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Sample records for reservoir permeability distributions

  1. Formation evaluation and well-test analysis for complex interpretation of reservoir permeability distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovin, M. O.; Merkulov, V. P.

    2014-08-01

    Data on heterogeneity of porous space and reservoir filtration properties determines the choice of most effective development strategy. The comparative analysis of well-logging and well-test results was carried out to determine the value of filtration heterogeneity. The similarity of the results obtained using different methods makes it possible to predict orientation of enhanced permeability.

  2. Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution. Annual report, March 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.O.; Collier, H.A.; Owen, T.E. [and others

    1997-06-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. They also may connect the borehole to remote zones of better reservoir characteristics. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based on the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. The project is a study directed toward the evaluation of acoustic logging and 3D-seismic measurement techniques as well as fluid flow and transport methods for mapping permeability anisotropy and other petrophysical parameters for the understanding of the reservoir fracture systems and associated fluid dynamics. The principal application of these measurement techniques and methods is to identify and investigate the propagation characteristics of acoustic and seismic waves in the Twin Creek hydrocarbon reservoir owned by Union Pacific Resources (UPR) and to characterize the fracture permeability distribution using production data. This site is located in the overthrust area of Utah and Wyoming. UPR drilled six horizontal wells, and presently UPR has two rigs running with many established drill hole locations. In addition, there are numerous vertical wells that exist in the area as well as 3D seismic surveys. Each horizontal well contains full FMS logs and MWD logs, gamma logs, etc.

  3. Advantageous Reservoir Characterization Technology in Extra Low Permeability Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutian Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper took extra low permeability reservoirs in Dagang Liujianfang Oilfield as an example and analyzed different types of microscopic pore structures by SEM, casting thin sections fluorescence microscope, and so on. With adoption of rate-controlled mercury penetration, NMR, and some other advanced techniques, based on evaluation parameters, namely, throat radius, volume percentage of mobile fluid, start-up pressure gradient, and clay content, the classification and assessment method of extra low permeability reservoirs was improved and the parameter boundaries of the advantageous reservoirs were established. The physical properties of reservoirs with different depth are different. Clay mineral variation range is 7.0%, and throat radius variation range is 1.81 μm, and start pressure gradient range is 0.23 MPa/m, and movable fluid percentage change range is 17.4%. The class IV reservoirs account for 9.56%, class II reservoirs account for 12.16%, and class III reservoirs account for 78.29%. According to the comparison of different development methods, class II reservoir is most suitable for waterflooding development, and class IV reservoir is most suitable for gas injection development. Taking into account the gas injection in the upper section of the reservoir, the next section of water injection development will achieve the best results.

  4. Estimating the permeability distribution and its uncertainty at the EGS demonstration reservoir Soultz-sous-Forêts using the ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, C.; Marquart, G.; Kosack, C.; Wolf, A.; Clauser, C.

    2012-08-01

    We present an estimation of the permeability fields of the reservoir at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, based on the data assimilation technique Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF). To this end, we assimilate data from a tracer circulation experiment performed in 2005. Using a 3-D numerical simulation of fluid transport and chemical tracer dispersion, we advance the tracer in time and control the concentration. With the EnKF we obtain reliable fits for concentration data recorded in both existing production boreholes, GPK2 and GPK4. As an alternative to discrete fracture networks, our heterogeneous equivalent porous medium approach thus can also characterize the hydraulically fractured zone of the engineered geothermal system. We present best estimates for permeabilities (10-14 m2-10-12 m2for the fracture zone) and the corresponding uncertainty which is about one order of magnitude. After comparing our results to results from a massive Monte Carlo and from a gradient-based Bayesian approach, it becomes clear that only the EnKF of this three approaches is able to fit concentrations at GPK2 and GPK4 simultaneously. Based on the EnKF estimates obtained, a long-term performance prediction including an uncertainty analysis for the reservoir (as it was in 2005) yields no thermal breakthrough in the system within at least 50 years of operation. Our study demonstrates the efficiency of the EnKF when estimating the permeability distribution in an EGS reservoir even with sparse data available.

  5. Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.O.; Hackett, C.L.; Brown, R.L.; Collier, H.A.; Datta-Gupta, A.

    1998-10-01

    To characterize the Buena Vista Hills field, the authors have implemented methods of modeling, processing and interpretation. The modeling methods are based on deterministic and stochastic solutions. Deterministic solutions were developed in Phase 1 and applied in Phase 2 to simulate acoustic responses of laminated reservoirs. Specifically, the simulations were aimed at implementing processing techniques to correct P-wave and S-wave velocity logs for scattering effects caused by thin layering. The authors are also including a summary of the theory and the processing steps of this new method for predicting intrinsic dispersion and attenuation in Section 2. Since the objective for correcting velocity scattering effects is to predict intrinsic dispersion from velocity data, they are presenting an application to illustrate how to relate permeability anisotropy with intrinsic dispersion. Also, the theoretical solution for calculating full waveform dipole sonic that was developed in Phase 1 was applied to simulate dipole responses at different azimuthal source orientations. The results will be used to interpret the effects of anisotropy associated with the presence of vertical fractures at Buena Vista Hills. The results of the integration of core, well logs, and geology of Buena Vista Hills is also given in Section 2. The results of this integration will be considered as the input model for the inversion technique for processing production data. Section 3 summarizes accomplishments. In Section 4 the authors present a summary of the technology transfer and promotion efforts associated with this project. In the last section, they address the work to be done in the next six months and future work by applying the processing, modeling and inversion techniques developed in Phases 1 and 2 of this project.

  6. Permeability restoration in underground disposal reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubbs, D.M.; Haynes, C.D.; Whittle, G.P.

    1973-09-01

    The aim of the research performed was to explore methods of permeability restoration in underground disposal reservoirs that may improve the receptive capacity of a well to a level that will allow continued use of the disposal zone without resorting to elevated injection pressures. The laboratory investigation employed a simulated open-hole completion in a disposal well wherein the entire formation face is exposed to the well bore. Cylindrical core samples from representative reservoir rocks through which a central vertical opening or borehole had been drilled were injected with a liquid waste obtained from a chemical manufacturing plant. This particular waste material was found to have a moderate plugging effect when injected into samples of reservoir rocks in a prior study. A review was made of the chemical considerations that might account for the reduction of permeability in waste injection. Purpose of this study was to ascertain the conditions under which the precipitation of certain compounds might occur in the injection of the particular waste liquid employed. A summary of chemical calculations is contained in Appendix B. The data may be useful in the treatment of wastes prior to injection and in the design of restoration procedures where analyses of waste liquids and interstitial materials are available. The results of permeability restoration tests were analyzed mathematically by curve-fitting techniques performed by a digital computer. A summary of the analyses is set forth in the discussion of test results and examples of computer printouts are included in Appendix A

  7. Dynamic modeling of surfactant flooding in low permeable argillaceous reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, A. N.; Gunkin, A. S.; Rogachev, M. К

    2017-10-01

    This article reveals the current state and problems of the Russian oil production sector. Physicochemical enhanced oil recovery methods are proposed as a solution. The investigation of surfactant treatment efficiency and their integrated effect on oil and reservoir rock is conducted as well as its applicability analysis for low permeable poly-mineral reservoir. The results of dynamic modeling of oil displacement by the developed surfactant composition in a low permeable reservoir are presented.

  8. Permeability Variation Models for Unsaturated Coalbed Methane Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Yumin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A large number of models have been established to describe permeability variation with the depletion of reservoir pressure to date. However, no attempt has been made to draw enough attention to the difference in the effect of various factors on permeability variation in different production stages of unsaturated CoalBed Methane (CBM reservoirs. This paper summarizes the existing and common permeability models, determines the relationship between various effects (effective stress effect, matrix shrinkage effect and Klinkenberg effect and desorption characteristics of the recovery of unsaturated CBM reservoirs, then establishes two improved models to quantificationally describe permeability variation, and finally discusses the effects of various factors (gas saturation, cleat porosity, Poisson’s ratio and shrinkage coefficient on permeability variation. The results show that permeability variation during the recovery of unsaturated CBM reservoirs can be divided into two stages: the first one is that permeability variation is only affected by the effective stress effect, and the second is that permeability variation is affected by the combination of the effective stress effect, matrix shrinkage effect and Klinkenberg effect. In the second stage, matrix shrinkage effect and Klinkenberg effect play much more significant role than the effective stress effect, which leads to an increase in permeability with depletion of reservoir pressure. Sensitivity analysis of parameters in the improved models reveals that those parameters associated with gas saturation, such as gas content, reservoir pressure, Langmuir volume and Langmuir pressure, have a significant impact on permeability variation in the first stage, and the important parameters in the second stage are the gas content, reservoir pressure, Langmuir volume, Langmuir pressure, Poisson’s ratio, Young’s modulus and shrinkage coefficient during the depletion of reservoir pressure. A comparative

  9. Permeability Evolution of Slowly Slipping Faults in Shale Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Reece, Julia S.; Gensterblum, Yves; Zoback, Mark D.

    2017-11-01

    Slow slip on preexisting faults during hydraulic fracturing is a process that significantly influences shale gas production in extremely low permeability "shale" (unconventional) reservoirs. We experimentally examined the impacts of mineralogy, surface roughness, and effective stress on permeability evolution of slowly slipping faults in Eagle Ford shale samples. Our results show that fault permeability decreases with slip at higher effective stress but increases with slip at lower effective stress. The permeabilities of saw cut faults fully recover after cycling effective stress from 2.5 to 17.5 to 2.5 MPa and increase with slip at constant effective stress due to asperity damage and dilation associated with slip. However, the permeabilities of natural faults only partially recover after cycling effective stress returns to 2.5 MPa and decrease with slip due to produced gouge blocking fluid flow pathways. Our results suggest that slowly slipping faults have the potential to enhance reservoir stimulation in extremely low permeability reservoirs.

  10. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  11. Effect of Permeability Anisotropy on the Production of Multi-Scale Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shales or mudstones are fine grained and layered reservoirs, which leads to strong shale permeability anisotropy. Shale has a wide pore-size distribution, and pores with different diameters contribute differently to the apparent permeability of shales. Therefore, understanding the anisotropy of multiscale shale gas reservoirs is an important aspect to model and evaluate gas production from shales. In this paper, a novel model of permeability anisotropy for shale gas reservoirs is presented to calculate the permeability in an arbitrary direction in three dimensional space. A numerical model which is valid for the entire Knudsen’s range (continuum flow, slip flow, transition flow and free molecular flow in shale gas reservoirs was developed, and the effect of gas-water flow and the simulation of hydraulic fracturing cracks were taken into consideration as well. The simulation result of the developed model was validated with field data. Effects of critical factors such as permeability anisotropy, relative permeability curves with different nanopore radii and initial water saturation in formation on the gas production rate of multi-stage fractured horizontal well were discussed. Besides, flow regimes of gas flow in shales were classified by Knudsen number, and the effect of various flow regimes on both apparent permeability of shales and then the gas production has been analyzed thoroughly.

  12. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  13. Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerans, C.; Lucia, F.J.; Senger, R.K.; Fogg, G.E.; Nance, H.S.; Hovorka, S.D.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.

  14. Thermoporoelastic effects during heat extraction from low-permeability reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Nick, Hamidreza M.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2018-01-01

    Thermoporoelastic effects during heat extraction from low permeability geothermal reservoirs are investigated numerically, based on the model of a horizontal penny-shaped fracture intersected by an injection well and a production well. A coupled formulation for thermo-hydraulic (TH) processes...... in EGS projects. Therefore, using the undrained thermal expansion coefficient for the matrix may overestimate the volumetric strain of the rock in low-permeability enhanced geothermal systems, whereas using a drained thermal expansion coefficient for the matrix may underestimate the volumetric strain...

  15. A Novel Integrated Approach to Modelling of Depletion-Induced Change in Full Permeability Tensor of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Izadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than half of all hydrocarbon reservoirs are Naturally Fractured Reservoirs (NFRs, in which production forecasting is a complicated function of fluid flow in a fracture-matrix system. Modelling of fluid flow in NFRs is challenging due to formation heterogeneity and anisotropy. Stress sensitivity and depletion effect on already-complex reservoir permeability add to the sophistication. Horizontal permeability anisotropy and stress sensitivity are often ignored or inaccurately taken into account when simulating fluid flow in NFRs. The aim of this paper is to present an integrated approach for evaluating the dynamic and true anisotropic nature of permeability in naturally fractured reservoirs. Among other features, this approach considers the effect of reservoir depletion on reservoir permeability tensor, allowing more realistic production forecasts. In this approach the NFR is discretized into grids for which an analytical model yields full permeability tensors. Then, fluid flow is modelled using the finite-element method to obtain pore-pressure distribution within the reservoir. Next, another analytical model evaluates the change in the aperture of individual fractures as a function of effective stress and rock mechanical properties. The permeability tensor of each grid is then updated based on the apertures obtained for the current time step. The integrated model proceeds according to the next prescribed time increments.

  16. An improved method for permeability estimation of the bioclastic limestone reservoir based on NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Liu, Jianyu; Zhang, Li; Han, Yujiao; Xing, Donghui

    2017-10-01

    Permeability is an important parameter in formation evaluation since it controls the fluid transportation of porous rocks. However, it is challengeable to compute the permeability of bioclastic limestone reservoirs by conventional methods linking petrophysical and geophysical data, due to the complex pore distributions. A new method is presented to estimate the permeability based on laboratory and downhole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. We divide the pore space into four intervals by the inflection points between the pore radius and the transversal relaxation time. Relationships between permeability and percentages of different pore intervals are investigated to investigate influential factors on the fluid transportation. Furthermore, an empirical model, which takes into account of the pore size distributions, is presented to compute the permeability. 212 core samples in our case show that the accuracy of permeability calculation is improved from 0.542 (SDR model), 0.507 (TIM model), 0.455 (conventional porosity-permeability regressions) to 0.803. To enhance the precision of downhole application of the new model, we developed a fluid correction algorithm to construct the water spectrum of in-situ NMR data, aiming to eliminate the influence of oil on the magnetization. The result reveals that permeability is positively correlated with percentages of mega-pores and macro-pores, but negatively correlated with the percentage of micro-pores. Poor correlation is observed between permeability and the percentage of meso-pores. NMR magnetizations and T 2 spectrums after the fluid correction agree well with laboratory results for samples saturated with water. Field application indicates that the improved method provides better performance than conventional models such as Schlumberger-Doll Research equation, Timur-Coates equation, and porosity-permeability regressions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An improved method for permeability estimation of the bioclastic limestone reservoir based on NMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Liu, Jianyu; Zhang, Li; Han, Yujiao; Xing, Donghui

    2017-10-01

    Permeability is an important parameter in formation evaluation since it controls the fluid transportation of porous rocks. However, it is challengeable to compute the permeability of bioclastic limestone reservoirs by conventional methods linking petrophysical and geophysical data, due to the complex pore distributions. A new method is presented to estimate the permeability based on laboratory and downhole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. We divide the pore space into four intervals by the inflection points between the pore radius and the transversal relaxation time. Relationships between permeability and percentages of different pore intervals are investigated to investigate influential factors on the fluid transportation. Furthermore, an empirical model, which takes into account of the pore size distributions, is presented to compute the permeability. 212 core samples in our case show that the accuracy of permeability calculation is improved from 0.542 (SDR model), 0.507 (TIM model), 0.455 (conventional porosity-permeability regressions) to 0.803. To enhance the precision of downhole application of the new model, we developed a fluid correction algorithm to construct the water spectrum of in-situ NMR data, aiming to eliminate the influence of oil on the magnetization. The result reveals that permeability is positively correlated with percentages of mega-pores and macro-pores, but negatively correlated with the percentage of micro-pores. Poor correlation is observed between permeability and the percentage of meso-pores. NMR magnetizations and T2 spectrums after the fluid correction agree well with laboratory results for samples saturated with water. Field application indicates that the improved method provides better performance than conventional models such as Schlumberger-Doll Research equation, Timur-Coates equation, and porosity-permeability regressions.

  18. Physical Simulation of Colayer Water Flooding in Low Permeability Carbonate Reservoir in Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwang Shi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the flow mechanism under different displacement modes of low permeability carbonate reservoir in the Middle East and to improve the utilization of various types of reservoirs, the physical simulation experiments of water flooding by different displacement methods were carried out. Selecting two types of rock samples with different permeability levels, two-layer coinjection and separated production experiments by samples I and III and conventional water flooding experiments by samples II and IV were carried out. In addition, by using low magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance, the development effect of microscopic pore structure under the different injection-production models was analyzed. Results show that, compared with the coinjection, the recovery rate of sample I was higher than II, 19.30%; sample III was lower than IV, 23.22%; and the comprehensive recovery degree reduced by 3.92%. NMR data also show that the crude oil is mainly distributed in the large pore throat; after water flooding, the displacement is also within the large pore throat, whereas the small pore throat is mainly obtained by the effect of infiltration absorption. The above studies provide a laboratory basis and foundation for the further development of low permeability carbonate reservoir in different Middle East strata.

  19. High permeability heavy oil reservoir nitrogen injection EOR research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining; Wang, Ruihe; Han, Guoqing; An, Yongsheng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen chemically very unreactive under normal showed great inertia. It is difficult to burn , dry, non-explosive , non-toxic , non-corrosive , and thus the use of safe and reliable. Coefficient of variation of nitrogen increases with increasing pressure , less affected by temperature . Under the same conditions, the ratio of the nitrogen gas formation volume factor carbon dioxide gas is high, about three times the carbon dioxide , the greater the elastic expansion of nitrogen play a beneficial role in flooding . EOR project trends increase the number of oil and gas injection gas injection from the calendar view, carbon dioxide miscible flooding gas injection EOR is the focus of the flue gas project currently has less to carry , nitrogen flooding is still subject to considerable attention. Note the nitrogen requirements of the basic conditions for enhanced oil recovery from major tectonic conditions , reservoir properties of crude nature of the gas injection timing and other aspects to consider , for different reservoir injected in different ways. Oilfield against a thick , high permeability and other characteristics, to improve oil recovery by injecting nitrogen indoor experiments conducted nitrogen injection process factors and supporting technical studies ; and introduced the field of nitrogen injection EOR field test conditions .

  20. Live Imaging of Micro-Wettability Experiments Performed for Low-Permeability Oil Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Clarkson, Christopher R; DeBuhr, Chris; Ghanizadeh, Amin

    2017-06-28

    Low-permeability (unconventional) hydrocarbon reservoirs exhibit a complex nanopore structure and micro (µm) -scale variability in composition which control fluid distribution, displacement and transport processes. Conventional methods for characterizing fluid-rock interaction are however typically performed at a macro (mm) -scale on rock sample surfaces. In this work, innovative methods for the quantification of micro-scale variations in wettability and fluid distribution in a low-permeability oil reservoir was enabled by using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Live imaging of controlled water condensation/evaporation experiments allowed micro-droplet contact angles to be evaluated, while imaging combined with x-ray mapping of cryogenically frozen samples facilitated the evaluation of oil and water micro-droplet contact angles after successive fluid injection. For the first time, live imaging of fluids injected through a micro-injection system has enabled quantification of sessile and dynamic micro-droplet contact angles. Application of these combined methods has revealed dramatic spatial changes in fluid contact angles at the micro-scale, calling into question the applicability of macro-scale observations of fluid-rock interaction.

  1. Dual permeability modeling of flow in a fractured geothermal reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.D.; Allman, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    A three dimensional fracture system synthesis and flow simulation has been developed to correlate drawdown characteristics measured in a geothermal well and to provide the basis for an analysis of tracer tests. A new dual permeability approach was developed which incorporates simulations at two levels to better represent a discrete fracture system within computer limitations. The first incorporates a discrete simulation of the largest fractures in the system plus distributed or representative element stimulation of the smaller fractures. The second determines the representative element properties by discrete simulation of the smaller fractures. The fracture system was synthesized from acoustic televiewer data on the orientation and separation of three distinct fracture sets, together with additional data from the literature. Lognormal and exponential distributions of fracture spacing and radius were studied with the exponential distribution providing more reasonable results. Hydraulic apertures were estimated as a function of distance from the model boundary to a constant head boundary. Mean values of 6.7, 101 and 46 ..mu..m were chosen as the most representative values for the three fracture sets. Recommendations are given for the additional fracture characterization needed to reduce the uncertainties in the model. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Permeability Prediction for Nahr-Umr Reservoir / Subba field by Using FZI Method

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    Sameera M. Hamd- Allah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability determination in the reservoirs that are anisotropic and heterogeneous is a complicated problem due to the limited number of wells that contain core samples and well test data. This paper presents hydraulic flow units and flow zone indicator for predicting permeability of rock mass from core for Nahr-Umr reservoir/ Subba field. The Permeability measurement is better found in the laboratory work on the cored rock that taken from the formation. Nahr-Umr Formation is the main lower cretaceous sandstone reservoir in southern of Iraq. This formation is made up mainly of sandstone. Nahr-Umr formation was deposited on a gradually rising basin floor. The digenesis of Nahr-Umr sediments is very important due to its direct relation to the porosity and permeability. In this study permeability has been predicated by using the flow zone indicator methods. This method attempts to identify the flow zone indicator in un-cored wells using log records. Once the flow zone indicator is calculated from the core data, a relationship between this FZI value and the well logs can be obtained. Three relationships have been found for Nahr-Umr reservoir/Subba field by FZI method. By plotting the permeability of the core versus the permeability that is predicted by FZI method the parameter R2 was found (0.905 which is very good for predict the permeability.

  3. Reservoir rock permeability prediction using support vector regression in an Iranian oil field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarzadeh, Sadegh; Shadizadeh, Seyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir permeability is a critical parameter for the evaluation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. It is often measured in the laboratory from reservoir core samples or evaluated from well test data. The prediction of reservoir rock permeability utilizing well log data is important because the core analysis and well test data are usually only available from a few wells in a field and have high coring and laboratory analysis costs. Since most wells are logged, the common practice is to estimate permeability from logs using correlation equations developed from limited core data; however, these correlation formulae are not universally applicable. Recently, support vector machines (SVMs) have been proposed as a new intelligence technique for both regression and classification tasks. The theory has a strong mathematical foundation for dependence estimation and predictive learning from finite data sets. The ultimate test for any technique that bears the claim of permeability prediction from well log data is the accurate and verifiable prediction of permeability for wells where only the well log data are available. The main goal of this paper is to develop the SVM method to obtain reservoir rock permeability based on well log data. (paper)

  4. The residual oil distribution regularity of low permeability oilfield

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    Huan Zhao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study on the residual oil distribution regularity is the important thing during the middle and later stage of the oilfield. With understanding and development of oilfield, the research methods of remaining oil are varied. Well block A is a low permeability oilfield and complex relationship between injection wells and production wells. The well pattern has low control of sand body. Based on the characteristics and the geological and dynamic data, technology of integrated 3-D geological modeling with reservoir numerical simulation is ensured to study the residual oil. Finally, deposition facies and flowing units are studied to analyze the residual oil distribution regularity. As a result, the types of residual oil were confirmed and the basis for the following development adjustment of the well block is provided.

  5. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  6. Forecast on Water Locking Damage of Low Permeable Reservoir with Quantum Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingyuan; Sun, Yuxue; Feng, Fuping; Zhao, Fulei; Sui, Dianjie; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    It is of great importance in oil-gas reservoir protection to timely and correctly forecast the water locking damage, the greatest damage for low permeable reservoir. An analysis is conducted on the production mechanism and various influence factors of water locking damage, based on which a quantum neuron is constructed based on the information processing manner of a biological neuron and the principle of quantum neural algorithm, besides, the quantum neural network model forecasting the water locking of the reservoir is established and related software is also made to forecast the water locking damage of the gas reservoir. This method has overcome the defects of grey correlation analysis that requires evaluation matrix analysis and complicated operation. According to the practice in Longxi Area of Daqing Oilfield, this method is characterized by fast operation, few system parameters and high accuracy rate (the general incidence rate may reach 90%), which can provide reliable support for the protection technique of low permeable reservoir.

  7. Integrated petrophysical and reservoir characterization workflow to enhance permeability and water saturation prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amri, Meshal; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Elkatatny, Salaheldin; Al-Yousef, Hasan; Al-Ghamdi, Tariq

    2017-07-01

    Accurate estimation of permeability is essential in reservoir characterization and in determining fluid flow in porous media which greatly assists optimize the production of a field. Some of the permeability prediction techniques such as Porosity-Permeability transforms and recently artificial intelligence and neural networks are encouraging but still show moderate to good match to core data. This could be due to limitation to homogenous media while the knowledge about geology and heterogeneity is indirectly related or absent. The use of geological information from core description as in Lithofacies which includes digenetic information show a link to permeability when categorized into rock types exposed to similar depositional environment. The objective of this paper is to develop a robust combined workflow integrating geology and petrophysics and wireline logs in an extremely heterogeneous carbonate reservoir to accurately predict permeability. Permeability prediction is carried out using pattern recognition algorithm called multi-resolution graph-based clustering (MRGC). We will bench mark the prediction results with hard data from core and well test analysis. As a result, we showed how much better improvements are achieved in the permeability prediction when geology is integrated within the analysis. Finally, we use the predicted permeability as an input parameter in J-function and correct for uncertainties in saturation calculation produced by wireline logs using the classical Archie equation. Eventually, high level of confidence in hydrocarbon volumes estimation is reached when robust permeability and saturation height functions are estimated in presence of important geological details that are petrophysically meaningful.

  8. Characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and distribution rules of effective reservoirs in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujun Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Songliao Basin, volcanic oil and gas reservoirs are important exploration domains. Based on drilling, logging, and 3D seismic (1495 km2 data, 546 sets of measured physical properties and gas testing productivity of 66 wells in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin, eruptive cycles and sub-lithofacies were distinguished after lithologic correction of the 19,384 m volcanic well intervals, so that a quantitative analysis was conducted on the relation between the eruptive cycles, lithologies and lithofacies and the distribution of effective reservoirs. After the relationship was established between lithologies, lithofacies & cycles and reservoir physical properties & oil and gas bearing situations, an analysis was conducted on the characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and the distribution rules of effective reservoirs. It is indicated that 10 eruptive cycles of 3 sections are totally developed in this area, and the effective reservoirs are mainly distributed at the top cycles of eruptive sequences, with those of the 1st and 3rd Members of Yingcheng Formation presenting the best reservoir properties. In this area, there are mainly 11 types of volcanic rocks, among which rhyolite, rhyolitic tuff, rhyolitic tuffo lava and rhyolitic volcanic breccia are the dominant lithologies of effective reservoirs. In the target area are mainly developed 4 volcanic lithofacies (11 sub-lithofacies, among which upper sub-lithofacies of effusive facies and thermal clastic sub-lithofacies of explosion lithofacies are predominant in effective reservoirs. There is an obvious corresponding relationship between the physical properties of volcanic reservoirs and the development degree of effective reservoirs. The distribution of effective reservoirs is controlled by reservoir physical properties, and the formation of effective reservoirs is influenced more by porosity than by permeability. It is concluded that deep volcanic gas exploration presents a good

  9. Permeability Estimation of Rock Reservoir Based on PCA and Elman Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Jian, Shaoyong

    2018-03-01

    an intelligent method which based on fuzzy neural networks with PCA algorithm, is proposed to estimate the permeability of rock reservoir. First, the dimensionality reduction process is utilized for these parameters by principal component analysis method. Further, the mapping relationship between rock slice characteristic parameters and permeability had been found through fuzzy neural networks. The estimation validity and reliability for this method were tested with practical data from Yan’an region in Ordos Basin. The result showed that the average relative errors of permeability estimation for this method is 6.25%, and this method had the better convergence speed and more accuracy than other. Therefore, by using the cheap rock slice related information, the permeability of rock reservoir can be estimated efficiently and accurately, and it is of high reliability, practicability and application prospect.

  10. Upscaling of permeability heterogeneities in reservoir rocks; an integrated approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikes, D.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents a hierarchical and geologically constrained deterministic approach to incorporate small-scale heterogeneities into reservoir flow simulators. We use a hierarchical structure to encompass all scales from laminae to an entire depositional system. For the geological models under

  11. Laboratory characterisation of coal reservoir permeability for primary and enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zhejun; Connell, Luke D.; Camilleri, Michael [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2010-06-01

    Coal permeability is highly sensitive to the stress. Meanwhile, coal swells with gas adsorption, and shrinks with gas desorption. Under reservoir conditions these strain changes affect the cleat porosity and thus permeability. Coal permeability models, such as the Palmer and Mansoori and Shi and Durucan models, relate the stress and swelling/shrinkage effect to permeability using an approximate geomechanical approach. Thus in order to apply these models, stress-permeability behaviour, swelling/shrinkage behaviour and the geomechanical properties of the coal must be estimated. This paper presents a methodology for the laboratory characterization of the Palmer and Mansoori and Shi and Durucan permeability models for reservoir simulation of ECBM and CO{sub 2} sequestration in coal. In this work a triaxial cell was used to measure gas permeability, adsorption, swelling and geomechanical properties of coal cores at a series of pore pressures and for CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and helium with pore pressures up to 13 MPa and confining pressures up to 20 MPa. Properties for the permeability models such as cleat compressibility, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and adsorption-induced swelling are calculated from the experimental measurements. Measurements on an Australian coal are presented. The results show that permeability decreases significantly with confining pressure and pore pressure. The permeability decline with pore pressure is a direct result of adsorption-induced coal swelling. Coal geomechanical properties show some variation with gas pressure and gas species, but there is no direct evidence of coal softening at high CO{sub 2} pressures for the coal sample studied. The experimental results also show that cleat compressibility changes with gas species and pressure. Then the measured properties were applied in the Shi and Durucan model to investigate the permeability behaviour during CO{sub 2} sequestration in coal. (author)

  12. The coupling of dynamics and permeability in the hydrocarbon accumulation period controls the oil-bearing potential of low permeability reservoirs: a case study of the low permeability turbidite reservoirs in the middle part of the third member of Shahejie Formation in Dongying Sag

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Tian; Cao, Ying-Chang; Wang, Yan-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between permeability and dynamics in hydrocarbon accumulation determine oilbearing potential (the potential oil charge) of low permeability reservoirs. The evolution of porosity and permeability of low permeability turbidite reservoirs of the middle part of the third member of t...

  13. Permeability estimation from NMR diffusion measurements in reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzarini, M; Brancolini, A; Gossenberg, P

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that in restricted geometries, such as in porous media, the apparent diffusion coefficient (D) of the fluid depends on the observation time. From the time dependence of D, interesting information can be derived to characterise geometrical features of the porous media that are relevant in oil industry applications. In particular, the permeability can be related to the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V), estimated from the short time behaviour of D(t), and to the connectivity of the pore space, which is probed by the long time behaviour of D(t). The stimulated spin-echo pulse sequence, with pulsed magnetic field gradients, has been used to measure the diffusion coefficients on various homogeneous and heterogeneous sandstone samples. It is shown that the petrophysical parameters obtained by our measurements are in good agreement with those yielded by conventional laboratory techniques (gas permeability and electrical conductivity). Although the diffusing time is limited by T1, eventually preventing an observation of the real asymptotic behaviour, and the surface-to-volume ratio measured by nuclear magnetic resonance is different from the value obtained by BET because of the different length scales probed, the measurement remains reliable and low-time consuming.

  14. Low permeability Neogene lithofacies in Northern Croatia as potential unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvić, Tomislav; Sučić, Antonija; Cvetković, Marko; Resanović, Filip; Velić, Josipa

    2014-06-01

    We present two examples of describing low permeability Neogene clastic lithofacies to outline unconventional hydrocarbon lithofacies. Both examples were selected from the Drava Depression, the largest macrostructure of the Pannonian Basin System located in Croatia. The first example is the Beničanci Field, the largest Croatian hydrocarbon reservoir discovered in Badenian coarse-grained clastics that consists mostly of breccia. The definition of low permeability lithofacies is related to the margins of the existing reservoir, where the reservoir lithology changed into a transitional one, which is mainly depicted by the marlitic sandstones. However, calculation of the POS (probability of success of new hydrocarbons) shows critical geological categories where probabilities are lower than those in the viable reservoir with proven reserves. Potential new hydrocarbon volumes are located in the structural margins, along the oil-water contact, with a POS of 9.375%. These potential reserves in those areas can be classified as probable. A second example was the Cremušina Structure, where a hydrocarbon reservoir was not proven, but where the entire structure has been transferred onto regional migration pathways. The Lower Pontian lithology is described from well logs as fine-grained sandstones with large sections of silty or marly clastics. As a result, the average porosity is low for conventional reservoir classification (10.57%). However, it is still an interesting case for consideration as a potentially unconventional reservoir, such as the "tight" sandstones.

  15. New well pattern optimization methodology in mature low-permeability anisotropic reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiazheng; Liu, Yuetian; Feng, Yueli; Ding, Yao; Liu, Liu; He, Youwei

    2018-02-01

    In China, lots of well patterns were designed before people knew the principal permeability direction in low-permeability anisotropic reservoirs. After several years’ production, it turns out that well line direction is unparallel with principal permeability direction. However, traditional well location optimization methods (in terms of the objective function such as net present value and/or ultimate recovery) are inapplicable, since wells are not free to move around in a mature oilfield. Thus, the well pattern optimization (WPO) of mature low-permeability anisotropic reservoirs is a significant but challenging task, since the original well pattern (WP) will be distorted and reconstructed due to permeability anisotropy. In this paper, we investigate the destruction and reconstruction of WP when the principal permeability direction and well line direction are unparallel. A new methodology was developed to quantitatively optimize the well locations of mature large-scale WP through a WPO algorithm on the basis of coordinate transformation (i.e. rotating and stretching). For a mature oilfield, large-scale WP has settled, so it is not economically viable to carry out further infill drilling. This paper circumvents this difficulty by combining the WPO algorithm with the well status (open or shut-in) and schedule adjustment. Finally, this methodology is applied to an example. Cumulative oil production rates of the optimized WP are higher, and water-cut is lower, which highlights the potential of the WPO methodology application in mature large-scale field development projects.

  16. Environmental response nanosilica for reducing the pressure of water injection in ultra-low permeability reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peisong; Niu, Liyong; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-12-01

    The super-hydrophobic silica nanoparticles are applied to alter the wettability of rock surface from water-wet to oil-wet. The aim of this is to reduce injection pressure so as to enhance water injection efficiency in low permeability reservoirs. Therefore, a new type of environmentally responsive nanosilica (denote as ERS) is modified with organic compound containing hydrophobic groups and "pinning" groups by covalent bond and then covered with a layer of hydrophilic organic compound by chemical adsorption to achieve excellent water dispersibility. Resultant ERS is homogeneously dispersed in water with a size of about 4-8 nm like a micro-emulsion system and can be easily injected into the macro or nano channels of ultra-low permeability reservoirs. The hydrophobic nanosilica core can be released from the aqueous delivery system owing to its strong dependence on the environmental variation from normal condition to injection wells (such as pH and salinity). Then the exposed silica nanoparticles form a thin layer on the surface of narrow pore throat, leading to the wettability from water-wet to oil-wet. More importantly, the two rock cores with different permeability were surface treated with ERS dispersion with a concentration of 2 g/L, exhibit great reduce of water injection pressure by 57.4 and 39.6%, respectively, which shows great potential for exploitation of crude oil from ultra-low permeability reservoirs during water flooding. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Dynamics of hydrofracturing and permeability evolution in layered reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan eGhani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A coupled hydro-mechanical model is presented to model fluid driven fracturing in layered porous rocks. In the model the solid elastic continuum is described by a discrete element approach coupled with a fluid continuum grid that is used to solve Darcy based pressure diffusion. The model assumes poro-elasto-plastic effects and yields real time dynamic aspects of the fracturing and effective stress evolution under the influence of excess fluid pressure gradients. We show that the formation and propagation of hydrofractures are sensitive to mechanical and tectonic conditions of the system. In cases where elevated fluid pressure is the sole driving agent in a stable tectonic system, sealing layers induce permutations between the principal directions of the local stress tensor, which regulate the growth of vertical fractures and may result in irregular pattern formation or sub-horizontal failure below the seal. Stiffer layers tend to concentrate differential stresses and lead to vertical fracture growth, whereas the layer-contact tends to fracture if the strength of the neighboring rock is comparably high. If the system has remained under extension for a longer time period, the developed hydrofractures propagate by linking up confined tensile fractures in competent layers. This leads to the growth of large-scale normal faults in the layered systems, so that subsequently the effective permeability is highly variable over time and the faults drain the system. The simulation results are shown to be consistent with some of the field observations carried out in the Oman Mountains, where abnormal fluid pressure is reported to be a significant factor in the development of several generations of local and regional fracture and fault sets.

  18. The Hybrid of Classification Tree and Extreme Learning Machine for Permeability Prediction in Oil Reservoir

    KAUST Repository

    Prasetyo Utomo, Chandra

    2011-06-01

    Permeability is an important parameter connected with oil reservoir. Predicting the permeability could save millions of dollars. Unfortunately, petroleum engineers have faced numerous challenges arriving at cost-efficient predictions. Much work has been carried out to solve this problem. The main challenge is to handle the high range of permeability in each reservoir. For about a hundred year, mathematicians and engineers have tried to deliver best prediction models. However, none of them have produced satisfying results. In the last two decades, artificial intelligence models have been used. The current best prediction model in permeability prediction is extreme learning machine (ELM). It produces fairly good results but a clear explanation of the model is hard to come by because it is so complex. The aim of this research is to propose a way out of this complexity through the design of a hybrid intelligent model. In this proposal, the system combines classification and regression models to predict the permeability value. These are based on the well logs data. In order to handle the high range of the permeability value, a classification tree is utilized. A benefit of this innovation is that the tree represents knowledge in a clear and succinct fashion and thereby avoids the complexity of all previous models. Finally, it is important to note that the ELM is used as a final predictor. Results demonstrate that this proposed hybrid model performs better when compared with support vector machines (SVM) and ELM in term of correlation coefficient. Moreover, the classification tree model potentially leads to better communication among petroleum engineers concerning this important process and has wider implications for oil reservoir management efficiency.

  19. Saturation distributions in heavy oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Joshua Todd

    Models that describe conventional reservoirs can be used to explore the possibility of heavier-than-water oil. Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a common process in reservoirs with extra heavy oils (oil sands). In some cases, oil that is heavier than water is present in these reservoirs. The segregation of oil and water may cause issues for recovery. It is important to understand the initial saturation distribution of oil and water for proper design of injection. It was found through simulation that the heavy oil would pool towards the bottom of a heavy oil reservoir with water remaining on top of the oil. With capillary pressure, the heavy oil and water will form a transition zone. The extent of the transition zone is dependent on the density gradient of the oil, the density difference between the oil and water, and the slope of the capillary pressure saturation profile. This finding influences the positioning of production piping in steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) as well as possible geological pooling areas for recovery. The possibility of a water zone between oil zones increases the risk of missing oil in the reservoir when drilling or perforating.

  20. Validating predictions of evolving porosity and permeability in carbonate reservoir rocks exposed to CO2-brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2017-12-01

    Improving our ability to better forecast the extent and impact of changes in porosity and permeability due to CO2-brine-carbonate reservoir interactions should lower uncertainty in long-term geologic CO2 storage capacity estimates. We have developed a continuum-scale reactive transport model that simulates spatial and temporal changes to porosity, permeability, mineralogy, and fluid composition within carbonate rocks exposed to CO2 and brine at storage reservoir conditions. The model relies on two primary parameters to simulate brine-CO2-carbonate mineral reaction: kinetic rate constant(s), kmineral, for carbonate dissolution; and an exponential parameter, n, relating porosity change to resulting permeability. Experimental data collected from fifteen core-flooding experiments conducted on samples from the Weyburn (Saskatchewan, Canada) and Arbuckle (Kansas, USA) carbonate reservoirs were used to calibrate the reactive-transport model and constrain the useful range of k and n values. Here we present the results of our current efforts to validate this model and the use of these parameter values, by comparing predictions of extent and location of dissolution and the evolution of fluid permeability against our results from new core-flood experiments conducted on samples from the Duperow Formation (Montana, USA). Agreement between model predictions and experimental data increase our confidence that these parameter ranges need not be considered site-specific but may be applied (within reason) at various locations and reservoirs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Permeable fracture zones in the hard rocks of the geothermal reservoir at Rittershoffen, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, J.; Genter, A.; Chopin, F.

    2017-07-01

    Fluid circulation in zones of fractures are a key challenge to exploit deep geothermal heat from natural reservoir. At Rittershoffen (Upper Rhine Graben, France), two geothermal boreholes, GRT-1 and GRT-2, were drilled in 2012 and 2014, respectively. They targeted the local Rittershoffen normal fault, which strikes N-S and dips westward. In this study, major natural fractures were observed in the open holes of both wells from acoustic image logs correlated with other standard geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron porosity, and caliper). Their permeability was evaluated at the borehole scale from temperature logs, mud losses, and gas surveys. One originally permeable (OP) fracture zone was observed in the granite of GRT-1. In GRT-2, four OP fracture zones were observed in the granite and two in sandstones. In GRT-2, fracture zones are composed by several fluid pathways that could explain the higher natural permeability than in GRT-1. All OP fractures are associated with positive temperature anomaly, interpreted as circulation of hot geothermal water through the permeable fracture, or negative one, interpreted as the cooling of a porous, altered and fractured zone around the permeable fracture after drilling operations. Permeability of natural fracture oriented N170° seems to be intimately linked to the secondary mineral deposits resulting from paleocirculations. The geometrical fracture model along the wellbore suggests that the inclined trajectory of GRT-2 increases the connection between the borehole and the nearly vertical fracture network associated to the local fault. A good characterization of zones of fractures in a targeted natural reservoir allows an optimal exploitation of geothermal resource.

