,1 Jing Gan,1 Mingzhu Zhou,1 Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai 9th People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa remains the most effective therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD, but its long-term administration is associated with the development of debilitating motor complications known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. Enhanced function of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of LID. Given the existence of physical and functional interactions between D1R and NMDAR, we explored the effects of uncoupling D1R and NMDA GluN1 (GluN1 interaction on LID by using the Tat-conjugated interfering peptide (Tat-D1-t2. In this study, we demonstrated in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned PD rat model that intrastriatal injection of Tat-D1-t2 alleviated dyskinetic behaviors and downregulated the phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 induced by levodopa. Moreover, we also showed intrastriatal administration of Tat-D1-t2 elicited alterations in membranous GluN1 and D1R expression. These findings indicate that D1R/GluN1 complexes may be a molecular target with therapeutic potential for the treatment of dyskinesia in Parkinson’s patients.Keywords: 6-hydroxydopamine, Parkinson’s disease, dyskinesia, L-dopa, D1 receptor, NMDA, protein–protein interaction

  19. Levodopa/benserazide microsphere (LBM) prevents L-dopa induced dyskinesia by inactivation of the DR1/PKA/P-tau pathway in 6-OHDA-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

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    Xie, Cheng-long; Wang, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Su-fang; Yuan, Ming-Lu; Che, Jun-Yi; Gan, Jing; Song, Lu; Yuan, Wei-En; Liu, Zhen-Guo

    2014-12-16

    L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) is the gold standard for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but long-term therapy is associated with the emergence of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). In the present study, L-dopa and benserazide were loaded by poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (LBM), which can release levodopa and benserazide in a sustained manner in order to continuous stimulate dopaminergic receptors. We investigated the role of striatal DR1/PKA/P-tau signal transduction in the molecular event underlying LID in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. We found that animals rendered dyskinetic by L-dopa treatment, administration of LBM prevented the severity of AIM score, as well as improvement in motor function. Moreover, we also showed L-dopa elicits profound alterations in the activity of three LID molecular markers, namely DR1/PKA/P-tau (ser396). These modifications are totally prevented by LBM treatment, a similar way to achieve continuous dopaminergic delivery (CDD). In conclusion, our experiments provided evidence that intermittent administration of L-dopa, but not continuous delivery, and DR1/PKA/p-tau (ser396) activation played a critical role in the molecular and behavioural induction of LID in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In addition, LBM treatment prevented the development of LID by inhibiting the expression of DR1/PKA/p-tau, as well as PPEB mRNA in dyskintic rats.

  20. Ibuprofen or piroxicam protects nigral neurons and delays the development of l-dopa induced dyskinesia in rats with experimental Parkinsonism: Influence on angiogenesis.

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    Teema, Asmaa M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-08-01

    Neuroinflammation and angiogenesis have been involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study investigated the effect of ibuprofen or piroxicam on the motor response to l-dopa and development of dyskinesia in Parkinsonian rats focusing on the anti-angiogenic role of the two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rats were divided into nine groups as follows: Group I: the vehicle group, Group II: rotenone group, rats were injected with nine doses of rotenone (1 mg/kg/48 h), group III&IV: rats received rotenone + ibuprofen (10 or 30 mg/kg), Group V-VI: rats received rotenone + piroxicam (1 or 3 mg/kg), Group VII: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa (100/10 mg/kg), Group VIII-IX: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa + ibuprofen (30 mg/kg) or piroxicam (3 mg/kg). In general, drugs were administered daily for ten weeks. Rotenone-treated rats showed motor dysfunction, lower striatal dopamine, lower staining for nigral tyrosine hydroxylase but higher level of striatal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared to vehicle-treated rats (P piroxicam in combination with l-dopa preserved the effect of l-dopa at the end of week 10, delayed the development of dyskinesia and decreased striatal COX-2 and VEGF levels. In conclusion, the current study suggests that ibuprofen and piroxicam are promising candidates for neuroprotection in PD and may have utility in conjunction with l-dopa in order to ensure the longevity of its action and to delay the development of dyskinesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective loss of bi-directional synaptic plasticity in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways accompanies generation of parkinsonism and l-DOPA induced dyskinesia in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Sherri L; Chen, Betty; Lo, Charlotte; Gertler, Tracey S; Warre, Ruth; Surmeier, James D; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Nash, Joanne E

    2014-11-01

    Parkinsonian symptoms arise due to over-activity of the indirect striatal output pathway, and under-activity of the direct striatal output pathway. l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) is caused when the opposite circuitry problems are established, with the indirect pathway becoming underactive, and the direct pathway becoming over-active. Here, we define synaptic plasticity abnormalities in these pathways associated with parkinsonism, symptomatic benefits of l-DOPA, and LID. We applied spike-timing dependent plasticity protocols to cortico-striatal synapses in slices from 6-OHDA-lesioned mouse models of parkinsonism and LID, generated in BAC transgenic mice with eGFP targeting the direct or indirect output pathways, with and without l-DOPA present. In naïve mice, bidirectional synaptic plasticity, i.e. LTP and LTD, was induced, resulting in an EPSP amplitude change of approximately 50% in each direction in both striatal output pathways, as shown previously. In parkinsonism and dyskinesia, both pathways exhibited unidirectional plasticity, irrespective of stimulation paradigm. In parkinsonian animals, the indirect pathway only exhibited LTP (LTP protocol: 143.5±14.6%; LTD protocol 177.7±22.3% of baseline), whereas the direct pathway only showed LTD (LTP protocol: 74.3±4.0% and LTD protocol: 63.3±8.7%). A symptomatic dose of l-DOPA restored bidirectional plasticity on both pathways to levels comparable to naïve animals (Indirect pathway: LTP protocol: 124.4±22.0% and LTD protocol: 52.1±18.5% of baseline. Direct pathway: LTP protocol: 140.7±7.3% and LTD protocol: 58.4±6.0% of baseline). In dyskinesia, in the presence of l-DOPA, the indirect pathway exhibited only LTD (LTP protocol: 68.9±21.3% and LTD protocol 52.0±14.2% of baseline), whereas in the direct pathway, only LTP could be induced (LTP protocol: 156.6±13.2% and LTD protocol 166.7±15.8% of baseline). We conclude that normal motor control requires bidirectional plasticity of both striatal outputs

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers For Parkinson's Disease and L-DOPA-induced Dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas

    -DOPA, 18 patienter blev behandlet med L-DOPA, hvoraf 10 havde LID. Prøverne blev analyseret ved brug af high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), western blotting, enzyme linked immune-assays (ELISA), Multiplex og fluorescence-assays. Flere mulige......-patienter, som ikke fik L-DOPA. Patienter med LID havde signifikante forandringer i tryptofan- og katekolamin-metabolismen og en øget fosforylering af enzymet extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2). Disse fund kan bidrage til en bedre forståelse af de sygdomsmekanismer, som giver PS og LID...

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas

    the development of biomarkers for earlier and more precise diagnosis and prognosis. The purpose of this study is the development and evaluation of proposed biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rat models of PD and LID as well as in patients with early and late stage PD with or without LID. Potential....... Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in Parkinson disease. Nature reviews Neurology. 2013;9(3):131-40. 5. Goetz CG, Tilley BC, Shaftman SR, et al. Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS): scale presentation and clinimetric testing results. Movement...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of catecholamine metabolites in Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael; Stenager, Egon

    -dyskinetic PD patients and controls. Method: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 6 age-matched controls and 16 PD patients, (11 receiving levodopa, 6 dyskinetic and 6 not receiving levodopa), was analysed for catecholamines and metabolites by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Samples were collected after overnight...

  5. The blood-brain barrier is intact after levodopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian primates--evidence from in vivo neuroimaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Jenkins, Bruce G; Choi, Ji-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested, based on rodent studies, that levodopa (L-dopa) induced dyskinesia is associated with a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have investigated BBB integrity with in vivo neuroimaging techniques in six 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) lesioned primates...

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor is upregulated by l-dopa in the parkinsonian brain: implications for the development of dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francardo, Veronica; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Sillivan, Stephanie E.; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Luksik, Andrew S.; Vassoler, Fair M.; Lees, Andrew J.; Konradi, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis and increased permeability of the blood–brain barrier have been reported to occur in animal models of Parkinson’s disease and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, but the significance of these phenomena has remained unclear. Using a validated rat model of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, this study demonstrates that chronic treatment with l-dopa dose dependently induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the basal ganglia nuclei. Vascular endothelial growth factor was abundantly expressed in astrocytes and astrocytic processes in the proximity of blood vessels. When co-administered with l-dopa, a small molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor signalling significantly attenuated the development of dyskinesia and completely blocked the angiogenic response and associated increase in blood–brain barrier permeability induced by the treatment. The occurrence of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation was verified in post-mortem basal ganglia tissue from patients with Parkinson’s disease with a history of dyskinesia, who exhibited increased microvascular density, microvascular nestin expression and an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor messenger ribonucleic acid. These congruent findings in the rat model and human patients indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor is implicated in the pathophysiology of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia and emphasize an involvement of the microvascular compartment in the adverse effects of l-dopa pharmacotherapy in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21771855

  7. Understanding and Prevention of “Therapy-” Induced Dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iciar Aviles-Olmos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-dopa is the most effective, currently available treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD, but it leads to the development of involuntary movements known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID in the majority of patients after long-term use. Both gene and cell therapy approaches are the subject of multiple ongoing studies as potential ways of relieving symptoms of PD without the complication of dyskinesia. However, the spectre of dyskinesia in the absence of L-dopa, the so-called “off-phase” or graft-induced dyskinesia (GID, remains a major obstacle particularly in the further development of cell therapy in PD, but it is also a concern for proponents of gene therapy approaches. LID results from nonphysiological dopamine release, supersensitivity of dopamine receptors, and consequent abnormal signalling through mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Restoration of physiological circuitry within the basal ganglia loops is ultimately the aim of all cell and gene therapy approaches but each using distinctive strategies and accompanied by risks of exacerbation of LID or development of “off-phase”/GID. In this paper we discuss the details of what is understood regarding the development of dyskinesias with relevance to cell and gene therapy and potential strategies to minimize their occurrence.

  8. Correlation between dopamine receptor D2 expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements in Wistar rats with hemiparkinsonism and dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro Aponte, P A; Otálora, C A; Guzmán, J C; Turner, L F; Alcázar, J P; Mayorga, E L

    2018-03-07

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by motor alterations, which are commonly treated with L-DOPA. However, long-term L-DOPA use may cause dyskinesia. Although the pathogenic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is unclear, the condition has been associated with alterations in dopamine receptors, among which D2 receptors (D2R) have received little attention. This study aims to: (i)develop and standardise an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with hemiparkinsonism; and (ii)evaluate the correlation between D2R expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements (AIM). We allocated 21 male Wistar rats into 3 groups: intact controls, lesioned rats (with neurotoxin 6-OHDA), and dyskinetic rats (injected with L-DOPA for 19 days). Sensorimotor impairment was assessed with behavioural tests. Dyskinetic rats gradually developed AIMs during the treatment period; front leg AIMs were more severe and locomotor AIMs less severe (Pde Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A2A Receptor Antagonism and Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela Morelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyskinesia, a major complication of treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD, involves two phases: induction, which is responsible for dyskinesia onset, and expression, which underlies its clinical manifestation. The unique cellular and regional distribution of adenosine A2A receptors in basal ganglia areas that are richly innervated by dopamine, and their antagonistic role towards dopamine receptor stimulation, have positioned A2A receptor antagonists as an attractive nondopaminergic target to improve the motor deficits that characterize PD. In this paper, we describe the biochemical characteristics of A2A receptors and the effects of adenosine A2A antagonists in rodent and primate models of PD on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, together with relevant biomarker studies. We also review clinical trials of A2A antagonists as adjuncts to L-DOPA in PD patients with motor fluctuations. These studies have generally demonstrated that the addition of an A2A antagonist to a stable L-DOPA regimen reduces OFF time and mildly increases dyskinesia. However, limited clinical data suggest that the addition of an A2A antagonist along with a reduction of L-DOPA might maintain anti-Parkinsonian benefit and reduce dyskinesia. Whether A2A antagonists might reduce the development of dyskinesia has not yet been tested clinically.

  10. Endothelial Proliferation and Increased Blood - Brain Barrier Permeability in the Basal Ganglia in a Rat Model of 3,4-Dihydrozyphenyl-L-Alanine-Induced Dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westin, Jenny E.; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2006-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia is associated with molecular and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, but the occurrence of structural remodeling through cell genesis has not been explored. In this study, rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions received injections of th...... of angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier dysfunction in an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. These microvascular changes are likely to affect the kinetics of L-DOPA entry into the brain, favoring the occurrence of motor complications....... dyskinesia. The vast majority (60-80%) of the newborn cells stained positively for endothelial markers. This endothelial proliferation was associated with an upregulation of immature endothelial markers (nestin) and a downregulation of endothelial barrier antigen on blood vessel walls. In addition......, dyskinetic rats exhibited a significant increase in total blood vessel length and a visible extravasation of serum albumin in the two structures in which endothelial proliferation was most pronounced (substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus). The present study provides the first evidence...

  11. Tardive Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Tardive dyskinesia is a neurological syndrome caused by the long-term use of neuroleptic drugs. Neuroleptic drugs are generally prescribed for psychiatric disorders, ...

  12. Role of Serotonin Neurons in L-DOPA- and Graft-Induced Dyskinesia in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunju Shin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-DOPA, the most effective drug to treat motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, causes abnormal involuntary movements, limiting its use in advanced stages of the disease. An increasing body of evidence points to the serotonin system as a key player in the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. In fact, exogenously administered L-DOPA can be taken up by serotonin neurons, converted to dopamine and released as a false transmitter, contributing to pulsatile stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors. Accordingly, destruction of serotonin fibers or silencing serotonin neurons by serotonin agonists could counteract LID in animal models. Recent clinical work has also shown that serotonin neurons are present in the caudate/putamen of patients grafted with embryonic ventral mesencephalic cells, producing intense serotonin hyperinnervation. These patients experience graft-induced dyskinesia (GID, a type of dyskinesia phenotypically similar to the one induced by L-DOPA but independent from its administration. Interestingly, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone has been shown to suppress GID in these patients, suggesting that serotonin neurons might be involved in the etiology of GID as for LID. In this paper we will discuss the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of the serotonin system in both LID and GID.

  13. Reset Control Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Baños, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Reset Control Systems addresses the analysis for reset control treating both its basic form which requires only that the state of the controller be reinitialized to zero (the reset action) each time the tracking error crosses zero (the reset condition), and some useful variations of the reset action (partial reset with fixed or variable reset percentage) and of the reset condition (fixed or variable reset band and anticipative reset). The issues regarding reset control – concepts and motivation; analysis tools; and the application of design methodologies to real-world examples – are given comprehensive coverage. The text opens with an historical perspective which moves from the seminal work of the Clegg integrator and Horowitz FORE to more recent approaches based on impulsive/hybrid control systems and explains the motivation for reset compensation. Preliminary material dealing with notation, basic definitions and results, and with the definition of the control problem under study is also included. The fo...

  14. The monoamine reuptake inhibitor BTS 74 398 fails to evoke established dyskinesia but does not synergise with levodopa in MPTP-treated primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, Matthew J; Smith, Lance A; Jackson, Michael J; Cheetham, Sharon C; Jenner, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with levodopa (L-dopa) induces dyskinesia that, once established, is provoked by each dose of L-dopa or a dopamine (DA) agonist. In contrast, monoamine reuptake inhibitors may reverse motor deficits in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated primates without provoking established involuntary movements. We now examine whether the potent monoamine reuptake blocker BTS 74 398 induces established dyskinesia in MPTP-treated common marmosets primed previously with L-dopa and whether co-administration of BTS 74 398 with L-dopa potentiates motor behaviour and dyskinesia induced by acute L-dopa treatment. Administration of BTS 74 398 (2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg, p.o.) in MPTP-treated common marmosets increased locomotor activity and reduced motor disability in a dose-related manner but did not provoke involuntary movements. BTS 74 398 (2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg p.o.) co-administered with a threshold dose of L-dopa (2.5 mg/kg p.o.) did not evoke a motor response or induce dyskinesia. Similarly, concomitant administration of BTS 74 398 (5.0 mg/kg p.o.) with a submaximal L-dopa dose (12.5 mg/kg p.o.) did not potentiate the motor response produced by L-dopa alone and there was no alteration in the dyskinesia provoked by L-dopa challenge. BTS 74 398 reverses motor abnormalities in MPTP-treated marmosets without evoking established dyskinesia but no additive improvement occurs when administered in combination with L-dopa. The lack of synergy with L-dopa may suggest different sites of drug action. Copyright 2003 Movement Disorder Society

  15. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is associated with increased thyrotropin releasing hormone in the dorsal striatum of hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolita Cantuti-Castelvetri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dyskinesias associated with involuntary movements and painful muscle contractions are a common and severe complication of standard levodopa (L-DOPA, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine therapy for Parkinson's disease. Pathologic neuroplasticity leading to hyper-responsive dopamine receptor signaling in the sensorimotor striatum is thought to underlie this currently untreatable condition.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was employed to evaluate the molecular changes associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease. With this technique, we determined that thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH was greatly increased in the dopamine-depleted striatum of hemi-parkinsonian rats that developed abnormal movements in response to L-DOPA therapy, relative to the levels measured in the contralateral non-dopamine-depleted striatum, and in the striatum of non-dyskinetic control rats. ProTRH immunostaining suggested that TRH peptide levels were almost absent in the dopamine-depleted striatum of control rats that did not develop dyskinesias, but in the dyskinetic rats, proTRH immunostaining was dramatically up-regulated in the striatum, particularly in the sensorimotor striatum. This up-regulation of TRH peptide affected striatal medium spiny neurons of both the direct and indirect pathways, as well as neurons in striosomes.TRH is not known to be a key striatal neuromodulator, but intrastriatal injection of TRH in experimental animals can induce abnormal movements, apparently through increasing dopamine release. Our finding of a dramatic and selective up-regulation of TRH expression in the sensorimotor striatum of dyskinetic rat models suggests a TRH-mediated regulatory mechanism that may underlie the pathologic neuroplasticity driving dopamine hyper-responsivity in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Converting the reset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Hoogland (Jiri); C.D.D. Neumann; D. Bloch

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWe give a simple algorithm to incorporate the effects of resets in convertible bond prices, without having to add an extra factor to take into account the value of the reset. Furthermore we show that the effect of a notice period, and additional make-whole features, can be treated in a

  17. Enkephalin and dynorphin neuropeptides are differently correlated with locomotor hypersensitivity and levodopa-induced dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Stefania; Capper-Loup, Christine; Paganetti, Paolo; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2016-06-01

    The opioidergic neuropeptides dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (ENK) and the D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors (D1R, D2R) are involved in the striatal control of motor and behavioral function. In Parkinson's disease, motor disturbances such as "on-off" motor fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesia) are severe complications that often arise after chronic l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) treatment. Changes in the striatal expression of preproENK (PPENK), proDYN (PDYN), D1R, and D2R mRNA have been observed in parkinsonian animals treated with l-DOPA. Enhanced opioidergic transmission has been found in association with l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, but the connection of PPENK, PDYN, D1R, and D2R mRNA expression with locomotor activity remains unclear. In this study, we measured PPENK, PDYN, D1R and D2R mRNA levels by in situ hybridization in the striatum of 6-OHDA hemi-parkinsonian rats treated with l-DOPA (PD+l-DOPA group), along with two control groups (PD+saline and naive+l-DOPA). We found different levels of expression of PPENK, PDYN, D1R and D2R mRNA across the experimental groups and correlated the changes in mRNA expression with dyskinesia and locomotor variables assessed by open field test during several phases of l-DOPA treatment. Both PDYN and PPENK mRNA levels were correlated with the severity of dyskinesia, while PPENK mRNA levels were also correlated with the frequency of contralateral rotational movements and with locomotor variables. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between D1R mRNA expression and D2R mRNA expression in the PD+l-DOPA group. These findings suggest that, in parkinsonian animals treated with l-DOPA, high levels of PPENK are a prerequisite for a locomotor sensitization to l-DOPA treatment, while PDYN overexpression is responsible only for the development of dyskinesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Ritwika; Nandi, Sitansu Sekhar

    2016-04-01

    We present a case of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) in a 21 year old girl, with no family history of similar episodes. The episodes were short (lasting less than a minute), frequent, occurring 5 to 10 times a day, self-limiting dystonia of her right upper limb precipitated by sudden movement. She also had a past history of partial seizures with secondary generalization in her childhood. She responded to phenytoin, with cessation of events after 1 month of treatment. This case impresses upon the hypothesis stating the association between seizure activity and PKD probably due to a common foci of origin. Awareness of this condition is required as it is easily treatable but frequently misdiagnosed. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primary ciliary dyskinesia also have year-round nasal congestion and a chronic cough. Chronic respiratory tract infections ... likely due to abnormal cilia in the fallopian tubes. Another feature of primary ciliary dyskinesia is recurrent ...

  20. Self-Service Password Reset

    CERN Multimedia

    IT department

    2011-01-01

    Forgotten your password? Throughout the year, one of the most common requests to the Service Desk concerns password resets.  This is especially the case now that we are at the end of the holiday season and many of us return after a long break. Currently, the only way to have your password reset is to call the Service Desk during the week and within the service hours (07:30 to 18:30). Not anymore!   The IT department is putting up a new service that will allow you to reset the password of your primary CERN account by yourself. Note, that you will still be able to request a password reset by calling the Service Desk as usual and that you will still have to do this if your account has been blocked for any reason.  However, the new service provides you with more flexibility and convenience when your memory has failed you. In order to take advantage of this new service, you must:   • Have a valid, active account   • Register in advance an external...

  1. Reduction rules for reset/inhibitor nets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, H.M.W.; Wynn, M.T.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Reset/inhibitor nets are Petri nets extended with reset arcs and inhibitor arcs. These extensions can be used to model cancellation and blocking. A reset arc allows a transition to remove all tokens from a certain place when the transition fires. An inhibitor arc can stop a transition from being

  2. [Tardive dyskinesia--diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamatsuri, H

    1993-11-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is defined as a syndrome consisting of abnormal, stereotypical involuntary movements usually of choreoathetoid type, principally affected the mouth, face, limbs and trunk, which occurs relatively late in the course of neuroleptic drug treatment and in the etiology of which the drug treatment is a necessary factor. Presently, the prevalence of tardive dyskinesia in the hospitalized patients in psychiatric hospitals in Japan is estimated to be 20-30%. Epidemiology, possible pathophysiology and symptomatology of tardive dyskinesia are briefly described. Differential diagnosis between this syndrome and other involuntary movements such as psychotic mannerism, senile orofacial dyskinesia, rabbit's syndrome, Pisa syndrome or Meige's syndrome is discussed. Several drugs to suppress involuntary movements of tardive dyskinesia are described. However, there appears to be no consistently reliable therapies for patients who develop the tardive dyskinesia. Treatment for this syndrome, other than neuroleptic withdrawal, are still uncertain.

  3. Dysphagia due to tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, neuroleptic-induced delayed onset movement disorder, remains an enigmatic phenomenon and a therapeutic challenge. Only a few cases of dysphagia also have been reported in world literature and to the best knowledge of the authors no case of TD manifesting as isolated dysphagia has been reported so far from India. We report a case of TD consequent to prolonged exposure to typical neuroleptics, manifesting as isolated dysphagia who responded well to a combination of Quetiapine, Donepezil and Vit E.

  4. Parkinson's disease: carbidopa, nausea, and dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted

    2014-01-01

    When l-dopa use began in the early 1960s for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, nausea and reversible dyskinesias were experienced as continuing side effects. Carbidopa or benserazide was added to l-dopa in 1975 solely to control nausea. Subsequent to the increasing use of carbidopa has been the recognition of irreversible dyskinesias, which have automatically been attributed to l-dopa. The research into the etiology of these phenomena has identified the causative agent of the irreversible dyskinesias as carbidopa, not l-dopa. The mechanism of action of the carbidopa and benserazide causes irreversible binding and inactivation of vitamin B6 throughout the body. The consequences of this action are enormous, interfering with over 300 enzyme and protein functions. This has the ability to induce previously undocumented profound antihistamine dyskinesias, which have been wrongly attributed to l-dopa and may be perceived as irreversible if proper corrective action is not taken.

  5. Desynchronizing electrical and sensory coordinated reset neuromodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS), to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and i...

  6. Desynchronizing Electrical and Sensory Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr V. Popovych; Peter A. Tass; Peter A. Tass

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS),to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and in...

  7. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters at...

  8. Preliminary Investigation of Risk Factors Causing Dyskinesias in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients on long- term treatment with levodopa experience motor fluctuations and dyskinesias (impaired voluntary movements which result in fragmented movement which only cease during sleep) [5]. Dyskinesias, also termed levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs), are a major limitation in the therapy of Parkinson's disease ...

  9. FPS camera sync and reset chassis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    The sync and reset chassis provides all the circuitry required to synchronize an event to be studied, a remote free-running focus projection and scanning (FPS) data-acquisition TV camera, and a video signal recording system. The functions, design, and operation of this chassis are described in detail

  10. Recensie "The Great Reset" : Richard Florida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy van Dalm

    2010-01-01

    Like the Great Depression and the Long Depression before it, experts have viewed prolonged economic downturns as crises. In The Great Reset , bestselling author Richard Florida argues that we should instead see the recent recession as an opportunity to create entirely new ways of working and living

  11. Parkinson's disease: carbidopa, nausea, and dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz,1 Alvin Stein,2 Ted Cole3 1Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Cape Coral, FL, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3Cole Center for Healing, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: When ʟ-dopa use began in the early 1960s for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, nausea and reversible dyskinesias were experienced as continuing side effects. Carbidopa or benserazide was added to ʟ-dopa in 1975 solely to control nausea. Subsequent to the increasing use of carbidopa has been the recognition of irreversible dyskinesias, which have automatically been attributed to ʟ-dopa. The research into the etiology of these phenomena has identified the causative agent of the irreversible dyskinesias as carbidopa, not ʟ-dopa. The mechanism of action of the carbidopa and benserazide causes irreversible binding and inactivation of vitamin B6 throughout the body. The consequences of this action are enormous, interfering with over 300 enzyme and protein functions. This has the ability to induce previously undocumented profound antihistamine dyskinesias, which have been wrongly attributed to ʟ-dopa and may be perceived as irreversible if proper corrective action is not taken. Keywords: vitamin B6, PLP, irreversible, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate

  12. Reset Tree-Based Optical Fault Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howon Kim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new reset tree-based scheme to protect cryptographic hardware against optical fault injection attacks. As one of the most powerful invasive attacks on cryptographic hardware, optical fault attacks cause semiconductors to misbehave by injecting high-energy light into a decapped integrated circuit. The contaminated result from the affected chip is then used to reveal secret information, such as a key, from the cryptographic hardware. Since the advent of such attacks, various countermeasures have been proposed. Although most of these countermeasures are strong, there is still the possibility of attack. In this paper, we present a novel optical fault detection scheme that utilizes the buffers on a circuit’s reset signal tree as a fault detection sensor. To evaluate our proposal, we model radiation-induced currents into circuit components and perform a SPICE simulation. The proposed scheme is expected to be used as a supplemental security tool.

  13. Resetting dynamic behaviour of pipework systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, M.

    1997-01-01

    Resetting models is applied to electricity generating plant pipework systems. A frequency approach to the problem is made in an original way thanks to the use of precise dynamic rigidity matrices. The method assumes two kinds of unknown: the usually processed mechanical characteristics (Young's Modulus, density etc.) and new resetting parameters acting on the dynamic behaviour of unknown connections. As the latter have a very wide range of possible variation, they benefit from a change of variable which allows the assumptions formulated to be complied with. The minimized cost function is based on a error in load. The frequencies required for building it are automatically selected thanks to different tests on measurements. Minimization uses a sensitivity technique linked with a method of least standard squares. The method has been programmed in Fortran 90 within the CIRCUS code and tried out on various examples which were simulated and sound effects cases as well as an actual case. (author)

  14. Wave Pipelining Using Self Reset Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel E. Litvin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel design approach combining wave pipelining and self reset logic, which provides an elegant solution at high-speed data throughput with significant savings in power and area as compared with other dynamic CMOS logic implementations. To overcome some limitations in SRL art, we employ a new SRL family, namely, dual-rail self reset logic with input disable (DRSRL-ID. These gates depict fairly constant timing parameters, specially the width of the output pulse, for varying fan-out and logic depth, helping accommodate process, supply voltage, and temperature variations (PVT. These properties simplify the implementation of wave pipelined circuits. General timing analysis is provided and compared with previous implementations. Results of circuit implementation are presented together with conclusions and future work.

  15. A case of paliperidone-palmitate-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lally, John

    2012-06-13

    OBJECTIVES: This is one of the first cases reported in the literature of paliperidone-palmitate-induced prolonged dyskinesia. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with paranoid schizophrenia who developed orofacial dyskinesia some 4 months after the commencement of paliperidone long-acting injection. CONCLUSION: This case serves as a clinical reminder that dyskinesia can occur with all antipsychotic medications.

  16. Desynchronizing electrical and sensory coordinated reset neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovych, Oleksandr V; Tass, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS), to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and inhibitory adaptive synapses that a phase reset of neuronal populations as well as a desynchronization and an anti-kindling can robustly be achieved by direct electrical stimulation or indirect (synaptically-mediated) excitatory and inhibitory stimulation. Our findings are relevant for DBS as well as for sensory stimulation in neurological disorders characterized by pathological neuronal synchrony. Based on the obtained results, we may expect that the local effects in the vicinity of a depth electrode (realized by direct stimulation of the neurons' somata or stimulation of axon terminals) and the non-local CR effects (realized by stimulation of excitatory or inhibitory efferent fibers) of deep brain CR neuromodulation may be similar or even identical. Furthermore, our results indicate that an effective desynchronization and anti-kindling can even be achieved by non-invasive, sensory CR neuromodulation. We discuss the concept of sensory CR neuromodulation in the context of neurological disorders.

  17. Desynchronizing Electrical and Sensory Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Popovych

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated reset (CR stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS,to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling. Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and inhibitory adaptive synapses that a phase reset of neuronal populations as well as a desynchronization and an anti-kindling can robustly be achieved by direct electrical stimulation or indirect (synaptically-mediated excitatory and inhibitory stimulation.Our findings are relevant for DBS as well as for sensory stimulation in neurological disorders characterized by pathological neuronalsynchrony. Based on the obtained results, we may expect that the local effects in the vicinity of a depth electrode (realized by direct stimulation of the neurons' somata or stimulation of axon terminals and the non-local CR effects (realized by stimulation of excitatory or inhibitory efferent fibers of deep brain CR neuromodulation may be similar or even identical. Furthermore, ourresults indicate that an effective desynchronization and anti-kindlingcan even be achieved by non-invasive, sensory CR neuromodulation. We discuss the concept of sensory CR neuromodulation in the context of neurological disorders.

  18. Dyskinesias differentiate autistic disorder from catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasic, J R; Barnett, J Y; Will, M V; Nadrich, R H; Sheitman, B B; Ahmad, R; Mendonca, M de F; Kaplan, D; Brathwaite, C

    2000-12-01

    Autistic disorder and catatonia are neuropsychiatric syndromes defined by impairments in social interaction, communication, and restricted, stereotypical motor routines. Assessments of children with these disorders are typically restricted in scope by the patients' limited ability to comprehend directions. The authors performed systematic assessments of dyskinesias on six prepubertal boys with autistic disorder and mental retardation and on one adolescent male with catatonia to determine if this type of information could be routinely obtained. The boys with autistic disorder had more stereotypies and tics, a greater degree of akathisia and hyperactivity, and more compulsions than the adolescent with catatonia. Catatonia was associated with catalepsy and dystonic postures. The authors conclude that the diagnostic accuracy and specificity of neuropsychiatric syndromes may be enhanced by the systematic assessment of the dyskinesias associated with each condition.

  19. Change in the CERN account password reset procedure

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    From Since 19 August 19th 2008, the security of the CERN account password reset procedure has been strengthened. As a result, users requesting to have their password reset by the Computing Helpdesk will be asked to provide some private personal information prior to resetting their CERN account password. Please note that all relevant information about the CERN account and password can be found at http://cern.ch/it-dep/AccountsandpasswordsatCERN.htm Thank you in advance for your cooperation. IT Department

  20. Change in the CERN account password reset procedure

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Since 19 August 2008, the security of the CERN account password reset procedure has been strengthened. As a result, users asking to have their password reset by the Computing Helpdesk will be asked to provide some personal information prior to resetting their CERN account password. Please note that all relevant information about CERN accounts and passwords can be found at http://cern.ch/it-dep/AccountsandpasswordsatCERN.htm Thank you in advance for your cooperation. IT Department

  1. Computerized spirography and roentgenopneumopolygraphy in diagnosis of tracheobroncheal dyskinesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkij, A.V.; Gul'ko, S.I.; Vyalyj, N.P.; Salivon, A.P.; Orlovskaya, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    The results of comprehensive examination of respiratory organs in 103 patients with hypotonic dyskinesia syndrome of trachea and large bronchi were presented. The comprehensive examination included computerized spirography and roentgenopneumopolygraphy with additional tests: exercise and drug. It was shown that the conducted comprehensive examination helped to receive an information about breathh physiology, to diagnose tracheobroncheal dyskinesia and to evaluate the degree of ventilation disorders

  2. L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) induces neuroendocrinological, physiological, and immunological regulation in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapanao, Ratchaneegorn; Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Chang, Chin-Chuan; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Cheng, Winton

    2018-03-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) is a precursor for dopamine (DA) synthesis. Assessments were conducted to analyze the effects of l-DOPA on mediating regulation of neuroendocrinological, immunological, and physiological parameters in the shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei when they were individually injected with 0.01 N HCl or l-DOPA at 0.5 or 1.0 μmol shrimp -1 for 60, 120, and 240 min. For catecholamine synthesis evaluation, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DA beta hydroxylase (DBH) activities, l-DOPA, DA, and norepinephrine (NE) levels in hemolymph were determined. The total hemocyte count (THC), differential hemocyte count (DHC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, phagocytic activity, and clearance efficiency in response to the pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus were assessed for immune responses, and plasma glucose and lactate levels were for physiological response. Results showed that the TH activity, THC, hyaline cells (HCs), and semigranular cells (SGCs) at 120 min, DA levels at 60-240 min, PO activity in hemocytes per 50 μL of hemolymph at 60-120 min, and PO activity per granulocyte (granular cells (GCs) + SGCs) at 60 min significantly increased, but TH activity, l-DOPA levels, GCs, SGCs, and respiratory bursts in hemocytes per 10 μL of hemolymph at 60 min, respiratory bursts per hemocyte and SOD activity at 120 min, phagocytic activity at 60-240 min, and the clearance efficiency at 60-120 min significantly decreased in shrimp injected with l-DOPA at 1.0 μmol shrimp -1 . In another experiment, 60 min after shrimp had received l-DOPA at 0.5 or 1.0 μmol shrimp -1 , they were challenged with an injection of V. alginolyticus at 2 × 10 5  colony-forming units (cfu) shrimp -1 . The injection of l-DOPA at 1.0 μmol shrimp -1 also significantly increased the cumulative mortality of shrimp by 16.7%, compared to the HCl-challenged control after 120 h. These results suggest that l-DOPA administration at 1.0 μmol shrimp -1 can mediate the transient regulation of neuroendocrinological, immunological, and physiologic responses resulting in immunosuppression, which in turn promoted the susceptibility of L. vannamei to V. alginolyticus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [A case of respiratory dyskinesia due to clebopride malate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, H; Yamamoto, M; Okayasu, H; Wakayama, Y

    1991-08-01

    Clebopride malate is therapeutically used for the treatment of peptic ulcer. This drug has potent antidopaminergic activity that causes acute dystonic reaction, parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia as adverse effects. Here, we have reported an 86-year-old man who developed abnormal involuntary movement of respiratory muscles and lower limb muscles after this drug had been given for four months. This involuntary movement appeared spontaneously at resting state and disappeared during sleep. Surface EMG demonstrated a synchronous grouping discharge in m. orbicularis oris, m. sternocleidomastoideus and m. interstales which synchronized with diaphragmatic movement on cinefluorography. Involuntary movement of the lower limbs was synchronous bilaterally and had little relationship with diaphragmatic movement. This involuntary movement was irregular not only in rhythm but also in duration. According to this irregular nature, we diagnosed this involuntary movement as respiratory dyskinesia with limb dyskinesia that belongs to tardive dyskinesia. After cessation of clebopride malate limb dyskinesia disappeared rapidly and respiratory dyskinesia markedly decreased. We emphasize that respiratory dyskinesia should be differentiated from psychogenic hyperventilation as easily misdiagnosed on initial examination.

  4. Quantum memory Write, read and reset

    CERN Document Server

    Wu Tai Tsun; Wu, Tai Tsun; Yu, Ming Lun

    2002-01-01

    A model is presented for the quantum memory, the content of which is a pure quantum state. In this model, the fundamental operations of writing on, reading, and resetting the memory are performed through scattering from the memory. The requirement that the quantum memory must remain in a pure state after scattering implies that the scattering is of a special type, and only certain incident waves are admissible. An example, based on the Fermi pseudo-potential in one dimension, is used to demonstrate that the requirements on the scattering process are consistent and can be satisfied. This model is compared with the commonly used model for the quantum memory; the most important difference is that the spatial dimensions and interference play a central role in the present model.

  5. Analyzing clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of Paroxysmal Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue-qian Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification, clinical and electrophysiological characteristics, treatment outcome and pathogenesis of paroxysmal dyskinesia were summarized and analyzed. Paroxysmal dyskinesia was classified into three types. Different types had different incentives in clinical practice. Patients were mostly male adolescents, and the attacks, which were in various forms, manifested as dysmyotonia of choreoathetosis, body torsion and facemaking; no disturbance of consciousness during attacks. Electroencephalogram and other examinations showed no specific abnormalities during both the attacks and interictal period. Paroxysmal dyskinesia was an independent disease and different from epilepsy.

  6. A study of reset mode in advanced alarm system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yenn, T. C.; Hwang, S. L.; Huang, F. H.; Yu, A. C.; Hsu, C. C.; Huang, H. W.

    2006-01-01

    An automation function has been widely applied in main control room of nuclear power plants. That leads to a new issue of human-automation interaction, which considers human operational performance in automated systems. In this research is the automation alarm reset in the advanced alarm system (AAS) of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan. Since alarms are very crucial for the understanding of the status of the plant as well as the reset function of alarm system will be changed from fully manual to fully automatic, it is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the effect of reset modes in AAS. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the auto-reset alarm system on the plant performance and on operators' preference and task load. To develop a dynamic simulator as an AAS was conducted to compare manual and automatic reset function of alarm system on task performance and subjective ratings of task workload, comprehension, and preference. The simulation includes PCTRAN model and alarm software processing. The final results revealed that, using the auto-reset mode, participants had lower task load index (TLX) on effort in the first test trial and was more satisfied in multiple tasks condition. In contrast, using manual reset mode, participants were more satisfied on alarm handling, monitoring, and decision making. In other words, either reset mode in the study has unique features to assist operator, but is insufficient. The reset function in AAS therefore should be very flexible. Additionally, the experimental results also pointed out that the user interfaces need to be improved. Those experiences will be helpful for human factors verification and validation in the near future. (authors)

  7. Current cannabis use and tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, A; Rector, N A; Seeman, M V; Fornazzari, X

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between substance abuse and tardive dyskinesia (TD) in 51 chronic, neuroleptic-treated, community outpatients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia. In the presence of a clinical researcher, subjects completed a questionnaire on past and current alcohol and drug use, and provided information pertaining to variables which have, in the past, been implicated in the development of TD: smoking habits, caffeine consumption, and current neuroleptic dose. Subjects were also administered the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) in an interview format with either two or three trained raters present in the room. Consistent with previous reports, our results indicated a trend for females and older patients with a longer duration of illness to show elevated scores on the AIMS. In a hierarchical multiple regression analysis, however, cannabis use was found to correlate best with the presence of TD, out-ranking other putative factors.

  8. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Auria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  9. An international registry for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Claudius; Lablans, Martin; Ataian, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder leading to chronic upper and lower airway disease. Fundamental data on epidemiology, clinical presentation, course and treatment strategies are lacking in PCD. We have established an international PCD registry to realise...... an unmet need for an international platform to systematically collect data on incidence, clinical presentation, treatment and disease course.The registry was launched in January 2014. We used internet technology to ensure easy online access using a web browser under www.pcdregistry.eu. Data from 201...... methods in addition to classical clinical symptoms. Preliminary analysis of lung function data demonstrated a mean annual decline of percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 0.59% (95% CI 0.98-0.22).Here, we present the development of an international PCD registry as a new promising tool...

  10. Short and long term prognostic importance of regional dyskinesia versus akinesia in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, E; Køber, L; Jørgensen, S

    2002-01-01

    outcome (up to seven years) with respect to mortality. RESULTS: Dyskinesia occurred in 673 patients (10.8%). In multivariate analysis, WMI was an important prognostic factor, with a relative risk of 2.4 (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.2 to 2.7), while dyskinesia had no independent long term prognostic...... information, but the presence of dyskinesia only has prognostic importance for the first 30 days.......BACKGROUND: The prognostic importance of dyskinesia after acute myocardial infarction is unknown, and recommendations have been made that dyskinesia be included in calculations of wall motion index (WMI). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether it is necessary to distinguish between dyskinesia and akinesia...

  11. Well-Posedness of Reset Control Systems as State-Dependent Impulsive Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Baños

    2012-01-01

    existence and uniqueness of solutions, and in particular to the resetting times to be well defined and distinct. A sufficient condition is developed for a reset system to have well-posed resetting times, which is also a sufficient condition for avoiding Zeno solutions and, thus, for a reset control system to be well-posed.

  12. Transistor reset preamplifier for high-rate high-resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, D.A.; Cork, C.P.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Pulsed transistor reset of high resolution charge sensitive preamplifiers used in cooled semiconductor spectrometers can sometimes have an advantage over pulsed light reset systems. Several versions of transistor reset spectrometers using both silicon and germanium detectors have been built. This paper discusses the advantages of the transistor reset system and illustrates several configurations of the packages used for the FET and reset transistor. It also describes the preamplifer circuit and shows the performance of the spectrometer at high rates

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of catecholamines and its metabolites in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Blaabjerg, Morten; Binzer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Levodopa (l-DOPA, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is the most effective drug in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but chronic use initiates a maladaptive process leading to l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Risk factors for early onset LID include younger age, more severe diseas...

  14. Dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias: under-recognized movement disorders in domestic animals? A comparison with human dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eRichter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e. dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans, and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals.

  15. Paroxysmal Hypnogenic Dyskinesia Responsive to Doxylamine: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is a rare clinical entity characterized by intermittent dystonia and choreoathetoid movements that begin exclusively during sleep, often with consciousness preserved once the patient is awakened during the episodes. They occur almost every night and are often misdiagnosed as sleeping disorders. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is currently known to be a form of frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in all cases. We present a 19-year-old male patient with paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia who responded to antihistamines. This supports an alternative theory from 1977 (before the cases had been adequately described that the disorder lies in dysregulation in the basal ganglia. This description now appears similar to acute dystonic reactions such as extrapyramidal symptoms from antipsychotic medications, which also respond to antihistamines.

  16. Rhabdomyolysis Related to Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesna Bektaş

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a life threatening syndrome. It accounts for an estimated 8% to 15% of cases of acute renal failure and is associated with a mortality rate of 5%. In movement disorders, various causes of rhabdomyolysis have been reported including status dystonicus, myoclonus, generalized chorea and parkinsonism-hyperprexia syndrome in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia leading to rhabdomyolysis is a very rare phenomenon in PD. We report a case of 76 years old PD patient with dyskinesia and rhabdomyolysis.

  17. The use of computerized tomography in patients showing tardive dyskinesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themelis, I.

    1983-01-01

    29 patients showing moderate to markedly pronounced tardive dyskinesia (TD) and a further 29 control patients (C) under a similar long-term medication with neuroleptics that had been so chosen as to match the age and sex distributions of the former group were subjected to computered tomography, neurological examination and psychological testing. The results did not point to any correlations between the structural changes and duration of treatment and the clinical signs or symptoms of extrapyramidal disorder. This was taken as further evidence in support of the theory that the initial damage in tardive dyskinesia mainly is at the level of the basal ganglia. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Set–Reset latch logical operation induced by colored noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Nan; Song, Aiguo

    2014-01-01

    We examine the possibility of obtaining Set–Reset latch logical operation in a symmetric bistable system subjected to OU noise. Three major results are presented. First, we prove the Set–Reset latch logical operation can be obtained driven by OU noise. Second, while increasing the correlation time, the optimal noise band shifts to higher level and becomes wider. Meanwhile, peak performance degrades from 100% accuracy, but the system can still perform reliable logical operation. Third, at fixed noise intensity, the success probability evolves non-monotonically as correlation time increases. The study might provide development of the new paradigm of memory device.

  19. Surgical Treatment of Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main indications for stereotactic surgery in Parkinson’s disease (PD is the control of levodopa induced dyskinesia. This can be achieved by by pallidotomy and globus pallidus internus (GPi deep brain stimulation (DBS or by subthalamotomy and subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS, which usually allow for a cut down in the dosage of levodopa. DBS has assumed a pivotal role in stereotactic surgical treatment of PD and, in fact, ablative procedures are currently considered surrogates, particularly when bilateral procedures are required, as DBS does not produce a brain lesion and the stimulator can be programmed to induce better therapeutic effects while minimizing adverse effects. Interventions in either the STN and the GPi seem to be similar in controlling most of the other motor aspects of PD, nonetheless, GPi surgery seems to induce a more particular and direct effect on dyskinesia, while the antidyskinetic effect of STN interventions is mostly dependent on a reduction of dopaminergic drug dosages. Hence, the si ne qua non condition for a reduction of dyskinesia when STN interventions are intended is their ability to allow for a reduction of levodopa dosage. Pallidal surgery is indicated when dyskinesia is a dose-limiting factor for maintaining or introducing higher adequate levels of dopaminergic therapy. Also medications used for the treatment of PD may be useful for the improvement of several non-motor aspects of the disease, including sleep, psychiatric, and cognitive domains, therefore, dose reduction of medication withdrawal are not always a fruitful objective.

  20. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia in antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Marc; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with a mixed movement disorder classifiable as a paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia, occurring as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Possible pathophysiology is discussed based on recent literature, and we stress that PAPS must be considered

  1. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia in antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, M; Tijssen, MAJ

    We report on a patient with a mixed movement disorder classifiable as a paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia, occurring as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Possible pathophysiology is discussed based on recent literature, and we stress that PAPS must be considered

  2. Dextromethorphan improves levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen Metman, L.; del Dotto, P.; Natté, R.; van den Munckhof, P.; Chase, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dextromethorphan (DM) on levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent experimental evidence suggests that increased synaptic efficacy of NMDA receptors expressed on basal ganglia neurons may play a role

  3. Preliminary Investigation of Risk Factors Causing Dyskinesias in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors involved in the onset of dyskinesias in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease in South Africa. Methods: A questionnaire survey and medical record review were conducted. A total of 43 patients with Parkinson's disease in two metropolitan areas were included in the study. Results: ...

  4. Defense Logistics. Preliminary Observations on the Army's Implementation of Its Equipment Reset Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solis, William M

    2007-01-01

    .... In order to provide effective oversight of the Army's implementation of its equipment reset strategies and to plan for future reset initiatives, the Congress needs to be assured that the funds...

  5. Re-Setting Music Education's "Default Settings"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the effects and problems of one highly influential default setting of the "normal style template" of music education and proposes some alternatives. These do not require abandoning all traditional templates for school music. But re-setting the default settings does depend on reconsidering the promised function of…

  6. The semaphore codes attached to a Turing machine via resets and their various limits

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, John; Schilling, Anne; Silva, Pedro V.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce semaphore codes associated to a Turing machine via resets. Semaphore codes provide an approximation theory for resets. In this paper we generalize the set-up of our previous paper "Random walks on semaphore codes and delay de Bruijn semigroups" to the infinite case by taking the profinite limit of $k$-resets to obtain $(-\\omega)$-resets. We mention how this opens new avenues to attack the P versus NP problem.

  7. Clinical phenotype analysis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wo-tu TIAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a disorder characterized by recurrent and brief dystonic or choreoathetoid attacks that are induced by sudden voluntary movement with highly clinical and genetic heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the clinical features of PKD in a large Chinese population. Methods One hundred and ninety five patients diagnosed as primary PKD were recruited. For all of the participants, neurological examinations were conducted and clinical manifestations were recorded and summarized in self - made uniform registration form for PKD patients. Clinical characteristics were statistically analyzed and compared between familial and sporadic PKD patients.  Results Among all of the 195 PKD patients in the present study, the gender ratio was 4.42∶1 (male∶ female. The average age of onset was (12.32 ± 3.49 years. There were 162 patients (83.08% manifestated with pure form and 33 (16.92% with complicated form of PKD. Among them 16 patients (8.21% had essential tremor (ET, and 144 patients (73.85% had premonitory symptom. The percentage of patients manifested as dystonia, chorea and mixed form during episodic attacks were 68.72% (134/195, 4.10% (8/195 and 27.18% (53/195 repectively. There were 134 cases (68.72% had facial involvement. It was recorded that 115 (58.97%, 54 (27.69% and 26 (13.33% patients had frequency of attack < 10 times/d, 10-20 times/d and > 20-30 times/d respectively. The percentages of patients whose duration of attack <10 s, 10-30 s and > 30-60 s were 60% (117/195, 29.74% (58/195 and 10.26% (20/195 respectively. There were 64 patietns (32.82% with family history of PKD and 131 (67.18% were sporadic PKD patients. Up to 40% (78/195 of patients did not require/take medications, as they had minor clinical manifestations or concerns about the side effects of anticonvulsants. Among 117 patients (60% prescribed with anticonvulsants, 114 patients showed a good response, including complete control (N

  8. Findings of cranial computerized tomography in chronic schizophrenics with and without tardive dyskinesias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.U.

    1985-11-25

    Findings of cranial computed tomography in 20 chronic schizophrenics with clinical distinct, long-dated hyperkinesias (tardive dyskinesias) are compared with those of a similar group of schizophrenics without hyperkinesias. Both groups had a long-term neuroleptic treatment. The tomograms of those patients with tardive dyskinesias showed only in two cases mild, pathological alterations. Also the tomograms of the comparative group showed no severe atrophies, defects of substance or pathological calcifications. It is concluded that there is no correlation between tardive dyskinesias in long-term neuroleptic treated schizophrenics and gross morphological alterations of the brain. Furthermore the problem of tardive dyskinesia in a general aspect is discussed. (orig.).

  9. Circadian phase resetting via single and multiple control targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Bagheri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian entrainment is necessary for rhythmic physiological functions to be appropriately timed over the 24-hour day. Disruption of circadian rhythms has been associated with sleep and neuro-behavioral impairments as well as cancer. To date, light is widely accepted to be the most powerful circadian synchronizer, motivating its use as a key control input for phase resetting. Through sensitivity analysis, we identify additional control targets whose individual and simultaneous manipulation (via a model predictive control algorithm out-perform the open-loop light-based phase recovery dynamics by nearly 3-fold. We further demonstrate the robustness of phase resetting by synchronizing short- and long-period mutant phenotypes to the 24-hour environment; the control algorithm is robust in the presence of model mismatch. These studies prove the efficacy and immediate application of model predictive control in experimental studies and medicine. In particular, maintaining proper circadian regulation may significantly decrease the chance of acquiring chronic illness.

  10. Core reset system design for linear induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durga Praveen Kumar, D.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K.V.; Chakravarthy, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    A repetitive pulsed power system based Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA-200) is being developed at BARC to get an electron beam of 200keV, 5kA, 50ns, 10-100 Hz. Amorphous core is the heart of these accelerators. It serves various functions in different subsystems viz. pulse power modulator, pulse transformer, magnetic switches and induction cavities. One of the factors that make the magnetic components compact is utilization of the total flux swing available in the core. In the present system, magnetic switches, pulse transformers, and induction cavity are designed to avail the full flux swing available in the core. For achieving this objective, flux density in the core has to be kept at the reverse saturation, before the main pulse is applied. The electrical circuit which makes it possible is called the core reset system. In this paper the details of core reset system designed for LIA-200 are described. (author)

  11. Kindling: A Model for the Development of Tardive Dyskinesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Glenthøj

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD from long-term neuroleptic treatment may be irreversible; therefore prevention has become a major concern. A controversial issue with regard to the clinical use of neuroleptic drugs is the possible influence on the development of TD of drug holidays. The major characteristics of kindling, theories of TD and the role of multiplicity in the development of TD are described. Some clinical studies point to interruption of neuroleptic therapy being a risk factor for development of irreversible TD. Induction of dyskinesia in non-human primates has been demonstrated after repeated administration of haloperidol. Rodent studies have not been conclusive. Several experimental results link TD with kindling: both conditions involve repeated stimulations, both seem to involve increased receptor responsiveness and in both conditions does depression in GABA transmission in SNR (substantia nigra; pars reticulata play an important role. It is concluded that the kindling hypothesis is relevant to the investigation of TD.

  12. A case of congenital myopathy masquerading as paroxysmal dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER disease is a significant comorbidity of neuromuscular disorders. It may present as paroxysmal dyskinesia, an entity known as Sandifer syndrome. A 6-week-old neonate presented with very frequent paroxysms of generalized stiffening and opisthotonic posture since day 22 of life. These were initially diagnosed as seizures and he was started on multiple antiepileptics which did not show any response. After a normal video electroencephalogram (VEEG was documented, possibility of dyskinesia was kept. However, when he did not respond to symptomatic therapy, Sandifer syndrome was thought of and GER scan was done, which revealed severe GER. After his symptoms got reduced to some extent, a detailed clinical examination revealed abnormal facies with flaccid quadriparesis. Muscle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a specific congenital myopathy. On antireflux measures, those episodic paroxysms reduced to some extent. Partial response to therapy in GER should prompt search for an underlying secondary etiology.