  2. Investigating Multiphase Flow Phenomena in Fine-Grained Reservoir Rocks: Insights from Using Ethane Permeability Measurements over a Range of Pore Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Aidan Letham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to quantify effective permeability at the various fluid saturations and stress states experienced during production from shale oil and shale gas reservoirs is required for efficient exploitation of the resources, but to date experimental challenges prevent measurement of the effective permeability of these materials over a range of fluid saturations. To work towards overcoming these challenges, we measured effective permeability of a suite of gas shales to gaseous ethane over a range of pore pressures up to the saturated vapour pressure. Liquid/semiliquid ethane saturation increases due to adsorption and capillary condensation with increasing pore pressure resulting in decreasing effective permeability to ethane gas. By how much effective permeability to ethane gas decreases with adsorption and capillary condensation depends on the pore size distribution of each sample and the stress state that effective permeability is measured at. Effective permeability decreases more at higher stress states because the pores are smaller at higher stress states. The largest effective permeability drops occur in samples with dominant pore sizes in the mesopore range. These pores are completely blocked due to capillary condensation at pore pressures near the saturated vapour pressure of ethane. Blockage of these pores cuts off the main fluid flow pathways in the rock, thereby drastically decreasing effective permeability to ethane gas.

  3. Evolving simple-to-use method to determine water–oil relative permeability in petroleum reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, a new approach constructed based on artificial intelligence concept is introduced to determine water/oil relative permeability at various conditions. To attain an effective tool, various artificial intelligence approaches such as artificial neural network (ANN, hybrid of genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization (HGAPSO are examined. Intrinsic potential of feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN optimized by different optimization algorithms are composed to estimate water/oil relative permeability. The optimization methods such as genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization and hybrid approach of them are implemented to obtain optimal connection weights involved in the developed smart technique. The constructed intelligent models are evaluated by utilizing extensive experimental data reported in open literature. Results obtained from the proposed intelligent tools were compared with the corresponding experimental relative permeability data. The average absolute deviation between the model predictions and the relevant experimental data was found to be less than 0.1% for hybrid genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization technique. It is expected that implication of HGAPSO-ANN in relative permeability of water/oil estimation leads to more reliable water/oil relative permeability predictions, resulting in design of more comprehensive simulation and further plans for reservoir production and management.

  4. Permeability model of tight reservoir sandstones combining core-plug and miniperm analysis of drillcore; longyearbyen co2lab, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnabosco, Cara; Braathen, Alvar; Ogata, Kei

    2014-01-01

    Permeability measurements in Mesozoic, low-permeability sandstone units within the strata cored in seven drillholes near Longyearbyen, Svalbard, have been analysed to assess the presence of aquifers and their potentials as reservoirs for the storage of carbon dioxide. These targeted sandstones are

  5. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    The permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs are controlled by their porosity and specific surface area. Measured permeabilities are in the range 0.025-5.3 mD and are successfully predicted by use of the Kozeny equation. In this paper we focus on the factors that control spec...

  6. Stability Analysis of Hydrodynamic Pressure Landslides with Different Permeability Coefficients Affected by Reservoir Water Level Fluctuations and Rainstorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faming Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is significant to study the variations in the stability coefficients of hydrodynamic pressure landslides with different permeability coefficients affected by reservoir water level fluctuations and rainstorms. The Sifangbei landslide in Three Gorges Reservoir area is used as case study. Its stability coefficients are simulated based on saturated-unsaturated seepage theory and finite element analysis. The operating conditions of stability coefficients calculation are reservoir water level variations between 175 m and 145 m, different rates of reservoir water level fluctuations, and a three-day continuous rainstorm. Results show that the stability coefficient of the hydrodynamic pressure landslide decreases with the drawdown of the reservoir water level, and a rapid drawdown rate leads to a small stability coefficient when the permeability coefficient ranges from 1.16 × 10−6 m/s to 4.64 × 10−5 m/s. Additionally, the landslide stability coefficient increases as the reservoir water level increases, and a rapid increase in the water level leads to a high stability coefficient when the permeability coefficient ranges from 1.16 × 10−6 m/s to 4.64 × 10−5 m/s. The landslide stability coefficient initially decreases and then increases as the reservoir water level declines when the permeability coefficient is greater than 4.64 × 10−5 m/s. Moreover, for structures with the same landslide, the landslide stability coefficient is most sensitive to the change in the rate of reservoir water level drawdown when the permeability coefficient increases from 1.16 × 10−6 m/s to 1.16 × 10−4 m/s. Additionally, the rate of decrease in the stability coefficient increases as the permeability coefficient increases. Finally, the three-day rainstorm leads to a significant reduction in landslide stability, and the rate of decrease in the stability coefficient initially increases and then decreases as the permeability coefficient increases.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2004-07-19

    regular, discrete, vertical fracture systems. The model contains a series of point scatterers delineating the top tip and bottom tip of each vertical fracture. When the shot record is located in the middle of the fractured zone and oriented normal to the direction of fracturing, a complicated series of beating is observed in the back scattered energy. When the shot record is oriented parallel to the fracturing, ringing wavetrains are observed with moveouts similar to reflections from many horizontal layers. These results are consistent with the full 3D elastic modeling results. An AVOA analysis method was refined and applied to a field data set. An iterative, nonlinear least squares inversion that uses the Gauss-Newton method and analyzes the full range of azimuths simultaneously was employed. Resulting fracture location and strike orientation estimates are consistent with other fracture information from the area. Two modeling approaches for estimating permeability values from seismically derived fracture parameters have been investigated. The first is a statistical method that calculates the permeability tensor for a given distribution of fractures. A possible workflow using this method was tested on fracture distributions obtained from the Transfer Function-Scattering Index analysis method. Fracture aperture and length estimates are needed for this method. The second method is a direct flow model of discrete fractures and fracture networks using a computational fluid dynamics code. This tool provides a means of visualizing flow in fracture networks and comparing expressions for equivalent fracture aperture flow to the actual flow. A series of two dimensional models of fractures and fracture networks, as well as a 3-D model of a single rough fracture, were tested.

  8. Porosity and permeability evolution of vesicular basalt reservoirs with increasing depth: constraints from the Big Island of Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, John; Haskins, Eric; Thomas, Donald; Jerram, Dougal; Planke, Sverre; Healy, Dave; Kück, Jochem; Rossetti, Lucas; Farrell, Natalie; Pierdominici, Simona

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic reservoirs are becoming increasingly important in the targeting of petroleum, geothermal and water resources globally. However, key areas of uncertainty in relation to volcanic reservoir properties during burial in different settings remain. In this contribution, we present results from borehole logging and sampling operations within two fully cored c. 1.5 km deep boreholes, PTA2 and KMA1, from the Humúula saddle region on the Big Island of Hawai'i. The boreholes were drilled as part of the Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (HGRP) between 2013-2016 and provide unique insights into the evolution of pore structure with increasing burial in a basaltic dominated lava sequence. The boreholes encounter mixed sequences of 'a'ā, pāhoehoe and transitional lava flows along with subsidiary intrusions and sediments from the shield to post-shield phases of Mauna Kea. Borehole wireline data including sonic, spectral gamma and Televiewer imagery were collected along with density, porosity, permeability and ultrasonic velocity laboratory measurements from core samples. A range of intra-facies were sampled for analysis from various depths within the two boreholes. By comparison with core data, the potential for high resolution Televiewer imaging to reveal spectacular intra-facies features including individual vesicles, vesicle segregations, 'a'ā rubble zones, intrusive contacts, and intricate pāhoehoe lava flow lobe morphologies is demonstrated. High quality core data enables the calibration of Televiewer facies enabling improved interpretation of volcanic reservoir features in the more common exploration scenario where core is absent. Laboratory results record the ability of natural vesicular basalt samples to host very high porosity (>50%) and permeability (>10 darcies) within lava flow top facies which we demonstrate are associated with vesicle coalescence and not micro-fractures. These properties may be maintained to depths of c. 1.5 km in regions of limited

  9. Porosity, permeability and 3D fracture network characterisation of dolomite reservoir rock samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorn, Maarten; Exner, Ulrike; Barnhoorn, Auke; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    With fractured rocks making up an important part of hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide, detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks is essential. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) however suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this paper, we therefore explore the use of an additional method - non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) - to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. We process the 3D μCT data in this study by a Hessian-based fracture filtering routine and can successfully extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations - in bulk as well as locally. Additionally, thin sections made from selected plug samples provide 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) towards more realistic reservoir conditions. This study shows that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that although there are limitations, several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these and

  10. Porosity, permeability and 3D fracture network characterisation of dolomite reservoir rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorn, Maarten; Exner, Ulrike; Barnhoorn, Auke; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    With fractured rocks making up an important part of hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide, detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks is essential. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) however suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this paper, we therefore explore the use of an additional method – non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) – to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. We process the 3D μCT data in this study by a Hessian-based fracture filtering routine and can successfully extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations – in bulk as well as locally. Additionally, thin sections made from selected plug samples provide 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) towards more realistic reservoir conditions. This study shows that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that although there are limitations, several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these

  11. A methodology for determining the evolution law of gob permeability and its distributions in longwall coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cun; Tu, Shihao; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Qingsheng; Yuan, Yong; Wang, Fangtian

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the permeability evolution law of the gob by mining disturbances and obtain the permeability distribution of the fully compacted gob, comprehensive methods including theoretical analyses of monitoring data and numerical simulation are used to determine the permeability of gobs in the mining process. Based on current research, three zones of the vertical stress and permeability in the gob are introduced in this article, which are the caving rock mass accumulation zone, the gradually compacted zone and the fully compacted zone. A simple algorithm is written by using FISH language to be imported into the reservoir model. FISH language is an internal programming language in FLAC3D. It is possible to calculate the permeability at each zone with this algorithm in the mining process. Besides, we analyze the gas flow rates from seven gob gas ventholes (GGV) located on a longwall face operated in a mine of a Huainan coalfield in Huainan City, China. Combined with Darcy’s law, a calculation model of permeability around GGV in the gob is proposed. Using this model, the evolution law of permeability in the gob is deduced; the phases of permeability evolution are the decline stage and the stable stage. The result of the vertical stress monitoring data and good fitting effect of the permeability to the experimental data show that the permeability decline caused by the compaction of the gob is the principal reason for the decline stage. The stable stage indicates that the gob has been fully compacted, and the average period of full gob compaction is 47.75 d. The permeability in the middle of the compacted gob is much smaller than the permeability on the edge of the gob which presents an O shape trend. Besides, the little difference among the results of the numerical simulation, the permeability calculation model and other commonly used calculation models validate the correctness of the permeability calculation model and numerical simulation results

  12. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius in the extra-low permeability reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junhui; Yin, Daiyin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is given. The capillary pressure curve is divided into linear type and concave type. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 spectrum is divided into 3 types: the left peak is greater than the right peak, the left peak is equal to the right one, and the left peak is smaller than the right one. The method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius is, first, converting the nuclear magnetic resonance T2 spectrum to the capillary pressure curve calculated, then fitting the capillary pressure curves measured by the constant speed mercury injection experiment and the capillary pressure curve calculated. After finding the relevant parameters, converting the horizontal axis of the NMR T2 spectra from relaxation time to pore throat radius, and the pore throat radius corresponding to the T2 cutoff value is the lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability Fuyang Oil Reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is about 0.68μm

  13. Fatigue hydraulic fracturing by cyclic reservoir treatment enhances permeability and reduces induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Arno; Yoon, Jeoung Seok; Stephansson, Ove; Heidbach, Oliver

    2013-11-01

    The occurrence of induced seismic events during hydraulic fracturing of reservoirs to enhance permeability is an unavoidable process. Due to the increased public concern with respect to the risks imposed by induced seismicity, however, the development of a soft stimulation method is needed creating higher permeability with less induced seismicity. We use a discrete element model of naturally fractured rock with pore fluid flow algorithm in order to analyse two scenarios of high-pressure fluid injection (hydraulic fracturing) at depth and associated induced seismicity. The ratio of pumped-in energy to released seismic energy is in agreement with field data. Our results suggest that cyclic reservoir treatment is a safer alternative to conventional hydraulic fracture stimulation as both, the total number of induced events as well as the occurrence of larger magnitude events are lowered. This work is motivated by results of laboratory triaxial indenter tests on granite rock samples where continuous loading leads to a wide fracture process zone while cyclic treatment with frequent starting and stopping of loading fatigues the rock, resulting in smaller damage volume and more persistent fracture growth.

  14. A simplified permeability model for coalbed methane reservoirs based on matchstick strain and constant volume theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiang [China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China); Harpalani, Satya; Liu, Shimin [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Significant changes occur in the absolute permeability of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs during primary depletion or enhanced recovery/CO{sub 2} sequestration operations. In order to project gas production, several analytical models have been developed to predict changes in coal permeability as a function of stress/porosity and sorption. Although these models are more transparent and less complicated than the coupled numerical models, there are differences between the various analytical models and there are several uncertainties. These are discussed briefly in this paper. A new model is then proposed, which is based on the volumetric balance between the bulk coal, and solid grains and pores, using the constant volume theory. It incorporates primarily the changes in grain and cleat volumes and is, therefore, different from the other models that lay heavy emphasis on the pore volume/cleat compressibility values. Finally, in order to demonstrate the simplicity of the proposed model, a history matching exercise is carried out using field data in order to compare the different models. The modeling results suggest that the agreement between the predicted permeability using the existing models and the one proposed here is very good. The merit of the proposed model is its simplicity, and the fact that all input parameters are easily measurable for any coal type with no uncertainties. (author)

  15. Discrete fracture modeling of multiphase flow and hydrocarbon production in fractured shale or low permeability reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y.; Settgast, R. R.; Fu, P.; Tompson, A. F. B.; Morris, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been recognized that multiphase flow and transport in fractured porous media is very important for various subsurface applications. Hydrocarbon fluid flow and production from hydraulically fractured shale reservoirs is an important and complicated example of multiphase flow in fractured formations. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing is able to create extensive fracture networks in low permeability shale rocks, leading to increased formation permeability and enhanced hydrocarbon production. However, unconventional wells experience a much faster production decline than conventional hydrocarbon recovery. Maintaining sustainable and economically viable shale gas/oil production requires additional wells and re-fracturing. Excessive fracturing fluid loss during hydraulic fracturing operations may also drive up operation costs and raise potential environmental concerns. Understanding and modeling processes that contribute to decreasing productivity and fracturing fluid loss represent a critical component for unconventional hydrocarbon recovery analysis. Towards this effort we develop a discrete fracture model (DFM) in GEOS (LLNL multi-physics computational code) to simulate multiphase flow and transfer in hydraulically fractured reservoirs. The DFM model is able to explicitly account for both individual fractures and their surrounding rocks, therefore allowing for an accurate prediction of impacts of fracture-matrix interactions on hydrocarbon production. We apply the DFM model to simulate three-phase (water, oil, and gas) flow behaviors in fractured shale rocks as a result of different hydraulic stimulation scenarios. Numerical results show that multiphase flow behaviors at the fracture-matrix interface play a major role in controlling both hydrocarbon production and fracturing fluid recovery rates. The DFM model developed in this study will be coupled with the existing hydro-fracture model to provide a fully integrated

  16. The Role of Horizontal Wells when Developing Low-Permeable, Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Yurova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of horizontal drilling in recent years has shown that horizontal wells can be successfully used both at the initial and late stages of development. This is due to the fact that horizontal wells, in contrast to vertical wells, contact a larger area of ​​the productive formation, while the surface of drainage of the oil-saturated layer, productivity of the wells due to the formation of cracks, and also the influence on thin layers increases. One of the methods of impact on the reservoir is the steam-thermal method. The main advantage of the use of the heat wave method in horizontal wells is a significant increase in the well production rate, a decrease in the water cut of the reservoir, a decrease in the oil viscosity, an increase in the injectivity of the injection well, and an increase in the inflow in producing wells. As a result of the total effect, a significant increase in production is obtained throughout the entire deposit. Enhanced oil recovery from the injection of steam is achieved by reducing the viscosity of oil, covering the reservoir with steam, distilling oil and extracting with a solvent. All this increases the displacement coefficient. One of the most effective ways to increase oil recovery at a late stage of field operation is sidetracking in emergency, highly watered and low-productive wells. This leads to the development of residual reserves in weakly drained zones of reservoirs with a substantial increase in well productivity in low-permeable reservoirs. This approach assumes that the initial drilling of wells is a ‘pilot’ stage, which precedes the development of oil reserves in the late stages of deposit development. In the fields of Western Siberia, multiple hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir has been improved due to a special stinger in the liner hanger of multi-packer installation, which excludes the influence of high pressures on the production column under the multiple hydraulic fracturing

  17. Multiparameter Analysis of Gas Transport Phenomena in Shale Gas Reservoirs: Apparent Permeability Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yinghao; Pang, Yu; Shen, Ziqi; Tian, Yuanyuan; Ge, Hongkui

    2018-02-08

    The large amount of nanoscale pores in shale results in the inability to apply Darcy's law. Moreover, the gas adsorption of shale increases the complexity of pore size characterization and thus decreases the accuracy of flow regime estimation. In this study, an apparent permeability model, which describes the adsorptive gas flow behavior in shale by considering the effects of gas adsorption, stress dependence, and non-Darcy flow, is proposed. The pore size distribution, methane adsorption capacity, pore compressibility, and matrix permeability of the Barnett and Eagle Ford shales are measured in the laboratory to determine the critical parameters of gas transport phenomena. The slip coefficients, tortuosity, and surface diffusivity are predicted via the regression analysis of the permeability data. The results indicate that the apparent permeability model, which considers second-order gas slippage, Knudsen diffusion, and surface diffusion, could describe the gas flow behavior in the transition flow regime for nanoporous shale. Second-order gas slippage and surface diffusion play key roles in the gas flow in nanopores for Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.18 to 0.5. Therefore, the gas adsorption and non-Darcy flow effects, which involve gas slippage, Knudsen diffusion, and surface diffusion, are indispensable parameters of the permeability model for shale.

  18. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  19. Effect of aggregate grain size distribution on properties of permeable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) ratio on the mechanical properties of permeable concrete is investigated. The aim of this study is to prepare permeable concrete mixture with optimum properties in terms of strength and permeability. For this purpose, five different permeable ...

  20. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to

  1. Evaluation of an Empirical Reservoir Shape Function to Define Sediment Distributions in Small Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusław Michalec

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and defining the spatial distribution of sediment deposited in reservoirs is essential not only at the design stage but also during the operation. The majority of research concerns the distribution of sediment deposition in medium and large water reservoirs. Most empirical methods do not provide satisfactory results when applied to the determination of sediment deposition in small reservoirs. Small reservoir’s volumes do not exceed 5 × 106 m3 and their capacity-inflow ratio is less than 10%. Long-term silting measurements of three small reservoirs were used to evaluate the method described by Rahmanian and Banihashemi for predicting sediment distributions in small reservoirs. Rahmanian and Banihashemi stated that their model of distribution of sediment deposition in water reservoir works well for a long duration operation. In the presented study, the silting rate was used in order to determine the long duration operation. Silting rate is a quotient of volume of the sediment deposited in the reservoir and its original volume. It was stated that when the silting rate had reached 50%, the sediment deposition in the reservoir may be described by an empirical reservoir depth shape function (RDSF.

  2. A multiscale model of distributed fracture and permeability in solids in all-round compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Maria Laura; Della Vecchia, Gabriele; Ortiz, Michael; Pandolfi, Anna

    2017-07-01

    We present a microstructural model of permeability in fractured solids, where the fractures are described in terms of recursive families of parallel, equidistant cohesive faults. Faults originate upon the attainment of tensile or shear strength in the undamaged material. Secondary faults may form in a hierarchical organization, creating a complex network of connected fractures that modify the permeability of the solid. The undamaged solid may possess initial porosity and permeability. The particular geometry of the superposed micro-faults lends itself to an explicit analytical quantification of the porosity and permeability of the damaged material. The model is the finite kinematics version of a recently proposed porous material model, applied with success to the simulation of laboratory tests and excavation problems [De Bellis, M. L., Della Vecchia, G., Ortiz, M., Pandolfi, A., 2016. A linearized porous brittle damage material model with distributed frictional-cohesive faults. Engineering Geology 215, 10-24. Cited By 0. 10.1016/j.enggeo.2016.10.010]. The extension adds over and above the linearized kinematics version for problems characterized by large deformations localized in narrow zones, while the remainder of the solid undergoes small deformations, as typically observed in soil and rock mechanics problems. The approach is particularly appealing as a means of modeling a wide scope of engineering problems, ranging from the prevention of water or gas outburst into underground mines, to the prediction of the integrity of reservoirs for CO2 sequestration or hazardous waste storage, to hydraulic fracturing processes.

  3. Oil recovery enhancement from fractured, low permeability reservoirs. Annual report 1990--1991, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, S.W.

    1991-12-31

    Joint funding by the Department of Energy and the State of Texas has Permitted a three year, multi-disciplinary investigation to enhance oil recovery from a dual porosity, fractured, low matrix permeability oil reservoir to be initiated. The Austin Chalk producing horizon trending thru the median of Texas has been identified as the candidate for analysis. Ultimate primary recovery of oil from the Austin Chalk is very low because of two major technological problems. The commercial oil producing rate is based on the wellbore encountering a significant number of natural fractures. The prediction of the location and frequency of natural fractures at any particular region in the subsurface is problematical at this time, unless extensive and expensive seismic work is conducted. A major portion of the oil remains in the low permeability matrix blocks after depletion because there are no methods currently available to the industry to mobilize this bypassed oil. The following multi-faceted study is aimed to develop new methods to increase oil and gas recovery from the Austin Chalk producing trend. These methods may involve new geological and geophysical interpretation methods, improved ways to study production decline curves or the application of a new enhanced oil recovery technique. The efforts for the second year may be summarized as one of coalescing the initial concepts developed during the initial phase to more in depth analyses. Accomplishments are predicting natural fractures; relating recovery to well-log signatures; development of the EOR imbibition process; mathematical modeling; and field test.

  4. The residual oil distribution regularity of low permeability oilfield

    OpenAIRE

    Huan Zhao; Hongjun Yin

    2015-01-01

    Study on the residual oil distribution regularity is the important thing during the middle and later stage of the oilfield. With understanding and development of oilfield, the research methods of remaining oil are varied. Well block A is a low permeability oilfield and complex relationship between injection wells and production wells. The well pattern has low control of sand body. Based on the characteristics and the geological and dynamic data, technology of integrated 3-D geological modelin...

  5. Application of Layered Perforation Profile Control Technique to Low Permeable Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sun

    2018-01-01

    it is difficult to satisfy the demand of profile control of complex well section and multi-layer reservoir by adopting the conventional profile control technology, therefore, a research is conducted on adjusting the injection production profile with layered perforating parameters optimization. i.e. in the case of coproduction for multi-layer, water absorption of each layer is adjusted by adjusting the perforating parameters, thus to balance the injection production profile of the whole well section, and ultimately enhance the oil displacement efficiency of water flooding. By applying the relationship between oil-water phase percolation theory/perforating damage and capacity, a mathematic model of adjusting the injection production profile with layered perforating parameters optimization, besides, perforating parameters optimization software is programmed. Different types of optimization design work are carried out according to different geological conditions and construction purposes by using the perforating optimization design software; furthermore, an application test is done for low permeable reservoir, and the water injection profile tends to be balanced significantly after perforation with optimized parameters, thereby getting a good application effect on site.

  6. Potential evaluation on CO2-EGR in tight and low-permeability reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqing Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available CO2-EGR, i.e. enhanced gas recovery by injecting CO2, is to displace natural gas by injecting CO2 in the supercritical phase. It can both enhance the recovery of gas reservoirs and realize CO2 storage. Currently, this technique is still at its exploring stage. The effect of CO2-EGR is not clarified, the geologic conditions for CO2-EGR are not definite, and the rational working system for CO2-EGR is not available. In this paper, the long-core experiment was conducted to determine whether and how much the recovery of low-permeability reservoirs can be enhanced by injecting CO2. According to the experimental results, the recovery can be enhanced by 12% when CO2 content in produced gas is more than 10%. Moreover, the multi-component seepage mathematical model was built for displacing natural gas by injecting supercritical CO2, and the model accuracy was verified using laboratory data. With this mathematical model, the influence factors for displacing natural gas by injecting supercritical CO2 were analyzed in order to define the conditions for selecting favorable zones. The Well DK13 area in the Daniudi gas field, Ordos Basin, was selected for potential evaluation of CO2-EGR. As indicated by the numerical simulation results, when CO2 content of producing wells in the Well DK13 area is 10% (with a lower cost for corrosion prevention, the ratio of CO2-EGR is 8.0–9.5%, and 31.1% HCPV(hydrocarbon pores volume of CO2 storage can be realized. It is thus concluded that the CO2-EGR technique can enhance the recovery of gas reservoirs and also store CO2 underground, contributing to the increase of both social and economic benefits.

  7. Hydrocarbon Potential in Sandstone Reservoir Isolated inside Low Permeability Shale Rock (Case Study: Beruk Field, Central Sumatra Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diria, Shidqi A.; Musu, Junita T.; Hasan, Meutia F.; Permono, Widyo; Anwari, Jakson; Purba, Humbang; Rahmi, Shafa; Sadjati, Ory; Sopandi, Iyep; Ruzi, Fadli

    2018-03-01

    Upper Red Bed, Menggala Formation, Bangko Formation, Bekasap Formation and Duri Formationare considered as the major reservoirs in Central Sumatra Basin (CSB). However, Telisa Formation which is well-known as seal within CSB also has potential as reservoir rock. Field study discovered that lenses and layers which has low to high permeability sandstone enclosed inside low permeability shale of Telisa Formation. This matter is very distinctive and giving a new perspective and information related to the invention of hydrocarbon potential in reservoir sandstone that isolated inside low permeability shale. This study has been conducted by integrating seismic data, well logs, and petrophysical data throughly. Facies and static model are constructed to estimate hydrocarbon potential resource. Facies model shows that Telisa Formation was deposited in deltaic system while the potential reservoir was deposited in distributary mouth bar sandstone but would be discontinued bedding among shale mud-flat. Besides, well log data shows crossover between RHOB and NPHI, indicated that distributary mouth bar sandstone is potentially saturated by hydrocarbon. Target area has permeability ranging from 0.01-1000 mD, whereas porosity varies from 1-30% and water saturation varies from 30-70%. The hydrocarbon resource calculation approximates 36.723 MSTB.

  8. Capacity expansion analysis of UGSs rebuilt from low-permeability fractured gas reservoirs with CO2 as cushion gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Tan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The techniques of pressurized mining and hydraulic fracturing are often used to improve gas well productivity at the later development stage of low-permeability carbonate gas reservoirs, but reservoirs are watered out and a great number of micro fractures are produced. Therefore, one of the key factors for underground gas storages (UGS rebuilt from low-permeability fractured gas reservoirs with CO2 as the cushion gas is how to expand storage capacity effectively by injecting CO2 to displace water and to develop control strategies for the stable migration of gas–water interface. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to simulate the gas–water flow when CO2 was injected into dual porosity reservoirs to displace water. Then, the gas–water interface migration rules while CO2 was injected in the peripheral gas wells for water displacement were analyzed with one domestic UGS rebuilt from fractured gas reservoirs as the research object. And finally, discussion was made on how CO2 dissolution, bottom hole flowing pressure (BHFP, CO2 injection rate and micro fracture parameters affect the stability of gas–water interface in the process of storage capacity expansion. It is shown that the speed of capacity expansion reaches the maximum value at the fifth cycle and then decreases gradually when UGS capacity is expanded in the pattern of more injection and less withdrawal. Gas–water interface during UGS capacity expansion is made stable due to that the solubility of CO2 in water varies with the reservoir pressure. When the UGS capacity is expanded at constant BHFP and the flow rate, the expansion speed can be increased effectively by increasing the BHFP and the injection flow rate of gas wells in the central areas appropriately. In the reservoir areas with high permeability and fracture-matrix permeability ratio, the injection flow rate should be reduced properly to prevent gas–water interface fingering caused by a high-speed flow

  9. Predicting permeability of low enthalpy geothermal reservoirs: A case study from the Upper Triassic − Lower Jurassic Gassum Formation, Norwegian–Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at improving the predictability of permeability in low enthalpy geothermal reser-voirs by investigating the effect of diagenesis on sandstone permeability. Applying the best fittedporosity–permeability trend lines, obtained from conventional core analysis, to log-interpreted poros...

  10. The effect of physical property change on the water flooding development in Changqing oilfield Jurassic low permeability reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangnan Shangguan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Changqing old oilfield Jurassic reservoir's average calibration recovery is 24.7%, with geological reserves recovery of 16.6%, water cut of 65.2%. And most of Jurassic reservoirs are in the middle and later field life, part of them has entered the high water cut and high recovery stage. Traditional water flooding way for improving oil recovery becomes more difficult, and new method has to be considered. Maling oilfield BS district is a typical representative, with high water cut of 90.8%, high recovery percent of 26.1% and low oil recovery rate of 0.25%. To explore the new way to improve oil recovery, the polymer and surfactant (SP for short important pilot test has been developed. The low permeability reservoir indoor core data in high water cut stage and inspection well results indicate that the reservoir permeability, pore combination characteristics and pore type changed greatly after long-term water flooding development. These changes bring more difficulties to the continue development, especially the high injection pressure, which can cause other problems for well pattern infilling and EOR. This paper takes the high injection pressure problem of Maling BS district Jurassic reservoir for example, analyzes the physical property change law on the following aspects: the development mode in the past, core analysis, formation sensitivity, interstitial matter, well test interpretation results, in order to help to further effective development and provide important parameters for tertiary oil recovery technique for similar reservoirs and others.

  11. A simulation of mud invasion and characteristics of array laterolog responses in a low-permeability gas reservoir: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjiao; Sun, Jianmeng; Gao, Jianshen; Zhang, Pengyun; Cui, Jiangman

    2017-06-01

    Mud invasion is a complex problem in reservoir evaluation. The original distribution of formation fluid and resistivity near the wellbore changes when mud filtrate invades the permeability formations, and the electric logging response always shows distortion. In this study, the influencing factors in mud invasion analysis are investigated for a low-permeability gas reservoir based on a numerical simulation method. These factors include overbalance pressure, formation permeability, initial water saturation, and relative permeability, and we acquire the law of mud invasion and the main controlling factors of the invasion. Based on the simulation results, the array laterolog responses of different invasion situations are calculated by a three-dimensional finite element method, and we hold the opinion that the characteristics of these responses and the separation differences of the curves at different investigation depths are affected by the depth of the mud invasion. Furthermore, combined with the logging data and invasion simulation results, the calculation relation of the invasion depth is established using physical property parameters and array laterolog responses. This method effectively hides the influencing factors of invasion time and has good applications regarding the logging data of different invasion moments. In a low-invasion well case, the calculated result is in accordance with the actual situation and verifies the reliability of the method. The research shows that the combination of mud invasion characteristics and array laterolog responses can be applied to the prediction and evaluation of mud invasion depth in the study area. Furthermore, it can provide a service for fluid property evaluation and resistivity correction, as well as improve the reliability of reservoir evaluation by electrical logging.

  12. Hydroacoustic Estimates of Fish Density Distributions in Cougar Reservoir, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Batten, George W.; Mitchell, T. D.

    2012-09-01

    Day and night mobile hydroacoustic surveys were conducted once each month from April through December 2011 to quantify the horizontal and vertical distributions of fish throughout Cougar Reservoir, Lane County, Oregon.

  13. Increasing Production from Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs by Optimizing Zone Isolation for Successful Stimulation Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2005-03-31

    Maximizing production from wells drilled in low-permeability reservoirs, such as the Barnett Shale, is determined by cementing, stimulation, and production techniques employed. Studies show that cementing can be effective in terms of improving fracture effectiveness by 'focusing' the frac in the desired zone and improving penetration. Additionally, a method is presented for determining the required properties of the set cement at various places in the well, with the surprising result that uphole cement properties in wells destined for multiple-zone fracturing is more critical than those applied to downhole zones. Stimulation studies show that measuring pressure profiles and response during Pre-Frac Injection Test procedures prior to the frac job are critical in determining if a frac is indicated at all, as well as the type and size of the frac job. This result is contrary to current industry practice, in which frac jobs are designed well before the execution, and carried out as designed on location. Finally, studies show that most wells in the Barnett Shale are production limited by liquid invasion into the wellbore, and determinants are presented for when rod or downhole pumps are indicated.

  14. Prediction of Geomechanical Properties from Thermal Conductivity of Low-Permeable Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Evgeny; Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Ovcharenko, Yury; Zhukov, Vladislav; Martemyanov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    A key to assessing a sedimentary basin's hydrocarbon prospect is correct reconstruction of thermal and structural evolution. It is impossible without adequate theory and reliable input data including among other factors thermal and geomechanical rock properties. Both these factors are also important in geothermal reservoirs evaluation and carbon sequestration problem. Geomechanical parameters are usually estimated from sonic logging and rare laboratory measurements, but sometimes it is not possible technically (low quality of the acoustic signal, inappropriate borehole and mud conditions, low core quality). No wonder that there are attempts to correlate the thermal and geomechanical properties of rock, but no one before did it with large amount of high quality thermal conductivity data. Coupling results of sonic logging and non-destructive non-contact thermal core logging opens wide perspectives for studying a relationship between the thermal and geomechanical properties. More than 150 m of full size cores have been measured at core storage with optical scanning technique. Along with results of sonic logging performed with Sonic Scanner in different wells drilled in low permeable formations in West Siberia (Russia) it provided us with unique data set. It was established a strong correlation between components of thermal conductivity (measured perpendicular and parallel to bedding) and compressional and shear acoustic velocities in Bazhen formation. As a result, prediction of geomechanical properties via thermal conductivity data becomes possible, corresponding results was demonstrated. The work was supported by the Russian Ministry of Education and Science, project No. RFMEFI58114X0008.

  15. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Donald M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics; Lienert, Barry R. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics; Wallin, Erin L. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Gasperikova, Erika [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-27

    Our objectives for the current project were to develop an innovative inversion and analysis procedure for magnetotelluric field data and time variable self-potentials that will enable us to map not only the subsurface resistivity structure of a geothermal prospect but to also delineate the permeability distribution within the field. Hence, the ultimate objective were to provide better targeting information for exploratory and development drilling of a geothermal prospect. Field data were collected and analyzed from the Kilauea Summit, Kilauea East Rift Zone, and the Humuula Saddle between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes. All of these areas were known or suspected to have geothermal activity of varying intensities. Our results provided evidence for significant long-term coordinated changes in spontaneous potential that could be associated with subsurface flows, significant interferences were encountered that arose from surface environmental changes (rainfall, temperature) that rendered it nearly impossible to unequivocally distinguish between deep fluid flow changes and environmental effects. Further, the analysis of the inferred spontaneous potential changes in the context of depth of the signals, and hence, permeability horizons, were unable to be completed in the time available.

  16. Digital Rock Physics Aplications: Visualisation Complex Pore and Porosity-Permeability Estimations of the Porous Sandstone Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoyo; Fatkhan; Del, Fourier

    2018-03-01

    Reservoir rock containing oil and gas generally has high porosity and permeability. High porosity is expected to accommodate hydrocarbon fluid in large quantities and high permeability is associated with the rock’s ability to let hydrocarbon fluid flow optimally. Porosity and permeability measurement of a rock sample is usually performed in the laboratory. We estimate the porosity and permeability of sandstones digitally by using digital images from μCT-Scan. Advantages of the method are non-destructive and can be applied for small rock pieces also easily to construct the model. The porosity values are calculated by comparing the digital image of the pore volume to the total volume of the sandstones; while the permeability values are calculated using the Lattice Boltzmann calculations utilizing the nature of the law of conservation of mass and conservation of momentum of a particle. To determine variations of the porosity and permeability, the main sandstone samples with a dimension of 300 × 300 × 300 pixels are made into eight sub-cubes with a size of 150 × 150 × 150 pixels. Results of digital image modeling fluid flow velocity are visualized as normal velocity (streamline). Variations in value sandstone porosity vary between 0.30 to 0.38 and permeability variations in the range of 4000 mD to 6200 mD. The results of calculations show that the sandstone sample in this research is highly porous and permeable. The method combined with rock physics can be powerful tools for determining rock properties from small rock fragments.

  17. Accounting for geochemical alterations of caprock fracture permeability in basin-scale models of leakage from geologic CO2 reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B.; Fitts, J. P.; Dobossy, M.; Bielicki, J. M.; Peters, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate mitigation, public acceptance and energy, markets demand that the potential CO2 leakage rates from geologic storage reservoirs are predicted to be low and are known to a high level of certainty. Current approaches to predict CO2 leakage rates assume constant permeability of leakage pathways (e.g., wellbores, faults, fractures). A reactive transport model was developed to account for geochemical alterations that result in permeability evolution of leakage pathways. The one-dimensional reactive transport model was coupled with the basin-scale Estimating Leakage Semi-Analytical (ELSA) model to simulate CO2 and brine leakage through vertical caprock pathways for different CO2 storage reservoir sites and injection scenarios within the Mt. Simon and St. Peter sandstone formations of the Michigan basin. Mineral dissolution in the numerical reactive transport model expands leakage pathways and increases permeability as a result of calcite dissolution by reactions driven by CO2-acidified brine. A geochemical model compared kinetic and equilibrium treatments of calcite dissolution within each grid block for each time step. For a single fracture, we investigated the effect of the reactions on leakage by performing sensitivity analyses of fracture geometry, CO2 concentration, calcite abundance, initial permeability, and pressure gradient. Assuming that calcite dissolution reaches equilibrium at each time step produces unrealistic scenarios of buffering and permeability evolution within fractures. Therefore, the reactive transport model with a kinetic treatment of calcite dissolution was coupled to the ELSA model and used to compare brine and CO2 leakage rates at a variety of potential geologic storage sites within the Michigan basin. The results are used to construct maps based on the susceptibility to geochemically driven increases in leakage rates. These maps should provide useful and easily communicated inputs into decision-making processes for siting geologic CO2

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2005-08-01

    During the past six months we have adapted our 3-D elastic, anisotropic finite difference code by implementing the rotated staggered grid (RSG) method to more accurately represent large contrasts of elastic moduli between the fractures and surrounding formation, and applying the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition to minimize boundary reflections. Two approaches for estimating fracture spacing from scattered seismic energy were developed. The first relates notches in the amplitude spectra of the scattered wavefield to the dominant fracture spacing that caused the scattering. The second uses conventional FK filtering to isolate the backscattered signals and then recovers an estimate of the fracture spacing from the dominant wavelength of those signals. Both methods were tested on synthetic data and then applied to the Emilio field data. The spectral notch method estimated the Emilio fracture spacing to be about 30 to 40 m, while the FK method found fracture spacing of about 48 to 53 m. We continue to work on two field data sets from fractured carbonate reservoirs provided by our industry sponsors--the offshore Emilio Field data (provided by ENIAGIP), and an onshore reservoir from the Middle East (provided by Shell). Calibration data in the form of well logs and previous fracture studies are available for both data sets. In previous reports we showed the spatial distribution fractures in the Emilio Field based on our calculated scattering index values. To improve these results we performed a map migration of all the scattering indices. The results of this migration process show a very strong correlation between the spatial distribution and orientation of our estimated fracture distribution and the fault system in the field. We observe that the scattering index clusters tend to congregate around the fault zones, particularly near multiple faults and at fault tips. We have also processed a swath of data from the second data set (the onshore

  19. Spatiotemporal distributions of threadfin shad in tropical reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neal, J. W.; Prchalová, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 5 (2012), s. 929-940 ISSN 0275-5947 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP505/12/P647 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : threadfin shad * trawl * distribution * tropical reservoir Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.179, year: 2012

  20. Research and application of multi-hydrogen acidizing technology of low-permeability reservoirs for increasing water injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Mengmeng; Che, Hang; Kong, Weizhong; Wang, Peng; Liu, Bingxiao; Xu, Zhengdong; Wang, Xiaochao; Long, Changjun; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Youmei

    2017-12-01

    The physical characteristics of Xiliu 10 Block reservoir is poor, it has strong reservoir inhomogeneity between layers and high kaolinite content of the reservoir, the scaling trend of fluid is serious, causing high block injection well pressure and difficulty in achieving injection requirements. In the past acidizing process, the reaction speed with mineral is fast, the effective distance is shorter and It is also easier to lead to secondary sedimentation in conventional mud acid system. On this point, we raised multi-hydrogen acid technology, multi-hydrogen acid release hydrogen ions by multistage ionization which could react with pore blockage, fillings and skeletal effects with less secondary pollution. Multi-hydrogen acid system has advantages as moderate speed, deep penetration, clay low corrosion rate, wet water and restrains precipitation, etc. It can reach the goal of plug removal in deep stratum. The field application result shows that multi-hydrogen acid plug removal method has good effects on application in low permeability reservoir in Block Xiliu 10.