  13. Shape memory alloy resetable spring lift for pedestrian protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brian M.; Brei, Diann E.; Luntz, Jonathan E.; Strom, Kenneth; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy

    2008-03-01

    Pedestrian protection has become an increasingly important aspect of automotive safety with new regulations taking effect around the world. Because it is increasingly difficult to meet these new regulations with traditional passive approaches, active lifts are being explored that increase the "crush zone" between the hood and rigid under-hood components as a means of mitigating the consequences of an impact with a non-occupant. Active lifts, however, are technically challenging because of the simultaneously high forces, stroke and quick timing resulting in most of the current devices being single use. This paper introduces the SMArt (Shape Memory Alloy ReseTable) Spring Lift, an automatically resetable and fully reusable device, which couples conventional standard compression springs to store the energy required for a hood lift, with Shape Memory Alloys actuators to achieve both an ultra high speed release of the spring and automatic reset of the system for multiple uses. Each of the four SMArt Device subsystems, lift, release, lower and reset/dissipate, are individually described. Two identical complete prototypes were fabricated and mounted at the rear corners of the hood, incorporated within a full-scale vehicle testbed at the SMARTT (Smart Material Advanced Research and Technology Transfer) lab at University of Michigan. Full operational cycle testing of a stationary vehicle in a laboratory setting confirms the ultrafast latch release, controlled lift profile, gravity lower to reposition the hood, and spring recompression via the ratchet engine successfully rearming the device for repeat cycles. While this is only a laboratory demonstration and extensive testing and development would be required for transition to a fielded product, this study does indicate that the SMArt Lift has promise as an alternative approach to pedestrian protection.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis Related to Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bektaş, Hesna; Deniz, Orhan; Temel, Şadiye; Keklikoğlu, Hava Dönmez; Akyol, Şener

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a life threatening syndrome. It accounts for an estimated 8% to 15% of cases of acute renal failure and is associated with a mortality rate of 5%. In movement disorders, various causes of rhabdomyolysis have been reported including status dystonicus, myoclonus, generalized chorea and parkinsonism-hyperprexia syndrome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Levodopa-induced dyskinesia leading to rhabdomyolysis is a very rare phenomenon in PD. We report a case of 76 years old PD patient ...

  15. Effects of the Factory Reset on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riqui Schwamm

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices usually provide a “factory-reset” tool to erase user-specific data from the main secondary storage. 9 Apple iPhones, 10 Android devices, and 2 BlackBerry devices were tested in the first systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of factory resets. Tests used the Cellebrite UME-36 Pro with the UFED Physical Analyzer, the Bulk Extractor open-source tool, and our own programs for extracting metadata, classifying file paths, and comparing them between images. Two phones were subjected to more detailed analysis. Results showed that many kinds of data were removed by the resets, but much user-specific configuration data was left. Android devices did poorly at removing user documents and media, and occasional surprising user data was left on all devices including photo images, audio, documents, phone numbers, email addresses, geolocation data, configuration data, and keys. A conclusion is that reset devices can still provide some useful information to a forensic investigation.

  16. GHK and DNA: Resetting the Human Genome to Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Pickart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During human aging there is an increase in the activity of inflammatory, cancer promoting, and tissue destructive genes plus a decrease in the activity of regenerative and reparative genes. The human blood tripeptide GHK possesses many positive effects but declines with age. It improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, and boney tissue, increases collagen and glycosaminoglycans, stimulates synthesis of decorin, increases angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, GHK has been found to reset genes of diseased cells from patients with cancer or COPD to a more healthy state. Cancer cells reset their programmed cell death system while COPD patients’ cells shut down tissue destructive genes and stimulate repair and remodeling activities. In this paper, we discuss GHK’s effect on genes that suppress fibrinogen synthesis, the insulin/insulin-like system, and cancer growth plus activation of genes that increase the ubiquitin-proteasome system, DNA repair, antioxidant systems, and healing by the TGF beta superfamily. A variety of methods and dosages to effectively use GHK to reset genes to a healthier state are also discussed.

  17. Impulse control disorders in advanced Parkinson's disease with dyskinesia: The ALTHEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biundo, Roberta; Weis, Luca; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Jori, Maria Cristina; Lopiano, Leonardo; Marconi, Roberto; Matinella, Angela; Morgante, Francesca; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Tamburini, Tiziano; Tinazzi, Michele; Zappia, Mario; Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Antonini, Angelo

    2017-11-01

    Impulse control disorders and dyskinesia are common and disabling complications of dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease. They may coexist and are possibly related. The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and severity of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia. The ALTHEA study enrolled 251 Parkinson's disease patients with various degrees of dyskinesia severity from 11 movement disorders centers in Italy. Each patient underwent a comprehensive assessment including Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale and the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson Disease-Rating Scale. There was an overall 55% frequency of impulse control disorder and related behaviors (36% were clinically significant). The positive patients were younger at disease diagnosis and onset and had higher Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale historical and total score (P = 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively, vs negative). There was an increased frequency of clinically significant impulse control disorders in patients with severe dyskinesia (P = 0.013), a positive correlation between the questionnaire total score and dopamine agonist dose (P = 0.018), and a trend with levodopa dose. More than half of Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia have impulse control disorders and related behaviors, which are frequently clinically significant. Dopaminergic therapy total dose is associated with their severity. Clinicians should carefully assess patients with maladaptive behaviors and dyskinesia because they do not properly evaluate their motor and nonmotor status. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Resetting in time of recordings in ultra-fast cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leduc, Michel

    In ultra-fast cinematography and photography the treatment and interpretation of the data contained in the recordings demand extremely precise readjustments in time. In the case of whole-image recordings by electro-optical cameras or flash sources the problem is resolved by the use of a chronometric unit taking into account the different events. For naving slit or spectrographic recordings the problem must be detail with differently and marking devices will be used to print resetting pulses on the recording themselves. Different marking devices are described [fr

  19. Effects of pay resets following drug use on attendance and hours worked in a therapeutic workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtyn, August F; Silverman, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    This secondary data analysis examined effects of an abstinence contingency on participation in a therapeutic workplace. Participants exposed to a pay reset after drug use did not differ in overall attendance from participants who were not exposed to a pay reset after drug use; however, they initially worked less after a pay reset than participants who did not receive a pay reset, and their attendance increased as their pay increased. Overall participation was not influenced by the abstinence contingency, but transient decreases in attendance occurred. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  20. Putaminal serotonergic innervation: monitoring dyskinesia risk in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Young; Seo, Seongho; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Jeon, Beom S

    2015-09-08

    To explore serotonergic innervation in the basal ganglia in relation to levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 30 patients with PD without dementia or depression were divided into 3 matched groups (dyskinetic, nondyskinetic, and drug-naive) for this study. We acquired 2 PET scans and 3T MRI for each patient using [(11)C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile ((11)C-DASB) and N-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane ((18)F-FP-CIT). Then we analyzed binding potentials of the 2 radiotracers at basal ganglia structures and correlations with clinical variables. We observed no difference in (18)F-FP-CIT binding between dyskinetic and nondyskinetic patients, whereas there were differences in (11)C-DASB binding for the caudate and putamen. Binding potential ratios ((11)C-DASB/(18)F-FP-CIT) at the putamen, which indicate serotoninergic fiber innervation relative to dopaminergic fiber availability, were highest in the dyskinetic group, followed by the nondyskinetic and drug-naive PD groups. (11)C-DASB/(18)F-FP-CIT ratios at the putamen and pallidum correlated positively with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total scores and duration of PD, and pallidal binding ratio also correlated with the UPDRS motor scores. Ratios were not dependent on dopaminergic medication dosages for any of the regions studied. Relative serotonergic innervation of the putamen and pallidum increased with clinical PD progression and was highest in patients with established dyskinesia. The serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio might be a potential marker of disease progression and an indicator of risk for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in PD. A prospective evaluation is warranted in the future. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Ventilation inhomogeneity in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik F; Marthin, June Kehlet

    2012-01-01

    The lung clearance index (LCI) derived from the multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) test reflects global ventilation distribution inhomogeneity. It is more sensitive than forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for detecting abnormal airway function and correlates closely with structural lung...... damage in children with cystic fibrosis, which shares features with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Normalised phase III slope indices S(cond) and S(acin) reflect function of the small conducting and acinar airways, respectively. The involvement of the peripheral airways assessed by MBW tests has...

  2. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumetti, S; Ghiacci, G; Macaluso, G M; Amore, M; Galli, C; Calciolari, E; Manfredi, E

    2016-01-01

    Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD) and oral parafunction (OP) rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation.

  3. Clinical care of children with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Jane S; Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Collins, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare heterogeneous disorder, usually inherited as an autosomal recessive condition but X-linked inheritance is also described. Abnormal ciliary function in childhood leads to neonatal respiratory distress in term infants, persistent wet cough...... is inappropriate since differences in pathophysiology, morbidity and prognosis risk treatment failure and lack of adherence. Areas covered: Review authors searched PubMed and Cochrane databases for publications relating to management of children with PCD. Because of the paucity of data, we emphasise the need...

  4. Resting-State Connectivity Predicts Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Nielsen, Silas H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are a common side effect of dopaminergic therapy in PD, but their neural correlates remain poorly understood. Objectives: This study examines whether dyskinesias are associated with abnormal dopaminergic modulation of resting-state cortico-striatal connect......Background: Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are a common side effect of dopaminergic therapy in PD, but their neural correlates remain poorly understood. Objectives: This study examines whether dyskinesias are associated with abnormal dopaminergic modulation of resting-state cortico......-striatal connectivity. Methods: Twelve PD patients with peak-of-dose dyskinesias and 12 patients without dyskinesias were withdrawn from dopaminergic medication. All patients received a single dose of fast-acting soluble levodopa and then underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging before any...... dyskinesias emerged. Levodopa-induced modulation of cortico-striatal resting-state connectivity was assessed between the putamen and the following 3 cortical regions of interest: supplementary motor area, primary sensorimotor cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These functional connectivity measures...

  5. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper.

  6. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  7. A quantitative measure of handwriting dysfluency for assessing tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Michael P; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E; Lohr, James B

    2015-04-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a movement disorder commonly associated with chronic exposure to antidopaminergic medications, which may be in some cases disfiguring and socially disabling. The consensus from a growing body of research on the incidence and prevalence of TD in the modern era of antipsychotics indicates that this disorder has not disappeared continues to challenge the effective management of psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. A fundamental component in an effective strategy for managing TD is its reliable and accurate assessment. In the present study, we examined the clinical utility of a brief handwriting dysfluency measure for quantifying TD. Digitized samples of handwritten circles and loops were obtained from 62 psychosis patients with or without TD and from 50 healthy subjects. Two measures of dysfluent pen movements were extracted from each vertical pen stroke, including normalized jerk and the number of acceleration peaks. Tardive dyskinesia patients exhibited significantly higher dysfluency scores than non-TD patients and controls. Severity of handwriting movement dysfluency was correlated with Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale severity ratings for some tasks. The procedure yielded high degrees of test-retest reliability. These results suggest that measures of handwriting movement dysfluency may be particularly useful for objectively evaluating the efficacy of pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treating TD.

  8. New and emerging treatments for symptomatic tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana AQ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdul Qayyum Rana,1–4 Zishan M Chaudry,5 Pierre J Blanchet6 1Parkinson's Clinic of Eastern Toronto and Movement Disorders Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Scarborough Memory Program, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Journal of Parkinsonism and RLS, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Bulletin of World Parkinson's Program, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Saba University School of Medicine, The Bottom, Saba, Dutch Caribbean; 6Department of Stomatology, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The aim of this review is to assess new, emerging, and experimental treatment options for tardive dyskinesia (TD. The methods to obtain relevant studies for review included a MEDLINE search and a review of studies in English, along with checking reference lists of articles. The leading explanatory models of TD development include dopamine receptor supersensitivity, GABA depletion, cholinergic deficiency, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, changes in synaptic plasticity, and defective neuroadaptive signaling. As such, a wide range of treatment options are available. To provide a complete summary of choices we review atypical antipsychotics along with resveratrol, botulinum toxin, Ginkgo biloba, tetrabenazine, clonazepam, melatonin, essential fatty acids, zonisamide, levetiracetam, branched-chain amino acids, drug combinations, and invasive surgical treatments. There is currently no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for TD; however, prudent use of atypical antipsychotics with routine monitoring remain the cornerstone of therapy, with experimental treatment options available for further management. Keywords: tardive dyskinesia, first-generation antipsychotics, motor symptoms, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, atypical antipsychotics

  9. Path-integral formalism for stochastic resetting: Exactly solved examples and shortcuts to confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Édgar; Gupta, Shamik

    2017-08-01

    We study the dynamics of overdamped Brownian particles diffusing in conservative force fields and undergoing stochastic resetting to a given location at a generic space-dependent rate of resetting. We present a systematic approach involving path integrals and elements of renewal theory that allows us to derive analytical expressions for a variety of statistics of the dynamics such as (i) the propagator prior to first reset, (ii) the distribution of the first-reset time, and (iii) the spatial distribution of the particle at long times. We apply our approach to several representative and hitherto unexplored examples of resetting dynamics. A particularly interesting example for which we find analytical expressions for the statistics of resetting is that of a Brownian particle trapped in a harmonic potential with a rate of resetting that depends on the instantaneous energy of the particle. We find that using energy-dependent resetting processes is more effective in achieving spatial confinement of Brownian particles on a faster time scale than performing quenches of parameters of the harmonic potential.

  10. Pressing reset on Moscow is worth a little Nato anxiety / Jonathan Steele

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Steele, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    USA president Barack Obama on avaldanud soovi vajutada USA-Vene suhetes reset-nuppu. Eesti president Toomas Hendrik Ilves ütles NATO tippkohtumise eelõhtul kuivalt, et arvutil reset-nuppu vajutades ei kustu mällu salvestatud failid siiski ära. President T. H. Ilvese teravast sõnavõtust president Lennart Meri konverentsi avamisel Tallinnas

  11. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    Single duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are currently the most widely used type of HVAC system in the United States. When installing such a system, it is critical to determine the minimum airflow set point of the terminal box, as an optimally selected set point will improve the level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) while at the same time lower overall energy costs. In principle, this minimum rate should be calculated according to the minimum ventilation requirement based on ASHRAE standard 62.1 and maximum heating load of the zone. Several factors must be carefully considered when calculating this minimum rate. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences may result in occupant discomfort and energy waste. If the minimum rate of airflow is set too high, the AHUs will consume excess fan power, and the terminal boxes may cause significant simultaneous room heating and cooling. At the same time, a rate that is too low will result in poor air circulation and indoor air quality in the air-conditioned space. Currently, many scholars are investigating how to change the algorithm of the advanced VAV terminal box controller without retrofitting. Some of these controllers have been found to effectively improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency. However, minimum airflow set points have not yet been identified, nor has controller performance been verified in confirmed studies. In this study, control algorithms were developed that automatically identify and reset terminal box minimum airflow set points, thereby improving indoor air quality and thermal comfort levels, and reducing the overall rate of energy consumption. A theoretical analysis of the optimal minimum airflow and discharge air temperature was performed to identify the potential energy benefits of resetting the terminal box minimum airflow set points. Applicable control algorithms for calculating the ideal values for the minimum airflow reset were developed and

  12. Effects of Linear Falling Ramp Reset Pulse on Addressing Operation in AC PDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zujun; Liang Zhihu; Liu Chunliang; Meng Lingguo

    2006-01-01

    The effects of linear falling ramp reset pulse related to addressing operation in an alternating current plasma display panel (AC PDP) were studied. The wall charge waveforms were measured by the electrode balance method in a 12-inch coplanar AC PDP. The wall charge waveforms show the relationship between the slope ratio of the falling ramp reset pulse and the wall charges at the end of the falling ramp reset pulse which influences the addressing stability. Then the effects of the slope ratio of the linear falling ramp reset pulse on the addressing voltage and addressing time were investigated. The experimental results show that the minimum addressing voltage increases with the increase of the slope ratio of the falling ramp reset pulse, and so does the minimum addressing time. Based on the experimental results, the optimization of the addressing time and the slope ratio of the falling ramp pulse is discussed

  13. A self-resetting spiking phase-change neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, R. A.; Hayat, H.; Wright, C. D.

    2018-05-01

    Neuromorphic, or brain-inspired, computing applications of phase-change devices have to date concentrated primarily on the implementation of phase-change synapses. However, the so-called accumulation mode of operation inherent in phase-change materials and devices can also be used to mimic the integrative properties of a biological neuron. Here we demonstrate, using physical modelling of nanoscale devices and SPICE modelling of associated circuits, that a single phase-change memory cell integrated into a comparator type circuit can deliver a basic hardware mimic of an integrate-and-fire spiking neuron with self-resetting capabilities. Such phase-change neurons, in combination with phase-change synapses, can potentially open a new route for the realisation of all-phase-change neuromorphic computing.

  14. Simulation of static pressure reset control in comfort ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    Variable air volume (VAV) ventilation systems reduce fan power consumption compared to constant air volume (CAV) systems because they supply air according to the airflow demand. However VAV ventilation systems do not take fully into account the potential energy savings as the control strategy...... management system. In this way the operation of central plant equipment is adjusted in real time according to the actual pressure demand; this control scheme can be implemented by the static pressure reset (SPR) method. The SPR control method ensures that at least one damper remains fully opened; thus...... of the art is represented by the method of trim and respond based on pressure alarms. This study investigates the operation of the SPR control method of trim and respond based on pressure alarms in a CO2 demand application where large air volumes are provided to three classrooms. The investigation was based...

  15. Type Directed Partial Evaluation for Level-1 Shift and Reset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Ilik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation in the Coq proof assistant of type directed partial evaluation (TDPE algorithms for call-by-name and call-by-value versions of shift and reset delimited control operators, and in presence of strong sum types. We prove that the algorithm transforms well-typed programs to ones in normal form. These normal forms can not always be arrived at using the so far known equational theories. The typing system does not allow answer-type modification for function types and allows delimiters to be set on at most one atomic type. The semantic domain for evaluation is expressed in Constructive Type Theory as a dependently typed monadic structure combining Kripke models and continuation passing style translations.

  16. A self-resetting spiking phase-change neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, R A; Hayat, H; Wright, C D

    2018-05-11

    Neuromorphic, or brain-inspired, computing applications of phase-change devices have to date concentrated primarily on the implementation of phase-change synapses. However, the so-called accumulation mode of operation inherent in phase-change materials and devices can also be used to mimic the integrative properties of a biological neuron. Here we demonstrate, using physical modelling of nanoscale devices and SPICE modelling of associated circuits, that a single phase-change memory cell integrated into a comparator type circuit can deliver a basic hardware mimic of an integrate-and-fire spiking neuron with self-resetting capabilities. Such phase-change neurons, in combination with phase-change synapses, can potentially open a new route for the realisation of all-phase-change neuromorphic computing.

  17. Simultaneous sinus and lung infections in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Aanaes, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The sinuses should be considered as a bacterial reservoir and a target for surgery and antibiotic treatment in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The observed decrease in serum precipitating antibodies (precipitins) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa may indicate a beneficial...

  18. Impulse control disorders and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Voon, V; Napier, TC; Frank, MJ; Sgambato-Faure, V; Grace, AA; Rodriguez-Oroz, M; Obeso, J; Bezard, E; Fernagut, P-O

    2017-01-01

    Dopaminergic medications used in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease are associated with motor and non-motor behavioural side-effects, such as dyskinesias and impulse control disorders also known as behavioural addictions. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias occur in up to 80% of patients with Parkinson's after a few years of chronic treatment. Impulse control disorders, including gambling disorder, binge eating disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour, and compulsive shopping occur in a...

  19. Mucuna pruriens attenuates haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Amjadkhan A; Mohan, Mahalaxmi; Kasture, Ameya S; Kasture, Sanjay B

    2011-04-01

    Neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor disorder of the orofacial region resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment. The agents improving dopaminergic transmission improve TD. Mucuna pruriens seed contains levodopa and amino acids. The effect of methanolic extract of M. pruriens seeds (MEMP) was studied on haloperidol-induced TD, alongside the changes in lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase levels. The effect of MEMP was also evaluated in terms of the generation of hydroxyl and 1,1-diphenyl,2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. MEMP (100 and 200 mg kg⁻¹) inhibited haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements, orofacial bursts and biochemical changes. MEMP also inhibited hydroxyl radical generation and DPPH. The results of the present study suggest that MEMP by virtue of its free radical scavenging activity prevents neuroleptic-induced TD.

  20. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lumetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD and oral parafunction (OP rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation.

  1. Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation in a Real Life Patient Population with Chronic Tonal Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Christian; Ströbel, Armin; Williams, Mark; Patel, Nitesh; Wurzer, Hannes; von Stackelberg, Tatjana; Brinkmann, Uwe; Langguth, Berthold; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Primary tinnitus has a severe negative influence on the quality of life of a significant portion of the general population. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation is designed to induce a long-lasting reduction of tinnitus symptoms. To test acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation as a treatment for chronic, tonal tinnitus under real life conditions, an outpatient study “RESET Real Life” was commissioned by ANM GmbH. Herein we present the results of this study. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized, noncontrolled multicenter clinical study with 200 chronic tinnitus patients, tinnitus questionnaire TBF-12 and Global Clinical Improvement-Impression Scale (CGI-I7) are used to study the safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation. 189 patients completed the last 12-month visit, 11 patients dropped out (8 because of nontreatment related reasons; 2 because tinnitus did not change; and 1 because tinnitus got louder). Results. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation caused a statistically and clinically significant decrease in TBF-12 scores as well as in CGI-I7 after 12 months of therapy under real life conditions. There were no persistent adverse events reported that were related to the therapy. Conclusion. The field study “RESET Real Life” provides evidence for safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in a prospective, open-label, real life setting. PMID:26568958

  2. Plasma HVA, tardive dyskinesia and psychotic symptoms in long-term drug-free inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscettola, G; Barbato, G; de Bartolomeis, A; Monteleone, P; Pickar, D

    1990-09-01

    Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels were measured in 16 chronically ill patients with schizophrenia who also suffered from tardive dyskinesia, and in a group of 14 chronically ill patients with schizophrenia who did not have tardive dyskinesia. All patients were studied following an extensive drug-free period (mean = 32.9 months). Patients with orofacial dyskinesia had significantly lower levels of pHVA than did controls. In patients without tardive dyskinesia, pHVA levels were significantly correlated with both positive and negative symptomatology. In contrast, pHVA levels from patients with tardive dyskinesia bore neither a significant nor a nearly significant relationship to symptomatology. The implications of these findings for dopaminergic models of tardive dyskinesia are discussed.

  3. Voice Biometrics as a Way to Self-service Password Reset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohgräfe, Bernd; Jacobi, Sebastian

    Password resets are time consuming. Especially when urgent jobs need to be done, it is cumbersome to inform the user helpdesk, to identify oneself and then to wait for response. It is easy to enter a wrong password multiple times, which leads to the blocking of the application. Voice biometrics is an easy and secure way for individuals to reset their own password. Read more about how you can ease the burden of your user helpdesk and how voice biometric password resets benefit your expense situation without harming your security.

  4. A parabolic variational inequality arising from the valuation of strike reset options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Yi, Fahuai; Dai, Min

    A strike reset option is an option that allows its holder to reset the strike price to the prevailing underlying asset price at a moment chosen by the holder. The pricing model of the option can be formulated as a one-dimensional parabolic variational inequality, or equivalently, a free boundary problem, where the free boundary just corresponds to the optimal reset strategy adopted by the holder of the option. This paper is concerned with the theoretical analysis of the model. The existence and uniqueness of the solution are established. Furthermore, we study properties of the free boundary. The monotonicity and C smoothness of the free boundary are proven in some situations.

  5. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C.; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti–B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti–B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti–B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti–B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  6. Optimal number of stimulation contacts for coordinated reset neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysyansky, Borys; Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    In this computational study we investigate coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation designed for an effective control of synchronization by multi-site stimulation of neuronal target populations. This method was suggested to effectively counteract pathological neuronal synchrony characteristic for several neurological disorders. We study how many stimulation sites are required for optimal CR-induced desynchronization. We found that a moderate increase of the number of stimulation sites may significantly prolong the post-stimulation desynchronized transient after the stimulation is completely switched off. This can, in turn, reduce the amount of the administered stimulation current for the intermittent ON–OFF CR stimulation protocol, where time intervals with stimulation ON are recurrently followed by time intervals with stimulation OFF. In addition, we found that the optimal number of stimulation sites essentially depends on how strongly the administered current decays within the neuronal tissue with increasing distance from the stimulation site. In particular, for a broad spatial stimulation profile, i.e., for a weak spatial decay rate of the stimulation current, CR stimulation can optimally be delivered via a small number of stimulation sites. Our findings may contribute to an optimization of therapeutic applications of CR neuromodulation. PMID:23885239

  7. Optimal number of stimulation contacts for coordinated reset neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borys eLysyansky

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this computational study we investigatecoordinated reset (CR neuromodulation designed for an effective controlof synchronization by multi-site stimulation of neuronal target populations. This method was suggested to effectively counteract pathological neuronal synchronycharacteristic for several neurological disorders. We studyhow many stimulation sites are required for optimal CR-induced desynchronization. We found that a moderate increase of the number of stimulation sitesmay significantly prolong the post-stimulation desynchronized transientafter the stimulation is completely switched off. This can, in turn,reduce the amount of the administered stimulation current for theintermittent ON-OFF CR stimulation protocol, where time intervalswith stimulation ON are recurrently followed by time intervals withstimulation OFF. In addition, we found that the optimal number ofstimulation sites essentially depends on how strongly the administeredcurrent decays within the neuronal tissue with increasing distancefrom the stimulation site. In particular, for a broad spatial stimulationprofile, i.e., for a weak spatial decay rate of the stimulation current,CR stimulation can optimally be delivered via a small number of stimulationsites. Our findings may contribute to an optimization of therapeutic applications of CR neuromodulation.

  8. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  9. LORETA EEG phase reset of the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Robert W; North, Duane M; Biver, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore phase reset of 3-dimensional current sources in Brodmann areas located in the human default mode network (DMN) using Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) of the human electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations from 70 healthy normal subjects ranging in age from 13 to 20 years. A time point by time point computation of LORETA current sources were computed for 14 Brodmann areas comprising the DMN in the delta frequency band. The Hilbert transform of the LORETA time series was used to compute the instantaneous phase differences between all pairs of Brodmann areas. Phase shift and lock durations were calculated based on the 1st and 2nd derivatives of the time series of phase differences. Phase shift duration exhibited three discrete modes at approximately: (1) 25 ms, (2) 50 ms, and (3) 65 ms. Phase lock duration present primarily at: (1) 300-350 ms and (2) 350-450 ms. Phase shift and lock durations were inversely related and exhibited an exponential change with distance between Brodmann areas. The results are explained by local neural packing density of network hubs and an exponential decrease in connections with distance from a hub. The results are consistent with a discrete temporal model of brain function where anatomical hubs behave like a "shutter" that opens and closes at specific durations as nodes of a network giving rise to temporarily phase locked clusters of neurons for specific durations.

  10. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  11. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Li, Ying; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2012-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS).

  12. Assessing the completeness of optical resetting of quartz OSL in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singarayer, J.S.; Bailey, R.M.; Ward, S.; Stokes, S.

    2005-01-01

    Resetting of previously accumulated optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals during transport of sediment is a fundamental requirement for reliable optical dating. The completeness of optical resetting of 46 modern-age quartz samples from a variety of depositional environments was examined. All equivalent dose (D e ) estimates were e from easy-to-bleach through to hard-to-bleach components. For all modern fluvial samples with non-zero D e values, SAR D e (t) analysis and component-resolved linearly modulated OSL (LM OSL) D e estimates showed this to be the case, implying incomplete resetting of previously accumulated charge. LM OSL measurements were also made to investigate the extent of bleaching of the slow components in the natural environment. In aeolian sediments examined, the natural LM OSL was effectively zero (i.e. all components were fully reset). The slow components of modern fluvial samples displayed measurable residual signals up to 15Gy

  13. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Magteld eZeitler; Peter A. Tass; Peter A. Tass; Peter A. Tass

    2015-01-01

    Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e. an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal sync...

  14. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Zeitler, Magteld; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal syn...

  15. Trial of dextromethorphan/quinidine to treat levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Susan H; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; Nutt, John G; Brodsky, Matthew; Factor, Stewart A; Lang, Anthony E; Pope, Laura E; Knowles, Nadine; Siffert, João

    2017-06-01

    Nondopaminergic pathways represent potential targets to treat levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD). This pilot-study (NCT01767129) examined the safety/efficacy of the sigma-1 receptor-agonist and glutamatergic/monoaminergic modulator, dextromethorphan plus quinidine (to inhibit rapid dextromethorphan metabolism), for treating levodopa-induced dyskinesia. PD patients were randomized to dextromethorphan/quinidine (45 mg/10 mg twice daily)/placebo in two 2-week double-blind, crossover treatment periods, with intervening 2-week washout. After 14 days, a 2-hour intravenous levodopa-infusion was administered. Patient examinations were videotaped before infusion ("off" state) and every 30 minutes during and afterwards until patients returned to "off." The primary endpoint was dyskinesia-severity during infusion measured by Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale part 3 area-under-curve scores (blinded expert rated). Additional endpoints included other dyskinesia/motor assessments, global measures of clinical-change, and adverse-events. A total of 13 patients were randomized and completed the study (efficacy-evaluable population). Dyskinesia-severity was nonsignificantly lower with dextromethorphan/quinidine than placebo during infusion (area-under-curve 966.5 vs 1048.8; P = .191 [efficacy-evaluable patients]), and significantly lower in a post-hoc sensitivity analysis of the per-protocol-population (efficacy-evaluable patients with ≥ 80% study-drug-compliance, n = 12) when measured from infusion start to 4-hours post-infusion completion (area-under-curve 1585.0 vs 1911.3; P = .024). Mean peak dyskinesia decreased significantly from infusion-start to return to "off" (13.3 vs 14.9; P = .018 [efficacy-evaluable patients]). A total of 9 patients rated dyskinesia "much/very much improved" on dextromethorphan/quinidine versus 1-patient on placebo. Dextromethorphan/quinidine did not worsen PD-motor scores, was generally well tolerated, and

  16. EEG PHASE RESET OF THE DEFAULT MODE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Thatcher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore phase reset of 3-dimensional current sources located in Brodmann areas located in the human default mode network (DMN using Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA of the human electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods: The EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations from 70 healthy normal subjects ranging in age from 13 to 20 years. A time point by time point computation of LORETA current sources were computed for 14 Brodman areas comprising the DMN in the delta frequency band. The Hilbert transform of the LORETA time series was used to compute the instantaneous phase differences between all pairs of Brodmann areas. Phase shift and lock durations were calculated based on the 1st & 2nd derivatives of the time series of phase differences. Results: Phase shift duration exhibited three discrete modes at approximately: 1- 30 msec,, 2- 55 msec and, 3- 65 msec. Phase lock duration present primarily at: 1- 300 to 350 msec and, 2- 350 msec to 450 msec. Phase shift and lock durations were inversely related and exhibited an exponential change with distance between Brodmann areas. Conclusions: The results are explained by local neural packing density of network hubs and an exponential decrease in connections with distance from a hub. The results are consistent with a discrete temporal model of brain function where anatomical hubs behave like a ‘shutter’ that opens and closes at specific durations as nodes of a network giving rise to temporarily phase locked clusters of neurons for specific durations.

  17. Hearing loss in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreicher, Kathryn L; Schopper, Heather K; Naik, Akash N; Hatch, Jonathan L; Meyer, Ted A

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the type and severity of hearing impairment in pediatric patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and relate these measures to patient demographics, treatment options, and other otologic factors. A retrospective analysis of children with a diagnosis of PCD, Kartagener's syndrome, or situs inversus in the AudGen Database was conducted. Audiograms were analyzed for type of hearing loss (HL), severity, laterality, and progression. Medical charts were reviewed to identify factors that influence severity and progression of hearing loss. 56 patients met inclusion criteria and 42 patients had HL. 66.6% had bilateral and 33.3% had unilateral loss (70 total ears with HL). Conductive hearing loss (CHL) was the most common type of HL, though 30% of children had some sensorineural component to their hearing loss. 92.9% of children with HL received at least one diagnosis of otitis media, but HL did not improve in the majority (77.8%) of ears in our study regardless of ear tube placement. Slight to mild CHL and all types of otitis media are prevalent among patients with PCD, and some of these children have sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). All patients diagnosed with situs inversus at birth should be evaluated by an otolaryngologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased putamen hypercapnic vasoreactivity in levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Vincent A; Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Tang, Chris C; Niethammer, Martin; Choi, Yoon Young; Markowitz, Daniel; Nazem, Amir; Nardi, Dominic; Carras, Nicholas; Feigin, Andrew; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2017-10-19

    In a rodent model of Parkinson's disease (PD), levodopa-induced involuntary movements have been linked to striatal angiogenesis - a process that is difficult to document in living human subjects. Angiogenesis can be accompanied by localized increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses to hypercapnia. We therefore explored the possibility that, in the absence of levodopa, local hypercapnic CBF responses are abnormally increased in PD patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) but not in their nondyskinetic (NLID) counterparts. We used H215O PET to scan 24 unmedicated PD subjects (12 LID and 12 NLID) and 12 matched healthy subjects in the rest state under normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions. Hypercapnic CBF responses were compared to corresponding levodopa responses from the same subjects. Group differences in hypercapnic vasoreactivity were significant only in the posterior putamen, with greater CBF responses in LID subjects compared with the other subjects. Hypercapnic and levodopa-mediated CBF responses measured in this region exhibited distinct associations with disease severity: the former correlated with off-state motor disability ratings but not symptom duration, whereas the latter correlated with symptom duration but not motor disability. These are the first in vivo human findings linking LID to microvascular changes in the basal ganglia.

  19. Continuous drug delivery in early- and late-stage Parkinson's disease as a strategy for avoiding dyskinesia induction and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, P.; McCreary, A. C.; Scheller, D. K. A.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) is dependent on the use of dopamine replacement therapy in the form of l-dopa and dopamine agonist drugs. However, the development of dyskinesia (chorea, dystonia, athetosis) can become treatment limiting. The initiation of dyskinesia

  20. Tardive dyskinesia and DRD3, HTR2A and HTR2C gene polymorphisms in Russian psychiatric inpatients from Siberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Hadithy, A. F. Y.; Ivanova, S. A.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Semke, A.; Fedorenko, O.; Kornetova, E.; Ryadovaya, L.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Wilffert, B.; Bruggeman, R.; Loonen, A. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pharmacogenetics of tardive dyskinesia and dopamine D3 (DRD3), serotonin 2A (HTR2A), and 2C (HTR2C) receptors has been examined in various populations, but not in Russians. Purpose: To investigate the association between orofaciolingual (TDof) and limb-truncal dyskinesias (TDlt) and

  1. Neural and Behavioral Evidence for an Online Resetting Process in Visual Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Halely; Luria, Roy

    2017-02-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) guides behavior by holding a set of active representations and modifying them according to changes in the environment. This updating process relies on a unique mapping between each VWM representation and an actual object in the environment. Here, we destroyed this mapping by either presenting a coherent object but then breaking it into independent parts or presenting an object but then abruptly replacing it with a different object. This allowed us to introduce the neural marker and behavioral consequence of an online resetting process in humans' VWM. Across seven experiments, we demonstrate that this resetting process involves abandoning the old VWM contents because they no longer correspond to the objects in the environment. Then, VWM encodes the novel information and reestablishes the correspondence between the new representations and the objects. The resetting process was marked by a unique neural signature: a sharp drop in the amplitude of the electrophysiological index of VWM contents (the contralateral delay activity), presumably indicating the loss of the existent object-to-representation mappings. This marker was missing when an updating process occurred. Moreover, when tracking moving items, VWM failed to detect salient changes in the object's shape when these changes occurred during the resetting process. This happened despite the object being fully visible, presumably because the mapping between the object and a VWM representation was lost. Importantly, we show that resetting, its neural marker, and the behavioral cost it entails, are specific to situations that involve a destruction of the objects-to-representations correspondence. Visual working memory (VWM) maintains task-relevant information in an online state. Previous studies showed that VWM representations are accessed and modified after changes in the environment. Here, we show that this updating process critically depends on an ongoing mapping between the

  2. Reset charge sensitive amplifier for NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Guoqiang; Tan, Chengjun; Li, Qiang; Ge, Liangquan; Liu, Xiyao; Luo, Qun

    2015-01-01

    The time constant of the output signal of the front-end readout circuit of a traditional gamma-ray spectrometer with a NaI(Tl)+PMT structure is affected by temperature, measurement environment and the signal transmission cable, so it is difficult to get a good resolution spectrum, especially at higher counting rates. In this paper, a reset charge sensitive amplifier (RCSA) is designed for the gamma-ray spectrometer with a NaI(Tl)+PMT structure. The designed RCSA outputs a step signal, thus enabling the acquisition of double-exponential signals with a stable time constant by using the next stage of a CR differentiating circuit. The designed RCSA is mainly composed of a basic amplifying circuit, a reset circuit and a dark current compensation circuit. It provides the output step signal through the integration of the PMT output charge signal. When the amplitude of the step signal exceeds a preset voltage threshold, it triggers the reset circuit to generate a reset pulse (about 5 µs pulse width) to reset the output signal. Experimental results demonstrated that the designed RCSA achieves a charge sensitivity of 4.26×10 10 V/C, with a zero capacitance noise of 51.09 fC and a noise slope of 1.98 fC/pF. Supported by the digital shaping algorithm of the digital multi-channel analyzer (DMCA), it can maintain good energy resolution with high counting rates up to 150 kcps and with a temperature range from −19 °C to 50 °C. - Highlights: • A new reset type charge sensitive amplifier for gamma-ray spectrometer based on a photomultiplier tube is proposed. • Reset circuit formed by constant current source output a fixed width pulse to reset charge sensitive amplifier. • Photomultiplier tube dark current compensation circuit could increase the pulse through rate by decreasing reset frequency. • This amplifier outputs a step function signal that could match next stage circuit easily

  3. Routes to Chaos Induced by a Discontinuous Resetting Process in a Hybrid Spiking Neuron Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko; Yamanishi, Teruya

    2018-01-10

    Several hybrid spiking neuron models combining continuous spike generation mechanisms and discontinuous resetting processes following spiking have been proposed. The Izhikevich neuron model, for example, can reproduce many spiking patterns. This model clearly possesses various types of bifurcations and routes to chaos under the effect of a state-dependent jump in the resetting process. In this study, we focus further on the relation between chaotic behaviour and the state-dependent jump, approaching the subject by comparing spiking neuron model versions with and without the resetting process. We first adopt a continuous two-dimensional spiking neuron model in which the orbit in the spiking state does not exhibit divergent behaviour. We then insert the resetting process into the model. An evaluation using the Lyapunov exponent with a saltation matrix and a characteristic multiplier of the Poincar'e map reveals that two types of chaotic behaviour (i.e. bursting chaotic spikes and near-period-two chaotic spikes) are induced by the resetting process. In addition, we confirm that this chaotic bursting state is generated from the periodic spiking state because of the slow- and fast-scale dynamics that arise when jumping to the hyperpolarization and depolarization regions, respectively.

  4. Can glacial shearing of sediment reset the signal used for luminescence dating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Mark D.; Swift, Darrel A.; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Rhodes, Edward J.; Damsgaard, Anders

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the geomorphology left by waxing and waning of former glaciers and ice sheets during the late Quaternary has been the focus of much research. This has been hampered by the difficulty in dating such features. Luminescence has the potential to be applied to glacial sediments but requires signal resetting prior to burial in order to provide accurate ages. This paper explores the possibility that, rather than relying on light to reset the luminescence signal, glacial processes underneath ice might cause resetting. Experiments were conducted on a ring-shear machine set up to replicate subglacial conditions and simulate the shearing that can occur within subglacial sediments. Luminescence measurement at the single grain level indicates that a number (albeit small) of zero-dosed grains were produced and that these increased in abundance with distance travelled within the shearing zone. Observed changes in grain shape characteristics with increasing shear distance indicate the presence of localised high pressure grain-to-grain stresses caused by grain bridges. This appears to explain why some grains became zeroed whilst others retained their palaeodose. Based on the observed experimental trend, it is thought that localised grain stress is a viable luminescence resetting mechanism. As such relatively short shearing distances might be sufficient to reset a small proportion of the luminescence signal within subglacial sediments. Dating of previously avoided subglacial sediments may therefore be possible.

  5. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for biliary dyskinesia in children: frequency increasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Martin; Yannam, Govardhana R; Muensterer, Oliver J; Aprahamian, Charles J; Haricharan, Ramanath N; Perger, Lena; Bartle, Donna; Talathi, Sonia S; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Scott A; Chen, Mike K; Harmon, Carroll M

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of children with biliary dyskinesia (BD) is controversial. As we recently observed an increasing frequency of referrals for BD in our institution the aim of the study was to re-evaluate the long-term outcome in children with BD. Children with laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) for suspected BD between 8/2006 and 5/2011 were included. A pathologic ejection fraction (EF) was defined as <35%. The long-term effect of cholecystectomy was assessed via a Likert scale symptom questionnaire. 82 children (median age 13.5 years, mean BMI 25.8) were included. CCK-HIDA scan was pathologic in 74 children (90.2%). Mean EF was 16.4%. Histology revealed chronic cholecystitis in 48 (58.5%) children and was normal in 30 children (36.5%). The frequency of LC for suspected BD increased by a factor of 4.3 in the last 10 years. Long term follow-up showed that only 23/52 children (44.2%) were symptom-free after LC. Patients with chronic inflammation were more likely to have persistent symptoms (p=0.017). An EF<15% was associated with a resolution of symptoms (p=0.031). The frequency of LC for suspected BD in our institution has increased significantly during recent years. The long-term efficacy in our cohort was only 44.2%. We believe that laparoscopic cholecystectomy is likely helpful in patients with an EF<15%. However, in children with an EF of 15%-35%, based upon our data, we would highly recommend an appropriately thorough pre-op testing to exclude other gastrointestinal disorders prior to consideration of operative management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PRRT2 links infantile convulsions and paroxysmal dyskinesia with migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloarec, Robin; Bruneau, Nadine; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Massacrier, Annick; Salmi, Manal; Bataillard, Marc; Boulay, Clotilde; Caraballo, Roberto; Fejerman, Natalio; Genton, Pierre; Hirsch, Edouard; Hunter, Alasdair; Lesca, Gaetan; Motte, Jacques; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanlaville, Damien; Wong, Sau-Wei; Fu, Ying-Hui; Rochette, Jacques; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Whole genome sequencing and the screening of 103 families recently led us to identify PRRT2 (proline-rich-transmembrane protein) as the gene causing infantile convulsions (IC) with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) (PKD/IC syndrome, formerly ICCA). There is interfamilial and intrafamilial variability and the patients may have IC or PKD. Association of IC with hemiplegic migraine (HM) has also been reported. In order to explore the mutational and clinical spectra, we analyzed 34 additional families with either typical PKD/IC or PKD/IC with migraine. Methods: We performed Sanger sequencing of all PRRT2 coding exons and of exon-intron boundaries in the probands and in their relatives whenever appropriate. Results: Two known and 2 novel PRRT2 mutations were detected in 18 families. The p.R217Pfs*8 recurrent mutation was found in ≈50% of typical PKD/IC, and the unreported p.R145Gfs*31 in one more typical family. PRRT2 mutations were also found in PKD/IC with migraine: p.R217Pfs*8 cosegregated with PKD associated with HM in one family, and was also detected in one IC patient having migraine with aura, in related PKD/IC familial patients having migraine without aura, and in one sporadic migraineur with abnormal MRI. Previously reported p.R240X was found in one patient with PKD with migraine without aura. The novel frameshift p.S248Afs*65 was identified in a PKD/IC family member with IC and migraine with aura. Conclusions: We extend the spectrum of PRRT2 mutations and phenotypes to HM and to other types of migraine in the context of PKD/IC, and emphasize the phenotypic pleiotropy seen in patients with PRRT2 mutations. PMID:23077017

  7. Effects of ramp reset pulses on the address discharge in a shadow mask plasma display panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lanlan; Tu Yan; Zhang Xiong; Jiang Youyan; Zhang Jian; Wang Baoping

    2007-01-01

    A two-dimensional self-consistent numerical simulation model is used to analyse the effects of the ramp reset pulses on the address discharge in a shadow mask plasma display panel (SM-PDP). Some basic parameters such as the slope of the ramp pulse and the terminal voltage of the ramp reset period are varied to investigate their effects. The simulation results illustrate that the wall voltage is mainly decided by the terminal voltage and the firing voltage at the end of the ramp reset period. Moreover, the variation of the ramp slope will also bring a few modifications to the wall voltage. The priming particles in the beginning of the addressing period are related to the slope of the ramping down voltage pulse. The simulation results can help us optimize the driving scheme of the SM-PDP

  8. Resonator reset in circuit QED by optimal control for large open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Ferris, Andrew J.; Blais, Alexandre

    2017-10-01

    We study an implementation of the open GRAPE (gradient ascent pulse engineering) algorithm well suited for large open quantum systems. While typical implementations of optimal control algorithms for open quantum systems rely on explicit matrix exponential calculations, our implementation avoids these operations, leading to a polynomial speedup of the open GRAPE algorithm in cases of interest. This speedup, as well as the reduced memory requirements of our implementation, are illustrated by comparison to a standard implementation of open GRAPE. As a practical example, we apply this open-system optimization method to active reset of a readout resonator in circuit QED. In this problem, the shape of a microwave pulse is optimized such as to empty the cavity from measurement photons as fast as possible. Using our open GRAPE implementation, we obtain pulse shapes, leading to a reset time over 4 times faster than passive reset.

  9. Impaired theta phase-resetting underlying auditory N1 suppression in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentemilla, Lluis; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Gual, Antoni; Escera, Carles; Polo, Maria Dolores; Grau, Carles

    2009-02-18

    It has been suggested that chronic alcoholism may lead to altered neural mechanisms related to inhibitory processes. Here, we studied auditory N1 suppression phenomena (i.e. amplitude reduction with repetitive stimuli) in chronic alcoholic patients as an early-stage information-processing brain function involving inhibition by the analysis of the N1 event-related potential and time-frequency computation (spectral power and phase-resetting). Our results showed enhanced neural theta oscillatory phase-resetting underlying N1 generation in suppressed N1 event-related potential. The present findings suggest that chronic alcoholism alters neural oscillatory synchrony dynamics at very early stages of information processing.

  10. Endurance Enhancement and High Speed Set/Reset of 50 nm Generation HfO2 Based Resistive Random Access Memory Cell by Intelligent Set/Reset Pulse Shape Optimization and Verify Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miyaji, Kousuke; Johguchi, Koh; Takeuchi, Ken

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a verify-programming method for the resistive random access memory (ReRAM) cell which achieves a 50-times higher endurance and a fast set and reset compared with the conventional method. The proposed verify-programming method uses the incremental pulse width with turnback (IPWWT) for the reset and the incremental voltage with turnback (IVWT) for the set. With the combination of IPWWT reset and IVWT set, the endurance-cycle increases from 48 ×103 to 2444 ×103 cycles. Furthermore, the measured data retention-time after 20 ×103 set/reset cycles is estimated to be 10 years. Additionally, the filamentary based physical model is proposed to explain the set/reset failure mechanism with various set/reset pulse shapes. The reset pulse width and set voltage correspond to the width and length of the conductive-filament, respectively. Consequently, since the proposed IPWWT and IVWT recover set and reset failures of ReRAM cells, the endurance-cycles are improved.

  11. Serotonergic modulation of receptor occupancy in rats treated with L-DOPA after unilateral 6-OHDA lesioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nahimi, Adjmal; Høltzermann, Mette; Landau, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that l-3,4 dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID), a severe complication of conventional L-DOPA therapy of Parkinson's disease, may be caused by dopamine (DA) release originating in serotonergic neurons. To evaluate the in vivo effect of a 5-HT(1A) agonist...... [(±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino) tetralin hydrobromide, 8-OHDPAT] on the L-DOPA-induced increase in extracellular DA and decrease in [(11) C]raclopride binding in an animal model of advanced Parkinson's disease and LID, we measured extracellular DA in response to L-DOPA or a combination of L......-DOPA and the 5-HT(1A) agonist, 8-OHDPAT, with microdialysis, and determined [(11) C]raclopride binding to DA receptors, with micro-positron emission tomography, as the surrogate marker of DA release. Rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions had micro-positron emission tomography scans with [(11) C...

  12. The Acute Brain Response to Levodopa Heralds Dyskinesias in Parkinson Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson disease (PD), long‐term treatment with the dopamine precursor levodopa gradually induces involuntary “dyskinesia” movements. The neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of levodopa‐induced dyskinesias in vivo are still poorly understood. Here, we applied functional magnetic...

  13. A longitudinal evaluation of hearing and ventilation tube insertion in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Nicolai; Alanin, Mikkel Christian; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease, which primarily manifests with oto-sino-pulmonary symptoms. Otitis media with effusion (OME) is common from early childhood. The existing literature on OME management in PCD is conflicting. The goals of the ...

  14. ZMYND10 is mutated in primary ciliary dyskinesia and interacts with LRRC6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Gee, Heon Yung; Kurkowiak, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Defects of motile cilia cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), characterized by recurrent respiratory infections and male infertility. Using whole-exome resequencing and high-throughput mutation analysis, we identified recessive biallelic mutations in ZMYND10 in 14 families and mutations in the ...

  15. Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozhidaev, I.; Alifirova, V.M.; Freidin, M.B.; Zhukova, I.A.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Osmanova, D.Z.; Mironova, Y.S.; Wilffert, B.; Ivanova, S.A.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Long-term levodopa treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently complicated by spontaneously occur ring involuntary muscle movements called levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). LID are a substantial barrier to effective symptomatic management of Parkinson's disease (PD), as up to

  16. Beneficial effect of candesartan and lisinopril against haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kuldeep Singh; Prakash, Atish; Bisht, Rohit; Bansal, Puneet Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is a serious motor disorder of the orofacial region, resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment of schizophrenia. Candesartan (AT1 antagonist) and lisinopril (ACE inhibitor) has been reported to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of candesartan and lisinopril on haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia and oxidative damage in rats. Tardive dyskinesia was induced by administering haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) and concomitantly treated with candesartan (3 and 5 mg/kg p.o.) and lisinopril (10 and 15 mg/kg p.o.) for 3 weeks in male Wistar rats. Various behavioral parameters were assessed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and biochemical parameters were estimated at day 22. Chronic administration of haloperidol significantly increased stereotypic behaviors in rats, which were significantly improved by administration of candesartan and lisinopril. Chronic administration of haloperidol significantly increased oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation in the striatum region of the rat's brain. Co-administration of candesartan and lisinopril significantly attenuated the oxidative damage and neuro-inflammation in the haloperidol-treated rat. The present study supports the therapeutic use of candesartan and lisinopril in the treatment of typical antipsychotic-induced orofacial dyskinesia and possible antioxidant and neuro-inflammatory mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Predictive genetic model for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Freidin, M.B.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.A.; Zhukova, N.G.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of the dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia, is commonly treated with levodopa (L-DOPA). The use of this drug, however, is severely limited by adverse effects. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is one of these and

  18. Etiological and therapeutical observations in a case of belly dancer's dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linazasoro, Girutz; Van Blercom, Nadège; Lasa, Asier; Fernández, José Manuel; Aranzábal, Inés

    2005-02-01

    We report on the case of a woman with belly dancer's syndrome. This case presented two peculiarities: (1) the condition was induced by the chronic use of clebopride, and (2) abdominal dyskinesias showed a dramatic response to the application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright 2004 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Evidence that lithium protects against tardive dyskinesia : The Curacao Extrapyramidal Syndromes study VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Peter N.; Hoek, Hans W.; Matroos, Glenn E.; van Os, Jim

    Lithium may have neuroprotective properties and therefore could affect the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia (TD). We conducted a nine-year follow-up study with one baseline and six follow-up assessments including all psychiatric inpatients in Curacao (N = 194). TD was measured with the Abnormal

  20. Multicenter analysis of body mass index, lung function, and sputum microbiology in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglione, Marco; Bush, Andrew; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No studies longitudinally, simultaneously assessed body mass index (BMI) and spirometry in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). METHODS: We determined BMI and spirometry in 158 PCD children and adolescents from London, UK (n = 75), Naples, Italy (n = 23) and Copenhagen, Denmark (n = 60) ...

  1. Non-Therapeutic Risk Factors for Onset of Tardive Dyskinesia in Schizophrenia : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenback, Diederik E.; van Harten, Peter N.; van Os, Jim

    2009-01-01

    A meta-analysis of prospective studies with schizophrenia patients was conducted to examine whether the evidence exists for risk factors for the emergence of Tardive Dyskinesia (TD) in schizophrenia. A computer assisted Medline/PubMed and Embase search was' conducted in January 2008 for the years

  2. Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozhidaev, Ivan V; Alifirova, V. M.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Zhukova, I.A.; Fedorenko, Olga Yu; Osmanova, Diana Z; Mironova, Y.S.; Wilffert, Berend; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia I. Pozhidaev(1), V.M. Alifirova(2), M.B. Freidin(3), I.A. Zhukova(2), O.Y. Fedorenko(1), D.Z. Osmanova(1), Y.S. Mironova(2), B. Wilffert(4), S.A. Ivanova(1), A.J.M. Loonen(5) (1)Mental Health Research

  3. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of orofacial tardive dyskinesia : A single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; van Harten, Peter N.; Bruggeman, Richard; Hoek, Hans W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Orofacial tardive dyskinesia (OTD) is difficult to treat and Botulinium Toxin A (BTA) may be an option. Methods: In a single blind (raters were blind) study (N= 12, duration 33 weeks) OTD was treated with Botulinum Toxin A in three consecutive sessions with increasing dosages. The

  4. Behavioral Relaxation Training for Parkinson's Disease Related Dyskinesia and Comorbid Social Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Lyons, Kelly E.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of brief Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT) on anxiety and dyskinesia of a 57-year-old female, with an 11-year history of Parkinson's disease (PD) and 18-months post-deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, were evaluated. Multiple process and outcome measures were used including the Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS), Subjective…

  5. Ranitidine reduced levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui G

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Guiyun Cui,1,* Xinxin Yang,1,* Xiaoying Wang,2,* Zunsheng Zhang,1 Xuanye Yue,1 Hongjuan Shi,1 Xia Shen11Department of Neurology, 2Department of Ultrasound, the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Chronic administration of levodopa in Parkinson’s disease leads to debilitating involuntary movements, termed levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. The pathogenesis of LID is poorly understood. Previous research has shown that histamine H2 receptors are highly expressed in the input (striatum and output (globus pallidus, substantia nigra regions of the basal ganglia, particularly in the GABAergic striatopallidal and striatonigral pathways. Therefore, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist could be used to reduce LID. In the present work, we investigated whether ranitidine has the potential to diminish LID in rats with dyskinesia and explored the underlying mechanisms involved.Methods: A rat model of PD was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Valid PD rats were then treated with levodopa (25 mg/kg, intraperitoneally and benserazide (12.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally for 21 days to induce a rat model of LID. The acute and chronic effects of administration of ranitidine at different doses (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 20 mg/kg on abnormal involuntary movements, levodopa-induced rotations, and the forelimb adjusting steps test were investigated in LID rats. The chronic effect of ranitidine (10 mg/kg on the expression of Arc and proenkephalin was also evaluated.Results: Levodopa elicited increased dyskinesia in PD rats. Acute ranitidine treatment had no effect on LID, but chronic ranitidine administration (10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg reduced LID in rats with dyskinesia. Importantly, levodopa-induced rotations were not affected by chronic treatment with ranitidine. In addition, chronic ranitidine (10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg significantly improved stepping of the lesioned forepaw. Real

  6. Beneficial effects of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats: Possible neurotransmitters and neuroinflammation modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Swati; Jamwal, Sumit; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-15

    Tardive Dyskinesia is a severe side effect of chronic neuroleptic treatment consisting of abnormal involuntary movements, characterized by orofacial dyskinesia. The study was designed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia possibly by neurochemical and neuroinflammatory modulation in rats. Rats were administered with haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p for 21 days) to induce orofacial dyskinesia. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) was given daily 1hour before haloperidol treatment for 21 days. Behavioral observations (vacuous chewing movements, tongue protrusions, facial jerking, rotarod activity, grip strength, narrow beam walking) were assessed on 0th, 7th(,) 14th(,) 21st day after haloperidol treatment. On 22nd day, animals were killed and striatum was excised for estimation of biochemical parameters (malondialdehyde, nitrite and endogenous enzyme (GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines [Tumor necrosis factor, Interleukin 1β, Interleukin 6] and neurotransmitters level (dopamine, serotonin, nor epinephrine, 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), Homovanillic acid, 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Haloperidol treatment for 21 days impaired muscle co-ordination, motor activity and grip strength with an increased in orofacial dyskinetic movements. Further free radical generation increases MDA and nitrite levels, decreasing GSH levels in striatum. Neuroinflammatory markers were significantly increased with decrease in neurotransmitters levels. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) treatment along with haloperidol significantly attenuated impairment in behavioral, biochemical, neurochemical and neuroinflammatory markers. Results of the present study attributed the therapeutic potential of lycopene in the treatment (prevented or delayed) of typical antipsychotic induced orofacial dyskinesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical commentary on "Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-like phenotype in multiple sclerosis" and "Secondary paroxysmal dyskinesia in multiple sclerosis: Clinical-radiological features and treatment. Case report of seven patients".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareés, Isabel

    2017-11-01

    This clinical commentary discusses the phenomenology and treatment of paroxysmal dyskinesia in patients with multiple sclerosis. It calls for a consensus on the definition as well as for larger studies to better understand this unusual clinical association.

  8. UVA-induced reset of hydroxyl radical ultradian rhythm improves temporal lipid production in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Ranjini; Suraishkumar, G K

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time that the endogenous, pseudo-steady-state, specific intracellular levels of the hydroxyl radical (si-OH) oscillate in an ultradian fashion (model system: the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris), and also characterize the various rhythm parameters. The ultradian rhythm in the endogenous levels of the si-OH occurred with an approximately 6 h period in the daily cycle of light and darkness. Further, we expected that the rhythm reset to a shorter period could rapidly switch the cellular redox states that could favor lipid accumulation. We reset the endogenous rhythm through entrainment with UVA radiation, and generated two new ultradian rhythms with periods of approximately 2.97 h and 3.8 h in the light phase and dark phase, respectively. The reset increased the window of maximum lipid accumulation from 6 h to 12 h concomitant with the onset of the ultradian rhythms. Further, the saturated fatty acid content increased approximately to 80% of total lipid content, corresponding to the peak maxima of the hydroxyl radical levels in the reset rhythm. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Identification of partial resetting using De as a function of illumination time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.M.; Singarayer, J.S.; Ward, S.; Stokes, S.

    2003-01-01

    Modern age samples from various depositional environments were examined for signal resetting. For 19 modern aeolian/beach samples all D e values obtained were e e values were e as a function of illumination (OSL measurement) time (D e (t)) plots were examined for all samples. Based on previous laboratory experiments, increases in D e (t) were expected for partially reset samples, and constant D e (t) for fully reset samples. All aeolian samples, both modern age and additional 'young' samples ( e (t) while all modern, non-zero D e , fluvial/colluvial samples showed increasing D e (t). 'Replacement plots', where a regenerated signal is substituted for the natural, yielded constant (flat) D e (t). These findings support strongly the use of D e (t) as a method of identifying incomplete resetting in fluvial samples. Potential complicating factors, such as illumination (bleaching) spectrum, thermal instability and component composition are discussed and a series of internal checks on the applicability of the D e (t) for each individual aliquot/grain level are outlined

  10. Effects of a NR2B Selective NMDA Glutamate Antagonist, CP-101,606, on Dyskinesia and Parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, John G.; Gunzler, Steven A; Kirchhoff, Trish; Hogarth, Penelope; Weaver, Jerry L.; Krams, Michael; Jamerson, Brenda; Menniti, Frank S.; Landen, Jaren W.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate antagonists decrease dyskinesia and augment the antiparkinsonian effects of levodopa in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial we investigated the acute effects of placebo and two doses of a NR2B subunit selective NMDA glutamate antagonist, CP-101,606, on the response to two-hour levodopa infusions in 12 PD subjects with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Both doses of CP-101,606 reduced the maximum severity of levodopa-induced dyskinesia approximately 30% but neither dose improved parkinsonism. CP-101,606 was associated with a dose-related dissociation and amnesia. These results support the hypothesis that glutamate antagonists may be useful antidyskinetic agents. However, future studies will have to determine if the benefits of dyskinesia suppression can be achieved without adverse cognitive effects. PMID:18759356

  11. Vitamin E for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Weiser, Karla; Maayan, Nicola; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-01-17

    Antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medication is used extensively to treat people with chronic mental illnesses. Its use, however, is associated with adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. Vitamin E has been proposed as a treatment to prevent or decrease TD. The primary objective was to determine the clinical effects of vitamin E in people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness who had developed antipsychotic-induced TD.The secondary objectives were:1. to examine whether the effect of vitamin E was maintained as duration of follow-up increased;2. to test the hypothesis that the use of vitamin E is most effective for those with early onset TD (less than five years) SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2015 and April 2017), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included reports if they were controlled trials dealing with people with antipsychotic-induced TD and schizophrenia who remained on their antipsychotic medication and had been randomly allocated to either vitamin E or to a placebo, no intervention, or any other intervention. We independently extracted data from these trials and we estimated risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assumed that people who left early had no improvement. We assessed risk of bias and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. The review now includes 13 poorly reported randomised trials (total 478 people), all participants were adults with chronic psychiatric disorders, mostly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic-induced TD. There was no clear difference between vitamin E and placebo for the outcome of TD: not improved to a clinically important extent (6 RCTs, N = 264, RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.01, low-quality evidence

  12. Longitudinal study of lung function in a cohort of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellerman, A; Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    Patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) have pronounced stasis of their respiratory secretions and therefore recurrent lower airway infections, which raises concerns for the development of lung function. Twenty four patients with PCD have been studied prospectively with a standardized regime...... patients entering as children (forced vital capacity (FVC) 70 versus 85% predicted; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 59 versus 72% pred). The lung damage did not relate to the type of ciliary dyskinesia. During the subsequent surveillance of the groups for a median of 14 and 7 yrs...... in our clinic for 2-16 yrs with clinic visits, including spirometry 2-4 times per year, daily physiotherapy and monthly sputum cultures with subsequent specific antibiotic treatment. Lung function was significantly lower in the 12 PCD patients entering the cohort as adults when compared to the PCD...

  13. Continuous cerebroventricular administration of dopamine: A new treatment for severe dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloux, C; Gouel, F; Lachaud, C; Timmerman, K; Do Van, B; Jonneaux, A; Petrault, M; Garcon, G; Rouaix, N; Moreau, C; Bordet, R; Duce, J A; Devedjian, J C; Devos, D

    2017-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) depletion of dopamine in the nigro-striatal pathway is a main pathological hallmark that requires continuous and focal restoration. Current predominant treatment with intermittent oral administration of its precursor, Levodopa (l-dopa), remains the gold standard but pharmacological drawbacks trigger motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Continuous intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of dopamine previously failed as a therapy because of an inability to resolve the accelerated dopamine oxidation and tachyphylaxia. We aim to overcome prior challenges by demonstrating treatment feasibility and efficacy of continuous i.c.v. of dopamine close to the striatum. Dopamine prepared either anaerobically (A-dopamine) or aerobically (O-dopamine) in the presence or absence of a conservator (sodium metabisulfite, SMBS) was assessed upon acute MPTP and chronic 6-OHDA lesioning and compared to peripheral l-dopa treatment. A-dopamine restored motor function and induced a dose dependent increase of nigro-striatal tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in mice after 7days of MPTP insult that was not evident with either O-dopamine or l-dopa. In the 6-OHDA rat model, continuous circadian i.c.v. injection of A-dopamine over 30days also improved motor activity without occurrence of tachyphylaxia. This safety profile was highly favorable as A-dopamine did not induce dyskinesia or behavioral sensitization as observed with peripheral l-dopa treatment. Indicative of a new therapeutic strategy for patients suffering from l-dopa related complications with dyskinesia, continuous i.c.v. of A-dopamine has greater efficacy in mediating motor impairment over a large therapeutic index without inducing dyskinesia and tachyphylaxia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential biomarkers of tardive dyskinesia: A multiplex analysis of blood serum

    OpenAIRE

    Boiko, Anastasia S; Kornetova, Elena G; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Potential biomarkers of tardive dyskinesia: a multiplex analysis of blood serum A.S. Boiko(1), E.G. Kornetova(2), S.A. Ivanova(1), A.J.M. Loonen(3) (1)Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Tomsk, Russia (2)Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Endogenous Disorders, Tomsk, Russia (3)Univers...

  15. LRRC6 mutation causes primary ciliary dyskinesia with dynein arm defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Horani

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress in defining the ciliome, the genetic basis for many cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD remains elusive. We evaluated five children from two unrelated, consanguineous Palestinian families who had PCD with typical clinical features, reduced nasal nitric oxide concentrations, and absent dynein arms. Linkage analyses revealed a single common homozygous region on chromosome 8 and one candidate was conserved in organisms with motile cilia. Sequencing revealed a single novel mutation in LRRC6 (Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 6 that fit the model of autosomal recessive genetic transmission, leading to a change of a highly conserved amino acid from aspartic acid to histidine (Asp146His. LRRC6 was localized to the cytoplasm and was up-regulated during ciliogenesis in human airway epithelial cells in a Foxj1-dependent fashion. Nasal epithelial cells isolated from affected individuals and shRNA-mediated silencing in human airway epithelial cells, showed reduced LRRC6 expression, absent dynein arms, and slowed cilia beat frequency. Dynein arm proteins were either absent or mislocalized to the cytoplasm in airway epithelial cells from a primary ciliary dyskinesia subject. These findings suggest that LRRC6 plays a role in dynein arm assembly or trafficking and when mutated leads to primary ciliary dyskinesia with laterality defects.

  16. Assessment of cervical range of motion, cervical core strength and scapular dyskinesia in violin players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawde, Pooja; Dabadghav, Rachana; Bedekar, Nilima; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-12-01

    Playing the violin can lead to asymmetric postures which can affect the cervical range of motion, cervical core strength and scapular stability. The objective of the study was to assess the cervical range of motion, cervical core strength and scapular dyskinesia in violin players and non-players of the same age group. An inclinometer was used to assess the cervical range of motion, pressure biofeedback was used to assess cervical core strength and scapular dyskinesia was also assessed in 30 professional violin players (18-40 years) compared with 30 age-matched non-players. Analysis was done using an unpaired t test. Significant change was seen with respect to extension (p = 0.051), cervical core strength (p = 0.005), right (Rt) superior angle 0° (p = 0.004), Rt superior angle 45° (p = 0.015) and Rt inferior angle 90° (p = 0.013). This study shows a significant difference in extension range of motion and cervical core strength of violin players. Also, there was scapular dyskinesia seen at 0° and 45° right-side superior angle of the scapula and 90° right-side inferior angle of the scapula.

  17. Transient resetting: a novel mechanism for synchrony and its biological examples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunguang Li

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of synchronization in biological systems is essential for the understanding of the rhythmic phenomena of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. In this paper, by using simple dynamical systems theory, we present a novel mechanism, named transient resetting, for the synchronization of uncoupled biological oscillators with stimuli. This mechanism not only can unify and extend many existing results on (deterministic and stochastic stimulus-induced synchrony, but also may actually play an important role in biological rhythms. We argue that transient resetting is a possible mechanism for the synchronization in many biological organisms, which might also be further used in the medical therapy of rhythmic disorders. Examples of the synchronization of neural and circadian oscillators as well as a chaotic neuron model are presented to verify our hypothesis.

  18. Persistent resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose uptake ratio by brain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Hasselbalch, S G; Hagemann, L P

    1995-01-01

    fraction of the activation-induced excess glucose uptake. These data confirm earlier reports that brain activation can induce resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose consumption ratio, and indicate that the resetting persists for a long period after cerebral activation has been terminated and physiologic......Global cerebral blood flow (CBF), global cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen (CMRO2), and for glucose (CMRglc), and lactate efflux were measured during rest and during cerebral activation induced by the Wisconsin card sorting test. Measurements were performed in healthy volunteers using the Kety......-Schmidt technique. Global CMRO2 was unchanged during cerebral activation, whereas global CBF and global CMRglc both increased by 12%, reducing the molar ratio of oxygen to glucose consumption from 6.0 during baseline conditions to 5.4 during activation. Data obtained in the period following cerebral activation...

  19. Cortical dynamics of feature binding and reset: control of visual persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, G; Grossberg, S; Mingolla, E

    1994-04-01

    An analysis of the reset of visual cortical circuits responsible for the binding or segmentation of visual features into coherent visual forms yields a model that explains properties of visual persistence. The reset mechanisms prevent massive smearing of visual percepts in response to rapidly moving images. The model simulates relationships among psychophysical data showing inverse relations of persistence to flash luminance and duration, greater persistence of illusory contours than real contours, a U-shaped temporal function for persistence of illusory contours, a reduction of persistence due to adaptation with a stimulus of like orientation, an increase of persistence with spatial separation of a masking stimulus. The model suggests that a combination of habituative, opponent, and endstopping mechanisms prevent smearing and limit persistence. Earlier work with the model has analyzed data about boundary formation, texture segregation, shape-from-shading, and figure-ground separation. Thus, several types of data support each model mechanism and new predictions are made.

  20. Resetting dynamic behaviour of pipework systems; Recalage du comportement dynamique des reseaux de tuyauteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, M [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1998-12-31

    Resetting models is applied to electricity generating plant pipework systems. A frequency approach to the problem is made in an original way thanks to the use of precise dynamic rigidity matrices. The method assumes two kinds of unknown: the usually processed mechanical characteristics (Young`s Modulus, density etc.) and new resetting parameters acting on the dynamic behaviour of unknown connections. As the latter have a very wide range of possible variation, they benefit from a change of variable which allows the assumptions formulated to be complied with. The minimized cost function is based on a error in load. The frequencies required for building it are automatically selected thanks to different tests on measurements. Minimization uses a sensitivity technique linked with a method of least standard squares. The method has been programmed in Fortran 90 within the CIRCUS code and tried out on various examples which were simulated and sound effects cases as well as an actual case. (author). 128 refs.

  1. Resetting dynamic behaviour of pipework systems; Recalage du comportement dynamique des reseaux de tuyauteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    Resetting models is applied to electricity generating plant pipework systems. A frequency approach to the problem is made in an original way thanks to the use of precise dynamic rigidity matrices. The method assumes two kinds of unknown: the usually processed mechanical characteristics (Young`s Modulus, density etc.) and new resetting parameters acting on the dynamic behaviour of unknown connections. As the latter have a very wide range of possible variation, they benefit from a change of variable which allows the assumptions formulated to be complied with. The minimized cost function is based on a error in load. The frequencies required for building it are automatically selected thanks to different tests on measurements. Minimization uses a sensitivity technique linked with a method of least standard squares. The method has been programmed in Fortran 90 within the CIRCUS code and tried out on various examples which were simulated and sound effects cases as well as an actual case. (author). 128 refs.

  2. Continuous-time random walks with reset events. Historical background and new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Miquel; Masó-Puigdellosas, Axel; Villarroel, Javier

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic process that may experience random reset events which relocate the system to its starting position. We focus our attention on a one-dimensional, monotonic continuous-time random walk with a constant drift: the process moves in a fixed direction between the reset events, either by the effect of the random jumps, or by the action of a deterministic bias. However, the orientation of its motion is randomly determined after each restart. As a result of these alternating dynamics, interesting properties do emerge. General formulas for the propagator as well as for two extreme statistics, the survival probability and the mean first-passage time, are also derived. The rigor of these analytical results is verified by numerical estimations, for particular but illuminating examples.

  3. Optimization of a PCRAM Chip for high-speed read and highly reliable reset operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyun; Chen, Houpeng; Li, Xi; Wang, Qian; Fan, Xi; Hu, Jiajun; Lei, Yu; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Zhen; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    The widely used traditional Flash memory suffers from its performance limits such as its serious crosstalk problems, and increasing complexity of floating gate scaling. Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) becomes one of the most potential nonvolatile memories among the new memory techniques. In this paper, a 1M-bit PCRAM chip is designed based on the SMIC 40nm CMOS technology. Focusing on the read and write performance, two new circuits with high-speed read operation and highly reliable reset operation are proposed. The high-speed read circuit effectively reduces the reading time from 74ns to 40ns. The double-mode reset circuit improves the chip yield. This 1M-bit PCRAM chip has been simulated on cadence. After layout design is completed, the chip will be taped out for post-test.

  4. Markers of impaired motor and cognitive volition in Parkinson's disease: Correlates of dopamine dysregulation syndrome, impulse control disorder, and dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jared T; Perepezko, Kate; Rosenthal, Liana S; Mills, Kelly A; Pantelyat, Alexander; Mari, Zoltan; Tochen, Laura; Bang, Jee Yun; Gudavalli, Medha; Yoritomo, Nadine; Butala, Ankur; Bakker, Catherine C; Johnson, Vanessa; Moukheiber, Emile; Dawson, Ted M; Pontone, Gregory M

    2018-02-01

    Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be associated with both motoric (e.g., dyskinesias) and neuropsychiatric adverse effects. Examples of the latter include Dopamine Dysregulation Syndrome (DDS) and impulse control disorder (ICD), which are separate but related behavioral/psychiatric complications of treatment in PD. Dysregulation of volition characterizes both dyskinesias and DDS/ICD; thus, we analyzed potential disease-related correlates in a large PD cohort. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 654 participants collected through the NINDS Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program. DDS/ICD symptoms and dyskinesias were assessed using the Movement Disorders Society (revised) Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Potential associated variables were selected from PD-validated or PD-specific scales of neuropsychiatric or motoric status. Multivariable models with DDS/ICD or dyskinesia presence outcomes were produced with backward stepwise regression to identify factors independently associated with DDS/ICD and/or dyskinesias. Fifty-three (8.1%) participants endorsed DDS and/or ICD symptoms and 150 (22.9%) were dyskinetic. In multivariable analysis, psychosis was independently associated with both dyskinesias (p = 0.006) and DDS/ICD (p < 0.001). Unpredictable motor fluctuations (p = 0.026) and depression (p = 0.023) were also associated with DDS/ICD; female sex (p = 0.025), low tremor score (p = 0.001) and high akinesia-rigidity score (p < 0.001) were associated with dyskinesias. Our findings suggest that psychosis may be an important marker of impaired volition across motor and cognitive domains. Unpredictable motor fluctuations, psychosis, and depression may together comprise a phenotypic profile of patients at increased risk for DDS/ICD. Similarly, dyskinetic PD patients should be closely monitored for psychotic symptoms and treated appropriately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Management of Refractory Orofacial Dyskinesia Caused by Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis Using Botulinum Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixia Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A injections for the treatment of orofacial dyskinesia secondary to anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR encephalitis is rarely reported. Here, we report a case of an urgent, successful management of severe orofacial dyskinesia in an 8-year-old girl with anti-NMDAR encephalitis using BoNT-A injection. The patient presented with de novo unilateral paroxysmal movement disorder progressing to generalized dystonia and repetitive orofacial dyskinesia. Diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of NMDAR antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The orofacial dyskinesia worsened despite the aggressive use of first-line immunotherapy and second-line immunotherapy (rituximab, and resulted in a potentially fatal self-inflicted oral injury. We urgently attempted symptomatic management using BoNT-A injections in the masseter, and induced muscle paralysis using vecuronium. The patient’s severe orofacial dyskinesia was controlled. We observed the effects of the BoNT-A injections and a tapering off of the effects of vecuronium 10 days after the treatment. The movement disorder had improved significantly 4 weeks after the first administration of rituximab. The injection of BoNT-A into the masseter may be an effective treatment for medically refractory orofacial dyskinesia in pediatric patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. We propose that the use of BoNT-A injections should be considered early to avoid self-inflicted oral injury due to severe refractory orofacial dyskinesia in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  6. EEG phase reset due to auditory attention: an inverse time-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Yin Fen; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel tool to evaluate the electroencephalograph (EEG) phase reset due to auditory attention by utilizing an inverse analysis of the instantaneous phase for the first time. EEGs were acquired through auditory attention experiments with a maximum entropy stimulation paradigm. We examined single sweeps of auditory late response (ALR) with the complex continuous wavelet transform. The phase in the frequency band that is associated with auditory attention (6–10 Hz, termed as theta–alpha border) was reset to the mean phase of the averaged EEGs. The inverse transform was applied to reconstruct the phase-modified signal. We found significant enhancement of the N100 wave in the reconstructed signal. Analysis of the phase noise shows the effects of phase jittering on the generation of the N100 wave implying that a preferred phase is necessary to generate the event-related potential (ERP). Power spectrum analysis shows a remarkable increase of evoked power but little change of total power after stabilizing the phase of EEGs. Furthermore, by resetting the phase only at the theta border of no attention data to the mean phase of attention data yields a result that resembles attention data. These results show strong connections between EEGs and ERP, in particular, we suggest that the presentation of an auditory stimulus triggers the phase reset process at the theta–alpha border which leads to the emergence of the N100 wave. It is concluded that our study reinforces other studies on the importance of the EEG in ERP genesis

  7. Nonlinear reset integrator control design: Application to the active suspension control of vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Acho Zuppa, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We present an unexampled reset integrator control design based on the Clegg integrator system. Using an appropriate mathematical model of our Clegg integrator controller, stability proof of the closed-loop system applied to the vibration control problem of a second-order system is shown without invoking hybrid system theory. Furthermore, we illustrate the pplicability of our controller, from the numerical experiment point of view, to the suspension vibration control of vehicles.

  8. EEG phase reset due to auditory attention: an inverse time-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yin Fen; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-08-01

    We propose a novel tool to evaluate the electroencephalograph (EEG) phase reset due to auditory attention by utilizing an inverse analysis of the instantaneous phase for the first time. EEGs were acquired through auditory attention experiments with a maximum entropy stimulation paradigm. We examined single sweeps of auditory late response (ALR) with the complex continuous wavelet transform. The phase in the frequency band that is associated with auditory attention (6-10 Hz, termed as theta-alpha border) was reset to the mean phase of the averaged EEGs. The inverse transform was applied to reconstruct the phase-modified signal. We found significant enhancement of the N100 wave in the reconstructed signal. Analysis of the phase noise shows the effects of phase jittering on the generation of the N100 wave implying that a preferred phase is necessary to generate the event-related potential (ERP). Power spectrum analysis shows a remarkable increase of evoked power but little change of total power after stabilizing the phase of EEGs. Furthermore, by resetting the phase only at the theta border of no attention data to the mean phase of attention data yields a result that resembles attention data. These results show strong connections between EEGs and ERP, in particular, we suggest that the presentation of an auditory stimulus triggers the phase reset process at the theta-alpha border which leads to the emergence of the N100 wave. It is concluded that our study reinforces other studies on the importance of the EEG in ERP genesis.

  9. The Inspection Process of the Army Reset Program for Equipment for Units Returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this report directly applies to the work of DoD civilian and military personnel responsible for the reset of equipment provided to the warfighter deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom...

  10. Morning and Evening Oscillators Cooperate to Reset Circadian Behavior in Response to Light Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Lamba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Light is a crucial input for circadian clocks. In Drosophila, short light exposure can robustly shift the phase of circadian behavior. The model for this resetting posits that circadian photoreception is cell autonomous: CRYPTOCHROME senses light, binds to TIMELESS (TIM, and promotes its degradation, which is mediated by JETLAG (JET. However, it was recently proposed that interactions between circadian neurons are also required for phase resetting. We identify two groups of neurons critical for circadian photoreception: the morning (M and the evening (E oscillators. These neurons work synergistically to reset rhythmic behavior. JET promotes acute TIM degradation cell autonomously in M and E oscillators but also nonautonomously in E oscillators when expressed in M oscillators. Thus, upon light exposure, the M oscillators communicate with the E oscillators. Because the M oscillators drive circadian behavior, they must also receive inputs from the E oscillators. Hence, although photic TIM degradation is largely cell autonomous, neural cooperation between M and E oscillators is critical for circadian behavioral photoresponses.

  11. Rapid resetting of human peripheral clocks by phototherapy during simulated night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marc; Boudreau, Philippe; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2017-11-24

    A majority of night shift workers have their circadian rhythms misaligned to their atypical schedule. While bright light exposure at night is known to reset the human central circadian clock, the behavior of peripheral clocks under conditions of shift work is more elusive. The aim of the present study was to quantify the resetting effects of bright light exposure on both central (plasma cortisol and melatonin) and peripheral clocks markers (clock gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMCs) in subjects living at night. Eighteen healthy subjects were enrolled to either a control (dim light) or a bright light group. Blood was sampled at baseline and on the 4 th day of simulated night shift. In response to a night-oriented schedule, the phase of PER1 and BMAL1 rhythms in PBMCs was delayed by ~2.5-3 h (P shift was observed for the other clock genes and the central markers. Three cycles of 8-h bright light induced significant phase delays (P night-oriented schedule and a rapid resetting effect of nocturnal bright light exposure on peripheral clocks.

  12. First and higher order, heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT) with optional control reset variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, A.

    1996-01-01

    The heuristically based generalized perturbation theory (HGPT), to first and higher order, applied to the neutron field of a reactor system, is discussed in relation to the criticality reset procedure. This procedure is implicit within the GPT methodology, corresponding to the so called filtering of the importance function relevant to the neutron field from the fundamental mode contamination. It is common practice to use the so called ''lambda''-mode filter. In order to account for any possible reset option, a general definition is introduced of an intensive control variable (ρ) entering into the governing equations, and correspondingly a fundamental ρ-mode filtering of the importance function is defined, relevant to the real criticality reset (control) mechanism adopted. A simple example illustrates the need to take into account the correct filtering, so as to avoid significant inaccuracies in the sensitivity calculation results. The extension of this filtering technique to other functions entering into the GPT perturbative formulations at first and higher order is also discussed. (author)

  13. Dyskinesia induced by phenytoin Discinesia induzida por fenitoína

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. AUGUSTA MONTENEGRO

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin is an effective antiepileptic drug, although, it can be associated with many side effects, including dyskinesia. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of phenytoin induced dyskinesia. METHODS: We investigated the occurrence of involuntary movements in patients followed at our adult and pediatric epilepsy clinics during the period of one year. RESULTS: Three patients presented with phenytoin-induced dyskinesia: one adult with axial and orofacial dyskinesia, and two children with choreoathetosis. They did not have other signs of phenytoin intoxication and had complete recovery after phenytoin withdrawal. CONCLUSION: Phenytoin induced dyskinesia may occur during either chronic or initial treatment and with normal serum phenytoin levels. However, it occurs most often in patients on polytherapy, usually after increasing dosage and with toxic serum levels. Other signs of phenytoin intoxication may be present in these patients, but often the dyskinesia is the only side effect, which may delay the diagnosis and treatment. The clinical characteristics of the involuntary movements vary and may be focal or generalized, most often characterized by choreoathetosis and dyskinesias. These may last for hours, days or even years, but frequently disappear completely after phenytoin withdrawal.Fenitoína é droga anti-epiléptica eficaz, mas pode estar associada a vários efeitos colaterais, inclusive discinesia. OBJETIVO: Descrever as características clínicas da discinesia induzida por fenitoína. MÉTODO: Avaliamos a ocorrência de movimentos involuntários em pacientes seguidos nos ambulatórios de epilepsia durante o período de um ano. RESULTADOS: Três pacientes apresentaram discinesia induzida por fenitoína: um adulto com discinesia orofacial e duas crianças com coreoatetose. Eles não tinham outros sinais de intoxicação por fenitoína e apresentaram recuperação completa após a retirada da fenitoína. CONCLUSÃO: Discinesia

  14. Handwriting Analysis Indicates Spontaneous Dyskinesias in Neuroleptic Naïve Adolescents at High Risk for Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Derek J.; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Caligiuri, Michael; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that movement abnormalities are a core feature of psychosis. One marker of movement abnormality, dyskinesia, is a result of impaired neuromodulation of dopamine in fronto-striatal pathways. The traditional methods for identifying movement abnormalities include observer-based reports and force stability gauges. The drawbacks of these methods are long training times for raters, experimenter bias, large site differences in instrumental apparatus, and suboptimal reliability. Taking these drawbacks into account has guided the development of better standardized and more efficient procedures to examine movement abnormalities through handwriting analysis software and tablet. Individuals at risk for psychosis showed significantly more dysfluent pen movements (a proximal measure for dyskinesia) in a handwriting task. Handwriting kinematics offers a great advance over previous methods of assessing dyskinesia, which could clearly be beneficial for understanding the etiology of psychosis. PMID:24300590

  15. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-03

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impulse control disorders and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Napier, T Celeste; Frank, Michael J; Sgambato-Faure, Veronique; Grace, Anthony A; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria; Obeso, Jose; Bezard, Erwan; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Dopaminergic medications used in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease are associated with motor and non-motor behavioural side-effects, such as dyskinesias and impulse control disorders also known as behavioural addictions. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias occur in up to 80% of patients with Parkinson's after a few years of chronic treatment. Impulse control disorders, including gambling disorder, binge eating disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour, and compulsive shopping occur in about 17% of patients with Parkinson's disease on dopamine agonists. These behaviours reflect the interactions of the dopaminergic medications with the individual's susceptibility, and the underlying neurobiology of Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonian rodent models show enhanced reinforcing effects of chronic dopaminergic medication, and a potential role for individual susceptibility. In patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders, impairments are observed across subtypes of decisional impulsivity, possibly reflecting uncertainty and the relative balance of rewards and losses. Impairments appear to be more specific to decisional than motor impulsivity, which might reflect differences in ventral and dorsal striatal engagement. Emerging evidence suggests impulse control disorder subtypes have dissociable correlates, which indicate that individual susceptibility predisposes towards the expression of different behavioural subtypes and neurobiological substrates. Therapeutic interventions to treat patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders have shown efficacy in randomised controlled trials. Large-scale studies are warranted to identify individual risk factors and novel therapeutic targets for these diseases. Mechanisms underlying impulse control disorders and dyskinesias could provide crucial insights into other behavioural symptoms in Parkinson's disease and addictions in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. A Survey of the Tardive Dyskinesia Induced by Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser tabibi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Tardive Dyskinesia (TD, is one of the important problems of the patients with schizophrenia. The emergence of these side effects depends on so many factors such as the patients' age and the duration of antipsychotic treatment. By discovering new drugs (Atypical, there has been an outstanding decrease in the emergence of these side effects. The present study investigates the symptoms of TD in the Patients with schizophrenia who were under  treatments for more than 6 months. "nMethod: The sample of this study was 200 Patients with schizophrenia of four wards in Razi hospital (two acute and two chronic wards who were hospitalized in the winter of 2006 and were qualified for this study. The subjects were 101 males and 99 females who were younger than 60 and had received antipsychotic drugs for at least 6 months. After psychiatric interview and filling the demographic questionnaire by the patients, the required information about the drugs and the intensity of the symptoms was acquired. Then clinical and physical examinations of tardive dyskinesia were done. Next, the tardive dyskinesia disorders' check list (AIMS was used. Findings of this cross-sectional, descriptive study were analyzed by SPSS. "nResults: There was a high ratio of 95% between TD and the age factor (P=0.05. There was no relationship between symptoms frequency and duration of treatment (P=0.68. Facial muscles and oral zones were mostly involved in T.D disorder (72%. "nConclusion: No significant difference was observed between nine fold symptoms of T.D in patients who were using traditional drugs and those who were using the new ones (typical and atypical. Findings showed that in the intensity of the symptoms, gender does not play a major role.

  18. Characterization of Paroxysmal Gluten‐Sensitive Dyskinesia in Border Terriers Using Serological Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, O.A.; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Sanders, D.S.; Powell, R.; Garosi, L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Paroxysmal gluten‐sensitive dyskinesia (PGSD) in border terriers (BTs) results from an immunologic response directed against transglutaminase (TG)2 and gliadin. Recent evidence suggests that PGSD is only one aspect of a range of possible manifestations of gluten sensitivity in the breed. Hypothesis/Objectives Gluten sensitivity in BTs is a heterogeneous disease process with a diverse clinical spectrum; to characterize the phenotype of PGSD using TG2 and gliadin autoantibodies as diagnostic markers. Animals One hundred twenty‐eight client‐owned BTs with various disorders. Methods Prospective study. BTs with paroxysmal episodes and a normal interictal examination were phenotyped using footage of a representative episode and assigned to 3 groups: idiopathic epilepsy (IE), paroxysmal dyskinesia (PD), or other. Owners of each dog completed a questionnaire to obtain information regarding clinical signs. Healthy BTs formed a control group. Serum antibodies against TG2 and AGA were measured in all dogs. Results One hundred twenty‐eight BTs were enrolled; 45 with PD, 28 with IE, 35 with other conditions, and 20 controls. Three overlapping phenotypes were identified; PD, signs suggestive of gastrointestinal disease, and dermatopathy. AGA‐IgG concentrations were increased in PD, compared with IE (P = 0.012), controls (P < 0.0001) and other (P = 0.018) conditions. Anti‐canine TG2‐IgA concentrations were increased in PD, compared with IE (P < 0.0001), controls (P < 0.0001) and other (P = 0.012) conditions. Serological markers are highly specific for PGSD but lack sensitivity. Conclusions PGSD appears part of a syndrome of gluten intolerance consisting of episodes of transient dyskinesia, signs suggestive of gastrointestinal disease, and dermatological hypersensitivity. PMID:29424456

  19. Desynchronization boost by non-uniform coordinated reset stimulation in ensembles of pulse-coupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücken, Leonhard; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Several brain diseases are characterized by abnormal neuronal synchronization. Desynchronization of abnormal neural synchrony is theoretically compelling because of the complex dynamical mechanisms involved. We here present a novel type of coordinated reset (CR) stimulation. CR means to deliver phase resetting stimuli at different neuronal sub-populations sequentially, i.e., at times equidistantly distributed in a stimulation cycle. This uniform timing pattern seems to be intuitive and actually applies to the neural network models used for the study of CR so far. CR resets the population to an unstable cluster state from where it passes through a desynchronized transient, eventually resynchronizing if left unperturbed. In contrast, we show that the optimal stimulation times are non-uniform. Using the model of weakly pulse-coupled neurons with phase response curves, we provide an approach that enables to determine optimal stimulation timing patterns that substantially maximize the desynchronized transient time following the application of CR stimulation. This approach includes an optimization search for clusters in a low-dimensional pulse coupled map. As a consequence, model-specific non-uniformly spaced cluster states cause considerably longer desynchronization transients. Intriguingly, such a desynchronization boost with non-uniform CR stimulation can already be achieved by only slight modifications of the uniform CR timing pattern. Our results suggest that the non-uniformness of the stimulation times can be a medically valuable parameter in the calibration procedure for CR stimulation, where the latter has successfully been used in clinical and pre-clinical studies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and tinnitus. PMID:23750134

  20. Saccadic reaction times to audiovisual stimuli show effects of oscillatory phase reset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Diederich

    Full Text Available Initiating an eye movement towards a suddenly appearing visual target is faster when an accessory auditory stimulus occurs in close spatiotemporal vicinity. Such facilitation of saccadic reaction time (SRT is well-documented, but the exact neural mechanisms underlying the crossmodal effect remain to be elucidated. From EEG/MEG studies it has been hypothesized that coupled oscillatory activity in primary sensory cortices regulates multisensory processing. Specifically, it is assumed that the phase of an ongoing neural oscillation is shifted due to the occurrence of a sensory stimulus so that, across trials, phase values become highly consistent (phase reset. If one can identify the phase an oscillation is reset to, it is possible to predict when temporal windows of high and low excitability will occur. However, in behavioral experiments the pre-stimulus phase will be different on successive repetitions of the experimental trial, and average performance over many trials will show no signs of the modulation. Here we circumvent this problem by repeatedly presenting an auditory accessory stimulus followed by a visual target stimulus with a temporal delay varied in steps of 2 ms. Performing a discrete time series analysis on SRT as a function of the delay, we provide statistical evidence for the existence of distinct peak spectral components in the power spectrum. These frequencies, although varying across participants, fall within the beta and gamma range (20 to 40 Hz of neural oscillatory activity observed in neurophysiological studies of multisensory integration. Some evidence for high-theta/alpha activity was found as well. Our results are consistent with the phase reset hypothesis and demonstrate that it is amenable to testing by purely psychophysical methods. Thus, any theory of multisensory processes that connects specific brain states with patterns of saccadic responses should be able to account for traces of oscillatory activity in observable

  1. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, T J G M; Jansen, J; Wessels, R J

    2017-01-01

    Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of antibiotics almost halved in the years 2009-2015, with a decrease of the use of critically important antibiotics to very low levels. To realize a sustainable decrease in antibiotic usage, the mindset towards the subject was considered crucial. Based on several models from social psychology, the RESET Mindset Model was used. This model contains the most important cues to change human behaviour, being Rules and regulations, Education and information, Social pressure, Economics, and Tools. To change behaviour of groups in order to reach a tipping point, it is of utmost importance to not choose among the different cues, but to use them all. In order to decrease antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands several actions, obliged as well as voluntary, were undertaken. An independent veterinary medicine authority was founded that became active for all animal sectors. In the dairy sector a national database on antibiotic usage called MediRund was developed, which made transparency and benchmarking on antibiotic usage at the national and the herd level possible. Several other activities are described, such as herd health and treatment plans, selective dry cow therapy, and the strong limitation on the use of critically important antibiotics. Antibiotic usage at the herd level, referred to as the 'antibiotic number', became an important and socially accepted herd level parameter. The actions undertaken worked through different cues, all part of the RESET Mindset Model. As such, different types of dairy farmers sensitive to different types of cues were motivated to change their behaviour. Antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands decreased significantly by intense

  2. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51–84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped...... with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who...

  3. Side effects in preventive maintenance therapy with neuroleptics with special emphasis on tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, J; Paraschos, A; Frangos, E

    1981-01-01

    Neuroleptics induce hypersensitivity reactions, and toxic, systemic and extrapyramidal manifestations. The latter mainly include acute dystonic reactions, other early dyskinesias, akathisia, parkinsonism and TD. These drugs have been implicated for DA antagonism exerted by an adenylate cyclase inhibition. Prolonged blockade of DA receptors is considered as the motivation for a counterbalancing mechanism inducing the DA supersensitivity from which TD results. Recent reports suggest cholinergic and GABA ergic insufficiency as secondary participants. The increasing frequency of TD calls for prevention by modifying treatment practices and searching for effective measures to combat the symptoms.

  4. The Foreign Policy of Modern China: from the Utopia of Nonpolar World to Chinese Reset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    К И Аксёнова

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The author touches the strategic problem of building China's foreign policy, which in a multipolar world will soon make the country do its significative choice and find an opportunity of modernization. Successful exit strategy from the financial crisis has played a low-down trick with Beijing - the «donor of capital» image raised fears among the leading powers. So, the future of China's foreign policy will depend largely on its ability to transition to a more dynamic and flexible response to rapidly changing trends - the «reset».

  5. Inspiring students through an authentic polar science expedition: the RESEt Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattadori, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    RESEt (Research and Education Svalbard Experience www.resetsvalbard.it) is an ongoing educational project focusing mainly on polar and climate system topics. It started in 2014 and will end in 2017 with the high school diploma of the 22 students (16 y. o.) making the participant class. This class attend a school (Liceo Filzi, Rovereto, Trento. Italy) with a primary focus on disciplines like philosophy and education, rather then STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). Nevertheless their science curricula include climate topics that are rather challenging to grasp and, at the same time, crucial for their scientific citizenship. Some questions arise: How to foster their interest in geosciences topics? How to engage them in authentic scientific knowledge? How to increase their interest in scientific university courses during their post-secondary career? RESEt project will attempt to answer these questions through the development of integrated activities distributed over the last three years of their high school cycle. The most important moment will be an educational scientific expedition at the Svalbard, an archipelago located in the Arctic. The expedition be entirely organized, planned, and directed by students. In Svalbard, students will visit the main scientific facilities devoted to climate studies including those of Italian CNR (National Research Council) and they will perform some environmental measurement using data-loggers. Students are even involved in the fundraising process to raise more than ten thousand Euros needed to for travel expenses. This work is aimed mainly at presenting some of the preliminary data collected during the RESEt project, including the fundraising aspects. The management of the RESEt project strongly relies on the experience and network gained by the abstract author during the participation to the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program of International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009 as well as the support of Polar

  6. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magteld eZeitler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e. an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal synchrony. The spatiotemporal sequence by which all stimulation sites are stimulated exactly once is called the stimulation site sequence, or briefly sequence. So far, in simulations, pre-clinical and clinical applications CR was applied either with fixed sequences or rapidly varying sequences (RVS. In this computational study we show that appropriate repetition of the sequence with occasional random switching to the next sequence may significantly improve the anti-kindling effect of CR. To this end, a sequence is applied many times before randomly switching to the next sequence. This new method is called SVS CR stimulation, i.e. CR with slowly varying sequences. In a neuronal network with strong short-range excitatory and weak long-range inhibitory dynamic couplings SVS CR stimulation turns out to be superior to CR stimulation with fixed sequences or RVS.

  7. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Magteld; Tass, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal synchrony. The spatiotemporal sequence by which all stimulation sites are stimulated exactly once is called the stimulation site sequence, or briefly sequence. So far, in simulations, pre-clinical and clinical applications CR was applied either with fixed sequences or rapidly varying sequences (RVS). In this computational study we show that appropriate repetition of the sequence with occasional random switching to the next sequence may significantly improve the anti-kindling effect of CR. To this end, a sequence is applied many times before randomly switching to the next sequence. This new method is called SVS CR stimulation, i.e., CR with slowly varying sequences. In a neuronal network with strong short-range excitatory and weak long-range inhibitory dynamic couplings SVS CR stimulation turns out to be superior to CR stimulation with fixed sequences or RVS.

  8. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for biliary dyskinesia in children provides durable symptom relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Proklova, Lyudmila V; Aprahamian, Charles J; Morgan, Traci L; Harmon, Carroll M; Barnhart, Douglas C; Saeed, Shehzad A

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in children with biliary dyskinesia. Reports of children with an abnormal cholecystokinin (CCK)-stimulated HIDA scan between January 2001 and July 2006 who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy were reviewed. Postoperatively, a 23-item Likert scale, symptom questionnaire was administered to parents. Sixty-four children with chronic abdominal pain and no gallstones on ultrasound had an abnormal CCK-HIDA scan. Twenty-three children (median age, 14 years; 16 girls), with mean (SD) ejection fraction of 17% (8), underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and were further analyzed. Preoperatively, these children had right upper quadrant/epigastric pain (78%), nausea (52%), vomiting (43%), and generalized abdominal pain (22%) lasting for a median of 3 months (range, 1 month to 2.5 years). Median postoperative follow-up was 2.7 years. Sixteen (70%) parents completed the questionnaire. Of those who responded, 63% indicated that their children had no abdominal pain, 87% had no vomiting, and 69% had no nausea in the month preceding the questionnaire. Overall, 67% of parents indicated that their children's symptoms were completely relieved after cholecystectomy, whereas 7% indicated that the symptoms were not relieved. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is effective in providing both short-term and long-term improvement of symptoms in children with biliary dyskinesia.

  9. VMAT2 Inhibitors: New Drugs for the Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anne P; Baker, Danial E; Levien, Terri L

    2018-04-01

    To provide a review of tardive dyskinesia (TD) symptoms, etiology, pathophysiology, and treatments. PubMed, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials. gov, and Google Scholar were searched for relevant literature using a combination of the following terms: tardive dyskinesia, treatment, management, guidelines, tetrabenazine, deutetrabenazine, and valbenazine. Sources were limited to human data. Articles were reviewed for relevance to TD therapy. Reference lists were manually searched for other relevant articles. Selected literature was published between 1968 and 2017. This article reviews treatment options available for patients with TD. Many agents have been tried off-label to manage symptoms, with limited evidence of benefit. The Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug to treat TD valbenazine on April 11, 2017. TD is largely iatrogenic. Valbenazine's approval by the Food and Drug Administration was followed by the approval of deutetrabenazine, a drug with similar mechanism of action. Further data from postmarketing studies will be needed to verify that valbenazine's adverse effect profile is different from the profiles of tetrabenazine and deutetrabenazine.

  10. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Becker-Heck, Anita; Castleman, Victoria H.; Al-Mutairi, Dalal; Liu, Yan; Loges, Niki T.; Pathak, Narendra; Austin-Tse, Christina; Sheridan, Eamonn; Schmidts, Miriam; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Häffner, Karsten; Hellman, Nathan; Chodhari, Rahul; Gupta, Amar; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Olale, Felix; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Schier, Alexander F.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Chung, Eddie MK; Reinhardt, Richard; Mitchison, Hannah M.; King, Stephen M.; Omran, Heymut; Drummond, Iain A.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are essential for fertilization, respiratory clearance, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and to establish laterality1. Cilia motility defects cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, MIM 242650), a disorder affecting 1:15-30,000 births. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multisubunit dynein arms that drive cilia bending2. Despite progress in understanding the genetic basis of PCD, mutations remain to be identified for several PCD linked loci3. Here we show that the zebrafish cilia paralysis mutant schmalhanstn222 (smh) mutant encodes the coiled-coil domain containing 103 protein (Ccdc103), a foxj1a regulated gene. Screening 146 unrelated PCD families identified patients in six families with reduced outer dynein arms, carrying mutations in CCDC103. Dynein arm assembly in smh mutant zebrafish was rescued by wild-type but not mutant human CCDC103. Chlamydomonas Ccdc103 functions as a tightly bound, axoneme-associated protein. The results identify Ccdc103 as a novel dynein arm attachment factor that when mutated causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. PMID:22581229

  11. Rapid diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia: cell culture and soft computing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Bush, Andrew; Montemurro, Francesca; Pioggia, Giovanni; Piras, Martina; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Di Cicco, Maria; Chinellato, Iolanda; Cangiotti, Angela M; Boner, Attilio L

    2013-04-01

    Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) sometimes requires repeated nasal brushing to exclude secondary ciliary alterations. Our aim was to evaluate whether the use of a new method of nasal epithelial cell culture can speed PCD diagnosis in doubtful cases and to identify which are the most informative parameters by means of a multilayer artificial neural network (ANN). A cross-sectional study was performed in patients with suspected PCD. All patients underwent nasal brushing for ciliary motion analysis, ultrastructural assessment and evaluation of ciliary function after ciliogenesis in culture by ANN. 151 subjects were studied. A diagnostic suspension cell culture was obtained in 117 nasal brushings. A diagnosis of PCD was made in 36 subjects (29 of whom were children). In nine out of the 36 patients the diagnosis was made only after a second brushing, because of equivocal results of both tests at first examination. In each of these subjects diagnosis of PCD was confirmed by cell culture results. Cell culture in suspension evaluated by means of ANN allows the separation of PCD from secondary ciliary dyskinesia patients after only 5 days of culture and allows diagnosis to be reached in doubtful cases, thus avoiding the necessity of a second sample.

  12. CYP2D6 and catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Osmanova, D.Z.; Tiguntsev, V.V.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.A.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of the dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia, is commonly treated with levodopa (L-DOPA). Use of this drug, however, is severely limited by the development of side effect. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) are

  13. Dissimilar mechanistic background of peripheral and orofacial hyperkinesia in patients with Parkinson’s disease and levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Fedorenko, Olga Yu.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Alifirova, Valentina M.; Zhukova, Natalia G.; Zhukova, Irina A.; Al Hadithy, Asmar F. Y.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Bokhan, Nikolay A.; Wilffert, Bob; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Long-term levodopa treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is frequently complicated by spontaneously occurring involuntary muscle movements called dyskinesia. The exact pathological mechanism of this complication has not yet been elucidated. We have previously demonstrated that in PD

  14. X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia due to mutations in the cytoplasmic axonemal dynein assembly factor PIH1D3.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olcese, C.; Patel, M.P.; Shoemark, A.; Kiviluoto, S.; Legendre, M.; Williams, H.J.; Vaughan, C.K.; Hayward, J.; Goldenberg, A.; Emes, R.D.; Munye, M.M.; Dyer, L.; Cahill, T.; Bevillard, J.; Gehrig, C.; Guipponi, M.; Chantot, S.; Duquesnoy, P.; Thomas, L.; Jeanson, L.; Copin, B.; Tamalet, A.; Thauvin-Robinet, C.; Papon, J.F.; Garin, A.; Pin, I.; Vera, G.; Aurora, P.; Fassad, M.R.; Jenkins, L.; Boustred, C.; Cullup, T.; Dixon, M.; Onoufriadis, A.; Bush, A.; Chung, E.M.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Loebinger, M.R.; Wilson, R.; Armengot, M.; Escudier, E.; Hogg, C.; Amselem, S.; Sun, Z.; Bartoloni, L.; Blouin, J.L.; Mitchison, H.M.; Schmidts, M.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    By moving essential body fluids and molecules, motile cilia and flagella govern respiratory mucociliary clearance, laterality determination and the transport of gametes and cerebrospinal fluid. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder frequently caused by non-assembly of

  15. Coenzyme Q10 does not prevent oral dyskinesias induced by long-term haloperidol treatment of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    OA, Andreassen; Weber, Christine; HA, Jorgensen

    1999-01-01

    dyskinesias in rats, a putative analogue to human TD, could be prevented by the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Rats received 16 weeks of treatment with haloperidol decanoate (HAL) IM alone or together with orally administered CoQ10, and the behavior was recorded during and after treatment. HAL...

  16. Bacteriology and treatment of infections in the upper and lower airways in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is lined with motile cilia that transport respiratory mucus. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a chronic genetic disease caused by mutations in genes responsible for ciliary structure and function. Non-functional airway cilia impair the mucociliary clearance (MCC), causing...

  17. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Fontan Patients With and Without Isomerism (Heterotaxy) as Compared to Patients With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Subjects With Structurally Normal Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Danduran, Michael; Nielsen, Kim G

    2017-01-01

    with and without isomerism. We have now compared these finding with those from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia, as many patients with isomerism have ciliary dyskinesia. We identified patients having the Fontan circulation with and without isomerism who had undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing......, comparing the findings from healthy individuals undergoing exercise, and a comparable number of individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia but no congenital heart disease. We were able to include a total of 68 patients in our study, with 17 in each of the four groups. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing...

  18. Resetting the evolution of marine reptiles at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Philippa M; Ruta, Marcello; Benton, Michael J

    2011-05-17

    Ichthyosaurs were important marine predators in the Early Jurassic, and an abundant and diverse component of Mesozoic marine ecosystems. Despite their ecological importance, however, the Early Jurassic species represent a reduced remnant of their former significance in the Triassic. Ichthyosaurs passed through an evolutionary bottleneck at, or close to, the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, which reduced their diversity to as few as three or four lineages. Diversity bounced back to some extent in the aftermath of the end-Triassic mass extinction, but disparity remained at less than one-tenth of pre-extinction levels, and never recovered. The group remained at low diversity and disparity for its final 100 Myr. The end-Triassic mass extinction had a previously unsuspected profound effect in resetting the evolution of apex marine predators of the Mesozoic.

  19. Long-lasting desynchronization in rat hippocampal slice induced by coordinated reset stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tass, P. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Silchenko, A. N.; Hauptmann, C.; Speckmann, E.-J.

    2009-01-01

    In computational models it has been shown that appropriate stimulation protocols may reshape the connectivity pattern of neural or oscillator networks with synaptic plasticity in a way that the network learns or unlearns strong synchronization. The underlying mechanism is that a network is shifted from one attractor to another, so that long-lasting stimulation effects are caused which persist after the cessation of stimulation. Here we study long-lasting effects of multisite electrical stimulation in a rat hippocampal slice rendered epileptic by magnesium withdrawal. We show that desynchronizing coordinated reset stimulation causes a long-lasting desynchronization between hippocampal neuronal populations together with a widespread decrease in the amplitude of the epileptiform activity. In contrast, periodic stimulation induces a long-lasting increase in both synchronization and amplitude.

  20. Simulation of thermal reset transitions in resistive switching memories including quantum effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villena, M. A.; Jiménez-Molinos, F.; Roldán, J. B. [Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Ciencias, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); González, M. B.; Campabadal, F. [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Suñé, J.; Miranda, E. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra Cerdanyola del Vallès 08193 (Spain); Romera, E. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear and Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-06-07

    An in-depth study of reset processes in RRAMs (Resistive Random Access Memories) based on Ni/HfO{sub 2}/Si-n{sup +} structures has been performed. To do so, we have developed a physically based simulator where both ohmic and tunneling based conduction regimes are considered along with the thermal description of the devices. The devices under study have been successfully fabricated and measured. The experimental data are correctly reproduced with the simulator for devices with a single conductive filament as well as for devices including several conductive filaments. The contribution of each conduction regime has been explained as well as the operation regimes where these ohmic and tunneling conduction processes dominate.

  1. l-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Shinobu; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Lee, Sang-Il; Ochiai, Shotaro; Hitachi, Rina; Shibata, Satomi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Tarumizu, Chie; Matsuoka, Sayuri; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Shigekazu

    2017-12-01

    Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood. Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans. Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 l-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before l-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of l-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean ± SD age 22.2 ± 1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase. Results: l-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts in mice (1.86-fold; P light-dark cycle by 6 h, l-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, l-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means ± SEMs-l-serine: 25.9 ± 6.6 min; placebo: 12.1 ± 7.0 min; P light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Sensitivity of the human circadian pacemaker to nocturnal light: melatonin phase resetting and suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R.; Brown, E.; Czeisler, C.

    2000-01-01

    Ocular exposure to early morning room light can significantly advance the timing of the human circadian pacemaker. The resetting response to such light has a non-linear relationship to illuminance. The dose-response relationship of the human circadian pacemaker to late evening light of dim to moderate intensity has not been well established. Twenty-three healthy young male and female volunteers took part in a 9 day protocol in which a single experimental light exposure6.5 h in duration was given in the early biological night. The effects of the light exposure on the endogenous circadian phase of the melatonin rhythm and the acute effects of the light exposure on plasma melatonin concentration were calculated. We demonstrate that humans are highly responsive to the phase-delaying effects of light during the early biological night and that both the phase resetting response to light and the acute suppressive effects of light on plasma melatonin follow a logistic dose-response curve, as do many circadian responses to light in mammals. Contrary to expectations, we found that half of the maximal phase-delaying response achieved in response to a single episode of evening bright light ( approximately 9000 lux (lx)) can be obtained with just over 1 % of this light (dim room light of approximately 100 lx). The same held true for the acute suppressive effects of light on plasma melatonin concentrations. This indicates that even small changes in ordinary light exposure during the late evening hours can significantly affect both plasma melatonin concentrations and the entrained phase of the human circadian pacemaker.