  1. Effect of retrograde gas condensate in low permeability natural gas reservoir; Efeito da condensacao retrograda em reservatorios de gas natural com baixa permeabilidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Paulo Lee K.C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Ligero, Eliana L.; Schiozer, Denis J. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2008-07-01

    Most of Brazilian gas fields are low-permeability or tight sandstone reservoirs and some of them should be gas condensate reservoir. In this type of natural gas reservoir, part of the gaseous hydrocarbon mixture is condensate and the liquid hydrocarbon accumulates near the well bore that causes the loss of productivity. The liquid hydrocarbon formation inside the reservoir should be well understood such as the knowledge of the variables that causes the condensate formation and its importance in the natural gas production. This work had as goal to better understanding the effect of condensate accumulation near a producer well. The influence of the porosity and the absolute permeability in the gas production was studied in three distinct gas reservoirs: a dry gas reservoir and two gas condensate reservoirs. The refinement of the simulation grid near the producer well was also investigated. The choice of simulation model was shown to be very important in the simulation of gas condensate reservoirs. The porosity was the little relevance in the gas production and in the liquid hydrocarbon formation; otherwise the permeability was very relevant. (author)

  2. Numerical Modeling of Permeability Enhancement by Hydroshearing: the Case of Phase I Reservoir Creation at Fenton Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutqvist, J.; Rinaldi, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The exploitation of a geothermal system is one of the most promising clean and almost inexhaustible forms of energy production. However, the exploitation of hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at depth requires circulation of a large amount of fluids. Indeed, the conceptual model of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) requires that the circulation is enhanced by fluid injection. The pioneering experiments at Fenton Hill demonstrated the feasibility of EGS by producing the world's first HDR reservoirs. Such pioneering project demonstrated that the fluid circulation can be effectively enhanced by stimulating a preexisting fracture zone. The so-called "hydroshearing" involving shear activation of preexisting fractures is recognized as one of the main processes effectively enhancing permeability. The goal of this work is to quantify the effect of shear reactivation on permeability by proposing a model that accounts for fracture opening and shearing. We develop a case base on a pressure stimulation experiment at Fenton Hill, in which observation suggest that a fracture was jacked open by pressure increase. The proposed model can successfully reproduce such a behavior, and we compare the base case of pure elastic opening with the hydroshearing model to demonstrate that this latter could have occurred at the field, although no "felt" seismicity was observed. Then we investigate on the sensitivity of the proposed model by varying some of the critical parameters such as the maximum aperture, the dilation angle, as well as the fracture density.

  3. Results of high resolution seismic imaging experiments for defining permeable pathways in fractured gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Daley, T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    As part of its Department of Energy (DOE) Industry cooperative program in oil and gas, Berkeley Lab has an ongoing effort in cooperation with Industry partners to develop equipment, field techniques, and interpretational methods to further the practice of characterizing fractured heterogeneous reservoirs. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the combined use of state-of-the-art technology in fluid flow modeling and geophysical imaging into an interdisciplinary approach for predicting the behavior of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoirs. The efforts in this program have mainly focused on using seismic methods linked with geologic and reservoir engineering analysis for the detection and characterization of fracture systems in tight gas formations, i.e., where and how to detect the fractures, what are the characteristics of the fractures, and how the fractures interact with the natural stresses, lithology, and their effect on reservoir performance. The project has also integrated advanced reservoir engineering methods for analyzing flow in fractured systems such that reservoir management strategies can be optimized. The work at Berkeley Lab focuses on integrating high resolution seismic imaging, (VSP, crosswell, and single well imaging), geologic information and well test data to invert for flow paths in fractured systems.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2002-12-31

    We have extended a three-dimensional finite difference elastic wave propagation model previously developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) for modeling and analyzing the effect of fractures on seismic waves. The code has been translated into C language and parallelized [using message passing interface (MPI)] to allow for larger models to be run on Linux PC computer clusters. We have also obtained another 3-D code from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, which we will use for verification of our ERL code results and also to run discrete fracture models. Testing of both codes is underway. We are working on a new finite difference model of borehole wave propagation for stressed formations. This code includes coordinate stretching to provide stable, variable grid sizes that will allow us to model the thin fluid annulus layers in borehole problems, especially for acoustic logging while drilling (LWD) applications. We are also extending our analysis routines for the inversion of flexural wave dispersion measurements for in situ stress estimates. Initial results on synthetic and limited field data are promising for a method to invert cross dipole data for the rotation angle and stress state simultaneously. A meeting is being scheduled between MIT and Shell Oil Company scientists to look at data from a fractured carbonate reservoir that may be made available to the project. The Focus/Disco seismic processing system from Paradigm Geophysical has been installed at ERL for field data analysis and as a platform for new analysis modules. We have begun to evaluate the flow properties of discrete fracture distributions through a simple 2D numerical model. Initial results illustrate how fluid flow pathways are very sensitive to variations in the geometry and apertures of fracture network.

  5. Evaluation of gas condensate reservoir behavior using velocity dependent relative permeability during the numerical well test analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Azamifard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gas condensate is one of the most different fluids in reservoir simulation due to retrograde condensation in case of pressure reduction. In this kind of fluids, two phenomena named negative inertia and positive coupling, become significant in the high velocity zone around the wellbore. In this study, a modified black oil simulator is developed that take into account the velocity dependent relative permeability. Against the industrial simulator that assumes linear variation of transmissibilities by pressure, modified black oil nonlinear equations are solved directly without linearization. The developed code is validated by ECLIPSE simulator. The behavior of two real gas condensate fluids, a lean and a rich one, are compared with each other. For each fluid, simulations of PVT experiments are carried out to calculate black oil property applying Coats approach for gas condensate fluids. For both fluids, the proposed models for gas condensate velocity dependent relative permeability show different influence of velocity on relative permeability in the same conditions. Moreover, it is observed that higher flow rate of gas production leads to more condensate production during constant rate well testing.

  6. The study of permeabilities, measured at various scales, of a fluviatile sandstone reservoir. Development and application of a well test numerical simulator; Etude des permeabilites mesurees a differentes echelles d`un reservoir greseux fluviatile. Developpement et application d`un simulateur numerique de tests de puits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquin, T.

    1997-10-10

    The general problem of a single phase fluid flow through heterogenous porous media, is studied, focusing on well test data interpretation in the context of reservoir characterization; a 3D finite volume code, with capacity of local refinement, is developed to simulate well tests. After a review of traditional techniques used to interpret well test data, and their extension to heterogenous media using a weighting function that depends upon the flow geometry, an analysis is carried out for 2D correlated lognormal permeability distributions: it compares well to numerical well tests performed on low variance permeability distributions but needs further investigation for high variance. For 3D heterogenous permeability fields, well bore pressure cannot be estimated by analytical means; therefore a more empirical approach is used to study the permeability field of a reservoir used by Gaz de France as an underground gas storage. Simulated well tests are performed on a reservoir model based upon core measurements and log analysis. The numerical investigation reveals inconsistencies in the treatment of available data, which can be corrected so geology is better taken into account

  7. Shape factor for dual-permeability fractured reservoir simulation : Effect of non-uniform flow in 2D fracture network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, J.; Rossen, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    The flow properties of naturally fractured reservoirs are dominated by flow through the fractures. In a previous study we showed that even a well-connected fracture network behaves like a much sparser network when the aperture distribution is broad enough: i.e., most fractures can be eliminated

  8. Effect of particle size distribution on permeability in the randomly packed porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markicevic, Bojan

    2017-11-01

    An answer of how porous medium heterogeneity influences the medium permeability is still inconclusive, where both increase and decrease in the permeability value are reported. A numerical procedure is used to generate a randomly packed porous material consisting of spherical particles. Six different particle size distributions are used including mono-, bi- and three-disperse particles, as well as uniform, normal and log-normal particle size distribution with the maximum to minimum particle size ratio ranging from three to eight for different distributions. In all six cases, the average particle size is kept the same. For all media generated, the stochastic homogeneity is checked from distribution of three coordinates of particle centers, where uniform distribution of x-, y- and z- positions is found. The medium surface area remains essentially constant except for bi-modal distribution in which medium area decreases, while no changes in the porosity are observed (around 0.36). The fluid flow is solved in such domain, and after checking for the pressure axial linearity, the permeability is calculated from the Darcy law. The permeability comparison reveals that the permeability of the mono-disperse medium is smallest, and the permeability of all poly-disperse samples is less than ten percent higher. For bi-modal particles, the permeability is for a quarter higher compared to the other media which can be explained by volumetric contribution of larger particles and larger passages for fluid flow to take place.

  9. The impact of different aperture distribution models and critical stress criteria on equivalent permeability in fractured rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Predicting equivalent permeability in fractured reservoirs requires an understanding of the fracture network geometry and apertures. There are different methods for defining aperture, based on outcrop observations (power law scaling), fundamental mechanics (sublinear length-aperture scaling......), and experiments (Barton-Bandis conductive shearing). Each method predicts heterogeneous apertures, even along single fractures (i.e., intrafracture variations), but most fractured reservoir models imply constant apertures for single fractures. We compare the relative differences in aperture and permeability...

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2005-02-04

    Numerical modeling and field data tests are presented on the Transfer Function/Scattering Index Method for estimating fracture orientation and density in subsurface reservoirs from the ''coda'' or scattered energy in the seismic trace. Azimuthal stacks indicate that scattered energy is enhanced along the fracture strike direction. A transfer function method is used to more effectively indicate fracture orientation. The transfer function method, which involves a comparison of the seismic signature above and below a reservoir interval, effectively eliminates overburden effects and acquisition imprints in the analysis. The transfer function signature is simplified into a scattering index attribute value that gives fracture orientation and spatial variations of the fracture density within a field. The method is applied to two field data sets, a 3-D Ocean Bottom Cable (OBC) seismic data set from an offshore fractured carbonate reservoir in the Adriatic Sea and a 3-D seismic data set from an onshore fractured carbonate field in the Middle East. Scattering index values are computed in both fields at the reservoir level, and the results are compared to borehole breakout data and Formation MicroImager (FMI) logs in nearby wells. In both cases the scattering index results are in very good agreement with the well data. Field data tests and well validation will continue. In the area of technology transfer, we have made presentations of our results to industry groups at MIT technical review meetings, international technical conferences, industry workshops, and numerous exploration and production company visits.

  11. Stratigraphic and Structural Analysis of Coals in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale and Fruitland Formation: Relationship to Coal Reservoir Permeability and Coalbed Methane Production

    OpenAIRE

    Kneedy, Jason Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Coal reservoir quality in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, and in the Fruitland Formation is dependent on coal cleat characteristics. Coal reservoir permeability increases as a result of high cleat density. From careful outcrop examination, we were able to identify several factors that increase cleat density. Vitrain coal typically has the highest fracture density as a result of having well-developed face cleats and conchoidal fractures. Clarain coal contains face and butt cle...

  12. Structural analysis characterization of permeability pathways across reservoir-seal interface - South-Eastern Utah; Results from integrated sedimentological, structural, and geochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, E. S.; Evans, J. P.; Richey, D.; Flores, S.; Barton, C.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks in the San Rafael Swell, Utah, were deformed by Laramide compression and subsequent Neogene extension. We evaluate the effect of fault damage zone morphology as a function of structural position, and changes in mechanical stratigraphy on the distribution of secondary minerals across the reservoir-seal pair of the Navajo Sandstone and overlying Carmel Formation. We decipher paleo-fluid migration and examine the effect faults and fractures have on reservoir permeability and efficacy of top seal for a range of geo-engineering applications. Map-scale faults have an increased probability of allowing upward migration of fluids along the fault plane and within the damage zone, potentially bypassing the top seal. Field mapping, mesoscopic structural analyses, petrography, and geochemical observations demonstrate that fault zone thickness increases at structural intersections, fault relay zones, fault-related folds, and fault tips. Higher densities of faults with meters of slip and dense fracture populations are present in relay zones relative to single, discrete faults. Curvature analysis of the San Rafael monocline and fracture density data show that fracture density is highest where curvature is highest in the syncline hinge and near faults. Fractures cross the reservoir-seal interface where fracture density is highest and structural diagensis includes mineralization events and bleaching and calcite and gypsum mineralization. The link between fracture distributions and structural setting implys that transmissive fractures have predictable orientations and density distributions. At the m- to cm- scale, deformation-band faults and joints in the Navajo Sandstone penetrate the reservoir-seal interface and transition into open-mode fractures in the caprock seal. Scanline analysis and petrography of veins provide evidence for subsurface mineralization and fracture reactivation, suggesting that the fractures act as loci for fluid flow through time

  13. Potential geographic distribution of hantavirus reservoirs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Stefan Vilges; Escobar, Luis E; Peterson, A Townsend; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome is an emerging zoonosis in Brazil. Human infections occur via inhalation of aerosolized viral particles from excreta of infected wild rodents. Necromys lasiurus and Oligoryzomys nigripes appear to be the main reservoirs of hantavirus in the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes. We estimated and compared ecological niches of the two rodent species, and analyzed environmental factors influencing their occurrence, to understand the geography of hantavirus transmission. N. lasiurus showed a wide potential distribution in Brazil, in the Cerrado, Caatinga, and Atlantic Forest biomes. Highest climate suitability for O. nigripes was observed along the Brazilian Atlantic coast. Maximum temperature in the warmest months and annual precipitation were the variables that most influence the distributions of N. lasiurus and O. nigripes, respectively. Models based on occurrences of infected rodents estimated a broader area of risk for hantavirus transmission in southeastern and southern Brazil, coinciding with the distribution of human cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. We found no demonstrable environmental differences among occurrence sites for the rodents and for human cases of hantavirus. However, areas of northern and northeastern Brazil are also apparently suitable for the two species, without broad coincidence with human cases. Modeling of niches and distributions of rodent reservoirs indicates potential for transmission of hantavirus across virtually all of Brazil outside the Amazon Basin.

  14. Potential geographic distribution of hantavirus reservoirs in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Vilges de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome is an emerging zoonosis in Brazil. Human infections occur via inhalation of aerosolized viral particles from excreta of infected wild rodents. Necromys lasiurus and Oligoryzomys nigripes appear to be the main reservoirs of hantavirus in the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes. We estimated and compared ecological niches of the two rodent species, and analyzed environmental factors influencing their occurrence, to understand the geography of hantavirus transmission. N. lasiurus showed a wide potential distribution in Brazil, in the Cerrado, Caatinga, and Atlantic Forest biomes. Highest climate suitability for O. nigripes was observed along the Brazilian Atlantic coast. Maximum temperature in the warmest months and annual precipitation were the variables that most influence the distributions of N. lasiurus and O. nigripes, respectively. Models based on occurrences of infected rodents estimated a broader area of risk for hantavirus transmission in southeastern and southern Brazil, coinciding with the distribution of human cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. We found no demonstrable environmental differences among occurrence sites for the rodents and for human cases of hantavirus. However, areas of northern and northeastern Brazil are also apparently suitable for the two species, without broad coincidence with human cases. Modeling of niches and distributions of rodent reservoirs indicates potential for transmission of hantavirus across virtually all of Brazil outside the Amazon Basin.

  15. Investigating the effects of rock porosity and permeability on the performance of nitrogen injection into a southern Iranian oil reservoirs through neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheshmi, M. S.; Fatahiyan, S. M.; Khanesary, N. T.; Sia, C. W.; Momeni, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a comprehensive model for Nitrogen injection into an oil reservoir (southern Iranian oil fields) was developed and used to investigate the effects of rock porosity and permeability on the oil production rate and the reservoir pressure decline. The model was simulated and developed by using ECLIPSE300 software, which involved two scenarios as porosity change and permeability changes in the horizontal direction. We found that the maximum pressure loss occurs at a porosity value of 0.07, which later on, goes to pressure buildup due to reservoir saturation with the gas. Also we found that minimum pressure loss is encountered at porosity 0.46. Increases in both pressure and permeability in the horizontal direction result in corresponding increase in the production rate, and the pressure drop speeds up at the beginning of production as it increases. However, afterwards, this pressure drop results in an increase in pressure because of reservoir saturation. Besides, we determined the regression values, R, for the correlation between pressure and total production, as well as for the correlation between permeability and the total production, using neural network discipline.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; Nafi Toksoz

    2006-03-16

    Using a 3-D finite difference method with a rotated-staggered-grid (RSG) scheme we generated synthetic seismograms for a reservoir model consisting of three horizontal layers with the middle layer containing parallel, equally spaced fractures. By separating and analyzing the backscattered signals in the FK domain, we can obtain an estimate of the fracture spacing. The fracture spacing is estimated by taking one-half of the reciprocal of the dominant wavenumber of the backscattered energy in data acquired normal to the fractures. FK analysis for fracture spacing estimation was successfully applied to these model results, with particular focus on PS converted waves. The method was then tested on data from the Emilio Field. The estimated fracture spacing from the dominant wavenumber values in time windows at and below the reservoir level is 25-40m. A second approach for fracture spacing estimation is based on the observation that interference of forward and backscattered energy from fractures introduces notches in the frequency spectra of the scattered wavefield for data acquired normal to the fracture strike. The frequency of these notches is related to the spacing of the fractures. This Spectral Notch Method was also applied to the Emilio data, with the resulting range of fracture spacing estimates being 25-50m throughout the field. The dominant spacing fracture spacing estimate is about 30-40 m, which is very similar to the estimates obtained from the FK method.

  17. A compositional reservoir simulator on distributed memory parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rame, M.; Delshad, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the application of distributed memory parallel computes to field scale reservoir simulations using a parallel version of UTCHEM, The University of Texas Chemical Flooding Simulator. The model is a general purpose highly vectorized chemical compositional simulator that can simulate a wide range of displacement processes at both field and laboratory scales. The original simulator was modified to run on both distributed memory parallel machines (Intel iPSC/960 and Delta, Connection Machine 5, Kendall Square 1 and 2, and CRAY T3D) and a cluster of workstations. A domain decomposition approach has been taken towards parallelization of the code. A portion of the discrete reservoir model is assigned to each processor by a set-up routine that attempts a data layout as even as possible from the load-balance standpoint. Each of these subdomains is extended so that data can be shared between adjacent processors for stencil computation. The added routines that make parallel execution possible are written in a modular fashion that makes the porting to new parallel platforms straight forward. Results of the distributed memory computing performance of Parallel simulator are presented for field scale applications such as tracer flood and polymer flood. A comparison of the wall-clock times for same problems on a vector supercomputer is also presented

  18. COSTING MODELS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION: PART III- PUMPS, TANKS, AND RESERVOIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distribution systems are generally designed to ensure hydraulic reliability. Storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are critical in maintaining this reliability. Although storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are necessary for maintaining adequate pressure, they may also have a negati...

  19. Characterization of In-Situ Stress and Permeability in Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2006-06-30

    Fracture orientation and spacing are important parameters in reservoir development. This project resulted in the development and testing of a new method for estimating fracture orientation and two new methods for estimating fracture spacing from seismic data. The methods developed were successfully applied to field data from fractured carbonate reservoirs. Specific results include: the development a new method for estimating fracture orientation from scattered energy in seismic data; the development of two new methods for estimating fracture spacing from scattered energy in seismic data; the successful testing of these methods on numerical model data and field data from two fractured carbonate reservoirs; and the validation of fracture orientation results with borehole data from the two fields. Researchers developed a new method for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method is based upon observations made from 3D finite difference modeling of the reflected and scattered seismic energy over discrete systems of vertical fractures. Regularly spaced, discrete vertical fractures impart a ringing coda type signature to seismic energy that is transmitted through or reflected off of them. This signature varies in amplitude and coherence as a function of several parameters including: (1) the difference in angle between the orientation of the fractures and the acquisition direction, (2) the fracture spacing, (3) the wavelength of the illuminating seismic energy, and (4) the compliance, or stiffness, of the fractures. This coda energy is the most coherent when the acquisition direction is parallel to the strike of the fractures. It has the largest amplitude when the seismic wavelengths are tuned to the fracture spacing, and when the fractures have low stiffness. The method uses surface seismic reflection traces to derive a transfer function that quantifies the change in the apparent source

  20. Permeability Evolution and Particle Size Distribution of Saturated Crushed Sandstone under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the particle size distribution and permeability of saturated crushed sandstone under variable axial stresses (0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 MPa were studied. X-ray Computed Tomography results revealed that particle crushing is likely to occur considerably as the axial stress is approaching 4 MPa, which results in the change of pore structure greatly. During compression, the particle size distribution satisfies the fractal condition well, and the fractal dimension of particle size distribution is an effective method for describing the particle crushing state of saturated crushed sandstone. When the axial stress increases from 0 MPa to 4 MPa, the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution increases rapidly by over 60% of the total increase (0–16 MPa, and the permeability decreases sharply by about 85% of the total decrease. These results indicate that 4 MPa is a key value in controlling the particle size distribution and the permeability of the saturated crushed sandstone under axial compression. The permeability is influenced by the initial gradation of the specimens, and a larger Talbot exponent corresponds to a larger permeability.

  1. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  2. Analytical solution for vacuum preloading considering the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Peng

    Full Text Available The vacuum preloading is an effective method which is widely used in ground treatment. In consolidation analysis, the soil around prefabricated vertical drain (PVD is traditionally divided into smear zone and undisturbed zone, both with constant permeability. In reality, the permeability of soil changes continuously within the smear zone. In this study, the horizontal permeability coefficient of soil within the smear zone is described by an exponential function of radial distance. A solution for vacuum preloading consolidation considers the nonlinear distribution of horizontal permeability within the smear zone is presented and compared with previous analytical results as well as a numerical solution, the results show that the presented solution correlates well with the numerical solution, and is more precise than previous analytical solution.

  3. Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

  4. A New Method to Identify Reservoirs in Tight Sandstones Based on the New Model of Transverse Relaxation Time and Relative Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative permeability and transverse relaxation time are both important physical parameters of rock physics. In this paper, a new transformation model between the transverse relaxation time and the wetting phase’s relative permeability is established. The data shows that the cores in the northwest of China have continuous fractal dimension characteristics, and great differences existed in the different pore size scales. Therefore, a piece-wise method is used to calculate the fractal dimension in our transformation model. The transformation results are found to be quite consistent with the relative permeability curve of the laboratory measurements. Based on this new model, we put forward a new method to identify reservoir in tight sandstone reservoir. We focus on the Well M in the northwestern China. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR logging is used to obtain the point-by-point relative permeability curve. In addition, we identify the gas and water layers based on new T2-Kr model and the results showed our new method is feasible. In the case of the price of crude oil being low, this method can save time and reduce the cost.

  5. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  6. Impact of pore and pore-throat distributions on porosity-permeability evolution in heterogeneous mineral dissolution and precipitation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Bensinger, J.; Steinwinder, J.

    2017-12-01

    Porosity and permeability in porous media can be altered by mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions, such as those following CO2 injection in saline aquifers. While the extent of reaction controls changes in porosity, the spatial location of geochemical reactions in individual pores and throats and in the greater pore network controls the evolution of permeability. Geochemical reactions have been observed to occur uniformly on all grain surfaces and non-uniformly, controlled by pore size, PeDa, or mineral distribution, for example. These discrete reaction patterns result in variations in pore scale porosity and corresponding differences in permeability. Macroscopic porosity-permeability relationships are often used to predict the evolution of permeability. These relationships, however, are unable to reflect non-uniform structure modifications. Using pore network modeling simulations, the permeability evolution for a range of uniform and non-uniform mineral reaction scenarios and the applicability of common macroscopic porosity—permeability relationships is investigated. The impact of variations in pore and pore-throat size distributions is evaluated using distributions for real sandstone samples complemented with synthetic distributions. Simulated permeability varies greatly for different reaction patterns. For an Alberta basin sandstone sample, macroscopic relationships are only able to reflect permeability alteration given a uniform reaction scenario where the extent of reaction is related to pore and pore-throat size. For this same sample, simulated permeability for uniform reactions with a fixed reaction thickness and all non-uniform reaction scenarios are unable to be captured using common porosity-permeability relationships. Size-dependent reaction scenarios, where reactions initiate in small or large pores, have the largest disagreement with the porosity-permeability relationships. In these scenarios, porosity-permeability resembles a step function

  7. Impact of geometrical properties on permeability and fluid phase distribution in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, P.; Berchtold, M.; Ahrenholz, B.; Tölke, J.; Kaestner, A.; Krafczyk, M.; Flühler, H.; Künsch, H. R.

    2008-09-01

    To predict fluid phase distribution in porous media, the effect of geometric properties on flow processes must be understood. In this study, we analyze the effect of volume, surface, curvature and connectivity (the four Minkowski functionals) on the hydraulic conductivity and the water retention curve. For that purpose, we generated 12 artificial structures with 800 3 voxels (the units of a 3D image) and compared them with a scanned sand sample of the same size. The structures were generated with a Boolean model based on a random distribution of overlapping ellipsoids whose size and shape were chosen to fulfill the criteria of the measured functionals. The pore structure of sand material was mapped with X-rays from synchrotrons. To analyze the effect of geometry on water flow and fluid distribution we carried out three types of analysis: Firstly, we computed geometrical properties like chord length, distance from the solids, pore size distribution and the Minkowski functionals as a function of pore size. Secondly, the fluid phase distribution as a function of the applied pressure was calculated with a morphological pore network model. Thirdly, the permeability was determined using a state-of-the-art lattice-Boltzmann method. For the simulated structure with the true Minkowski functionals the pores were larger and the computed air-entry value of the artificial medium was reduced to 85% of the value obtained from the scanned sample. The computed permeability for the geometry with the four fitted Minkowski functionals was equal to the permeability of the scanned image. The permeability was much more sensitive to the volume and surface than to curvature and connectivity of the medium. We conclude that the Minkowski functionals are not sufficient to characterize the geometrical properties of a porous structure that are relevant for the distribution of two fluid phases. Depending on the procedure to generate artificial structures with predefined Minkowski functionals

  8. Modeling a distributed environment for a petroleum reservoir engineering application with software product line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidt, Rafael de Faria; Vilain, Patrícia; Dantas, M A R

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoir engineering is a complex and interesting field that requires large amount of computational facilities to achieve successful results. Usually, software environments for this field are developed without taking care out of possible interactions and extensibilities required by reservoir engineers. In this paper, we present a research work which it is characterized by the design and implementation based on a software product line model for a real distributed reservoir engineering environment. Experimental results indicate successfully the utilization of this approach for the design of distributed software architecture. In addition, all components from the proposal provided greater visibility of the organization and processes for the reservoir engineers

  9. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  10. A study of the relationship between permeability distributions and small scale sedimentary features in a fluvial formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotkowitz, M.

    1993-10-01

    This study focuses on styles of small-scale heterogeneity found in fluvial sand and soil bodies. Over 1,700 in situ measurements of air permeability were taken in an outcrop-based study which joins observations of sedimentary features with their associated permeability distributions. The relationship between sedimentology and hydrologic parameters provides a geologic framework to assess geostatistical hypotheses. The soils in the study area are found to have a significantly lower permeability than the channel sand deposits. The soil deposits showed a significant lack of observable small scale sedimentary structures, which is reflected in the experimental variograms. The permeability distribution in these study sites appears to be adequately represented by a continuous gaussian random field model. The presence of calcium carbonate nodules in the soils is related to the permeability distribution. Correlation lengths in the channel sands perpendicular to stratigraphy are significantly shorter than those observed parallel to stratigraphy. A sedimentological, bounding surfaces model is evaluated with regard to permeability distributions. In deposits of little sedimentary structure, the mean and variance may adequately characterize the permeability distribution. Where significant sedimentary structure exists, the bounding surfaces model can be used to determine the scales of variability present in the permeability distribution and may also be used to infer an appropriate choice of random field model.

  11. pressure distribution in a layered reservoir with gas-cap and bottom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... pressure derivatives, interlayer cross flow, heterogeneity, reservoir characterization, pressure distribution, dimensionless pressure. 1. Introduction. Oil production from a layered reservoir with a top gas cap and bottom water acting simultaneously poses serious challenges of rate and pressure monitoring.

  12. The meshless Galerkin method for pressure distribution simulation of horizontal well reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyong Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a novel three-dimensional meshless Galerkin for horizontal well reservoir simulation. The pressure function is approached by moving least-square method which consists of weight function, basic function and coefficient. Based on Galerkin principle and use penalty function method, the paper deduces the meshless Galerkin numerical linear equations. Cut off the pressure distribution of the horizontal section from the simulation database of horizontal well reservoir. It demonstrates that meshless Galerkin is a feasible numerical method for the horizontal well reservoir simulation. It is useful to research complex reservoir.

  13. The grain size distribution of settled sediment within storage reservoir Otmuchów

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Głowski Robert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The grain size distribution of settled sediment within storage reservoir Otmuchów. The river Nysa Kłodzka is flowing through the flat-reduction Otmuchów. There are localized two storage reservoirs Otmuchów and Nysa. The first of these reservoirs have been constructed in the period 1928-1933 and the filling was completed in 1934. Reservoir Nysa was completed in 1971. Both reservoirs are located within walking distance of each other, creating since 1971 cascade. Reservoir Otmuchów is located above the Nysa reservoir what cause, that in the bowl of the Otmuchów reservoir, the significant part of transported by Nysa Kłodzka sediments is deposited. When established after the 1997 flood damming levels, summer and winter, the length of the reservoir Otmuchów is suitably from 4.5 to 5 km. At the maximum impoundment level and a maximal capacity of 130.45 million m3 the reservoir length reach approx. 7 km. From the analysis of the satellite image can be seen advancing silting of the reservoir Otmuchów especially in the estuary zone of the Nysa Kłodzka. Obtained archival data about changes of the sediment grain size distribution in the longitudinal reservoir profile cover only the region of the still capacity extending a distance of 3 km from the cross-section of the dam. In this zone the fine particles of the suspended load with characteristic diameters ranging from 0.030 to 0.088 mm were embedded. In 2010, the authors presented the results of preliminary analysis of the silting process of the reservoir Otmuchów. The authors pointed out that there is a lack of the data about the dimension of the particles embedded in the usable capacity and flood capacity reserve (above 3 km from the dam causing visible on satellite photo silting. This paper presents the results of the sediment grain size distribution in the usable capacity of the reservoir and in the estuary region of the Nysa Kłodzka located in flood capacity reserve, obtained from the

  14. Management of complex multi-reservoir water distribution systems using advanced control theoretic tools and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Chmielowski, Wojciech Z

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses issues of optimal water management in a complex distribution system. The main elements of the water-management system under consideration are retention reservoirs, among which water transfers are possible, and a network of connections between these reservoirs and water treatment plants (WTPs). System operation optimisation involves determining the proper water transport routes and their flow volumes from the retention reservoirs to the WTPs, and the volumes of possible transfers among the reservoirs, taking into account transport-related delays for inflows, outflows and water transfers in the system. Total system operation costs defined by an assumed quality coefficient should be minimal. An analytical solution of the optimisation task so formulated has been obtained as a result of using Pontriagin’s maximum principle with reference to the quality coefficient assumed. Stable start and end conditions in reservoir state trajectories have been assumed. The researchers have taken into accou...

  15. Integrating a reservoir regulation scheme into a spatially distributed hydrological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Gang; Gao, Huilin; Naz, Bibi S.; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Voisin, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    During the past several decades, numerous reservoirs have been built across the world for a variety of purposes such as flood control, irrigation, municipal/industrial water supplies, and hydropower generation. Consequently, natural streamflow timing and magnitude have been altered significantly by reservoir operations. In addition, the hydrological cycle can be modified by land use/land cover and climate changes. To understand the fine scale feedback between hydrological processes and water management decisions, a distributed hydrological model embedded with a reservoir component is of desire. In this study, a multi-purpose reservoir module with predefined complex operational rules was integrated into the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM). Conditional operating rules, which are designed to reduce flood risk and enhance water supply reliability, were adopted in this module. The performance of the integrated model was tested over the upper Brazos River Basin in Texas, where two U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs, Lake Whitney and Aquilla Lake, are located. The integrated DHSVM model was calibrated and validated using observed reservoir inflow, outflow, and storage data. The error statistics were summarized for both reservoirs on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis. Using the weekly reservoir storage for Lake Whitney as an example, the coefficients of determination (R2) and the Nash-Sutcliff Efficiency (NSE) are 0.85 and 0.75, respectively. These results suggest that this reservoir module has promise for use in sub-monthly hydrological simulations. Enabled with the new reservoir component, the DHSVM model provides a platform to support adaptive water resources management under the impacts of evolving anthropogenic activities and substantial environmental changes.

  16. Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Final technical report, September 15, 1993--October 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, T.L.

    1996-10-01

    This multidisciplinary study was designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal was accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, and depositional regional frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; and (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery. Concurrent efforts were aimed at understanding the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery processes. The work focused on quantifying the interrelationship of fluid-rock interaction with lithologic characterization and with fluid characterization in terms of changes in chemical composition and fluid properties. This work establishes new criteria for the susceptibility of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs to formation alteration that results in wellbore scale damage. This task was accomplished by flow experiments using core material; examination of regional trends in water chemistry; examination of local water chemistry trends the at field scale; and chemical modeling of both the experimental and reservoir systems.

  17. MORPHOLOGICAL EFFECT OF FLOOD WATER PATHWAY IN RESERVOIRS ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF SEDIMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nsiri Ines

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the North Africa countries, sediments deposition in the reservoir dams reduces the available surface water resources by 2 to 5% per year. In Tunisia, even many efforts are made to protect reservoir dams against soil erosion, the sedimentation still very important and constitute a limitation their time duration. In order to better understand these phenomena, bathymetry, turbidity, suspended soil particles and sediments were monitored for two reservoir dams in Tunisia: Joumine and Sejnane. These data will be interpreted in order to better characterize the sedimentation process and identify the determinant factors. Geostatistical Technics are applied to the bathymetric data in order to simulate the evolution, in time and in space, of the morphology of the reservoir dams and to estimate the distribution of the sediments deposits. The results for the two dams will permit to better understand the influence of the initial geometry of the reservoir dams on the sedimentation process and to deduce the main water flow path lines. Turbidity, suspended particles and sediments particles size profiles established for fixed stations in the reservoir dams will be interpreted in order to better understand the sedimentation process in the reservoirs dams and to characterize the influence of the initial reservoir geometry.

  18. Effect of Flow Direction on Relative Permeability Curves in Water/Gas Reservoir System: Implications in Geological CO2 Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrauf Rasheed Adebayo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of gravity on vertical flow and fluids saturation, especially when flow is against gravity, is not often a subject of interest to researchers. This is because of the notion that flow in subsurface formations is usually in horizontal direction and that vertical flow is impossible or marginal because of the impermeable shales or silts overlying them. The density difference between two fluids (usually oil and water flowing in the porous media is also normally negligible; hence gravity influence is neglected. Capillarity is also often avoided in relative permeability measurements in order to satisfy some flow equations. These notions have guided most laboratory core flooding experiments to be conducted in horizontal flow orientation, and the data obtained are as good as what the experiments tend to mimic. However, gravity effect plays a major role in gas liquid systems such as CO2 sequestration and some types of enhanced oil recovery techniques, particularly those involving gases, where large density difference exists between the fluid pair. In such cases, laboratory experiments conducted to derive relative permeability curves should take into consideration gravity effects and capillarity. Previous studies attribute directional dependence of relative permeability and residual saturations to rock anisotropy. It is shown in this study that rock permeability, residual saturation, and relative permeability depend on the interplay between gravity, capillarity, and viscous forces and also the direction of fluid flow even when the rock is isotropic. Rock samples representing different lithology and wide range of permeabilities were investigated through unsteady-state experiments covering drainage and imbibition in both vertical and horizontal flow directions. The experiments were performed at very low flow rates to capture capillarity. The results obtained showed that, for each homogeneous rock and for the same flow path along the core length

  19. Fluid-flow, diagenesis and generation of secondary porosity-permeability in the Cretaceous Jandaira Formation, Brazil - an analogue of karstified carbonate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, F. H.; Cazarin, C. L.; Srivastava, N. K.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the diagenetic processes that generated secondary porosity-permeability in carbonates. Our study area is the Jandaira Formation, a post-rift unit, 50-700 m thick, which occurs over an area of 70 x 260 km in the Potiguar Basin, Equatorial margin of Brazil. The Jandaira Formation formed in the Turonian-Campanian and is the major exposed Cretaceous carbonate platform in the eastern continental margin of South America. Little folding and nearly flat-lying layers characterize this unit. We used a multidisciplinary approach, which included drone imagery, petrographic, petrophysical, petrological, and structural studies. Our results indicate that several levels of dissolution occurred in mudstone, grainstone, and wackestone facies along faults, fractures, and bedding planes. Fracture and faults provided vertical leaching pathways and sedimentary bedding provided horizontal pathways of increased secondary porosity and permeability. Dissolution resulted in a multi-scale karst system that could reach voids 5 m wide and 1 km long. Dissolution mostly affect the dolomitized sedimentary facies in the form of vugular, moldic, interparticular, and intercrystalline porosity. It also generated a new modified facies that we defined as karstified facies. Dissolution increased permeability in carbonate rocks from primary values of 0.0-0.94 mD to as much as 1370.11 mD. Micritization, lixiviation of evaporites, meteoric water infiltration and dolomitization during late diagenesis could have triggered dissolution processes. The Jandaira Formation serves as an analog of fractured and karstified carbonate reservoirs, where faults, joints, and bedding acted as pathways of high permeability.

  20. Well Test Analysis of Naturally Fractured Vuggy Reservoirs with an Analytical Triple Porosity – Double Permeability Model and a Global Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Susana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the automatic characterization of Naturally Fractured Vuggy Reservoirs via well test analysis, using a triple porosity-dual permeability model. The inter-porosity flow parameters, the storativity ratios, as well as the permeability ratio, the wellbore storage effect, the skin and the total permeability will be identified as parameters of the model. In this work, we will perform the well test interpretation in Laplace space, using numerical algorithms to transfer the discrete real data given in fully dimensional time to Laplace space. The well test interpretation problem in Laplace space has been posed as a nonlinear least squares optimization problem with box constraints and a linear inequality constraint, which is usually solved using local Newton type methods with a trust region. However, local methods as the one used in our work called TRON or the well-known Levenberg-Marquardt method, are often not able to find an optimal solution with a good fit of the data. Also well test analysis with the triple porosity-double permeability model, like most inverse problems, can yield multiple solutions with good match to the data. To deal with these specific characteristics, we will use a global optimization algorithm called the Tunneling Method (TM. In the design of the algorithm, we take into account issues of the problem like the fact that the parameter estimation has to be done with high precision, the presence of noise in the measurements and the need to solve the problem computationally fast. We demonstrate that the use of the TM in this study, showed to be an efficient and robust alternative to solve the well test characterization, as several optimal solutions, with very good match to the data were obtained.

  1. Evaluation Method of Reservoir Producing Status Based on Cumulative Distribution Curve of Oil Displacement Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuo Guan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a method for evaluating the status of old oilfield development. This method mainly uses the abundant coring well data of the oilfield to obtain the cumulative distribution curve of the displacement efficiency after the displacement efficiency of the statistical wells in the study area in a similar period is ordered from small to large. Based on the cumulative distribution curve of displacement efficiency, combined with the reservoir ineffective circulation limit, the cumulative water absorption ratio of reservoirs and other data are used to study the reservoir producing degree, calculate the degree of oil recovery, evaluate the proportion of the remaining movable oil after water flooding, calculate the reservoir ineffective circulation thickness and ineffective circulation water volume, and so on.

  2. Pressure Transient Analysis and Flux Distribution for Multistage Fractured Horizontal Wells in Triple-Porosity Reservoir Media with Consideration of Stress-Sensitivity Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-porosity model is usually adopted to describe reservoirs with multiscaled pore spaces, including matrix pores, natural fractures, and vugs. Multiple fractures created by hydraulic fracturing can effectively improve the connectivity between existing natural fractures and thus increase well deliverability. However, little work has been done on pressure transient behavior of multistage fractured horizontal wells in triple-porosity reservoirs. Based on source/sink function method, this paper presents a triple-porosity model to investigate the transient pressure dynamics and flux distribution for multistage fractured horizontal wells in fractured-vuggy reservoirs with consideration of stress-dependent natural fracture permeability. The model is semianalytically solved by discretizing hydraulic fractures and Pedrosa’s transformation, perturbation theory, and integration transformation method. Type curves of transient pressure dynamics are generated, and flux distribution among hydraulic fractures for a fractured horizontal well with constant production rate is also discussed. Parametric study shows that major influential parameters on transient pressure responses are parameters pertinent to reservoir properties, interporosity mass transfer, and hydraulic fractures. Analysis of flux distribution indicates that flux density gradually increases from the horizontal wellbore to fracture tips, and the flux contribution of outermost fractures is higher than that of inner fractures. The model can also be extended to optimize hydraulic fracture parameters.

  3. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    specific surface area. Fifty-nine Tor and Ekofisk Formation chalk samples from five North Sea chalk reservoirs were investigated. All contain quartz and clay minerals, most commonly kaolinite and smectite, with trace amounts of illite. The contents of calcite and quartz are inversely correlated and both...