  3. Learning of temporal motor patterns: An analysis of continuous vs. reset timing

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    Rodrigo eLaje

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to generate well-timed sequences of movements is critical to an array of behaviors, including the ability to play a musical instrument or a video game. Here we address two questions relating to timing with the goal of better understanding the neural mechanisms underlying temporal processing. First, how does accuracy and variance change over the course of learning of complex spatiotemporal patterns? Second, is the timing of sequential responses most consistent with starting and stopping an internal timer at each interval or with continuous timing?To address these questions we used a psychophysical task in which subjects learned to reproduce a sequence of finger taps in the correct order and at the correct times—much like playing a melody at the piano. This task allowed us to calculate the variance of the responses at different time points using data from the same trials. Our results show that while standard Weber’s law is clearly violated, variance does increase as a function of time squared, as expected according to the generalized form of Weber’s law—which separates the source of variance into time-dependent and time-independent components. Over the course of learning, both the time-independent variance and the coefficient of the time-dependent term decrease. Our analyses also suggest that timing of sequential events does not rely on the resetting of an internal timer at each event.We describe and interpret our results in the context of computer simulations that capture some of our psychophysical findings. Specifically, we show that continuous timing, as opposed to reset timing, is expected from population clock models in which timing emerges from the internal dynamics of recurrent neural networks.

  4. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced global propagation of transient phase resetting associated with directional information flow

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    Masahiro eKawasaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG phase synchronization analyses can reveal large-scale communication between distant brain areas. However, it is not possible to identify the directional information flow between distant areas using conventional phase synchronization analyses. In the present study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to the occipital area in subjects who were resting with their eyes closed, and analyzed the spatial propagation of transient TMS-induced phase resetting by using the transfer entropy (TE, to quantify the causal and directional flow of information. The time-frequency EEG analysis indicated that the theta (5 Hz phase locking factor (PLF reached its highest value at the distant area (the motor area in this study, with a time lag that followed the peak of the transient PLF enhancements of the TMS-targeted area at the TMS onset. PPI (phase-preservation index analyses demonstrated significant phase resetting at the TMS-targeted area and distant area. Moreover, the TE from the TMS-targeted area to the distant area increased clearly during the delay that followed TMS onset. Interestingly, the time lags were almost coincident between the PLF and TE results (152 vs. 165 ms, which provides strong evidence that the emergence of the delayed PLF reflects the causal information flow. Such tendencies were observed only in the higher-intensity TMS condition, and not in the lower-intensity or sham TMS conditions. Thus, TMS may manipulate large-scale causal relationships between brain areas in an intensity-dependent manner. We demonstrated that single-pulse TMS modulated global phase dynamics and directional information flow among synchronized brain networks. Therefore, our results suggest that single-pulse TMS can manipulate both incoming and outgoing information in the TMS-targeted area associated with functional changes.

  6. Impact of the duct static pressure reset control strategy on the energy consumption by the HVAC system

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    Walaszczyk Juliusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses different duct static pressure control strategies which could be implemented in variable air volume air-conditioning systems (VAV. Two pressure reset control strategies are compared to the commonly used control solution based on the “Constant static pressure” method. First pressure reset control strategy, known as PID Control, uses signals from VAV boxes controllers to reset duct static pressure in a way that one of the VAV dampers is maintained almost entirely open. Second strategy decreases static pressure setpoint until an adjustable number of pressure requests occur. As a response to the certain amount of requests, static pressure setpoint is increased. This strategy is called Trim & Respond. Both static pressure reset control strategies described in this paper are considered to have more significant potential for energy savings than the “Constant static pressure” method. In order to validate this potential, several simulations for different control strategies were carried out and the obtained results are compared and analysed. The theoretical limit of the energy savings - set of the optimal control actions, was estimated with Nelder-Mead algorithm and also presented in this article. General description of the static pressure control strategies "Constant static pressure", PID Control and Trim & Respond is given.

  7. Aerobic fitness in children and young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Astrid Hellerup; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although aerobic fitness is regarded as an overall prognostic measure of morbidity and mortality, its evaluation in the chronic progressive sinopulmonary disease primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has been infrequently and inconsistently reported. Here we assessed peak oxygen uptake (VO2...... multiple breath inert gas washout (N2 MBW) were assessed in a cross-sectional, single-occasion study of clinically stable children and young adults with PCD. We used a questionnaire including self-reported physical limitations in everyday life or in vigorous activities, and estimation of weekly hours...... patients. CONCLUSION: One-third of PCD patients exhibited substantially lower aerobic fitness than healthy subjects. Aerobic fitness correlated with FEV1, DLCO/VA and self-reported complaints of limitations in vigorous physical activity. These findings are most likely explained by PCD pulmonary disease...

  8. Oromandibular Dyskinesia as the Initial Manifestation of Late-Onset Huntington Disease

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    Dong-Seok Oh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a triad of choreoathetosis, dementia and dominant inheritance. The cause of HD is an expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the HD gene. Typical age at onset of symptoms is in the 40s, but the disorder can manifest at any time. Late-onset (≥ 60 years HD is clinically different from other adult or juvenile onset HD and characterized by mild motor problem as the initial symptoms, shorter disease duration, frequent lack of family history, and relatively low CAG repeats expansion. We report a case of an 80-year-old female with oromandibular dyskinesia as an initial manifestation of HD and 40 CAG repeats.

  9. Mutations in the Gene PRRT2 Cause Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia with Infantile Convulsions

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    Hsien-Yang Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and high penetrance, but the causative genetic mutation is unknown. We have now identified four truncating mutations involving the gene PRRT2 in the vast majority (24/25 of well-characterized families with PKD/IC. PRRT2 truncating mutations were also detected in 28 of 78 additional families. PRRT2 encodes a proline-rich transmembrane protein of unknown function that has been reported to interact with the t-SNARE, SNAP25. PRRT2 localizes to axons but not to dendritic processes in primary neuronal culture, and mutants associated with PKD/IC lead to dramatically reduced PRRT2 levels, leading ultimately to neuronal hyperexcitability that manifests in vivo as PKD/IC.

  10. Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Caused by 16p11.2 Microdeletion

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    Pichet Termsarasab

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Four cases of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD have been reported in individuals with proximal 16p11.2 microdeletions that include PRRT2. Case Report: We describe a fifth patient with PKD, features of Asperger’s syndrome, and mild language delays. Sanger sequencing of the PRRT2 gene did not identify any mutations implicated in PKD. However, microarray‐based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH detected a 533.9‐kb deletion on chromosome 16, encompassing over 20 genes and transcripts. Discussion: This case underscores the importance of aCGH testing for individuals with PKD who do not have PRRT2 mutations, particularly when developmental delays, speech problems, intellectual disability, and/or autism spectrum disorder are present.

  11. Tardive dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GS, Sullivan KL, Zesiewicz TA; American Academy of Neurology. Evidence-based guideline: treatment of tardive syndromes: report ... Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology . 2013;81(5):463-469. PMID: 23897874 ...

  12. Tardive Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library Public Policy Research Find Support Free Support 24/7 Text NAMI to 741741 Find Help Living with ... 6264 Press & Media In A Crisis? Stay Connected facebook twitter Instagram tumblr youtube Discussion Groups Terms of ...

  13. Variations of Aripiprazole-Induced Dyskinesia Existing with Concurrent Use of Amantadine and an Anticholinergic Agent in an Elderly Patient

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    I-Wen Sun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly patients are vulnerable to the adverse neurological effects of antipsychotics, particularly Parkinsonian symptoms and tardive dyskinesia. This vulnerability in the elderly becomes complex and unpredictable when aripiprazole is prescribed to replace other second-generation or first-generation antipsychotics. This report describes a 69-year-old female schizophrenic patient, who received aripiprazole after using a few antipsychotics, including the first- and second-generation ones. The tardive dyskinesia developed 6 weeks after switching to aripiprazole but subsided 4 weeks later when stopping the concurrent amantadine and decreasing the dosage of trihexyphenidyl. However, Parkinsonian symptoms developed insidiously thereafter, which remitted after the dosage of trihexyphenidyl was increased again. The possible mechanisms of the alternated adverse neurological events after a switch to aripiprazole in the chronic elderly psychosis are discussed.

  14. AltitudeOmics: Resetting of cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity following acclimatization to high altitude

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    Jui-Lin eFan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported enhanced cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity upon ascent to high altitude using linear models. However, there is evidence that this response may be sigmoidal in nature. Moreover, it was speculated that these changes at high altitude are mediated by alterations in acid-base buffering. Accordingly, we reanalyzed previously published data to assess middle cerebral blood flow velocity (MCAv responses to modified rebreathing at sea level (SL, upon ascent (ALT1 and following 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16 to 5,260 m in 21 lowlanders. Using sigmoid curve fitting of the MCAv responses to CO2, we found the amplitude (95% vs. 129%, SL vs. ALT1, 95% confidence intervals (CI [77, 112], [111, 145], respectively, P=0.024 and the slope of the sigmoid response (4.5 vs. 7.5 %/mmHg, SL vs. ALT1, 95% CIs [3.1, 5.9], [6.0, 9.0], respectively, P=0.026 to be enhanced at ALT1, which persisted with acclimatization at ALT16 (amplitude: 177%, 95% CI [139, 215], P<0.001; slope: 10.3 %/mmHg, 95% CI [8.2, 12.5], P=0.003 compared to SL. Meanwhile, the sigmoidal response midpoint was unchanged at ALT1 (SL: 36.5 mmHg; ALT1: 35.4 mmHg, 95% CIs [34.0, 39.0], [33.1, 37.7], respectively, P=0.982, while it was reduced by ~7 mmHg at ALT16 (28.6 mmHg, 95% CI [26.4, 30.8], P=0.001 vs. SL, indicating leftward shift of the cerebrovascular CO2 response to a lower arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2 following acclimatization to altitude. Sigmoid fitting revealed a leftward shift in the midpoint of the cerebrovascular response curve which could not be observed with linear fitting. These findings demonstrate that there is resetting of the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity operating point to a lower PaCO2 following acclimatization to high altitude. This cerebrovascular resetting is likely the result of an altered acid-base buffer status resulting from prolonged exposure to the severe hypocapnia associated with ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude.

  15. Weight gain after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease is influenced by dyskinesias' reduction and electrodes' position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrino, Roberta; Baroncini, Damiano; Fichera, Mario; Donofrio, Carmine Antonio; Franzin, Alberto; Mortini, Pietro; Comi, Giancarlo; Volontè, Maria Antonietta

    2017-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disease that can be treated with pharmacological or surgical therapy. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation is a commonly used surgical option. A reported side effect of STN-DBS is weight gain: the aim of our study was to find those factors that determine weight gain, through one year-long observation of 32 patients that underwent surgery in our centre. During the follow-up, we considered: anthropometric features, hormonal levels, motor outcome, neuropsychological and quality of life outcomes, therapeutic parameters and electrodes position. The majority (84%) of our patients gained weight (6.7 kg in 12 months); more than a half of the cohort became overweight. At 12th month, weight gain showed a correlation with dyskinesias reduction, electrodes voltage and distance on the lateral axis. In the multivariate regression analysis, the determinants of weight gain were dyskinesias reduction and electrodes position. In this study, we identified dyskinesias reduction and distance between the active electrodes and the third ventricle as determining factors of weight gain after STN-DBS implantation in PD patients. The first finding could be linked to a decrease in energy consumption, while the second one could be due to a lower stimulation of the lateral hypothalamic area, known for its important role in metabolism and body weight control. Weight gain is a common finding after STN-DBS implantation, and it should be carefully monitored given the potential harmful consequences of overweight.

  16. Successful Fitting of a Complete Maxillary Denture in a Patient with Severe Alzheimer’s Disease Complicated by Oral Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Morita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing population of elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common form of dementia. In dentistry, a critical problem associated with these patients is the use of a new denture, as AD patients often refuse dental management and are disturbed by minor changes in their oral environment. Some AD patients have further complications associated with oral dyskinesia, a movement disorder that can make dental management difficult, including the stability of a complete denture. In this case, we successfully fitted a complete maxillary denture using modified bilateral balanced occlusion after multiple tooth extractions under intravenous sedation in a 66-year-old woman with severe AD complicated by oral dyskinesia. Following treatment, her appetite and food intake greatly improved. Providing a well-fitting complete denture applied by modified bilateral balanced occlusion, which removes lateral interference using zero-degree artificial teeth for movement disorder of the jaw in patients with severe AD complicated by oral dyskinesia, helps improve oral function.

  17. High amplitude phase resetting in rev-erbalpha/per1 double mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Jud

    Full Text Available Over time, organisms developed various strategies to adapt to their environment. Circadian clocks are thought to have evolved to adjust to the predictable rhythms of the light-dark cycle caused by the rotation of the Earth around its own axis. The rhythms these clocks generate persist even in the absence of environmental cues with a period of about 24 hours. To tick in time, they continuously synchronize themselves to the prevailing photoperiod by appropriate phase shifts. In this study, we disrupted two molecular components of the mammalian circadian oscillator, Rev-Erbalpha and Period1 (Per1. We found that mice lacking these genes displayed robust circadian rhythms with significantly shorter periods under constant darkness conditions. Strikingly, they showed high amplitude resetting in response to a brief light pulse at the end of their subjective night phase, which is rare in mammals. Surprisingly, Cry1, a clock component not inducible by light in mammals, became slightly inducible in these mice. Taken together, Rev-Erbalpha and Per1 may be part of a mechanism preventing drastic phase shifts in mammals.

  18. Quantum reversibility is relative, or does a quantum measurement reset initial conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2018-07-13

    I compare the role of the information in classical and quantum dynamics by examining the relation between information flows in measurements and the ability of observers to reverse evolutions. I show that in the Newtonian dynamics reversibility is unaffected by the observer's retention of the information about the measurement outcome. By contrast-even though quantum dynamics is unitary, hence, reversible-reversing quantum evolution that led to a measurement becomes, in principle, impossible for an observer who keeps the record of its outcome. Thus, quantum irreversibility can result from the information gain rather than just its loss-rather than just an increase of the (von Neumann) entropy. Recording of the outcome of the measurement resets, in effect, initial conditions within the observer's (branch of) the Universe. Nevertheless, I also show that the observer's friend-an agent who knows what measurement was successfully carried out and can confirm that the observer knows the outcome but resists his curiosity and does not find out the result-can, in principle, undo the measurement. This relativity of quantum reversibility sheds new light on the origin of the arrow of time and elucidates the role of information in classical and quantum physics. Quantum discord appears as a natural measure of the extent to which dissemination of information about the outcome affects the ability to reverse the measurement.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Foundations of quantum mechanics and their impact on contemporary society'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  19. Resetting translational homeostasis restores myelination in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Maurizio; Musner, Nicolò; Scapin, Cristina; Ungaro, Daniela; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ron, David; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2013-04-08

    P0 glycoprotein is an abundant product of terminal differentiation in myelinating Schwann cells. The mutant P0S63del causes Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B neuropathy in humans, and a very similar demyelinating neuropathy in transgenic mice. P0S63del is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of Schwann cells, where it promotes unfolded protein stress and elicits an unfolded protein response (UPR) associated with translational attenuation. Ablation of Chop, a UPR mediator, from S63del mice completely rescues their motor deficit and reduces active demyelination by half. Here, we show that Gadd34 is a detrimental effector of CHOP that reactivates translation too aggressively in myelinating Schwann cells. Genetic or pharmacological limitation of Gadd34 function moderates translational reactivation, improves myelination in S63del nerves, and reduces accumulation of P0S63del in the ER. Resetting translational homeostasis may provide a therapeutic strategy in tissues impaired by misfolded proteins that are synthesized during terminal differentiation.

  20. Transgenerational inheritance or resetting of stress-induced epigenetic modifications: two sides of the same coin.

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    Penny J Tricker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transgenerational inheritance of stress-induced epigenetic modifications is still controversial. Despite several examples of defence ‘priming’ and induced genetic rearrangements, the involvement and persistence of transgenerational epigenetic modifications is not known to be general. Here I argue that non-transmission of epigenetic marks through meiosis may be regarded as an epigenetic modification in itself, and that we should understand the implications for plant evolution in the context of both selection for and selection against transgenerational epigenetic memory. Recent data suggest that both epigenetic inheritance and resetting are mechanistically directed and targeted. Stress-induced epigenetic modifications may buffer against DNA sequence-based evolution to maintain plasticity, or may form part of plasticity’s adaptive potential. To date we have tended to concentrate on the question of whether and for how long epigenetic memory persists. I argue that we should now re-direct our question to investigate the differences between where it persists and where it does not, to understand the higher order evolutionary methods in play and their contribution.

  1. Transgenerational inheritance or resetting of stress-induced epigenetic modifications: two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricker, Penny J

    2015-01-01

    The transgenerational inheritance of stress-induced epigenetic modifications is still controversial. Despite several examples of defense "priming" and induced genetic rearrangements, the involvement and persistence of transgenerational epigenetic modifications is not known to be general. Here I argue that non-transmission of epigenetic marks through meiosis may be regarded as an epigenetic modification in itself, and that we should understand the implications for plant evolution in the context of both selection for and selection against transgenerational epigenetic memory. Recent data suggest that both epigenetic inheritance and resetting are mechanistically directed and targeted. Stress-induced epigenetic modifications may buffer against DNA sequence-based evolution to maintain plasticity, or may form part of plasticity's adaptive potential. To date we have tended to concentrate on the question of whether and for how long epigenetic memory persists. I argue that we should now re-direct our question to investigate the differences between where it persists and where it does not, to understand the higher order evolutionary methods in play and their contribution.

  2. Qualitative models and experimental investigation of chaotic NOR gates and set/reset flip-flops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aminur; Jordan, Ian; Blackmore, Denis

    2018-01-01

    It has been observed through experiments and SPICE simulations that logical circuits based upon Chua's circuit exhibit complex dynamical behaviour. This behaviour can be used to design analogues of more complex logic families and some properties can be exploited for electronics applications. Some of these circuits have been modelled as systems of ordinary differential equations. However, as the number of components in newer circuits increases so does the complexity. This renders continuous dynamical systems models impractical and necessitates new modelling techniques. In recent years, some discrete dynamical models have been developed using various simplifying assumptions. To create a robust modelling framework for chaotic logical circuits, we developed both deterministic and stochastic discrete dynamical models, which exploit the natural recurrence behaviour, for two chaotic NOR gates and a chaotic set/reset flip-flop. This work presents a complete applied mathematical investigation of logical circuits. Experiments on our own designs of the above circuits are modelled and the models are rigorously analysed and simulated showing surprisingly close qualitative agreement with the experiments. Furthermore, the models are designed to accommodate dynamics of similarly designed circuits. This will allow researchers to develop ever more complex chaotic logical circuits with a simple modelling framework.

  3. Coordinated reset stimulation in a large-scale model of the STN-GPe circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eEbert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization of populations of neurons is a hallmark of several brain diseases. Coordinated reset (CR stimulation is a model-based stimulation technique which specifically counteracts abnormal synchrony by desynchronization. Electrical CR stimulation, e.g. for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD, is administered via depth electrodes. In order to get a deeper understanding of this technique, we extended the top-down approach of previous studies and constructed a large-scale computational model of the respective brain areas. Furthermore, we took into account the spatial anatomical properties of the simulated brain structures and incor- porated a detailed numerical representation of 2·104 simulated neurons. We simulated the subthalamic nucleus (STN and the globus pallidus externus (GPe. Connections within the STN were governed by spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP. In this way, we modeled the physiological and pathological activity of the considered brain structures. In particular, we investigated how plasticity could be exploited and how the model could be shifted from strongly synchronized (pathological activity to strongly desynchronized (healthy activity of the neuronal populations via CR stimulation of the STN neurons. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of specific stimulation parameters especially the electrode position on the stimulation outcome. Our model provides a step forward towards a biophysically realistic model of the brain areas relevant to the emergence of pathological neuronal activity in PD. Furthermore, our model constitutes a test bench for the optimization of both stimulation parameters and novel electrode geometries for efficient CR stimulation.

  4. Reverse Engineering the Inflammatory "Clock": From Computational Modeling to Rational Resetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodovotz, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Properly-regulated inflammation is central to homeostasis. Traumatic injury, hemorrhagic shock, septic shock, and other injury-related processes such as wound healing are associated with dysregulated inflammation. Like many biological processes, inflammation is a dynamic, complex system whose function, like that of an analog clock, cannot be discerned simply from a laundry list of its parts (data). The advent of multiplexed platforms for gathering biological data, while providing an unprecedented level of detailed information about the inflammatory response, has paradoxically also proven to be overwhelming. This problem is especially acute when the datasets involve time courses, since typical statistical analyses and data-driven modeling are geared towards single time points. Various groups have addressed this problem using dynamic approaches to data-driven and mechanistic computational modeling. These modeling tools can be thought of as the "gears" and "hands" of the "clock," and have led to insights regarding principal drivers, dynamic networks, feedbacks, and regulatory switches that characterize and perhaps regulate the inflammatory response. In parallel, mechanistic computational models have given an abstracted sense of how the inflammatory "clock" works, leading to in silico models of critically ill individuals and populations. Integrating data-driven and mechanistic modeling may point the way to a rational "resetting" of inflammation via model-driven precision medicine.

  5. Selective Interareal Synchronization through Gamma Frequency Differences and Slower-Rhythm Gamma Phase Reset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwick, Thomas; Bouras, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    The communication-through-coherence (CTC) hypothesis states that a sending group of neurons will have a particularly strong effect on a receiving group if both groups oscillate in a phase-locked ("coherent") manner (Fries, 2005 , 2015 ). Here, we consider a situation with two visual stimuli, one in the focus of attention and the other distracting, resulting in two sites of excitation at an early cortical area that project to a common site in a next area. Taking a modeler's perspective, we confirm the workings of a mechanism that was proposed by Bosman et al. ( 2012 ) in the context of providing experimental evidence for the CTC hypothesis: a slightly higher gamma frequency of the attended sending site compared to the distracting site may cause selective interareal synchronization with the receiving site if combined with a slow-rhythm gamma phase reset. We also demonstrate the relevance of a slightly lower intrinsic frequency of the receiving site for this scenario. Moreover, we discuss conditions for a transition from bottom-up to top-down driven phase locking.

  6. The influence of levodopa-induced dyskinesias on manual tracking in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Sarah; Ghassemi, Mehrdad; Jog, Mandar; Edwards, Roderick; Duval, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The influence of peak-dose, levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) on manual tracking (MT) was examined in 10 dyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease (DPD), and compared to 10 age/gender-matched non-dyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease (NDPD) and 10 healthy controls. Whole-body movement (WBM) and MT performance were recorded simultaneously with a 6-degrees-of-freedom magnetic motion tracker and forearm rotation sensors, respectively. Subjects were asked to match the length of a computer-generated line with a line they controlled via wrist rotation. Results show that DPD patients had greater WBM magnitude at rest and during the motor task, both in displacement and in velocity. All groups displayed some increase in WBM displacement from rest to MT, but only the DPD group had a significant increase in WBM velocity during movement. As for MT performance (determined by assessing the positional mismatch between subjects' and target lines), ERROR in displacement was statistically similar between groups. There was no correlation between ERROR and the magnitude of WBM within the DPD group. The DPD group showed significant increased ERROR when the velocity of the subject's line was compared with that of the velocity of the target line. When two distinct target pace segments were examined (FAST/SLOW), no significant differences were found in ERROR for displacement for either group, but both the NDPD and DPD group showed increased ERROR from SLOW to FAST for velocity. This was accompanied with an increase in WBM velocity only in the DPD group. The lack of increased ERROR during the SLOW tracking portion in the DPD group supports the notion that the dyskinesias themselves were not primarily responsible for the ERROR seen in the patients. When examining the positive or negative values of ERROR (i.e., faster or slower than the target), we found that the increased ERROR in velocity observed in the DPD group was the result of excess velocity rather than bradykinesia

  7. A case of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia which exhibited the phenotype of anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunii Y

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yasuto Kunii,1,2 Nozomu Matsuda,3 Hirooki Yabe1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Aizu Medical Center, School of Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan; 3Department of Neurology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan Background: Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a rare heritable neurologic disorder characterized by attacks of involuntary movement induced by sudden voluntary movements. No previous reports have described cases showing comorbidity with psychiatric disease or symptoms. In this case, we showed a patient with PKD who exhibited several manifestations of anxiety disorder.Case: A 35-year-old Japanese man with PKD had been maintained on carbamazepine since he was 16 years of age without any attacks. However, 10 years before this referral, he became aware of a feeling of breakdown in his overall physical functions. He had then avoided becoming familiar with people out of concern that his physical dysfunctions might be perceived in a negative light. One day he was referred by the neurologic department at our hospital to the Department of Psychiatry because of severe anxiety and hyperventilation triggered by carbamazepine. We treated with escitalopram, aripiprazole, and ethyl loflazepate. Both his subjective physical condition and objective expressions subsequently showed gradual improvement. At last, the feelings of chest compression and anxiety entirely disappeared. Accordingly, increases in plasma monoamine metabolite levels were observed, and the c.649dupC mutation, which has been found in most Japanese PKD families, was detected in his proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 gene.Conclusion: This is the first report to describe psychiatric comorbidities or symptoms in a PKD case. The efficacy of psychotropic medication used in this case, the resulting changes in plasma monoamine metabolite

  8. Depression, anxiety, and quality of life in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wo-Tu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Li; Shen, Jun-Yi; Liang, Gui-Ling; Zhu, Chen-Xi; Tang, Wei-Guo; Chen, Sheng-Di; Song, Yan-Yan; Cao, Li

    2017-09-05

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is a rare movement disorder characterized by recurrent dystonic or choreoathetoid attacks triggered by sudden voluntary movements. Under the condition of psychological burden, some patients' attacks may get worsened with longer duration and higher frequency. This study aimed to assess nonmotor symptoms and quality of life of patients with PKD in a large population. We performed a cross-sectional survey in 165 primary PKD patients from August 2008 to October 2016 in Rui Jin Hospital, using Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), World Health Organization Quality of Life-100 (WHOQoL-100), Self-Rating Depression Scale, and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. We evaluated the differences of SCL-90-R and WHOQOL-100 scores in patients and Chinese normative data (taken from literature) by using the unpaired Student's t-test. We applied multivariate linear regression to analyze the relationships between motor manifestations, mental health, and quality of life among PKD patients. Compared with Chinese normative data taken from literature, patients with PKD exhibited significantly higher (worse) scores across all SCL-90-R subscales (somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism; P= 0.000 for all) and significantly lower (worse) scores of five domains in WHOQoL-100 (physical domain, psychological domain, independence domain, social relationship domain, and general quality of life; P= 0.000 for all). Nonremission of dyskinesia episodes (P = 0.011) and higher depression score (P = 0.000) were significantly associated with lower levels of quality of life. The rates of depression and anxiety in patients with PKD were 41.2% (68/165) and 26.7% (44/165), respectively. Depression, anxiety, and low levels of quality of life were prevalent in patients with PKD. Co-occurrence of depression and anxiety was common among these patients. Regular mental health

  9. Detection efficiency characteristics of free-running InGaAs/InP single photon detector using passive quenching active reset IC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Fu; Wang Chao; Sun Zhi-Bin; Zhai Guang-Jie

    2016-01-01

    InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (APD) are rarely used in a free-running regime for near-infrared single photon detection. In order to overcome the detrimental afterpulsing, we demonstrate a passive quenching active reset integrated circuit. Taking advantage of the inherent fast passive quenching process and active reset to reduce reset time, the integrated circuit is useful for reducing afterpulses and is also area-efficient. We investigate the free-running single photon detector’s afterpulsing effect, de-trapping time, dark count rate, and photon detection efficiency, and also compare with gated regime operation. After correction for deadtime and afterpulse, we find that the passive quenching active reset free-running single photon detector’s performance is consistent with gated operation. (paper)

  10. Defense Logistics: Army and Marine Corps Cannot Be Assured That Equipment Reset Strategies Will Sustain Equipment Availability While Meeting Ongoing Operational Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solis, William M; Schmitt, David A; Brown, Renee; Cristinzio, Frank; Hartig, Luke; Helt, Brent; Rogers, Donna M; Song, Yong; Storts, Maria

    2007-01-01

    .... Because of the potential for equipment reset costs to affect the Department of Defense's (DoD) future budget requirements and related readiness concerns, GAO initiated this review under the Comptroller General's authority...

  11. Compliance-Free, Digital SET and Analog RESET Synaptic Characteristics of Sub-Tantalum Oxide Based Neuromorphic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Yawar; Jeon, Yu-Rim; Sokolov, Andrey Sergeevich; Kim, Sohyeon; Ku, Boncheol; Choi, Changhwan

    2018-01-19

    A two terminal semiconducting device like a memristor is indispensable to emulate the function of synapse in the working memory. The analog switching characteristics of memristor play a vital role in the emulation of biological synapses. The application of consecutive voltage sweeps or pulses (action potentials) changes the conductivity of the memristor which is considered as the fundamental cause of the synaptic plasticity. In this study, a neuromorphic device using an in-situ growth of sub-tantalum oxide switching layer is fabricated, which exhibits the digital SET and analog RESET switching with an electroforming process without any compliance current (compliance free). The process of electroforming and SET is observed at the positive sweeps of +2.4 V and +0.86 V, respectively, while multilevel RESET is observed with the consecutive negative sweeps in the range of 0 V to -1.2 V. The movement of oxygen vacancies and gradual change in the anatomy of the filament is attributed to digital SET and analog RESET switching characteristics. For the Ti/Ta 2 O 3-x /Pt neuromorphic device, the Ti top and Pt bottom electrodes are considered as counterparts of the pre-synaptic input terminal and a post-synaptic output terminal, respectively.

  12. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia: potential options for resource-limited countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisreen Rumman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetic disease of ciliary function leading to chronic upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms. The diagnosis is frequently overlooked because the symptoms are nonspecific and the knowledge about the disease in the primary care setting is poor. Additionally, none of the available tests is accurate enough to be used in isolation. These tests are expensive, and need sophisticated equipment and expertise to analyse and interpret results; diagnosis is therefore only available at highly specialised centres. The diagnosis is particularly challenging in countries with limited resources due to the lack of such costly equipment and expertise. In this review, we discuss the importance of early and accurate diagnosis especially for countries where the disease is clinically prevalent but diagnostic tests are lacking. We review the diagnostic tests available in specialised centres (nasal nitric oxide, high-speed video microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and genetics. We then consider modifications that might be considered in less well-resourced countries whilst maintaining acceptable accuracy.

  13. Primary ciliary dyskinesia-causing mutations in Amish and Mennonite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas W; Puffenberger, Erik G; Lie, Hauw; Helms, Cynthia; Strauss, Kevin A; Bowcock, Anne; Carson, John L; Hazucha, Milan; Morton, D Holmes; Patel, Anand C; Leigh, Margaret W; Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) from unrelated Amish and Mennonite families harbor a single and unique founder mutation. Subjects from Amish and Mennonite communities in several states were enrolled in the study. All subjects were clinically characterized, and nasal nitric oxide levels were measured. Nasal epithelial scrapings were collected from several subjects for ciliary ultrastructural analyses. DNA was isolated from patients with PCD and their unaffected first- and second-degree relatives. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping, linkage analyses, targeted mutation analyses, and exome sequencing were performed. All subjects from Old-Order Amish communities from Pennsylvania were homozygous for a nonsense mutant DNAH5 allele, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X). Two affected siblings from an unrelated Mennonite family in Arkansas were homozygous for the same nonsense DNAH5 mutation. Children with PCD from an Amish family from Wisconsin had biallelic DNAH5 mutations, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X) and c.10815delT (p.P3606HfsX23), and mutations in other genes associated with PCD were also identified in this community. The Amish and Mennonite subjects from geographically dispersed and socially isolated communities had the same founder DNAH5 mutation, owing to the common heritage of these populations. However, disease-causing mutations in other PCD-associated genes were also found in affected individuals in these communities, illustrating the genetic heterogeneity in this consanguineous population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduced anaerobic and aerobic performance in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Senem; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Cakmak, Aslihan; Emiralioglu, Nagehan; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Ozcelik, Hayriye Ugur; Sonbahar-Ulu, Hazal; Bozdemir-Ozel, Cemile; Kiper, Nural; Arikan, Hulya

    2018-05-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) restricts lifestyle and increases morbidity. The aim of the study was to investigate anaerobic and aerobic performance in children with PCD and their healthy counterparts. Thirty-one children with PCD and 29 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Pulmonary function, hand grip strength (HGS), quadriceps strength (QMS), physical activity, anaerobic capacity (muscle power sprint test), and aerobic performance (modified shuttle walk test (MSWT)) were determined. Pulmonary function, HGS, QMS, mean anaerobic power (MAP), and MSWT distance in PCD were significantly lower than those of healthy subjects (p aerobic performance is impaired in PCD from the early stages. Age determines anaerobic performance. Gender is the determinant of aerobic performance. Whether skeletal muscle characteristics and sex-related changes in body composition affect anaerobic and aerobic capacity in PCD children warrants further study. What is Known: • Exercise performance is determined by anaerobic and aerobic power. • Few studies have shown that PCD patients have lower aerobic performance which is associated with impaired lung function. What is New: • The present research indicated that both anaerobic and aerobic exercise capacity determined using field testing is impaired in PCD from the early stages. • Anaerobic capacity was found to be independently associated with age in PCD. Higher aerobic performance is independently associated with male gender.

  15. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: a report from ATS 2001, May 18–23, San Francisco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noone Peadar G

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a genetic disorder of abnormal ciliary structure and function that leads to defective mucociliary clearance, resulting in oto-sino-pulmonary disease, and infertility. The disease is currently under intense investigation by a number of research groups worldwide. At the recent American Thoracic Society meeting in San Francisco in May 2001, two sessions focused on PCD; a symposium session on May 21 with several featured expert speakers was followed by a mini-symposium on Tuesday May 22, with one featured speaker and presentation of nine abstracts covering a range of research topics. Mattias Salathe (University of Miami, USA and Stephen Brody (Washington University, St Louis, USA chaired the symposium session. Presentations focused on the clinical spectrum of PCD, the genetics of PCD, a proteomics approach to detail the structure of cilia, the role of cilia in the embryology of situs laterality, and airway epithelial cell biology. The mini-symposium was chaired by Peadar Noone (University of North Carolina, USA and Malcolm King (University of Alberta, USA and included presentations on the use of PCD as a human disease model, accurate definition of the phenotype using clinical and cell biologic markers, and molecular studies. The latter reports ranged from isolation of a protein involved in ciliary structure and function to genetic studies using linkage analysis and the candidate gene approach. Clinicians and scientists alike displayed considerable interest at both sessions, and there were several lively question–answer sessions.

  16. Apparent X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia associated with retinitis pigmentosa and a hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, Maciej R; Dmeńska, Hanna; Witt, Michał

    2004-01-01

    Three brothers, one 10-year-old and a pair of 14-year-old dizygotic twins--expressed the classical, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with typical ophthalmoscopic findings, night blindness, visual field constricted to 10 degrees and flat ERG response. All three brothers were also diagnosed with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and had recurrent respiratory infections, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis. In all of them, resection of the middle lobe of the right lung was performed. A similar clinical picture of coexisting RP and PCD was noted in the brother of the probands' mother. All probands displayed situs solitus. Consistent with the X-linked mode of RP inheritance, there were also three obligatory female carriers of the disorder in this family: the mother of the affected boys, her mother and a daughter of her brother. In all of them, retinitis pigmentosa "sine pigmento" was found with milder but clinically significant symptoms (mild night blindness, visual field constricted to 30 degrees, and scotopic and photopic ERG responses reduced to 30-60%). No extraocular symptoms were detected in any of the heterozygous female carriers. This family presents an example of two rare phenomena: X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa (with milder expression in females) and a rare combination of RP with recurrent respiratory infections due to PCD.

  17. Lingual dyskinesia and tics: a novel presentation of copper-metabolism disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goez, Helly R; Jacob, Francois D; Yager, Jerome Y

    2011-02-01

    Copper is a trace element that is required for cellular respiration, neurotransmitter biosynthesis, pigment formation, antioxidant defense, peptide amidation, and formation of connective tissue. Abnormalities of copper metabolism have been linked with neurologic disorders that affect movement, such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease; however, the diagnosis of non-Wilson, non-Menkes-type copper-metabolism disorders has been more elusive, especially in cases with atypical characteristics. We present here the case of an adolescent with a novel presentation of copper-metabolism disorder who exhibited acute severe hemilingual dyskinesia and prominent tics, with ballismus of the upper limbs, but had normal brain and spinal MRI results and did not show any signs of dysarthria or dysphagia. His serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were low, but his urinary copper level was elevated after penicillamine challenge. We conclude that copper-metabolism disorders should be included in the differential diagnosis for movement disorders, even in cases with highly unusual presentations, because many of them are treatable. Moreover, a connection between copper-metabolism disorders and tics is presented, to our knowledge, for the first time in humans; further investigation is needed to better establish this connection and understand its underlying pathophysiology.

  18. Prevalence of extrapyramidal syndromes in psychiatric inpatients and the relationship of clozapine treatment to tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestin, J; Stephan, P L; Erni, T; Umari, T

    2000-05-05

    In 200 inpatients on regular neuroleptics, point prevalence of extrapyramidal syndromes, including Parkinson syndrome, akathisia and tardive dyskinesia (TD), was studied and found to be 20, 11 and 22%, respectively. A total of 46 patients have currently, and for a longer time, (average about 3years, median over 1year) been treated with clozapine, and 127 with typical neuroleptics (NLs). Comparing both groups, higher TD scores were found in the clozapine sample. Investigating the influence of a set of seven clinical variables on the TD score with the help of multiple regression analysis, the influence of the treatment modality disappeared, whereas the age proved to be the only significant variable. Studying the role of past clozapine therapy in patients currently on typical NLs and comparing 10 matched pairs of chronic patients with and without TD in whom a complete life-time cumulative dose of NLs was identified, a relationship between TD and length of current typical NL therapy and life-time typical NL dosage could be demonstrated. On the whole, long-term relatively extensive use of clozapine has not markedly reduced the prevalence of extrapyramidal syndromes in our psychiatric inpatient population. In particular, we failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of clozapine on prevalence of TD. There are certainly patients who suffer from TD in spite of a long-term intensive clozapine treatment.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors associated with tardive dyskinesia among Indian patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achalia, Rashmin M; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Desai, Geetha; Rao, Girish N; Prakash, Om

    2014-06-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is one of the most distressing side effects of antipsychotic treatment. As prevalence studies of TD in Asian population are scarce, a cross-sectional study was performed to assess the frequency of TD in Indian patients with schizophrenia and risk factors of TD. Cross-sectional study of 160 Indian patients fulfilling the DSM-IV TR criteria for schizophrenia and who received antipsychotics for at least one year, were examined with two validated scales for TD. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between TD and clinical risk factors. The frequency of probable TD in the total sample was 26.4%. The logistic regression yielded significant odds ratios between TD and age, intermittent treatment, and total cumulative antipsychotic dose. The difference of TD between SGA and FGA disappeared after adjusting for important co-variables in regression analysis. Indian patients with schizophrenia and long-term antipsychotic treatment have a high risk of TD, and TD is associated with older age, intermittent antipsychotic treatment, and a high total cumulative antipsychotic dose. Our study findings suggest that there is no significant difference between SGAs with regards to the risk of causing TD as compared to FGAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves′ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves′ disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  1. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Nadeem, Ambreen; Yousuf, Muhammad Saad; Kachhvi, Zakerabibi M

    2013-10-01

    Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves' disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  2. Exclusion of NFAT5 from mitotic chromatin resets its nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution in interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Estrada-Gelonch

    signals acting in interphase, resets the cytoplasmic localization of NFAT5 and prevents its nuclear accumulation and association with DNA in the absence of hypertonic stress.

  3. Anti-kindling induced by two-stage coordinated reset stimulation with weak onset intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magteld eZeitler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal neuronal synchrony plays an important role in a number of brain diseases. To specifically counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization, Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation, a spatiotemporally patterned stimulation technique, was designed with computational means. In neuronal networks with spike timing–dependent plasticity CR stimulation causes a decrease of synaptic weights and finally anti-kindling, i.e. unlearning of abnormally strong synaptic connectivity and abnormal neuronal synchrony. Long-lasting desynchronizing aftereffects of CR stimulation have been verified in pre-clinical and clinical proof of concept studies. In general, for different neuromodulation approaches, both invasive and non-invasive, it is desirable to enable effective stimulation at reduced stimulation intensities, thereby avoiding side effects. For the first time, we here present a two-stage CR stimulation protocol, where two qualitatively different types of CR stimulation are delivered one after another, and the first stage comes at a particularly weak stimulation intensity. Numerical simulations show that a two-stage CR stimulation can induce the same degree of anti-kindling as a single-stage CR stimulation with intermediate stimulation intensity. This stimulation approach might be clinically beneficial in patients suffering from brain diseases characterized by abnormal neuronal synchrony where a first treatment stage should be performed at particularly weak stimulation intensities in order to avoid side effects. This might, e.g., be relevant in the context of acoustic CR stimulation in tinnitus patients with hyperacusis or in the case of electrical deep brain CR stimulation with sub-optimally positioned leads or side effects caused by stimulation of the target itself. We discuss how to apply our method in first in man and proof of concept studies.

  4. Practice Parameter: treatment of Parkinson disease with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, R; Factor, S A; Lyons, K E; Ondo, W G; Gronseth, G; Bronte-Stewart, H; Hallett, M; Miyasaki, J; Stevens, J; Weiner, W J

    2006-04-11

    To make evidence-based treatment recommendations for the medical and surgical treatment of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) with levodopa-induced motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. To that end, five questions were addressed. 1. Which medications reduce off time? 2. What is the relative efficacy of medications in reducing off time? 3. Which medications reduce dyskinesia? 4. Does deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus interna (GPi), or ventral intermediate (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus reduce off time, dyskinesia, and antiparkinsonian medication usage and improve motor function? 5. Which factors predict improvement after DBS? A 10-member committee including movement disorder specialists and general neurologists evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases from 1965 through June 2004. 1. Entacapone and rasagiline should be offered to reduce off time (Level A). Pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, and tolcapone should be considered to reduce off time (Level B). Apomorphine, cabergoline, and selegiline may be considered to reduce off time (Level C). 2. The available evidence does not establish superiority of one medicine over another in reducing off time (Level B). Sustained release carbidopa/levodopa and bromocriptine may be disregarded to reduce off time (Level C). 3. Amantadine may be considered to reduce dyskinesia (Level C). 4. Deep brain stimulation of the STN may be considered to improve motor function and reduce off time, dyskinesia, and medication usage (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the efficacy of DBS of the GPi or VIM nucleus of the thalamus in reducing off time, dyskinesia, or medication usage, or to improve motor function. 5. Preoperative response to levodopa predicts better outcome after DBS of the STN (Level B).

  5. Efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libov, Igor; Miodownik, Chanoch; Bersudsky, Yuly; Dwolatzky, Tzvi; Lerner, Vladimir

    2007-07-01

    Piracetam is a potent antioxidant, a cerebral neuroprotector, a neuronal metabolic enhancer, and a brain integrative agent. More than 20 years ago, an intravenous preparation of piracetam demonstrated an improvement in the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. The aim of our study was to reexamine the efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia using an oral preparation. The study was conducted at the Be'er Sheva Mental Health Center from May 2003 to December 2004 and involved a 9-week, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial assessing 40 DSM-IV schizophrenic and schizo-affective patients with DSM-IV-TR tardive dyskinesia. All study subjects received their usual antipsychotic treatment. Initially, subjects were randomly assigned to receive 4 weeks of treatment with either piracetam (4800 mg/day) or placebo. Thereafter, following a washout period of 1 week, they entered the crossover phase of the study for a further 4 weeks. The change in score of the Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale from baseline to the study endpoint was the primary outcome measure. The mean decrease in score from baseline to endpoint in the clinical global impression subscale in patients treated with piracetam was 1.1 points compared to 0.1 points in the placebo group (p = .004). The mean decrease in the tardive parkinsonism subscale was 8.7 points in patients treated with piracetam and 0.6 points in those on placebo (p = .001). The mean decrease in the tardive dyskinesia subscale was 3.0 points in the piracetam group in contrast to deterioration of condition in the placebo group by -0.2 points (p = .003). Piracetam appears to be effective in reducing symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. The specific mechanism by which piracetam may attenuate symptoms of tardive dyskinesia needs to be further evaluated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00190008.

  6. Discinesias induzidas por levodopa em 176 pacientes com doença de Parkinson Levodopa-induced dyskinesias in 176 parkisonian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sheila G. Rocha

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de discinesias dificulta consideravelmente o manuseio terapêutico dos pacientes parkinsonianos tratados com levodopa. Estudamos as características clínicas das discinesias em 176 pacientes com diagnóstico de doença de Parkinson e tratados com levodopa. As discinesias ocorreram, em média, após 6,2 anos de duração da doença e após 4,2 anos de tratamento com levodopa. A maioria dos pacientes (90% achava-se nos estágios II e III de Hoehn & Yahr por ocasião do início das discinesias. As discinesias mais frequentes foram as de "pico de dose" e "contínua". Movimento do tipo distônico ocorreu em 40% dos casos e predominou nas discinesias de "fim de dose" e "bifásica". Distonia matinal correspondeu a 35% dos casos de distonia. Movimentos coreiformes se manifestaram de forma generalizada em 43,2% dos casos. Movimentos distônicos predominaram nos membros inferiores. A discinesia, quando unilateral, ocorreu mais frequüentemente no hemicorpo mais comprometido pela doença de Parkinson. A discinesia orofacial, quando isolada, foi mais frequente nos pacientes mais idosos.Dyskinesias are frequently observed in parkinsonian patients during levodopa treatment. The occurrence of these movement disorders usually makes the therapeutic management of the patients very difficult. The clinical characteristics of 176 patients with dyskinesias were retrospectively studied. Dyskinesias occurred, on average, after 6,2 years of duration of Parkinson's disease and after 4.2 years on treatment with levodopa. Patients were more likely to have dyskinesias during more advanced stages (measured by Hoehn and Yahr scale. Peak of dose and square wave were the types of dyskinesia more frequently described and were associated with choreic movements in most cases. Dystonia occurred in 40% of the cases and was predominant in end of dose and diphasic dyskinesias. Thirty-five percent of dystonia cases presented as "early morning dystonia". Chorea was the

  7. Evaluation of pulmonary disease using static lung volumes in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Bush, Andrew; Pioggia, Giovanni; Caramella, Davide; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Di Cicco, Maria; Zangani, Marta; Chinellato, Iolanda; Maggi, Fabrizio; Tezza, Giovanna; Macchia, Pierantonio; Boner, Attilio

    2012-11-01

    In primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) lung damage is usually evaluated by high-resolution CT (HRCT). To evaluate whether HRCT abnormalities and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection were better predicted by spirometry or plethysmography. A cross-sectional study performed in consecutive patients with PCD who underwent sputum culture, spirometry, plethysmography and HRCT within 48 h. Principal component analysis and soft computing were used for data evaluation. Fifty patients (26 children) were studied. P aeruginosa infection was found in 40% of the patients and bronchiectasis in 88%. There was a correlation between infection with P aeruginosa and extent of bronchiectasis (p=0.009; r =0.367) and air-trapping (p=0.03; r =0.315). Moreover, there was an association between infection with P aeruginosa and residual volume (RV) values >150% (p=0.04) and RV/total lung capacity (TLC) ratio >140% (p=0.001), but not between infection with P aeruginosa and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))<80%, or forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEF(25-75%))<70% or FEV(1)/FVC<70% (<80% in children). Severity of the total lung impairment on chest HRCT directly correlated with RV when expressed as per cent predicted (p=0.003; r =0.423), and RV/TLC (p<0.001; r =0.513) or when expressed as z scores (p=0.002, r =0.451 and p<0.001, r =0.536 respectively). Principal component analysis on plethysmographic but not on spirometry data allowed recognition of different severities of focal air trapping, atelectasis and extent of bronchiectasis. Plethysmography better predicts HRCT abnormalities than spirometry. Whether it might be a useful test to define populations of patients with PCD who should or should not have HRCT scans requires further longitudinal studies.

  8. No evidence of cholesteatoma in untreated otitis media with effusion in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedia, Reshma; Ahmed, Jahangir; Navaratnam, Annakan; Harcourt, Jonny

    2018-02-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) describes a group of inherited disorders that result in abnormal ciliary motion leading to mucous stasis. Clinical features include almost universally otitis media with effusion (OME), particularly in infants. PCD patients provide us with a cohort of patients with OME that is not treated with ventilatory tube (VT) insertion as these have been shown to result in frequent complications including chronic otorrhoea, early extrusion and persistent perforation without significant improvement to hearing in the long term. This cohort was used to investigate whether children with PCD and OME not treated with VT were predisposed to cholesteatoma formation in the setting of a paediatric quaternary referral centre. A retrospective chart review was performed of all the children attending a multi-disciplinary PCD clinic at a national quaternary referral centre with a diagnosis of OME. We reviewed otoscopic findings, and audiometry and tympanometry results. We assessed the children in four groups: Watchful waiting, hearing aids, VT, and VT and hearing aids. One-hundred-and-one of 107 patients included in the study had a diagnosis of otitis media with effusion. No child with OME and PCD was diagnosed with a cholesteatoma during the follow up period. The only children who had insertion of a ventilatory tube were those who had the procedure prior to the formal diagnosis of PCD. We found a significant complication rate in the children with VT insertion. Hearing improved over time. The prevalence of retraction pockets in untreated OME was 1.72% (3 out of 174 ears). In children with PCD, OME is an almost universal finding in younger children, but not in adolescents. The study supports the current preference to avoid VT insertion in children with PCD as it confers a significantly higher rate of complications. No cases of cholesteatoma were found in this cohort of PCD children with OME managed without VTs. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B

  9. Striatal cholinergic interneurons and D2 receptor-expressing GABAergic medium spiny neurons regulate tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordia, Tanuja; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A; Quik, Maryka

    2016-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a drug-induced movement disorder that arises with antipsychotics. These drugs are the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and are also prescribed for major depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity, obsessive compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is thus a need for therapies to reduce TD. The present studies and our previous work show that nicotine administration decreases haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rodent TD models, suggesting a role for the nicotinic cholinergic system. Extensive studies also show that D2 dopamine receptors are critical to TD. However, the precise involvement of striatal cholinergic interneurons and D2 medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in TD is uncertain. To elucidate their role, we used optogenetics with a focus on the striatum because of its close links to TD. Optical stimulation of striatal cholinergic interneurons using cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT)-Cre mice expressing channelrhodopsin2-eYFP decreased haloperidol-induced VCMs (~50%), with no effect in control-eYFP mice. Activation of striatal D2 MSNs using Adora2a-Cre mice expressing channelrhodopsin2-eYFP also diminished antipsychotic-induced VCMs, with no change in control-eYFP mice. In both ChAT-Cre and Adora2a-Cre mice, stimulation or mecamylamine alone similarly decreased VCMs with no further decline with combined treatment, suggesting nAChRs are involved. Striatal D2 MSN activation in haloperidol-treated Adora2a-Cre mice increased c-Fos + D2 MSNs and decreased c-Fos + non-D2 MSNs, suggesting a role for c-Fos. These studies provide the first evidence that optogenetic stimulation of striatal cholinergic interneurons and GABAergic MSNs modulates VCMs, and thus possibly TD. Moreover, they suggest nicotinic receptor drugs may reduce antipsychotic-induced TD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebellum in levodopa-induced dyskinesias: the unusual suspect in the motor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha eKishore

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms that generate levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID during chronic levodopa therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD are not yet fully established. The most widely accepted theories incriminate the non-physiological synthesis, release and reuptake of dopamine generated by exogenously administered levodopa in the striatum, and the aberrant plasticity in the corticostriatal loops. However, normal motor performance requires the correct recruitment of motor maps. This depends on a high level of synergy within the primary motor cortex (M1 as well as between M1 and other cortical and subcortical areas, for which dopamine is necessary. The plastic mechanisms within M1 which are crucial for the maintenance of this synergy are disrupted both during OFF and dyskinetic states in PD. When tested without levodopa, dyskinetic patients show loss of treatment benefits on long-term potentiation and long-term depression-like plasticity of the intracortical circuits. When tested with the regular pulsatile levodopa doses, they show further impairment of the M1 plasticity, such as inability to depotentiate an already facilitated synapse and paradoxical facilitation in response to afferent input aimed at synaptic inhibition. Dyskinetic patients have also severe impairment of the associative, sensorimotor plasticity of M1 attributed to deficient cerebellar modulation of sensory afferents to M1. Here we review the anatomical and functional studies, including the recently described bidirectional connections between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia that support a key role of the cerebellum in the generation of LID. This model stipulates that aberrant neuronal synchrony in PD with LID may propagate from the sub thalamic nucleus to the cerebellum and lock the cerebellar cortex in a hyperactive state. This could affect critical cerebellar functions such as the dynamic and discrete modulation of M1 plasticity and the matching of motor commands with sensory

  11. National dental waitlists: what would it take to reset to zero?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudko, Yevgeni; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2016-06-01

    been the subject of debate at the government level and, over the years, has seen an increase in allocation of public funds in an effort to address the policy needs. What does this paper add? This study calculates the actual number of people on the public dental waitlist, provides a detailed analysis of the distribution of the demand for the services and offers a cost model for resetting public dental waitlists across Australia. What are the implications for practitioners? This study carries no implications for individual practitioners at the clinical level. However, at the state and national levels, this model offers direction to a more cost-effective allocation of public funds and human resources.

  12. Validation of a Mobile Device for Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation Tinnitus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Christian; Wegener, Alexander; Poppe, Hendrik; Williams, Mark; Popelka, Gerald; Tass, Peter A

    2016-10-01

    Sound-based tinnitus intervention stimuli include broad-band noise signals with subjectively adjusted bandwidths used as maskers delivered by commercial devices or hearing aids, environmental sounds broadly described and delivered by both consumer devices and hearing aids, music recordings specifically modified and delivered in a variety of different ways, and other stimuli. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation therapy for tinnitus reduction has unique and more stringent requirements compared to all other sound-based tinnitus interventions. These include precise characterization of tinnitus pitch and loudness, and effective provision of patient-controlled daily therapy signals at defined frequencies, levels, and durations outside of the clinic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an approach to accommodate these requirements including evaluation of a mobile device, validation of an automated tinnitus pitch-matching algorithm and assessment of a patient's ability to control stimuli and collect repeated outcome measures. The experimental design involved direct laboratory measurements of the sound delivery capabilities of a mobile device, comparison of an automated, adaptive pitch-matching method to a traditional manual method and measures of a patient's ability to understand and manipulate a mobile device graphic user interface to both deliver the therapy signals and collect the outcome measures. This study consisted of 5 samples of a common mobile device for the laboratory measures and a total of 30 adult participants: 15 randomly selected normal-hearing participants with simulated tinnitus for validation of a tinnitus pitch-matching algorithm and 15 sequentially selected patients already undergoing tinnitus therapy for evaluation of patient usability. No tinnitus intervention(s) were specifically studied as a component of this study. Data collection involved laboratory measures of mobile devices, comparison of manual and automated adaptive tinnitus

  13. Resetting the Abnormal Circadian Cortisol Rhythm in Adrenal Incidentaloma Patients With Mild Autonomous Cortisol Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Miguel; Harrison, Robert F; Chadarevian, Rita; Gueroult, Carole; Abitbol, Jean-Louis; Newell-Price, John

    2017-09-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas (AIs) are found commonly on axial imaging. Around 30% exhibit autonomous cortisol secretion (ACS) associated with increased cardiovascular events and death. We hypothesized that AI/ACS patients have an abnormal cortisol rhythm that could be reversed by use of carefully timed short-acting cortisol synthesis blockade, with improvement in cardiovascular disease markers. In a phase 1/2a, prospective study (Eudract no. 2012-002586-35), we recruited six patients with AI/ACS and two control groups of six sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched individuals: (1) patients with AI and no ACS (AI/NoACS) and (2) healthy volunteers with no AI [healthy controls (HC)]. Twenty-four-hour circadian cortisol analysis was performed to determine any differences between groups and timing of intervention for cortisol lowering using the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone. Circadian profiles of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assessed. Serum cortisol levels in group AI/ACS were significantly higher than both group AI/NoACS and group HC from 6 pm to 10 pm [area under the curve (AUC) difference: 0.81 nmol/L/h; P = 0.01] and from 10 pm to 2 am (AUC difference: 0.86 nmol/L/h; P cortisol rhythms were reassessed. Postintervention evening serum cortisol was lowered, similar to controls [6 pm to 10 pm (AUC difference: -0.06 nmol/L/h; P = 0.85); 10 pm to 2 am (AUC difference: 0.10 nmol/L/h; P = 0.76)]. Salivary cortisone showed analogous changes. IL-6 levels were elevated before treatment [10 pm to 2 pm (AUC difference: 0.42 pg/mL/h; P = 0.01)] and normalized post treatment. In AI/ACS, the evening and nocturnal cortisol exposure is increased. Use of timed evening doses of metyrapone resets the cortisol rhythm to normal. This unique treatment paradigm is associated with a reduction in the cardiovascular risk marker IL-6. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  14. Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia Is Related to Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neuron Excitotoxicity: A Hypothesis Based on an Unexpected Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A serendipitous pharmacogenetic finding links the vulnerability to developing levodopa-induced dyskinesia to the age of onset of Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease is caused by a polyglutamate expansion of the protein huntingtin. Aberrant huntingtin is less capable of binding to a member of membrane-associated guanylate kinase family (MAGUKs: postsynaptic density- (PSD- 95. This leaves more PSD-95 available to stabilize NR2B subunit carrying NMDA receptors in the synaptic membrane. This results in increased excitotoxicity for which particularly striatal medium spiny neurons from the indirect extrapyramidal pathway are sensitive. In Parkinson’s disease the sensitivity for excitotoxicity is related to increased oxidative stress due to genetically determined abnormal metabolism of dopamine or related products. This probably also increases the sensitivity of medium spiny neurons for exogenous levodopa. Particularly the combination of increased oxidative stress due to aberrant dopamine metabolism, increased vulnerability to NMDA induced excitotoxicity, and the particular sensitivity of indirect pathway medium spiny neurons for this excitotoxicity may explain the observed increased prevalence of levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

  15. Focal status epilepticus and progressive dyskinesia: A novel phenotype for glycine receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, D W S; Thomas, T; Lim, M; Ling, S; Woodhall, M; Vincent, A

    2017-03-01

    Antibody-associated disorders of the central nervous system are increasingly recognised in adults and children. Some are known to be paraneoplastic, whereas in others an infective trigger is postulated. They include disorders associated with antibodies to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), voltage-gated potassium channel-complexes (VGKC-complex), GABA B receptor or glycine receptor (GlyR). With antibodies to NMDAR or VGKC-complexes, distinct clinical patterns are well characterised, but as more antibodies are discovered, the spectra of associated disorders are evolving. GlyR antibodies have been detected in patients with progressive encephalopathy with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), or stiff man syndrome, both rare but disabling conditions. We report a case of a young child with focal seizures and progressive dyskinesia in whom GlyR antibodies were detected. Anticonvulsants and immunotherapy were effective in treating both the seizures and movement disorder with good neurological outcome and with a decline in the patient's serum GlyR-Ab titres. Glycine receptor antibodies are associated with focal status epilepticus and seizures, encephalopathy and progressive dyskinesia and should be evaluated in autoimmune encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A thorough investigation of the progressive reset dynamics in HfO{sub 2}-based resistive switching structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzi, P., E-mail: lorenzi@die.uniroma1.it; Rao, R.; Irrera, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Università di Roma “Sapienza,” 00184 Rome (Italy); Suñé, J.; Miranda, E. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2015-09-14

    According to previous reports, filamentary electron transport in resistive switching HfO{sub 2}-based metal-insulator-metal structures can be modeled using a diode-like conduction mechanism with a series resistance. Taking the appropriate limits, the model allows simulating the high (HRS) and low (LRS) resistance states of the devices in terms of exponential and linear current-voltage relationships, respectively. In this letter, we show that this simple equivalent circuit approach can be extended to represent the progressive reset transition between the LRS and HRS if a generalized logistic growth model for the pre-exponential diode current factor is considered. In this regard, it is demonstrated here that a Verhulst logistic model does not provide accurate results. The reset dynamics is interpreted as the sequential deactivation of multiple conduction channels spanning the dielectric film. Fitting results for the current-voltage characteristics indicate that the voltage sweep rate only affects the deactivation rate of the filaments without altering the main features of the switching dynamics.

  17. Argon-plasma-controlled optical reset in the SiO2/Cu filamentary resistive memory stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, T.; Yew, K. S.; Zhou, Y.; Ang, D. S.; Zhang, H. Z.; Kyuno, K.

    2018-05-01

    We show that resistive switching in the SiO2/Cu stack can be modified by a brief exposure of the oxide to an Ar plasma. The set voltage of the SiO2/Cu stack is reduced by 33%, while the breakdown voltage of the SiO2/Si stack (control) is almost unchanged. Besides, the Ar plasma treatment suppresses the negative photoconductivity or optical resistance reset effect, where the electrically formed filamentary conductive path consisting of Cu-ion and oxygen-vacancy clusters is disrupted by the recombination of the oxygen vacancies with nearby light-excited oxygen ions. From the enhanced O-H peak in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of the plasma-treated oxide, it is proposed that the Ar plasma has created more oxygen vacancies in the surface region of the oxide. These vacancies in turn adsorb water molecules, which act as counter anions (OH-) promoting the migration of Cu cations into the oxide and forming a more complete Cu filament that is less responsive to light. The finding points to the prospect of a control over the optical resistance reset effect by a simple surface treatment step.

  18. Characterization and modeling of SET/RESET cycling induced read-disturb failure time degradation in a resistive switching memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Po-Cheng; Hsu, Chun-Chi; Du, Sin-I.; Wang, Tahui

    2017-12-01

    Read operation induced disturbance in SET-state in a tungsten oxide resistive switching memory is investigated. We observe that the reduction of oxygen vacancy density during read-disturb follows power-law dependence on cumulative read-disturb time. Our study shows that the SET-state read-disturb immunity progressively degrades by orders of magnitude as SET/RESET cycle number increases. To explore the cause of the read-disturb degradation, we perform a constant voltage stress to emulate high-field stress effects in SET/RESET cycling. We find that the read-disturb failure time degradation is attributed to high-field stress-generated oxide traps. Since the stress-generated traps may substitute for some of oxygen vacancies in forming conductive percolation paths in a switching dielectric, a stressed cell has a reduced oxygen vacancy density in SET-state, which in turn results in a shorter read-disturb failure time. We develop an analytical read-disturb degradation model including both cycling induced oxide trap creation and read-disturb induced oxygen vacancy reduction. Our model can well reproduce the measured read-disturb failure time degradation in a cycled cell without using fitting parameters.

  19. A thorough investigation of the progressive reset dynamics in HfO2-based resistive switching structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzi, P.; Rao, R.; Irrera, F.; Suñé, J.; Miranda, E.

    2015-01-01

    According to previous reports, filamentary electron transport in resistive switching HfO 2 -based metal-insulator-metal structures can be modeled using a diode-like conduction mechanism with a series resistance. Taking the appropriate limits, the model allows simulating the high (HRS) and low (LRS) resistance states of the devices in terms of exponential and linear current-voltage relationships, respectively. In this letter, we show that this simple equivalent circuit approach can be extended to represent the progressive reset transition between the LRS and HRS if a generalized logistic growth model for the pre-exponential diode current factor is considered. In this regard, it is demonstrated here that a Verhulst logistic model does not provide accurate results. The reset dynamics is interpreted as the sequential deactivation of multiple conduction channels spanning the dielectric film. Fitting results for the current-voltage characteristics indicate that the voltage sweep rate only affects the deactivation rate of the filaments without altering the main features of the switching dynamics

  20. Mutations in ZMYND10, a gene essential for proper axonemal assembly of inner and outer dynein arms in humans and flies, cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Daniel J; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy characterized by airway disease, infertility, and laterality defects, often caused by dual loss of the inner dynein arms (IDAs) and outer dynein arms (ODAs), which power cilia and flagella beating. Using whole-exome and candidate-gene Sanger resequ...

  1. Polymorphisms of DRD2, DRD3, DRD4 and HTR2C genes in levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Freidin, M.B.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.; Al Hadithy, A.F.Y.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) are involuntary muscle movements that occur as a consequence of chronic levodopa (L-DOPA) treatment. LID are a substantial barrier to effective symptomatic management of Parkinson's disease (PD), up to 45% of L-DOPA users develop LID within 5 years [1]. Clinical

  2. Lung structure and function similarities between primary ciliary dyskinesia and mild cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Marco; Montella, Silvia; Mollica, Carmine; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Iacotucci, Paola; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Tosco, Antonella; Cervasio, Mariarosaria; Raia, Valeria; Santamaria, Francesca

    2017-04-12

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) are increasingly compared. There are no chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) comparative studies of PCD and CF. We assessed clinical, functional, microbiological and MRI findings in PCD and mild CF patients in order to evaluate different expression of lung disease. Twenty PCD (15.1 years) and 20 CF subjects with mild respiratory impairment (16 years, 70% with pancreatic insufficiency) underwent MRI, spirometry, and sputum cultures when clinically stable. MRI was scored using the modified Helbich system. PCD was diagnosed later than CF (9.9 versus 0.6 years, p = 0.03), despite earlier symptoms (0.1 versus 0.6 years, p = 0.02). In the year preceding the study, patients from both groups underwent two systemic antibiotic courses (p = 0.48). MRI total scores were 11.6 ± 0.7 and 9.1 ± 1 in PCD and CF, respectively. FEV 1 and FVC Z-scores were -1.75 (range, -4.6-0.7) and -0.6 (-3.9-1.8) in PCD, and -0.9 (range, -5.4-2.3) and -0.3 (-3.4-2.5) in CF, respectively. No difference was found between lung function or structure, despite a higher MRI subscore of collapse/consolidation in PCD versus CF (1.6 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.2, p < 0.001). These findings were confirmed after data-control for diagnostic delay. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were more frequent in CF than in PCD (p = 0.05 and p = 0.003, respectively). MRI is a valuable radiation-free tool for comparative PCD and CF lung disease assessment. Patients with PCD may exhibit similar MRI and lung function changes as CF subjects with mild pulmonary disease. Delay in PCD diagnosis is unlikely the only determinant of similarities.

  3. Agmatine attenuates reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in mice: Role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and glutamate NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Andréia S; Matheus, Filipe C; Moretti, Morgana; Sampaio, Tuane B; Poli, Anicleto; Santos, Danúbia B; Colle, Dirleise; Cunha, Mauricio P; Blum-Silva, Carlos H; Sandjo, Louis P; Reginatto, Flávio H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-10-01

    Dyskinesia consists in a series of trunk, limbs and orofacial involuntary movements that can be observed following long-term pharmacological treatment in some psychotic and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Agmatine is an endogenous arginine metabolite that emerges as neuromodulator and a promising agent to manage diverse central nervous system disorders by modulating nitric oxide (NO) pathway, glutamate NMDA receptors and oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the effects of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different agmatine doses (10, 30 or 100mg/kg) against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine (1mg/kg,s.c.) in mice by measuring the vacuous chewing movements and tongue protusion frequencies, and the duration of facial twitching. The results showed an orofacial antidyskinetic effect of agmatine (30mg/kg, i.p.) or the combined administration of sub-effective doses of agmatine (10mg/kg, i.p.) with the NMDA receptor antagonists amantadine (1mg/kg, i.p.) and MK801 (0.01mg/kg, i.p.) or the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 0.1mg/kg, i.p.). Reserpine-treated mice displayed locomotor activity deficits in the open field and agmatine had no effect on this response. Reserpine increased nitrite and nitrate levels in cerebral cortex, but agmatine did not reverse it. Remarkably, agmatine reversed the decrease of dopamine and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels caused by reserpine in the striatum. However, no changes were observed in striatal immunocontent of proteins related to the dopaminergic system including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, pDARPP-32[Thr75], dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. These results indicate that the blockade of NO pathway, NMDAR and oxidative stress are possible mechanisms associated with the protective effects of agmatine against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine in mice

  4. Resetting of Quartz OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) Signals by Frictional Heating in Experimentally Sheared Gouges at Seismic Slip Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. H.; Choi, J. H.; Chauhan, N.; Lee, S.; Hirose, T.; Ree, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies on natural and experimental seismic faults have revealed that frictional heating plays an important role in earthquake dynamics as well as in producing mineralogical and microstructural signatures of seismic faulting. Here, we report changes in OSL signals in quartz by frictional heating in experimental fault gouges. The gouges (80% of quartz and 20% of bentonite by weight) with a thickness of 1 mm were sheared between sandstone cylinders (diameter: 25 mm) at a normal stress of 1 MPa and slip rate of 1.31 m/s. The quartz grains from a sand dune on the western coast of South Korea were sieved to select size fractions between 90 and 250 μm. The equivalent dose (De) of the undeformed quartz grains was 8.0 ± 0.3 Gy. Upon displacement, the friction abruptly increases to the 1st peak (with friction coefficient μ ≈ 0.75) followed by slip weakening. Then the fault zones show two more peak frictions (μ ≈ 0.53~0.75) and finally reach a steady-state friction (μ ≈ 0.2~0.35). The fault can be divided into three zones based grain size (thus slip rate); slip localization (SLZ), intermediate slip-rate (ISZ) and low slip-rate (LSZ) zones. SLZ develops adjacent to the moving side of the sandstone cylinder with P-foliation and shear band. The size of quartz (Dq) in ISZ and LSZ is 5-30 μm and 50-250 μm, respectively. SEM and TEM analyses indicate that the fault gouge of SLZ consists of subangular quartz clasts (Dq ≈ 3 μm) and matrix of nano-scale quartz, unidentified silicate minerals and amorphous material. The fault zones were sectioned into six layers (~160 µm thick for each layer) parallel to the fault zone boundary for OSL analyses. Quartz grains from all the layers except the one immediately adjacent to the stationary side of the sandstone cylinder show De of 'effectively' 0 Gy indicating a full resetting of OSL signals. The partial resetting of OSL signal in the layer adjacent to the stationary side of the cylinder indicates the temperature (T

  5. Distinction between added-energy and phase-resetting mechanisms in non-invasively detected somatosensory evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, T; Scheer, H-J; Burghoff, M; Waterstraat, G; Nikulin, V V; Curio, G

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasively recorded averaged event-related potentials (ERP) represent a convenient opportunity to investigate human brain perceptive and cognitive processes. Nevertheless, generative ERP mechanisms are still debated. Two previous approaches have been contested in the past: the added-energy model in which the response raises independently from the ongoing background activity, and the phase-reset model, based on stimulus-driven synchronization of oscillatory ongoing activity. Many criteria for the distinction of these two models have been proposed, but there is no definitive methodology to disentangle them, owing also to the limited information at the single trial level. Here, we propose a new approach combining low-noise EEG technology and multivariate decomposition techniques. We present theoretical analyses based on simulated data and identify in high-frequency somatosensory evoked responses an optimal target for the distinction between the two mechanisms.

  6. Hybrid Z-Source DC-DC Converter with ZVZCS and Power Transformer Resetting: Design, Modeling, and Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Torkaman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel two transistors forward topology employing a z-source to achieve ZVZCS and power transformer resetting for various applications. Comparing with the forward converter, this topology has the advantage of displaying ZCS condition with an added Z-Source and no additional switches when the switches turn on, and that ZVS condition happens when the switches turn off. Duty cycle of the topology can exceed 50 percent. As a result, these converters are suitable for applications with high efficiency. In this paper, structure and properties of the topology will be discussed in details. Then the design principles will be presented. Finally, the benefits aforementioned will be approved in practice through a simple forward converter.

  7. Exhaled breath analysis using electronic nose in cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia patients with chronic pulmonary infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Odin; Paff, Tamara; Haarman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    The current diagnostic work-up and monitoring of pulmonary infections may be perceived as invasive, is time consuming and expensive. In this explorative study, we investigated whether or not a non-invasive exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose would discriminate between cystic fibrosis...... (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) with or without various well characterized chronic pulmonary infections. We recruited 64 patients with CF and 21 with PCD based on known chronic infection status. 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. An electronic nose was employed to analyze exhaled......, this method significantly discriminates CF patients suffering from a chronic pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA) infection from CF patients without a chronic pulmonary infection. Further studies are needed for verification and to investigate the role of electronic nose technology in the very early diagnostic workup...

  8. [Application of a mathematical algorithm for the detection of electroneuromyographic results in the pathogenesis study of facial dyskinesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, N P; Iudel'son, Ia B; Golubev, V L; Abramenkova, I V

    2003-01-01

    To carry out a differential diagnosis of two facial dyskinesia (FD) models--facial hemispasm (FH) and facial paraspasm (FP), a combined program of electroneuromyographic (ENMG) examination has been created, using statistical analyses, including that for objects identification based on hybrid neural network with the application of adaptive fuzzy logic method and standard statistics programs (Wilcoxon, Student statistics). In FH, a lesion of peripheral facial neuromotor apparatus with augmentation of functions of inter-neurons in segmental and upper segmental stem levels predominated. In FP, primary afferent strengthening in mimic muscles was accompanied by increased motor neurons activity and reciprocal augmentation of inter-neurons, inhibiting motor portion of V pair. Mathematical algorithm for ENMG results recognition worked out in the study provides a precise differentiation of two FD models and opens possibilities for differential diagnosis of other facial motor disorders.

  9. Co-treatment with imipramine averted haloperidol-instigated tardive dyskinesia: Association with serotonin in brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Noreen; Yasmin, Farzana; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2016-11-01

    Outcome of imipramine (IMI) treatment was scrutinized on progression of haloperidol instigated tardive dyskinesia (TD). 0.2 mg/kg/rat dosage of haloperidol provided orally to rats for 2 weeks enhanced vacuous chewing movements that escalated when the process proceeded for 5 weeks. Following 2 weeks co-injection 5 mg/kg dosage of IMI was diminished haloperidol-instigated VCMs and fully averted following five weeks. The potency of 8-OH-DPAT-instigated locomotor activity exhibited higher in saline+haloperidol treated rats while not observed in IMI+ haloperidol treated rats. 8-OH-DPAT-instigated low 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) metabolism was higher in saline+ haloperidol treated rats when compare to IMI+ haloperidol treated rats in both regions of brain (striatum and midbrain). It is recommended that IMI possibly competent in averting TD, in cases receiving treatment to antipsychotics.

  10. Clinical value of measurement of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance in the work up of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Mathias; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate and define the general clinical applicability and impact of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance (PRMC) on the work up of patients suspected of having primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In addition, we wanted to evaluate the accuracy of the reference values...... primarily to results from nasal ciliary function testing, to electron microscopic (EM) examination of the ultrastructure of the cilia, and to the final clinical diagnosis. RESULTS: Of the 239 patients, 27 ended up with a final clinical diagnosis of definitive PCD. No patients with a PRMC test...... of the entire lung. Its greatest strength is its ability to reject a suspected PCD diagnosis with great certainty. In our material, this accounted for 2/3 of referred patients. In addition, the test has a high rate of conclusive results. According to our analyses, reference equations on children would benefit...

  11. Warfighter Support: Army Has Taken Steps to Improve Reset Process, but More Complete Reporting of Equipment and Future Cost Is Needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    asphalt spreaders ), other semi-trucks and trailers, palletized loading systems, and heavy equipment transports. As table 3 shows, the actual reset...Copies of GAO Reports and Testimony Order by Phone Connect with GAO To Report Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Federal Programs Congressional Relations Public Affairs Please Print on Recycled Paper.

  12. Controlled-release levodopa methyl ester/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles ameliorate levodopa-induced dyskinesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xinxin Yang1*, Ruiyuan Zheng2*, Yunpeng Cai2, Meiling Liao2, Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital (affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*Xinxin Yang and Ruiyuan Zheng contributed equally to this workBackground: Levodopa remains the most effective drug in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term administration of levodopa induces motor complications, such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. The mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia are not fully understood.Methods: In this study, we prepared levodopa methyl ester (LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles, which can release LDME and benserazide in a sustained manner. Dyskinesia was induced in rats by repeated administration of levodopa then treated with LDME plus benserazide or the same dose of LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles. Apomorphine-induced rotations and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs were measured on treatment days 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20. In addition, the levels of phosphorylated dopamine- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, and ΔfosB were determined by Western blot. Tau levels were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Dynorphin levels in the striatum and cortex of rats were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Over the course of levodopa treatment, the rats developed abnormal AIMs, classified as locomotive, axial, orolingual, and forelimb dyskinesia. The degree of reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations was comparable in dyskinetic rats treated with LDME plus benserazide or LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles. The axial, limb, and orolingual (ALO AIMs of dyskinetic rats treated with LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles were 14 ± 2.5, 9 ± 2.0, and 10 ± 2.1 on treatment days 10, 15, and 20

  13. Protective effect of Curcumin, the active principle of turmeric (Curcuma longa) in haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia and associated behavioural, biochemical and neurochemical changes in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2008-02-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor disorder of the orofacial region resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment. A high incidence and irreversibility of this hyperkinetic disorder has been considered a major clinical issue in the treatment of schizophrenia. The molecular mechanism related to the pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia is not completely known. Various animal studies have demonstrated an enhanced oxidative stress and increased glutamatergic transmission as well as inhibition in the glutamate uptake after the chronic administration of haloperidol. The present study investigated the effect of curcumin, an antioxidant, in haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia by using different behavioural (orofacial dyskinetic movements, stereotypy, locomotor activity, % retention), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, antioxidant enzyme levels (SOD and catalase) and neurochemical (neurotransmitter levels) parameters. Chronic administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p. for 21 days) significantly increased vacuous chewing movements (VCM's), tongue protrusions, facial jerking in rats which was dose-dependently inhibited by curcumin. Chronic administration of haloperidol also resulted in increased dopamine receptor sensitivity as evident by increased locomotor activity and stereotypy and also decreased % retention time on elevated plus maze paradigm. Pretreatment with curcumin reversed these behavioral changes. Besides, haloperidol also induced oxidative damage in all major regions of brain which was attenuated by curcumin, especially in the subcortical region containing striatum. On chronic administration of haloperidol, there was a decrease in turnover of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine in both cortical and subcortical regions which was again dose-dependently reversed by treatment with curcumin. The findings of the present study suggested for the involvement of free radicals in the development of neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia and

  14. MSBIS: A Multi-Step Biomedical Informatics Screening Approach for Identifying Medications that Mitigate the Risks of Metoclopramide-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Xu; Alexandrea G. Ham; Rickey D. Tivis; Matthew L. Caylor; Aoxiang Tao; Steve T. Flynn; Peter J. Economen; Hung K. Dang; Royal W. Johnson; Vaughn L. Culbertson

    2017-01-01

    In 2009 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a black box warning on metoclopramide (MCP) due to the increased risks and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD). In this study, we developed a multi-step biomedical informatics screening (MSBIS) approach leveraging publicly available bioactivity and drug safety data to identify concomitant drugs that mitigate the risks of MCP-induced TD. MSBIS includes (1) TargetSearch (http://dxulab.org/software) bioinformatics scoring for drug anti...

  15. Management of gallbladder dyskinesia: patient outcomes following positive 99mtechnetium (Tc)-labelled hepatic iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) scintigraphy with cholecystokinin (CCK) provocation and laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, R.V.; Pathak, S.; Cockbain, A.J.; Lodge, J.P.; Smith, A.M.; Chowdhury, F.U.; Toogood, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with typical biliary pain, normal ultrasonic findings, and a positive 99m technetium (Tc)-labelled hepatic iminodiacetic acid analogue (HIDA) scintigraphy with cholecystokinin (CCK) provocation indicating gallbladder dyskinesia, as per Rome III criteria, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Methods and materials: Consecutive patients undergoing LC for gallbladder dyskinesia were identified retrospectively. They were followed up by telephone interview and review of the electronic case records to assess symptom resolution. Results: One hundred consecutive patients (median age 44; 80% female) with abnormal gallbladder ejection fraction (GB-EF <35%) were followed up for a median of 12 months (range 2–80 months). Following LC, 84% reported symptomatic improvement and 52% had no residual pain. Twelve percent had persisting preoperative-type pain of either unchanged or worsening severity. Neither pathological features of chronic cholecystitis (87% of 92 incidences when histology available) nor reproduction of pain on CCK injection were significantly predictive of symptom outcome or pain relief post-LC. Conclusion: In one of the largest outcome series of gallbladder dyskinesia patients in the UK with a positive provocation HIDA scintigraphy examination and LC, the present study shows that the test is a useful functional diagnostic tool in the management of patients with typical biliary pain and normal ultrasound, with favourable outcomes following surgery. - Highlights: • Gallbladder dyskinesia (GD) is a challenging condition to diagnose and treat. • This study evaluated clinical outcomes following laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). • There was sustained symptomatic benefit in >80% following surgery. • Pre-operative counselling before LC is important

  16. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of alpha lipoic acid associated with omega-3 in tardive dyskinesia induced by chronic haloperidol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; Camboim, Thaisa Gracielle Martins; Silva, Ana Patrícia Magalhães; Silva, Caio da Fonseca; de Sousa, Rebeca Canuto; Barbosa, Mabson Delâno Alves; Oliveira, Lucidio Clebeson; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná

    2017-07-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is characterized by involuntary movements of the lower portion of the face being related to typical antipsychotic therapy. TD is associated with the oxidative imbalance in the basal ganglia. Lipoic acid (LA) and omega-3 (ω-3) are antioxidants acting as enzyme cofactors, regenerating antioxidant enzymes. This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of supplementation with LA (100 mg/kg) and ω-3 (1 g/kg) in the treatment of TD induced by chronic use of haloperidol (HAL) (1 mg/kg) in rats. Wistar male rats were used, weighing between 180-200 g. The animals were treated chronically (31 days) with LA alone or associated with HAL or ω-3. Motor behavior was assessed by open-field test, the catalepsy test, and evaluation of orofacial dyskinesia. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation and concentration of nitrite. LA and ω-3 alone or associated caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open-field test and decreased the permanence time on the bar in the catalepsy test and decreased the orofacial dyskinesia. LA and ω-3 showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels. Thus, the use of LA associated with ω-3 reduced the extrapyramidal effects produced by chronic use of HAL.

  17. Beneficial effects of vitamin C and vitamin E on reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in rats: critical role of striatal catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rulian Ricardo; Abílio, Vanessa Costhek; Grassl, Christian; Chinen, Cibele Cristina; Negrão, Luciana Takahashi Ribeiro; de Castro, Juliana Pedroso Moraes Vilela; Fukushiro, Daniela Fukue; Rodrigues, Marcelo Scarpari Dutra; Gomes, Patricia Helena Zanier; Registro, Sibele; de Carvalho, Rita de Cassia; D'Almeida, Vania; Silva, Regina Helena; Ribeiro, Rosana de Alencar; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Oral dyskinesias are implicated in a series of neuropathologies and have been associated to an increase in oxidative stress. Several antioxidants, including vitamin E, decrease reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia (OD) in rodents and we have described a protective role of striatal catalase against the development of OD. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of vitamin C alone or in combination with vitamin E on reserpine-induced OD as well as to determine a possible role of catalase in the antidyskinetic property of these vitamins. Different doses of vitamin C attenuated reserpine-induced increase in OD. A similar treatment with an effective dose of vitamin C concomitant to an effective dose of vitamin E potentiated the antidyskinetic effect of both vitamins when administered alone. The administration of these vitamins alone produced an increase in striatal catalase activity that likewise was potentiated by their combined administration. In addition, the antidyskinetic property of vitamin E and vitamin C was abolished by a concomitant treatment with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole. These results indicate a beneficial effect of these vitamins and reinforce the critical role of striatal catalase against the development of oral dyskinesias.

  18. Gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabed, Samer; Latifeh, Youssef; Mohammad, Husam Aldeen; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-04-17

    Chronic antipsychotic drug treatment may cause tardive dyskinesia (TD), a long-term movement disorder. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist drugs, which have intense sedative properties and may exacerbate psychotic symptoms, have been used to treat TD. 1. Primary objectiveThe primary objective was to determine whether using non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist drugs for at least six weeks was clinically effective for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced TD in people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or other chronic mental illnesses.2. Secondary objectivesThe secondary objectives were as follows.To examine whether any improvement occurred with short periods of intervention (less than six weeks) and, if this did occur, whether this effect was maintained at longer periods of follow-up.To examine whether there was a differential effect between the various compounds.To test the hypothesis that GABA agonist drugs are most effective for a younger age group (less than 40 years old). We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (last searched April 2017), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials, and, when necessary, contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included randomised controlled trials of non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist drugs in people with antipsychotic-induced TD and schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness. Two review authors independently selected and critically appraised studies, extracted and analysed data on an intention-to-treat basis. Where possible and appropriate we calculated risk ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For continuous data we calculated mean differences (MD). We assumed that people who left early had no improvement. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. We included 11 studies that randomised 343 people. Overall, the risk of bias

  19. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  20. Intrastriatal injections of KN-93 ameliorates levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Xinxin Yang, Na Wu, Lu Song, Zhenguo Liu Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated with Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Levodopa remains the most effective drug for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, long-term levodopa treatment is associated with the emergence of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID, which has hampered its use for PD treatment. The mechanisms of LID are only partially understood. A previous study showed that KN-93, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII inhibitor, could be used to ameliorate LID in rats. However, the precise mechanisms by which KN-93 acts as an antidyskinetic are not fully understood. Methods: In the present study, a rat model of PD was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (OHDA injections. Then, the successfully lesioned rats were intrastriatally administered with a different dose of KN-93 (1 µg, 2 µg, or 5 µg prior to levodopa treatment. Abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs scores and apomorphine-induced rotations were measured in PD rats. Phosphorylated levels of GluR1 at Serine-845 (pGluR1S845 levels were determined by western blot. Arc and Penk levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: We found that both 2 µg and 5 µg KN-93 treatment lowered AIMs scores in levodopa priming PD rats without affecting the antiparkinsonian effect of levodopa. In agreement with behavioral analysis, KN-93 treatment (2 µg reduced pGluR1S845 levels in PD rats. Moreover, KN-93 treatment (2 µg reduced the expression of Gad1 and Nur77 in PD rats. Conclusion: These data indicated that intrastriatal injections of KN-93 were beneficial in reducing the expression of LID by lowering the expression of pGluR1S845 via suppressing the activation of CaMKII in PD rats. Decreased expression of pGluR1S845 further reduced the expression of Gad1 and Nur77 in PD rats. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, levodopa

  1. Concatenated logic circuits based on a three-way DNA junction: a keypad-lock security system with visible readout and an automatic reset function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhua; Zhou, Shungui; Wen, Junlin

    2015-01-07

    Concatenated logic circuits operating as a biocomputing keypad-lock security system with an automatic reset function have been successfully constructed on the basis of toehold-mediated strand displacement and three-way-DNA-junction architecture. In comparison with previously reported keypad locks, the distinctive advantage of the proposed security system is that it can be reset and cycled spontaneously a large number of times without an external stimulus, thus making practical applications possible. By the use of a split-G-quadruplex DNAzyme as the signal reporter, the output of the keypad lock can be recognized readily by the naked eye. The "lock" is opened only when the inputs are introduced in an exact order. This requirement provides defense against illegal invasion to protect information at the molecular scale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Temporal windows in visual processing: "prestimulus brain state" and "poststimulus phase reset" segregate visual transients on different temporal scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutz, Andreas; Weisz, Nathan; Braun, Christoph; Melcher, David

    2014-01-22

    Dynamic vision requires both stability of the current perceptual representation and sensitivity to the accumulation of sensory evidence over time. Here we study the electrophysiological signatures of this intricate balance between temporal segregation and integration in vision. Within a forward masking paradigm with short and long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA), we manipulated the temporal overlap of the visual persistence of two successive transients. Human observers enumerated the items presented in the second target display as a measure of the informational capacity read-out from this partly temporally integrated visual percept. We observed higher β-power immediately before mask display onset in incorrect trials, in which enumeration failed due to stronger integration of mask and target visual information. This effect was timescale specific, distinguishing between segregation and integration of visual transients that were distant in time (long SOA). Conversely, for short SOA trials, mask onset evoked a stronger visual response when mask and targets were correctly segregated in time. Examination of the target-related response profile revealed the importance of an evoked α-phase reset for the segregation of those rapid visual transients. Investigating this precise mapping of the temporal relationships of visual signals onto electrophysiological responses highlights how the stream of visual information is carved up into discrete temporal windows that mediate between segregated and integrated percepts. Fragmenting the stream of visual information provides a means to stabilize perceptual events within one instant in time.

  3. Modeling how shark and dolphin skin patterns control transitional wall-turbulence vorticity patterns using spatiotemporal phase reset mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R; Hellum, Aren M

    2014-10-23

    Many slow-moving biological systems like seashells and zebrafish that do not contend with wall turbulence have somewhat organized pigmentation patterns flush with their outer surfaces that are formed by underlying autonomous reaction-diffusion (RD) mechanisms. In contrast, sharks and dolphins contend with wall turbulence, are fast swimmers, and have more organized skin patterns that are proud and sometimes vibrate. A nonlinear spatiotemporal analytical model is not available that explains the mechanism underlying control of flow with such proud patterns, despite the fact that shark and dolphin skins are major targets of reverse engineering mechanisms of drag and noise reduction. Comparable to RD, a minimal self-regulation model is given for wall turbulence regeneration in the transitional regime--laterally coupled, diffusively--which, although restricted to pre-breakdown durations and to a plane close and parallel to the wall, correctly reproduces many experimentally observed spatiotemporal organizations of vorticity in both laminar-to-turbulence transitioning and very low Reynolds number but turbulent regions. We further show that the onset of vorticity disorganization is delayed if the skin organization is treated as a spatiotemporal template of olivo-cerebellar phase reset mechanism. The model shows that the adaptation mechanisms of sharks and dolphins to their fluid environment have much in common.

  4. Improvement in R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio and reset current via combining compliance current with multilayer structure in tantalum oxide-based RRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaorong; Feng, Jie [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Department of Micro/Nano Electronics, Shanghai (China)

    2015-07-15

    Improvements in the R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio and reset current are required prior to the practical application of RRAM. To achieve this improvement, tantalum oxide-based RRAM devices with multilayer structure (bi-layer and tri-layer) were fabricated and various compliance currents were adopted. The reset current of 40 μA was observed; the R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio increased to more than 20 in the tri-layer structure device. Resistance changes in two types of devices under voltage pulses with different pulse width were also conducted. The tri-layer device exhibited lower reset voltage and higher R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio than the bi-layer device under voltage pulses. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated the formation of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} via plasma oxidation, and there was an oxygen gradient in the multilayer devices. The results demonstrated that the tri-layer structure with oxygen gradient was an effective method for achieving better device performance. Additionally, it is implied that reasonable control of the proportion of TaO{sub 2} and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and compliance current can improve device performance. (orig.)

  5. Association of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism with levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lobato, Bruno Lopes; Borges, Vanderci; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Mata, Ignacio Fernandez; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Tumas, Vitor

    2018-04-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a common complication of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). PD physiopathology is associated with dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic pathways, including the nitric oxide system. The present study aims to examine the association of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS1) single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2682826) with LID in PD patients. We studied 186 PD patients using levodopa. The presence of LID was defined as a MDS-UPDRS Part IV score ≥1 on item 4.1. We tested for association between NOS1 rs2682826 and the presence, daily frequency, and functional impact of LID using regression models, adjusting for important covariates. There was no significant association between genotype and any of the LID-related variables examined. Our results suggest that this NOS1 polymorphism does not contribute to LID susceptibility or severity. However, additional studies that include a comprehensive set of NOS1 variants will be needed to fully define the role of this gene in LID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Report: Protective effects of rice bran oil in haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia and serotonergic responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Noreen; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2016-07-01

    Effect of administration of Rice bran oil (RBO) was evaluated on haloperidol elicited tardive dyskinesia in rats. Albino Wistar rats treated with haloperidol in drinking water at a dose of 0.2mg/kg/day and RBO by oral tubes at a dose of 0.4 mL/day for 5 weeks. Motor coordination, VCMs and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetraline)[8-OH-DPAT] _syndrome were monitored. Striatal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-EC). Rats treated with haloperidol orally at a dose of for a period of 5 weeks developed VCMs, which increased progressively as the treatment continued for 5 weeks. Motor coordination impairment started after the 1st week and was maximally impaired after 3 weeks and gradually returned to the 1st week value. Co-administration of RBO prevented haloperidol_induced VCMs as well impairment of motor coordination. The intensity of 8-OH-DPAT_induced syndrome and decreased 5-HT metabolism were greater in water + haloperidol treated animals than RBO + haloperidol treated animals. The present study suggested that involvement of free radical in the development of TD and point to RBO as a possible therapeutic option to treat this hyperkinetic motor disorder.

  7. Polymorphisms of Dopamine Receptor Genes and Risk of L-Dopa–Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Comi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available L-dopa–induced dyskinesia (LID is a frequent motor complication of Parkinson’s disease (PD, associated with a negative prognosis. Previous studies showed an association between dopamine receptor (DR gene (DR variants and LID, the results of which have not been confirmed. The present study is aimed to determine whether genetic differences of DR are associated with LID in a small but well-characterized cohort of PD patients. To this end we enrolled 100 PD subjects, 50 with and 50 without LID, matched for age, gender, disease duration and dopaminergic medication in a case-control study. We conducted polymerase chain reaction for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in both D1-like (DRD1A48G; DRD1C62T and DRD5T798C and D2-like DR (DRD2G2137A, DRD2C957T, DRD3G25A, DRD3G712C, DRD4C616G and DRD4nR VNTR 48bp analyzed genomic DNA. Our results showed that PD patients carrying allele A at DRD3G3127A had an increased risk of LID (OR 4.9; 95% CI 1.7–13.9; p = 0.004. The present findings may provide valuable information for personalizing pharmacological therapy in PD patients.

  8. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutation of LRRC6 in a Chinese Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a clinical rare peculiar disorder, mainly featured by respiratory infection, tympanitis, nasosinusitis, and male infertility. Previous study demonstrated it is an autosomal recessive disease and by 2017 almost 40 pathologic genes have been identified. Among them are the leucine-rich repeat- (LRR- containing 6 (LRRC6 codes for a 463-amino-acid cytoplasmic protein, expressed distinctively in motile cilia cells, including the testis cells and the respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with PCD-known genes filtering to explore the genetic lesion of a PCD patient. A novel compound heterozygous mutation in LRRC6 (c.183T>G/p.N61K; c.179-1G>A was identified and coseparated in this family. The missense mutation (c.183T>G/p.N61K may lead to a substitution of asparagine by lysine at position 61 in exon 3 of LRRC6. The splice site mutation (c.179-1G>A may cause a premature stop codon in exon 4 and decrease the mRNA levels of LRRC6. Both mutations were not present in our 200 local controls, dbSNP, and 1000 genomes. Three bioinformatics programs also predicted that both mutations are deleterious. Our study not only further supported the importance of LRRC6 in PCD, but also expanded the spectrum of LRRC6 mutations and will contribute to the genetic diagnosis and counseling of PCD patients.

  9. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Noguchi

    Full Text Available In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR, respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that

  10. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  11. Presynaptic dopamine depletion determines the timing of levodopa-induced dyskinesia onset in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Han Soo; Chung, Seok Jong; Chung, Su Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Phil Hyu; Moon, Hyojeong; Oh, Jung Su; Kim, Jae Seung; Hong, Jin Yong

    2018-01-01

    Reduced presynaptic dopaminergic activity plays an important role in the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated whether dopaminergic function in the nigrostriatal system is associated with the timing of LID onset. From among 412 drug-naive PD patients who underwent a dopamine transporter (DAT) PET scan during their baseline evaluation, we enrolled 65 patients who developed LID during a follow-up period of >2 years. Based on the time from PD onset, LID was classified as early, intermediate or late onset. We then compared DAT availability in the striatal subregions of the patients in the three groups. The demographic characteristics did not differ among the three patient groups except for earlier intervention of levodopa therapy in the early LID onset group (p = 0.001). After adjusting for age at PD onset, gender, timing of levodopa therapy from PD onset, and the severity of PD motor symptoms, DAT activity in the posterior putamen was found to be significantly lower in the early LID onset group than in the late LID onset group (p = 0.017). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen was significantly associated with the early appearance of LID in the early LID onset group (β = 16.039, p = 0.033). This study demonstrated that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen at baseline is a major risk factor for the early onset of LID in patients with PD, suggesting that the degree of presynaptic dopaminergic denervation plays an important role in determining the timing of LID onset. (orig.)

  12. Haloperidol-induced striatal Nur77 expression in a non-human primate model of tardive dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Souha; Blanchet, Pierre J.; Lévesque, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a delayed and potentially irreversible motor complication arising in patients chronically exposed to antipsychotic drugs. As several modern (so-called atypical) antipsychotic drugs are common offenders, the widening clinical indications for prescription as well as exposure of vulnerable individuals, TD will remain a significant drug-induced unwanted side effect. In addition, the pathophysiology of TD remains elusive and therapeutics difficult. Based on rodent experiments, we have previously shown that the transcriptional factor Nur77 (also known as NGFI-B or Nr4a1) is induced in the striatum following antipsychotic drug exposure as part of a long-term neuroadaptive process. To confirm this, we exposed adult capuchin (Cebus apella) monkeys to prolonged treatments with haloperidol (median 18.5 months, N=11) or clozapine (median 6 months, N=6). Six untreated animals were used as controls. Six haloperidol-treated animals developed mild TD movements similar to those found in humans. No TD was observed in the clozapine group. Postmortem analysis of Nur77 expression measured by in situ hybridization revealed a stark contrast between the two drugs, as Nur77 mRNA levels in the caudate-putamen were strongly upregulated in animals exposed to haloperidol while spared following clozapine treatment. Interestingly, within the haloperidol-treated group, TD-free animals showed higher Nur77 expression in putamen subterritories compared to dyskinetic animals. This suggests that Nur77 expression might be associated with a reduced risk to TD in this experimental model and could provide a novel target for drug intervention. PMID:23551242

  13. Aberrant transcriptional networks in step-wise neurogenesis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Ma, Yu; Zhang, Kunshan; Gu, Junjie; Tang, Fan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li; Li, Siguang; Jin, Ying

    2016-08-16

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and marked variability in clinical manifestations.Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as a causative gene of PKD, but the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PKD still remains a mystery. The phenotypes and transcriptional patterns of the PKD disease need further clarification. Here, we report the generation and neural differentiation of iPSC lines from two familial PKD patients with c.487C>T (p. Gln163X) and c.573dupT (p. Gly192Trpfs*8) PRRT2 mutations, respectively. Notably, an extremely lower efficiency in neural conversion from PKD-iPSCs than control-iPSCs is observed by a step-wise neural differentiation method of dual inhibition of SMAD signaling. Moreover, we show the high expression level of PRRT2 throughout the human brain and the expression pattern of PRRT2 in other human tissues for the first time. To gain molecular insight into the development of the disease, we conduct global gene expression profiling of PKD cells at four different stages of neural induction and identify altered gene expression patterns, which peculiarly reflect dysregulated neural transcriptome signatures and a differentiation tendency to mesodermal development, in comparison to control-iPSCs. Additionally, functional and signaling pathway analyses indicate significantly different cell fate determination between PKD-iPSCs and control-iPSCs. Together, the establishment of PKD-specific in vitro models and the illustration of transcriptome features in PKD cells would certainly help us with better understanding of the defects in neural conversion as well as further investigations in the pathogenesis of the PKD disease.

  14. Presynaptic dopamine depletion determines the timing of levodopa-induced dyskinesia onset in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Han Soo; Chung, Seok Jong; Chung, Su Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Phil Hyu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyojeong; Oh, Jung Su; Kim, Jae Seung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jin Yong [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-03-15

    Reduced presynaptic dopaminergic activity plays an important role in the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated whether dopaminergic function in the nigrostriatal system is associated with the timing of LID onset. From among 412 drug-naive PD patients who underwent a dopamine transporter (DAT) PET scan during their baseline evaluation, we enrolled 65 patients who developed LID during a follow-up period of >2 years. Based on the time from PD onset, LID was classified as early, intermediate or late onset. We then compared DAT availability in the striatal subregions of the patients in the three groups. The demographic characteristics did not differ among the three patient groups except for earlier intervention of levodopa therapy in the early LID onset group (p = 0.001). After adjusting for age at PD onset, gender, timing of levodopa therapy from PD onset, and the severity of PD motor symptoms, DAT activity in the posterior putamen was found to be significantly lower in the early LID onset group than in the late LID onset group (p = 0.017). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen was significantly associated with the early appearance of LID in the early LID onset group (β = 16.039, p = 0.033). This study demonstrated that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen at baseline is a major risk factor for the early onset of LID in patients with PD, suggesting that the degree of presynaptic dopaminergic denervation plays an important role in determining the timing of LID onset. (orig.)

  15. Sleep Deprivation and Caffeine Treatment Potentiate Photic Resetting of the Master Circadian Clock in a Diurnal Rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2017-04-19

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light/dark cycle. However, nonphotic factors, such as behavioral arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNs) and/or reduce the synchronizing effects of light in nocturnal rodents. In diurnal rodents, the role of arousal or insufficient sleep in these functions is still poorly understood. In the present study, diurnal Sudanian grass rats, Arvicanthis ansorgei , were aroused at night by sleep deprivation (gentle handling) or caffeine treatment that both prevented sleep. Phase shifts of locomotor activity were analyzed in grass rats transferred from a light/dark cycle to constant darkness and aroused in early night or late night. Early night, but not late night, sleep deprivation induced a significant phase shift. Caffeine on its own induced no phase shifts. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced phase delays and phase advances in response to a 30 min light pulse, respectively. Sleep deprivation in early night, but not late night, potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in the ventral SCN. Caffeine treatment in midnight triggered c-Fos expression in dorsal SCN. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in calbindin-containing cells of the ventral SCN in early and late night. These findings indicate that, in contrast to nocturnal rodents, behavioral arousal induced either by sleep deprivation or caffeine during the sleeping period potentiates light resetting of the master circadian clock in diurnal rodents, and activation of calbindin-containing suprachiasmatic cells may be involved in this effect. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Arousing stimuli have the ability to regulate circadian rhythms in mammals. Behavioral arousal in the sleeping period phase shifts the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and/or slows down the photic

  16. Tasimelteon for non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder in totally blind people (SET and RESET): two multicentre, randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled phase 3 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Steven W; Dressman, Marlene A; Licamele, Louis; Xiao, Changfu; Fisher, Dennis M; Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Hull, Joseph T; Torres, Rosarelis; Lavedan, Christian; Polymeropoulos, Mihael H

    2015-10-31

    Most totally blind people have non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (non-24), a rare circadian rhythm disorder caused by an inability of light to reset their circadian pacemaker. In two consecutive placebo-controlled trials (SET and RESET), we assessed safety and efficacy (in terms of circadian entrainment and maintenance) of once-daily tasimelteon, a novel dual-melatonin receptor agonist. We undertook the placebo-controlled, randomised, double-masked trials in 27 US and six German clinical research centres and sleep centres. We screened totally blind adults (18-75 years of age), who were eligible for the randomisation phase of SET if they had a non-24-hour circadian period (τ) of 24·25 h or longer (95% CI greater than 24·0 and up to 24·9 h), as calculated from measurements of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythms. For SET, we used block randomisation to assign patients (1:1) to receive tasimelteon (20 mg) or placebo every 24 h at a fixed clock time 1 h before target bedtime for 26 weeks. Patients who entered the open-label group receiving tasimelteon in SET or who did not meet the SET inclusion criteria but did meet the RESET inclusion criteria were screened for RESET. A subset of the patients who entered the open-label group before the RESET study and who had eligible τ values were screened for RESET after completing the open-label treatment. In RESET, we withdrew tasimelteon in a randomised manner (1:1) in patients who responded (ie, entrained) after a tasimelteon run-in period. Entrainment was defined as having τ of 24·1 h or less and a 95% CI that included 24·0 h. In SET, the primary endpoint was the proportion of entrained patients, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. The planned step-down primary endpoint assessed the proportion of patients who had a clinical response (entrainment at month 1 or month 7 plus clinical improvement, measured by the Non-24 Clinical Response Scale). In RESET, the primary endpoint was the proportion of non

  17. Culture of primary ciliary dyskinesia epithelial cells at air-liquid interface can alter ciliary phenotype but remains a robust and informative diagnostic aid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Hirst

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD requires the analysis of ciliary function and ultrastructure. Diagnosis can be complicated by secondary effects on cilia such as damage during sampling, local inflammation or recent infection. To differentiate primary from secondary abnormalities, re-analysis of cilia following culture and re-differentiation of epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface (ALI aids the diagnosis of PCD. However changes in ciliary beat pattern of cilia following epithelial cell culture has previously been described, which has brought the robustness of this method into question. This is the first systematic study to evaluate ALI culture as an aid to diagnosis of PCD in the light of these concerns.We retrospectively studied changes associated with ALI-culture in 158 subjects referred for diagnostic testing at two PCD centres. Ciliated nasal epithelium (PCD n = 54; non-PCD n  111 was analysed by high-speed digital video microscopy and transmission electron microscopy before and after culture.Ciliary function was abnormal before and after culture in all subjects with PCD; 21 PCD subjects had a combination of static and uncoordinated twitching cilia, which became completely static following culture, a further 9 demonstrated a decreased ciliary beat frequency after culture. In subjects without PCD, secondary ciliary dyskinesia was reduced.The change to ciliary phenotype in PCD samples following cell culture does not affect the diagnosis, and in certain cases can assist the ability to identify PCD cilia.

  18. Brain morphometry and the neurobiology of levodopa-induced dyskinesias: current knowledge and future potential for translational pre-clinical neuroimaging studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare eFinlay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine replacement therapy in the form of levodopa results in a significant proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD developing debilitating dyskinesia. This significantly complicates further treatment and negatively impacts patient quality of life. A greater understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID is therefore crucial to develop new treatments to prevent or mitigate LID. Such investigations in humans are largely confined to assessment of neurochemical and cerebrovascular blood flow changes using positron emission tomography (PET and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. However, recent evidence suggests that LID is associated with specific morphological changes in the frontal cortex and midbrain, detectable by structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Current human neuroimaging methods however lack sufficient resolution to reveal the biological mechanism driving these morphological changes at the cellular level. In contrast, there is a wealth of literature from well-established rodent models of LID documenting detailed post-mortem cellular and molecular measurements. The combination therefore of advanced neuroimaging methods and rodent LID models offers an exciting opportunity to bridge these currently disparate areas of research. To highlight this opportunity, in this mini-review, we provide an overview of the current clinical evidence for morphological changes in the brain associated with LID and identify potential cellular mechanisms as suggested from human and animal studies. We then suggest a framework for combining small animal MRI imaging with rodent models of LID, which may provide important mechanistic insights into the neurobiology of LID.

  19. Effects of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonism and antagonism on SKF81297-induced dyskinesia and haloperidol-induced dystonia in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten V; Peacock, Linda P; Werge, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    81297 (SKF) and acute dystonia induced by the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist haloperidol in Cebus apella monkeys. The monkeys were sensitised to EPS by prior exposure to D(2) receptor antagonists. SKF (0.3 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with the CB(1) agonist CP55,940 (0.......0025-0.01 mg/kg) or the CB(1) antagonist SR141716A (0.25-0.75 mg/kg). Haloperidol (individual doses at 0.01-0.02 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with CP55,940 (0.005 or 0.01 mg/kg) or SR141716A (0.5 or 0.75 mg/kg). Subsequently, the monkeys were videotaped, and the recordings were rated...... for oral dyskinesia or dystonia. SKF-induced oral dyskinesia was dose-dependently reduced by CP55,940, with no effect of SR141716A. Haloperidol-induced dystonia was not affected by either CP55,940 or SR141716A....

  20. Validation of a health-related quality of life instrument for primary ciliary dyskinesia (QOL-PCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, Laura; Leigh, Margaret W; Dell, Sharon D; Dunn Galvin, Audrey; Quittner, Alexandra L; Lucas, Jane S

    2017-09-01

    Quality of life (QOL)-primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is the first disease-specific, health-related QOL instrument for PCD. Psychometric validation of QOL-PCD assesses the performance of this measure in adults, including its reliability, validity and responsiveness to change. Seventy-two adults (mean (range) age: 33 years (18-79 years); mean (range) FEV 1 % predicted: 68 (26-115)) with PCD completed the 49-item QOL-PCD and generic QOL measures: Short-Form 36 Health Survey, Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 (SNOT-20) and St George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ)-C. Thirty-five participants repeated QOL-PCD 10-14 days later to measure stability or reproducibility of the measure. Multitrait analysis was used to evaluate how the items loaded on 10 hypothesised scales: physical, emotional, role and social functioning, treatment burden, vitality, health perceptions, upper respiratory symptoms, lower respiratory symptoms and ears and hearing symptoms. This analysis of item-to-total correlations led to 9 items being dropped; the validated measure now comprises 40 items. Each scale had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's α: 0.74 to 0.94). Two-week test-retest demonstrated stability for all scales (intraclass coefficients 0.73 to 0.96). Significant correlations were obtained between QOL-PCD scores and age and FEV 1 . Strong relationships were also found between QOL-PCD scales and similar constructs on generic questionnaires, for example, lower respiratory symptoms and SGRQ-C (r=0.72, pmeasures of different constructs. QOL-PCD has demonstrated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent and divergent validity. QOL-PCD offers a promising tool for evaluating new therapies and for measuring symptoms, functioning and QOL during routine care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. A water extract of Mucuna pruriens provides long-term amelioration of parkinsonism with reduced risk for dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Christopher A; Kunselman, Allen R; Manyam, Bala V; Venkiteswaran, Kala; Subramanian, Thyagarajan

    2010-08-01

    Dopaminergic anti-parkinsonian medications, such as levodopa (LD) cause drug-induced dyskinesias (DID) in majority of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Mucuna pruriens, a legume extensively used in Ayurveda to treat PD, is reputed to provide anti-parkinsonian benefits without inducing DID. We compared the behavioral effects of chronic parenteral administration of a water extract of M. pruriens seed powder (MPE) alone without any additives, MPE combined with the peripheral dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor (DDCI) benserazide (MPE+BZ), LD+BZ and LD alone without BZ in the hemiparkinsonian rat model of PD. A battery of behavioral tests assessed by blinded investigators served as outcome measures in these randomized trials. In experiment 1, animals that received LD+BZ or MPE+BZ at high (6mg/kg) and medium (4mg/kg) equivalent doses demonstrated significant alleviation of parkinsonism, but, developed severe dose-dependent DID. LD+BZ at low doses (2mg/kg) did not provide significant alleviation of parkinsonism. In contrast, MPE+BZ at an equivalent low dose significantly ameliorated parkinsonism. In experiment 2, MPE without any additives (12mg/kg and 20mg/kg LD equivalent dose) alleviated parkinsonism with significantly less DID compared to LD+BZ or MPE+BZ. In experiment 3, MPE without additives administered chronically provided long-term anti-parkinsonian benefits without causing DID. In experiment 4, MPE alone provided significantly more behavioral benefit when compared to the equivalent dose of synthetic LD alone without BZ. In experiment 5, MPE alone reduced the severity of DID in animals initially primed with LD+BZ. These findings suggest that M. pruriens contains water-soluble ingredients that either have an intrinsic DDCI-like activity or mitigate the need for an add-on DDCI to ameliorate parkinsonism. These unique long-term anti-parkinsonian effects of a parenterally administered water extract of M. pruriens seed powder may provide a platform for future drug

  2. The Restoration of Chronotropic CompEtence in Heart Failure PatientS with Normal Ejection FracTion (RESET) Study: Rationale and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, David A.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Alvarez, Guy E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the predominant form of HF among the elderly and in women. However, there are few if any evidence-based therapeutic options for HFpEF. The chief complaint of HFpEF is reduced tolerance to physical exertion. Recent data revealed that one potential mechanism of exertional intolerance in HFpEF patients is inadequate chronotropic response. Although there is considerable evidence demonstrating the benefits of rate-adaptive pacing (RAP) provided from implantable cardiac devices in patients with an impaired chronotropic response, the effect of RAP in HFpEF is unknown. Methods and Results The RESET study is a prospective, multi-center, double-blind, randomized with stratification, study assessing the effect of RAP on peak VO2 and quality of life. RAP therapy will be evaluated in a cross-over paired fashion for each patient within each study stratum. Study strata are based on patient beta-blocker usage at time of enrollment. The study is powered to assess the impact of pacing independently in both strata. Conclusions The RESET study seeks to evaluate the potential benefit of RAP in patients with symptomatic mild to moderate HFpEF and chronotropic impairment. Study enrollment began in July 2008. PMID:20123314

  3. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-06-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  4. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P.L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C.A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.