  4. Using Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensing Systems to Estimate Inflow and Reservoir Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farshbaf Zinati, F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the deployment of distributed fiber-optic sensing systems in horizontal wells carry the promise to lead to a new, cheap and reliable way of monitoring production and reservoir performance. Practical applicability of distributed pressure sensing for quantitative inflow

  5. Effect of reservoir heterogeneity on air injection performance in a light oil reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Air injection is a good option to development light oil reservoir. As well-known that, reservoir heterogeneity has great effect for various EOR processes. This also applies to air injection. However, oil recovery mechanisms and physical processes for air injection in heterogeneous reservoir with dip angle are still not well understood. The reported setting of reservoir heterogeneous for physical model or simulation model of air injection only simply uses different-layer permeability of porous media. In practice, reservoir heterogeneity follows the principle of geostatistics. How much of contrast in permeability actually challenges the air injection in light oil reservoir? This should be investigated by using layered porous medial settings of the classical Dykstra-Parsons style. Unfortunately, there has been no work addressing this issue for air injection in light oil reservoir. In this paper, Reservoir heterogeneity is quantified based on the use of different reservoir permeability distribution according to classical Dykstra-Parsons coefficients method. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on physical process and production performance of air injection in light oil reservoir through numerical reservoir simulation approach. The basic model is calibrated based on previous study. Total eleven pseudo compounders are included in this model and ten complexity of reactions are proposed to achieve the reaction scheme. Results show that oil recovery factor is decreased with the increasing of reservoir heterogeneity both for air and N2 injection from updip location, which is against the working behavior of air injection from updip location. Reservoir heterogeneity sometimes can act as positive effect to improve sweep efficiency as well as enhance production performance for air injection. High O2 content air injection can benefit oil recovery factor, also lead to early O2 breakthrough in heterogeneous reservoir. Well

  6. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  7. [Monitoring report of Oncomelania hupensis snail distribution and diffusion in main drainages of Hexi Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu-hong; Xu, Feng-ming; Lu, Hong-mei; Qin, Jia-sheng; Cao, Wei-min; Jiang, Ya-juan; Lu, Qin-nan

    2015-02-01

    To understand the status of Oncomelania hupensis snail distribution and diffusion in main drainages of Hexi Reservoir and evaluate the snail control effect of the schistosomiasis control engineering of Hexi Reservoir. The O. hupensis snails were investigated by using the straw curtain method and fishing net method in different areas of the main drainages of Hexi Reservoir, and the results were analyzed. A total of 1 800 straw curtains were used and 37 snails were found in Naxi stream. Totally 5 870 kg floats were salved and no snails were found. The schistosomiasis control engineering of Hexi Reservoir is effective in the prevention of the snail diffusion, but there are still snails in the upstream. rherefore, the snail surveillance and control need to be strengthened.

  8. Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes from North Sea Oil reservoirs; organisms, distribution and origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeder, Janiche

    1996-12-31

    During oil production in the North Sea, anaerobic seawater is pumped in which stimulates the growth of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes that produce hydrogen sulphide. This sulphide causes major health hazards, economical and operational problems. As told in this thesis, several strains of sulphate reducers have been isolated from North Sea oil field waters. Antibodies have been produced against these strains and used to investigate the distribution of sulphate reducers in a North Sea oil reservoir. The result showed a high diversity among sulphate reducers, with different strains belonging to different parts of the reservoir. Some of these strains have been further characterized. The physiological and phylogenetic characterization showed that strain 7324 was an archaean. Strain A8444 was a bacterium, representing a new species of a new genus. A benzoate degrading sulphate reducing bacterium was isolated from injection water, and later the same strain was detected in produced water. This is the first field observations indicating that sulphate reducers are able to penetrate an oil reservoir. It was found that the oil reservoir contains a diverse population of thermophilic sulphate reducers able to grow on carbon sources in the oil reservoir, and to live and grow in this extreme environment of high temperature and pressure. The mesophilic sulphate reducers are established in the injection water system and in the reservoir near the injection well during oil production. The thermophilic sulphate reducers are able to grow in the reservoir prior to, as well as during production. It appears that the oil reservoir is a natural habitat for thermophilic sulphate reducers and that they have been present in the reservoir long before production started. 322 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Distribution patterns of fishes in a canyon-shaped reservoir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prchalová, Marie; Kubečka, Jan; Vašek, Mojmír; Peterka, Jiří; Seďa, Jaromír; Jůza, Tomáš; Říha, Milan; Jarolím, Oldřich; Tušer, Michal; Kratochvíl, Michal; Čech, Martin; Draštík, Vladislav; Frouzová, Jaroslava; Hohausová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2008), s. 54-78 ISSN 0022-1112 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600170504; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600170502; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/07/1392 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : longitudinal distribution * vertical distribution * fish community structure Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.246, year: 2008

  10. Modeling of heat and high viscous fluid distributions with variable viscosity in a permeable channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hona

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow field under study is characterized by velocity components, temperature and pressure in non-dimensional formulation. The flow is driven by suction through the horizontal channel with permeable walls fixed at different temperatures. In order to ascertain a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the flow, the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation are solved concurrently applying a similarity transformation technique. The hydrodynamic structures obtained from the numerical integration include flow reversal or backward flow, collision zones due to the coexistence of wall suction and flow reversal inside the channel, the inflection through temperature distribution, the growth of thermal gradients near the walls, and the sensitivity of normal pressure gradients to the difference of temperatures at boundaries. These hydrodynamic structures are investigated considering the influences of the Péclet number P and the sensitivity of viscosity to thermal variations α which are the main control parameters of the problem.

  11. Longitudinal and vertical spatial gradients in the distribution of fish within a canyon-shaped reservoir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašek, Mojmír; Kubečka, J.; Peterka, Jiří; Čech, Martin; Draštík, Vladislav; Hladík, Milan; Prchalová, Marie; Frouzová, Jaroslava

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 4 (2004), s. 352-362 ISSN 1434-2944 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS6017004 Keywords : fish distribution * spatial heterogeneity * reservoirs Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2004

  12. Fine-Scale Spatial Heterogeneity in the Distribution of Waterborne Protozoa in a Drinking Water Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Jean-Baptiste; Ogorzaly, Leslie; Penny, Christian; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2015-09-23

    The occurrence of faecal pathogens in drinking water resources constitutes a threat to the supply of safe drinking water, even in industrialized nations. To efficiently assess and monitor the risk posed by these pathogens, sampling deserves careful design, based on preliminary knowledge on their distribution dynamics in water. For the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia, only little is known about their spatial distribution within drinking water supplies, especially at fine scale. Two-dimensional distribution maps were generated by sampling cross-sections at meter resolution in two different zones of a drinking water reservoir. Samples were analysed for protozoan pathogens as well as for E. coli, turbidity and physico-chemical parameters. Parasites displayed heterogeneous distribution patterns, as reflected by significant (oo)cyst density gradients along reservoir depth. Spatial correlations between parasites and E. coli were observed near the reservoir inlet but were absent in the downstream lacustrine zone. Measurements of surface and subsurface flow velocities suggest a role of local hydrodynamics on these spatial patterns. This fine-scale spatial study emphasizes the importance of sampling design (site, depth and position on the reservoir) for the acquisition of representative parasite data and for optimization of microbial risk assessment and monitoring. Such spatial information should prove useful to the modelling of pathogen transport dynamics in drinking water supplies.

  13. Influence of break structures on the distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments of the Kyiv reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestopalov, V.M.; Lyal'ko, V.I.; Fedorovskij, A.D.; Sirenko, L.A.; Khodorovskij, A.Ya.

    2000-01-01

    We study the distribution of radionuclides in bottom sediments of the Kyiv reservoir on the basis of research of adjacent territory break - block structures with deciphering space-born images and ground measurements and forecast the occurrence of extreme situations due to the redistribution of bottom water flows and sediments of radionuclides

  14. Numerical investigation of temperature distribution in a confined heterogeneous geothermal reservoir due to injection-production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, M.S.

    The present study deals with the modeling of transient temperature distribution in a heterogeneous geothermal reservoir in response to the injection-production process. The heterogeneous geothermal aquifer considered here is a confined aquifer with homogeneous layers of finite length and overlain

  15. Fish distribution in a small domestic water supply reservoir: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the composition and distribution of fish populations in the inshore, surface and bottom water habitats of Kangimi Reservoir showed that the most abundant family was the Cichlidae followed in order of abundance by the families Cyprinidae, Schilbeidae, Mormyridae, Mochokidae, Characidae, Centropomidae and ...

  16. Size distribution of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, B.L.; Groeger, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    Naturally occurring assemblages of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton were radiolabelled with sodium 14 C-bicarbonate and sodium 3 H-acetate and size fractionated to determine the size structure of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, an oligotrophic impoundment of the Caddo River in south-central Arkansas. Size distributions of autotrophy and microheterotrophy were remarkably uniform seasonally, vertically within the water column, and along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir despite significant changes in environmental conditions. Planktonic autotrophy was dominated by small algal cells with usually >50% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake accounted for by organisms 75% of the planktonic microheterotrophy. Longitudinal patterns in autotrophic and microheterotrophic activities associated with >3-μm and >1-μm size fractions, respectively, suggest an uplake to downlake shift from riverine to lacustrine environmental influences within the reservoir. 83 references, 7 figures

  17. Itaipu reservoir limnology: eutrophication degree and the horizontal distribution of its limnological variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RA. Ribeiro Filho

    Full Text Available Reservoirs are manmade habitats, intermediate between rivers and lakes, presenting distinct hydrological and morphometric characteristics, with differential mean water residence time. They also present proper vertical and horizontal organisations, and their evolution depends on several variables acting on different special and temporal scales. The water quality evolution of the Itaipu Reservoir was evaluated through the analysis of the physical, chemical and biological variables, and by the application of Trophic State Indices. We concluded that the limnological variables present a horizontal pattern of variation highly dependent upon the hydrological regime. The turbidity and total suspended solids presented the same distribution pattern in the reservoir zones. The fluvial zone had the highest concentrations of nutrients, suspended solids and turbidity. The results of the Trophic State Indices indicate a mesotrophic level for the fluvial and transition zones, and an oligotrophic one for the lacustrine zone.

  18. Distribution and properties of faults and fractures in shales: Permeability model and implications for optimum flow stimulation by hydraulic fracturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of reactivated fractures and fracture permeability after stimulation are key controlling factors that determine typical drainage areas, shale to well connectivity, and hydrocarbon flow rates in fractured shales. In this paper, the influence of fault and fracture populations

  19. Distribution and decontamination of radioactive cesium in small-scale agricultural reservoirs of Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Inagaki, Masayo; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    The authors studied optimal methods against the Cs contamination of agricultural reservoirs outside the evacuation zones, which had been contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. As a result of measurements at three points of a small reservoir, the highest radioactivity value was 16.8 Bq/g, with a higher value at bank part and bottom mud. The possibility is considered that the bank part held an organic layer with accumulated Cs, and the bottom mud had litters and clay soil that adsorbed Ce. The distribution of Cs was fluctuated depending on the environment of reservoirs, with the effects of the influx of sediment, influx of litters, and landform of catchment areas. In the 'Technical manual on measures against radioactive materials at reservoirs,' published by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, three decontamination methods for reservoirs have been taken up: (1) removal of mud, (2) fixation of bottom mud, and (3) improvement of water intake method. The method (1) and (2) alone cannot cope with re-contamination from water catchment areas. As a countermeasure for recontamination after decontamination, it is good to install a headrace channel, slope, retaining part, etc. at the pond bottom, to increase the efficiency of the recollection and immobilization of Ce. The felling of neighboring trees, litter collection in peripheral areas, and covering measures for the surface layer in the vicinity are essential. (A.O.)

  20. Estimating the geographic distribution of human Tanapox and potential reservoirs using ecological niche modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Benjamin P; Nakazawa, Yoshinori J; Reynolds, Mary G; Carroll, Darin S

    2014-09-25

    Tanapox virus is a zoonotic infection that causes mild febrile illness and one to several nodular skin lesions. The disease is endemic in parts of Africa. The principal reservoir for the virus that causes Tanapox is unknown, but has been hypothesized to be a non-human primate. This study employs ecological niche modeling (ENM) to determine areas of tropical Africa suitable for the occurrence of human Tanapox and a list of hypothetical reservoirs. The resultant niche model will be a useful tool to guide medical surveillance activities in the region. This study uses the Desktop GARP software to predict regions where human Tanapox might be expected to occur based on historical human case locations and environmental data. Additional modeling of primate species, using occurrence data from museum records was performed to determine suitable disease reservoirs. The final ENM predicts a potential distribution of Tanapox over much of equatorial Africa, exceeding the borders of Kenya and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) where it has been historically reported. Five genera of non-human primates were found to be potential reservoir taxa. Validity testing suggests the model created here is robust (p modeling technique has several limitations and results should be interpreted with caution. This study may increase knowledge and engage further research in this neglected disease.

  1. Influence of eutrophication on the distribution of total mercury and methylmercury in hydroelectric reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Feng, X B; Chen, C X; Qiu, G L; Sommar, J; Guo, Y N; Liang, P; Wan, Q

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of mercury (Hg) and the characteristics of its methylation were investigated in Wujiangdu (WJD) and Yinzidu (YZD) reservoirs in Guizhou province, China. The two reservoirs are characterized by high and low levels of primary productivity, respectively. Mercury species in water samples from depth profiles in both reservoirs and from interface water in the WJD were analyzed each season during 2007. The concentrations of total Hg (HgT(unf)) and methylmercury (MeHgT(unf)) in unfiltered water samples from the WJD varied from 3.0 to 18 pmol dm(-3) and from 0.17 to 15 pmol dm(-3), respectively; ranges were 2.0 to 9.5 pmol dm(-3) for HgT(unf) and 0.14 to 2.2 pmol dm(-3) for MeHgT(unf) in the YZD. Elevated methylmercury concentrations in water samples from the bottom water and water-sediment interface demonstrated an active net Hg methylation in the downstream reach of the WJD. There was no discernable Hg methylation occurring in the YZD, nor in the upstream and middle reaches of the WJD. The results suggest that high primary productivity resulting from cage aquaculture activities in the WJD is an important control on Hg methylation in the reservoir, increasing the concentrations of MeHg in water in the Wujiang River basin Southwestern China.

  2. Thermal effluents from nuclear power plant influences species distribution and thermal tolerance of fishes in reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, A.K.; Das, T.; Dalvi, R.S.; Bagchi, S.; Manush, S.M.; Ayyappan, S.; Chandrachoodan, P.P.; Apte, S.K.; Ravi, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    During electricity generation water bodies like reservoir act as a heat sink for thermal effluent discharges from nuclear power plant. We hypothesized that the fish fauna gets distributed according to their temperature preference in the thermal gradient. In a simulated environment using critical thermal methodology (CTM), we assessed thermal tolerance and metabolic profile of fishes (Puntius filamentosus, Parluciosoma daniconius, Ompok malabaricus, Mastacembelus armatus, Labeo calbasu, Horabragrus brachysoma, Etroplus suratensis, Danio aequipinnatus and Gonoproktopterus curmuca) collected from Kadra reservoir in Karnataka state. Results of CTM tests agrees with the species abundance as per the temperature gradient formed in the reservoir due to thermal effluent discharge. E. suratensis and H. brachysoma) appear to be adapted to high temperature (with high CTMax and CTMin values) and are in abundance at point of thermal discharge. Similarly, P. daniconius, appear to be adapted to cold (low CTM values) is in abundance in lower stretches of Kadra reservoir. Overall results indicate that discharge form nuclear power plant influences the species biodiversity in enclosed water bodies. (author)

  3. The spatial and temporal distribution of chemical species in Padaviya Reservoir, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliyabandara, S. M. P. A.; Siriwardhana, C.; Cooray, P. L. A. T.; Liyanage, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Water is one of the most important assets for human life. Eutrophication and pollution are some of the major threats to many freshwater bodies. There are thousands of reservoirs exist in Sri Lanka; however, only a handful of them has been thoroughly monitored and studied. The main objective of this study is to investigate the temporal and spatial distribution of chemical species in Padaviya reservoir which is shallow man-made irrigation reservoir (8°49'30.6" N and 80°46'2.05"E) located in Sri Lanka constructed around 300 BC. The average depth is 8 m and 4 m in wet and dry seasons respectively. It has a catchment area of 270 km2. Water sampling was done at bi-monthly intervals for a period of one year staring from January 2016. Chemical analyses were conducted according to standard protocols. The maximum temperature difference between the surface and bottom waters of the reservoir was 2 °C throughout the year. The surface and bottom water conductivity varied between 175 ± 2.3 to 250 ± 3.0 μS cm-1 and 475 ± 3.7 to 600 ± 4.5 μScm-1 respectively. The average pH of surface and bottom waters varied between 8.5 ± 0.1 to 7.8 ± 0.2 and 7.2 ± 0.02 to 6.8 ± 0.2 respectively. The dissolved oxygen concentration showed a clinograde type distribution throughout the year where the surface waters were well oxygenated (DO ≈ 7.5 ppm) and the bottom waters were anoxic (DO ≈ 0.15 ppm). Ammonia concentration increased with the depth from surface concentration of 150 ± 50 to 300 ± 25 ppb at the bottom. Nitrite distribution was similar to ammonia and the surface concentration was 100 ± 25ppb throughtout the year and at the bottom it varied between 300 ± 30 to 4500 ± 30 ppb. Water soluble phosphate distribution was also similar to ammonia. The surface concentration was 200 ± 20 ppb throughtout the year and varied from 100 ± 20 to 2000 ±20 ppb at the bottom. Nitrate distribution was inverse of the ammonia. The surface concentration was 500 ± 30 to 900 ± 30 ppb

  4. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. [Distribution Characteristics and Pollution Status Evaluation of Sediments Nutrients in a Drinking Water Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-lin; Liu, Fei; Shi, Jian-chao

    2016-01-15

    The main purpose of this paper is to illustrate the influence of nutrients distribution in sediments on the eutrophication of drinking water reservoir. The sediments of three representative locations were field-sampled and analyzed in laboratory in March 2015. The distribution characteristics of TOC, TN and TP were measured, and the pollution status of sediments was evaluated by the comprehensive pollution index and the manual for sediment quality assessment. The content of TOC in sediments decreased with depth, and there was an increasing trend of the nitrogen content. The TP was enriched in surface sediment, implying the nutrients load in Zhoucun Reservoir was aggravating as the result of human activities. Regression analysis indicated that the content of TOC in sediments was positively correlated with contents of TN and TP in sediments. The TOC/TN values reflected that the vascular land plants, which contain cellulose, were the main source of organic matter in sediments. The comprehensive pollution index analysis result showed that the surface sediments in all three sampling sites were heavily polluted. The contents of TN and TP of surface sediments in three sampling sites were 3273-4870 mg x kg(-1) and 653-2969 mg x kg(-1), and the content of TOC was 45.65-83.00 mg x g(-1). According to the manual for sediment quality assessment, the TN, TP and TOC contents in sediments exceed the standard values for the lowest level of ecotoxicity, so there is a risk of eutrophication in Zhoucun Reservoir.

  6. DETERMINATION OF LOW PERMEABLE LITHOFACIES, AS TYPE OF UNCONVENTIONAL HYDROCARBON RESERVOIRS, USING SEQUENTIAL INDICATOR METHODS, CASE STUDY FROM THE KLOŠTAR FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Novak Zelenika

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Geostatistical methods are very successfully used in Upper Miocene (Lower Pontian Kloštar structure modelling. Mapping of the two variables (porosity and thickness and their common observation in certain cut-off values gave the insight in depositional channel location, transitional lithofacies, material transport direction and variables distribution within representative Lower Pontian reservoir. It was possible to observe direction of the turbidites and role of the normal fault in detritus flow direction in the analyzed structure. Intercalation between turbiditic sandstones and basinal pelitic marls were the locations with the highest thicknesses. Sequential Indicator Simulations highlighted porosity maps as primary and thickness maps as secondary (additional data source (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. Size distribution of autotrophy and microheterotrophy in reservoirs: implications for foodweb structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Particle size is a primary determinant of resources available to consumers and of the efficiency of energy transfer through planktonic food chains. Dual radioisotopic labeling (with 14 C-bicarbonate and 3 H-acetate) and size fractionation of naturally-occurring phytoplankton-bacterioplankton assemblages were employed to examine the particle size distributions of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in four limnologically-dissimilar US reservoirs (Lake Mead, Arizona-Nevada, oligo-mesotrophic; Broken Bow Lake, Oklahoma, mesotrophic; Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, eutrophic; and Normandy Lake, Tennessee, eutrophic). Small nano- and ultraphytoplankton (< 8.0 μm) and free-living bacteria (< 3.0 μm) were primarly responsible for planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy, respecitvely, even in eutrophic conditions. Zooplankton grazing experiments indicated that (1) most grazing pressure occurs on 3.0 to 8.0 μm particles, (2) grazer limitation of the occurrence of attached bacteria amd microbial-detrital aggregates is unlikely, and (3) free-living bacteria are inefficiently harvested, relative to algae, by most reservoir zooplankton. Relative to autorophy, the microheterotrophic conversion of allochthonous dissolved organic matter and algal excretion products to bacterial biomass appears unlikely to be a significant source of organic carbon for planktonic grazers in most reservoirs

  8. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Community Diversity and Water Quality during the Reservoir Thermal Stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Han Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir thermal stratification drives the water temperature and dissolved oxygen gradient, however, the characteristic of vertical water microbial community during thermal stratification is so far poorly understood. In this work, water bacterial community diversity was determined using the Illumina Miseq sequencing technique. The results showed that epilimnion, metalimnion and hypolimnion were formed steadily in the JINPEN drinking water reservoir. Water temperature decreased steadily from the surface (23.11 °C to the bottom (9.17 °C. Total nitrogen ranged from 1.07 to 2.06 mg/L and nitrate nitrogen ranged from 0.8 to 1.84 mg/L. The dissolved oxygen concentration decreased sharply below 50 m, and reached zero at 65 m. The Miseq sequencing revealed a total of 4127 operational taxonomic units (OTUs with 97% similarity, which were affiliated with 15 phyla including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Caldiserica, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. The highest Shannon diversity was 4.41 in 45 m, and the highest Chao 1 diversity was 506 in 5 m. Rhodobacter dominated in 55 m (23.24% and 65 m (12.58%. Prosthecobacter dominated from 0.5 to 50 m. The heat map profile and redundancy analysis (RDA indicated significant difference in vertical water bacterial community composition in the reservoir. Meanwhile, water quality properties including dissolved oxygen, conductivity, nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen have a dramatic influence on vertical distribution of bacterial communities.

  9. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Community Diversity and Water Quality during the Reservoir Thermal Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Han; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Ting-Lin; Ma, Wei-Xing; Xu, Jin-Lan; Sun, Xin

    2015-06-17

    Reservoir thermal stratification drives the water temperature and dissolved oxygen gradient, however, the characteristic of vertical water microbial community during thermal stratification is so far poorly understood. In this work, water bacterial community diversity was determined using the Illumina Miseq sequencing technique. The results showed that epilimnion, metalimnion and hypolimnion were formed steadily in the JINPEN drinking water reservoir. Water temperature decreased steadily from the surface (23.11 °C) to the bottom (9.17 °C). Total nitrogen ranged from 1.07 to 2.06 mg/L and nitrate nitrogen ranged from 0.8 to 1.84 mg/L. The dissolved oxygen concentration decreased sharply below 50 m, and reached zero at 65 m. The Miseq sequencing revealed a total of 4127 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 97% similarity, which were affiliated with 15 phyla including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Caldiserica, Chlamydiae, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. The highest Shannon diversity was 4.41 in 45 m, and the highest Chao 1 diversity was 506 in 5 m. Rhodobacter dominated in 55 m (23.24%) and 65 m (12.58%). Prosthecobacter dominated from 0.5 to 50 m. The heat map profile and redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated significant difference in vertical water bacterial community composition in the reservoir. Meanwhile, water quality properties including dissolved oxygen, conductivity, nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen have a dramatic influence on vertical distribution of bacterial communities.

  10. Size distribution of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmel, B.L.; Groeger, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    Naturally occurring assemblages of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton were radiolabelled with sodium /sup 14/C-bicarbonate and sodium /sup 3/H-acetate and size fractionated to determine the size structure of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, an oligotrophic impoundment of the Caddo River in south-central Arkansas. Size distributions of autotrophy and microheterotrophy were remarkably uniform seasonally, vertically within the water column, and along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir despite significant changes in environmental conditions. Planktonic autotrophy was dominated by small algal cells with usually >50% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake accounted for by organisms <8.0 ..mu..m. Microheterotrophic activity in the 0.2- to 1.0-..mu..m size fraction, presumably associated with free-living bacterioplankton not attached to suspended particles, usually accounted for >75% of the planktonic microheterotrophy. Longitudinal patterns in autotrophic and microheterotrophic activities associated with >3-..mu..m and >1-..mu..m size fractions, respectively, suggest an uplake to downlake shift from riverine to lacustrine environmental influences within the reservoir. 83 references, 7 figures.

  11. Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2006-09-30

    This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point

  12. Do physicochemical variables regulate the distribution of zooplankton communities in reservoirs dominated by filter-feeding carp?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Menghong; Yang, Lili; Liu, Qigen

    2014-03-01

    The temporal and spatial distributions of zooplankton communities in the upper, middle, and lower reaches of the Xin'anjiang Reservoir, Zhejiang, China, were investigated monthly, between 2009 and 2010. Silver carp ( Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp ( Aristichthys nobilis) dominated the pelagic fish community of this large, deep reservoir. Cladocerans were distributed evenly throughout the reservoir. Rotifers were mainly found in the upper reaches, while copepods tended to assemble in the lower reaches. The Pearson correlation analysis and stepwise multiple regression were used to identify the major physicochemical gradients influencing community variations. Zooplankton community distributions were influenced by water temperature, dissolved oxygen, phosphorus, nitrogen, and silicon. Excess nutrients, in particular silicon, stimulated rotifer growth. Based on these findings, it is possible to use rotifer density as a bioindicator of eutrophic status in deep reservoir ecosystems.

  13. Quantifying quagga mussel veliger abundance and distribution in Copper Basin Reservoir (California) using acoustic backscatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael A; Taylor, William D

    2011-11-01

    Quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) have been linked to oligotrophication of lakes, alteration of aquatic food webs, and fouling of infrastructure associated with water supply and power generation, causing potentially billions of dollars in direct and indirect damages. Understanding their abundance and distribution is key in slowing their advance, assessing their potential impacts, and evaluating effectiveness of control strategies. Volume backscatter strength (Sv) measurements at 201- and 430-kHz were compared with quagga mussel veliger and zooplankton abundances determined from samples collected using a Wisconsin closing net from the Copper Basin Reservoir on the Colorado River Aqueduct. The plankton within the lower portion of the water column (>18 m depth) was strongly dominated by D-shaped quagga mussel veligers, comprising up to 95-99% of the community, and allowed direct empirical measurement of their mean backscattering cross-section. The upper 0-18 m of the water column contained a smaller relative proportion of veligers based upon net sampling. The difference in mean volume backscatter strength at these two frequencies was found to decrease with decreasing zooplankton abundance (r(2) = 0.94), allowing for correction of Sv due to the contribution of zooplankton and the determination of veliger abundance in the reservoir. Hydroacoustic measurements revealed veligers were often present at high abundances (up to 100-200 ind L(-1)) in a thin 1-2 m layer at the thermocline, with considerable patchiness in their distribution observed along a 700 m transect on the reservoir. Under suitable conditions, hydroacoustic measurements can rapidly provide detailed information on the abundance and distribution of quagga mussel veligers over large areas with high horizontal and vertical resolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Implications of heterogeneous fracture distribution on reservoir quality; an analogue from the Torridon Group sandstone, Moine Thrust Belt, NW Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Hannah; Healy, David; Bond, Clare E.; Butler, Robert W. H.

    2018-03-01

    Understanding fracture network variation is fundamental in characterising fractured reservoirs. Simple relationships between fractures, stress and strain are commonly assumed in fold-thrust structures, inferring relatively homogeneous fracture patterns. In reality fractures are more complex, commonly appearing as heterogeneous networks at outcrop. We use the Achnashellach Culmination (NW Scotland) as an outcrop analogue to a folded tight sandstone reservoir in a thrust belt. We present fracture data is collected from four fold-thrust structures to determine how fracture connectivity, orientation, permeability anisotropy and fill vary at different structural positions. We use a 3D model of the field area, constructed using field observations and bedding data, and geomechanically restored using Move software, to determine how factors such as fold curvature and strain influence fracture variation. Fracture patterns in the Torridon Group are consistent and predictable in high strain forelimbs, however in low strain backlimbs fracture patterns are inconsistent. Heterogeneities in fracture connectivity and orientation in low strain regions do not correspond to fluctuations in strain or fold curvature. We infer that where strain is low, other factors such as lithology have a greater control on fracture formation. Despite unpredictable fracture attributes in low strain regions, fractured reservoir quality would be highest here because fractures in high strain forelimbs are infilled with quartz. Heterogeneities in fracture attribute data on fold backlimbs mean that fractured reservoir quality and reservoir potential is difficult to predict.

  15. Richness and distribution of aquatic macrophytes in a subtropical reservoir in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Pavão

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: to evaluate the richness, biomass and distribution of aquatic macrophytes in a subtropical reservoir in the dry and rainy seasons. Methods this study was carried out in the Itupararanga Reservoir, an important water source in São Paulo State, undergoing a continuous process of eutrophication. Samples of macrophytes were collected at 12 sampling sites in the summer and at 9 sampling sites in the winter in the Itupararanga Reservoir using the quadrat method (0.25 m2. In the laboratory, the plants were washed to remove the coarse material and then were dried (60 °C for biomass determination (gDW. m-2. All the species in the sampling sites in both periods were identified using the specific literature. In each sampling site, the water temperature, pH, electrical conductivity and dissolved oxygen were measured using a probe. The temporal and spatial differences were analyzed using t-test and a Cluster Analysis was performed. Results The checklist showed sixteen species, 75% of them were emergent. From the 16 species, 15 were present in the summer and 10 in the winter. Eichhornia crassipes, Polygonum sp., and Urochloa sp. were the frequent taxa and had the highest biomass in both periods. The winter showed the highest biomass mainly due to the growth of free-floating species. The headwaters of the reservoir, the most eutrophic region, showed that the highest macrophyte richness and the sampling sites of this area were clustered in both the summer and winter. Conclusions There was no significant spatial variation among the measured variables. E. crassipes, Salvinia sp. and Urochloa sp. showed a significant variation of biomass between two periods. Urochloa sp. is a nuisance species occurring in up to 60% of the sampling sites having implications for the whole catchment. Continuous macrophyte monitoring is important due to the increasing trophic status of this ecosystem.

  16. Diel variation in gillnet catches and vertical distribution of pelagic fishes in a stratified European reservoir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašek, Mojmír; Kubečka, Jan; Čech, Martin; Draštík, Vladislav; Matěna, Josef; Mrkvička, T.; Peterka, Jiří; Prchalová, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2009), s. 64-69 ISSN 0165-7836. [Fish Stock Assessment Methods for Lakes and Reservoirs: Towards the true picture of fish stock. České Budějovice, 11.09.2007-15.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600170504; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600170502; GA ČR(CZ) GP206/06/P418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : gillnet * diel catchability * distribution * epilimnetic fishes * CPUE * man-made lake Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2009

  17. Simulation of extreme reservoir level distribution with the SCHADEX method (EXTRAFLO project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Emmanuel; Penot, David; Garavaglia, Federico

    2013-04-01

    The standard practice for the design of dam spillways structures and gates is to consider the maximum reservoir level reached for a given hydrologic scenario. This scenario has several components: peak discharge, flood volumes on different durations, discharge gradients etc. Within a probabilistic analysis framework, several scenarios can be associated with different return times, although a reference return level (e.g. 1000 years) is often prescribed by the local regulation rules or usual practice. Using continuous simulation method for extreme flood estimation is a convenient solution to provide a great variety of hydrological scenarios to feed a hydraulic model of dam operation: flood hydrographs are explicitly simulated by a rainfall-runoff model fed by a stochastic rainfall generator. The maximum reservoir level reached will be conditioned by the scale and the dynamics of the generated hydrograph, by the filling of the reservoir prior to the flood, and by the dam gates and spillway operation during the event. The simulation of a great number of floods will allow building a probabilistic distribution of maximum reservoir levels. A design value can be chosen at a definite return level. An alternative approach is proposed here, based on the SCHADEX method for extreme flood estimation, proposed by Paquet et al. (2006, 2013). SCHADEX is a so-called "semi-continuous" stochastic simulation method in that flood events are simulated on an event basis and are superimposed on a continuous simulation of the catchment saturation hazard using rainfall-runoff modelling. The SCHADEX process works at the study time-step (e.g. daily), and the peak flow distribution is deduced from the simulated daily flow distribution by a peak-to-volume ratio. A reference hydrograph relevant for extreme floods is proposed. In the standard version of the method, both the peak-to-volume and the reference hydrograph are constant. An enhancement of this method is presented, with variable peak

  18. Sedimentary mode and reservoir distribution of the Cambrian carbonate & evaporate paragenesis system in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cambrian carbonate & evaporite paragenesis system in the Sichuan Basin is made up of the Longwangmiao, Gaotai and Xixiangchi Fms. So far, great breakthrough has been made only in the Longwangmiao Fm instead of the latter two, and the Anyue Gasfield was discovered in the center of this basin. In this paper, therefore, the Cambrian carbonate & evaporite paragenesis system in the Sichuan Basin was analyzed in terms of its structural–sedimentary setting, sequence stratigraphic framework, sedimentary facies and the distribution of evaporites by using various geologic, logging and seismic data. Then, the geological model of sedimentary facies was established and the distribution range of favorable reservoirs was predicted. Based on these studies, the following results are obtained. Firstly, the palaeotectonic framework is characterized by the style of “one depression between two uplifts” in the setting of a large SE dipping slope, and the stratigraphic filling is in the structure of “onlapping at the bottom and truncation at the top” which is thin in the west and thick in the east. Secondly, three third-order sequence cycles which, on the whole, become shallow upward are developed from bottom to top, and gypsum-salt rocks are mainly located at the high system tract (HST of third-order sequences and concentrated in the Wanzhou–Yibin sag. Thirdly, the geological model of sedimentary facies is composed of three major sedimentary structural layers from bottom to top, namely the evaporative carbonate ramp, the evaporative diamictic restricted platform and the evaporative restricted platform. The sedimentary environment changes from the open to the closed and the penesaline for a long time, and then back to the open. The distribution of shoals changes from the pattern of “dual banks” in a large area to more scattered shoals and banded shoals, while the evaporative lagoon and tidal flat shrink. Fourthly, the reservoir distribution is

  19. Taxonomical and ecological characteristics of the desmids placoderms in reservoir: analyzing the spatial and temporal distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirlene Aparecida Felisberto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of river-dam axis and abiotic factors on the composition of Closteriaceae, Gonatozygaceae, Mesotaeniaceae and Peniaceae in a tropical reservoir METHODS: Water samples for physical, chemical and periphyton analysis were collected in April and August 2002 in different regions along the axis of the river-dam of Rosana Reservoir, River Basin Paranapanema. The substrates collected, always in the litoranea region, were petioles of Eichhornia azurea (Swartz Kunth. To examine the relationship of abiotic variables with reservoir zones and between the floristic composition of desmids, we used principal component analysis (PCA and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA RESULTS: The results of the PCA explained 81.3% of the total variability in the first two axes. In the first axis, the variables of conductivity, water temperature and the pH were related to the sampling regions of April with higher values, while for the month of August, nitrate, total phosphorus and dissolved oxygen showed higher values. We identified 20 taxa, distributed in the genera Closterium (14, Gonatozygon (4, Netrium (1 and Penium (1. Spatially, the higher taxa were recorded in the lacustrine region for both collection periods. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA summarized 62.2% of total data variability of taxa in the first two axes, and in August, Closterium incurvum Brébisson, C. cornu Ehrenberg ex Ralfs and Gonatozygon monotaenium De Bary, were related to higher values of turbidity and nitrate to the lacustrine and intermediate regions CONCLUSION: Thus, the formation of groups was due to the regions along the longitudinal axis, then the seasonal period, which must be related to the low current velocity, the higher values of temperature and the water transparency, especially in late summer

  20. Distribution of fish assemblages in Lajes Reservoir, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. ARAÚJO

    Full Text Available Spatial distribution of fish assemblages in Lajes Reservoir, a 30 km² impoundment in Rio de Janeiro State (Lat. 22º42'-22º50'S; Long. 43º53'-44º05'W was assessed to detect patterns of available habitat use by the fish. A standardized monthly sampling program was carried out from January to December 1994 at three zones of the reservoir (upper, near tributary mouths; middle; and lower, near the dam. Fishes were caught by gillnets, (50 m long, 3 m height, with mesh ranging having from 25 to 45 mm between knots, submerged during 12 hours. A total of 5,089 fishes were collected comprising 15 species, 14 genera and 9 families. Loricariichthys spixii, Astyanax bimaculatus, Parauchenipterus striatulus, Astyanax fasciatus parahybae, Oligosarchus hepsetus, Rhamdia parahybae, Hypostomus affinis, and Geophagus brasiliensis were the most abundant species, each contributing above 1% of the total number. Loricariichthys spixii was the dominant species, contributing over 80% of total number and biomass. Fish abundance, number of species, and biomass were higher in the upper zone, but differences from this overall pattern were shown by some species. Loricariichthys spixii and Rhamdia parahybae were more abundant in the upper zone, while all other species showed no differences in their abundance among the zones. Seasonal environmental variables of temperature, pH, transparency, and water level did not show a clear association with fish occurrence. Most fish used the different zones of the reservoir with no clear sign of spatial separation. High dominance of L. spixii, reduced abundance of reolific species Leporinus copelandii and Cyphocharax gilberti, and presence of introduced species such as Cichla monoculus and Tilapia rendalli are indications of antropic effects in the fish community.

  1. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of elastic waves is the primary datum available for acquiring information about subsurface characteristics such as lithology and porosity. Cheap and quick (spatial coverage, ease of measurement) information of permeability can be achieved, if sonic velocity is used for permeability...... prediction, so we have investigated the use of velocity data to predict permeability. The compressional velocity fromwireline logs and core plugs of the chalk reservoir in the South Arne field, North Sea, has been used for this study. We compared various methods of permeability prediction from velocities....... The relationships between permeability and porosity from core data were first examined using Kozeny’s equation. The data were analyzed for any correlations to the specific surface of the grain, Sg, and to the hydraulic property defined as the flow zone indicator (FZI). These two methods use two different approaches...

  2. Distribution of Major and Trace Elements in a Tropical Hydroelectric Reservoir in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Siong Fong; Ling, Teck Yee; Nyanti, Lee; Ean Lee, Terri Zhuan; Mohd Irwan Lu, Nurul Aida Lu; Bakeh, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the metals content in water, sediment, macroalgae, aquatic plant, and fish of Batang Ai Hydroelectric Reservoir in Sarawak, Malaysia. The samples were acid digested and subjected to atomic absorption spectrometry analysis for Na, K, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zn, Mg, Fe, Sn, Al, Ca, As, Se, and Hg. The total Hg content was analysed on the mercury analyser. Results showed that metals in water, sediment, macroalgae, aquatic plant, and fish are distinguishable, with sediment and biota samples more susceptible to metal accumulation. The distributions of heavy metals in water specifically Se, Sn, and As could have associated with the input of fish feed, boating, and construction activities. The accumulation of heavy metals in sediment, macroalgae, and aquatic plant on the other hand might be largely influenced by the redox conditions in the aquatic environment. According to the contamination factor and the geoaccumulation index, sediment in Batang Ai Reservoir possesses low risk of contamination. The average metal contents in sediment and river water are consistently lower than the literature values reported and well below the limit of various guidelines. For fishes, trace element Hg was detected; however, the concentration was below the permissible level suggested by the Food and Agriculture Organization.

  3. Spatial distribution and secondary production of Copepoda in a tropical reservoir: Barra Bonita, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ. Santos-Wisniewski

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to describe the spatial distribution of zooplankton copepods, their biomass and instantaneous secondary production, in Barra Bonita, a large eutrophic, polymitic reservoir (22° 29' S and 48° 34' W on the Tietê River, of the Paraná basin. Sampling was carried out during two seasons: dry winter and rainy summer. Species composition, age structure and numerical density of each copepod species population were analyzed at 25 sampling stations. Secondary production was calculated for Copepoda, the dominant group in zooplankton communities, taking Calanoida and Cyclopoida separately. Copepoda represented the largest portion of the total zooplankton biomass, the dominant species being Notodiaptomus iheringi among the Calanoida and Mesocyclops ogunnus and Thermocyclops decipiens among the Cyclopoida. The production of Copepoda was higher during the rainy summer (23.61 mgDW.m-3.d-1 in January 1995 than during the dry winter season (14 mgDW.m-3.d-1 in August 1995, following the general pattern of abundance for the whole zooplankton community. Among the copepods, Cyclopoida production was higher than that of Calanoida, a pattern commonly observed for tropical lakes and reservoirs. Barra Bonita copepods are very productive, but there was a great degree of spatial heterogeneity, related to the physical and chemical conditions, particularly the level of nutrients and also to phytoplankton biomass.