    2015-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented

  5. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, P., E-mail: yangping0710@126.com [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Chalmet, P.L. [MIND, Archamps (France); Chanlek, N. [Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand); Collu, A. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Gao, C. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kofarago, M. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kim, D. [Dongguk and Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lattuca, A. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); Marin Tobon, C.A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marras, D. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Mager, M.; Martinengo, P. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mazza, G. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); and others

    2015-06-11

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  6. Changes in the referent body location and configuration may underlie human gait, as confirmed by findings of multi-muscle activity minimizations and phase resetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Anatol G; Krasovsky, Tal; Baniña, Melanie C; Lamontagne, Anouk; Levin, Mindy F

    2011-04-01

    Locomotion is presumably guided by feed-forward shifts in the referent body location in the desired direction in the environment. We propose that the difference between the actual and the referent body locations is transmitted to neurons that virtually diminish this difference by appropriately changing the referent body configuration, i.e. the body posture at which muscles reach their recruitment thresholds. Muscles are activated depending on the gap between the actual and the referent body configurations resulting in a step being made to minimize this gap. This hypothesis implies that the actual and the referent leg configurations can match each other at certain phases of the gait cycle, resulting in minimization of leg muscle activity. We found several leg configurations at which EMG minima occurred, both during forward and backward gait. It was also found that the set of limb configurations associated with EMG minima can be changed by modifying the pattern of forward and backward gait. Our hypothesis predicts that, in response to perturbations of gait, the rate of shifts in the referent body location can temporarily be changed to avoid falling. The rate influences the phase of rhythmic limb movements during gait. Therefore, following the change in the rate of the referent body location, the whole gait pattern, for all four limbs, will irreversibly be shifted in time (long-lasting and global phase resetting) with only transient changes in the gait speed, swing and stance timing and cycle duration. Aside from transient changes in the duration of the swing and/or stance phase in response to perturbation, few previous studies have documented long-lasting and global phase resetting of human gait in response to perturbation. Such resetting was a robust finding in our study. By confirming the notion that feed-forward changes in the referent body location and configuration underlie human locomotion, this study solves the classical problem in the relationship between

  7. Hand-held tidal breathing nasal nitric oxide measurement--a promising targeted case-finding tool for the diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) measurement is an established first line test in the work-up for primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Tidal breathing nNO (TB-nNO) measurements require minimal cooperation and are potentially useful even in young children. Hand-held NO devices are becoming...... increasingly widespread for asthma management. Therefore, we chose to assess whether hand-held TB-nNO measurements reliably discriminate between PCD, and Healthy Subjects (HS) and included Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients as a disease control group known to have intermediate nNO levels. METHODS: In this cross...... sectional, single centre, single occasion, proof-of-concept study in children and adults with PCD and CF, and in HS we compared feasibility, success rates, discriminatory capacity, repeatability and agreement between a hand-held electrochemical device equipped with a nNO software application sampling...

  8. A study on the action of two calcium channel blockers (verapamil and flunarizine upon an experimental model of tardive dyskinesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João S. Pereira

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, a serious complications of neuroleptic chronic use, has no effective therapy yet. We performed an experiment to study the action on TD, of the calcium channel blockers (CCB drugs, verapamil and flunarizine. We obtained the TD model in rats, administering haloperidol for a 21-day period. After this, the stereotyped movement induced by apomorphyne was rated. The CCB drugs were administered in acute (in the 28th. day and chronic (for 8 days, after the 25th day experiments. Acutely, verapamil increased the stereotyped behaviour, and promoted a reduction of it in the chronic experiment. The results suggest that CCB drugs should be tested in clinical trials of TD.

  9. Um caso raro de discinesia ciliar primária associada a heterotaxia A rare case of primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Quintela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A discinesia ciliar primária é uma doença autossómica recessiva caracterizada pela história de infecções de repetição do aparelho respiratório superior e inferior, rinossinusite e bronquite associada a situs inversus completo ou parcial. Os autores apresentam um doente de 78 anos, eurocaucasiano, com rinossinusites, bronquite crónica e dispneia, otite média com défices auditivos, infertilidade, seguido em consulta de gastrenterologia por dispepsia e obstipação há vários anos. Realizou vários exames que mostraram: agenesia frontal direita, espessamento brônquico, bronquiectasias, cego e cólon ascendente localizados na fossa ilíaca esquerda. Excluiu-se imunodeficiência, alergias, fibrose quística e outros. No decurso da investigação concluímos que se tratava de um caso de discinesia ciliar primária. Pela raridade deste caso, decidimos apresentá-lo.Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease with a clinical history of upper and lowers respiratory infections, rhinosinusitis and bronquitis associated with complete or partial situs inversus. The authors present a 78-year-old male caucasian patient with rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infection and dyspnea, chronic otitis with hearing deficit and infertility followed in Gastroenterology for dyspepsia and constipation. The radiological studies revealed agenesis of right frontal sinus; bronchial wall thickening; bronchiectasis; cecum and ascending colon located on the left and small bowel occupies right side of abdomen. He had no immunodeficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis and others. We concluded primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy. For the rarity of this case we decided to present it.

  10. Coherence of neuronal firing of the entopeduncular nucleus with motor cortex oscillatory activity in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xingxing; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah

    2016-04-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms leading to dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD) after long-term treatment with levodopa remain unclear. This study investigates the neuronal firing characteristics of the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the rat equivalent of the human globus pallidus internus and output nucleus of the basal ganglia, and its coherence with the motor cortex (MCx) field potentials in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model of PD with and without levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID). 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned hemiparkinsonian (HP) rats, 6-OHDA-lesioned HP rats with LID (HP-LID) rats, and naïve controls were used for recording of single-unit activity under urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p) anesthesia in the EPN "on" and "off" levodopa. Over the MCx, the electrocorticogram output was recorded. Analysis of single-unit activity in the EPN showed enhanced firing rates, burst activity, and irregularity compared to naïve controls, which did not differ between drug-naïve HP and HP-LID rats. Analysis of EPN spike coherence and phase-locked ratio with MCx field potentials showed a shift of low (12-19 Hz) and high (19-30 Hz) beta oscillatory activity between HP and HP-LID groups. EPN theta phase-locked ratio was only enhanced in HP-LID compared to HP rats. Overall, levodopa injection had no stronger effect in HP-LID rats than in HP rats. Altered coherence and changes in the phase lock ratio of spike and local field potentials in the beta range may play a role for the development of LID.

  11. Association between monoamine oxidase A gene promoter 30 bp repeat polymorphism and tardive dyskinesia in Chinese schizophrenics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhe Fan; Lihua Li; Yan Fu; Hehuang Deng; Xiangjiao Liao; Youcai Zhou

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia (TD) is not yet fully understood. With the hypothesis of altered dopaminergic neurotransmission, altered activities of dopamine degrading enzymes such as monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and their coding genes are supposed to be related to the pathophysiology of TD.OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible association between 30 bp variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the promoter of MAOA gene and susceptibility, severity of neuroleptic induced TD in Chinese Han people in Guandong Province.DESIGN: Non-randomization-synchronization controlled study. SETTING: Guangdong Mental Health Institute, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital; Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital; Affiliated Psychiatric Hospital of Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Civil Administration. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 179 subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects were sporadic and genetically unrelated Chinese schizophrenic patients who were hospitalizing in Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital or Affiliated Psychiatric Hospital of Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Civil Administration during January to April 2005. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was made according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorder-the third edition-revised (DSM-Ⅲ-R). Among all patients, 88 were diagnosed as with TD and 91 without TD according to the research diagnostic criteria described by Schooler-Kane. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their relatives.METHODS: ① TD severity was assessed with the AIMS which was a 5-degree rating scale from 0 to 4 (corresponding to none, minimal, mild, moderate and severe, respectively). The study was approved by the Ethics Committees of the two hospitals and informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their relatives. ② The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) techniques were used to detect MAOA gene 30 bp VNTR polymorphism in schizophrenic patients

  12. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made to help with CPT, such as: An electric chest clapper, known as a mechanical percussor. An ... your child spends time, including the home and car. Encourage your child to never start smoking. For ...

  13. Dopamine signaling leads to loss of Polycomb repression and aberrant gene activation in experimental parkinsonism.

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    Erik Södersten

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins bind to and repress genes in embryonic stem cells through lineage commitment to the terminal differentiated state. PcG repressed genes are commonly characterized by the presence of the epigenetic histone mark H3K27me3, catalyzed by the Polycomb repressive complex 2. Here, we present in vivo evidence for a previously unrecognized plasticity of PcG-repressed genes in terminally differentiated brain neurons of parkisonian mice. We show that acute administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, induces a remarkable increase in H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation. The induction of the H3K27me3S28p histone mark specifically occurs in medium spiny neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors and is dependent on Msk1 kinase activity and DARPP-32-mediated inhibition of protein phosphatase-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments showed that increased H3K27me3S28p was accompanied by reduced PcG binding to regulatory regions of genes. An analysis of the genome wide distribution of L-DOPA-induced H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation by ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with expression analysis by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq showed that the induction of H3K27me3S28p correlated with increased expression of a subset of PcG repressed genes. We found that induction of H3K27me3S28p persisted during chronic L-DOPA administration to parkisonian mice and correlated with aberrant gene expression. We propose that dopaminergic transmission can activate PcG repressed genes in the adult brain and thereby contribute to long-term maladaptive responses including the motor complications, or dyskinesia, caused by prolonged administration of L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Differential effects of gaseous versus injectable anesthetics on changes in regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by l-DOPA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpisidis, Zisis; Öberg, Carl M; Maslava, Natallia; Cenci, M Angela; Lundblad, Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of brain activity requires the use of anesthesia. In this study, we have compared the effects of two widely used anesthetics, inhaled isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine cocktail, on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Specific tracers were used to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF - [ 14 C]-iodoantipyrine) and regional cerebral metabolic rate (rCMR - [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose) with a highly sensitive autoradiographic method. The two types of anesthetics had quite distinct effects on l-DOPA-induced changes in rCBF and rCMR. Isoflurane did not affect either the absolute rCBF values or the increases in rCBF in the basal ganglia after l-DOPA administration. On the contrary, rats anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine showed lower absolute rCBF values, and the rCBF increases induced by l-DOPA were masked. We developed a novel improved model to calculate rCMR, and found lower metabolic activities in rats anesthetized with isoflurane compared to animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Both anesthetics prevented changes in rCMR upon l-DOPA administration. Pharmacological challenges in isoflurane-anesthetized rats indicated that drugs mimicking the actions of ketamine/xylazine on adrenergic or glutamate receptors reproduced distinct effects of the injectable anesthetics on rCBF and rCMR. Our results highlight the importance of anesthesia in studies of cerebral flow and metabolism, and provide novel insights into mechanisms mediating abnormal neurovascular responses to l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tri-state resistive switching characteristics of MnO/Ta2O5 resistive random access memory device by a controllable reset process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N. J.; Kang, T. S.; Hu, Q.; Lee, T. S.; Yoon, T.-S.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, E. J.; Choi, Y. J.; Kang, C. J.

    2018-06-01

    Tri-state resistive switching characteristics of bilayer resistive random access memory devices based on manganese oxide (MnO)/tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) have been studied. The current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of the Ag/MnO/Ta2O5/Pt device show tri-state resistive switching (RS) behavior with a high resistance state (HRS), intermediate resistance state (IRS), and low resistance state (LRS), which are controlled by the reset process. The MnO/Ta2O5 film shows bipolar RS behavior through the formation and rupture of conducting filaments without the forming process. The device shows reproducible and stable RS both from the HRS to the LRS and from the IRS to the LRS. In order to elucidate the tri-state RS mechanism in the Ag/MnO/Ta2O5/Pt device, transmission electron microscope (TEM) images are measured in the LRS, IRS and HRS. White lines like dendrites are observed in the Ta2O5 film in both the LRS and the IRS. Poole–Frenkel conduction, space charge limited conduction, and Ohmic conduction are proposed as the dominant conduction mechanisms for the Ag/MnO/Ta2O5/Pt device based on the obtained I–V characteristics and TEM images.

  16. MSBIS: A Multi-Step Biomedical Informatics Screening Approach for Identifying Medications that Mitigate the Risks of Metoclopramide-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Ham, Alexandrea G; Tivis, Rickey D; Caylor, Matthew L; Tao, Aoxiang; Flynn, Steve T; Economen, Peter J; Dang, Hung K; Johnson, Royal W; Culbertson, Vaughn L

    2017-12-01

    In 2009 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a black box warning on metoclopramide (MCP) due to the increased risks and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD). In this study, we developed a multi-step biomedical informatics screening (MSBIS) approach leveraging publicly available bioactivity and drug safety data to identify concomitant drugs that mitigate the risks of MCP-induced TD. MSBIS includes (1) TargetSearch (http://dxulab.org/software) bioinformatics scoring for drug anticholinergic activity using CHEMBL bioactivity data; (2) unadjusted odds ratio (UOR) scoring for indications of TD-mitigating effects using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS); (3) adjusted odds ratio (AOR) re-scoring by removing the effect of cofounding factors (age, gender, reporting year); (4) logistic regression (LR) coefficient scoring for confirming the best TD-mitigating drug candidates. Drugs with increasing TD protective potential and statistical significance were obtained at each screening step. Fentanyl is identified as the most promising drug against MCP-induced TD (coefficient: -2.68; p-valueTD after fentanyl-induced general anesthesia. Loperamide is identified as a potent mitigating drug against a broader range of drug-induced movement disorders through pharmacokinetic modifications. Using drug-induced TD as an example, we demonstrated that MSBIS is an efficient in silico tool for unknown drug-drug interaction detection, drug repurposing, and combination therapy design. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary ciliary dyskinesia in the paediatric population: range and severity of radiological findings in a cohort of patients receiving tertiary care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, K. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.padley@ic.ac.uk; Goldstraw, E.J.; Kidd, S.J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hogg, C.; Biggart, E.; Bush, A. [Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical range and severity of radiological findings in a cohort of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) receiving tertiary care. Materials and methods: The case notes and clinical test results of 89 children attending the paediatric respiratory disease clinic at our institution were retrospectively analysed. Demographic details including age at diagnosis and common presenting signs and symptoms were studied. Results of chest radiographs, microscopy, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for quantification of lung damage were analysed. Results: In a cohort of 89 children with PCD, a presentation chest radiograph was available in 62% of patients (n = 55), with all but one demonstrating changes of bronchial wall thickening. HRCT of the lungs, available in 26 patients, were scored using the system described by Brody et al. analysing five specific features of lung disease, including bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, peribronchial thickening, parenchymal changes of consolidation, and ground-glass density, and focal air-trapping in each lobe. Peribronchial thickening was observed using HRCT in 25 patients, while 20 patients had bronchiectasis. Severity scores were highest for the middle and the lingular lobes. Conclusion: The radiographic findings of the largest reported cohort of patients with PCD are presented, with associated clinical findings. Dextrocardia remains the commonest finding on chest radiography. HRCT demonstrates peribronchial thickening and bronchiectasis, which is most marked in the lower zones. Radiological scoring techniques developed for assessment of cystic fibrosis can also be applied for the assessment of disease severity in this patient population.

  18. NMDA receptor GluN2A/GluN2B subunit ratio as synaptic trait of levodopa-induced dyskinesias: from experimental models to patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela eMellone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs are major complications in the pharmacological management of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Abnormal glutamatergic transmission in the striatum is considered a key factor in the development of LIDs. This work aims at i. characterizing NMDA receptor GluN2A/GluN2B subunit ratio as a common synaptic trait in rat and primate models of LIDs and in dyskinetic PD patients, and ii. validating the potential therapeutic effect of a cell-permeable peptide interfering with GluN2A synaptic localization on the dyskinetic behavior of these experimental models of LIDs. Here we demonstrate an altered ratio of synaptic GluN2A/GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the striatum of levodopa-treated dyskinetic rats and monkeys as well as in post-mortem tissue from dyskinetic PD patients. The modulation of synaptic NMDA receptor composition by a cell-permeable peptide interfering with GluN2A subunit interaction with the scaffolding protein PSD-95 leads to a reduction in the dyskinetic motor behavior in the two animal models of LIDs. Our results indicate that targeting synaptic NMDA receptor subunit composition may represent an intriguing therapeutic approach aimed at ameliorating levodopa motor side effects.

  19. Lack of LTP-like plasticity in primary motor cortex in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppa, A; Marsili, L; Belvisi, D; Conte, A; Iezzi, E; Modugno, N; Fabbrini, G; Berardelli, A

    2011-02-01

    In this study in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), off and on dopaminergic therapy, with and without L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs), we tested intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS), a technique currently used for non-invasively inducing long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in primary motor cortex (M1). The study group comprised 20 PD patients on and off dopaminergic therapy (11 patients without and 9 patients with LIDs), and 14 age-matched healthy subjects. Patients had mild-to-moderate PD, and no additional neuropsychiatric disorders. We clinically evaluated patients using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS). The left M1 was conditioned with iTBS at 80% active motor threshold intensity. Twenty motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from right first interosseous muscle before and at 5, 15 and 30 min after iTBS. Between-group analysis of variance (ANOVA) testing healthy subjects versus patients with and without LIDs, on and off therapy showed a significant interaction between factors "Group" and "Time". After iTBS, MEP amplitudes in healthy subjects increased significantly at 5, 15 and 30 min (piTBS fails to increase MEP responses. This finding suggests lack of iTBS-induced LTP-like plasticity in M1 in PD regardless of patients' clinical features. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impairment of Serotonergic Transmission by the Antiparkinsonian Drug L-DOPA: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Miguelez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The link between the anti-Parkinsonian drug L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA and the serotonergic (5-HT system has been long established and has received increased attention during the last decade. Most studies have focused on the fact that L-DOPA can be transformed into dopamine (DA and released from 5-HT terminals, which is especially important for the management of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. In patients, treatment using L-DOPA also impacts 5-HT neurotransmission; however, few studies have investigated the mechanisms of this effect. The purpose of this review is to summarize the electrophysiological and neurochemical data concerning the effects of L-DOPA on 5-HT cell function. This review will argue that L-DOPA disrupts the link between the electrical activity of 5-HT neurons and 5-HT release as well as that between 5-HT release and extracellular 5-HT levels. These effects are caused by the actions of L-DOPA and DA in 5-HT neurons, which affect 5-HT neurotransmission from the biosynthesis of 5-HT to the impairment of the 5-HT transporter. The interaction between L-DOPA and 5-HT transmission is especially relevant in those Parkinson’s disease (PD patients that suffer dyskinesia, comorbid anxiety or depression, since the efficacy of antidepressants or 5-HT compounds may be affected.

  1. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 3: Clinical Trial Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H; Macaluso, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. This column reviews clinical trial data to assess whether those data support the conclusion that aripiprazole has a low to absent risk of causing TD when used as an augmentation strategy to treat MDD. To date, no randomized, placebo-controlled trials have established a definitive link between exposure to aripiprazole and TD in patients with MDD. One long-term, open-label, safety trial examined aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy in individuals with MDD and found a rare occurrence (4/987, 0.4%, the confidence interval of which overlaps with zero) of an adverse event termed TD. In all 4 cases, the observed movements resolved within weeks of aripiprazole discontinuation, suggesting that they were either amenable to treatment or represented an acute syndrome rather than TD. No cases of TD were reported in the registration trials for the MDD indication for aripiprazole. These data were presented in a pooled analysis of

  2. Value of transmission electron microscopy for primary ciliary dyskinesia diagnosis in the era of molecular medicine: Genetic defects with normal and non-diagnostic ciliary ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam J; Leigh, Margaret W

    2017-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder causing chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. No single diagnostic test will detect all PCD cases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of respiratory cilia was previously considered the gold standard diagnostic test for PCD, but 30% of all PCD cases have either normal ciliary ultrastructure or subtle changes which are non-diagnostic. These cases are identified through alternate diagnostic tests, including nasal nitric oxide measurement, high-speed videomicroscopy analysis, immunofluorescent staining of axonemal proteins, and/or mutation analysis of various PCD causing genes. Autosomal recessive mutations in DNAH11 and HYDIN produce normal TEM ciliary ultrastructure, while mutations in genes encoding for radial spoke head proteins result in some cross-sections with non-diagnostic alterations in the central apparatus interspersed with normal ciliary cross-sections. Mutations in nexin link and dynein regulatory complex genes lead to a collection of different ciliary ultrastructures; mutations in CCDC65, CCDC164, and GAS8 produce normal ciliary ultrastructure, while mutations in CCDC39 and CCDC40 cause absent inner dynein arms and microtubule disorganization in some ciliary cross-sections. Mutations in CCNO and MCIDAS cause near complete absence of respiratory cilia due to defects in generation of multiple cellular basal bodies; however, the scant cilia generated may have normal ultrastructure. Lastly, a syndromic form of PCD with retinal degeneration results in normal ciliary ultrastructure through mutations in the RPGR gene. Clinicians must be aware of these genetic causes of PCD resulting in non-diagnostic TEM ciliary ultrastructure and refrain from using TEM of respiratory cilia as a test to rule out PCD.

  3. Altered neuronal firing pattern of the basal ganglia nucleus plays a role in levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu eLi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Levodopa therapy alleviates the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD, but long-term treatment often leads to motor complications such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. Aim: To explore the neuronal activity in the basal ganglia nuclei in patients with PD and LID. Methods: Thirty patients with idiopathic PD (age, 55.1±11.0 years; disease duration, 8.7±5.6 years were enrolled between August 2006 and August 2013 at the Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, China. Their Hoehn and Yahr scores ranged from 2 to 4 and their UPDRS III scores were 28.5±5.2. Fifteen of them had severe LID (UPDRS IV scores of 6.7±1.6. Microelectrode recording was performed in the globus pallidus internus (GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN during pallidotomy (n=12 or STN deep brain stimulation (DBS; bilateral, n=12; unilateral, n=6. The firing patterns and frequencies of various cell types were analyzed by assessing single cell interspike intervals (ISIs and the corresponding coefficient of variation (CV. Results: A total of 295 neurons were identified from the GPi (n=12 and STN (n=18. These included 26 (8.8% highly grouped discharge, 30 (10.2% low frequency firing, 78 (26.4% rapid tonic discharge, 103 (34.9% irregular activity, and 58 (19.7% tremor-related activity. There were significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05 for neurons with irregular firing, highly irregular cluster-like firing, and low-frequency firing. Conclusion: Altered neuronal activity was observed in the basal ganglia nucleus of GPi and STN, and may play important roles in the pathophysiology of PD and LID.

  4. MSBIS: A Multi-Step Biomedical Informatics Screening Approach for Identifying Medications that Mitigate the Risks of Metoclopramide-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2009 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA placed a black box warning on metoclopramide (MCP due to the increased risks and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD. In this study, we developed a multi-step biomedical informatics screening (MSBIS approach leveraging publicly available bioactivity and drug safety data to identify concomitant drugs that mitigate the risks of MCP-induced TD. MSBIS includes (1 TargetSearch (http://dxulab.org/software bioinformatics scoring for drug anticholinergic activity using CHEMBL bioactivity data; (2 unadjusted odds ratio (UOR scoring for indications of TD-mitigating effects using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS; (3 adjusted odds ratio (AOR re-scoring by removing the effect of cofounding factors (age, gender, reporting year; (4 logistic regression (LR coefficient scoring for confirming the best TD-mitigating drug candidates. Drugs with increasing TD protective potential and statistical significance were obtained at each screening step. Fentanyl is identified as the most promising drug against MCP-induced TD (coefficient: −2.68; p-value < 0.01. The discovery is supported by clinical reports that patients fully recovered from MCP-induced TD after fentanyl-induced general anesthesia. Loperamide is identified as a potent mitigating drug against a broader range of drug-induced movement disorders through pharmacokinetic modifications. Using drug-induced TD as an example, we demonstrated that MSBIS is an efficient in silico tool for unknown drug-drug interaction detection, drug repurposing, and combination therapy design.

  5. Study protocol for a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of S-ketamine for pain treatment in patients with chronic pancreatitis (RESET trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Jacob; Olesen, Søren Schou; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Dahan, Albert; Wilder-Smith, Oliver; Madzak, Adnan; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-03-10

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease that causes irreversible damage to pancreatic tissue. Pain is its most prominent symptom. In the absence of pathology suitable for endoscopic or surgical interventions, pain treatment usually includes opioids. However, opioids often have limited efficacy. Moreover, side effects are common and bothersome. Hence, novel approaches to control pain associated with CP are highly desirable. Sensitisation of the central nervous system is reported to play a key role in pain generation and chronification. Fundamental to the process of central sensitisation is abnormal activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, which can be antagonised by S-ketamine. The RESET trial is investigating the analgaesic and antihyperalgesic effect of S-ketamine in patients with CP. 40 patients with CP will be enrolled. Patients are randomised to receive 8 h of intravenous S-ketamine followed by oral S-ketamine, or matching placebo, for 4 weeks. To improve blinding, 1 mg of midazolam will be added to active and placebo treatment. The primary end point is clinical pain relief as assessed by a daily pain diary. Secondary end points include changes in patient-reported outcome measures, opioid consumption and rates of side effects. The end points are registered through the 4-week medication period and for an additional follow-up period of 8 weeks to investigate long-term effects. In addition, experimental pain measures also serves as secondary end points, and neurophysiological imaging parameters are collected. Furthermore, experimental baseline recordings are compared to recordings from a group of healthy controls to evaluate general aspects of pain processing in CP. The protocol is approved by the North Denmark Region Committee on Health Research Ethics (N-20130040) and the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities (EudraCT number: 2013-003357-17). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences

  6. Morphological and electrophysiological changes in intratelencephalic-type pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex of a rat model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Tatsuya; Yamada, Junko; Nishijima, Haruo; Arai, Akira; Migita, Keisuke; Baba, Masayuki; Ueno, Shinya; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease, and becomes increasingly problematic in the advanced stage of the disease. Although the cause of LID still remains unclear, there is accumulating evidence from animal experiments that it results from maladaptive plasticity, resulting in supersensitive excitatory transmission at corticostriatal synapses. Recent work using transcranial magnetic stimulation suggests that the motor cortex displays the same supersensitivity in Parkinson's disease patients with LID. To date, the cellular mechanisms underlying the abnormal cortical plasticity have not been examined. The morphology of the dendritic spines has a strong relationship to synaptic plasticity. Therefore, we explored the spine morphology of pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex in a rat model of LID. We used control rats, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (a model of Parkinson's disease), 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats chronically treated with levodopa (a model of LID), and control rats chronically treated with levodopa. Because the direct pathway of the basal ganglia plays a central role in the development of LID, we quantified the density and size of dendritic spines in intratelencephalic (IT)-type pyramidal neurons in M1 cortex that project to the striatal medium spiny neurons in the direct pathway. The spine density was not different among the four groups. In contrast, spine size became enlarged in the Parkinson's disease and LID rat models. The enlargement was significantly greater in the LID model than in the Parkinson's disease model. This enlargement of the spines suggests that IT-type pyramidal neurons acquire supersensitivity to excitatory stimuli. To confirm this possibility, we monitored miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in the IT-type pyramidal neurons in M1 cortex using whole-cell patch clamp. The amplitude of the mEPSCs was significantly increased in the LID

  7. Effect of Zishenpingchan Granule on Neurobehavioral Manifestations and the Activity and Gene Expression of Striatal Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptors of Rats with Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to observe the effects of Zishenpingchan granule on neurobehavioral manifestations and the activity and gene expression of striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors of rats with levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID. We established normal control group, LID model group, and TCM intervention group. Each group received treatment for 4 weeks. Artificial neural network (ANN was applied to excavate the main factor influencing variation in neurobehavioral manifestations of rats with LID. The results showed that overactivation in direct pathway mediated by dopamine D1 receptor and overinhibition in indirect pathway mediated by dopamine D2 receptor may be the main mechanism of LID. TCM increased the efficacy time of LD to ameliorate LID symptoms effectively mainly by upregulating dopamine D2 receptor gene expression.

  8. Postsynaptic density protein 95-regulated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in levodopa-induced dyskinesia rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ba M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Maowen Ba,1,* Min Kong,2,* Guozhao Ma3 1Department of Neurology, Yuhuangding Hospital, Yantai City, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurology, Yantaishan Hospital, Yantai City, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Context: Abnormality in interactions between N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor and its signaling molecules occurs in the lesioned striatum in Parkinson’s disease (PD and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. It was reported that Fyn-mediated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation, can enhance NMDA receptor function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95, one of the synapse-associated proteins, regulates interactions between receptor and downstream-signaling molecules. In light of the relationship between PSD-95, NR2B, and Fyn kinases, does PSD-95 contribute to the overactivity of NMDA receptor function induced by dopaminergic treatment? To further prove the possibility, the effects of regulating the PSD-95 expression on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and on the interactions of Fyn and NR2B in LID rat models were evaluated.Methods: In the present study, parkinsonian rat models were established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine. Subsequently, valid PD rats were treated with levodopa (50 mg/kg/day with benserazide 12.5 mg/kg/day, twice daily intraperitoneally for 22 days to create LID rat models. Then, the effect of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of the PSD-95mRNA antisense oligonucleotides (PSD-95 ASO on the rotational response to levodopa challenge was assessed. The effects of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of PSD-95 ASO on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in the LID rat models were detected by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Results: Levodopa

  9. Origin of the current discretization in deep reset states of an Al2O3/Cu-based conductive-bridging memory, and impact on state level and variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, A.; Degraeve, R.; Fantini, A.; Kim, W.; Houssa, M.; Jurczak, M.; Goux, L.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a Quantum-Point-Contact (QPC) model describing the state conduction in a W/Al2O3/TiW/Cu Conductive-Bridging Memory cell (CBRAM). The model allows describing both the voltage- and the temperature-dependence of the conduction. For deep current levels, a resistance component is added in series to the point-contact constriction to account for electron scattering in the residual filament. The fitting of single-particle perturbation also allowed to estimate the number and effective size of the conduction-controlling particles in the QPC constriction. The results clearly point to smaller particles for CBRAM (Cu particles) as compared to oxide-based resistive RAM involving oxygen-vacancy defects, which is discussed as a possible origin of deeper reset level obtained in CBRAM. We also evidence a beneficial impact of this smaller particle size on lower Random-Telegraph-Noise amplitude measured on CBRAM devices.

  10. Circadian control of p75 neurotrophin receptor leads to alternate activation of Nrf2 and c-Rel to reset energy metabolism in astrocytes via brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuro; Warabi, Eiji; Mann, Giovanni E

    2018-05-01

    Circadian clock genes regulate energy metabolism partly through neurotrophins in the body. The low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 NTR is a clock component directly regulated by the transcriptional factor Clock:Bmal1 complex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed in the brain and plays a key role in coordinating metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. BDNF transduces signals through TrkB and p75 NTR receptors. This review highlights a novel molecular mechanism by which BDNF via circadian control of p75 NTR leads to daily resetting of glucose and glycogen metabolism in brain astrocytes to accommodate their functional interaction with neurons. Astrocytes store glycogen as an energy reservoir to provide active neurons with the glycolytic metabolite lactate. Astrocytes predominantly express the truncated receptor TrkB.T1 which lacks an intracellular receptor tyrosine kinase domain. TrkB.T1 retains the capacity to regulate cell morphology through regulation of Rho GTPases. In contrast, p75 NTR mediates generation of the bioactive lipid ceramide upon stimulation with BDNF and inhibits PKA activation. As ceramide directly activates PKCζ, we discuss the importance of the TrkB.T1-p75 NTR -ceramide-PKCζ signaling axis in the stimulation of glycogen and lipid synthesis and activation of RhoA. Ceramide-PKCζ-casein kinase 2 signaling activates Nrf2 to support oxidative phosphorylation via upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. In the absence of p75 NTR , TrkB.T1 functionally interacts with adenosine A 2A R and dopamine D1R receptors to enhance cAMP-PKA signaling and activate Rac1 and NF-κB c-Rel, favoring glycogen hydrolysis, gluconeogenesis and aerobic glycolysis. Thus, diurnal changes in p75 NTR levels in astrocytes resets energy metabolism via BDNF to accommodate their metabolic interaction with neurons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling in the striatum: New targets for the treatment of Parkinson's disease?

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    Anthony R West

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Striatal nitric oxide (NO-producing interneurons play an important role in the regulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and motor behavior. Striatal NO synthesis is driven by concurrent activation of NMDA and dopamine (DA D1 receptors. NO diffuses into the dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs which contain high levels of NO receptors called soluble guanylyl cyclases (sGC. NO-mediated activation of sGC leads to the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. In the intact striatum, transient elevations in intracellular cGMP primarily act to increase neuronal excitability and to facilitate glutamatergic corticostriatal transmission. NO-cGMP signaling also functionally opposes the inhibitory effects of DA D2 receptor activation on corticostriatal transmission. Not surprisingly, abnormal striatal NO-sGC-cGMP signaling becomes apparent following striatal DA depletion, an alteration thought to contribute to pathophysiological changes observed in basal ganglia circuits in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Here, we discuss recent developments in the field which have shed light on the role of NO-sGC-cGMP signaling pathways in basal ganglia dysfunction and motor symptoms associated with PD and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias.

  12. Current Experimental Studies of Gene Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

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    Jing-ya Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD was characterized by late-onset, progressive dopamine neuron loss and movement disorders. The progresses of PD affected the neural function and integrity. To date, most researches had largely addressed the dopamine replacement therapies, but the appearance of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia hampered the use of the drug. And the mechanism of PD is so complicated that it's hard to solve the problem by just add drugs. Researchers began to focus on the genetic underpinnings of Parkinson's disease, searching for new method that may affect the neurodegeneration processes in it. In this paper, we reviewed current delivery methods used in gene therapies for PD, we also summarized the primary target of the gene therapy in the treatment of PD, such like neurotrophic factor (for regeneration, the synthesis of neurotransmitter (for prolong the duration of L-dopa, and the potential proteins that might be a target to modulate via gene therapy. Finally, we discussed RNA interference therapies used in Parkinson's disease, it might act as a new class of drug. We mainly focus on the efficiency and tooling features of different gene therapies in the treatment of PD.

  13. Anti-dyskinetic mechanisms of amantadine and dextromethorphan in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson’s disease: role of NMDA vs. 5-HT1A receptors

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    Paquette, Melanie A.; Martinez, Alex A.; Macheda, Teresa; Meshul, Charles K.; Johnson, Steven W.; Berger, S. Paul; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Amantadine and dextromethorphan suppress levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model. These effects have been attributed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonism. However, amantadine and dextromethorphan are also thought to block serotonin (5-HT) uptake and cause 5-HT overflow, leading to stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors, which has been shown to reduce LID. We undertook a study in 6-OHDA rats to determine whether the anti-dyskinetic effects of these two compounds are mediated by NMDA antagonism and/or 5-HT1A agonism. In addition, we assessed the sensorimotor effects of these drugs using the Vibrissae-Stimulated Forelimb Placement and Cylinder tests. Our data show that the AIM-suppressing effect of amantadine was not affected by the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635, but was partially reversed by the NMDA agonist d-cycloserine. Conversely, the AIM-suppressing effect of dextromethorphan was prevented by WAY-100635 but not by d-cycloserine. Neither amantadine nor dextromethorphan affected the therapeutic effects of L-DOPA in sensorimotor tests. We conclude that the anti-dyskinetic effect of amantadine is partially dependent on NMDA antagonism, while dextromethorphan suppresses AIMs via indirect 5-HT1A agonism. Combined with previous work from our group, our results support the investigation of 5-HT1A agonists as pharmacotherapies for LID in PD patients. PMID:22861201

  14. Mitochondrial DNA depletion by ethidium bromide decreases neuronal mitochondrial creatine kinase: Implications for striatal energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Emily Booth; Aicher, Aidan Edward; Fessel, Joshua Patrick; Konradi, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the discrete genome which encodes subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is present at highly variable copy numbers across cell types. Though severe mtDNA depletion dramatically reduces mitochondrial function, the impact of tissue-specific mtDNA reduction remains debated. Previously, our lab identified reduced mtDNA quantity in the putamen of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients who had developed L-DOPA Induced Dyskinesia (LID), compared to PD patients who had not developed LID and healthy subjects. Here, we present the consequences of mtDNA depletion by ethidium bromide (EtBr) treatment on the bioenergetic function of primary cultured neurons, astrocytes and neuron-enriched cocultures from rat striatum. We report that EtBr inhibition of mtDNA replication and transcription consistently reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and that neurons are significantly more sensitive to EtBr than astrocytes. EtBr also increases glycolytic activity in astrocytes, whereas in neurons it reduces the expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA and levels of phosphocreatine. Further, we show that mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA is similarly downregulated in dyskinetic PD patients, compared to both non-dyskinetic PD patients and healthy subjects. Our data support a hypothesis that reduced striatal mtDNA contributes to energetic dysregulation in the dyskinetic striatum by destabilizing the energy buffering system of the phosphocreatine/creatine shuttle.

  15. Single or combined treatment with L-DOPA and quinpirole differentially modulate expression and phosphorylation of key regulatory kinases in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzzati-Armentero, Marie Therese; Ghezzi, Cristina; Nisticò, Robert; Oda, Adriano; Blandini, Fabio

    2013-09-27

    In the past decades, the clinical use of dopamine agonists has expanded from adjunct therapy in patients with a deteriorating response to L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) to monotherapy for the treatment of early PD. Dopamine agonists provide their antiparkinsonian benefit through stimulation of brain postsynaptic type 2 dopamine receptors that exert their effect through classical cAMP-dependent mechanisms, as well as cAMP-independent cellular signaling cascades, including the Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) pathway. Alterations of Akt/GSK3 have been observed and may contribute to the neurodegenerative processes and the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. The effects L-DOPA and quinpirole, a dopamine agonist, on the two key regulatory kinases, Akt and GSK3, were evaluated in neuroblastoma cell line. L-DOPA and dopamine agonist dose-dependently and differentially modulated Akt and GSK3 expression and phosphorylation when added alone or combined. The combined treatment inverted or potentiated the modulatory properties of the single compound. The drug- and concentration-dependent balance of dopamine receptor stimulation over auto-oxidation may distinctively modulate GSK3 isoforms and Akt. Our results indicate that particular attention must be given to drug concentration and combination when multiple therapies are applied for the clinical treatment of PD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Striatal proteomic analysis suggests that first L-dopa dose equates to chronic exposure.

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    Birger Scholz

    Full Text Available L-3,4-dihydroxypheylalanine (L-dopa-induced dyskinesia represent a debilitating complication of therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD that result from a progressive sensitization through repeated L-dopa exposures. The MPTP macaque model was used to study the proteome in dopamine-depleted striatum with and without subsequent acute and chronic L-dopa treatment using two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. The present data suggest that the dopamine-depleted striatum is so sensitive to de novo L-dopa treatment that the first ever administration alone would be able (i to induce rapid post-translational modification-based proteomic changes that are specific to this first exposure and (ii, possibly, lead to irreversible protein level changes that would be not further modified by chronic L-dopa treatment. The apparent equivalence between first and chronic L-dopa administration suggests that priming would be the direct consequence of dopamine loss, the first L-dopa administrations only exacerbating the sensitization process but not inducing it.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA depletion by ethidium bromide decreases neuronal mitochondrial creatine kinase: Implications for striatal energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Booth Warren

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, the discrete genome which encodes subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is present at highly variable copy numbers across cell types. Though severe mtDNA depletion dramatically reduces mitochondrial function, the impact of tissue-specific mtDNA reduction remains debated. Previously, our lab identified reduced mtDNA quantity in the putamen of Parkinson's Disease (PD patients who had developed L-DOPA Induced Dyskinesia (LID, compared to PD patients who had not developed LID and healthy subjects. Here, we present the consequences of mtDNA depletion by ethidium bromide (EtBr treatment on the bioenergetic function of primary cultured neurons, astrocytes and neuron-enriched cocultures from rat striatum. We report that EtBr inhibition of mtDNA replication and transcription consistently reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and that neurons are significantly more sensitive to EtBr than astrocytes. EtBr also increases glycolytic activity in astrocytes, whereas in neurons it reduces the expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA and levels of phosphocreatine. Further, we show that mitochondrial creatine kinase mRNA is similarly downregulated in dyskinetic PD patients, compared to both non-dyskinetic PD patients and healthy subjects. Our data support a hypothesis that reduced striatal mtDNA contributes to energetic dysregulation in the dyskinetic striatum by destabilizing the energy buffering system of the phosphocreatine/creatine shuttle.

  18. Discinesia ciliar primária: quando o pediatra deve suspeitar e como diagnosticar? Primary ciliary dyskinesia: when the pediatrician must suspect and how to do the diagnosis?

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    Mary Anne K. Olm

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar a discinesia ciliar primária (DCP quanto aos seus aspectos ultra-estruturais, discriminar os defeitos ciliares primários dos secundários, descrever o quadro clínico, os testes laboratoriais de triagem e de diagnóstico disponíveis, bem como seu manejo clínico. FONTE DE DADOS: Pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Lilacs e SciELO, no período de 1980 a 2007. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A DCP é uma doença autossômica recessiva que compromete a estrutura e/ou a função ciliar e, conseqüentemente, o transporte mucociliar. As manifestações clínicas envolvem o trato respiratório superior e inferior, com infecções recorrentes do ouvido médio, seios paranasais e pulmonares, que podem evoluir para bronquiectasias. Outras manifestações incluem situs inversus totalis e infertilidade masculina. O diagnóstico deve ser suspeitado pelos pediatras em várias situações: recém-nascidos de termo com desconforto respiratório sem causa aparente; neonatos portadores de dextrocardia; lactentes com tosse persistente e/ou infecções otorrinolaringológicas de repetição, excluindo-se as imunodeficiências e a fibrose cística; crianças com asma atípica e as com bronquiectasias sem causa definida. Os testes de triagem diagnóstica são os da sacarina e do óxido nítrico nasal. As avaliações do defeito ultra-estrutural e funcional exigem análise por microscopia eletrônica e da freqüência e formato da onda de batimento ciliar. CONCLUSÕES: A DCP, apesar da baixa prevalência, é pouco diagnosticada pelas dificuldades de estabelecer o diagnóstico definitivo do defeito ciliar devido à complexidade da investigação laboratorial e pela falta de reconhecimento da doença pelos médicos. A suspeita clínica e o diagnóstico precoce são fundamentais para reduzir a morbidade e prevenir o desenvolvimento de complicações.OBJECTIVE: To review primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD and its ultrastructural aspects, to differentiate primary

  19. Involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in impulse control disorders associated with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; López-Azcárate, Jon; Garcia-Garcia, David; Alegre, Manuel; Toledo, Jon; Valencia, Miguel; Guridi, Jorge; Artieda, Julio; Obeso, Jose A

    2011-01-01

    frequencies and with different topography for the motor (dyskinesias) and behavioural (abnormal impulsivity) manifestations. These findings suggest that the activity recorded in parkinsonian patients with impulse control disorders stems from the associative-limbic area (ventral subthalamic area), which is coherent with premotor frontal cortical activity. Conversely, in patients with l-dopa-induced dyskinesias such activity is recorded in the motor area (dorsal subthalamic area) and it is coherent with cortical motor activity. Consequently, the subthalamic nucleus appears to be implicated in the motor and behavioural complications associated with dopaminergic drugs in Parkinson's disease, specifically engaging different anatomo-functional territories.

  20. Parkinsonism secondary to ethylene oxide exposure

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    Egberto R. Barbosa

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene oxide is a gas widely used in the production of industrial chemicals. It is also used to sterilize heat-sensitive medical supplies. Previous reports of acute and chronic exposure have described neurotoxic effects like peripheral neuropathy and cognitive impairment. We describe a pure parkinsonian syndrome following acute ethylene oxide intoxication. A 39-years-old male was referred to our Movement Disorders Clinic tor evaluation of a parkinsonian syndrome. He was acutely exposed to ethylene oxide four years before and remained comatose for three days, and gradually regained consciousness.. At that time he showed a global parkinsonian syndrome including bradykinesia, rigidity and rest tremor, with a severe motor disability; no other neurological disorders were found. The symptomatology was partially controlled with biperidene and levodopa plus carbidopa. Two years later he developed L-dopa induced dyskinesias. Four years after the intoxication he was evaluated at our clinic. General examination showed no abnormalities. Neurologic examination revealed a normal menta1 status. Motor evaluation disclosed moderate bradykinesia, rigidity and rest tremor, shuffling gait, poor facial mimic, stooped posture, and his speech was low and monotonous; deep tendon reflexes were brisk. The Hoehn-Yahr disability score was degree IV. Routine laboratory and radiological exams showed results within normal limits. The CSF examination was normal. Brain computed tomography and magnetic ressonance were normal. A trial with bromocriptine and levodopa plus carbidopa did not improve dyskinesia, and he was put on a schedule including amantadine and biperidene with improvement to grade III in Hoehn-Yahr scale. In the present case there was a clear relation between the acute exogenous intoxication and irreversible parkinsonism. No other causes for the condition were identified.

  1. Deep brain stimulation of the center median-parafascicular complex of the thalamus has efficient anti-parkinsonian action associated with widespread cellular responses in the basal ganglia network in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouve, Loréline; Salin, Pascal; Melon, Christophe; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2010-07-21

    The thalamic centromedian-parafascicular (CM/Pf) complex, mainly represented by Pf in rodents, is proposed as an interesting target for the neurosurgical treatment of movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease. In this study, we examined the functional impact of subchronic high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of Pf in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model. Pf-HFS had significant anti-akinetic action, evidenced by alleviation of limb use asymmetry (cylinder test). Whereas this anti-akinetic action was moderate, Pf-HFS totally reversed lateralized neglect (corridor task), suggesting potent action on sensorimotor integration. At the cellular level, Pf-HFS partially reversed the dopamine denervation-induced increase in striatal preproenkephalin A mRNA levels, a marker of the neurons of the indirect pathway, without interfering with the markers of the direct pathway (preprotachykinin and preprodynorphin). Pf-HFS totally reversed the lesion-induced changes in the gene expression of cytochrome oxidase subunit I in the subthalamic nucleus, the globus pallidus, and the substantia nigra pars reticulata, and partially in the entopeduncular nucleus. Unlike HFS of the subthalamic nucleus, Pf-HFS did not induce per se dyskinesias and directly, although partially, alleviated L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced forelimb dyskinesia. Conversely, L-DOPA treatment negatively interfered with the anti-parkinsonian effect of Pf-HFS. Altogether, these data show that Pf-DBS, by recruiting a large basal ganglia circuitry, provides moderate to strong anti-parkinsonian benefits that might, however, be affected by L-DOPA. The widespread behavioral and cellular outcomes of Pf-HFS evidenced here demonstrate that CM/Pf is an important node for modulating the pathophysiological functioning of basal ganglia and related disorders.

  2. Receptor-heteromer mediated regulation of endocannabinoid signaling in activated microglia. Role of CB1 and CB2 receptors and relevance for Alzheimer's disease and levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel; Angelats, Edgar; Etayo, Íñigo; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Pulido-Salgado, Marta; Rodríguez-Pérez, Ana I; Canela, Enric I; Saura, Josep; Lanciego, José Luis; Labandeira-García, José Luis; Saura, Carlos A; Fuxe, Kjell; Franco, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are important regulators of neurotransmission and, acting on activated microglia, they are postulated as neuroprotective agents. Endocannabinoid action is mediated by CB 1 and CB 2 receptors, which may form heteromeric complexes (CB 1 -CB 2 Hets) with unknown function in microglia. We aimed at establishing the expression and signaling properties of cannabinoid receptors in resting and LPS/IFN-γ-activated microglia. In activated microglia mRNA transcripts increased (2 fold for CB 1 and circa 20 fold for CB 2 ), whereas receptor levels were similar for CB 1 and markedly upregulated for CB 2 ; CB 1 -CB 2 Hets were also upregulated. Unlike in resting cells, CB 2 receptors became robustly coupled to G i in activated cells, in which CB 1 -CB 2 Hets mediated a potentiation effect. Hence, resting cells were refractory while activated cells were highly responsive to cannabinoids. Interestingly, similar results were obtained in cultures treated with ß-amyloid (Aß 1-42 ). Microglial activation markers were detected in the striatum of a Parkinson's disease (PD) model and, remarkably, in primary microglia cultures from the hippocampus of mutant β-amyloid precursor protein (APP Sw,Ind ) mice, a transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) model. Also of note was the similar cannabinoid receptor signaling found in primary cultures of microglia from APP Sw,Ind and in cells from control animals activated using LPS plus IFN-γ. Expression of CB 1 -CB 2 Hets was increased in the striatum from rats rendered dyskinetic by chronic levodopa treatment. In summary, our results showed sensitivity of activated microglial cells to cannabinoids, increased CB 1 -CB 2 Het expression in activated microglia and in microglia from the hippocampus of an AD model, and a correlation between levodopa-induced dyskinesia and striatal microglial activation in a PD model. Cannabinoid receptors and the CB 1 -CB 2 heteroreceptor complex in activated microglia have potential as targets in the

  3. Discinesia ciliar primária: considerações sobre seis casos da síndrome de Kartagener Primary ciliary dyskinesia: considerations regarding six cases of Kartagener syndrome

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    Hugo Alejandro Vega Ortega

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A discinesia ciliar primária (DCP, anteriormente conhecida como síndrome dos cílios imóveis, é uma doença hereditária autossômica recessiva que inclui vários padrões de defeitos em sua ultra-estrutura ciliar. Sua forma clínica mais grave é a síndrome de Kartagener (SK, a qual é encontrada em 50% dos casos de DCP. A DCP causa deficiência ou mesmo estase no transporte de secreções em todo o trato respiratório, favorecendo a proliferação de vírus e bactérias. Sua incidência varia de 1:20.000 a 1:60.000. Como conseqüência, os pacientes apresentam infecções crônicas e repetidas desde a infância e geralmente são portadores de bronquite, pneumonia, hemoptise, sinusite e infertilidade. As bronquiectasias e outras infecções crônicas podem ser o resultado final das alterações irreversíveis dos brônquios, podendo progredir para cor pulmonale crônico e suas conseqüências. Somente a metade dos pacientes afetados pela DCP apresenta todos os sintomas, condição denominada SK completa; no restante, não ocorre situs inversus, condição denominada SK incompleta. O diagnóstico é feito com base no quadro clínico e confirmado por meio da microscopia eletrônica de transmissão. Como não há tratamento especifico para a DCP, recomenda-se que, tão logo seja feito o diagnóstico, as infecções secundárias sejam tratadas com antibióticos potentes e medidas profiláticas sejam adotadas. Neste trabalho, relatamos seis casos de DCP (cinco casos de SK completa e um caso de SK incompleta e revisamos a literatura sobre o assunto, tendo como foco os aspectos diagnósticos, terapêuticos e clínicos desta doença.Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, previously known as immotile cilia syndrome, is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease that includes various patterns of ciliary ultrastructural defects. The most serious form is Kartagener syndrome (KS, which accounts for 50% of all cases of PCD. The incidence of PCD ranges from 1

  4. Existence and control of Go/No-Go decision transition threshold in the striatum.

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    Jyotika Bahuguna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A typical Go/No-Go decision is suggested to be implemented in the brain via the activation of the direct or indirect pathway in the basal ganglia. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the striatum, receiving input from cortex and projecting to the direct and indirect pathways express D1 and D2 type dopamine receptors, respectively. Recently, it has become clear that the two types of MSNs markedly differ in their mutual and recurrent connectivities as well as feedforward inhibition from FSIs. Therefore, to understand striatal function in action selection, it is of key importance to identify the role of the distinct connectivities within and between the two types of MSNs on the balance of their activity. Here, we used both a reduced firing rate model and numerical simulations of a spiking network model of the striatum to analyze the dynamic balance of spiking activities in D1 and D2 MSNs. We show that the asymmetric connectivity of the two types of MSNs renders the striatum into a threshold device, indicating the state of cortical input rates and correlations by the relative activity rates of D1 and D2 MSNs. Next, we describe how this striatal threshold can be effectively modulated by the activity of fast spiking interneurons, by the dopamine level, and by the activity of the GPe via pallidostriatal backprojections. We show that multiple mechanisms exist in the basal ganglia for biasing striatal output in favour of either the `Go' or the `No-Go' pathway. This new understanding of striatal network dynamics provides novel insights into the putative role of the striatum in various behavioral deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease, including increased reaction times, L-Dopa-induced dyskinesia, and deep brain stimulation-induced impulsivity.