  4. Seasonal distribution of potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba species from drinking water reservoirs in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Tzeng, Kai-Jiun; Huang, Shih-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect the presence/absence of Acanthamoeba along with geographical variations, water quality variations and seasonal change of Acanthamoeba in Taiwan was investigated by 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected quarterly at 19 drinking water reservoir sites from November 2012 to August 2013. Acanthamoeba was detected in 39.5 % (30/76) of the water sample, and the detection rate was 63.2 % (12/19) from samples collected in autumn. The average concentration of Acanthamoeba was 3.59 × 10(4) copies/L. For geographic distribution, the detection rate for Acanthamoeba at the northern region was higher than the central and southern regions in all seasons. Results of Spearman rank test revealed that heterotrophic plate count (HPC) had a negative correlation (R = -0.502), while dissolved oxygen (DO) had a positive correlation (R = 0.463) in summer. Significant differences were found only between the presence/absence of Acanthamoeba and HPC in summer (Mann-Whitney U test, P Acanthamoeba were identified, and T4 was the most commonly identified Acanthamoeba genotypes. The presence of Acanthamoeba in reservoirs presented a potential public health threat and should be further examined.

  5. Virtual outcrop models of petroleum reservoir outcrop analogues – a review of the current state-of-the-art

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, JK; Howell, JA; Hodgetts, D; Westerman, AR; Hodgson, DM

    2006-01-01

    A subsurface reservoir model is a computer based representation of petrophysical parameters such a porosity, permeability, fluid saturation, etc. Given that direct measurement of these parameters is limited to a few wells it is necessary to extrapolate their distribution. As geology is a first order control on petrophysics, it follows that an understanding of facies and their distribution is central to predicting reservoir quality and architecture. The majority of reservoir modelling systems ...

  6. Distribution and abundance of submerged macrophytes, including Myriophyllum spicatum L. (Angiospermae), in a reactor cooling reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, J.B.; Tilly, L.J.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of aquatic macrophytes, including Myriophyllum spicatum L., in a reactor cooling reservoir was analyzed by biomass removal. Samples were collected by use of a corer from hot, warm, and cold stations at progressive distances from a thermal effluent. Standing crop was doubled at the warm station as compared to the cold station due to the enhancement of Myriophyllum spicatum L. However, M. spicatum was least abundant at the hot station where Najas guadalupensis (Spreng.) Morong. predominated. Possible causes for the restriction of M. spicatum from the hot station are given. Maximum rooting depth of vegetation was reduced near the effluent apparently due to a combination of decreased light penetration and a higher photosynthesis-respiration compensation level at higher temperatures. (U.S.)

  7. Fracture-permeability development in organically-rich sediments through methane generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, John Napier, Jr.

    The result of methane generation in low-permeability rock matrices is fracture-permeability development. Such expansion is the result of methane generation which, in turn, is the result of burial of organic matter under euxinic conditions. The fracture-permeability-development process has been demonstrated in the laboratory using a microwave oven to generate gas (water vapor) in well-indurated, low-permeability sedimentary rocks. The process has been quantified through modeling constrained by principles of chemistry and physics. The modeling process is applied to both shales and limestones and relates sediment expansion to sediment organic carbon content converted to methane. The model shows that the quantity of organic carbon required to be converted into methane for microfracture development is small compared to the amount commonly contained in hydrocarbon source rocks. A wide variety of fracture-producing mechanisms proposed to explain natural fracture development in hydrocarbon reservoirs is acknowledged. However, fracture permeability-development that appears to occur selectively in low-permeability, organically-rich sequences has received much less attention. Additionally, unabsolved anomalies that persist when current explanations are applied call attention to the need for alternative explanations. The fracture permeability, including the distribution and orientation of those fractures, which some reservoirs exhibit seem to defy explanation until now. A better understanding of fracture-permeability development and related aspects of petroleum maturation will remain illusive until the methane-generation fracture-permeability process, which until now has not been adequately quantified, is fully appreciated. Sediment expansion through methane generation in low-permeability rock matrices explains fracture-permeability development in many naturally-fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs including cleat permeability in coalbed methane reservoirs. Evidence is presented

  8. Are Geotehrmal Reservoirs Stressed Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Laboso, R. C.; Layland-Bachmann, C. E.; Feigl, K. L.; Foxall, W.; Tabrez, A. R.; Mellors, R. J.; Templeton, D. C.; Akerley, J.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal permeability can be strongly influenced by developing connected networks of open fractures. However, the detailed evolution of a fracture network, its extent, and the persistence of fracture porosity are difficult to analyze. Even in fault-hosted geothermal systems, where heat is brought to the surface from depth along a fault, hydrothermal flow is heterogeneously distributed. This is presumably due to variations in fracture density, connectivity, and attitude, as well as variations in fracture permeability caused by sealing of fractures by precipitated cements or compaction. At the Brady Geothermal field in Nevada, we test the relationship between the modeled local stress state perturbed by dislocations representing fault slip or volume changes in the geothermal reservoir inferred from surface deformation measured by InSAR and the location of successful geothermal wells, hydrothermal activity, and seismicity. We postulate that permeability is favored in volumes that experience positive Coulomb stress changes and reduced compression, which together promote high densities of dilatant fractures. Conversely, permeability can be inhibited in locations where Coulomb stress is reduced, compression promotes compaction, or where the faults are poorly oriented in the stress field and consequently slip infrequently. Over geologic time scales spanning the development of the fault system, these local stress states are strongly influenced by the geometry of the fault network relative to the remote stress driving slip. At shorter time scales, changes in fluid pressure within the fracture network constituting the reservoir cause elastic dilations and contractions. We integrate: (1) direct observations of stress state and fractures in boreholes and the mapped geometry of the fault network; (2) evidence of permeability from surface hydrothermal features, production/injection wells and surface deformations related to pumping history; and (3) seismicity to test the

  9. Development and application of 3-D fractal reservoir model based on collage theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.K.; Kim, K.S.; Sung, W.M. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-04-30

    Reservoir characterization is the essential process to accurately evaluate the reservoir and has been conducted by geostatistical method, SRA algorithm, and etc. The characterized distribution of heterogeneous property by these methods shows randomly distributed phenomena, and does not present anomalous shape of property variation at discontinued space as compared with the observed shape in nature. This study proposed a new algorithm of fractal concept based on collage theorem, which can virtually present not only geometric shape of irregular and anomalous pore structures or coastlines, but also property variation for discontinuously observed data. With a basis of fractal concept, three dimensional fractal reservoir model was developed to more accurately characterize the heterogeneous reservoir. We performed analysis of pre-predictable hypothetically observed permeability data by using the fractal reservoir model. From the results, we can recognize that permeability distributions in the areal view or the cross-sectional view were consistent with the observed data. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  10. Influence of limnological zones on the spatial distribution of fish assemblages in three Brazilian reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Becker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reservoirs can have both positive and negative effects on differing fish species depending on the species concerned and reservoir morphology, flow regime, and basin location.  We assessed the influence of limnological zones on the ichthyofauna of three large Neotropical reservoirs in two different river basins. We sampled fish through use of gill nets set at 40 systematically selected sites on each reservoir. We used satellite images, algae, and suspended solids concentrations to classify those sites as lacustrine or riverine. We observed significant differences in assemblage composition between riverine and lacustrine zones of each reservoir. We either tested if the same region (lacustrine or riverine showed the same patterns in different reservoirs. In São Simão, the riverine zone produced greater abundances of native species, long-distance migratory species, diversity, and richness, whereas the lacustrine zone supported greater total and non-native species abundances. Conversely, in Três Marias, the riverine zone supported greater total and non-native species abundances, whereas the others traits evaluated did not differ significantly between zones. Only lacustrine sites occurred in Volta Grande Reservoir. The same zones in the three reservoirs usually had significantly different patterns in the traits evaluated. The differences in spatial patterns observed between reservoirs could be explained partly by the differing morphologies (complex versus linear, the differential influence of tributaries of each reservoir and basin positions (presence or absence of upstream dams of the reservoirs.

  11. The influence of permeability anisotropy on the distribution of pore fluid pressure around fault zones: Insights for fault stability and reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D.; Harland, S. R.; Cappa, F.; Gan, Q.; Mitchell, T. M.; Meredith, P. G.; Browning, J.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in pore fluid pressure can trigger the reactivation of a fault. In order to understand the process of reactivation, discerning how pore fluid pressure is distributed, spatially and temporally, within a fault zone is necessary. Imperative to this is an accurate quantification of the permeability - and any anisotropy of permeability - of the rocks comprising the fault zone. New experimental data have provided insight into the distribution of permeability anisotropy surrounding a normal fault in a porous sandstone (Farrell et al. 2014). In the study performed here, we use this new data to populate a model of a normal fault in order to investigate the impact of permeability anisotropy on normal fault stability and the potential for reactivation. Fault zone permeability can evolve through deformation due to reactivation, and therefore our longer term aim is to understand how permeability anisotropy evolves with fault growth, slip and reactivation. A coupled hydrological-mechanical simulator (Tough2-FLAC3D) is employed to simulate changes in pore fluid pressure in the area surrounding the modelled normal fault. To increase the pore pressure in the model and reduce effective stress along the fault zone, two scenarios are examined; firstly, through regional stress and secondly, through fluid injection at a well. Systematic variations in the model parameters are explored in order to assess the sensitivity of fault reactivation to the various properties. Such variations include the regional stress setting, well to fault separation distance, degree of permeability anisotropy and fault core and damage zone dimensions. All variations are guided by experimental and field observations. The results can be used to understand how permeability anisotropy and fluid flow affect fault slip and to guide more robust assessments of fault stability and earthquake hazard. Farrell, N., Healy, D. and Taylor, C., 2014. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones. Journal of

  12. Distribution and concentration evaluation of trace and rare earth elements in sediment samples of the Billings and Guarapiranga reservoir systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Larissa S.; Fávaro, Déborah I.T.; Ferreira, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Concentration and distribution of trace and rare earth elements in bottom sediment samples collected in the Billings System (including Rio Grande and Guarapiranga Reservoirs) were assessed by using Instrumental Neutron Activation (INAA). To evaluate the sources of anthropogenic contamination the enrichment factor (FE) and the geoacumulation index (IGeo) were calculated using NASC and Guarapiranga Park Soil as Reference Values. Results were compared to the concentration guideline values established by CCME (Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment) environmental agency for As, Cr and Zn, and values in other published studies. Most points exceeded TEL values and, in some points, PEL values for these elements, indicating poor sediment quality in these reservoirs. In general terms, the elements As, Cr, Sb and Zn through EF and IGeo calculations present enrichment at all points analyzed, in both collection campaigns, except for the Rio Grande Reservoir points. The region where the reservoirs are located receive untreated sewage as well as pollution from urban occupation, industrial and mining activities, making it difficult to accurately identify the pollution sources. This study found higher concentrations of the elements analyzed in the Billings Reservoir, indicating a greater contamination level in relation to the other reservoirs. (author)

  13. Distribution and concentration evaluation of trace and rare earth elements in sediment samples of the Billings and Guarapiranga reservoir systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Larissa S.; Fávaro, Déborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (LAN-CRPq/IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo(Brazil). Lab. de Análise por Ativação Neutrônica; Ferreira, Francisco J. [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de São Paulo (ELAI/CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Química Inorgânica

    2017-07-01

    Concentration and distribution of trace and rare earth elements in bottom sediment samples collected in the Billings System (including Rio Grande and Guarapiranga Reservoirs) were assessed by using Instrumental Neutron Activation (INAA). To evaluate the sources of anthropogenic contamination the enrichment factor (FE) and the geoacumulation index (IGeo) were calculated using NASC and Guarapiranga Park Soil as Reference Values. Results were compared to the concentration guideline values established by CCME (Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment) environmental agency for As, Cr and Zn, and values in other published studies. Most points exceeded TEL values and, in some points, PEL values for these elements, indicating poor sediment quality in these reservoirs. In general terms, the elements As, Cr, Sb and Zn through EF and IGeo calculations present enrichment at all points analyzed, in both collection campaigns, except for the Rio Grande Reservoir points. The region where the reservoirs are located receive untreated sewage as well as pollution from urban occupation, industrial and mining activities, making it difficult to accurately identify the pollution sources. This study found higher concentrations of the elements analyzed in the Billings Reservoir, indicating a greater contamination level in relation to the other reservoirs. (author)

  14. Mantle convection and the distribution of geochemical reservoirs in the silicate shell of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Uwe; Hendel, Roland

    2010-05-01

    We present a dynamic 3-D spherical-shell model of mantle convection and the evolution of the chemical reservoirs of the Earth`s silicate shell. Chemical differentiation, convection, stirring and thermal evolution constitute an inseparable dynamic system. Our model is based on the solution of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy, angular momentum, and four sums of the number of atoms of the pairs 238U-206Pb, 235U-207Pb, 232Th-208Pb, and 40K-40Ar. Similar to the present model, the continental crust of the real Earth was not produced entirely at the start of the evolution but developed episodically in batches [1-7]. The details of the continental distribution of the model are largely stochastic, but the spectral properties are quite similar to the present real Earth. The calculated Figures reveal that the modeled present-day mantle has no chemical stratification but we find a marble-cake structure. If we compare the observational results of the present-day proportion of depleted MORB mantle with the model then we find a similar order of magnitude. The MORB source dominates under the lithosphere. In our model, there are nowhere pure unblended reservoirs in the mantle. It is, however, remarkable that, in spite of 4500 Ma of solid-state mantle convection, certain strong concentrations of distributed chemical reservoirs continue to persist in certain volumes, although without sharp abundance boundaries. We deal with the question of predictable and stochastic portions of the phenomena. Although the convective flow patterns and the chemical differentiation of oceanic plateaus are coupled, the evolution of time-dependent Rayleigh number, Rat , is relatively well predictable and the stochastic parts of the Rat(t)-curves are small. Regarding the juvenile growth rates of the total mass of the continents, predictions are possible only in the first epoch of the evolution. Later on, the distribution of the continental-growth episodes is increasingly stochastic

  15. Reclaimed water as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes: distribution system and irrigation implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Fahrenfeld

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Treated wastewater is increasingly being reused to achieve sustainable water management in arid regions. The objective of this study was to quantify the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in recycled water, particularly after it has passed through the distribution system, and to consider point-of-use implications for soil irrigation. Three separate reclaimed wastewater distribution systems in the western U.S. were examined. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to quantify ARGs corresponding to resistance to sulfonamides (sul1, sul2, macrolides (ermF, tetracycline (tet(A, tet(O, glycopeptides (vanA, and methicillin (mecA, in addition to genes present in waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumophila (Lmip, Escherichia coli (gadAB, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ecfx, gyrB. In a parallel lab study, the effect of irrigating an agricultural soil with secondary, chlorinated, or dechlorinated wastewater effluent was examined in batch microcosms. A broader range of ARGs were detected after the reclaimed water passed through the distribution systems, highlighting the importance of considering bacterial re-growth and the overall water quality at the point of use. Screening for pathogens with qPCR indicated presence of Lmip and gadAB genes, but not ecfx or gyrB. In the lab study, chlorination was observed to reduce 16S rRNA and sul2 gene copies in the wastewater effluent, while dechlorination had no apparent effect. ARGs levels did not change with time in soil slurries incubated after a single irrigation event with any of the effluents. However, when irrigated repeatedly with secondary wastewater effluent (not chlorinated or dechlorinated, elevated levels of sul1 and sul2 were observed. This study suggests that reclaimed water may be an important reservoir of ARGs, especially at the point of use, and that attention should be directed towards the fate of ARGs in irrigation water and the implications for human health.

  16. Modeling flow in naturally fractured reservoirs : effect of fracture aperture distribution on dominant sub-network for flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, J.; Rossen, W.R.

    2017-01-01

    Fracture network connectivity and aperture (or conductivity) distribution are two crucial features controlling flow behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs. The effect of connectivity on flow properties is well documented. In this paper, however, we focus here on the influence of fracture

  17. Comparison of Particle-Associated Bacteria from a Drinking Water Treatment Plant and Distribution Reservoirs with Different Water Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Ling, F.Q.; Van der Mark, E.J.; Zhang, X.D.; Knezev, A.; Verberk, J.Q.J.C.; Van der Meer, W.G.J.; Medema, G.J.; Liu, W.T.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of and changes in the suspended particles and the associated bacteria in an unchlorinated drinking water distribution system and its reservoirs with different water sources. The results show that particle-associated bacteria (PAB) were present at a level of

  18. Permeability and pore size distribution in medium strength self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Cánovas, M.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of self-compacting concrete (SCC has been on the rise in recent years. Research on this type of concrete has focused primarily on determining optimal dosage, while durability, particularly for medium strength SCC, has received much less attention. The present study explored the permeability of a number of medium strength (characteristic strength, 30 MPa self-compacting concretes, including SCCs made with common cement, in pursuit of a balance between performance and cost. Pressurised water and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests were conducted to determine concrete behaviour when exposed to aggressive agents. The findings showed that the capillary networks of these concretes are essentially impermeable to aggressive agents.

    El hormigón autocompactante ha experimentado un amplio desarrollo en los últimos años. Los estudios sobre este hormigón se han centrado en obtener dosificaciones óptimas, mientras los relativos a su durabilidad son escasos, especialmente en el caso de hormigones de resistencia moderada. Este trabajo se centra en el estudio de la permeabilidad de distintos hormigones autocompactantes de resistencia moderada (resistencia característica 30 MPa. El estudio incluye hormigones fabricados con cementos comunes, en los que se ha buscado un equilibrio entre prestaciones y precio. Con el fin de estudiar su comportamiento frente a la penetración de agentes agresivos, se han realizado los ensayos de permeabilidad al agua bajo presión y estudio de la porosimetría por intrusión de mercurio. Los resultados de los ensayos ponen de manifiesto el buen comportamiento de estos hormigones frente a la posible penetración de agentes agresivos por la red capilar.

  19. Estimation of soil permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Elhakim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soils are permeable materials because of the existence of interconnected voids that allow the flow of fluids when a difference in energy head exists. A good knowledge of soil permeability is needed for estimating the quantity of seepage under dams and dewatering to facilitate underground construction. Soil permeability, also termed hydraulic conductivity, is measured using several methods that include constant and falling head laboratory tests on intact or reconstituted specimens. Alternatively, permeability may be measured in the field using insitu borehole permeability testing (e.g. [2], and field pumping tests. A less attractive method is to empirically deduce the coefficient of permeability from the results of simple laboratory tests such as the grain size distribution. Otherwise, soil permeability has been assessed from the cone/piezocone penetration tests (e.g. [13,14]. In this paper, the coefficient of permeability was measured using field falling head at different depths. Furthermore, the field coefficient of permeability was measured using pumping tests at the same site. The measured permeability values are compared to the values empirically deduced from the cone penetration test for the same location. Likewise, the coefficients of permeability are empirically obtained using correlations based on the index soil properties of the tested sand for comparison with the measured values.

  20. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  1. Temporal-spatial distribution of non-point source pollution in a drinking water source reservoir watershed based on SWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of drinking water source reservoirs has a close relationship between regional economic development and people’s livelihood. Research on the non-point pollution characteristics in its watershed is crucial for reservoir security. Tang Pu Reservoir watershed was selected as the study area. The non-point pollution model of Tang Pu Reservoir was established based on the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool model. The model was adjusted to analyse the temporal-spatial distribution patterns of total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP. The results showed that the loss of TN and TP in the reservoir watershed were related to precipitation in flood season. And the annual changes showed an "M" shape. It was found that the contribution of loss of TN and TP accounted for 84.5% and 85.3% in high flow years, and for 70.3% and 69.7% in low flow years, respectively. The contributions in normal flow years were 62.9% and 63.3%, respectively. The TN and TP mainly arise from Wangtan town, Gulai town, and Wangyuan town, etc. In addition, it was found that the source of TN and TP showed consistency in space.

  2. Distribution and Thermal Maturity of Devonian Carbonate Reservoir Solid Bitumen in Desheng Area of Guizhong Depression, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Hou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of solid bitumen in the Devonian carbonate reservoir from well Desheng 1, Guizhong Depression, was investigated by optical microscope and hydrocarbon inclusions analysis. Vb and chemical structure indexes measured by bitumen reflectance, laser Raman microprobe (LRM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were carried out to determine the thermal maturity of solid bitumen. Based on the solid bitumen thermal maturity, the burial and thermal maturity history of Devonian carbonate reservoir were reconstructed by basin modeling. The results indicate that the fractures and fracture-related dissolution pores are the main storage space for the solid bitumen. The equivalent vitrinite reflectance of solid bitumen ranges from 3.42% to 4.43% converted by Vb (% and LRM. The infrared spectroscopy analysis suggests that there are no aliphatic chains detected in the solid bitumen which is rich in aromatics C=C chains (1431–1440 cm−1. The results of Vb (%, LRM, and FTIR analysis demonstrate that the solid bitumen has experienced high temperature and evolved to the residual carbonaceous stage. The thermal evolution of Devonian reservoirs had experienced four stages. The Devonian reservoirs reached the highest reservoir temperature 210–260°C during the second rapid burial-warming stage, which is the main period for the solid bitumen formation.

  3. Distribution of Bartonella henselae Variants in Patients, Reservoir Hosts and Vectors in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Horacio; Escudero, Raquel; Pons, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; García-Esteban, Coral; Rodríguez-Moreno, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Lobo, Bruno; Valcárcel, Félix; Pérez, Azucena; Jiménez, Santos; Jado, Isabel; Juste, Ramón; Segura, Ferrán; Anda, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the diversity of B. henselae circulating in patients, reservoir hosts and vectors in Spain. In total, we have fully characterized 53 clinical samples from 46 patients, as well as 78 B. henselae isolates obtained from 35 cats from La Rioja and Catalonia (northeastern Spain), four positive cat blood samples from which no isolates were obtained, and three positive fleas by Multiple Locus Sequence Typing and Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeats Analysis. This study represents the largest series of human cases characterized with these methods, with 10 different sequence types and 41 MLVA profiles. Two of the sequence types and 35 of the profiles were not described previously. Most of the B. henselae variants belonged to ST5. Also, we have identified a common profile (72) which is well distributed in Spain and was found to persist over time. Indeed, this profile seems to be the origin from which most of the variants identified in this study have been generated. In addition, ST5, ST6 and ST9 were found associated with felines, whereas ST1, ST5 and ST8 were the most frequent sequence types found infecting humans. Interestingly, some of the feline associated variants never found on patients were located in a separate clade, which could represent a group of strains less pathogenic for humans. PMID:23874563

  4. Monitoring thermal processes in low-permeability fractured media using fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Loew, Simon; Amann, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) systems constitute arguably one of the main significant advances in the development of modern monitoring techniques in field hydrogeology, both for shallow (e.g. quantification of surface water-groundwater interactions) and deeper applications (borehole temperature monitoring). Deployment of FO-DTS monitoring systems in boreholes has notably allowed further promoting the use of temperature as a tracer to improve the characterization of heterogeneous media, with a strong focus on permeable environments such as shallow unconsolidated aquifers and/or highly-fractured rocks, generally found close to ground surface. However, applying this technology to low-permeability media, as in the case of intact rock mass intersected by isolated, discrete fractures still remains a challenge, perhaps explaining the limited number of field results reported in the scientific literature to date. Yet, understanding the transport, storage and exchange of heat in deep, low-permeability crystalline rocks is critical to many scientific and engineering research topics and applications, including for example deep geothermal energy (DGE). In the present contribution, we describe the use and application of FO-DTS monitoring to a broad range of processes, varying from the propagation and persistence of thermal anomalies (both natural and induced) to the monitoring of the curing of epoxy resin and cement grouts along the annular space of boreholes designed for monitoring discrete, packed-off zones. All data provided herein has been collected as part of a multi-disciplinary research program on hydraulic stimulation and deep geothermal energy carried out at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), an underground rock laboratory located in the Aar massif, in the Swiss Alps. Through these examples, we illustrate the importance of understanding the spatial and temporal variations of local thermal regimes when planning to monitoring boreholes temperatures

  5. Permeability in Rotliegend gas sandstones to gas and brine as predicted from NMR, mercury injection and image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Fisher, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Permeability characterisation of low permeability, clay-rich gas sandstones is part of production forecasting and reservoir management. The physically based Kozeny (1927) equation linking permeability with porosity and pore size is derived for a porous medium with a homogeneous pore size, whereas...... the pore sizes in tight sandstones can range from nm to μm. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation was used to estimate a pore size distribution for 63 samples of Rotliegend sandstone. The surface relaxation parameter required to relate NMR to pore size is estimated by combination of NMR...... and mercury injection data. To estimate which pores control permeability to gas, gas permeability was calculated for each pore size increment by using the Kozeny equation. Permeability to brine is modelled by assuming a bound water layer on the mineral pore interface. The measured brine permeabilities...

  6. An Integrated Capillary, Buoyancy, and Viscous-Driven Model for Brine/CO2Relative Permeability in a Compositional and Parallel Reservoir Simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, X.

    2012-11-03

    The effectiveness of CO2 storage in the saline aquifers is governed by the interplay of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. Recent experimental study reveals the impact of pressure, temperature, and salinity on interfacial tension (IFT) between CO2 and brine. The dependence of CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure on pressure (IFT) is also clearly evident in published experimental results. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the migration and trapping of CO2 in subsurface is crucial to design future storage projects that warrant long-term and safe containment. Simulation studies ignoring the buoyancy and also variation in interfacial tension and the effect on the petrophysical properties such as trapped CO2 saturations, relative permeability, and capillary pressure have a poor chance of making accurate predictions of CO2 injectivity and plume migration. We have developed and implemented a general relative permeability model that combines effects of pressure gradient, buoyancy, and IFT in an equation of state (EOS) compositional and parallel simulator. The significance of IFT variations on CO2 migration and trapping is assessed.

  7. [Distribution of Mercury in Plants at Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Wang, Yong-min; Li, Xian-yuan; Tang, Zhen-ya; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Cheng; WANG, Ding-yong

    2015-11-01

    The mercury (Hg) distribution and storage in plants at water-level-fluctuating zone (WLFZ) in the Three Gorges Reservoir were investigated by analyzing the total mercury(THg) and methylmercury ( MeHg) levels in different parts of plants collected from three typical sites including Shibaozhai, Zhenxi and Hanfeng Lake in WLFZ. The results indicated that THg and MeHg concentrations in plants ranged from (1.62 ± 0.57) to (49.42 ± 3.93) μg x kg(-1) and from (15.27 ± 7.09) to (1 974.67 ± 946.10) ng x kg(-1), respectively. In addition, THg levels in different plant parts followed the trend: root > leaf > stem, and similar trend for MeHg was observed with the highest level in root. An obvious spatial distribution was also found with the THg and MeHg levels in plants in Hanfeng higher than those in the same plants in the other two sampling sites (Shibaozhai and Zhenxi), and there was a difference of THg and MeHg storage in plants in various attitudes. The corresponding THg and MeHg storages were 145.3, 166.4, 124.3 and 88.2 mg x hm(-2), and 1.9, 2.7, 3.6 and 3.2 mg x hm(-2) in 145-150, 150-160, 160-170 and 170-175 m attitudes. The accumulation ability of dominant plants in WLFZ for THg (bioaccumulation factor, BAF 1).

  8. How Does Knowing Snowpack Distribution Help Model Calibration and Reservoir Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, C. B.; Mazurkiewicz, A.; McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Well calibrated hydrologic models are a necessary tool for reservoir managers to meet increasingly complicated regulatory, environmental and consumptive demands on water supply systems. Achieving these objectives is difficult during periods of drought, such as seen in the Sierra Nevada in recent years. This emphasizes the importance of accurate watershed modeling and forecasting of runoff. While basin discharge has traditionally been the main criteria for model calibration, many studies have shown it to be a poor control on model calibration where correct understanding of the subbasin hydrologic processes are required. Additional data sources such as snowpack accumulation and melt are often required to create a reliable model calibration. When allocating resources for monitoring snowpack conditions, water system managers often must choose between monitoring point locations at high temporal resolution (i.e. real time weather and snow monitoring stations) and large spatial surveys (i.e. remote sensing). NASA's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) provides a unique opportunity to test the relative value of spatially dense, temporally sparse measurements vs. temporally dense, spatially sparse measurements for hydrologic model calibration. The ASO is a demonstration mission using coupled LiDAR and imaging spectrometer mounted to an aircraft flying at 6100 m to collect high spatial density measurements of snow water content and albedo over the 1189 km2 Tuolumne River Basin. Snow depth and albedo were collected weekly throughout the snowmelt runoff period at 5 m2 resolution during the 2013-2014 snowmelt. We developed an implementation of the USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) for the Tuolumne River above Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the primary water source for San Francisco. The modeled snow accumulation and ablation was calibrated in 2 models using either 2 years of weekly measurements of distributed snow water equivalent from the ASO, or 2 years of 15 minute snow

  9. Reservoir characterization using artificial neural network; Neural network wo mochiita choryuso tokusei kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, N.; Kozawa, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishikawa, N.; Tani, A. [Fuji Research Institute Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Neural network is used for the prediction of porosity and permeability using logging data as reservoir characteristics, and the validity of this method is verified. For the prediction of reservoir characteristics by the use of seismic survey data, composite seismic survey records obtained by density logging and acoustic logging are used to experiment the prediction of porosity and permeability continuous along lines of wells. A 3-output back propagation network is used for analysis. There is a possibility that this technique when optimized will improve on prediction accuracy. Furthermore, in the case of characteristics mapping, 3-dimensional seismic data is applied to a carbonate rock reservoir for predicting spatial porosity and permeability. This technique facilitates the comprehensive analysis of core data, well data, and seismic survey data, enabling the derivation of a high-precision spatial distribution of reservoir characteristics. Efforts will continue for further improvement on prediction accuracy. 6 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Reservoir Characteristic of Famennian Deposits of the Solikamsk Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Plyusnin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the reservoir rock properties of Famennian (Late Devonian reef carbonate strata obtained by core study at boreholes № 1-4 of the Sukharev oil field. Based on the results of detailed study of lithological features of productive strata, authors defined the structural types and composed their description. The characteristics of the porosity and permeability of oil-bearing beds were shown. In a result of studies, the structure and main lithotypes of Famennian portion of reservoir were determined that allowed predicting the spatial distribution of reservoir properties within oilfield area.

  11. The impact of in-situ stress and outcrop-based fracture geometry on hydraulic aperture and upscaled permeability in fractured reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    and diagenetic processes that control aperture. In the absence of cement bridges and high pore pressure, fractures in the subsurface are generally considered to be closed. However, experimental work, outcrop analyses and subsurface data show that some fractures remain open, and that aperture varies even along...... explicitly, we quantify equivalent permeability, i.e. combined matrix and stress-dependent fracture flow. Fracture networks extracted from a large outcropping pavement form the basis of these models. The results show that the angle between fracture strike and σ 1 has a controlling impact on aperture...

  12. MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Yannong Dong; Ning Liu; Guohua Gao; Fengjun Zhang; Ruijian Li

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. The volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade. The techniques developed in this research will make it easier to use all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. In this project, we have developed computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Specifically, we have developed methods for adjusting porosity and permeability fields to match both production and time-lapse seismic data and have also developed a procedure to adjust the locations of boundaries between facies to match production data. In all cases, the history matched rock property fields are consistent with a prior model based on static data and geologic information. Our work also indicates that it is possible to adjust relative permeability curves when history matching production data.

  13. [Spatiotemporal distribution characteristics of rainfall erosivity in Three Gorges Reservoir Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Guang; Lin, De-Sheng; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Ma, Hao; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on the 1976-2005 daily rainfall records from 25 weather stations in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area and its surrounding regions, this paper studied the spatiotemporal distribution characteristics of rainfall erosivity in the Area, with the focus on the annual and inter-annual trends of the rainfall erosivity around seven main weather stations. In 1976-2005, the average annual rainfall erosivity (R) in the Area was from 4389.0 to 8021.0 MJ x mm x hm(-2) x h(-1) x a(-1), being increased first from the northeast to the southwest, reached the peak in the central, and then decreased. The annual rainfall erosivity around the seven main weather stations mostly concentrated in the period from April to October, with the R value increased first from April, reached the highest in June or July, and then decreased. The maximum rainfall erosivity in consecutive three months around each of the seven weather stations accounted for 54.2%-60.7% of the total annual rainfall erosivity. In the study period, the coefficients of variation of the annual rainfall erosivity around the seven main weather stations varied moderately from 0.278 to 0.387, and the tendency rate ranged from -431.1 to 263.5 MJ x mm x hm(-2) x h(-1) x (10 a)(-1). However, the coefficients of tendency did not pass the confidence test with 5% level of significance, and the changes of annual rainfall erosivity showed random fluctuation. The variation degree of monthly rainfall erosivity was larger than the variation of annual rainfall erosivity, but only showed an obvious climate trend in a few months around parts of the weather stations.

  14. Seismic spectral decomposition and analysis based on Wigner–Ville distribution for sandstone reservoir characterization in West Sichuan depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoyang; Liu, Tianyou

    2010-01-01

    Reflections from a hydrocarbon-saturated zone are generally expected to have a tendency to be low frequency. Previous work has shown the application of seismic spectral decomposition for low-frequency shadow detection. In this paper, we further analyse the characteristics of spectral amplitude in fractured sandstone reservoirs with different fluid saturations using the Wigner–Ville distribution (WVD)-based method. We give a description of the geometric structure of cross-terms due to the bilinear nature of WVD and eliminate cross-terms using smoothed pseudo-WVD (SPWVD) with time- and frequency-independent Gaussian kernels as smoothing windows. SPWVD is finally applied to seismic data from West Sichuan depression. We focus our study on the comparison of SPWVD spectral amplitudes resulting from different fluid contents. It shows that prolific gas reservoirs feature higher peak spectral amplitude at higher peak frequency, which attenuate faster than low-quality gas reservoirs and dry or wet reservoirs. This can be regarded as a spectral attenuation signature for future exploration in the study area

  15. Distribution and structure of internal secretory reservoirs on the vegetative organs of Inula helenium L. (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Sulborska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the structure and topography of endogenous secretory tissues of Inula helenium L. By using light and electron microscopy, morphological and anatomical observations of stems, leaves and rhizomes were made. It was shown that in the stems secretory cavities were situated in the vicinity of phloem and xylem bundles. The number of the reservoirs reached its maximum value (34 at shoot flowerig termination, whereas the cavities with the largest diameter were observed at full flowering stage (44.6 µm. In the leaf petioles and midribs, the reservoirs also accompanied the vascular bundles, and their number and size increased along with the growth of the assimilation organs. Observations of the cross sections of the rhizomes revealed the presence of several rings of secretory reservoirs. The measurements of the cavities showed that as a rule the reservoirs with a larger dimension were located in the phelloderm, whereas the smallest ones in the xylem area. The secretory cavities located in the stems and leaves developed by schizogenesis, whereas the rhizome reservoirs were probably formed schizolisygenously. The cells lining the reservoirs formed a one - four-layered epithelium. Observed in TEM, the secretory cells of the mature cavities located in the rhizomes were characterised by the presence of a large central vacuole, whereas the protoplast was largely degraded. Fibrous elements of osmophilic secretion and numerous different coloured vesicles could be distinguished in it. The cell walls formed, from the side of the reservoir lumen, ingrowths into the interior of the epithelial cells. Between the cell wall and the plasmalemma of the glandular cells, a brighter periplasmatic zone with secretory vesicles was observed.

  16. MIB-producing cyanobacteria (Planktothrix sp.) in a drinking water reservoir: distribution and odor producing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming; Yu, Jianwei; Zhang, Junzhi; Chen, Hui; An, Wei; Vogt, Rolf D; Andersen, Tom; Jia, Dongmin; Wang, Jingshi; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    The production of odorant 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) in water bodies by Planktothrix sp. have not been understood very well. Through a four-year investigation in Miyun Reservoir, a huge mesotrophic drinking water reservoir known to have the MIB episodes, we found that the Planktothrix sp. bloomed during September and October causing the high levels of MIB in the reservoir. The concentration of MIB and the biomass of MIB-producing cyanobacteria Planktothrix were measured (n = 887) at different sites and depths during different seasons. The results indicated that the shallow region of the reservoir is the major habitat for Planktothrix sp. due to that the light is able to penetrate down to the relatively high concentrations of nutrients close to the sediments. Quantile regression analysis between Planktothrix biomass and MIB concentration shows that the risk of MIB exceeding the odor threshold (15 ng L⁻¹) in water was as high as 90% when the Planktothrix density was more than 4.0 × 10⁵ cells L⁻¹, while the risk was reduced to 10% when the Planktothrix density remained below 1.6 × 10⁴ cells L⁻¹. This study will improve the understanding of the environmental behaviors of Planktothrix sp., and can provide useful information for better management of drinking water lakes/reservoirs experiencing the taste and odor (T&O) problems caused by deep living cyanobacterial species.

  17. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally different but edaphically similar reactor cooling reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure and the physicochemical characteristics of three reactor cooling reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type were studied during 1978. The three reservoirs differed in thermal alteration resulting from reactor cooling water as follows: (1) considerable heating with lake-wide temperatures >30 0 C, even in winter; (2) a maximal 5 0 C increase occurring in only one of three major arms of the reservoir; and (3) no thermal effluent received during the study period. Considerable spatial and temporal differences in water quality and phytoplankton community structure were observed; however, water temperature independent of other environmental factors (e.g., light and nutrients) was found to be a relatively unimportant variable for explaining phytoplankton periodicity

  18. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally different but edaphically similar reactor cooling reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E W

    1982-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure and the physicochemical characteristics of three reactor cooling reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type were studied during 1978. The three reservoirs differed in thermal alteration resulting from reactor cooling water as follows: (1) considerable heating with lake-wide temperatures >30/sup 0/C, even in winter; (2) a maximal 5/sup 0/C increase occurring in only one of three major arms of the reservoir; and (3) no thermal effluent received during the study period. Considerable spatial and temporal differences in water quality and phytoplankton community structure were observed; however, water temperature independent of other environmental factors (e.g., light and nutrients) was found to be a relatively unimportant variable for explaining phytoplankton periodicity.

  19. Estimating the Permeability of Carbonate Rocks from the Fractal Properties of Moldic Pores using the Kozeny-Carman Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Amosu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir modeling of carbonate rocks requires a proper understanding of the pore space distribution and its relationship to permeability. Using a pigeonhole fractal model we characterize the fractal geometry of moldic pore spaces and extract the fractal dimension. We apply the Kozeny-Carman equation and equations relating the tortuosity and the porosity to the fractal dimension to derive an empirical relationship between permeability and porosity.