  5. Existence and control of Go/No-Go decision transition threshold in the striatum.

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    Bahuguna, Jyotika; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-04-01

    A typical Go/No-Go decision is suggested to be implemented in the brain via the activation of the direct or indirect pathway in the basal ganglia. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum, receiving input from cortex and projecting to the direct and indirect pathways express D1 and D2 type dopamine receptors, respectively. Recently, it has become clear that the two types of MSNs markedly differ in their mutual and recurrent connectivities as well as feedforward inhibition from FSIs. Therefore, to understand striatal function in action selection, it is of key importance to identify the role of the distinct connectivities within and between the two types of MSNs on the balance of their activity. Here, we used both a reduced firing rate model and numerical simulations of a spiking network model of the striatum to analyze the dynamic balance of spiking activities in D1 and D2 MSNs. We show that the asymmetric connectivity of the two types of MSNs renders the striatum into a threshold device, indicating the state of cortical input rates and correlations by the relative activity rates of D1 and D2 MSNs. Next, we describe how this striatal threshold can be effectively modulated by the activity of fast spiking interneurons, by the dopamine level, and by the activity of the GPe via pallidostriatal backprojections. We show that multiple mechanisms exist in the basal ganglia for biasing striatal output in favour of either the `Go' or the `No-Go' pathway. This new understanding of striatal network dynamics provides novel insights into the putative role of the striatum in various behavioral deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease, including increased reaction times, L-Dopa-induced dyskinesia, and deep brain stimulation-induced impulsivity.

  6. Noradrenaline and Parkinson's disease

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    Claire eDelaville

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and motor symptoms including bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor at rest. These symptoms are manifest when around 70% of striatal DA is lost. In addition to motor deficits, PD is also characterized by the manifestation of non-motor symptoms. However, depletion of DA alone in animal models has failed to simultaneously elicit both the motor and non-motor deficits of PD because the disease is a multi-system disorder that features a profound loss of other neurotransmitter systems. There is growing evidence that additional loss of noradrenaline (NA neurons of the locus coeruleus, the principal source of NA in the brain, could be involved in the clinical expression of motor as well as in non-motor deficits. In the present review, we analyzed the latest data obtained from animal models of parkinsonism and from parkinsonian patients providing evidence for the implication of NA in the pathophysiology of PD. Recent studies have shown that NA depletion alone or combined with DA depletion resulted in motor as well as in non-motor dysfunctions. In addition, by using selective agonists and antagonists of alpha receptors we, and others, have shown that α2 receptors are implicated in the control of motor activity and that α2 receptor antagonists can improve PD motor symptoms as well as L-Dopa-induced dyskinesia. Here we provide arguments that the loss of NA neurons in PD has an impact on all PD symptoms and that the association of NAergic agents to dopaminergic medication can be beneficial in the treatment of the disease.

  7. Basal ganglia disorders associated with imbalances in the striatal striosome and matrix compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill R. Crittenden

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is composed principally of GABAergic, medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs that can be categorized based on their gene expression, electrophysiological profiles and input-output circuits. Major subdivisions of MSN populations include 1 those in ventromedial and dorsolateral striatal regions, 2 those giving rise to the direct and indirect pathways, and 3 those that lie in the striosome and matrix compartments. The first two classificatory schemes have enabled advances in understanding of how basal ganglia circuits contribute to disease. However, despite the large number of molecules that are differentially expressed in the striosomes or the extra-striosomal matrix, and the evidence that these compartments have different input-output connections, our understanding of how this compartmentalization contributes to striatal function is still not clear. A broad view is that the matrix contains the direct and indirect pathway MSNs that form parts of sensorimotor and associative circuits, whereas striosomes contain MSNs that receive input from parts of limbic cortex and project directly or indirectly to the dopamine-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, pars compacta. Striosomes are widely distributed within the striatum and are thought to exert global, as well as local, influences on striatal processing by exchanging information with the surrounding matrix, including through interneurons that send processes into both compartments. It has been suggested that striosomes exert and maintain limbic control over behaviors driven by surrounding sensorimotor and associative parts of the striatal matrix. Consistent with this possibility, imbalances between striosome and matrix functions have been reported in relation to neurological disorders, including Huntington’s disease, L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, dystonia and drug addiction. Here, we consider how signaling imbalances between the striosomes and matrix might relate to symptomatology in

  8. Levodopa-induced plasticity: a double-edged sword in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabresi, Paolo; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Mazzocchetti, Petra; Corbelli, Ilenia; Picconi, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The long-term replacement therapy with the dopamine (DA) precursor 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) is a milestone in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although this drug precursor can be metabolized into the active neurotransmitter DA throughout the brain, its therapeutic benefit is due to restoring extracellular DA levels within the dorsal striatum, which lacks endogenous DA as a consequence of the neurodegenerative process induced by the disease. In the early phases of PD, L-DOPA treatment is able to restore both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP), two major forms of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity that are altered by dopaminergic denervation. However, unlike physiological DA transmission, this therapeutic approach in the advanced phase of the disease leads to abnormal peaks of DA, non-synaptically released, which are supposed to trigger behavioural sensitization, namely L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. This condition is characterized by a loss of synaptic depotentiation, an inability to reverse previously induced LTP. In the advanced stages of PD, L-DOPA can also induce non-motor fluctuations with cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders. Although the mechanisms underlying the role of L-DOPA in both motor and behavioural symptoms are still incompletely understood, recent data from electrophysiological and imaging studies have increased our understanding of the function of the brain areas involved and of the mechanisms implicated in both therapeutic and adverse actions of L-DOPA in PD patients. PMID:26009763

  9. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviraja eUdupa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD, there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG thalamo-cortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostrial dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1, which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LID, the plasticity protocol used, medication and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS. The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g. brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism, emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  10. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  11. Targeting the dopamine D3 receptor: an overview of drug design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Antoni; Moreno, Estefanía; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter widely distributed in both the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS). Its physiological effects are mediated by five closely related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are divided into two major subclasses: the D1-like (D1, D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3, D4) receptors. D3 receptors (D3Rs) have the highest density in the limbic areas of the brain, which are associated with cognitive and emotional functions. These receptors are therefore attractive targets for therapeutic management. This review summarizes the functional and pharmacological characteristics of D3Rs, including the design and clinical relevance of full agonists, partial agonists and antagonists, as well as the capacity of these receptors to form active homodimers, heterodimers or higher order receptor complexes as pharmacological targets in several neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. The high sequence homology between D3R and the D2-type challenges the development of D3R-selective compounds. The design of new D3R-preferential ligands with improved physicochemical properties should provide a better pharmacokinetic/bioavailability profile and lesser toxicity than is found with existing D3R ligands. It is also essential to optimize D3R affinity and, especially, D3R vs. D2-type binding and functional selectivity ratios. Developing allosteric and bitopic ligands should help to improve the D3R selectivity of these drugs. As most evidence points to the ability of GPCRs to form homomers and heteromers, the most promising therapeutic strategy in the future is likely to involve the application of heteromer-selective drugs. These selective ligands would display different affinities for a given receptor depending on the receptor partners within the heteromer. Therefore, designing novel compounds that specifically target and modulate D1R-D3R heteromers would be an interesting approach for the treatment of levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias.

  12. Anti-dyskinetic mechanisms of amantadine and dextromethorphan in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease: role of NMDA vs. 5-HT1A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Melanie A; Martinez, Alex A; Macheda, Teresa; Meshul, Charles K; Johnson, Steven W; Berger, S Paul; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Amantadine and dextromethorphan suppress levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model. These effects have been attributed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonism. However, amantadine and dextromethorphan are also thought to block serotonin (5-HT) uptake and cause 5-HT overflow, leading to stimulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors, which has been shown to reduce LID. We undertook a study in 6-OHDA rats to determine whether the anti-dyskinetic effects of these two compounds are mediated by NMDA antagonism and/or 5-HT(1A) agonism. In addition, we assessed the sensorimotor effects of these drugs using the Vibrissae-Stimulated Forelimb Placement and Cylinder tests. Our data show that the AIM-suppressing effect of amantadine was not affected by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-100635, but was partially reversed by the NMDA agonist d-cycloserine. Conversely, the AIM-suppressing effect of dextromethorphan was prevented by WAY-100635 but not by d-cycloserine. Neither amantadine nor dextromethorphan affected the therapeutic effects of L-DOPA in sensorimotor tests. We conclude that the anti-dyskinetic effect of amantadine is partially dependent on NMDA antagonism, while dextromethorphan suppresses AIMs via indirect 5-HT(1A) agonism. Combined with previous work from our group, our results support the investigation of 5-HT(1A) agonists as pharmacotherapies for LID in PD patients. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slow, prolonged contraction of muscles (dystonia); small, fast, "dance-like" motions (chorea); writhing movements of the limbs ( ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involve slow, prolonged muscle contractions (dystonia); small, fast, "dance-like" motions (chorea); writhing movements of the limbs ( ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ADCY5-related dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and severity before stabilizing or even improving in middle age. Anxiety, fatigue, and other stress can temporarily increase ... What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages RAB18 deficiency Depression Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease ...

  16. RESETTING AND REINVENTING PRINT MEDIA: LEARNING FROM COLLEGE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Jackson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A readership study, employing an online survey (n = 275, was conducted to determine the reading preferences of students, faculty, staff, and alumni for the student magazine and web site of a technological university. The print version (53% was preferred over the online version (22%, with 25% having no preference. Internet and social media were the preferred news media with Facebook dominating all other sites. Few had downloaded the app (7%, despite the fact that 92% owned smartphones. Attitudes toward news were positive and predictive of reading specific sections. Reading the technology section was significantly related to being “part of my daily habit,” “part of my civic duty,” “helpful in making choices,” and negatively related to “inconvenient.” Additional qualitative responses are discussed.

  17. Effectiveness of the Factory Reset on a Mobile Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    images and photos taken by the camera (.jpg, .png)  Other user data (address book /phone book /calendar data) The data that should be left behind...statements  Credit card statements  Tax returns  Emails  Contact lists  Photos The authors tested secondhand phones purchased through

  18. Temperature influence and reset voltage study of bipolar resistive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moreover, the Cu/ZrO2/ATO device which the ZrO2 thin film annealed at 300 °C can be measured as resistive switching sweeps at 200, 100 and 50 K. It was found that the ratio of off/on reduced when the measured temperature decreased. When the - measurement temperature decreases, on decreases obviously ...

  19. Arms Control and Proliferation Challenges to the Reset Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Sunshine Policy and economic transfers to the North.185 While it is impos- sible to determine conclusively which of these analy- ses of the DPRK’s motives...induce a return to some agreeable forum for negotiations. But it is quite unlikely that in the present configuration, North Korea will renounce its...engage North Ko- rea directly within the Six-Party framework, as China and others have recommended. Then it might be pos- sible to resume

  20. ASC Addresses Unit Commanders' Concerns through LBE and Reset Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Sustainment Command (ASC), part of the U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC) team, is available to assist, identify, and resolve equipment and maintenance problems as well as materiel readiness issues for combatant commanders...

  1. Chromatin resetting mechanisms preventing trangenerational inheritance of epigenetic states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi eIwasaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation can be altered by environmental cues including abiotic and biotic stresses. In most cases, environmentally-induced epigenetic changes are transient, but in some cases they are maintained for extensive periods of time and may even be transmitted to the next generation. However, the underlying mechanisms of transgenerational transmission of environmentally-induced epigenetic states remain largely unknown. Such traits can be adaptive, but also can have negative consequences if the parentally inherited epigenetic memory interferes with canonical environmental responses of the progeny. This review highlights recent insights into the mechanisms preventing transgenerational transmission of environmentally-induced epigenetic states in plants, which resemble those of germline reprogramming in mammals.

  2. Analysis of I Marine Expeditionary Force Support Team Reset Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    in the process. For the hands that have assisted in providing information and that have truly been a catalyst and a crutch for the completion...simulation-Marine Corps. Point paper . Retrieved February 20, 2013 from http://www.ehqmc.usmc.mil/org/IL/ Burton, L.D. (2005). Strategic Inventory

  3. Clinical Trial of Exercise on Circadian Clock Resetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czeisler, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Specific Aim 1: test the hypothesis that a 9-hr phase delay shift of the duty-rest schedule, such as that required for either transmeridian travel or night operations, will induce physiologic maladaptation...

  4. Clinical Trial of Exercise on Circadian Clock Resetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czeisler, Charles

    2001-01-01

    ...: test the hypothesis that multiple nightly bouts of exercise will induce significant delays in the endogenous circadian rhythms of core body temperature, plasma melatonin, reaction time, alertness...

  5. Investigating the resetting of OSL signals in rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    were insensitive. Dose recovery tests using solar simulator and IR diodes on both K-feldspar grains and solid slices taken from the inner parts of the rocks are discussed. Preheat plateau results using surface grains and slices show that significant thermal transfer in naturally bleached samples can...... be avoided by keeping preheat temperatures low. Equivalent doses from surface K-feldspar grains were highly scattered and much larger than expected (0.02 Gy to >100 Gy), while solid surface slices gave more reproducible small doses (mean = 0.17±0.02 Gy, n = 32). Neither crushing nor partial bleaching were...... factors were derived for two samples. These indicate that, for instance, bleaching at a depth of 2 mm into these samples occurs at about ∼28% of the rate at the surface. We conclude that it should be possible to derive meaningful burial doses of >1 Gy from such cobbles; younger samples would probably...

  6. Resetting cancer stem cell regulatory nodes upon MYC inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardi, Silvia; Savino, Mauro; Scagnoli, Fiorella; Pellegatta, Serena; Pisati, Federica; Zambelli, Federico; Illi, Barbara; Annibali, Daniela; Beji, Sara; Orecchini, Elisa; Alberelli, Maria Adele; Apicella, Clara; Fontanella, Rosaria Anna; Michienzi, Alessandro; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Farace, Maria Giulia; Pavesi, Giulio; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Nasi, Sergio

    2016-12-01

    MYC deregulation is common in human cancer and has a role in sustaining the aggressive cancer stem cell populations. MYC mediates a broad transcriptional response controlling normal biological programmes, but its activity is not clearly understood. We address MYC function in cancer stem cells through the inducible expression of Omomyc-a MYC-derived polypeptide interfering with MYC activity-taking as model the most lethal brain tumour, glioblastoma. Omomyc bridles the key cancer stemlike cell features and affects the tumour microenvironment, inhibiting angiogenesis. This occurs because Omomyc interferes with proper MYC localization and itself associates with the genome, with a preference for sites occupied by MYC This is accompanied by selective repression of master transcription factors for glioblastoma stemlike cell identity such as OLIG2, POU3F2, SOX2, upregulation of effectors of tumour suppression and differentiation such as ID4, MIAT, PTEN, and modulation of the expression of microRNAs that target molecules implicated in glioblastoma growth and invasion such as EGFR and ZEB1. Data support a novel view of MYC as a network stabilizer that strengthens the regulatory nodes of gene expression networks controlling cell phenotype and highlight Omomyc as model molecule for targeting cancer stem cells. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Proprioceptive input resets central locomotor rhythm in the spinal cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conway, B. A.; Hultborn, H.; Kiehn, O.

    1987-01-01

    The reflex regulation of stepping is an important factor in adapting the step cycle to changes in the environment. The present experiments have examined the influence of muscle proprioceptors on centrally generated rhythmic locomotor activity in decerebrate unanesthetized cats with a spinal...... fictive locomotion in a coordinated fashion. An extensor group I volley delivered during a flexor burst would abruptly terminate the flexor activity and initiate an extensor burst. The same stimulus given during an extensor burst prolonged the extensor activity while delaying the appearance...... afferents. Thus an increased load of limb extensors during the stance phase would enhance and prolong extensor activity while simultaneously delaying the transition to the swing phase of the step cycle....

  8. Temperature influence and reset voltage study of bipolar resistive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    which is typical for electronic transportation in a Cu metal. It is indicated ... the defects in the oxide (Choi et al 2005; Waser 2009). Researchers ... and ethanol as starting materials while benzoyl acetone ..... the temperature dependence of Roff.

  9. Resetting the T Cell Repertoire in Prostate Cancer Bearing Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Science 264:703-707. 32. Staveley-O’Carroll K, et al. (2003) In vivo ligation of CD40 enhances priming against the endogenous tumor antigen and promotes...bearing the invariant Va14 rearrangement [32,33]. Although the identity of the endogenous antigen presented by CD1d is still unclear, a synthetic...with a BrdU Flow Kit, as described by manufacturer (BD PharMingen). Induction of ConA induced hepatitis Con A (Sigma, C0412) was dissolved in pyrogen

  10. Efficacy on Affective Disorder and Dyskinesia Treated with Modified Sini San and Music Therapy in the Patients of Post - Stroke Depression%加味四逆散联合音乐疗法对脑卒中后合并抑郁症状患者的情感和肢体运动障碍的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁迪赛

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy on the affective disorder and dyskinesia treated with modified sini san and music therapy in the patients of post - stroke depression(PSD). Methods One hun-dred and eighty PSD patients were randomized into a combined treatment of modified sini san and music ther-apy(combined therapy group,64 cases),a modified sini san group(TCM control group,62 cases)and a rou-tine western medicine group(western medicine control group,54 cases). The basic treatment was given in the three groups. In the western medicine control group,besides the basic treatment,fluoxetine was used. In the TCM control group,besides the basic treatment,the granules of modified sini san were added. In the combined therapy group,on the basis of the treatment as the TCM control group,music therapy was added. The different music types were selected in accordance with the syndrome differentiation. Hamilton depression scale (HAMD),scale of activities of daily living(ADL)and national institute of health stroke scale(NIHSS)as well as the relevant adverse reactions were observed 8 weeks after treatment in the three groups. Results In the 4th and 8th weeks of the treatment in the three groups,HAMD score was reduced significantly(P ﹤ 0. 05), ADL score was increased significantly(P ﹤ 0. 05)and NIHSS score was reduced significant only in the 8th week(P ﹤ 0. 05). In the 4th week of treatment,HAMD and ADL scores in the combined treatment group were different significantly as compared with the western medicine control group(P ﹤ 0. 05,P ﹤ 0. 01). In the 8th week group,HAMD and NIHSS scores were lower significantly than those in the TCM control group and the western medicine control group(P ﹤ 0. 05). The difference in the incidence of adverse reactions was not sig-nificant among the three groups(P ﹥ 0. 05). Conclusion The combined treatment of modified sini san and music therapy is safe and effective in affective order and dyskinesia in PSD patients and the effects are

  11. Functional selectivity of allosteric interactions within G protein-coupled receptor oligomers: the dopamine D1-D3 receptor heterotetramer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Xavier; Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefania; Yano, Hideaki; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Sánchez-Soto, Marta; Kumar-Barodia, Sandeep; Naidu, Yamini T; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent; McCormick, Peter J; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor-D3 receptor (D1R-D3R) heteromer is being considered as a potential therapeutic target for neuropsychiatric disorders. Previous studies suggested that this heteromer could be involved in the ability of D3R agonists to potentiate locomotor activation induced by D1R agonists. It has also been postulated that its overexpression plays a role in L-dopa-induced dyskinesia and in drug addiction. However, little is known about its biochemical properties. By combining bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, bimolecular complementation techniques, and cell-signaling experiments in transfected cells, evidence was obtained for a tetrameric stoichiometry of the D1R-D3R heteromer, constituted by two interacting D1R and D3R homodimers coupled to Gs and Gi proteins, respectively. Coactivation of both receptors led to the canonical negative interaction at the level of adenylyl cyclase signaling, to a strong recruitment of β-arrestin-1, and to a positive cross talk of D1R and D3R agonists at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Furthermore, D1R or D3R antagonists counteracted β-arrestin-1 recruitment and MAPK activation induced by D3R and D1R agonists, respectively (cross-antagonism). Positive cross talk and cross-antagonism at the MAPK level were counteracted by specific synthetic peptides with amino acid sequences corresponding to D1R transmembrane (TM) domains TM5 and TM6, which also selectively modified the quaternary structure of the D1R-D3R heteromer, as demonstrated by complementation of hemiproteins of yellow fluorescence protein fused to D1R and D3R. These results demonstrate functional selectivity of allosteric modulations within the D1R-D3R heteromer, which can be involved with the reported behavioral synergism of D1R and D3R agonists. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  12. Development of a unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Sherri L; Warre, Ruth; Nash, Joanne E

    2012-02-14

    The unilaterally lesioned 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) has proved to be invaluable in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying parkinsonian symptoms, since it recapitulates the changes in basal ganglia circuitry and pharmacology observed in parkinsonian patients(1-4). However, the precise cellular and molecular changes occurring at cortico-striatal synapses of the output pathways within the striatum, which is the major input region of the basal ganglia remain elusive, and this is believed to be site where pathological abnormalities underlying parkinsonian symptoms arise(3,5). In PD, understanding the mechanisms underlying changes in basal ganglia circuitry following degeneration of the nigro-striatal pathway has been greatly advanced by the development of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mice over-expressing green fluorescent proteins driven by promoters specific for the two striatal output pathways (direct pathway: eGFP-D1; indirect pathway: eGFP-D2 and eGFP-A2a)(8), allowing them to be studied in isolation. For example, recent studies have suggested that there are pathological changes in synaptic plasticity in parkinsonian mice(9,10). However, these studies utilised juvenile mice and acute models of parkinsonism. It is unclear whether the changes described in adult rats with stable 6-OHDA lesions also occur in these models. Other groups have attempted to generate a stable unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA adult mouse model of PD by lesioning the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), unfortunately, the mortality rate in this study was extremely high, with only 14% surviving the surgery for 21 days or longer(11). More recent studies have generated intra-nigral lesions with both a low mortality rate >80% loss of dopaminergic neurons, however expression of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia(11,12,13,14) was variable in these studies. Another well established mouse model of PD is the MPTP-lesioned mouse(15). Whilst this

  13. Chronic levodopa administration followed by a washout period increased number and induced phenotypic changes in striatal dopaminergic cells in MPTP-monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla DiCaudo

    in the development of aberrant striatal circuits and the appearance of L-Dopa induced dyskinesias.

  14. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome in a family with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J. Marafie

    2014-12-22

    Dec 22, 2014 ... flagella of sperm tail, brain and spinal cord ependyma [2]. Many syndromes are linked to ... VC) to left sided superior caval vein (right sided inferior caval vein), and with S/P left .... east: nature versus nurture. Open Complement ...

  15. l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine induces ptosis through a GPR143-independent mechanism in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Ueda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Through its conversion to dopamine by aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA replenishes depleted brain dopamine in Parkinson's disease patients. We recently identified GPR143 as a candidate receptor for l-DOPA. In this study, we investigated the behavioral actions of l-DOPA in wild type (wt and Gpr143-deficient mice. l-DOPA dose-dependently (10–100 mg/kg, i.p. induced ptosis under treatment with 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine, a centrally acting AADC inhibitor. This effect was not mimicked by 3-O-methyldopa. l-DOPA-induced ptosis in Gpr143-deficient mice to a similar extent as in wt mice. These results suggest that l-DOPA induces ptosis in a GPR143-independent fashion in mice.

  16. Sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback as adjunct therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Wubben, Jacqueline A; Vanwersch, Raymond A P; Estevao, Dave L; Tass, Peter A

    2017-08-01

    Neurofeedback may enhance compensatory brain mechanisms. EEG-based sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback training was suggested to be beneficial in Parkinson's disease. In a placebo-controlled study in parkinsonian nonhuman primates we here show that sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback training reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonian symptoms and both ON and OFF scores during classical L-DOPA treatment. Our findings encourage further development of sensorimotor rhythm neurofeedback training as adjunct therapy for Parkinson's disease which might help reduce L-DOPA-induced side effects.

  17. A role for neuroglobin: Resetting the trigger level for apoptosis in neuronal and retinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Mathews, A.J.; Brittain, T.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new hypothesis for the molecular mechanism by which neuroglobin exerts its protective effect in hypoxia-induced cell death. Our recent observation of a very rapid electron-transfer reaction between ferrous neuroglobin and ferric cytochrome c is central to this hypothesis. In contrast...

  18. How old are lunar lobate scarps? 1. Seismic resetting of crater size-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hiesinger, Harald; Banks, Maria E.; Watters, Thomas R.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2018-05-01

    Previous studies have estimated the ages of lunar lobate scarps, some of the youngest tectonic landforms on the Moon, based on the estimated life-times of their fresh morphologies and associated small graben, using crater degradation ages, or via buffered and traditional crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Here, we reexamine five scarps previously dated by Binder and Gunga (1985) with crater degradation ages to benchmark the evaluation of both the buffered and traditional CSFD approaches for determination of absolute model ages (AMAs) at scarps. Both CSFD methods yield similar ages for each individual scarp, indicating that fault activity not only can be measured on the scarp itself, but also in the surrounding terrain - an indication that tectonic activity causes surface renewal both adjacent to and even kilometers distant from scarps. Size-frequency variations in the regions surrounding the scarps are thus useful for studying the extent and severity of the ground motion caused by coseismic slip events during scarp formation. All age determination approaches continue to indicate that lunar lobate scarps were active in the late Copernican, with some scarps possibly experiencing activity within the last 100 Ma.

  19. Medical ethics in an era of bioethics: resetting the medical profession's compass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Edmund D

    2012-02-01

    What it means to be a medical professional has been defined by medical ethicists throughout history and remains a contemporary concern addressed by this paper. A medical professional is generally considered to be one who makes a public promise to fulfill the ethical obligations expressed in the Hippocratic Code. This presentation summarizes the history of medical professionalism and refocuses attention on the interpersonal relationship of doctor and patient. This keynote address was delivered at the Founders of Bioethics International Congress (June, 2010).

  20. Assessment of the recovery annealing efficiency for VVER-1000 materials' structure reset and lifetime extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Prikhodko, K.; Fedotova, S.

    2011-01-01

    The results of the VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessels welds studies based on the surveillance specimens sets have revealed a high embrittlement rate of steel with high nickel content compared with predicted embrittlement determined from the Russian Guide. For these critical vessels further safe operation (even during design service life) is not allowed without additional measures (recovery annealing of the VVER-1000 welds as earlier for VVER- 440). The reason is that the rate of high nickel VVER-1000 welds embrittlement is significantly higher than that is for base metal. In order to solve a problem of VVER-1000 lifetime extension recovery annealing validation and accelerated reirradiation of specimens for prolonged operation period estimation after annealing were necessary. In this work comparison of electron-microscopy fine structure studies and fractographic studies of Charpy specimens fracture surface of the VVER-1000 high nickel welds in different states were carried out. It allows estimation of the recovery annealing effect on steels structure and its behavior at further operation. It is shown that both secondary and primary irradiation causes alike radiation-induced fine structure changes: dislocation loops and nano-size precipitates. Recovery annealing leads to full dislocation loops dissolution and significant nano-size precipitates solution but not to the initial values. The rate of radiation defects and radiation-induced precipitates accumulation at reirradiation weld after recovery annealing is lower than at primary irradiation and determine the lower secondary embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld. (authors)

  1. Sensory coding by cerebellar mossy fibres through inhibition-driven phase resetting and synchronisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahl Holtzman

    Full Text Available Temporal coding of spike-times using oscillatory mechanisms allied to spike-time dependent plasticity could represent a powerful mechanism for neuronal communication. However, it is unclear how temporal coding is constructed at the single neuronal level. Here we investigate a novel class of highly regular, metronome-like neurones in the rat brainstem which form a major source of cerebellar afferents. Stimulation of sensory inputs evoked brief periods of inhibition that interrupted the regular firing of these cells leading to phase-shifted spike-time advancements and delays. Alongside phase-shifting, metronome cells also behaved as band-pass filters during rhythmic sensory stimulation, with maximal spike-stimulus synchronisation at frequencies close to the idiosyncratic firing frequency of each neurone. Phase-shifting and band-pass filtering serve to temporally align ensembles of metronome cells, leading to sustained volleys of near-coincident spike-times, thereby transmitting synchronised sensory information to downstream targets in the cerebellar cortex.

  2. Sensory Coding by Cerebellar Mossy Fibres through Inhibition-Driven Phase Resetting and Synchronisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Tahl; Jörntell, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Temporal coding of spike-times using oscillatory mechanisms allied to spike-time dependent plasticity could represent a powerful mechanism for neuronal communication. However, it is unclear how temporal coding is constructed at the single neuronal level. Here we investigate a novel class of highly regular, metronome-like neurones in the rat brainstem which form a major source of cerebellar afferents. Stimulation of sensory inputs evoked brief periods of inhibition that interrupted the regular firing of these cells leading to phase-shifted spike-time advancements and delays. Alongside phase-shifting, metronome cells also behaved as band-pass filters during rhythmic sensory stimulation, with maximal spike-stimulus synchronisation at frequencies close to the idiosyncratic firing frequency of each neurone. Phase-shifting and band-pass filtering serve to temporally align ensembles of metronome cells, leading to sustained volleys of near-coincident spike-times, thereby transmitting synchronised sensory information to downstream targets in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:22046297

  3. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, T. J. G. M.; Wessels, R. J.; Jansen, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of

  4. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, T. J. G. M.; Wessels, R. J.; Jansen, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of antibiotics almost halved in the years 2009-2015, with a decrease of the use of critically important antibiotics to very low levels. THEORY OF BEHAVIOUR CHANGE: To realize a sustainable decrease i...

  5. Parallel superconducting strip-line detectors: reset behaviour in the single-strip switch regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casaburi, A; Heath, R M; Tanner, M G; Hadfield, R H; Cristiano, R; Ejrnaes, M; Nappi, C

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting strip-line detectors (SSLDs) are an important emerging technology for the detection of single molecules in time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). We present an experimental investigation of a SSLD laid out in a parallel configuration, designed to address selected single strip-lines operating in the single-strip switch regime. Fast laser pulses were tightly focused onto the device, allowing controllable nucleation of a resistive region at a specific location and study of the subsequent device response dynamics. We observed that in this regime, although the strip-line returns to the superconducting state after triggering, no effective recovery of the bias current occurs, in qualitative agreement with a phenomenological circuit simulation that we performed. Moreover, from theoretical considerations and by looking at the experimental pulse amplitude distribution histogram, we have the first confirmation of the fact that the phenomenological London model governs the current redistribution in these large area devices also after detection events. (paper)

  6. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G

    1998-01-01

    In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose...... and oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...... interference. During baseline conditions CBF was 1.08 +/- 0.25 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1), and the cerebral oxygen to glucose uptake ratio was 5.5. Activation was induced by opening the sheltering box for 6 minutes. Activation increased CBF to 1.81 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1). During activation cerebral glucose...

  7. When to Reset Your Keys: Optimal Timing of Security Updates via Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zizhan; Shroff, Ness B.; Mohapatra, Prasant

    2016-01-01

    Cybersecurity is increasingly threatened by advanced and persistent attacks. As these attacks are often designed to disable a system (or a critical resource, e.g., a user account) repeatedly, it is crucial for the defender to keep updating its security measures to strike a balance between the risk of being compromised and the cost of security updates. Moreover, these decisions often need to be made with limited and delayed feedback due to the stealthy nature of advanced attacks. In addition t...

  8. Resetting the Growth Engines of the BRICS Countries as a Reaction to the Global Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Monica Oehler-Șincai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, our main objective is to bring to the forefront two notable processes, as a result of the world financial and economic crisis. On the one side, we underline the increasing role of the emerging countries (especially that of China, Brazil, Russia and India in the world economy and, on the other side, we underscore the remodelling of the patterns of economic growth and development in the case of the BRICS countries. The Russian Federation, Brazil and South Africa rapidly eased out of the recession in 2009, while China and India continued to record robust growth rates. Nevertheless, in 2012, one can remark the precipitate slowdown of the GDP growth in all the five analysed economies. This demonstrates that the emerging economies were not able to “decouple” from the world economy and, on the contrary, they were deeply affected by the adverse economic situation in the USA and the EU (especially the Euro Zone. At the same time, China’s economic slowdown negatively influences Brazil, Russia, India and South Africa, as China represents the largest trading partner for them, after the EU. At the same time, one should not ignore the actual weaknesses of these economies. For instance, inflation represents a “common vulnerability” of the BRICS. In this situation, the selection of the most viable instrument of monetary policy represents a veritable challenge for the authorities in these countries, as the economic growth should be stimulated but, at the same time, inflation has to be tempered. Besides, unemployment rate in South Africa is already at high levels. The fiscal deficit, as a percentage of GDP is excessive in India and South Africa and the public debt to GDP ratio is extremely high in India and Brazil. During the world financial and economic crisis, the authorities and companies, both public and private, concentrated their attention more and more on the internal markets, with a high absorption capacity. Without giving up exports and FDI as engines of economic growth, the administrative bodies at macro and microeconomic levels understood that the internal demand represents a complementary source of growth. In contrast with the most developed countries, which intensely resorted to austerity measures, the BRICS were able to adopt stimulus measures. Such Keynesian moves were possible, as the emerging countries entered the global crisis with strong macroeconomic and financial positions. As a matter of fact, the world financial and economic crisis erupted in a moment considered by the international experts as the “most prosperous” for these countries. The general measures adopted in order to stimulate the economy in the field of fiscal policy and monetary policy were combined with specific, sectoral ones. Such measures managed even to attenuate the negative effects of the global crisis at social level. Infrastructure development though public investment projects is used by the BRICS governments as one of the principal means to stimulate economic growth and jobs creation. Our paper concludes that, for the BRICS countries, the classical engines for economic growth like exports and inward FDI are complemented by additional growth engines: internal demand (spurred by the high level of remittances from abroad, the outward FDI, innovation and infrastructure development.

  9. Is the nonREM–REM sleep cycle reset by forced awakenings from REM sleep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grözinger, Michael; Beersma, Domien G.M.; Fell, Jürgen; Röschke, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    In selective REM sleep deprivation (SRSD), the occurrence of stage REM is repeatedly interrupted by short awakenings. Typically, the interventions aggregate in clusters resembling the REM episodes in undisturbed sleep. This salient phenomenon can easily be explained if the nonREM–REM sleep process

  10. Is the nonREM-REM sleep cycle reset by forced awakenings from REM sleep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grozinger, M; Beersma, DGM; Fell, J; Roschke, J

    In selective REM sleep deprivation (SRSD), the occurrence of stage REM is repeatedly interrupted by short awakenings. Typically, the interventions aggregate in clusters resembling the REM episodes in undisturbed sleep. This salient phenomenon can easily be explained if the nonREM-REM sleep process

  11. Resetting the compass: exploring the implicit messages of orientation to a community-engaged medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Helen Ellaway

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Orientation to undergraduate medical training can be successfully linked to a school’s social mission, but in doing so it can send complex and unintended messages to the participants that may be perceived quite differently based on their circumstances and expectations.

  12. Clinical Trial of the Effect of Exercise on Resetting of the Endogenous Circadian Pacemaker

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czeisler, Charles

    2000-01-01

    ...: test the hypothesis that multiple nightly bouts of exercise will induce significant delays in the endogenous circadian rhythms of core body temperature, plasma - melatonin, reaction time, alertness...

  13. How Old are Lunar Lobate Scarps? 1. Seismic Resetting of Crater Size-Frequency Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hiesinger, Harald; Banks, Maria E.; Watters, Thomas R.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have estimated the ages of lunar lobate scarps, some of the youngest tectonic landforms on the Moon, based on the estimated life-times of their fresh morphologies and associated small graben, using crater degradation ages, or via buffered and traditional crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Here, we reexamine five scarps previously dated by Binder and Gunga (1985) with crater degradation ages to benchmark the evaluation of both the buffered and traditional CSFD approaches for determination of absolute model ages (AMAs) at scarps. Both CSFD methods yield similar ages for each individual scarp, indicating that fault activity not only can be measured on the scarp itself, but also in the surrounding terrain - an indication that tectonic activity causes surface renewal both adjacent to and even kilometers distant from scarps. Size-frequency variations in the regions surrounding the scarps are thus useful for studying the extent and severity of the ground motion caused by coseismic slip events during scarp formation. All age determination approaches continue to indicate that lunar lobate scarps were active in the late Copernican, with some scarps possibly experiencing activity within the last 100 Ma.

  14. Llinas’ Phase Reset Mechanism Delays the Onset of Chaos in Shark and Dolphin Wall Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-10

    the results of the modeling of chaos control by sharks . Skins of great white ,33 Atlantic sharpnose,36 and tiger shark37 dermal denticles (dd), with...13. c: Dermal denticles (diamond-shaped scales) of great white shark ; depending on species, there may be three to six riblets per scale (five to...Denticles of Great White Shark ," Electron Microscope Unit, University of Cape Town, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, http://ocean.si.edu/ocean

  15. Army 2020: Generating Health & Discipline in the Force Ahead of the Strategic Reset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    that many will choose to endure the effects of  behavioral health conditions  – even when they know they may be relieved or  cured  with treatment...they]  determine that  absentee  Soldiers have departed without the intent to return and are considered high  risk.”280  Although this policy will...Symptoms, Health Care Visits, and  Absenteeism  among  Iraq War Veterans. American Journal of Psychiatry 164, no. 1. (January): 150–153.  54 United

  16. Pedagogies That Explore Food Practices: Resetting the Table for Improved Eco-Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Carol E.; Barter, Barbara G.

    2015-01-01

    As health threats appear with increasing regularity in our food systems and other food crises loom worldwide, we look to rural areas to provide local and nutritious foods. Educationally, we seek approaches to food studies that engage students and their communities and, ultimately, lead to positive action. Yet food studies receive only generic…

  17. Reset, Hack and Own : Media Focus in Art and Design Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Nordeman

    2014-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, the professional context of arts and design, in terms of production, distribution and consumption, has largely changed as a result of technological developments. However, art and design education programmes in the Netherlands have mostly failed to constructively

  18. Changing epidemiology of maternal mortality in rural India: time to reset strategies for MDG-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pankaj; Shah, Shobha; Kutty, Raman V; Modi, Dhiren

    2014-05-01

    To understand changes in epidemiology of maternal mortality in rural India in the context of increasing institutional deliveries and implementation of community-based interventions that can inform policies to reach MDG-5. This study is a secondary analysis of prospectively collected community-based data of every pregnancy and its outcomes from 2002 to 2011 in a rural, tribal area of Gujarat, India as part of safe-motherhood programme implemented by voluntary organisation, SEWA Rural. The programme consisted of community-based interventions supported by a first referral unit, and promotion of institutional deliveries. For every maternal death, a verbal autopsy was conducted. The incidence rates for maternal mortality according to place, cause and timing of maternal deaths in relation to pregnancy were computed. Annual incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for caste and maternal education, were estimated using Poisson regression to test for linear trend in reduction in mortality during the study period. Thirty-two thousand eight hundred and ninety-three pregnancies, 29,817 live births and 80 maternal deaths were recorded. Maternal mortality ratio improved from 607 (19 deaths) in 2002-2003 to 161 (five deaths) in 2010-2011. The institutional delivery rate increased from 23% to 65%. The trend of falling maternal deaths was significant over time, with an annual reduction of 17% (adjusted IRR 0.83 CI 0.75-0.91, P-value rate of maternal deaths due to direct causes, during intrapartum and post-partum periods, and those which occurred at home. However, reductions in incidence of maternal deaths due to indirect causes, at hospital and during antepartum period were not statistically significant. Most maternal deaths are now occurring at hospitals and due to indirect causes. Gains in institutional deliveries and community-based interventions resulting in fewer maternal deaths due to direct causes should be maintained. However, it would be essential to now prioritize management of indirect causes of maternal mortality during pregnancy at community and hospitals for further reduction in maternal deaths to achieve MDG-5. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Earthquake recurrence models fail when earthquakes fail to reset the stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Parkfield's regularly occurring M6 mainshocks, about every 25 years, have over two decades stoked seismologists' hopes to successfully predict an earthquake of significant size. However, with the longest known inter-event time of 38 years, the latest M6 in the series (28 Sep 2004) did not conform to any of the applied forecast models, questioning once more the predictability of earthquakes in general. Our study investigates the spatial pattern of b-values along the Parkfield segment through the seismic cycle and documents a stably stressed structure. The forecasted rate of M6 earthquakes based on Parkfield's microseismicity b-values corresponds well to observed rates. We interpret the observed b-value stability in terms of the evolution of the stress field in that area: the M6 Parkfield earthquakes do not fully unload the stress on the fault, explaining why time recurrent models fail. We present the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake as counter example, which did release a significant portion of the stress along its fault segment and yields a substantial change in b-values.

  20. Reset of a critically disturbed microbial ecosystem: faecal transplant in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuentes, Susana; van Nood, Els; Tims, Sebastian; Heikamp-de Jong, Ineke; ter Braak, Cajo J. F.; Keller, Josbert J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can be effectively treated by infusion of a healthy donor faeces suspension. However, it is unclear what factors determine treatment efficacy. By using a phylogenetic microarray platform, we assessed composition, diversity and dynamics of faecal

  1. Crystallization Age and Impact Resetting of Ancient Lunar Crust from the Descartes Terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M. D.; Borg, L. E.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Lunar ferroan anorthosites (FANs) are relics of an ancient, primary feldspathic crust that is widely believed to have crystallized from a global magma ocean. Compositions and ages of FANs provide fundamental information about the origin and magmatic evolution of the Moon, while the petrology and thermal history of lunar FANs illustrate the structure and impact history of the lunar crust. Here we report petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic (Nd-Sr-Ar) studies of a ferroan noritic anorthosite clast from lunar breccia 67215 to improve our understanding of the composition, age, and thermal history of the Moon.

  2. Simplified wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with 3t APS reset-drain actuation

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Augusto de Moraes Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Um sensor de imagem é uma matriz de pequenas células fotossensíveis chamadas sensores de pixeis. Um pixel, elemento el fotográfico (picture) pix, é a menor porção de uma imagem. Assim o sensor de pixel é a menor célula de um sensor de imagem, capaz de detectar um ponto singular da imagem. Este ponto é então usado para reconstruir um quadro completo de imagem. Sensores de imagem CMOS são atualmente largamente utilizados tanto em câmeras profissionais como em aparelhos moveis em geral como celu...

  3. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest that ripe apple tissues finely and specifically modulate sensing and regulatory mechanisms in response to different hypoxic stress conditions. PMID:26909091

  4. METODE RESET PASSWORD LEVEL ROOT PADA RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (RDBMS MySQL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taqwa Hariguna

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Database merupakan sebuah hal yang penting untuk menyimpan data, dengan database organisasi akan mendapatkan keuntungan dalam beberapa hal, seperti kecepatan akases dan mengurangi penggunaan kertas, namun dengan implementasi database tidak jarang administrator database lupa akan password yang digunakan, hal ini akan mempersulit dalam proses penangganan database. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menggali cara mereset password level root pada relational database management system MySQL.

  5. The Afghanistan Question and the Reset in U.S.-Russian Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Pakistani cities. In the Pakistani Islamic coffee shops, the Arabs would 40 provide the intellectual framework for creating an Is- lamic government...of law, while his administration’s obsession with Iraq would lead the United States into fighting two wars in the Muslim world simultaneously...warp U.S. foreign policy and distort key American ideals about the rule of law, while his administration’s obsession with Iraq would lead the

  6. Benign infantile seizures and paroxysmal dyskinesia caused by an SCN8A mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardella, Elena; Becker, Felicitas; Møller, Rikke S

    2016-01-01

    by stretching, motor initiation or by emotional stimuli. In one case, we recorded typical PKD spells by video-EEG-polygraphy, documenting a cortical involvement. INTERPRETATION: Our study establishes SCN8A as a novel gene in which a recurrent mutation causes BFIS/ICCA, expanding the clinical-genetic spectrum...... patient had seizures only at school age. All patients stayed otherwise seizure-free, most without medication. Interictal EEG was normal in all cases but two. Five/16 patients developed additional brief paroxysmal episodes in puberty, either dystonic/dyskinetic or "shivering" attacks, triggered...... identified as the major gene in all three conditions, found to be mutated in 80-90% of familial and 30-35% of sporadic cases. METHODS: We searched for the genetic defect in PRRT2-negative, unrelated families with BFIS or ICCA using whole exome or targeted gene panel sequencing, and performed a detailed...

  7. Tongluo Zhitong Prescription Alleviates Allodynia, Hyperalgesia, and Dyskinesia in the Chronic Constriction Injury Model of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is common in clinical practice. Exploration of new drug therapeutics has always been carried out for more satisfactory effects and fewer side-effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate effects of Tongluo Zhitong Prescription (TZP, a compounded Chinese medicine description, on neuropathic pain model of rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI. The CCI model was established by loosely ligating sciatic nerve with catgut suture, proximal to its trifurcation. The static and dynamic allodynia, heat hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, cold allodynia, and gait were assessed. Our results showed that TZP alleviated CCI-induced static and dynamic allodynia, suppressed heat hyperalgesia and cold and mechanical allodynia, and improved gait function. These results suggest that TZP could alleviate neuropathic pain. Further experiments are needed to explore its mechanisms.

  8. Sinus bacteriology in patients with cystic fibrosis or primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Maria E.; Alanin, Mikkel C.; Grønhøj, Christian

    2017-01-01

    flora in the sinuses and nasal cavities of patients with CF or PCD.  Methods: A number of medical literature data bases were systematically searched between January 1960 and July 2016. We applied the following inclusion criteria: a minimum of one case of PCD (or Kartagener syndrome) or CF...... are aspirated to and colonize the lungs according to the theory of the united (unified) airways. Whereas the pattern of bacterial flora in the lower airways has been extensively studied, the upper airways have drawn limited attention.  Objective: Our aim was to review the literature that reported bacterial...

  9. Biliary Dyskinesia as a Rare Presentation of Metastatic Breast Carcinoma of the Gallbladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Markelov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast carcinoma is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. It is most commonly associated with metastases to the liver, lung, bone, and the brain. Invasive lobular carcinoma is a less common pathology with slightly higher metastases to the upper gastrointestinal tract. Invasive lobular carcinoma metastasis to the gallbladder is extremely rare. Method. In this paper we are presenting a case of a 67-year-old female with metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer to the gallbladder six years after her therapy. Conclusion. This case clearly signifies the nature of the micrometastatic foci of the invasive lobular carcinoma even many years after a successful treatment.

  10. Paroxysmal Exercise-induced Dyskinesias Caused by GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Mongin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is due to de novo mutations in the SLC2A1 gene encoding the glucose transporter type 1. Phenomenology Shown: Paroxysmal motor manifestations induced by exercise or fasting may be the main manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Educational Value: Proper identification of the paroxysmal events and early diagnosis is important since the disease is potentially treatable.

  11. Depression, anxiety, and quality of life in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wo-Tu Tian

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Depression, anxiety, and low levels of quality of life were prevalent in patients with PKD. Co-occurrence of depression and anxiety was common among these patients. Regular mental health interventions could set depression and anxiety as intervention targets. Considering that the motor episodes could be elicited by voluntary movements and sometimes also by emotional stress, and that symptoms may get worsened with longer duration and higher frequency when patients are stressed out, intervention or treatment of depression and anxiety might improve the motor symptoms and overall quality of life in PKD patients.

  12. Dopamine signaling leads to loss of Polycomb repression and aberrant gene activation in experimental parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Södersten, Erik; Feyder, Michael; Lerdrup, Mads

    2014-01-01

    . Here, we present in vivo evidence for a previously unrecognized plasticity of PcG-repressed genes in terminally differentiated brain neurons of parkisonian mice. We show that acute administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, induces a remarkable increase in H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation....... The induction of the H3K27me3S28p histone mark specifically occurs in medium spiny neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors and is dependent on Msk1 kinase activity and DARPP-32-mediated inhibition of protein phosphatase-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments showed that increased H3K27me3S28p...

  13. Firing and Resetting Characteristics of Carnivorous Utricularia reflexa Traps: Physiological or only Physical Regulation of Trap Triggering?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, Lubomír

    Roč. 52, č. 2 ( 2012 ), 281-290 ISSN 0079-2047 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : aquatic carnivorous plants * water flow * ether Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2012

  14. Demonstration of Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings for Tiered Trim and Respond Method in Resetting Static Pressure for VAV Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Technology Certification Program EUI Energy Use Intensity EW Energy and Water GHG Greenhouse Gas GSM Global System for Mobile GWh Gigawatt hours...utility bill. Other charges could include basic service charge, transmission service charge, on-peak and off-peak demand charges, and franchise fee...Regulated Air Volume (TRAV) systems. ASHRAE Transactions 99(1):791-800. 106 15. Hartman, T. 1995. Global optimization strategies for high

  15. Not Business-as-Usual: Resetting Expectations for Recruitment, Engagement & Professional Development of Today's URM in Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzenne, K.; Teranes, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    "The significant problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them." - Albert Einstein. In order to successfully recruit and retain today's URM in geosciences, we must think critically and strategically about how opportunities for professional engagement and skills-building are marketed, structured and implemented at various stages of an individual's career, and how those opportunities may be viewed and/or experienced differently by URM students and professionals. This presentation will discuss how modern professional development strategies for URMs should include: (1) clearly defined expectations that acknowledge cultural differences and challenges; (2) supportive exposure to experiences and individuals, such as role models, mentors and potential advisors; (3) constructive skill-building experiences that foster confidence and a sense of belonging, and (4) a demonstrated institutional commitment to diversity and inclusion from leadership that translates into visible resources and support. The presentation will highlight examples of these efforts and outcomes at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, including the Scripps Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Program, a NSF-funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU). With a commitment to enhancing diversity and inclusion, the SURF program has used the strategies above to help recruit and retain URM, women and veterans in graduate school and careers in the geosciences.

  16. System Re-set: High LET Radiation or Transient Musculoskeletal Disuse Cause Lasting Changes in Oxidative Defense Pathways Within Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, A.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Six months post-IR, there were no notable changes in skeletal expression of 84 principal genes in the p53 signaling pathway due to low dose IR (0.5Gy), HU, or both. In contrast, numerous genes relevant to oxidative stress were regulated by the treatments, typically in a direction indicative of increased oxidative stress and impaired defense. IR and HU independently reduced (between 0.46 to 0.88 fold) expression levels of Noxa1, Gpx3, Prdx2, Prdx3, and Zmynd17. Surprisingly, transient HU alone (sham-irradiated) decreased expression of several redox-related genes (Gpx1,Gstk1, Prdx1, Txnrd2), which were not affected significantly by IR alone. Irradiation increased (1.13 fold) expression of a gene responsible for production of superoxides by neutrophils (NCF2). Of interest, only combined treatment with HU and IR led to increased expression levels of Ercc2, (1.19 fold), a DNA excision repair enzyme. Differences in gene expression levels may reflect a change in gene expression on a per cell basis, a shift in the repertoire of specific cell types within the tissue, or both. Serum nitrite/nitrate levels were elevated to comparable levels (1.6-fold) due to IR, HU or both, indicative of elevated systemic nitrosyl stress. CONCLUSIONS The magnitude of changes in skeletal expression of oxidative stress-related genes six months after irradiation and/or transient unloading tended to be relatively modest (0.46-1.15 fold), whereas the p53 pathway was not affected. The finding that many different oxidative stress-related genes differed from controls at this late time point implicates a generalized impairment of oxidative defense within skeletal tissue, which coincides with both profound radiation damage to osteoprogenitors/stem cells in bone marrow and impaired remodeling of mineralized tissue.

  17. A Method for SINS Alignment with Large Initial Misalignment Angles Based on Kalman Filter with Parameters Resetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixiang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS, large initial misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which causes alignment failure when the classical linear error model and standard Kalman filter are used. In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS initial alignment is investigated, and the key reason for alignment failure is given as the state covariance from Kalman filter cannot represent the true one during the steady filtering process. According to the analysis, an alignment method for SINS based on multiresetting the state covariance matrix of Kalman filter is designed to deal with large initial misalignment angles, in which classical linear error model and standard Kalman filter are used, but the state covariance matrix should be multireset before the steady process until large misalignment angles are decreased to small ones. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by simulation and car test, and the results indicate that the proposed method can fulfill initial alignment with large misalignment angles effectively and the alignment accuracy of the proposed method is as precise as that of alignment with small misalignment angles.

  18. Prenatal programming of renal salt wasting resets postnatal salt appetite, which drives food intake in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwasel, Saleh H; Barker, David J P; Ashton, Nick

    2012-03-01

    Sodium retention has been proposed as the cause of hypertension in the LP rat (offspring exposed to a maternal low-protein diet in utero) model of developmental programming because of increased renal NKCC2 (Na+/K+/2Cl- co-transporter 2) expression. However, we have shown that LP rats excrete more rather than less sodium than controls, leading us to hypothesize that LP rats ingest more salt in order to maintain sodium balance. Rats were fed on either a 9% (low) or 18% (control) protein diet during pregnancy; male and female offspring were studied at 4 weeks of age. LP rats of both sexes held in metabolism cages excreted more sodium and urine than controls. When given water to drink, LP rats drank more and ate more food than controls, hence sodium intake matched excretion. However, when given a choice between saline and water to drink, the total volume of fluid ingested by LP rats fell to control levels, but the volume of saline taken was significantly larger [3.8±0.1 compared with 8.8±1.3 ml/24 h per 100 g of body weight in control and LP rats respectively; Psodium content and ECF (extracellular fluid) volumes were greater in LP rats. These results show that prenatal programming of renal sodium wasting leads to a compensatory increase in salt appetite in LP rats. We speculate that the need to maintain salt homoeostasis following malnutrition in utero stimulates greater food intake, leading to accelerated growth and raised BP (blood pressure).

  19. Resetting of the luminescence signal in modern riverbed cobbles along the course of the Shiyang River, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Cui, Furong; Murray, Andrew Sean

    2018-01-01

    . The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal was measured as a function of depth for cobbles of two different lithologies (sandstone and granite). The results show that (i) the bleaching rate of the signal for light-coloured granite is higher than for opaque dark-coloured sandstone, because granite...... is bleached to greater depths than sandstone; (ii) cobble daylight bleaching depths show a downstream increasing trend, with almost all bleaching occurring in the upstream section; and (iii) despite possible abrasion of the upper surface of granite cobbles, the bleaching depth in the upper surface is greater...

  20. Fast-responding short circuit protection system with self-reset for use in circuit supplied by DC power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Bradley M. (Inventor); Blalock, Norman N. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A short circuit protection system includes an inductor, a switch, a voltage sensing circuit, and a controller. The switch and inductor are electrically coupled to be in series with one another. A voltage sensing circuit is coupled across the switch and the inductor. A controller, coupled to the voltage sensing circuit and the switch, opens the switch when a voltage at the output terminal of the inductor transitions from above a threshold voltage to below the threshold voltage. The controller closes the switch when the voltage at the output terminal of the inductor transitions from below the threshold voltage to above the threshold voltage.

  1. An analysis of the operation of a single-pole relay integrated circuit device with a controlled reset ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshetov, N.E.

    1980-01-01

    Relay equipment using semiconductor components (such as those containing gates using planar transformers, and a relay in networks which control the operational time of a relay) are widely used in the automation equipment of electric power systems. A scheme where a gate in the form of an integrated circuit is used is given.