  20. Sediment-water interactions affecting dissolved-mercury distributions in Camp Far West Reservoir, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Stewart, A. Robin; Fend, Steven V.; Parcheso, Francis; Moon, Gerald E.; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    2003-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted in April and November 2002 to provide the first direct measurements of the benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micrometer filtered) mercury species (total and methylated forms) between the bottom sediment and water column at three sampling locations within Camp Far West Reservoir, California: one near the Bear River inlet to the reservoir, a second at a mid-reservoir site of comparable depth to the inlet site, and the third at the deepest position in the reservoir near the dam (herein referred to as the inlet, midreservoir and near-dam sites, respectively; Background, Fig. 1). Because of interest in the effects of historic hydraulic mining and ore processing in the Sierra Nevada foothills just upstream of the reservoir, dissolved-mercury species and predominant ligands that often control the mercury speciation (represented by dissolved organic carbon, and sulfides) were the solutes of primary interest. Benthic flux, sometimes referred to as internal recycling, represents the transport of dissolved chemical species between the water column and the underlying sediment. Because of the affinity of mercury to adsorb onto particle surfaces and to form insoluble precipitates (particularly with sulfides), the mass transport of mercury in mining-affected watersheds is typically particle dominated. As these enriched particles accumulate at depositional sites such as reservoirs, benthic processes facilitate the repartitioning, transformation, and transport of mercury in dissolved, biologically reactive forms (dissolved methylmercury being the most bioavailable for trophic transfer). These are the forms of mercury examined in this study. In contrast to typical scientific manuscripts, this report is formatted in a pyramid-like structure to serve the needs of diverse groups who may be interested in reviewing or acquiring information at various levels of technical detail (Appendix 1). The report enables quick transitions between the initial

  1. Quantification of pore size distribution in reservoir rocks using MRI logging: A case study of South Pars Gas Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghojogh, Jalal Neshat; Esmaili, Mohammad; Noruzi-Masir, Behrooz; Bakhshi, Puyan

    2017-12-01

    Pore size distribution (PSD) is an important factor for controlling fluid transport through porous media. The study of PSD can be applicable in areas such as hydrocarbon storage, contaminant transport, prediction of multiphase flow, and analysis of the formation damage by mud infiltration. Nitrogen adsorption, centrifugation method, mercury injection, and X-ray computed tomography are commonly used to measure the distribution of pores. A core sample is occasionally not available because of the unconsolidated nature of reservoirs, high cost of coring operation, and program limitations. Magnetic resonance imaging logging (MRIL) is a proper logging technique that allows the direct measurement of the relaxation time of protons in pore fluids and correlating T 2 distribution to PSD using proper mathematical equations. It is nondestructive and fast and does not require core samples. In this paper, 8 core samples collected from the Dalan reservoir in South Pars Gas Field were studied by processing MRIL data and comparing them by PSD determined in the laboratory. By using the MRIL method, variation in PSD corresponding to the depth for the entire logged interval was determined. Moreover, a detailed mineralogical composition of the reservoir samples related to T 2 distribution was obtained. A good correlation between MRIL and mercury injection data was observed. High degree of similarity was also observed between T 2 distribution and PSD (R 2 = 0.85 to 0.91). Based on the findings from the MRIL method, the obtained values for clay bond water varied between 1E-6 and 1E-3µm, a range that is comprehended from an extra peak on the PSD curve. The frequent pore radius was determined to be 1µm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crustal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  3. Direct simulation of groundwater transit-time distributions using the reservoir theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, David; Perrochet, Pierre

    Groundwater transit times are of interest for the management of water resources, assessment of pollution from non-point sources, and quantitative dating of groundwaters by the use of environmental isotopes. The age of water is the time water has spent in an aquifer since it has entered the system, whereas the transit time is the age of water as it exits the system. Water at the outlet of an aquifer is a mixture of water elements with different transit times, as a consequence of the different flow-line lengths. In this paper, transit-time distributions are calculated by coupling two existing methods, the reservoir theory and a recent age-simulation method. Based on the derivation of the cumulative age distribution over the whole domain, the approach accounts for the whole hydrogeological framework. The method is tested using an analytical example and its applicability illustrated for a regional layered aquifer. Results show the asymmetry and multimodality of the transit-time distribution even in advection-only conditions, due to the aquifer geometry and to the velocity-field heterogeneity. Résumé Les temps de transit des eaux souterraines sont intéressants à connaître pour gérer l'évaluation des ressources en eau dans le cas de pollution à partir de sources non ponctuelles, et aussi pour dater quantitativement les eaux souterraines au moyen des isotopes du milieu. L'âge de l'eau est le temps qu'elle a passé dans un aquifère depuis qu'elle est entrée dans le système, alors que le temps de transit est l'âge de l'eau au moment où elle quitte le système. L'eau à la sortie d'un aquifère est un mélange d'eaux possédant différents temps de transit, du fait des longueurs différentes des lignes de courant suivies. Dans ce papier, les distributions des temps de transit sont calculées en couplant deux méthodes, la théorie du réservoir et une méthode récente de simulation des âges. Basée sur la dérivation de la distribution cumulées des âges sur

  4. [Spatial Distribution of Stable Isotopes in Particle Organic Matters and Sediments from Baishi Reservoirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Shan; Dai, Yu-xin; Zhang, Rong-kun; Li, Dong-ming

    2015-12-01

    Water quality and spatial distribution of stable isotopes in particle organic matters and sediments from Baishi reservoirs were produced in October, 2013. The results revealed that the average concentration of POC, TP and TN were (1.76 ± 0.98), (0.04 ± 0.03) and (1.80 ± 0.08) mg · L⁻¹, respectively. In different water depths, the concentrations of POC and TN in surface were higher than those in deep layer, but the concentration of TP was opposite. The concentrations of POC and TP were reduced gradually from upstream to downstream, but the concentration of TN had no obvious change in horizontal distribution. The δ¹³C and δ ¹⁵N values of small particle organic matters were (-24.6 ± 0.9) per thousand and (4.8 ± 0.4) per thousand, the δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values of large particle organic matters were (-22.5 ± 0.9) per thousand and (6.7 ± 0.5) per thousand, both of which exhibited significant fluctuations. With the δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values in small particle organic matters were different between each other of 4.6 per thousand and 2.7 per thousand, and those in large particle organic matters were different between each other of 3.3 per thousand and 1.8 per thousand. The δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values of sediments were (-24.2 ± 1.2) per thousand and (4.1 ± 0.7) per thousand. The results of correlation analysis indicated that there were positively significantly correlated relationships between the stable isotopes values of large particle organic matters with those of small particle organic matters (P stable isotopes values of particle organic matters with those of sediments (P < 0.05). The δ¹⁵N values of particle organic matters in water surface were higher than those in deep layer. The results of correlation analysis indicated that the δ¹⁵N values of large particle organic matters were positive significantly correlated with the concentration of TN (P < 0.05), and the δ¹⁵N values of particle organic matters were positively significantly

  5. Comparison of Particle-Associated Bacteria from a Drinking Water Treatment Plant and Distribution Reservoirs with Different Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G.; Ling, F. Q.; van der Mark, E. J.; Zhang, X. D.; Knezev, A.; Verberk, J. Q. J. C.; van der Meer, W. G. J.; Medema, G. J.; Liu, W. T.; van Dijk, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of and changes in the suspended particles and the associated bacteria in an unchlorinated drinking water distribution system and its reservoirs with different water sources. The results show that particle-associated bacteria (PAB) were present at a level of 0.8–4.5 × 103 cells ml−1 with a biological activity of 0.01–0.04 ng l−1 ATP. Different PAB communities in the waters produced from different sources were revealed by a 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing analysis. The quantified biomass underestimation due to the multiple cells attached per particle was ≥ 85%. The distribution of the biologically stable water increased the number of cells per particle (from 48 to 90) but had minor effects on the PAB community. Significant changes were observed at the mixing reservoir. Our results show the characteristics of and changes in suspended PAB during distribution, and highlight the significance of suspended PAB in the distribution system, because suspended PAB can lead to a considerable underestimation of biomass, and because they exist as biofilm, which has a greater mobility than pipe-wall biofilm and therefore presents a greater risk, given the higher probability that it will reach the customers’ taps and be ingested. PMID:26832989

  6. Comparison of Particle-Associated Bacteria from a Drinking Water Treatment Plant and Distribution Reservoirs with Different Water Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Ling, F Q; van der Mark, E J; Zhang, X D; Knezev, A; Verberk, J Q J C; van der Meer, W G J; Medema, G J; Liu, W T; van Dijk, J C

    2016-02-02

    This study assessed the characteristics of and changes in the suspended particles and the associated bacteria in an unchlorinated drinking water distribution system and its reservoirs with different water sources. The results show that particle-associated bacteria (PAB) were present at a level of 0.8-4.5 × 10(3) cells ml(-1) with a biological activity of 0.01-0.04 ng l(-1) ATP. Different PAB communities in the waters produced from different sources were revealed by a 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing analysis. The quantified biomass underestimation due to the multiple cells attached per particle was ≥ 85%. The distribution of the biologically stable water increased the number of cells per particle (from 48 to 90) but had minor effects on the PAB community. Significant changes were observed at the mixing reservoir. Our results show the characteristics of and changes in suspended PAB during distribution, and highlight the significance of suspended PAB in the distribution system, because suspended PAB can lead to a considerable underestimation of biomass, and because they exist as biofilm, which has a greater mobility than pipe-wall biofilm and therefore presents a greater risk, given the higher probability that it will reach the customers' taps and be ingested.

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN IN THE BOTTOM SEDIMENTS OF THE WATER RESERVOIR PORAJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Rozpondek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the content of phosphorus and nitrogen in the bottom sediments of the Poraj Reservoir located on the Warta River, along with defining their spatial distribution and the relationship between these elements and organic matter, aluminum and iron. Samples of bottom sediments were collected on the basis of regular measurement grid of 46 points located in the area of the water reservoir Poraj. The collected samples were analyzed in terms of content of following elements, which values are in range: total phosphorus (TP 0,06 – 5,06 g/kg, total nitrogen (TN 0,17 – 9,66 g/kg, organic matter (OM 0,49 - 28,41% of solid content, aluminum (Al 2,44 - 145,15 g/kg and iron (Fe 0,28 - 16,50 g/kg. By using of GIS system, spatial distribution of obtained results of laboratory analyzes were interpolated (Inverse Distance Weighted method was used. On basis of spatial distribution it was noted that in northern part of water reservoir bottom sediments have greater values of TP, TN and OM than in southern part. The study also included calculation of correlation between: OM and TN (n=46, R^2= 0,9335, TN and Fe (n=46, R^2= 0,8782, TN and Al (n=46, R^2= 0,8629, OM and Fe (n=46, R^2= 0,8243, OM and Al (n=46, R^2= 0,7981, TP and Fe (n=46, R^2= 0,7456, TP and Al (n=46, R^2= 0,6209. The presented pilot studies show that the potential content of phosphorus, nitrogen and organic matter in the sediments of the water reservoir Poraj can reach a significant level. The need to plan and carry out further research allowing the evaluation of the properties of the analyzed elements and examining their potential impact on water quality in the tested water reservoir was stated.

  8. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts

  9. Using artificial intelligence to predict permeability from petrographic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maqsood Ali; Adwait Chawathe [New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Centre (Mexico)

    2000-10-01

    Petrographic data collected during thin section analysis can be invaluable for understanding the factors that control permeability distribution. Reliable prediction of permeability is important for reservoir characterization. The petrographic elements (mineralogy, porosity types, cements and clays, and pore morphology) interact with each other uniquely to generate a specific permeability distribution. It is difficult to quantify accurately this interaction and its consequent effect on permeability, emphasizing the non-linear nature of the process. To capture these non-linear interactions, neural networks were used to predict permeability from petrographic data. The neural net was used as a multivariate correlative tool because of its ability to learn the non-linear relationships between multiple input and output variables. The study was conducted on the upper Queen formation called the Shattuck Member (Permian age). The Shattuck Member is composed of very fine-grained arkosic sandstone. The core samples were available from the Sulimar Queen and South Lucky Lake fields located in Chaves County, New Mexico. Nineteen petrographic elements were collected for each permeability value using a combined minipermeameter-petrographic technique. In order to reduce noise and overfitting the permeability model, these petrographic elements were screened, and their control (ranking) with respect to permeability was determined using fuzzy logic. Since the fuzzy logic algorithm provides unbiased ranking, it was used to reduce the dimensionality of the input variables. Based on the fuzzy logic ranking, only the most influential petrographic elements were selected as inputs for permeability prediction. The neural net was trained and tested using data from Well 1-16 in the Sulimar Queen field. Relying on the ranking obtained from the fuzzy logic analysis, the net was trained using the most influential three, five, and ten petrographic elements. A fast algorithm (the scaled conjugate

  10. Lateral Facies and Permeability Changes in Upper Shoreface Sandstones, Berakas Syncline, Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovinda Ovinda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.1.11-20Several outcrops were studied to identify sedimentary facies and to analyze permeability distribution, through which an outcrop analogue for upper shoreface reservoirs can be established. Four facies were identified: upper shoreface, lower shoreface, offshore transition, and tidal ones. Stratigraphic correlation of eleven outcrops indicates that the upper shoreface sandstone is generally clean, well sorted, parallel, and planar cross laminated. The sand becomes thinner and pinches out to the northwest where the mud proportion increases within the sand. Muddier sand was deposited in a relatively low energy upper shoreface setting. The thickness of the upper shoreface reservoir sand generally is 5 m. It decreases to zero over approximately 1.3 km as the sand pinches out to the northwest. To the northeast, the thickness also decreases to 4 m over approximately 4 km. Permeability values are more variable laterally than vertically. The permeability distribution has an obvious relationship to the sedimentary facies and is mainly controlled by the proportion of mud and bioturbation. As the sand pinches out in the northwest, permeability decreases from 590 md to 97 md over 1 km. To the northeast, permeability also decreases to 152 md over approximately 4 km where the sand becomes highly bioturbated. These values indicate that the sands are of good to very good reservoir quality. It appears that there are no major barriers to the lateral flow of fluid within the upper shoreface sandstone.

  11. Notional Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.; Van den Bos, J.P.; Maertens, J.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Different layer design of a rock slope and under layers has a large effect on the strengths on the rock slope itself. In the stability formula developed of VAN DER MEER [1988] this effect is represented by the term Notional Permeability with symbol P. A more open, or permeable, structure underneath

  12. Day-Night Vertical Distribution and Feeding Patterns of Fourth Instar ofChaoborus Larvae in a Neotropical Reservoir (Socuy Reservoir, Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carlos; Zoppi de Roa, Evelyn

    2005-05-01

    The day-night vertical distribution, diel feeding activity and diet of fourth instar of Chaoborus larvae were analyzed in lacustrine zone of a neotropical reservoir which shows seasonally contrasting hypolimnetic oxygen conditions. Larvae stayed in sediment and water bottom during day and ascended to surface during night. Results indicate that feeding activity is limited mainly to the plankton population. Phytoplankton, rotifers or remains of Chaoborus larvae were not found in crops. With the exception of ostracods, all crustacean prey available in the zooplankton occurred in the guts. Ceriodaphnia cornuta and Moina micrura were the most frequent food items (about 75% of occurrence frequency) and were positively selected. The remainder crustacean zooplankton taxa were negatively selected by larvae. The most intense feeding activity in larvae occurred near midnight and sunrise, in dates when the hypolimnion was anoxic. When oxygen was available on the bottom, a higher and not changing diel feeding activity was detected. Our results indicate that vertical migration may promote a spatial separation between larvae and zooplankton, and feeding activity of larvae occurred only when both overlapped.

  13. Distribution and diet of 0+ fish within a canyon-shaped European reservoir in late summer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašek, Mojmír; Kubečka, Jan; Matěna, Josef; Seďa, Jaromír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 2 (2006), s. 178-194 ISSN 1434-2944 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6017201; GA ČR(CZ) GP206/06/P418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : juvenile fish * spatial heterogeneity * freshwater reservoir Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.775, year: 2006

  14. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-01-01

    Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

  15. Effect of pore structure on the seepage characteristics of tight sandstone reservoirs: A case study of Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm reservoirs in the western Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Sima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight sandstone reservoirs are characterized by complex pore structures and strong heterogeneity, and their seepage characteristics are much different from those of conventional sandstone reservoirs. In this paper, the tight sandstone reservoirs of Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm in western Sichuan Basin were analyzed in terms of their pore structures by using the data about physical property, mercury injection and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests. Then, the seepage characteristics and the gas–water two-phase migration mechanisms and distribution of tight sandstone reservoirs with different types of pore structures in the process of hydrocarbon accumulation and development were simulated by combining the relative permeability experiment with the visual microscopic displacement model. It is shown that crotch-like viscous fingering occurs in the process of gas front advancing in reservoirs with different pore structures. The better the pore structure is, the lower the irreducible water saturation is; the higher the gas-phase relative permeability of irreducible water is, the more easily the gas reservoir can be developed. At the late stage of development, the residual gas is sealed in reservoirs in the forms of bypass, cutoff and dead end. In various reservoirs, the interference between gas and water is stronger, so gas and water tends to be produced simultaneously. The sealed gas may reduce the production rate of gas wells significantly, and the existence of water phase may reduce the gas permeability greatly; consequently, the water-bearing low-permeability tight sandstone gas reservoirs reveal serious water production, highly-difficult development and low-recovery percentage at the late stage, which have adverse impacts on the effective production and development of gas wells.

  16. Spatio-temporal distribution of Diaphanosoma brachyurum (Cladocera: Sididae in freshwater reservoir ecosystems: importance of maximum water depth and macrophyte beds for avoidance of fish predation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yun Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In empirical studies, Cladocera is commonly utilized as a primary food source for predators such as fish, thus, predator avoidance are important strategies to sustain their population in freshwater ecosystems. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that water depth is an important factor in determining the spatial distribution of Diaphanosoma brachyurum Liévin, 1848 in response to fish predation. Quarterly monitoring was implemented at three water layers (i.e., water surface and middle and bottom layers in 21 reservoirs located in the southeastern part of South Korea. D. brachyurum individuals were frequently observed at the study sites and exhibited different spatial patterns of distribution in accordance with the maximum depth of the reservoirs. In the reservoirs with a maximum depth of more than 6 m, high densities of D. brachyurum were observed in the bottom layers; however, in the shallower reservoirs (maximum depth <6 m, D. brachyurum were concentrated in the surface layer. Moreover, during additional surveys, we observed a trend in which D. brachyurum densities increased as the maximum depth or macrophyte biomass increased. Gut contents analysis revealed that predatory fishes in each reservoir frequently consumed D. brachyurum; however, the consumption rate abruptly decreased in reservoirs where the maximum depth was more than 11 m or in the shallow reservoirs supporting a macrophyte bed. Interestingly, the reservoirs more than 11-m depth supported high densities of D. brachyurum in the bottom layer and in the surface macrophyte bed. Based on these results, reservoirs with a maximum depth of more than 11 m or those with a macrophyte bed may provide a refuge for D. brachyurum to avoid fish predation. Compared with other cladoceran species, D. brachyurum readily exploits various types of refugia (in this study, the deep layer or surface macrophyte bed, which may help explain why this species is abundant in various types of reservoirs.

  17. The application of SEM in analyzing the damage to the petroleum reservoirs caused by drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Razak Ismail

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to analyze the damage to the potential oil and gas reservoirs due to the invasion of drilling fluid during drilling operation. Two types of rock samples representing low and high permeability were used to stimulate the petroleum reservoirs. Sea water based drilling fluids were used in this study. Detail observations to the rock samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of both permeability restoration and SEM observation showed that severe permeability impairments were obtained for high permeability rock. These results indicate that the relative size of the barite particles and the pore size distribution and characteristics of the formation play an important role in determining the damage caused by the drilling fluids

  18. Distribution and geochemistry of selected trace elements in the Sacramento River near Keswick Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Taylor, Howard E.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heavy metals from the Iron Mountain Mines (IMM) Superfund site on the upper Sacramento River is examined using data from water and bed sediment samples collected during 1996-97. Relative to surrounding waters, aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, thallium, zinc and the rare-earth elements (REE) were all present in high concentrations in effluent from Spring Creek Reservoir (SCR), which enters into the Sacramento River in the Spring Creek Arm of Keswick Reservoir. SCR was constructed in part to regulate the flow of acidic, metal-rich waters draining the IMM Superfund site. Although virtually all of these metals exist in SCR in the dissolved form, upon entering Keswick Reservoir they at least partially converted via precipitation and/or adsorption to the particulate phase. In spite of this, few of the metals settled out; instead the vast majority was transported colloidally down the Sacramento River at least to Bend Bridge, 67. km from Keswick Dam.The geochemical influence of IMM on the upper Sacramento River was variable, chiefly dependent on the flow of Spring Creek. Although the average flow of the Sacramento River at Keswick Dam is 250m 3/s (cubic meters per second), even flows as low as 0.3m 3/s from Spring Creek were sufficient to account for more than 15% of the metals loading at Bend Bridge, and these proportions increased with increasing Spring Creek flow.The dissolved proportion of the total bioavailable load was dependent on the element but steadily decreased for all metals, from near 100% in Spring Creek to values (for some elements) of less than 1% at Bend Bridge; failure to account for the suspended sediment load in assessments of the effect of metals transport in the Sacramento River can result in estimates which are low by as much as a factor of 100. ?? 2012.

  19. Mercury distribution in different tissues and trophic levels of fish from a tropical reservoir, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Kasper

    Full Text Available Concentrations of organic (OrgHg and inorganic mercury (InorgHg were assessed in different fish tissues (liver, muscle, kidney, gut and gonads and trophic levels collected in an impacted tropical reservoir in southeastern Brazil. Organic mercury concentrations in muscle were remarkably higher in the carnivorous species Hoplias malabaricus and Oligosarcus hepsetus. The ratios of OrgHg in relation to total mercury (%OrgHg in muscle also varied according to the species trophic level: 93% for carnivores, 84% for omnivores, 73% for algivores/planktivores and 58% for detritivores. The %OrgHg in the gut tissue of carnivores (78% was much higher than that found in omnivores (30%, possibly reflecting a process of trophic biomagnification in the reservoir. On the other hand, the InorgHg concentrations in muscle decreased with the trophic level increase, suggesting that this form of mercury did not biomagnify through the food web. Gonads contained the least total mercury, and approximately all of this mercury was represented by the organic form (83 to 98%. The kidney and the liver of all fish species contained less than 50% OrgHg. We suggest that the low %OrgHg in the liver is related to different capacities or strategies of OrgHg detoxification by the fish.

  20. Seasonal Distribution of Phytoplankton in Riwada Reservoir, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi KAPARAPU

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with seasonal variations, correlation coefficient and biodiversity indices of phytoplankton during April 2011 to March 2012 in the Riwada reservoir, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. Sampling was performed at five stations during pre-monsoon, monsoon and post monsoon. There were a total of 57 genera belonging to four major groups i.e., Chlorophyceae (27 genera, Bacillariophyceae (14 genera, Cyanophyceae (13 genera and Euglenophyceae (three genera. Maximum and minimum total phytoplankton population and percentages were recorded at station three in pre monsoon and at station two during monsoon. The maximum and minimum species richness (Menhinick index R2 were found to be 1.29 at station one and 1.10 at station three respectively. Maximum and minimum species diversity (H1 were found at station four (3.98 and station two (3.71. Maximum species evenness was recorded at stations one, being four and five; minimum species evenness was recorded at station two. Correlation coefficient matrix indicated significant positive relationship with water temperature, pH, transparency, biological oxygen demand and chlorides, negative relationship with electric conductivity, total solids, total dissolved solids, total hardness, dissolved oxygen, nitrates, sulphates and phosphates of water. The diversity indices showed that the reservoir have a well balanced phytoplankton community.

  1. MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Fengjun Zhang; Yannong Dong; Jan Arild Skjervheim; Ning Liu

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. But while the volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade, it is not yet possible to make use of all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. The goal of this project is to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem is necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management. Facies (defined here as regions of relatively uniform petrophysical properties) are common features of all reservoirs. Because the flow properties of the various facies can vary greatly, knowledge of the location of facies boundaries is of utmost importance for the prediction of reservoir performance and for the optimization of reservoir management. When the boundaries between facies are fairly well known, but flow properties are poorly known, the average properties for all facies can be determined using traditional techniques. Traditional history matching honors dynamic data by adjusting petrophysical properties in large areas, but in the process of adjusting the reservoir model ignores the static data and often results in implausible reservoir

  2. Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong [Univ. of Petroleum Changping, Beijing (China)

    1997-08-01

    Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

  3. Occurrence and distribution characteristics of fluids in tight sandstone reservoirs in the Shilijiahan zone, northern Ordos Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongqiang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available High-yield gas layers, low-yield gas layers and (gas bearing water layers of Upper Paleozoic coexist in the Shilijiahan zone in the northern Ordos Basin, but gas–water distribution characteristics, laws and influence factors are not understood well, so the exploration and development of natural gas in this zone are restricted. In this paper, statistical analysis was carried out on the data of Upper Paleozoic formation water in this zone, e.g. salinity, pH value and ion concentration. It is shown that the formation water in this zone is of CaCl2 type. Then, the origin, types, controlling factors and spatial distribution characteristics of formation water were figured out by using core, mud logging, well logging and testing data, combined with the classification and evaluation results of geochemical characteristics of formation water. Besides, the logging identification chart of gas, water and dry layers in this zone was established. Finally, the occurrence and distribution laws of reservoir fluids were defined. The formation water of CaCl2 type indicates a good sealing capacity in this zone, which is favorable for natural gas accumulation. It is indicated that the reservoir fluids in this zone exist in the state of free water, capillary water and irreducible water. Free water is mainly distributed in the west of this zone, irreducible water in the east, and capillary water in the whole zone. The logging identification chart has been applied in many wells in this zone like Well Jin 86. The identification result is basically accordant with the gas testing result. It is verified that gas and water layers can be identified effectively based on this logging identification chart.

  4. Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

    1997-08-01

    A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

  5. Composition, distribution, and characterization of suspected endocrine-disrupting pesticides in Beijing GuanTing Reservoir (GTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Nandong; Xu, Xiaobai

    2006-05-01

    GuanTing Reservoir (GTR) is one of two main water resources for the agriculture, industry, and living uses of Beijing (China). As a result of extensive pollution over the last few decades (particularly the 1980s), the reservoir has not supplied potable water to Beijing city since 1997. Composition, distribution, and characterization of 31 suspected endocrine-disrupting pesticides in surface water, pore water, and surface sediments from the reservoir are reported in this study. An analytical procedure based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) technology and capillary gas chromatography with electron-capture detection has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the 31 suspected endocrine-disrupting pesticides including the compounds hexachlorocyclohexane, cyclodiene, diphenyl aliphatic, chlordane, and other selected pesticides (hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor, endrin aldehyde, hepachlor epoxide, dicofol, acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, chlorpyriphos, nitrofen, trifluralin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin). The result shows that the pesticide pollution is moderate in GTR and its tributaries, although pesticide residue values in a few sites are quite high when considering their endocrine-disrupting effects and chronic health effects. Among the analyzed pesticides, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT, beta-HCH, endosulfan sulfate, and aldrin were the most abundant pesticides in water while o,p'-DOT, delta-HCH, beta-HCH, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, and endosulfan sulfate were the most abundant in sediment. The variation in concentration of pesticides among sites can be expected to be caused by several factors such as contaminants in the rivers and drainage of contaminated water from the surrounding agricultural fields. To reduce exposure to these endocrine-disrupting compounds, the abundant current use of pesticides in the area should be minimized. Regular monitoring is needed to manage the environmental hazards due to these pesticides.

  6. A reservoir simulation approach for modeling of naturally fractured reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohammadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the Warren and Root model proposed for the simulation of naturally fractured reservoir was improved. A reservoir simulation approach was used to develop a 2D model of a synthetic oil reservoir. Main rock properties of each gridblock were defined for two different types of gridblocks called matrix and fracture gridblocks. These two gridblocks were different in porosity and permeability values which were higher for fracture gridblocks compared to the matrix gridblocks. This model was solved using the implicit finite difference method. Results showed an improvement in the Warren and Root model especially in region 2 of the semilog plot of pressure drop versus time, which indicated a linear transition zone with no inflection point as predicted by other investigators. Effects of fracture spacing, fracture permeability, fracture porosity, matrix permeability and matrix porosity on the behavior of a typical naturally fractured reservoir were also presented.

  7. Coupling fracture facies with in situ permeability measurements to generate stochastic simulations of tight carbonate aquifer properties: example from the Lower Cretaceous aquifer, Northern Provence, SE France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Pierre-Olivier; Guglielmi, Yves; Viseur, Sophie; Lamarche, Juliette

    2015-04-01

    The relationships between fracture facies and permeability distribution have been explored using a well-constrained 3D implicit structural model of hemipelagic low porosity/low permeability carbonate from the Northern Provence region, SE France. Fracture and permeability facies were determined using an extensive dataset of 99 hydrogeological boreholes wells. Data processing was undertaken using a step-by-step approach, involving: i) identification of the fracture facies based on well logs detailing structure and stratigraphy ; ii) determination of permeability facies from the a priori correlation between the dimension of the hydraulic radius of influence (deduced from slug test analyses) and the type of reservoir heterogeneity (fissure, fracture, fault zone, etc.); iii) three dimensional plot of fracture and permeability facies in the geological model using a variographic analysis of data. Thirty-three sequential indicator simulations (SIS) were realised on both fracture and permeability facies. Finally, a connectivity algorithm was developed to compute the probability of connection between selected infiltration areas and the major aquifer springs via moderate-to high-permeability geological bodies. Key results are: i) fault zones have a greater role in controlling permeability facies distribution than on fracture facies repartition; ii) there is little correlation between permeability and fracture facies distributions ; iii) connectivity results highlight the compartmentalization of aquifers in the Cadarache area, the extensions of permeable geological bodies being limited by the N130 faults.

  8. Coupling fracture facies with in-situ permeability measurements to generate stochastic simulations of tight carbonate aquifer properties: Example from the Lower Cretaceous aquifer, Northern Provence, SE France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Pierre-Olivier; Guglielmi, Yves; Viseur, Sophie; Lamarche, Juliette; Bildstein, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    The relationships between fracture facies and permeability distribution have been explored using a well-constrained 3D implicit structural model of hemipelagic low porosity/low permeability carbonate from the Northern Provence region, SE France. Fracture and permeability facies were determined using an extensive dataset of 99 hydrogeological wells. Data processing was undertaken using a step-by-step approach, involving: (i) identification of the fracture facies based on well logs detailing structure and stratigraphy; (ii) determination of permeability facies from the a priori correlation between the dimension of the hydraulic radius of influence (deduced from slug test analyses) and the type of reservoir heterogeneity (fissure, fracture, fault zone, etc.); (iii) three dimensional plot of fracture and permeability facies in the geological model using a variographic analysis of data. Thirty-three sequential indicator simulations (SIS) based on geostatistic analyses were realised on both fracture and permeability facies. Finally, a connectivity algorithm was developed to compute the probability of connection between selected infiltration areas and the major aquifer springs via moderate- to high-permeability geological bodies. Key results are: (i) fault zones have a greater role in controlling permeability facies distribution than on fracture facies repartition; (ii) there is little correlation between permeability and fracture facies distributions; (iii) connectivity results highlight the compartmentalisation of aquifers in the Cadarache area, the extensions of permeable geological bodies being limited by the N130 faults.

  9. Determination of the vertical distribution and areal of the composition in volatile oil and/or gas condensate reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Santos, Nicolas; Ortiz Cancino, Olga Patricia; Barrios Ortiz, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The compositional variation in vertical and areal direction due to gravitational and thermal effects plays an important role in the determination of the original reserves in-situ and in the selection of the operation scheme for volatile oil and/or gas condensate reservoirs. In this work we presented the mathematical formulation of the thermodynamic behavior experienced by compositional fluids, such as volatile oil and/or gas condensate, under the influence of the mentioned effects (gravitational and thermal), which was implemented in a software tool, this tool determine the compositional variation in vertical direction and, in addition, it allows to know the saturation pressure variation in the hydrocarbon column and the location of the gas-oil contact. With the obtained results, product of the use of this tool, was developed a methodology to obtain one first approach of the compositional variation in areal direction to obtain compositional spatial distribution (iso composition maps) in the reservoir, for components like the methane, which experiences the greater variations. These iso composition maps allow to determine the location of the hydrocarbon deposits, in such a way that the production strategies can be selected and be applied to maximize the recovery, such as in fill wells, perforation of new zones, EOR processes, etc

  10. Performance evaluation on water-producing gas wells based on gas & water relative permeability curves: A case study of tight sandstone gas reservoirs in the Sulige gas field, Ordos Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuegang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An outstanding issue in the oil and gas industry is how to evaluate quantitatively the influences of water production on production performance of gas wells. Based on gas–water flow theories, therefore, a new method was proposed in this paper to evaluate quantitatively the production performance of water-producing gas wells by using gas & water relative permeability curves after a comparative study was conducted thoroughly. In this way, quantitative evaluation was performed on production capacity, gas production, ultimate cumulative gas production and recovery factor of water-producing gas wells. Then, a case study was carried out of the tight sandstone gas reservoirs with strong heterogeneity in the Sulige gas field, Ordos Basin. This method was verified in terms of practicability and reliability through a large amount of calculation based on the actual production performance data of various gas wells with different volumes of water produced. Finally, empirical formula and charts were established for water-producing gas wells in this field to quantitatively evaluate their production capacity, gas production, ultimate cumulative gas production and recovery factor in the conditions of different water–gas ratios. These formula and charts provide technical support for the field application and dissemination of the method. Study results show that water production is serious in the west of this field with water–gas ratio varying in a large range. If the average water–gas ratio is 1.0 (or 2.0 m3/104 m3, production capacity, cumulative gas production and recovery factor of gas wells will be respectively 24.4% (or 40.2%, 24.4% (or 40.2% and 17.4% (or 33.2%.

  11. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. K. Pande

    1998-10-29

    Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

  12. Tectonic characteristics and distribution of Putaohua oil Reservoir in Changchang area of Songliao basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yan; Liu, Dameng

    2018-01-01

    Since the Late Jurassic in the Songliao Basin, the tectonic movement of Yanshan and Heshan has experienced a lot of tectonic movement. The tectonic activity has a clearer display on the seismic profile. The tectonic deformation is generally weak in the east, Features. The regional structure of the Chaochang area is located on the Chaoyangou terrace and Changchunling anticline belt in the central depression of the northern part of the Songliao Basin, and across the two tectonic units of the Chaoyanggou terrace and Changchunling anticline. The study area is characterized by a low tectonic pattern in the southwest and northwest. The highest point is located near the Chang72 well in the Changchunling anticline. The elevation is about -100 m, and the lowest point is the Zhou50 Well near the depth of about - 1750 m. Based on the technical means such as splicing, closed difference correction, horizon calibration, seismic interpretation and attribute extraction of 9 seismic blocks in the study area, the seismic interpretation of the top of the Putaohua reservoir is completed, and the next step Style, tectonic evolution characteristics, oil and gas accumulation law and other research work to lay the foundation.

  13. Levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs were investigated in water, sediments, suspended sediments and biofilms in Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR, China. Results showed that dissolved bioavailable PBDEs in water of TGR collected with semipermeable membrane device (SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs were very low in the range of n.d. to 811 pg/g lipid and the detected compounds were mainly low molecular BDEs such as BDE-15, 17, 28, 47, 49, 66, 99 and 100. The PBDE levels in the sediment core collected near the dam were also very low in the range of 84–300 pg/g dw and the detected compounds were mainly large molecular BDEs such as BDE-196, 197, 206, 207 and 208. In suspended sediments and biofilms, the levels of PBDEs ranged from 298 to 52,843 pg/g dw and the detected compounds were also mainly large molecular BDEs such as BDE- 196, 197, 201, 203, 206, 207, 208 and 209. The dominant compound was BDE-209 which accounted for more than 90% of the total BDEs. Therefore, large molecular BDEs tended to be attached on fine particles. The vertical profile of BDEs on suspended sediments (SS showed that SSs in the middle depth of water contained high level of BDE-209. The phenomenon indicated that most of BDE-209 did not settle into the sediment in front of the dam, instead transported further to downstream.

  14. Genesis and distribution pattern of carbonate cements in lacustrine deep-water gravity-flow sandstone reservoirs in the third member of the Shahejie Formation in the Dongying Sag, Jiyang Depression, Eastern China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Tian; Cao, Yingchang; Friis, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The lacustrine deep-water gravity-flow sandstone reservoirs in the third member of the Shahejie Formation are the main exploration target for hydrocarbons in the Dongying Sag, Eastern China. Carbonate cementation is responsible for much of the porosity and permeability reduction in the lacustrine...

  15. Distribution and prevalence of Cytauxzoon felis in bobcats (Lynx rufus), the natural reservoir, and other wild felids in thirteen states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Barbara C; Murphy, Staci M; Patton, Laura L; Shock, Philip M; Olfenbuttel, Colleen; Beringer, Jeff; Prange, Suzanne; Grove, Daniel M; Peek, Matt; Butfiloski, Joseph W; Hughes, Daymond W; Lockhart, J Mitchell; Bevins, Sarah N; VandeWoude, Sue; Crooks, Kevin R; Nettles, Victor F; Brown, Holly M; Peterson, David S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2011-02-10

    Cytauxzoon felis, a protozoan parasite of wild and domestic felids, is the causative agent of cytauxzoonosis in domestic and some exotic felids in the United States. The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is the natural reservoir for this parasite, but other felids such as Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryii) and domestic cats may maintain long-term parasitemias and serve as reservoirs. Experimentally, two tick species, Dermacentor variabilis and Amblyomma americanum, have demonstrated the ability to transmit C. felis. These two tick species have overlapping distributions throughout much of the southeastern United States. The objective of the current study was to determine the distribution and prevalence of C. felis in free-ranging bobcat populations from 13 states including California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and West Virginia. These states were selected because of differential vector presence; D. variabilis is present in each of these states except for the region of Colorado sampled and A. americanum is currently known to be present only in a subset of these states. Blood or spleen samples from 696 bobcats were tested for C. felis infection by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay which targeted the first ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1). Significantly higher prevalences of C. felis were detected from Missouri (79%, n=39), North Carolina (63%, n=8), Oklahoma (60%, n=20), South Carolina (57%, n=7), Kentucky (55%, n=74), Florida (44%, n=45), and Kansas (27%, n=41) compared with Georgia (9%, n=159), North Dakota (2.4%, n=124), Ohio (0%, n=19), West Virginia (0%, n=37), California (0%, n=26), and Colorado (0%, n=67). In addition to bobcats, seven cougars (Puma concolor) from Georgia, Louisiana, and North Dakota and one serval (Leptailurus serval) from Louisiana were tested for C. felis. Only one cougar from Louisiana was PCR positive, which represents the first

  16. Reservoir characterization of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of open hole well log analyses, core analyses and pressure transient analyses was used for reservoir characterization of the Mt. Simon sandstone. Characterization of the injection interval provides the basis for a geologic model to support the baseline MVA model, specify pressure design requirements of surface equipment, develop completion strategies, estimate injection rates, and project the CO2 plume distribution.The Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone overlies the Precambrian granite basement of the Illinois Basin. The Mt. Simon is relatively thick formation exceeding 800 meters in some areas of the Illinois Basin. In the deeper part of the basin where sequestration is likely to occur at depths exceeding 1000 m, horizontal core permeability ranges from less than 1 ?? 10-12 cm 2 to greater than 1 ?? 10-8 cm2. Well log and core porosity can be up to 30% in the basal Mt. Simon reservoir. For modeling purposes, reservoir characterization includes absolute horizontal and vertical permeability, effective porosity, net and gross thickness, and depth. For horizontal permeability, log porosity was correlated with core. The core porosity-permeability correlation was improved by using grain size as an indication of pore throat size. After numerous attempts to identify an appropriate log signature, the calculated cementation exponent from Archie's porosity and resistivity relationships was used to identify which porosity-permeability correlation to apply and a permeability log was made. Due to the relatively large thickness of the Mt. Simon, vertical permeability is an important attribute to understand the distribution of CO2 when the injection interval is in the lower part of the unit. Only core analyses and specifically designed pressure transient tests can yield vertical permeability. Many reservoir flow models show that 500-800 m from the injection well most of the CO2 migrates upward depending on the magnitude of the vertical permeability and CO2 injection

  17. Short-term thermal stratification and partial overturning events in a warm polymictic reservoir: effects on distribution of phytoplankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RM. Santos

    Full Text Available In lentic freshwater ecosystems, patterns of thermal stratification play a considerable part in determining the population dynamics of phytoplankton. In this study we investigated how these thermal patterns and the associated hydrodynamic processes affect the vertical distribution of phytoplankton during two consecutive diel cycles in a warm polymictic urban reservoir in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were taken and physical, chemical and biological data collected at half-meter intervals of depth along a water column at a fixed site, every 3 hours throughout the 48-hour period. Two events of stratification, followed by deepening of the thermocline occurred during the study period and led to changes in the vertical distribution of phytoplankton populations. Aphanocapsa delicatissima Nägeli was the single dominant species throughout the 48-hour period. In the second diel cycle, the density gradient induced by temperature differences avoided the sedimentation of Mougeotia sp. C. Agardh to the deepest layers. On the other hand, Pseudanabaena galeata Böcher remained in the 4.0-5.5 m deep layer. The thermal structure of the water was directly affected by two meteorological factors: air temperature and wind speed. Changes in the cell density and vertical distribution of the phytoplankton were controlled by the thermal and hydrodynamic events.

  18. Permeability measuremens of brazilian Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rogério da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of Brazilian Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora wood was measured in a custom build gas analysis chamber in order to determine which species could be successfully treated with preservatives. Liquid permeability was tested using an emulsion of Neen oil and a control of distillated water. Air was used to test the gas phase permeability. For both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora, the longitudinal permeability of gas was shown to be about twice as great as the liquid phase permeability. No radial permeability was observed for either wood. The permeability of air and water through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was greater than that through the sapwood of Eucalyptus citriodora. The permeability of neen oil preservative through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was also greater than through the sapwood of E. Citradora, but the difference was not statistically significant. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed that the distribution and obstruction in the vessels could be correlated with observed permeability properties. Irrespective of the causes of differences in permeability between the species, the fluid phase flux through the sapwood of both species was significant, indicating that both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora could be successfully treated with wood preservative.

  19. Variation in angler distribution and catch rates of stocked rainbow trout in a small reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Brian S; Martin, Dustin R; Chizinski, Christopher J; Pope, Kevin L

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal relationship of catch rates and angler party location for two days following a publicly announced put-and-take stocking of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Catch rates declined with time since stocking and distance from stocking. We hypothesized that opportunity for high catch rates would cause anglers to fish near the stocking location and disperse with time, however distance between angler parties and stocking was highly variable at any given time. Spatially explicit differences in catch rates can affect fishing quality. Further research could investigate the variation between angler distribution and fish distribution within a waterbody.

  20. pressure distribution in a layered reservoir with gas-cap and bottom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... dimensionless pressure and dimensionless pressure derivative plots, respectively, when the effects ... effects of layering on pressure distribution of a two- ..... Journal of Pet. Tech., Oct. 1974, Page. 1178-1186. 2. Ehlig-Economides, C.A., and Joseph, J.A. A New. Test for Determination of Individual Layer ...

  1. Study on temperature distribution along wellbore of fracturing horizontal wells in oil reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Cai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of distributed temperature sensors (DTS to monitor producing zones of horizontal well through a real-time measurement of a temperature profile is becoming increasingly popular. Those parameters, such as flow rate along wellbore, well completion method, skin factor, are potentially related to the information from DTS. Based on mass-, momentum-, and energy-balance equations, this paper established a coupled model to study on temperature distribution along wellbore of fracturing horizontal wells by considering skin factor in order to predict wellbore temperature distribution and analyze the factors influencing the wellbore temperature profile. The models presented in this paper account for heat convective, fluid expansion, heat conduction, and viscous dissipative heating. Arriving temperature and wellbore temperature curves are plotted by computer iterative calculation. The non-perforated and perforated sections show different temperature distribution along wellbore. Through the study on the sensitivity analysis of skin factor and flow rate, we come to the conclusion that the higher skin factor generates larger temperature increase near the wellbore, besides, temperature along wellbore is related to both skin factors and flow rate. Temperature response type curves show that the larger skin factor we set, the less temperature augmenter from toe to heel could be. In addition, larger flow rate may generate higher wellbore temperature.

  2. QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND IMPROVED RECOVERY: APPLICATION TO HEAVY OIL SANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Castle; Fred J. Molz; Ronald W. Falta; Cynthia L. Dinwiddie; Scott E. Brame; Robert A. Bridges

    2002-10-30

    Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity has the potential to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involves application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation, particularly in heavy oil sands. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field. Observations of lateral variability and vertical sequences observed in Temblor Formation outcrops has led to a better understanding of reservoir geology in West Coalinga Field. Based on the characteristics of stratigraphic bounding surfaces in the outcrops, these surfaces were identified in the subsurface using cores and logs. The bounding surfaces were mapped and then used as reference horizons in the reservoir modeling. Facies groups and facies tracts were recognized from outcrops and cores of the Temblor Formation and were applied to defining the stratigraphic framework and facies architecture for building 3D geological models. The following facies tracts were recognized: incised valley, estuarine, tide- to wave-dominated shoreline, diatomite, and subtidal. A new minipermeameter probe, which has important advantages over previous methods of measuring outcrop permeability, was developed during this project. The device, which measures permeability at the distal end of a small drillhole, avoids surface weathering effects and provides a superior seal compared with previous methods for measuring outcrop permeability. The new probe was used successfully for obtaining a high-quality permeability data set from an outcrop in southern Utah

  3. Static reservoir modeling of the Bahariya reservoirs for the oilfields development in South Umbarka area, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed I.; Metwalli, Farouk I.; Mesilhi, El Sayed I.

    2018-02-01

    3D static reservoir modeling of the Bahariya reservoirs using seismic and wells data can be a relevant part of an overall strategy for the oilfields development in South Umbarka area (Western Desert, Egypt). The seismic data is used to build the 3D grid, including fault sticks for the fault modeling, and horizon interpretations and surfaces for horizon modeling. The 3D grid is the digital representation of the structural geology of Bahariya Formation. When we got a reasonably accurate representation, we fill the 3D grid with facies and petrophysical properties to simulate it, to gain a more precise understanding of the reservoir properties behavior. Sequential Indicator Simulation (SIS) and Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGS) techniques are the stochastic algorithms used to spatially distribute discrete reservoir properties (facies) and continuous reservoir properties (shale volume, porosity, and water saturation) respectively within the created 3D grid throughout property modeling. The structural model of Bahariya Formation exhibits the trapping mechanism which is a fault assisted anticlinal closure trending NW-SE. This major fault breaks the reservoirs into two major fault blocks (North Block and South Block). Petrophysical models classified Lower Bahariya reservoir as a moderate to good reservoir rather than Upper Bahariya reservoir in terms of facies, with good porosity and permeability, low water saturation, and moderate net to gross. The Original Oil In Place (OOIP) values of modeled Bahariya reservoirs show hydrocarbon accumulation in economic quantity, considering the high structural dips at the central part of South Umbarka area. The powerful of 3D static modeling technique has provided a considerable insight into the future prediction of Bahariya reservoirs performance and production behavior.

  4. Distribution of Aeromonas hydrophila in a South Carolina cooling reservoir. [Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Gorden, R.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Esch, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Par Pond is a thermally enriched monomictic southeastern lake which receives heated effluent from a production nuclear reactor. Fish populations in the lake have lesions of epizooty from which Aeromonas spp. are readily isolated. Distribution and population densities of Aeromonas in the water column were measured along an oxygen and temperature gradient. Greater population densities of Aeromonas occurred below the oxygen chemocline when the lake was stratified. Survival of A. hydrophila under in situ conditions in both epilimnetic and hypolimnetic waters was determined using polycarbonate membrane diffusion chambers, during two separate reactor operating conditions. Survival levels of pure cultures of A. hydrophila corresponded to the distribution patterns of the naturally occurring Aeromonas-like populations. The greater survival of A. hydrophila below the chemocline when the reactor was in full operation suggests that the fish populations may be exposed to Aeromonas for a longer period of time than when the reactor is not operating.

  5. Mathematical simulation of oil reservoir properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESQIE-UPALM-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met., Edif. ' Z' y Edif. 6 planta baja., Mexico City c.p. 07300 (Mexico)], E-mail: adalop123@mailbanamex.com; Romero, A.; Chavez, F. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESQIE-UPALM-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met., Edif. ' Z' y Edif. 6 planta baja., Mexico City c.p. 07300 (Mexico); Carrillo, F. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN, Altamira Tamaulipas) (Mexico); Lopez, S. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo - Molecular Engineering Researcher (Mexico)

    2008-11-15

    The study and computational representation of porous media properties are very important for many industries where problems of fluid flow, percolation phenomena and liquid movement and stagnation are involved, for example, in building constructions, ore processing, chemical industries, mining, corrosion sciences, etc. Nevertheless, these kinds of processes present a noneasy behavior to be predicted and mathematical models must include statistical analysis, fractal and/or stochastic procedures to do it. This work shows the characterization of sandstone berea core samples which can be found as a porous media (PM) in natural oil reservoirs, rock formations, etc. and the development of a mathematical algorithm for simulating the anisotropic characteristics of a PM based on a stochastic distribution of some of their most important properties like porosity, permeability, pressure and saturation. Finally a stochastic process is used again to simulated the topography of an oil reservoir.

  6. Towards a better understanding of small scale distribution of littoral age-0 fish in a deep-valley reservoir: day or night surveys?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, Michal; Vašek, Mojmír; Peterka, Jiří; Draštík, Vladislav; Čech, Martin; Jůza, Tomáš; Muška, Milan; Matěna, Josef; Kubečka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 728, č. 1 (2014), s. 125-139 ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : spatial distribution * habitat use * juvenile fish * littoral zone * deep reservoirs * electrofishing Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.275, year: 2014

  7. Application of multi-agent simulation to evaluate the influence of reservoir operation strategies on the distribution of water availability in the semi-arid Jaguaribe basin, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oel, P.R.; Krol, Martinus S.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2012-01-01

    Studying the processes responsible for the distribution of water resources in a river basin over space and time is of great importance for spatial planning. In this study a multi-agent simulation approach is applied for exploring the influence of alternative reservoir operation strategies on water

  8. APPLICATION OF INTEGRATED RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Bergeron; Tom Blasingame; Louis Doublet; Mohan Kelkar; George Freeman; Jeff Callard; David Moore; David Davies; Richard Vessell; Brian Pregger; Bill Dixon; Bryce Bezant

    2000-03-01

    Reservoir performance and characterization are vital parameters during the development phase of a project. Infill drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to characterization does not optimize development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, especially carbonate reservoirs. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: (1) large, discontinuous pay intervals; (2) vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties; (3) low reservoir energy; (4) high residual oil saturation; and (5) low recovery efficiency. The operational problems they encounter in these types of reservoirs include: (1) poor or inadequate completions and stimulations; (2) early water breakthrough; (3) poor reservoir sweep efficiency in contacting oil throughout the reservoir as well as in the nearby well regions; (4) channeling of injected fluids due to preferential fracturing caused by excessive injection rates; and (5) limited data availability and poor data quality. Infill drilling operations only need target areas of the reservoir which will be economically successful. If the most productive areas of a reservoir can be accurately identified by combining the results of geological, petrophysical, reservoir performance, and pressure transient analyses, then this ''integrated'' approach can be used to optimize reservoir performance during secondary and tertiary recovery operations without resorting to ''blanket'' infill drilling methods. New and emerging technologies such as geostatistical modeling, rock typing, and rigorous decline type curve analysis can be used to quantify reservoir quality and the degree of interwell communication. These results can then be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations. The application of reservoir surveillance techniques to identify additional reservoir ''pay'' zones

  9. Dielectric permeability tensor and linear waves in spin-1/2 quantum kinetics with non-trivial equilibrium spin-distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.; Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2017-11-01

    A consideration of waves propagating parallel to the external magnetic field is presented. The dielectric permeability tensor is derived from the quantum kinetic equations with non-trivial equilibrium spin-distribution functions in the linear approximation on the amplitude of wave perturbations. It is possible to consider the equilibrium spin-distribution functions with nonzero z-projection proportional to the difference of the Fermi steps of electrons with the chosen spin direction, while x- and y-projections are equal to zero. It is called the trivial equilibrium spin-distribution functions. In the general case, x- and y-projections of the spin-distribution functions are nonzero which is called the non-trivial regime. A corresponding equilibrium solution is found in Andreev [Phys. Plasmas 23, 062103 (2016)]. The contribution of the nontrivial part of the spin-distribution function appears in the dielectric permeability tensor in the additive form. It is explicitly found here. A corresponding modification in the dispersion equation for the transverse waves is derived. The contribution of the nontrivial part of the spin-distribution function in the spectrum of transverse waves is calculated numerically. It is found that the term caused by the nontrivial part of the spin-distribution function can be comparable with the classic terms for the relatively small wave vectors and frequencies above the cyclotron frequency. In a majority of regimes, the extra spin caused term dominates over the spin term found earlier, except the small frequency regime, where their contributions in the whistler spectrum are comparable. A decrease of the left-hand circularly polarized wave frequency, an increase of the high-frequency right-hand circularly polarized wave frequency, and a decrease of frequency changing by an increase of frequency at the growth of the wave vector for the whistler are found. A considerable decrease of the spin wave frequency is found either. It results in an

  10. [Analysis of nitrogen distribution characters and their sources of the major input rivers of Three Gorges Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; Cao, Cheng-Jin; Qin, Yan-Wen; Huang, Min-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    According to the survey conducted from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2005, the seasonal characters of nitrogen in the water of input rivers of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) were discussed, and the forms and distributions of nitrogen among three major input rivers (Changjiang river, Jialingjiang river and Wujiang river) were studied. The results indicate that some primary hydrologic values of input rivers have seasonal characters, and they are in the danger range, which might bring algal bloom. The average contents per year of total nitrogen are 1.55-2.15 mg/L in the three monitor sections of input rivers of TGR, and Wulong monitor section is more severe than the others. The contents of total nitrogen in abundant water period are much higher than them in low water period, which displays the nonpoint source pollution has far-reaching influence upon total nitrogen. The total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) is the major form of total nitrogen and further nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) is dominant accounting for 70% or more of DIN. Ammoniacal nitrogen is the uppermost input form of nitrogen pollution of input rivers of TGR. Ammoniacal nitrogen was oxidated to nitroso-nitrogen, and then it was oxidated to nitrate nitrogen using up a lot of dissolved oxygen of water. Nitrate nitrogen sources include agricultural runoff, city pollution water, city runoff and slow-releasing from submersed soil, whenas nitrogen-ammonia (NH4(+)-N) origins are city pollution water, industrial pollution water, and a little source of living garbage and bilgewater.

  11. [Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Different Species Mercury in Water Body of Changshou Lake in Three Gorges Reservoir Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wei-yang; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Zheng; Tang, Zhen-ya; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-08-01

    An investigation on the concentrations and the spatial distribution characteristics of different species of mercury in the water body of Changshou Lake in Three Gorges Reservoir region was carried out based on the AreGIS statistics module. The results showed that the concentration of the total mercury in Changshou Lake surface water ranged from 0.50 to 3.78 ng x L(-1), with an average of 1.51 ng x L(-1); the concentration of the total MeHg (methylmercury) ranged from 0.10 to 0.75 ng x L(-1), with an average of 0.23 ng x L(-1). The nugget effect value of total mercury in surface water (50.65%), dissolved mercury (49.80%), particulate mercury (29.94%) and the activity mercury (26.95%) were moderate spatial autocorrelation. It indicated that the autocorrelation was impacted by the intrinsic properties of sediments (such as parent materials and rocks, geological mineral and terrain), and on the other hand it was also disturbed by the exogenous input factors (such as aquaculture, industrial activities, farming etc). The nugget effect value of dissolved methylmercury (DMeHg) in Changshou lake surface water (3.49%) was less than 25%, showing significant strong spatial autocorrelation. The distribution was mainly controlled by environmental factors in water. The proportion of total MeHg in total Hg in Changshou Lake water reached 30% which was the maximum ratio of the total MeHg to total Hg in freshwater lakes and rivers. It implied that mercury was easily methylated in the environment of Chanashou Lake.

  12. The Pore Size Distribution of Naturally Porous Cigarette Paper and its Relation to Permeability and Diffusion Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitzinger Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available La distribution de la taille des pores détermine la perméabilité d’air et la capacité de diffusion d’un papier à cigarettes, et par conséquent elle a une influence signifiante sur les échanges gazeux à travers le papier à cigarettes, non seulement d’une cigarette allumée, mais aussi d’une cigarette qui s’éteint. Pour le dessin des cigarettes, et notamment des papiers à cigarettes, il faut comprendre comment la distribution de la taille des pores du papier à cigarettes est influencée par la structure et les qualités du papier, ainsi que comment la distribution de la taille des pores influence la perméabilité d’air et la capacité de diffusion.

  13. Reservoir characteristics and control factors of Carboniferous volcanic gas reservoirs in the Dixi area of Junggar Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji'an Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Field outcrop observation, drilling core description, thin-section analysis, SEM analysis, and geochemistry, indicate that Dixi area of Carboniferous volcanic rock gas reservoir belongs to the volcanic rock oil reservoir of the authigenic gas reservoir. The source rocks make contact with volcanic rock reservoir directly or by fault, and having the characteristics of near source accumulation. The volcanic rock reservoir rocks mainly consist of acidic rhyolite and dacite, intermediate andesite, basic basalt and volcanic breccia: (1 Acidic rhyolite and dacite reservoirs are developed in the middle-lower part of the structure, have suffered strong denudation effect, and the secondary pores have formed in the weathering and tectonic burial stages, but primary pores are not developed within the early diagenesis stage. Average porosity is only at 8%, and the maximum porosity is at 13.5%, with oil and gas accumulation showing poor performance. (2 Intermediate andesite and basic basalt reservoirs are mainly distributed near the crater, which resembles the size of and suggests a volcanic eruption. Primary pores are formed in the early diagenetic stage, secondary pores developed in weathering and erosion transformation stage, and secondary fractures formed in the tectonic burial stage. The average porosity is at 9.2%, and the maximum porosity is at 21.9%: it is of the high-quality reservoir types in Dixi area. (3 The volcanic breccia reservoir has the same diagenetic features with sedimentary rocks, but also has the same mineral composition with volcanic rock; rigid components can keep the primary porosity without being affected by compaction during the burial process. At the same time, the brittleness of volcanic breccia reservoir makes it easily fracture under the stress; internal fracture was developmental. Volcanic breccia developed in the structural high part and suffered a long-term leaching effect. The original pore-fracture combination also made

  14. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  15. Assessment of spatial distribution of soil loss over the upper basin of Miyun reservoir in China based on RS and GIS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Niu, Rui-qing; Wang, Yi; Li, Ping-xiang; Zhang, Liang-pei; Du, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Soil conservation planning often requires estimates of the spatial distribution of soil erosion at a catchment or regional scale. This paper applied the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to investigate the spatial distribution of annual soil loss over the upper basin of Miyun reservoir in China. Among the soil erosion factors, which are rainfall erosivity (R), soil erodibility (K), slope length (L), slope steepness (S), vegetation cover (C), and support practice factor (P), the vegetative cover or C factor, which represents the effects of vegetation canopy and ground covers in reducing soil loss, has been one of the most difficult to estimate over broad geographic areas. In this paper, the C factor was estimated based on back propagation neural network and the results were compared with the values measured in the field. The correlation coefficient (r) obtained was 0.929. Then the C factor and the other factors were used as the input to RUSLE model. By integrating the six factor maps in geographical information system (GIS) through pixel-based computing, the spatial distribution of soil loss over the upper basin of Miyun reservoir was obtained. The results showed that the annual average soil loss for the upper basin of Miyun reservoir was 9.86 t ha(-1) ya(-1) in 2005, and the area of 46.61 km(2) (0.3%) experiences extremely severe erosion risk, which needs suitable conservation measures to be adopted on a priority basis. The spatial distribution of erosion risk classes was 66.9% very low, 21.89% low, 6.18% moderate, 2.89% severe, and 1.84% very severe. Thus, by using RUSLE in a GIS environment, the spatial distribution of water erosion can be obtained and the regions which susceptible to water erosion and need immediate soil conservation planning and application over the upper watershed of Miyun reservoir in China can be identified.

  16. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Department of Geosciences, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Wang, Chaoyi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Ishibashi, Takuya [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koriyama Japan; Fitts, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  17. The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarg, Frederick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-03-01

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  18. Distribution of the bathypelagic perch fry layer along the longitudinal profile of two large canyon-shaped reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čech, Martin; Kubečka, Jan; Frouzová, Jaroslava; Draštík, Vladislav; Kratochvíl, Michal; Matěna, Josef; Hejzlar, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2007), s. 141-154 ISSN 0022-1112 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600170502; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600170504; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/06/1371 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : Slapy Reservoir * Orlík Reservoir * Perca fluviatilis * shoal * echosounder * Sonar5 Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.404, year: 2007

  19. Distribution, Abundance, and Population Dynamics of Northern Squawfish, Walleye, Smallmouth Bass, and Channel Catfish in John Day Reservoir, 1986 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.

    1987-04-01

    John Day Reservoir was sampled from 25 March to 1 September 1986 using gill nets, trap nets, boat electrofishers, hook and line, and an angler survey to collect 4945 northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonesis, 602 walleye Stizostedion vitreum 2894 smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and 563 channel catfish Icatalurus punctatus. Distribution, abundance and population parameters of each species were examined. One year growth, mortality, and relative year class strength was described.

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of the zoobenthos community during the filling up period of Porto Primavera Reservoir (Paraná River, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jorcin

    Full Text Available This study is part of the limnological monitoring undertaken by the Energy Company of the State of São Paulo (CESP during the filling up process of the Porto Primavera Reservoir (Hydroelectric Power Plant Engenheiro Sérgio Motta. This reservoir, located in the high Paraná River between the States of São Paulo and Mato Grosso do Sul, is the fourth largest in the country. The first filling up phase started in December 1998 and the second phase in March 2001. Samples for benthic community and sediment characteristics analysis were quarterly collected between August of 1999 and November 2001 and also in August of 2002 (11 sampling campaigns. Samplings were carried out at 13 stations distributed in the reservoir, and at one point located downstream of the dam. 128 invertebrate taxa were identified, being Mollusca, Annelida, Insecta and Nematoda the dominant groups during almost the whole study period. Insecta was the best represented class (9 different orders, and Diptera contributed with higher number of taxa, 63. The exotic species of bivalve Corbicula fluminea was recorded in all sampling stations showing its great capacity to colonize new habitats in the neotropical region. Noticeable variations in the fauna density were observed, considering both different periods and locations. The maximum density of organisms (mean value of 7812 ind.m-2 was recorded in the center of the reservoir, and the minimum (mean value 9 ind.m-2 in the more lacustrine area near the dam. The greatest species richness per sample (24 taxa was observed in the reservoir upstream (fluvial zone. The maximum diversity (Shannon-Wiener Index per station/period, 3.82 and 3.86 bits.ind-1, were calculated in the transitional river/reservoir zone during the beginning (August 1999 and in the reservoir central zones in the end (August 2002 of the filling up period, respectively. There was no clear relation between the distribution of the different faunistic groups and the sediment

  1. Spatial and temporal distribution of the zoobenthos community during the filling up period of Porto Primavera Reservoir (Paraná River, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorcin, A; Nogueira, M G; Belmont, R

    2009-02-01

    This study is part of the limnological monitoring undertaken by the Energy Company of the State of São Paulo (CESP) during the filling up process of the Porto Primavera Reservoir (Hydroelectric Power Plant Engenheiro Sérgio Motta). This reservoir, located in the high Paraná River between the States of São Paulo and Mato Grosso do Sul, is the fourth largest in the country. The first filling up phase started in December 1998 and the second phase in March 2001. Samples for benthic community and sediment characteristics analysis were quarterly collected between August of 1999 and November 2001 and also in August of 2002 (11 sampling campaigns). Samplings were carried out at 13 stations distributed in the reservoir, and at one point located downstream of the dam. 128 invertebrate taxa were identified, being Mollusca, Annelida, Insecta and Nematoda the dominant groups during almost the whole study period. Insecta was the best represented class (9 different orders), and Diptera contributed with higher number of taxa, 63. The exotic species of bivalve Corbicula fluminea was recorded in all sampling stations showing its great capacity to colonize new habitats in the neotropical region. Noticeable variations in the fauna density were observed, considering both different periods and locations. The maximum density of organisms (mean value of 7812 ind.m-2) was recorded in the center of the reservoir, and the minimum (mean value 9 ind.m-2) in the more lacustrine area near the dam. The greatest species richness per sample (24 taxa) was observed in the reservoir upstream (fluvial zone). The maximum diversity (Shannon-Wiener Index) per station/period, 3.82 and 3.86 bits.ind-1, were calculated in the transitional river/reservoir zone during the beginning (August 1999) and in the reservoir central zones in the end (August 2002) of the filling up period, respectively. There was no clear relation between the distribution of the different faunistic groups and the sediment

  2. Study on the enhancement of hydrocarbon recovery by characterization of the reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Tae-Jin; Kwak, Young-Hoon; Huh, Dae-Gee [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    The reservoir geochemistry is to understand the origin of these heterogeneities and distributions of the bitumens within the reservoir and to use them not only for exploration but for the development of the petroleums. Methods and principles of the reservoir geochemistry, which are applicable to the petroleum exploration and development, are reviewed in the study. In addition, a case study was carried out on the gas, condensate, water and bitumen samples in the reservoir, taken from the Haenam, Pohang areas and the Ulleung Basin offshore Korea. Mineral geothermometers were studied to estimate the thermal history in sedimentary basins and successfully applied to the Korean onshore and offshore basins. The opal silica-to-quartz transformation was investigated in the Pohang basin as a geothermometer. In Korean basins, the smectite-to-illite changes indicate that smectite and illite can act as the geothermometer to estimate the thermal history of the basins. The albitization reaction was also considered as a temperature indicator. Naturally fractured reservoir is an important source of oil and gas throughout the world. The properties of matrix and fracture are the key parameters in predicting the performances of naturally fractured reservoirs. A new laboratory equipment has been designed and constructed by pressure pulse method to determine the properties, which are (1) the porosity of matrix, (2) the permeability of matrix, (3) the effective width of the fractures, and the permeability of the fractures. (author). 97 refs.

  3. Heavy metal pollution in reservoirs in the hilly area of southern China: Distribution, source apportionment and health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Zhonghua; Cai, Yongjiu

    2018-04-05

    Reservoirs play more and more important role in providing potable water in many developing countries, including the China. In the present study, pollution characteristics, source and health risk of dissolved heavy metals in 19 representative reservoirs in the hilly area of southern China were investigated. The results presented great spatial heterogeneity in heavy metal concentrations among the studied reservoirs due to the disturbances by different anthropogenic activities. Several reservoirs had significantly higher concentrations of heavy metals compared with others, FengTan (FT) reservoir (0.34μg/L in dry season), Cr in reservoirs of HuangShi (HS) and ZheLin (ZL) with values of 4.16μg/L and 3.45μg/L in dry season respectively, and Al in reservoirs of JiaoKou (JK), GuTian (GT) and DouShui (DS) with values of 1011μg/L, 1036μg/L and 1001μg/L in wet season, respectively. Furthermore, there was a great difference in the seasonal variation of heavy metals, especially for Al and Pb in wet season characterized with relatively high values of 643μg/L and 0.67μg/L, respectively. Accordingly, Al was identified with a great health risk to living beings in view of its mean value in wet season, which greatly exceeded the criteria for drinking water of China, WHO and US EPA. Furthermore, As might be the greatest concern of health risk in this region considering its high carcinogenic risk to the local residents around the reservoirs of OuYangHai (OYH), DS, ZhiXi (ZX) and HS. Multivariate statistical analysis suggested that there was great heterogeneity in the sources of these heavy metals in the hilly area of southern China. Therefore, specific measures, such as controls on point source pollution control and tailings, should be taken for maintaining drinking water safety and aquatic ecosystem health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.O.

    2001-01-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.

  5. Concomitant influence of helminth infection and landscape on the distribution of Puumala hantavirus in its reservoir, Myodes glareolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Puumala virus, the agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE), is the most prevalent hantavirus in Europe. The risk for human infection seems to be strongly correlated with the prevalence of Puumala virus (PUUV) in populations of its reservoir host species, the bank vole Myodes glareolus. In humans, the infection risks of major viral diseases are affected by the presence of helminth infections. We therefore proposed to analyse the influence of both helminth community and landscape on the prevalence of PUUV among bank vole populations in the Ardennes, a PUUV endemic area in France. Results Among the 313 voles analysed, 37 had anti-PUUV antibodies. Twelve gastro-intestinal helminth species were recorded among all voles sampled. We showed that PUUV seroprevalence strongly increased with age or sexual maturity, especially in the northern forests (massif des Ardennes). The helminth community structure significantly differed between this part and the woods or hedgerows of the southern cretes pre-ardennaises. Using PUUV RNA quantification, we identified significant coinfections between PUUV and gastro-intestinal helminths in the northern forests only. More specifically, PUUV infection was positively associated with the presence of Heligmosomum mixtum, and in a lesser extent, Aonchotheca muris-sylvatici. The viral load of PUUV infected individuals tended to be higher in voles coinfected with H. mixtum. It was significantly lower in voles coinfected with A. muris-sylvatici, reflecting the influence of age on these latter infections. Conclusions This is the first study to emphasize hantavirus - helminth coinfections in natural populations. It also highlights the importance to consider landscape when searching for such associations. We have shown that landscape characteristics strongly influence helminth community structure as well as PUUV distribution. False associations might therefore be evidenced if geographic patterns of helminths or PUUV repartition are not

  6. Concomitant influence of helminth infection and landscape on the distribution of Puumala hantavirus in its reservoir, Myodes glareolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Alexis Ribas; Guivier, Emmanuel; Xuéreb, Anne; Chaval, Yannick; Cadet, Patrice; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine; Sironen, Tarja; Voutilainen, Liina; Henttonen, Heikki; Cosson, Jean-François; Charbonnel, Nathalie

    2011-02-08

    Puumala virus, the agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE), is the most prevalent hantavirus in Europe. The risk for human infection seems to be strongly correlated with the prevalence of Puumala virus (PUUV) in populations of its reservoir host species, the bank vole Myodes glareolus. In humans, the infection risks of major viral diseases are affected by the presence of helminth infections. We therefore proposed to analyse the influence of both helminth community and landscape on the prevalence of PUUV among bank vole populations in the Ardennes, a PUUV endemic area in France. Among the 313 voles analysed, 37 had anti-PUUV antibodies. Twelve gastro-intestinal helminth species were recorded among all voles sampled. We showed that PUUV seroprevalence strongly increased with age or sexual maturity, especially in the northern forests (massif des Ardennes). The helminth community structure significantly differed between this part and the woods or hedgerows of the southern cretes pre-ardennaises. Using PUUV RNA quantification, we identified significant coinfections between PUUV and gastro-intestinal helminths in the northern forests only. More specifically, PUUV infection was positively associated with the presence of Heligmosomum mixtum, and in a lesser extent, Aonchotheca muris-sylvatici. The viral load of PUUV infected individuals tended to be higher in voles coinfected with H. mixtum. It was significantly lower in voles coinfected with A. muris-sylvatici, reflecting the influence of age on these latter infections. This is the first study to emphasize hantavirus--helminth coinfections in natural populations. It also highlights the importance to consider landscape when searching for such associations. We have shown that landscape characteristics strongly influence helminth community structure as well as PUUV distribution. False associations might therefore be evidenced if geographic patterns of helminths or PUUV repartition are not previously identified. Moreover, our

  7. Concomitant influence of helminth infection and landscape on the distribution of Puumala hantavirus in its reservoir, Myodes glareolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henttonen Heikki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puumala virus, the agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE, is the most prevalent hantavirus in Europe. The risk for human infection seems to be strongly correlated with the prevalence of Puumala virus (PUUV in populations of its reservoir host species, the bank vole Myodes glareolus. In humans, the infection risks of major viral diseases are affected by the presence of helminth infections. We therefore proposed to analyse the influence of both helminth community and landscape on the prevalence of PUUV among bank vole populations in the Ardennes, a PUUV endemic area in France. Results Among the 313 voles analysed, 37 had anti-PUUV antibodies. Twelve gastro-intestinal helminth species were recorded among all voles sampled. We showed that PUUV seroprevalence strongly increased with age or sexual maturity, especially in the northern forests (massif des Ardennes. The helminth community structure significantly differed between this part and the woods or hedgerows of the southern cretes pre-ardennaises. Using PUUV RNA quantification, we identified significant coinfections between PUUV and gastro-intestinal helminths in the northern forests only. More specifically, PUUV infection was positively associated with the presence of Heligmosomum mixtum, and in a lesser extent, Aonchotheca muris-sylvatici. The viral load of PUUV infected individuals tended to be higher in voles coinfected with H. mixtum. It was significantly lower in voles coinfected with A. muris-sylvatici, reflecting the influence of age on these latter infections. Conclusions This is the first study to emphasize hantavirus - helminth coinfections in natural populations. It also highlights the importance to consider landscape when searching for such associations. We have shown that landscape characteristics strongly influence helminth community structure as well as PUUV distribution. False associations might therefore be evidenced if geographic patterns of helminths or PUUV

  8. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang [Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

    1997-08-01

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  9. Reservoir monitoring and characterization using satellite geodetic data: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations from the Krechba field, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Deformation in the material overlying an active reservoir is used to monitor pressure change at depth. A sequence of pressure field estimates, eleven in all, allow us to construct a measure of diffusive travel time throughout the reservoir. The dense distribution of travel time values means that we can construct an exactly linear inverse problem for reservoir flow properties. Application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data gathered over a CO{sub 2} injection in Algeria reveals pressure propagation along two northwest trending corridors. An inversion of the travel times indicates the existence of two northwest-trending high permeability zones. The high permeability features trend in the same direction as the regional fault and fracture zones. Model parameter resolution estimates indicate that the features are well resolved.

  10. Distribution of picocyanobacteria and virioplankton in mesotrophic and eutrophic reservoirs: The role of viruses in mortality of picocyanobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopylov, A.I.; Kosolapov, D.B.; Zabotkina, E.A.; Straškrábová, Viera

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 6 (2010), s. 565-573 ISSN 1062-3590 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : cyanobacteria * cyanophages * upper Volga reservoirs Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 0.222, year: 2010

  11. Unconventional Tight Reservoirs Characterization with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C. J. S.; Solatpour, R.; Kantzas, A.

    2017-12-01

    The increase in tight reservoir exploitation projects causes producing many papers each year on new, modern, and modified methods and techniques on estimating characteristics of these reservoirs. The most ambiguous of all basic reservoir property estimations deals with permeability. One of the logging methods that is advertised to predict permeability but is always met by skepticism is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The ability of NMR to differentiate between bound and movable fluids and providing porosity increased the capability of NMR as a permeability prediction technique. This leads to a multitude of publications and the motivation of a review paper on this subject by Babadagli et al. (2002). The first part of this presentation is dedicated to an extensive review of the existing correlation models for NMR based estimates of tight reservoir permeability to update this topic. On the second part, the collected literature information is used to analyze new experimental data. The data are collected from tight reservoirs from Canada, the Middle East, and China. A case study is created to apply NMR measurement in the prediction of reservoir characterization parameters such as porosity, permeability, cut-offs, irreducible saturations etc. Moreover, permeability correlations are utilized to predict permeability. NMR experiments were conducted on water saturated cores. NMR T2 relaxation times were measured. NMR porosity, the geometric mean relaxation time (T2gm), Irreducible Bulk Volume (BVI), and Movable Bulk Volume (BVM) were calculated. The correlation coefficients were computed based on multiple regression analysis. Results are cross plots of NMR permeability versus the independently measured Klinkenberg corrected permeability. More complicated equations are discussed. Error analysis of models is presented and compared. This presentation is beneficial in understanding existing tight reservoir permeability models. The results can be used as a guide for choosing

  12. Challenges of reservoir properties and production history matching in a CHOPS reservoir study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Mahbub [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In order to meet increasing world energy demand, wells have to be drilled within very thin reservoir beds. This paper, we present one of the solutions for optimizing the reservoir characterization. Reservoir characterization is the process between the discovery of a property and the reservoir management phase. Principal data for reservoir modeling are: 4D Seismic interpretation, wireline log interpretation, core analysis, and petrophysical analysis. Reservoir conditions, perforation and completion technology are the key issues to the production rate of cold production. Reservoir modeling intends to minimize the risk factor, maximize production, and help determine the location for infill drillings. Cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) is a method for enhancing primary production from heavy oil reservoirs. Gravitational forces, natural fluid pressure gradients and foamy oil flow phenomena are the major driving forces of the CHOPS mechanism. Finally, Reservoir characterization allows better understanding of permeability and porosity prediction.

  13. Compressible fluid flow through rocks of variable permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of course-grained igneous rocks as shelters for burying radioactive waste can be assessed by determining the rock permeabilities at their in situ pressures and stresses. Analytical and numerical methods were used to solve differential equations of one-dimensional fluid flow through rocks with permeabilities from 10 4 to 1 nD. In these calculations, upstream and downstream reservoir volumes of 5, 50, and 500 cm 3 were used. The optimal size combinations of the two reservoirs were determined for measurements of permeability, stress, strain, acoustic velocity, and electrical conductivity on low-porosity, coarse-grained igneous rocks

  14. Reservoir Engineering Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

    1977-12-14

    The Reservoir Engineering Management Program being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory includes two major tasks: 1) the continuation of support to geothermal reservoir engineering related work, started under the NSF-RANN program and transferred to ERDA at the time of its formation; 2) the development and subsequent implementation of a broad plan for support of research in topics related to the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs. This plan is now known as the GREMP plan. Both the NSF-RANN legacies and GREMP are in direct support of the DOE/DGE mission in general and the goals of the Resource and Technology/Resource Exploitation and Assessment Branch in particular. These goals are to determine the magnitude and distribution of geothermal resources and reduce risk in their exploitation through improved understanding of generically different reservoir types. These goals are to be accomplished by: 1) the creation of a large data base about geothermal reservoirs, 2) improved tools and methods for gathering data on geothermal reservoirs, and 3) modeling of reservoirs and utilization options. The NSF legacies are more research and training oriented, and the GREMP is geared primarily to the practical development of the geothermal reservoirs. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  15. Interwell tracer analyses of a hydraulically fractured granitic geothermal reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.; Bivins, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments using fluorescent dye and radioactive tracers (Br 82 and I 131 ) have been employed to characterize a hot, low-matrix permeability, hydraulically-fractured granitic reservoir at depths of 2440 to 2960 m (8000 to 9700 ft). Tracer profiles and residence time distributions have been used to delineate changes in the fracture system, particularly in diagnosing pathological flow patterns and in identifying new injection and production zones. The effectiveness of one- and two-dimensional theoretical dispersion models utilizing single and multiple porous, fractured zones with velocity and formation dependent effects are discussed with respect to actual field data

  16. Analysis of the Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Lake and Reservoir Water Quality in China and Changes in Its Relationship with GDP from 2005 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Meng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the spatial distribution of lake and reservoir water quality in China, and the trends from 2005 to 2010, based on monitoring data from 28 large Chinese lakes and reservoirs. We used a comprehensive water pollution index (WPI to describe water quality and also identified the major pollutants. Using GDP data, we analyzed the relationships between economic factors and water quality. We found that although the water quality of large reservoirs is improving or remaining stable, despite economic growth, the water quality of most lakes either did not change or worsened. The outlook is pessimistic, as water quality in most lakes has decreased to Grade V or worse. The water quality was lowest for northern lakes and highest for southern lakes due to a combination of the local industrial structure and lower rainfall in the north. The primary pollutants generally remained stable during the study period. For some lakes, fluoride and volatile phenols became the primary pollutants, indicating more diverse sources of contamination. We divided the 28 bodies of water into four types based on the median WPI and GDP. The dominant combinations were low WPI with low GDP and high WPI with high GDP, as a result of the balance among economic development, the natural environment and environmental policy.

  17. Impact of flood on distribution of bathypelagic perch fry layer along the longitudinal profile of large canyon-shaped reservoir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čech, Martin; Kubečka, Jan; Frouzová, Jaroslava; Draštík, Vladislav; Kratochvíl, Michal; Jarošík, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 4 (2007), s. 1109-1119 ISSN 0022-1112. [Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society /136/. Lake Placid, 10.09.2006-14.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/06/1371 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : Orlík Reservoir * shoaling * echosounder * cyprinids * Perca fluviatilis * Sander lucioperca Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.404, year: 2007

  18. Seasonal and spatial distribution of bacterial biomass and the percentage of viable cells in a reservoir of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, T.E.; Wetzel, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Spatial community dynamics of bacterioplankton were evaluated along the length of the former stream channel of Elledge Lake, a small reservoir in western Alabama. The reservoir was strongly stratified from April to October with up to a 10??C temperature difference across the 1 m deep metalimnion. Bacterial biomass was highest during late summer, with a general pattern of increasing abundance from the inflowing river (???10 ??g C l-1) to the dam (???20-30 ??g C l-1). Bacterial numbers also increased following a >10-fold increase in turbidity associated with a major precipitation event, although only ???10% of these cells were viable. The percentage of viable cells generally increased through the stratified period with 50-70% viable cells in late summer. Overall, an average of 38% of bacterial cells were viable, with a range from <20 to 70%. Although these values were similar to those found by others, additional patterns were identified that have not been previously observed: a marked decline in viable cells was found following turbid storm inflows and increases in the percentage of viable cells occurred during spring warming and following autumnal mixing events. Although a modest increase in abundance occurred along the gradient from inflow down-reservoir to the dam, bacterial abundance did not increase near the dam in a pattern coincident with the commonly observed increased algal biomass in the lacustrine portion of reservoir ecosystems. The increases observed in bacterial viability moving from the inflowing rivers towards the dam and later in stratified periods stress the importance of differences in environmental conditions in time and space in regulating bacterial biomass and development, as well as of shifts that would be anticipated accompanying altered hydrological regimes under climatic change.

  19. Reservoir management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satter, A.; Varnon, J.E.; Hoang, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A reservoir's life begins with exploration leading to discovery followed by delineation of the reservoir, development of the field, production by primary, secondary and tertiary means, and finally to abandonment. Sound reservoir management is the key to maximizing economic operation of the reservoir throughout its entire life. Technological advances and rapidly increasing computer power are providing tools to better manage reservoirs and are increasing the gap between good and neutral reservoir management. The modern reservoir management process involves goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans. Setting a reservoir management strategy requires knowledge of the reservoir, availability of technology, and knowledge of the business, political, and environmental climate. Formulating a comprehensive management plan involves depletion and development strategies, data acquisition and analyses, geological and numerical model studies, production and reserves forecasts, facilities requirements, economic optimization, and management approval. This paper provides management, engineers geologists, geophysicists, and field operations staff with a better understanding of the practical approach to reservoir management using a multidisciplinary, integrated team approach

  20. Temporal variation and spatial distribution of PAH in water of Three Gorges Reservoir during the complete impoundment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxian; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Bi, Yonghong; Zhu, Kongxian; Pfister, Gerd; Hu, Wei; Temoka, Cedrique; Westrich, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2013-10-01

    Bioavailable concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in water of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) using semipermeable membrane devices during the period of completely impounding water. ∑PAH concentrations in water of TGR in the period of completely impounding water were 15-381 ng L(-1). ∑PAH concentrations increased from town or counties to big industrialized cities in TGR, indicating urbanization effects on PAH pollution in the water. Tributaries in TGR have a certain contribution of PAH pollution to the mainstream of Yangtze River and their pollution could not be neglected. An obvious decrease of PAH concentration was observed after 175-m water impounding in 2011 in TGR. Several factors may account for this decrease, including execution of comprehensive treatment and management measures in TGR, less rainfall in 2011, and sedimentation effect caused by the dam. Passive sampling method has been successfully applied in the investigation of trace PAH in water of TGR and proved to be a useful and efficient tool for the management and sustainable development of the big reservoir. The results of the study provide valuable information about PAH pollution in the whole reservoir including some tributaries, and the pollution status is dynamically related with human activities. Therefore, PAH could be used as a marker compound or indicator in the network monitoring system to surveil and trace the pollution status in TGR.

  1. Distribution of benthic invertebrates at different depths in a shallow reservoir in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Samways

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available The bottom of a freshwater reservoir in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands was sampled for macro-invertebrates and macrophytes at depths of 0.5 m, 1 m, 2 m, and 3 m. The water plants Elodea spp. which did not occur much beyond 1 m appeared to be a major deter-minant for the presence of invertebrates. At 2 m and 3 m, when temperature and light decreased greatly, it was replaced by the algae Chara spp. Over 98 of the macroinvertebrate individuals in 21 species and 14 families occurred in water 1 m or less in depth. At 2 m and deeper, there was a rapid decline of species, with only one, a snail, occurring at 3 m. Odonata species occurred only in water 1 m or less in depth. Among the Ephemeroptera, Caenis sp. was abundant at 0.5 m and the most dominant species of all. At 1 m, the most dominant species was Cleon palidulosum of the Baetidae. Both in terms of food for waterfowl and trout, and as a reserve for aquatic macroin vertebrates, the shallow fringe of the reservoir was playing by far the major role compared with the deeper, open water. It is recommended both for biotic conservation and fishing that reservoirs have a shallow rim and constant water levels.