  2. Evolving Learning Paradigms: Re-Setting Baselines and Collection Methods of Information and Communication Technology in Education Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David; Broadley, Tania; Downie, Jill; Wallet, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) has been measuring ICT in education since 2009, but with such rapid change in technology and its use in education, it is important now to revise the collection mechanisms to focus on how technology is being used to enhance learning and teaching. Sustainable development goal (SDG) 4, for example, moves…

  3. Resetting our priorities in environmental health: an example from the South-North partnership in Lake Chapala, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Kasten, Felipe Lozano; Trasande, Leonardo; Goldman, Rose H

    2011-08-01

    Lake Chapala is a major source of water for crop irrigation and subsistence fishing for a population of 300,000 people in central Mexico. Economic activities have created increasing pollution and pressure on the whole watershed resources. Previous reports of mercury concentrations detected in fish caught in Lake Chapala have raised concerns about health risks to local families who rely on fish for both their livelihood and traditional diet. Our own data has indicated that 27% of women of childbearing age have elevated hair mercury levels, and multivariable analysis indicated that frequent consumption of carp (i.e., once a week or more) was associated with significantly higher hair mercury concentrations. In this paper we describe a range of environmental health research projects. Our main priorities are to build the necessary capacities to identify sources of water pollution, enhance early detection of environmental hazardous exposures, and deliver feasible health protection measures targeting children and pregnant women. Our projects are led by the Children's Environmental Health Specialty Unit nested in the University of Guadalajara, in collaboration with the Department of Environmental Health of Harvard School of Public Health and Department of Pediatrics of the New York School of Medicine. Our partnership focuses on translation of knowledge, building capacity, advocacy and accountability. Communication will be enhanced among women's advocacy coalitions and the Ministries of Environment and Health. We see this initiative as an important pilot program with potential to be strengthened and replicated regionally and internationally. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Smart Industry Research in the Field of HRM : Resetting Job Design as an Example of Upcoming Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habraken, Milou Maria Petronella; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Bondarouk, Tanya; Ruel, Huub; Parry, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This chapter aims to encourage and guide Smart Industry HRM-related research by addressing upcoming challenges developed using a Job Design lens. Methodology/approach – The challenges are constructed based on a developed overview of the existing body of work related to Job Design and a

  5. Jet Propellant (JP)-8 Fuel Evaluation Test Mk II - Reset (Mk II R) Bridge Erection Boat (BEB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    diesel engines (fig. 2 and 3) equipped with Delphi rotary fuel injection pumps. Figure 1. Mk II R BEB pushing a two-bay IRB raft. TR No. WF-E-83 2... nozzles . The new pump (serial No. 08813K7B) and gasket were installed. 24 May 07 51.0 50.4 44.9 103 Port Fuel Pump and Injectors Replaced. At the...part No. 3909356) were installed on the injector nozzles . The new pump (serial No. 59640HZB) and gasket were installed. 31 May 07 51.5 50.5 44.9 104

  6. Demonstration of Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings for Tiered Trim and Respond Method in Resetting Static Pressure for VAV Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNONOLOGY 1350 BEARDSHEAR HALL AMES IA 50011-2025 9...Volume CEC California Energy Commission CO2 Carbon Dioxide DDC Direct Digital Control DoD Department of Defense DOE Department of Energy...Keith Kutz, Britta Sandberg Iowa State University : Nicholas Haberl, Yi Liu, Ganesh Krishnan Iowa Army National Guard: Kimberly Dickey, David Shea

  7. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome in a family with a novel DNAH5 gene mutation and variable phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makia J. Marafie

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Molecular test helped in confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in providing better management of the affected family members, which in turn could significantly improve overall quality of their life. Consequently, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, which is the most acceptable procedure in the Islamic countries, was offered to the heterozygous-carrier couple in order to prevent recurrence of the disease in their future generations.

  8. Sinus surgery can improve quality of life, lung infections, and lung function in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Aanaes, Kasper; Hoiby, Niels

    2017-01-01

    patients (62%). Four patients with preoperative P. aeruginosa lung colonization (25%) had no regrowth during follow-up; 2 of these had P. aeruginosa sinusitis. Sinonasal symptoms were improved 12 months after ESS and we observed a trend toward better lung function after ESS. Conclusion We demonstrated...... an improvement in CRS-related symptoms after ESS and adjuvant therapy. In selected PCD patients, the suggested regimen may postpone chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa and stabilize lung function....

  9. CCDC151 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disruption of the outer dynein arm docking complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjeij, Rim; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Watson, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    disorder of ciliary and flagellar dysmotility characterized by chronic upper and lower respiratory infections and defects in laterality. Here, by combined high-throughput mapping and sequencing, we identified CCDC151 loss-of-function mutations in five affected individuals from three independent families...

  10. Subtype-Specific Corticostriatal Projection Neuron Developmental Gene Expression and Corticospinal Expression of the Paroxysmal Nonkinesigenic Dyskinesia Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhaoying

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is responsible for motor control, integration of sensory information, perception, cognitive function, and consciousness. It is complex, yet highly organized, with six layers containing broad classes of excitatory projection neurons (along with interneurons) with diverse subtype and area identities. Corticostriatal projection neurons (CStrPN) are the major cortical efferent neurons connecting the cerebral cortex to the striatum of the basal ganglia, and are critically i...

  11. CCDC151 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia by Disruption of the Outer Dynein Arm Docking Complex Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjeij, R.; Onoufriadis, A.; Watson, C.M.; Slagle, C.E.; Klena, N.T.; Dougherty, G.W.; Kurkowiak, M.; Loges, N.T.; Diggle, C.P.; Morante, N.F.; Gabriel, G.C.; Lemke, K.L.; Li, Y.; Pennekamp, P.; Menchen, T.; Konert, F.; Marthin, J.K.; Mans, D.A.; Letteboer, S.J.F.; Werner, C.; Burgoyne, T.; Westermann, C.; Rutman, A.; Carr, I.M.; O'Callaghan, C.; Moya, E.; Chung, E.M.; Consortium, U.K.; Sheridan, E.; Nielsen, K.G.; Roepman, R.; Bartscherer, K.; Burdine, R.D.; Lo, C.W.; Omran, H.; Mitchison, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse family of cytoskeletal dynein motors powers various cellular transport systems, including axonemal dyneins generating the force for ciliary and flagellar beating essential to movement of extracellular fluids and of cells through fluid. Multisubunit outer dynein arm (ODA) motor complexes,

  12. Elevated Serum Triiodothyronine and Intellectual and Motor Disability with Paroxysmal Dyskinesia Caused by a Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Gene Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Pfarr, Nicole; Pohlenz, Joachim; Schmidt, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    "Monocarboxylate transporter 8" ("MCT8" or SLC16A2) is important for the neuronal uptake of triiodothyronine (T3) in its function as a specific and active transporter of thyroid hormones across the cell membrane, thus being essential for human brain development. We report on a German male with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome…

  13. Increased binding of (/sup 3/H)apomorphine in caudate membranes after dopamine pretreatment in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManus, C; Hartley, E J; Seeman, P [Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1978-07-01

    Most patients with Parkinson's disease treated with L-dopa show a progressively deteriorating response which may possibly be attributed to an L-dopa-induced process of unknown origin. Long-term administration of dopamine-mimetic drugs to animals sometimes produces behavioural facilitation. To investigate one possible molecular mechanism of this facilitation or sensitization the effects of prolonged exposure, in vitro, of dopamine on the dopamine/neuroleptic receptors in the caudate nucleus of the calf were tested. Calf caudate homogenates pretreated with dopamine or other drugs were tested for the binding of (/sup 3/H)apomorphine, (/sup 3/H)haloperidol, 3H-WB-4101, or (/sup 3/H)naloxine. Pre-exposure with dopamine or noradrenaline lead to an increased binding of (/sup 3/H)apomorphine. The significance of the results is discussed.

  14. Increased binding of [3H]apomorphine in caudate membranes after dopamine pretreatment in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManus, C.; Hartley, E.J.; Seeman, P.

    1978-01-01

    Most patients with Parkinson's disease treated with L-dopa show a progressively deteriorating response which may possibly be attributed to an L-dopa-induced process of unknown origin. Long-term administration of dopamine-mimetic drugs to animals sometimes produces behavioural facilitation. To investigate one possible molecular mechanism of this facilitation or sensitization the effects of prolonged exposure, in vitro, of dopamine on the dopamine/neuroleptic receptors in the caudate nucleus of the calf were tested. Calf caudate homogenates pretreated with dopamine or other drugs were tested for the binding of [ 3 H]apomorphine, [ 3 H]haloperidol, 3H-WB-4101, or [ 3 H]naloxine. Pre-exposure with dopamine or noradrenaline lead to an increased binding of [ 3 H]apomorphine. The significance of the results is discussed. (author)

  15. Study protocol for a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of S-ketamine for pain treatment in patients with chronic pancreatitis (RESET trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Olesen, Søren Schou; Olesen, Anne Estrup

    2015-01-01

    are randomised to receive 8 h of intravenous S-ketamine followed by oral S-ketamine, or matching placebo, for 4 weeks. To improve blinding, 1 mg of midazolam will be added to active and placebo treatment. The primary end point is clinical pain relief as assessed by a daily pain diary. Secondary end points......INTRODUCTION: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease that causes irreversible damage to pancreatic tissue. Pain is its most prominent symptom. In the absence of pathology suitable for endoscopic or surgical interventions, pain treatment usually includes opioids. However, opioids often...... have limited efficacy. Moreover, side effects are common and bothersome. Hence, novel approaches to control pain associated with CP are highly desirable. Sensitisation of the central nervous system is reported to play a key role in pain generation and chronification. Fundamental to the process...

  16. Resetting the bar: Establishing baselines for persistent contaminants after Hurricane Sandy in the coastal environments of New Jersey and New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.; Simmons, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    In the immediate aftermath of natural disasters, public health officials and other first responders engage in many activities to protect the public and ecosystems in the affected area. These activities include critical tasks designed to minimize adverse consequences resulting from chemical and microbial contaminant exposures, such as acute disease incidence and transmission. However, once these urgent priorities have been met and situations requiring immediate attention have been stabilized, questions regarding the potential longer term threats to humans and ecosystems associated with persistent contaminant exposures remain. Research conducted to address these questions is frequently challenged by the lack of available baseline contaminant information collected before the event for comparison and perspective. In addition, deployments of field crews and collection of environmental samples typically occur days, weeks, or months after the event. Consequently, during and in the aftermath of disasters, public health agencies commonly advise the public to disinfect water, avoid contact with disturbed infrastructure (such as sewer lines), and (or) refrain from use of recreational waters, with the general focus on acute health threats; however, the persisting effects of such releases on local recreational waters, fisheries, and other estuarine habitats are often undetermined.

  17. Russia and Countering Violent Extremism in the Internet and Social Media: Exploring Prospects for U.S.-Russia Cooperation Beyond the "Reset"

    OpenAIRE

    Sharyl N. Cross Dr.

    2013-01-01

    Russia has been targeted with a series of terrorist attacks over the past several years, and there are a growing number of extremist groups operating throughout Russia’s society utilizing the Internet/social media to promote their narratives and objectives. Russia’s policy community has created institutional mechanisms and laws to address the challenge of violent extremism in the Internet/social media, and recognizes the importance of international cooperation toward these ends. This study, b...

  18. Functional Peptidomics: Combining Discovery-Based Mass Spectrometry and Neurophysiology to Explore Communication of Phase-Resetting Cues in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Norman, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Intercellular signaling is vital to communication within neuronal circuits. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock of mammals, contains a dense collection of neurons that align their intrinsic rhythmicity with environmental stimulus and physiological state. While peptide physiology has been demonstrated as a contributor to…

  19. Daily repetitive sensory stimulation of the paretic hand for the treatment of sensorimotor deficits in patients with subacute stroke: RESET, a randomized, sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenstroth, Jan C; Kalisch, Tobias; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Greulich, Wolfgang; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert R

    2018-01-09

    Repetitive sensory stimulation (RSS) adapts the timing of stimulation protocols used in cellular studies to induce synaptic plasticity. In healthy subjects, RSS leads to widespread sensorimotor cortical reorganization paralleled by improved sensorimotor behavior. Here, we investigated whether RSS reduces sensorimotor upper limb impairment in patients with subacute stroke more effectively than conventional therapy. A single-blinded sham-controlled clinical trial assessed the effectiveness of RSS in treating sensorimotor deficits of the upper limbs. Patients with subacute unilateral ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to receive standard therapy in combination with RSS or with sham RSS. Patients were masked to treatment allocation. RSS consisted of intermittent 20 Hz electrical stimulation applied on the affected hand for 45 min/day, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks, and was transmitted using custom-made stimulation-gloves with built-in electrodes contacting each fingertip separately. Before and after the intervention, we assessed light-touch and tactile discrimination, proprioception, dexterity, grip force, and subtasks of the Jebsen Taylor hand-function test for the non-affected and the affected hand. Data from these quantitative tests were combined into a total performance index serving as primary outcome measure. In addition, tolerability and side effects of RSS intervention were recorded. Seventy one eligible patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive RSS treatment (n = 35) or sham RSS (n = 36). Data of 25 patients were not completed because they were transferred to another hospital, resulting in n = 23 for each group. Before treatment, sensorimotor performance between groups was balanced (p = 0.237). After 2 weeks of the intervention, patients in the group receiving standard therapy with RSS showed significantly better restored sensorimotor function than the control group (standardized mean difference 0.57; 95% CI -0.013-1.16; p = 0.027) RSS treatment was superior in all domains tested. Repetitive sensory stimulation was well tolerated and accepted, and no adverse events were observed. Rehabilitation including RSS enhanced sensorimotor recovery more effectively than standard therapy alone. Rehabilitation outcome between the effects of RSS and standard therapy was largest for sensory and motor improvement; however, the results for proprioception and everyday tasks were encouraging warranting further studies in more severe patients. The trial was retrospectively registered January 31, 2012 under DRKS00003515 ( https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do;jsessionid=AEE2585CCB82A22A2B285470B37C47C8?navigationId=results ).

  20. Is Elevating Sir John A. Macdonald Really Worth It? Hitting the Reset Button on Canada's Founding Narrative in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This special issue of "Canadian Social Studies," entitled "Monumental Mistakes? Confronting Difficult Pasts," has brought together a diverse range of scholars offering insights into discussions regarding removing or altering monuments, buildings, and other reminders of difficult histories. The editors have requested that…

  1. The RESET project: constructing a European tephra lattice for refined synchronisation of environmental and archaeological events during the last c. 100 ka

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lowe, J. J.; Ramsey, C. B.; Housley, R. A.; Lane, C. S.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Stringer, C.; Davies, W.; Barton, N.; Pollard, M.; Gamble, C.; Menzies, M.; Rohling, E.; Roberts, A.; Blockley, S.; Cullen, V.; Grant, K.; Lewis, M.; MacLeod, A.; White, D.; Albert, P.; Hardiman, M.; Lee, S.; Oh, A.; Satow, C.; Cross, J. K.; Bramham Law, C.; Todman, A.; Bourne, A.; Matthews, I.; Müller, W.; Smith, V.; Wulf, S.; Anghelinu, M.; Antl-Weiser, W.; Bar-Yosef, O.; Borić, D.; Boscato, P.; Ronchitelli, A.; Chabai, V.; Veselsky, A.; Uthmeier, T.; Farrand, W.; Gjipali, I.; Ruka, R.; Güleç, E.; Karavanić, I.; Karkanas, P.; King, T.; Komšo, D.; Koumouzelis, M.; Kyparissi, N.; Lengyel, G.; Mester, Z.; Neruda, P.; Nigst, P.; Haesaerts, P.; Panagopoulou, E.; Shalamanov-Korobar, L.; Tolevski, I.; Sinitsyn, A.; Sirakov, N.; Guadelli, A.; Guadelli, J.-L.; Ferrier, C.; Škrdla, Petr; Slimak, L.; Soler, N.; Soller, J.; Soressi, M.; Tushabramishvilii, N.; Zilhão, J.; Angelucci, D.; Cullen, V. L.; Lincoln, P.; Staff, R.; Flower, K.; Aouadi-Abdeljaouad, N.; Belhouchet, L.; Barker, G.; Bouzouggar, A.; Van Peer, P.; Kindermann, K.; Gerken, K.; Niemann, H.; Tipping, R.; Saville, A.; Ward, T.; Clausen, I.; Weber, M.-J.; Kaiser, K.; Torksdorf, J. F.; Turner, F.; Veil, S.; Nygaard, N.; Pyne-O'Donnel, S. D. F.; Masojć, M.; Nalepka, D.; Jurochnik, A.; Kabaciński, J.; Antoine, P.; Olive, M.; Christensen, M.; Bodu, P.; Debout, G.; Orliac, M.; De Bie, M.; Van Gils, M.; Paulissen, E.; Brou, L.; Leesch, D.; Hadorn, P.; Thew, N.; Riede, F.; Heinen, M.; Joris, O.; Richter, J.; Knipping, M.; Stika, H.-P.; Friedrich, M.; Conard, N. J.; Malina, M.; Kind, C.-J.; Beutelspacher, T.; Mortensen, M. F.; Burdukiewicz, J. M.; Szynkiewicz, A.; Połtowicz-Bobak, M.; Bobak, D.; Wiśniewski, A.; Przeździecki, M.; Valde-Nowak, P.; Muzyczuk, A.; Davies, L.; Morgan, P.; Aydar, E.; Çubukçu, E.; Brown, R.; Coltelli, M.; Lo Castro, D.; Cioni, R.; DeRosa, R.; Donato, P.; Di Roberto, A.; Gertisser, R.; Giordano, G.; Branney, M.; Jordan, N.; Keller, J.; Kinvig, H.; Gottsman, J.; Blundy, J.; Marani, M.; Orsi, G.; Civetta, L.; Arienzo, I.; Carandente, A.; Rosi, M.; Zanchetta, G.; Seghedi, I.; Szakacs, A.; Sulpizio, R.; Thordarson, T.; Trincardi, F.; Vigliotti, L.; Asioli, A.; Piva, A.; Andrič, M.; Brauer, A.; de Klerk, P.; Filippi, M.-L.; Finsinger, W.; Galović, L.; Jones, T.; Lotter, A.; Müller, U.; Pross, J.; Mangerud, J.; Lohne, Ø.; Pyne-O'Donnell, S.; Markovic, S.; Pini, R.; Ravazzi, C.; Theuerkauf, M.; Tzedakis, C.; Margari, V.; Veres, D.; Wastegård, S.; Ortiz, J. E.; Torres, T.; Díaz-Bautista, A.; Moreno, A.; Valero-Garcés, B.; Lowick, S.; Ottolini, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 118, 15 June 2015 (2015), s. 1-17 ISSN 0277-3791 Institutional support: RVO:68081758 Keywords : Last Glacial stage * Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events * Abrupt environmental transitions (AETs) * Middle to Upper Palaeolithic * Volcanic ash isochrons * Tephra geochemistry * Tephra database Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 4.521, year: 2015

  2. Russia and Countering Violent Extremism in the Internet and Social Media: Exploring Prospects for U.S.-Russia Cooperation Beyond the "Reset"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyl N. Cross Dr.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Russia has been targeted with a series of terrorist attacks over the past several years, and there are a growing number of extremist groups operating throughout Russia’s society utilizing the Internet/social media to promote their narratives and objectives. Russia’s policy community has created institutional mechanisms and laws to address the challenge of violent extremism in the Internet/social media, and recognizes the importance of international cooperation toward these ends. This study, based on primary research conducted in Moscow in 2012, defines Russia’s assessment of domestic and international sources violent extremist threats; explains Moscow’s perspective on balancing democratic principles with the challenge of countering violent extremism in the Internet/social media; assesses existing capacities and impediments to further international collaboration with Russia in countering violent extremism in the Internet/social media spheres; defines specific initiatives that Russia, the United States, and other nations of the world community could advance to enhance international cooperation in countering violent extremism throughout the world cyber community.

  3. Direct Digital Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Deck - Cold Deck Reset Reheat Coil Reset Steam Boiler Optimization [lot Water Outside Air Reset Chiller Optimization Chiller Water Temperature Reset...with programming techniques for each type of installed DDC in order to effect changes in operating setpoints and application programs. *Communication...can be changed without recailbration of instrumentation devices. Changes to the application software, operating setpoints and parameters require the

  4. The effectiveness of non-invasive brain stimulation in improving clinical signs of hyperkinetic movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio eObeso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a safe and non-invasive method for stimulating cortical neurons. In neurological realm, rTMS has prevalently been applied to understand pathophysiological mechanisms underlying movement disorders. However, this tool has also the potential to be translated into a clinically applicable therapeutic use. Several available studies supported this hypothesis, but differences in protocols, clinical enrollment and variability of rTMS effects across individuals complicate better understanding of efficient clinical protocols.The aim of this present review is to discuss to what extent the evidence provided by the therapeutic use of rTMS may be generalized. In particular, we attempted to define optimal cortical regions and stimulation protocols that have been demonstrated to maximize the effectiveness seen in the actual literature for the three most prevalent hyperkinetic movement disorders: Parkinson´s disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesias, essential tremor and dystonia. A total of 28 rTMS studies met our search criteria. Despite clinical and methodological differences, overall these studies demonstrated that therapeutic applications of rTMS to normalize pathologically decreased or increased levels of cortical activity have given moderate progress in patient´s quality of life. Moreover, the present literature suggests that altered pathophysiology in hyperkinetic movement disorders establishes motor, premotor or cerebellar structures as candidate regions to reset cortico-subcortical pathways back to normal. Although rTMS has the potential to become a powerful tool for ameliorating the clinical outcome of hyperkinetic neurological patients, until now there is not a clear consensus on optimal protocols for these motor disorders. Well-controlled multicenter randomized clinical trials with high numbers of patients are urgently required.

  5. The Parkinson's disease death rate: carbidopa and vitamin B6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz,1 Alvin Stein,2 Ted Cole31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc., Cape Coral, FL, USA; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, USA; 3Cole Center for Healing, Cincinnati, OH, USAAbstract: The only indication for carbidopa and benserazide is the management of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa-induced nausea. Both drugs irreversibly bind to and permanently deactivate pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP, the active form of vitamin B6, and PLP-dependent enzymes. PLP is required for the function of over 300 enzymes and proteins. Virtually every major system in the body is impacted directly or indirectly by PLP. The administration of carbidopa and benserazide potentially induces a nutritional catastrophe. During the first 15 years of prescribing L-dopa, a decreasing Parkinson's disease death rate was observed. Then, in 1976, 1 year after US Food and Drug Administration approved the original L-dopa/carbidopa combination drug, the Parkinson's disease death rate started increasing. This trend has continued to the present, for 38 years and counting. The previous literature documents this increasing death rate, but no hypothesis has been offered concerning this trend. Carbidopa is postulated to contribute to the increasing Parkinson's disease death rate and to the classification of Parkinson's as a progressive neurodegenerative disease. It may contribute to L-dopa tachyphylaxis.Keywords: L-dopa, levodopa, vitamin B6, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate

  6. The Parkinson's disease death rate: carbidopa and vitamin B6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The only indication for carbidopa and benserazide is the management of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa)-induced nausea. Both drugs irreversibly bind to and permanently deactivate pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6, and PLP-dependent enzymes. PLP is required for the function of over 300 enzymes and proteins. Virtually every major system in the body is impacted directly or indirectly by PLP. The administration of carbidopa and benserazide potentially induces a nutritional catastrophe. During the first 15 years of prescribing L-dopa, a decreasing Parkinson's disease death rate was observed. Then, in 1976, 1 year after US Food and Drug Administration approved the original L-dopa/carbidopa combination drug, the Parkinson's disease death rate started increasing. This trend has continued to the present, for 38 years and counting. The previous literature documents this increasing death rate, but no hypothesis has been offered concerning this trend. Carbidopa is postulated to contribute to the increasing Parkinson's disease death rate and to the classification of Parkinson's as a progressive neurodegenerative disease. It may contribute to L-dopa tachyphylaxis.

  7. Serotonin hyperinnervation and upregulated 5-HT2A receptor expression and motor-stimulating function in nigrostriatal dopamine-deficient Pitx3 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Qiu, Guozhen; Ding, Shengyuan; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2013-01-23

    The striatum receives serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) innervation and expresses 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) and other 5-HT receptors, raising the possibility that the striatal 5-HT system may undergo adaptive changes after chronic severe dopamine (DA) loss and contribute to the function and dysfunction of the striatum. Here we show that in transcription factor Pitx3 gene mutant mice with a selective, severe DA loss in the dorsal striatum mimicking the DA denervation in late Parkinson's disease (PD), both the 5-HT innervation and the 5-HT2AR mRNA expression were increased in the dorsal striatum. Functionally, while having no detectable motor effect in wild type mice, the 5-HT2R agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine increased both the baseline and l-dopa-induced normal ambulatory and dyskinetic movements in Pitx3 mutant mice, whereas the selective 5-HT2AR blocker volinanserin had the opposite effects. These results demonstrate that Pitx3 mutant mice are a convenient and valid mouse model to study the compensatory 5-HT upregulation following the loss of the nigrostriatal DA projection and that the upregulated 5-HT2AR function in the DA deficient dorsal striatum may enhance both normal and dyskinetic movements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DISCINESIA ÁNTERO-APICAL TRANSITORIA O SÍNDROME DE TAKO-TSUBO. PRESENTACIÓN DE UN CASO / Transient antero-apical dyskinesia or tako-tsubo syndrome. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayán A. García Cuesta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient apical ballooning, Tako-tsubo syndrome (and other synonyms, is a clinical condition first described in Japan, and then in other countries, that mimics acute myocardial infarction. Disorders of left ventricular contractility recover within a few weeks. The fatality rate is very low compared with infarction, but it should be known by professionals that see patients with acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department. A patient who was discharged from our department with this diagnosis is presented, and electrocardiographic, echocardiographic and angiographic images are shown.

  9. Study protocol, rationale and recruitment in a European multi-centre randomized controlled trial to determine the efficacy and safety of azithromycin maintenance therapy for 6 months in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobbernagel, Helene Elgaard; Buchvald, Frederik F; Haarman, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    maintenance therapy in PCD. METHODS: The BESTCILIA trial is a European multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. The intervention is tablets of azithromycin 250/500 mg according to body weight or placebo administered three times a week for 6 months. Subjects...... prescribed in other chronic respiratory disorders. Furthermore, the trial will utilize the Lung clearance index and new, PCD-specific quality of life instruments as outcome measures for PCD. Recruitment is hampered by frequent occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, exacerbations at enrolment...

  10. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  11. Diagnosis of the bile reflux into the introhepatic biliary ducts using using radionuclide hepatocholecystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mtvaradze, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    To reveal functional disorders of bile secretion 165 patients with diseases of gastrointestinal tract were examined. It was established that radionuclide hepatocholecystography enables to reveal dyskinesia of bile secretion, as well as bile reflux into the intrahepatic biliary ducts. Bile reflux into the intrahepatic biliary ducts is observed more often in patients with spasm of oddii sphincter and hyperkinetic dyskinesia of bile cyst

  12. Impaired Awareness of Movement Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzio, Martina; Monteverdi, Silvia; Giordano, Alessandra; Soliveri, Paola; Filippi, Paola; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study analyzed the presence of awareness of movement disorders (dyskinesias and hypokinesias) in 25 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and motor fluctuations (dyskinesias, wearing off, on-off fluctuations). Of the few studies that have dealt with this topic, none have analyzed the differences in the awareness of motor deficits…

  13. Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) rescues motor, olfactory, mitochondrial and synaptic impairment in PINK1B9 Drosophila melanogaster genetic model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Simone; De Rose, Francescaelena; Marotta, Roberto; Ruffilli, Roberta; Fanti, Maura; Secci, Pietro Paolo; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Setzu, Maria Dolores; Zuncheddu, Maria Antonietta; Collu, Ignazio; Solla, Paolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Kasture, Sanjay; Acquas, Elio; Liscia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) mutant for PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1B9) gene is a powerful tool to investigate physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Using PINK1B9 mutant Dm we sought to explore the effects of Mucuna pruriens methanolic extract (Mpe), a L-Dopa-containing herbal remedy of PD. The effects of Mpe on PINK1B9 mutants, supplied with standard diet to larvae and adults, were assayed on 3-6 (I), 10-15 (II) and 20-25 (III) days old flies. Mpe 0.1% significantly extended lifespan of PINK1B9 and fully rescued olfactory response to 1-hexanol and improved climbing behavior of PINK1B9 of all ages; in contrast, L-Dopa (0.01%, percentage at which it is present in Mpe 0.1%) ameliorated climbing of only PINK1B9 flies of age step II. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of antennal lobes and thoracic ganglia of PINK1B9 revealed that Mpe restored to wild type (WT) levels both T-bars and damaged mitochondria. Western blot analysis of whole brain showed that Mpe, but not L-Dopa on its own, restored bruchpilot (BRP) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to age-matched WT control levels. These results highlight multiple sites of action of Mpe, suggesting that its effects cannot only depend upon its L-Dopa content and support the clinical observation of Mpe as an effective medication with intrinsic ability of delaying the onset of chronic L-Dopa-induced long-term motor complications. Overall, this study strengthens the relevance of using PINK1B9 Dm as a translational model to study the properties of Mucuna pruriens for PD treatment.

  14. Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) Rescues Motor, Olfactory, Mitochondrial and Synaptic Impairment in PINK1B9 Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffilli, Roberta; Fanti, Maura; Secci, Pietro Paolo; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Setzu, Maria Dolores; Zuncheddu, Maria Antonietta; Collu, Ignazio; Solla, Paolo; Marrosu, Francesco; Kasture, Sanjay; Acquas, Elio; Liscia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) mutant for PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1B9) gene is a powerful tool to investigate physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Using PINK1B9 mutant Dm we sought to explore the effects of Mucuna pruriens methanolic extract (Mpe), a L-Dopa-containing herbal remedy of PD. The effects of Mpe on PINK1B9 mutants, supplied with standard diet to larvae and adults, were assayed on 3–6 (I), 10–15 (II) and 20–25 (III) days old flies. Mpe 0.1% significantly extended lifespan of PINK1B9 and fully rescued olfactory response to 1-hexanol and improved climbing behavior of PINK1B9 of all ages; in contrast, L-Dopa (0.01%, percentage at which it is present in Mpe 0.1%) ameliorated climbing of only PINK1B9 flies of age step II. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of antennal lobes and thoracic ganglia of PINK1B9 revealed that Mpe restored to wild type (WT) levels both T-bars and damaged mitochondria. Western blot analysis of whole brain showed that Mpe, but not L-Dopa on its own, restored bruchpilot (BRP) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression to age-matched WT control levels. These results highlight multiple sites of action of Mpe, suggesting that its effects cannot only depend upon its L-Dopa content and support the clinical observation of Mpe as an effective medication with intrinsic ability of delaying the onset of chronic L-Dopa-induced long-term motor complications. Overall, this study strengthens the relevance of using PINK1B9 Dm as a translational model to study the properties of Mucuna pruriens for PD treatment. PMID:25340511

  15. Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean rescues motor, olfactory, mitochondrial and synaptic impairment in PINK1B9 Drosophila melanogaster genetic model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Poddighe

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm mutant for PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1B9 gene is a powerful tool to investigate physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD. Using PINK1B9 mutant Dm we sought to explore the effects of Mucuna pruriens methanolic extract (Mpe, a L-Dopa-containing herbal remedy of PD. The effects of Mpe on PINK1B9 mutants, supplied with standard diet to larvae and adults, were assayed on 3-6 (I, 10-15 (II and 20-25 (III days old flies. Mpe 0.1% significantly extended lifespan of PINK1B9 and fully rescued olfactory response to 1-hexanol and improved climbing behavior of PINK1B9 of all ages; in contrast, L-Dopa (0.01%, percentage at which it is present in Mpe 0.1% ameliorated climbing of only PINK1B9 flies of age step II. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of antennal lobes and thoracic ganglia of PINK1B9 revealed that Mpe restored to wild type (WT levels both T-bars and damaged mitochondria. Western blot analysis of whole brain showed that Mpe, but not L-Dopa on its own, restored bruchpilot (BRP and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression to age-matched WT control levels. These results highlight multiple sites of action of Mpe, suggesting that its effects cannot only depend upon its L-Dopa content and support the clinical observation of Mpe as an effective medication with intrinsic ability of delaying the onset of chronic L-Dopa-induced long-term motor complications. Overall, this study strengthens the relevance of using PINK1B9 Dm as a translational model to study the properties of Mucuna pruriens for PD treatment.

  16. Studies on resistive switching times in NiO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, P; Sahu, V K; Ajimsha, R S; Das, A K; Singh, B

    2017-01-01

    The resistive switching dynamics of NiO thin films in Au/NiO/Pt device configuration have been investigated to measure the switching times of set and reset events and their dependence on compliance current and switching voltages. The set switching time was found to be ∼10 ns at the set voltage of ∼1.8 V, while reset switching time was much longer ∼150 µ s at reset voltage of 0.8 V. With increasing compliance current from 5 to 75 mA during set process, although the resistance contrast of two states improved due to the decrease in the resistance of the low resistance state, the reset switching time increased substantially up to ∼3 ms while set time remained nearly unchanged. The fast reset switching time of ∼27 ns, comparable to that of set switching time, was achieved by applying a higher reset voltage of ∼1.2 V. The observed dependence of reset time on compliance current and reset voltage in NiO thin films was explained in light of the conducting filamentary model in which reset process is of thermal nature and involves dissolution of conducting filaments as a consequence of Joule heating generated by the reset current. (paper)

  17. Neurological Adverse Effects of Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Amador, Margarita; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Tapia, Cecilia; Moreno, Carmen; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Alda, José A; Muñoz, Daniel; Andrés Nestares, Patricia; Cantarero, Carmen Martínez; Arango, Celso

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate demographic, clinical, and treatment factors that may impact on neurological adverse effects in naive and quasi-naive children and adolescents treated with antipsychotics. This was a 1-year, multicenter, observational study of a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population receiving antipsychotic treatment. Two subanalyses were run using the subsample of subjects taking the 3 most used antipsychotics and the subsample of antipsychotic-naive subjects. Total dyskinesia score (DyskinesiaS) and total Parkinson score (ParkinsonS) were calculated from the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center Involuntary Movement Scale, total UKU-Cognition score was calculated from the UKU Side Effect Rating Scale. Risk factors for tardive dyskinesias (TDs) defined after Schooler-Kaine criteria were studied using a logistic regression. Two hundred sixty-five subjects (mean age, 14.4 [SD, 2.9] years) with different Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I disorders were recruited. DyskinesiaS (P < 0.001) and ParkinsonS (P < 0.001) increased at 1-year follow-up. Risperidone was associated with higher increases in DyskinesiaS compared with quetiapine (P < 0.001). Higher increases in ParkinsonS were found with risperidone (P < 0.001) and olanzapine (P = 0.02) compared with quetiapine. Total UKU-Cognition Score decreased at follow-up. Findings were also significant when analyzing antipsychotic-naive subjects. Fifteen subjects (5.8%) fulfilled Schooler-Kane criteria for TD at follow-up. Younger age, history of psychotic symptoms, and higher cumulative exposure time were associated with TD at follow-up. Antipsychotics increased neurological adverse effects in a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population and should be carefully monitored. Risperidone presented higher scores in symptoms of dyskinesia and parkinsonism. Quetiapine was the antipsychotic with less neurological adverse effects. Younger subjects, psychosis, and

  18. Experimental evaluation of human-system interaction on alarm design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.-H.; Lee, Y.-L.; Hwang, S.-L.; Yenn, T.-C.; Yu, Y.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Huang, H.-W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the practicability of automatic reset alarm system in Fourth Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) of Taiwan. The features of auto-reset alarm system include dynamic prioritization of all alarm signals and fast system reset. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of automatic/manual reset on operation time, situational awareness (SA), task load index (TLX), and subjective ratings. All participants, including Experts and Novices, took part in the experiment on the alarm system simulator with Load Rejection procedure. The experimental results imply that the auto-reset alarm system may be applied in an advanced control room under Load Rejection procedure, because all participants' operation time were reduced as well as Novice's SA were raised up. Nevertheless, to ensure operating safety in FNPP, the effects of the auto-reset alarm system in other procedures/special situations still need to be tested in the near future

  19. Vitamin B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... off the market in 1983 because they were running up expensive legal bills in defense of their ... effects and are not likely to increase the beneficial effects. Movement disorders (tardive dyskinesia).Taking vitamin B6 ...

  20. Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... effects of levodopa called dyskinesias. Additional Information on Parkinson's Web Links MedlinePlus: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  1. Disease: H01258 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01258 Generalized epilepsy and paroxysmal dyskinesia (GEPD) Epilepsy is one of th...BK channel causes this syndrome. Nervous system disease; Epilepsy KCNMA1 [HSA:3778] [KO:K04936] ... ICD-10

  2. Glossary of ALS-Related Medical and Scientific Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dyskinesia An involuntary movement including athetosis and chorea. dysphagia Difficulty in swallowing. dystonia A slow movement or ... Paralysis of a muscle or group of muscles. Parkinson's Disease The most common form of Parkinson's is ...

  3. 2018-04-20T04:47:56Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Intercontinental Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes Study Treuer ... tardive dyskinesia (TD), side-effects (sexual dysfunction and weight change)) were ... The prevalence of side-effects associated with sexual function (loss of libido, ...

  4. Restorative treatment program with physical exercise of patients with dysfunction of the biliary tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parhotik I.I.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the thesis there has been shown that biliary dyskinesia takes a leading position among hepatobiliary diseases. 54 women and 14 men aged between 19 and 64 years old, who suffered from hypo kinetic and hyper kinetic forms of dyskinesia, took part in the research. Based on the character of the functional disorders, it was defined that at hyper kinetic form of dyskinesia the best rehabilitation effects were achieved at the application of physical exercises promoting relaxation of the gallbladder, sphincter and biliary duct musculature combined with the stimulation of bile formation. It was proved that means and methods of motion therapy for patients with hyper kinetic dyskenisia had to be aimed at the restoration of the gallbladder till its full reduction. It was defined that application of different forms of therapeutic physical training considering the type of biliary dyskinesia promoted the improvement of the patients' clinical condition, motor and evacuator function of the biliary ducts.

  5. Involuntary movements in the elderly. Parkinson's disease and other causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J Q

    1986-03-01

    Dyskinesia is usually lifelong and progressive; therefore, physicians generally see the disorder in elderly patients. Medical treatment must be carefully selected on the basis of the cause of the dyskinesia. Parkinsonian dyskinesia is well controlled by drug therapy. However, patients can become less responsive to a drug after years of use and may experience unwelcome side effects. Cerebellar tremor is extremely disabling because it worsens with activity, but no satisfactory therapy is available. Senile, essential, and familial tremors are also intensified by action, but they can often be suppressed with a mild tranquilizer or a beta blocker. Drug treatment of blepharospasm and spastic dysphonia has been disappointing: Facial or laryngeal surgery is sometimes required. Tardive dyskinesia is caused by neuroleptic drugs, so the only therapy for the disorder is withdrawal of the offending drug.

  6. Two-year, randomized, controlled study of safinamide as add-on to levodopa in mid to late Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgohain, Rupam; Szasz, Jozsef; Stanzione, Paolo; Meshram, Chandrashekhar; Bhatt, Mohit H; Chirilineau, Dana; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Lucini, Valentina; Giuliani, Rodolfo; Forrest, Emma; Rice, Patricia; Anand, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    In a 6-month double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Parkinson's disease patients with motor fluctuations, safinamide 50 and 100 mg/d significantly increased ON-time without increasing dyskinesia. Further long-term safinamide use in these patients was evaluated over an additional 18 months. Patients continued on their randomized placebo, 50, or 100 mg/d safinamide. The primary endpoint was change in Dyskinesia Rating Scale total score during ON-time over 24 months. Other efficacy endpoints included change in ON-time without troublesome dyskinesia, changes in individual diary categories, depressive symptoms, and quality of life measures. Change in Dyskinesia Rating Scale was not significantly different in safinamide versus placebo groups, despite decreased mean total Dyskinesia Rating Scale with safinamide compared with an almost unchanged score in placebo. Ad hoc subgroup analysis of moderate to severe dyskinetic patients at baseline (36% of patients) showed a decrease with safinamide 100 mg/d compared with placebo (P = 0.0317). Improvements in motor function, activities of daily living, depressive symptoms, clinical status, and quality of life at 6 months remained significant at 24 months. Adverse events and discontinuation rates were similar with safinamide and placebo. This 2-year, controlled study of add-on safinamide in mid-to-late Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations, although not demonstrating an overall difference in dyskinesias between patients and controls, showed improvement in dyskinesia in patients at least moderately dyskinetic at baseline. The study additionally demonstrated significant clinical benefits in ON-time (without troublesome dyskinesia), OFF-time, activities of daily living, motor symptoms, quality of life, and symptoms of depression. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  7. Tardive Dystonia: Clinical Spectrum and Novel Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jeffrey Davis

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dystonia was identified in 25 patients: involvement of the face and neck was most common; truncal and limb dystonia were also observed. There were 3 cases of laryngospasm and 2 of spasmodic dysphonia. The latter has not been previously reported as a manifestation of tardive dystonia. In all cases, movements typical of classic tardive dyskinesia could be demonstrated. This group illustrates the variety of dystonic disorders that may occur in conjunction with tardive dyskinesia.

  8. Duodopa pump treatment in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Korbo, Lise; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump. Monothe......Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump...

  9. Carbidopa-based modulation of the functional effect of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy in 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Ciesielska

    Full Text Available Progressively blunted response to L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease (PD is a critical factor that complicates long-term pharmacotherapy in view of the central importance of this drug in management of the PD-related motor disturbance. This phenomenon is likely due to progressive loss of one of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway for dopamine in the basal ganglia: aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC. We have developed a gene therapy based on an adeno-associated virus encoding human AADC (AAV2-hAADC infused into the Parkinsonian striatum. Although no adverse clinical effects of the AAV2-hAADC gene therapy have been observed so far, the ability to more precisely regulate transgene expression or transgene product activity could be an important long-term safety feature. The present study was designed to define pharmacological regulation of the functional activity of AAV2-hAADC transgene product by manipulating L-DOPA and carbidopa (AADC inhibitor administration in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Thirty days after unilateral striatal infusion of AAV2-hAADC, animals displayed circling behavior and acceleration of dopamine metabolism in the lesioned striatum after administration of a low dose of L-DOPA (5 mg/kg co-administered with 1.25 mg/kg of carbidopa. This phenomenon was not observed in control AAV2-GFP-treated rats. Withdrawal of carbidopa from a daily L-DOPA regimen decreased the peripheral L-DOPA pool, resulting in almost total loss of L-DOPA-induced behavioral response in AAV2-hAADC rats and a significant decline in striatal dopamine turnover. The serum L-DOPA level correlated with the magnitude of circling behavior in AAV2-hAADC rats. Additionally, AADC activity in homogenates of lesioned striata transduced by AAV2-AADC was 10-fold higher when compared with AAV2-GFP-treated control striata, confirming functional transduction. Our data suggests that the pharmacological regulation of circulating L-DOPA might be effective in the

  10. Induction of dopamine biosynthesis by l-DOPA in PC12 cells: implications of L-DOPA influx and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chun Mei; Yang, Yoo Jung; Huang, Hai Shan; Lim, Sung Cil; Kai, Masaaki; Lee, Myung Koo

    2008-09-04

    The effects of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) on dopamine biosynthesis and cytotoxicity were investigated in PC12 cells. l-DOPA treatment (20-200 microM) increased the levels of dopamine by 226%-504% after 3-6 h of treatment and enhanced the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). l-DOPA (20-200 muM) treatment led to a 562%-937% increase in l-DOPA influx at 1 h, which inhibited the activity of TH, but not AADC, during the same period. The extracellular releases of dopamine were also increased by 231%-570% after treatment with 20 and 200 microM l-DOPA for 0.5-3 h. l-DOPA at a concentration of 100-200 microM, but not 20 microM, exerted apoptotic cytotoxicity towards PC12 cells for 24-48 h. l-DOPA (20-200 microM) increased the intracellular cyclic AMP levels by 318%-557% after 0.5-1 h in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the elevated cyclic AMP levels by l-DOPA could not protect against l-DOPA (100-200 microM)-induced cytotoxicity after 24-48 h. In addition, l-DOPA (20-200 microM)-induced increases in cyclic AMP and dopamine were significantly reduced by treatment with SCH23390 (dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist). The increased levels of dopamine by l-DOPA were also reduced by H89 (protein kinase A, PKA, inhibitor) and GF109203X (protein kinase C inhibitor); however, the reduction by GF109203X was not significant. l-DOPA at 20-200 microM stimulated the phosphorylation of PKA and cyclic AMP-response element binding protein and induced the biosynthesis of the TH protein. These results indicate that 20-200 microM l-DOPA induces dopamine biosynthesis by two pathways. One pathway involves l-DOPA directly entering the cells to convert dopamine through AADC activity (l-DOPA decarboxylation). The other pathway involves l-DOPA and/or released dopamine activating TH to enhance dopamine biosynthesis by the dopamine D(1) receptor-cyclic AMP-PKA signaling system (dopamine biosynthesis by TH).

  11. Validating an Observation Protocol to Measure Special Education Teacher Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evelyn S.; Semmelroth, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    This study used Kane's (2013) Interpretation/Use Argument (IUA) to measure validity on the Recognizing Effective Special Education Teachers (RESET) observation tool. The RESET observation tool is designed to evaluate special education teacher effectiveness using evidence-based instructional practices as the basis for evaluation. In alignment with…

  12. 77 FR 24829 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... off, a transient loss of elevator control associated with a temporary incorrect flight control law... manual. We are issuing this AD to prevent movement of the elevators to zero position, which could result... transients lead to a FCPC2 reset. FCPC3 reset does not occur thanks to the introduction of second electrical...

  13. 2009 Tactical Wheeled Vehicles Conference (TWV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-03

    fields. 5 ... Spent $265.2 Million in Reset of TWVs … or larger than the entire 2007 revenue of the Los Angeles Dodgers . ... Spent $265.2 Million in...Reset of T Vs or larger than the entire 2007 revenue of the Los Angeles Dodgers . ... Maintains over 29,000 Tactical Wheeled Vehicles in theater … or

  14. Hf layer thickness dependence of resistive switching characteristics of Ti/Hf/HfO2/Au resistive random access memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryo; Azuma, Atsushi; Yoshida, Hayato; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Ito, Takeshi; Shingubara, Shoso

    2018-06-01

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices with a HfO2 dielectric layer have been studied extensively owing to the good reproducibility of their SET/RESET switching properties. Furthermore, it was reported that a thin Hf layer next to a HfO2 layer stabilized switching properties because of the oxygen scavenging effect. In this work, we studied the Hf thickness dependence of the resistance switching characteristics of a Ti/Hf/HfO2/Au ReRAM device. It is found that the optimum Hf thickness is approximately 10 nm to obtain good reproducibility of SET/RESET voltages with a small RESET current. However, when the Hf thickness was very small (∼2 nm), the device failed after the first RESET process owing to the very large RESET current. In the case of a very thick Hf layer (∼20 nm), RESET did not occur owing to the formation of a leaky dielectric layer. We observed the occurrence of multiple resistance states in the RESET process of the device with a Hf thickness of 10 nm by increasing the RESET voltage stepwise.

  15. Studies on transient characteristics of unipolar resistive switching processes in TiO2 thin film grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Vikas Kumar; Das, Amit K.; Ajimsha, R. S.; Misra, P.

    2018-05-01

    The transient characteristics of resistive switching processes have been investigated in TiO2 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to study the temporal evolution of the switching processes and measure the switching times. The reset and set switching times of unipolar Au/TiO2/Pt devices were found to be ~250 µs and 180 ns, respectively in the voltage windows of 0.5–0.9 V for reset and 1.9–4.8 V for set switching processes, obtained from quasi-static measurements. The reset switching time decreased exponentially with increasing amplitude of applied reset voltage pulse, while the set switching time remained insensitive to the amplitude of the set voltage pulse. A fast reset process with a switching time of ~400 ns was achieved by applying a reset voltage of ~1.8 V, higher than that of the quasi-static reset voltage window but below the set voltage window. The sluggish reset process in TiO2 thin film and the dependence of the reset switching time on the amplitude of the applied voltage pulse was understood on the basis of a self-accelerated thermal dissolution model of conducting filaments (CFs), where a higher temperature of the CFs owing to enhanced Joule heating at a higher applied voltage imposes faster diffusion of oxygen vacancies, resulting in a shorter reset switching time. Our results clearly indicate that fast resistive switching with switching times in hundreds of nanoseconds can be achieved in ALD-grown TiO2 thin films. This may find applications in fast non-volatile unipolar resistive switching memories.

  16. Risk and course of motor complications in a population-based incident Parkinson's disease cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornestad, Anders; Forsaa, Elin B; Pedersen, Kenn Freddy; Tysnes, Ole-Bjorn; Larsen, Jan Petter; Alves, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Motor complications may become major challenges in the management of patients with Parkinson's disease. In this study, we sought to determine the incidence, risk factors, evolution, and treatment of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in a population-representative, incident Parkinson's disease cohort. In this prospective population-based 5-year longitudinal study, we followed 189 incident and initially drug-naïve Parkinson's disease patients biannually for detailed examination of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations as defined by the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale. We performed Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses to assess cumulative incidence and risk factors of these motor complications. The 5-year cumulative incidence of motor complications was 52.4%. Motor fluctuations occurred in 42.9% and dyskinesias in 24.3%. Besides higher motor severity predicting both motor fluctuations (p = 0.016) and dyskinesias (p motor fluctuations (p = 0.001), whereas female gender predicted dyskinesias (p = 0.001). Actual levodopa dose at onset of motor fluctuations (p = 0.037) or dyskinesias (p 0.1) independently predicted development of motor complications. Motor fluctuations reversed in 37% and dyskinesias in 49% of patients on oral treatment and remained generally mild in those with persistent complications. No patients received device-aided therapies during the study. More than 50% in the general Parkinson's disease population develop motor complications within 5 years of diagnosis. However, they remain mild in the vast majority and are reversible in a substantial proportion of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnosis and management of acute movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, D; Benecke, R

    2005-11-01

    Most movement disorders, reflecting degenerative disorders, develop in a slowly progressive fashion. Some movement disorders, however, manifest with an acute onset. We wish to give an overview of the management and therapy of those acute-onset movement disorders.Drug-induced movement disorders are mainly caused by dopamine-receptor blockers (DRB) as used as antipsychotics (neuroleptics) and antiemetics. Acute dystonic reactions usually occur within the first four days of treatment. Typically, cranial pharyngeal and cervical muscles are affected. Anticholinergics produce a prompt relief. Akathisia is characterized by an often exceedingly bothersome feeling of restlessness and the inability to remain still. It is a common side effect of DRB and occurs within few days after their initiation. It subsides when DRB are ceased. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome is a rare, but life-threatening adverse reaction to DRB which may occur at any time during DRB application. It is characterised by hyperthermia, rigidity, reduced consciousness and autonomic failure. Therapeutically immediate DRB withdrawal is crucial. Additional dantrolene or bromocriptine application together with symptomatic treatment may be necessary. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are childhood onset disorders characterised by dystonic postures, chorea, athetosis and ballism occurring at irregular intervals. In Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia they are triggered by rapid movements, startle reactions or hyperventilation. They last up to 5 minutes, occur up to 100 times per day and are highly sensitive to anticonvulsants. In Paroxysmal Non-Kinesiogenic Dyskinesia they cannot be triggered, occur less frequently and last longer. Other paroxysmal dyskinesias include hypnogenic paroxysmal dyskinesias, paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia, infantile paroxysmal dystonias, Sandifer's syndrome and symptomatic paroxysmal dyskinesias. In Hereditary Episodic Ataxia Type 1 attacks of ataxia last for up to two minutes, may be accompanied

  18. Functional (psychogenic) stereotypies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMDs) may present with a broad spectrum of phenomenology including stereotypic movements. We aimed to characterize the phenomenology of functional stereotypies and compare these features with those observed in 65 patients with tardive dyskinesia (TD). From a cohort of 184 patients with FMDs, we identified 19 (10.3%) with functional stereotypies (FS). There were 15 women and 4 men, with a mean age at onset of 38.6 ± 17.4 years. Among the patients with FS, there were 9 (47%) with orolingual dyskinesia/stereotypy, 9 (47%) with limb stereotypies, 6 (32%) with trunk stereotypies, and 2 (11%) with respiratory dyskinesia as part of orofacial-laryngeal-trunk stereotypy. These patients showed signs commonly seen in FMDs such as sudden onset (84%), prominent distractibility (58%), and periods of unexplained improvement (84%) that were not reported in patients with TD. Besides a much lower frequency of exposure to potential offending drugs, patients with FS differed from those with classic TD by a younger age at onset, lack of self-biting, uncommon chewing movements, more frequent lingual movements without mouth dyskinesia, and associated functional tremor and abnormal speech. Lack of self-biting showed the highest sensitivity (1.0) and abnormal speech showed the highest specificity (0.9) for the diagnosis of functional orolingual dyskinesia. FS represent part of the clinical spectrum of FMDs. Clinical and demographic features are helpful in distinguishing patients with FS from those with TD.

  19. Buspirone anti-dyskinetic effect is correlated with temporal normalization of dysregulated striatal DRD1 signalling in L-DOPA-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Sagarduy, Ainhoa; Aristieta, Asier; Vazquez, Nerea; Zubillaga, Verónica; Ruíz-Ortega, José Angel; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Ugedo, Luisa; Sánchez-Pernaute, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Dopamine replacement with l-DOPA is the most effective therapy in Parkinson's disease. However, with chronic treatment, half of the patients develop an abnormal motor response including dyskinesias. The specific molecular mechanisms underlying dyskinesias are not fully understood. In this study, we used a well-characterized animal model to first establish the molecular differences between rats that did and did not develop dyskinesias. We then investigated the molecular substrates implicated in the anti-dyskinetic effect of buspirone, a 5HT1A partial agonist. Striatal protein expression profile of dyskinetic animals revealed increased levels of the dopamine receptor (DR)D3, ΔFosB and phospho (p)CREB, as well as an over-activation of the DRD1 signalling pathway, reflected by elevated ratios of phosphorylated DARPP32 and ERK2. Buspirone reduced the abnormal involuntary motor response in dyskinetic rats in a dose-dependent fashion. Buspirone (4 mg/kg) dramatically reduced the presence and severity of dyskinesias (by 83%) and normalized DARPP32 and ERK2 phosphorylation ratios, while the increases in DRD3, ΔFosB and pCREB observed in dyskinetic rats were not modified. Pharmacological experiments combining buspirone with 5HT1A and DRD3 antagonists confirmed that normalization of both pDARPP32 and pERK2 is required, but not sufficient, for blocking dyskinesias. The correlation between pDARPP32 ratio and dyskinesias was significant but not strong, pointing to the involvement of convergent factors and signalling pathways. Our results suggest that in dyskinetic rats DRD3 striatal over-expression could be instrumental in the activation of DRD1-downstream signalling and demonstrate that the anti-dyskinetic effect of buspirone in this model is correlated with DRD1 pathway normalization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Medicamental treatment of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotstra, F; Lestienne, S; De Nayer, A

    2010-09-01

    Antipsychotics play a key role in biologic therapy of schizophrenia. Following the first-generation neuroleptics, associated with many extrapyramidal side effects (severe dystonias, parkinsonian syndrome, akatisia and late dyskinesia) altering patients' compliance to the treatment, one can now find a new generation of molecules considered as atypical antipsychotics because they rarely cause neurological complications. This propriety provides a better compliance, along with a clear decrease of late dyskinesia risk but the effectiveness compared to ordinary molecules is still questioned. However, some of them can cause an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Some molecules such as benzodiazepines and some antidepressants can also be prescribed to cure schizophrenic patients.