  2. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, Jack; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill; Bezant, Bryce

    2000-03-16

    The major purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.

  3. Integrating geologic and engineering data into 3-D reservoir models: an example from norman wells field, NWT, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yose, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    A case study of the Norman Wells field will be presented to highlight the work-flow and data integration steps associated with characterization and modeling of a complex hydrocarbon reservoir. Norman Wells is a Devonian-age carbonate bank ('reef') located in the Northwest Territories of Canada, 60 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle. The reservoir reaches a maximum thickness of 130 meters in the reef interior and thins toward the basin due to depositional pinch outs. Norman Wells is an oil reservoir and is currently under a 5-spot water injection scheme for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). EOR strategies require a detailed understanding of how reservoir flow units, flow barriers and flow baffles are distributed to optimize hydrocarbon sweep and recovery and to minimize water handling. Reservoir models are routinely used by industry to characterize the 3-D distribution of reservoir architecture (stratigraphic layers, depositional facies, faults) and rock properties (porosity. permeability). Reservoir models are validated by matching historical performance data (e.g., reservoir pressures, well production or injection rates). Geologic models are adjusted until they produce a history match, and model adjustments are focused on inputs that have the greatest geologic uncertainty. Flow simulation models are then used to optimize field development strategies and to forecast field performance under different development scenarios. (author)

  4. Plague circulation and population genetics of the reservoir Rattus rattus: the influence of topographic relief on the distribution of the disease within the Madagascan focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Brouat

    Full Text Available Landscape may affect the distribution of infectious diseases by influencing the population density and dispersal of hosts and vectors. Plague (Yersinia pestis infection is a highly virulent, re-emerging disease, the ecology of which has been scarcely studied in Africa. Human seroprevalence data for the major plague focus of Madagascar suggest that plague spreads heterogeneously across the landscape as a function of the relief. Plague is primarily a disease of rodents. We therefore investigated the relationship between disease distribution and the population genetic structure of the black rat, Rattus rattus, the main reservoir of plague in Madagascar.We conducted a comparative study of plague seroprevalence and genetic structure (15 microsatellite markers in rat populations from four geographic areas differing in topology, each covering about 150-200 km(2 within the Madagascan plague focus. The seroprevalence levels in the rat populations mimicked those previously reported for humans. As expected, rat populations clearly displayed a more marked genetic structure with increasing relief. However, the relationship between seroprevalence data and genetic structure differs between areas, suggesting that plague distribution is not related everywhere to the effective dispersal of rats.Genetic diversity estimates suggested that plague epizootics had only a weak impact on rat population sizes. In the highlands of Madagascar, plague dissemination cannot be accounted for solely by the effective dispersal of the reservoir. Human social activities may also be involved in spreading the disease in rat and human populations.

  5. Plague circulation and population genetics of the reservoir Rattus rattus: the influence of topographic relief on the distribution of the disease within the Madagascan focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouat, Carine; Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Loiseau, Anne; Rahalison, Lila; Rajerison, Minoariso; Laffly, Dominique; Handschumacher, Pascal; Duplantier, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Landscape may affect the distribution of infectious diseases by influencing the population density and dispersal of hosts and vectors. Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a highly virulent, re-emerging disease, the ecology of which has been scarcely studied in Africa. Human seroprevalence data for the major plague focus of Madagascar suggest that plague spreads heterogeneously across the landscape as a function of the relief. Plague is primarily a disease of rodents. We therefore investigated the relationship between disease distribution and the population genetic structure of the black rat, Rattus rattus, the main reservoir of plague in Madagascar. We conducted a comparative study of plague seroprevalence and genetic structure (15 microsatellite markers) in rat populations from four geographic areas differing in topology, each covering about 150-200 km(2) within the Madagascan plague focus. The seroprevalence levels in the rat populations mimicked those previously reported for humans. As expected, rat populations clearly displayed a more marked genetic structure with increasing relief. However, the relationship between seroprevalence data and genetic structure differs between areas, suggesting that plague distribution is not related everywhere to the effective dispersal of rats. Genetic diversity estimates suggested that plague epizootics had only a weak impact on rat population sizes. In the highlands of Madagascar, plague dissemination cannot be accounted for solely by the effective dispersal of the reservoir. Human social activities may also be involved in spreading the disease in rat and human populations.

  6. Occurrence and distribution of taste and odor compounds in subtropical water supply reservoirs and their fates in water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Chaoyi; Zong, Dongliang; Li, Haipu; Yang, Zhaoguang

    2017-01-01

    Taste and odor (T&O) problems in surface water supplies attract growing environmental and ecological concerns. In this study, 10 T&O compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB), geosmin, β-ionone, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP), 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA), 2,3,6-trichloroanisole (2,3,6-TCA), 2,3,4-trichloroanisole (2,3,4-TCA), 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TBA), and trans-2,cis-6-nonadienal (NDE) were investigated in 13 water supply reservoirs and 2 water treatment plants (WTPs) in S City of China. 2-MIB, geosmin, and β-ionone were detected in most of the reservoirs and WTPs. The highest concentrations in reservoirs reached 196.0 ng L -1 for 2-MIB, 11.4 ng L -1 for geosmin, and 39.7 ng L -1 for β-ionone. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to examine the relationship between the 3 T&O compounds and environmental parameters of the reservoirs. The results showed that TP was strongly positively correlated with 2-MIB in wet season and negatively correlated in dry season. It was suggested that controlling nutrient (TP, TN/TP, and NH 3 -N) inputs was required for better management of drinking water reservoirs. Furthermore, the maximum concentrations in raw water of WTPs was kept at 82.1 ng L -1 for 2-MIB, 5.6 ng L -1 for geosmin, and 66.1 ng L -1 for β-ionone. β-Ionone could not be detected in the post-filtration and finished water of two WTPs, and both 2-MIB and geosmin significantly decreased in the water of XWTP. It was indicated that T&O compounds could be removed partly or completely by the filtration of conventional treatment processes.

  7. Developments in permeable and low permeability barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferis, S.A.; Norris, G.H.; Thomas, A.O.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the reactive treatment zone whereby pollutants are attenuated as they move along a pathway in the ground has enabled a re-thinking of many of the concepts of containment. In particular it offers the potential for the control of the flux from a contaminated area by controlling the contaminant concentration in the pathway(s) as well as or instead of using a low permeability barrier. The paper outlines the basic concepts of the reactive treatment zone and the use of permeable and low permeability reactive systems. The paper then gives a case history of the installation of a permeable barrier using an in-situ reaction chamber

  8. Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

    2009-01-07

    The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

  9. Characteristics and origin of the relatively high-quality tight reservoir in the Silurian Xiaoheba Formation in the southeastern Sichuan Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoxing; Shi, Zejin; Wang, Yong; Tian, Yaming; Li, Wenjie; Liu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    A mature understanding of the sandstone gas reservoir in the Xiaoheba Formation in the southeastern Sichuan Basin remains lacking. To assess the reservoir characteristics and the origin of the high-quality reservoir in the Xiaoheba Formation, this paper uses systematic field investigations, physical property analysis, thin section identification, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe methods. The results indicate that the Xiaoheba sandstone is an ultra-tight and ultra-low permeability reservoir, with an average porosity of 2.97% and an average permeability of 0.56×10−3 μm2. This promising reservoir is mainly distributed in the Lengshuixi and Shuangliuba regions and the latter has a relatively high-quality reservoir with an average porosity of 5.28% and average permeability of 0.53×10−3 μm2. The reservoir space comprises secondary intergranular dissolved pores, moldic pores and fractures. Microfacies, feldspar dissolution and fracture connectivity control the quality of this reservoir. The relatively weak compaction and cementation in the interbedded delta front distal bar and interdistributary bay microfacies indirectly protected the primary intergranular pores and enhanced late-stage dissolution. Late-stage potassium feldspar dissolution was controlled by the early-stage organic acid dissolution intensity and the distance from the hydrocarbon generation center. Early-stage fractures acted as pathways for organic acid migration and were therefore important factors in the formation of the reservoir. Based on these observations, the area to the west of the Shuangliuba and Lengshuixi regions has potential for gas exploration. PMID:28686735

  10. Characteristics and origin of the relatively high-quality tight reservoir in the Silurian Xiaoheba Formation in the southeastern Sichuan Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Gong

    Full Text Available A mature understanding of the sandstone gas reservoir in the Xiaoheba Formation in the southeastern Sichuan Basin remains lacking. To assess the reservoir characteristics and the origin of the high-quality reservoir in the Xiaoheba Formation, this paper uses systematic field investigations, physical property analysis, thin section identification, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe methods. The results indicate that the Xiaoheba sandstone is an ultra-tight and ultra-low permeability reservoir, with an average porosity of 2.97% and an average permeability of 0.56×10-3 μm2. This promising reservoir is mainly distributed in the Lengshuixi and Shuangliuba regions and the latter has a relatively high-quality reservoir with an average porosity of 5.28% and average permeability of 0.53×10-3 μm2. The reservoir space comprises secondary intergranular dissolved pores, moldic pores and fractures. Microfacies, feldspar dissolution and fracture connectivity control the quality of this reservoir. The relatively weak compaction and cementation in the interbedded delta front distal bar and interdistributary bay microfacies indirectly protected the primary intergranular pores and enhanced late-stage dissolution. Late-stage potassium feldspar dissolution was controlled by the early-stage organic acid dissolution intensity and the distance from the hydrocarbon generation center. Early-stage fractures acted as pathways for organic acid migration and were therefore important factors in the formation of the reservoir. Based on these observations, the area to the west of the Shuangliuba and Lengshuixi regions has potential for gas exploration.

  11. Effect of Clay Mineralogy and Exchangeable Cations on Permeability of Saudi Sandstone Reservoirs Effet de la minéralogie des argiles et des cations échangeables sur la perméabilité des réservoirs gréseux d'Arabie Saoudite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahab A. S.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir rocks are susceptible to formation damage during secondary recovery operations due to the particular mineralogical, textural and electrochemical properties of the clay minerals they contain. This damage can be explained by the swelling of indigeneous clays present, resulting in the constricting of pores, or by the dispersion of indigeneous nonswelling particle rearrangements during fluid flow, resulting in the plugging of the pore system, or by a combination of the two. This article describes a laboratory study showing the effect of clay mineralogy on the permeability of actual Saudi sandstone reservoirs during water flooding operations. The study shows that the permeability damage of Saudi sandstone reservoirs depends upon the amount of swelling clays and exchangeable ions as well as on the nature of these ions. Monovalent cations cause more damage than multivalent ones but within the same group of metals, those with smaller atomic mass cause more damage. Les roches réservoirs peuvent être endommagées pendant les opérations de récupération secondaire à cause des propriétés minéralogiques, texturales et électrochimiques particulières des minéraux argileux qu'elles contiennent. Cet endommagement peut s'expliquer, soit par le gonflement des argiles qui conduit à un rétrécissement des pores, soit par la migration de particules non gonflantes pendant l'écoulement des fluides qui entraîne le colmatage des milieux poreux, soit par une combinaison des deux mécanismes. Cet article présente une étude de laboratoire montrant l'effet de la minéralogie des argiles sur la perméabilité des roches réservoirs réelles d'Arabie Saoudite pendant des opérations d'injection d'eau. L'étude montre que l'endommagement de la perméabilité des roches réservoirs d'Arabie Saoudite dépend de la quantité d'argiles gonflantes et d'ions échangeables, ainsi que de la nature de ces ions. Les cations monovalents provoquent plus d

  12. Productivity model for gas reservoirs with open-hole multi-fracturing horizontal wells and optimization of hydraulic fracture parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-fractured horizontal wells are commonly employed to improve the productivity of low and ultra-low permeability gas reservoirs. However, conventional productivity models for open-hole multi-fractured horizontal wells do not consider the interferences between hydraulic fractures and the open-hole segments, resulting in significant errors in calculation results. In this article, a novel productivity prediction model for gas reservoirs with open-hole multi-fractured horizontal wells was proposed based on complex potential theories, potential superimposition, and numerical analysis. Herein, an open-hole segment between two adjacent fractures was regarded as an equivalent fracture, which was discretized as in cases of artificial fractures. The proposed model was then applied to investigate the effects of various parameters, such as the angle between the fracture and horizontal shaft, fracture quantity, fracture length, diversion capacity of fractures, horizontal well length, and inter-fracture distance, on the productivity of low permeability gas reservoirs with multi-fractured horizontal wells. Simulation results revealed that the quantity, length, and distribution of fractures had significant effects on the productivity of low permeability gas reservoirs while the effects of the diversion capacity of fractures and the angle between the fracture and horizontal shaft were negligible. Additionally, a U-shaped distribution of fracture lengths was preferential as the quantity of fractures at shaft ends was twice that in the middle area. Keywords: Low permeability gas reservoir, Multi-fractured horizontal well, Productivity prediction, Open-hole completion, Unsteady-state flow, Fracture parameters optimization

  13. Distributed snow data as a tool to inform water management decisions: Using Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) at the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in Yosemite National Park, City and County of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, C. B.

    2016-12-01

    The timing and magnitude of spring snowmelt and runoff is critical in managing reservoirs in the Western United States. The Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in Yosemite National Park provides drinking water for 2.6 million customers in over 30 communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. Power generation from Hetch Hetchy meets the municipal load of the City and County of San Francisco. Water from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir is also released in the Tuolumne River, supporting critical ecosystems in Yosemite National Park and the Stanislaus National Forest. Better predictions of long (seasonal) and short (weekly) term streamflow allow for more secure water resource planning, earlier power generation and ecologically beneficial releases from the Reservoir. Hetch Hetchy Reservoir is fed by snow dominated watersheds in the Sierra Mountains. Better knowledge of snowpack conditions allow for better predictions of inflows, both at the seasonal and at the weekly time scales. The ASO project has provided the managers of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir with high resolution estimates of total snowpack and snowpack distribution in the 460 mi2 Hetch Hetchy. We show that there is a tight correlation between snowpack estimates and future streamflow, allowing earlier, more confident operational decisions. We also show how distributed SWE estimates were used to develop and test a hydrologic model of the system (PRMS). This model, calibrated directly to snowpack conditions, is shown to correctly simulate snowpack volume and distribution, as well as streamflow patterns.

  14. Potosi Reservoir Modeling; History and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    from using data from a single well in 2010 to the inclusion of data from three wells in 2013 which largely leverage the porosity and permeability logs plus knowledge of lost circulation zones. The first Potosi model (Potosi Geobody Model 2010) attempted to use the available seismic inversion data to inform the geomodel and predict vugular zones in advance of drilling VW1. Lost circulation zones in VW1 came in as the geologists predicted. The model was not implemented in subsequent simulation work. To date, reservoir models used for flow simulation work have relied predominately on Gaussian distributed properties (porosity and permeability) and have employed a single injection well. Potosi Model 2013b incorporated the new VW2 logs, and exhibited an extra level of sophistication by delineating the vugular intervals. This method added further realism that likely represents the best reservoir approximation to date. Where the 2010 reservoir models were 10 by 10 mi (16 by 16 km) in area, the 2013 models were expanded in size to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km). The latest reservoir simulations show that a minimum of four injectors might be required to meet target injection rates. Still, there is data that requires further scrutiny and modeling methodologies that require testing for the Potosi Formation. This work is currently ongoing, and the next phase of the reservoir modeling intends to implement valuable data like porosity derived from seismic inversion, seismically derived geobodies, or a combination of both to further define vugular zones and the porosity distribution within the Potosi Formation. Understanding the dual porosity, dual permeability character of the Potosi remains the greatest challenge in representing this formation. Further analysis of the FMI* fullbore formation microimager data may aid in assessing this uncertainty. The Potosi Formation is indeed an interesting formation, and recommendations to further characterize it are included in the following list

  15. Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Pennington; Mohamed Ibrahim; Roger Turpening; Sean Trisch; Josh Richardson; Carol Asiala; Walid Mabrouk

    2008-09-30

    Crosswell seismic surveys were conducted at two fields in northern Michigan. One of these, Springdale, included two monitor wells that are located external to the reef, and the other, Coldspring, employed two production wells within the reef. The Springdale wells extended to much greater depths than the reef, and imaging was conducted from above and from beneath the reef. The resulting seismic images provide the best views of pinnacle Niagaran reefs obtained to date. The tops of the reservoirs can be clearly distinguished, and their lateral extent or dipping edges can be observed along the profile. Reflecting events internal to the reef are evident; some of them are fairly continuous across the reef and others are discontinuous. Inversion of the seismic data indicates which events represent zones of higher porosity and which are lower porosity or even anhydrite plugged. The full stacked image includes angles that are beyond critical for many of the interfaces, and some reflections are visible only for a small range of angles, presumably near their critical angle. Stacking these angles in provides an opportunity for these events to be seen on the stacked image, where otherwise they would have been unrecognized. For inversion, however, the complexity associated with phase changes beyond critical can lead to poor results, and elastic inversion of partial angle stacks may be best conducted with restrictions to angles less than critical. Strong apparent attenuation of signals occurs when seismic ray paths pass through the upper part of the Springdale reservoir; this may be due to intrinsic attenuation and/or scattering of events due to the locally strongly varying gas saturation and extremely low fluid pressures. Signal-to-noise limitations become evident far from the source well in the Coldspring study, probably because the raw data were strongly affected by tube-wave noise generated by flow through the perforation of the receiver well. The seismic images obtained, and

  16. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  17. Influence of habitat and seasonal variation on wild mammal diversity and distribution with special reference to the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense host-reservoir in Bipindi (Cameroon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massussi, Jacques Anselme; Djieto-Lordon, Champlain; Njiokou, Flobert; Laveissière, Claude; van der Ploeg, Jan Douwe

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the role of wildlife in the resurgence and perenisation of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), we investigated the influence of habitat and seasonal variations on the diversity and spatial distribution of wild mammals, with special reference to those recognised as potential host-reservoirs of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Bipindi (southwestern Cameroon). To achieve this, we carried out transect surveys in four habitat types over two years. A total of 31 mammal species were recorded, of which 14 occurred in the undisturbed forest, 9 in cocoa plantations, 11 in farmlands and 11 in village-adjacent gallery forests. Among them, six species (Cephalophus monticola, Cephalophus dorsalis, Atherurus africanus, Cricetomys emini, Nandinia binotata and Cercopithecus nictitans), known as reservoir hosts of T. b. gambiense, occurred in all kinds of habitats suitable or unsuited to Glossina palpalis palpalis and in all seasons. These species are the most involved in the transmission cycle (human being/tsetse flies/wild animals). Cercopithecus cephus, Miopithecus talapoin and Heliosciurus rufobrachium host Trypanosoma brucei spp.; however, only C. cephus does not occur permanently in the suitable habitat of G. palpalis palpalis. In general, some species (C. monticola, Tragelaphus spekei and C. emini) showed a slight density increase from the long dry to the heavy rainy season within the undisturbed and farmland habitats, and a slight decrease within cocoa plantations and village-adjacent forests in the same period. The density of A. africanus increased greatly from the long dry season to the heavy rainy season in the undisturbed forest while, the density of primates in this habitat decreased slightly from the long dry season to the heavy rainy season. These variations indicate a permanent movement of wild mammal reservoir or feeding hosts from one biotope to another over the seasons. Thryonomys swinderianus needs to be investigated because it occurs permanently in

  18. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  19. Macro-permeability distribution and anisotropy in a 3D fissured and fractured clay rock: ‘Excavation Damaged Zone’ around a cylindrical drift in Callovo-Oxfordian Argilite (Bure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababou, Rachid; Cañamón Valera, Israel; Poutrel, Adrien

    The Underground Research Laboratory at Bure (CMHM), operated by ANDRA, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, was developed for studying the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep clayey geologic repository. It comprises a network of underground galleries in a 130 m thick layer of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (depths 400-600 m). This work focuses on hydraulic homogenization (permeability upscaling) of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) around a cylindrical drift, taking into account: (1) the permeability of the intact porous rock matrix; (2) the geometric structure of micro-fissures and small fractures synthesized as a statistical set of planar discs; (3) the curved shapes of large ‘chevron’ fractures induced by excavation (periodically distributed). The method used for hydraulic homogenization (upscaling) of the 3D porous and fractured rock is based on a ‘frozen gradient’ superposition of individual fluxes pertaining to each fracture/matrix block, or ‘unit block’. Each unit block comprises a prismatic block of permeable matrix (intact rock) obeying Darcy’s law, crossed by a single piece of planar fracture obeying either Darcy or Poiseuille law. Polygonal as well as disc shaped fractures are accommodated. The result of upscaling is a tensorial Darcy law, with macro-permeability K ij( x) distributed over a grid of upscaling sub-domains, or ‘voxels’. Alternatively, K ij( x) can be calculated point-wise using a moving window, e.g., for obtaining permeability profiles along ‘numerical’ boreholes. Because the permeable matrix is taken into account, the upscaling procedure can be implemented sequentially, as we do here: first, we embed the statistical fissures in the matrix, and secondly, we embed the large curved chevron fractures. The results of hydraulic upscaling are expressed first in terms of ‘equivalent’ macro-permeability tensors, K ij( x, y, z) distributed around the drift. The statistically isotropic fissures are

  20. Modeling Flow in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs : Effect of Fracture Aperture Distribution on Critical Sub-Network for Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, J.; Rossen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Fracture network connectivity and aperture (or conductivity) distribution are two crucial features controlling the flow behavior of fractured formations. The effect of connectivity on flow properties is well documented. We focus here on the influence of fracture aperture distribution. We model a

  1. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, Don W.

    2003-04-08

    Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

  2. Abundance and Distribution of Walleye, Northern Squawfish and Smallmouth Bass in John Day Reservoir and Tailrace, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Anthony A.; Faler, Michael P.; Elliott, John C. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

    1985-06-01

    Walleye, northern squawfish and smallmouth bass abundances were estimated in John Day Reservoir using a modified Schnabel multiple mark and recapture estimator. Sampling was conducted from March 25 to August 31 using gill nets, trap nets, boat electrofishing, angling and an angler survey. A total of 858 walleye, 4552 northern squawfish, and 1599 smallmouth bass were collected. Discrete populations were defined according to observed movements of recaptured and radiotagged fish. Abundance estimates were corrected for angler harvest, size selectivity of gear, tag loss and recruitment due to growth during sampling. In addition, the likelihood of biases resulting from differential mortality of marked fish was examined. Abundances in John Day pool of walleye and northern squawfish with fork lengths greater than 250 mm were estimated at 15,832 and 80,486. Abundances of smallmouth bass with fork lengths greater than 200 mm were estimated to be 2596 in lower John Day pool and 1791 in upper John Day pool. Walleye and northern squawfish moved throughout the pool, whereas movements by smallmouth bass were more localized. Angler harvests of walleye and smallmouth bass in upper John Day pool from April through August were estimated at 309 and 584 fish. Angler harvest of northern squawfish was negligible. Most walleye collected were age 5. The most abundant age groups of northern squawfish and smallmouth bass were 10 and 2. 10 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Total mercury distribution in different tissues of six species of freshwater fish from the Kpong hydroelectric reservoir in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Alhassan; Voegborlo, Ray Bright; Agorku, Eric Selorm

    2012-05-01

    Total mercury concentrations were determined in seven tissues of 38 fish samples comprising six species from the Kpong hydroelectric reservoir in Ghana by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry technique using an automatic mercury analyzer. Mercury concentration in all the tissues ranged from 0.005 to 0.022 μg/g wet weight. In general, the concentration of mercury in all the tissues were decreasing in the order; liver > muscle > intestine > stomach > gonad > gill > swim bladder. Mercury concentration was generally greater in the tissues of high-trophic-level fish such as Clarotes laticeps, Mormyrops anguilloides and Chrysichthys aurutus whereas low-trophic-level fish such as Oreochromis niloticus recorded low mercury concentration in their tissues. The results obtained for total mercury concentration in the muscle tissues analysed in this study are below the WHO/FAO threshold limit of 0.5 μg/g. This suggests that the exposure of the general public to Hg through fish consumption can be considered negligible.

  4. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  5. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  6. Modeling of non-equilibrium effects in solvent-enhanced spontaneous imbibition in fractured reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chahardowli, M.; Bruining, J.

    2013-01-01

    In fractured reservoirs, much of the oil is stored in low permeable matrix blocks that are surrounded by a high permeability fracture network. Therefore, production from fractured reservoir depends on the transfer between fracture and matrix, which is critically dependent on their interaction.

  7. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  8. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2004-07-20

    Our analysis and imaging of reservoir properties at the Fullerton Clear Fork field (Figure 1) is in its final stages. Major accomplishments during the past 6 months include: (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in cores, (2) correlation of cycles and sequences using core-calibrated wireline logs, (3) calculation and modeling of wireline porosity, (4) analysis of new cores for conventional and special core analysis data, (5) construction of full-field reservoir model, and (6) revision of 3D seismic inversion of reservoir porosity and permeability. One activity has been eliminated from the originally proposed tasks. Task 3 (Characterization and Modeling of Rock Mechanics and Fractures) has been deleted because we have determined that fractures are not significant contributing in the reservoir under study. A second project extension has been asked for to extend the project until 7/31/04. Remaining project activities are: (1) interpretation and synthesis of fieldwide data, (2) preparation of 3D virtual reality demonstrations of reservoir model and attributes, (3) transfer of working data sets to the operator for reservoir implementation and decision-making, and (4) preparation and distribution of final reports.

  9. Characteristics of Soil Nutrient and Spatial Distribution on Riparian Zone Restored by Different Vegetation Restoration Methods at Wanzhou Section in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ya-jing

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Riparian vegetation and water-level fluctuation are critical factors influencing soil nutrients and their spatial distribution. Taking Wanzhou section as a case study, the characteristics of soil nutrient and spatial distribution in riparian vegetation restored by different methods in the Three Gorges Reservoir area were uncovered by field investigation and chemical analysis of soil samples collected from the artificial and natural restoration plots, respectively. Results showed that restoration method had significant effect on soil nutrients. The content of soil nutrients in the artificial restoration plot was generally higher than that in the natural recovery plot indicating that artificial restoration promoted accumulation of soil nutrients in vegetation. Under the influence of the reverse seasonal water-level fluctuation, a special spatial distribution pattern that the riparian soil nutrients increased and then decreased with the increasing latitude appeared on the artificial restoration plot. The maximum content of soil nutrients occurred at the middle riparian part(altitude 165 m. However, soil organic matter and total nitrogen increased with the increasing of altitude gradient on the natural restoration plot, and reached the maximum at the upper riparian part(altitude 175 m. The spatial distribution pattern of soil nutrients resulted from the differentiation of water-level fluctuation disturbance and vegetation among altitude gradients. Restoration methods also affected the spatial distribution of soil nutrients as it influenced vegetation restoration. Appropriate tree and shrub species adapting to the disturbance of the reverse seasonal water-level fluctuation should be further introduced to the upper riparian part to promote the vegetation capacity of holding soil nutrients.

  10. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities were identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program currently being implemented is a result of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

  11. Porosities and permeability of Paleozoic sandstones derived from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorand, Rachel; Koch, Andreas; Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of porosity and permeability in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on thirty-three sandstones from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical values of the desired hydraulic properties for selected sandstones in the German subsurface. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to estimate the porosity and the permeability of sandstones from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Besides NMR standard poro-perm-measurements were performed on the samples to obtain independent data sets for comparison. Porosity was measured by Archimedes principle and pore-size distribution by mercury injection. Also permeability was determined by gas flow measurements taking into account the Klinkenberg effect. The porosities of the studied samples vary between 0 % and 16 %. NMR yields suitable porosity results whereas the porosities obtain by T1 relaxation measurements fit better to the Archimedes porosities than the porosities obtained by T2 relaxation measurements. For porosities up to 10 %, T2 relaxation measurements overestimate the porosity. Furthermore, we calculate the effective porosity using a cutoff time of 3 ms. This effective porosity agrees much better with Archimedes porosities, particularly for the low porosity samples. The gas permeability of studied sandstones varies between 10-21 m2 and 2.10-17 m2. A large number of empirical relationships between relaxation times and gas permeability have been published. We have applied several of these relationships to select the appropriate law for

  12. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Carbonate Reservoiring Capability Evaluation Based on Multifractal Analysis of Micropore Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, S.; Cheng, Q.; Xing, X.; Liu, X.; Bao, Z.

    2009-04-01

    It has been of great importance for evaluating the petrophysical properties of the reserves and then predicting the productivity of petroleum fields. In tradition, the petrophysical porosity and permeability are measured by experiments which were usually time-consuming and may even result in incorrect conclusions. The fractal and multifractal analysis of pore spaces based on digital images have been attracting much attention. For the pore-scale analysis, it is challenging to study the irregularities of pore shapes and the frequency distributions of pore sizes. In this paper, based on one program for fractal and multifractal analysis of two-dimensional binary images (http://www.ird.fr/ur079/perso/perrier/multifractals/MF.htm, Edith Perrier, Ana M. Tarquis, Annette Dathe) for soil pore space analysis, we studied the distribution patterns of the pore spaces of carbonate reservoiring rocks which are from the Tarim Basin in Xinjiang Province, China. In terms of the box-counting fractal dimensions, generalized fractal dimensions and multifractal spectra of the micropores, the reservoiring capacity of the rocks are quantitatively evaluated. The higher the fractal dimensions are, the greater the reservoiring capabilities would be. In this aspect, the fractal and multifractal parameters would be helpful for the quantitative evaluation of reservoiring capabilities. Key Words: ESEM images, Micropore, Fractal and Multifractal, Carbonate Reservoir.

  14. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2003-08-01

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have adopted an integrated approach whereby we combine data from multiple sources to minimize the uncertainty and non-uniqueness in the interpreted results. For partitioning interwell tracer tests, these are primarily the distribution of reservoir permeability and oil saturation distribution. A novel approach to multiscale data integration using Markov Random Fields (MRF) has been developed to integrate static data sources from the reservoir such as core, well log and 3-D seismic data. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, the behavior of partitioning tracer tests in fractured reservoirs is investigated using a dual-porosity finite-difference model.

  15. Distribution and arrest of vertical through-going joints in shallow-water carbonates: Insights from an integrated virtual outcrop - field structural analysis of a reservoir-scale exposure (Sorrento Peninsula, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradetti, Amerigo; Tavani, Stefano; Parente, Mariano; Iannace, Alessandro; Vinci, Francesco; Pirmez, Carlos; Torrieri, Stefano; Giorgioni, Maurizio; Pignalosa, Antonio; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Through-going joints cutting across several beds are often invoked to match large-scale permeability patterns in tight carbonate reservoirs. However, despite the importance of these structures for fluid flow, only few field studies focused on the understanding and estimation of through-going joint dimensional parameters, including spacing and vertical extent in relation to stratigraphy. Recent improvements in the construction of virtual models of outcrops can greatly help to overcome many logistic issues, favoring the evaluation of relationships between jointing and stratigraphy at the reservoir scale. In this study, we present the results obtained from integrating field measurements and stratigraphic logs with a virtual outcrop model of a carbonate platform reservoir analogue in the Sorrento peninsula (Italy). The outcrop consists of a nearly vertical cliff exposing a monocline of alternating gently-dipping shallow-water limestones and dolostones, crossed by several vertical joints of different size. This study allowed us to define how major through-going joints pass across thick beds (bed thickness > 30 cm), while they arrest against packages made of thinly stratified layers. In essence, through-going joints arrest on "weak" levels, consisting of thinly bedded layers interposed between packages made of thick beds, in the same manner as bed-confined joints arrest on less competent interlayers.

  16. Geological Characterisation of Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of the derived reservoir and seal properties such as porosity, permeability, thickness and depth with the minimum recommended site selection criteria shows that the reservoirs are potential candidates for carbon geosequestration with a total theoretical storage capacity of 147MM tons. © JASEM ...

  17. Petrophysical Charaterization of the Kwale Field Reservoir Sands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similarly, the average permeability values vary between 3.2 and 28.0 mD. This study is a first attempt to make available Petrophysical data for the reservoir sands in the Kwale field of the Niger delta basin. The results of this study will also enhance the proper characterization of the reservoir sands. However, other sources of ...

  18. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal 1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  19. New chemical approach to permeability reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presley, C.T.; Argabright, P.A.; Smith, R.E.; Phillips B.L.

    1974-01-01

    A new class of polyelectrolytes, polyisocyanurate salts, has been discovered at this laboratory. The most versatile member of this class, T/sub M/PI, possesses a number of unique properties, not the least of which is its hydrolysis in basic solution. The hydrolysis product is in the form of a colloidal suspension resulting from the opening of some hydrophilic isocyanurate salt rings to the more hydrophobic biuret moiety. The influence of base and T/sub M/PI concentrations on the rate of hydrolysis and, more importantly, the time to onset of particle formation, were investigated. The reaction of T/sub M/PI with base was shown to be an efficient method for generating particles, irreversibly, in porous media for the purpose of reducing permeability. The T/sub M/PI-based partial plugging process has a number of important advantages, namely: (1) the plugging agent is injected as a single solution; (2) the time available after mixing for placement of the solution in the reservoir (i.e., handling time) can be varied over rather wide limits; (3) the process can be designed so that the final permeability is essentially any desired fraction of the initial permeability; (4) the fractional permeability reduction appears to be independent of the initial permeability; and (5) the particles are not removed by subsequent water injection. (16 refs.)

  20. Preliminary study of soil permeability properties using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, M.; Sudriani, Y.; Rustini, H. A.

    2018-02-01

    Soil permeability measurement is undoubtedly important in carrying out soil-water research such as rainfall-runoff modelling, irrigation water distribution systems, etc. It is also known that acquiring reliable soil permeability data is rather laborious, time-consuming, and costly. Therefore, it is desirable to develop the prediction model. Several studies of empirical equations for predicting permeability have been undertaken by many researchers. These studies derived the models from areas which soil characteristics are different from Indonesian soil, which suggest a possibility that these permeability models are site-specific. The purpose of this study is to identify which soil parameters correspond strongly to soil permeability and propose a preliminary model for permeability prediction. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to 16 parameters analysed from 37 sites consist of 91 samples obtained from Batanghari Watershed. Findings indicated five variables that have strong correlation with soil permeability, and we recommend a preliminary permeability model, which is potential for further development.

  1. The regional abundance and size distribution of lakes and reservoirs in the United States and implication for estimates of global lake extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Cory P.; Rover, Jennifer; Stets, Edward G.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed complete geospatial data for the 3.5 million lakes and reservoirs larger than 0.001 km2, with a combined surface area of 131,000 km2, in the contiguous United States (excluding the Laurentian Great Lakes) and identified their regional distribution characteristics. For Alaska, we also analyzed (1) incomplete data that suggest that the state contains 1–2.5 million lakes larger than 0.001 km2 covering over 50,000 km2 and (2) localized high-resolution (5 m) data that suggest that the number of very small water bodies ( 0.001 km2 in some areas. The Pareto distribution cannot accurately describe the lake abundance-size relationship across the entire size spectrum, and extrapolation of this density function to small size classes has likely resulted in the overestimation of the number of small lakes in the world. While small water bodies dominate in terms of numbers, they are not numerous enough to dominate in terms of surface area, as has been previously suggested. Extending our results to the global scale suggests that there are on the order of 64 million water bodies larger than 0.001 km2 in the world, with a total surface area of approximately 3.8 million km2.

  2. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    of the salinity of the pore fluid can increase the electrical double layer repulsion between quartz grains and kaolinite particles in Berea sandstone, which could lead to kaolinite mobilisation and permeability reduction. Heating increases the magnitude of the mineral surface charge, whereas salinity reduction...... permeability to brine than to gas is often observed, which might be due to interaction between the mineral surface and the pore fluid. By modelling a layer of immobile fluid on the fluid-mineral interface permeability to brine was estimated, based on both the pore size distribution from NMR combined...

  3. Chalk as a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    basin, so stylolite formation in the chalk is controlled by effective burial stress. The stylolites are zones of calcite dissolution and probably are the source of calcite for porefilling cementation which is typical in water zone chalk and also affect the reservoirs to different extent. The relatively...... 50% calcite, leaving the remaining internal surface to the fine grained silica and clay. The high specific surface of these components causes clay- and silica rich intervals to have high irreducible water saturation. Although chalks typically are found to be water wet, chalk with mixed wettability...... stabilizes chemically by recrystallization. This process requires energy and is promoted by temperature. This recrystallization in principle does not influence porosity, but only specific surface, which decreases during recrystallization, causing permeability to increase. The central North Sea is a warm...

  4. Permeable Pavements at Purdue

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Two case studies will be presented describing sustainable drainage alternatives. The processes used for the 2nd Street project in Seymour will provide a comparison of the design processes for conventional and green infrastructure solutions. Purdue University will discuss a number of permeable pavement installations on campus and provide a map for viewing. Asphalt, concrete, and permeable paver options will be discussed.

  5. A review on hydraulic fracturing of unconventional reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Quanshu Li; Huilin Xing; Jianjun Liu; Xiangchon Liu

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is widely accepted and applied to improve the gas recovery in unconventional reservoirs. Unconventional reservoirs to be addressed here are with very low permeability, complicated geological settings and in-situ stress field etc. All of these make the hydraulic fracturing process a challenging task. In order to effectively and economically recover gas from such reservoirs, the initiation and propagation of hydraulic fracturing in the heterogeneous fractured/porous media u...

  6. The tight reservoir microscopic classification of southern part of Qijia area in Songliao Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Fu

    2018-02-01

    With the decreasing of the conventional oil and gas reserves, the unconventional tight oil and gas are gradually becoming the focus of the study. The casting thin section, conventional mercury injection, constant velocity and pressure mercury and other experimental methods, tight reservoir microscopic characteristics in southern part of Qijia area were studied in this paper. Based on the above conditions, combined with the parameters of pore type, pore throat radius, the reservoir is divided into two types, conventional reservoir and low permeability tight reservoir. Reservoir conventional reservoir permeability values are greater than 1mD, low permeability tight reservoirs are classified into IIa type and IIb type, which provides some reference value for the actual exploration and development.

  7. Water coning in porous media reservoirs for compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, L.E.; McCann, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The general purpose of this work is to define the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a CAES porous media reservoir subjected to simulated air mass cycling. This research will assist in providing design guidelines for the efficient and stable operation of the air storage reservoir. This report presents the analysis and results for the two-phase (air-water), two-dimensional, numerical modeling of CAES porous media reservoirs. The effects of capillary pressure and relative permeability were included. The fluids were considered to be immisicible; there was no phase change; and the system was isothermal. The specific purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the reservoir parameters that were believed to be important to water coning. This phenomenon may occur in reservoirs in which water underlies the air storage zone. It involves the possible intrusion of water into the wellbore or near-wellbore region. The water movement is in response to pressure gradients created during a reservoir discharge cycle. Potential adverse effects due to this water movement are associated with the pressure response of the reservoir and the geochemical stability of the near-wellbore region. The results obtained for the simulated operation of a CAES reservoir suggest that water coning should not be a severe problem, due to the slow response of the water to the pressure gradients and the relatively short duration in which those gradients exist. However, water coning will depend on site-specific conditions, particularly the fluid distributions following bubble development, and, therefore, a water coning analysis should be included as part of site evaluation.

  8. Well test analysis of horizontal wells in a two-layered reservoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reservoir drained from each layer by a horizontal well. Reservoir mathematical model are derived for each layer so that analysis can be done strictly for each layered reservoir. Procedures for obtaining all the directional permeabilities, wellbore skin, degree of crossflow and individual layers average pressures are discussed ...

  9. Crosswell electromagnetic imaging for geothermal reservoir characterization - a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrock, Friedemann; Saar, Martin O.

    2016-04-01

    Most regions in the world do not have ready access to natural convective hydrothermal resources. To use deep geothermal heat as a viable energy resource in low-permeability formations, permeable fracture networks have to be created artificially to enable deep fluid circulation for advective heat transport to a production well. Such generation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is studied in the "Deep Underground Geothermal (DUG)" laboratory at the Grimsel pass, Switzerland. Here, an underground experiment is conducted by hydraulically stimulating a pre-existing shear zone within crystalline rock. The objectives of this project are to better describe and understand the processes acting during reservoir generation. We perform a feasibility study to evaluate the capability of low-frequency crosswell electromagnetic (EM) tomography for mapping of stimulation-induced changes in electrical conductivity. First numerical results show that crosswell EM data are generally sensitive to the inter-well conductivity distribution, which is affected by properties such as interconnected porosity, permeability and the presence of fluids. It thereby provides important information for characterization of potential EGS reservoirs. We present a 3-D forward modeling and inversion study using synthetic data and under realistic conditions, these include the true borehole spacing and the observed electromagnetic noise level in the DUG laboratory. Based on these results we discuss the system requirements and the capability of crosswell EM to recover the inter-well structure and stimulation-induced changes. Besides the numerical study we report on the current status of instrumentation and realization of crosswell EM measurements at the DUG laboratory.

  10. Geothermal reservoir management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

    1978-02-01

    The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

  11. Permeability of porour rhyolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  12. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  13. Geoprocessing techniques to evaluate the spatial distribution of natural rain erosion potential in the Hydrographic Basin of Cachoeira Dourada Reservoir – Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Pereira CABRAL

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural potential erosion were defined from their main natural conditioners in the region of hydrographic basin of Cachoeira Dourada (between Goiás and Minas Gerais states −Brazil, with geoprocessing techniques and the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE. Upon the decision for natural erosion potential, a matrix with values of erosivity (R, erodibility (K, declivity, and ramp length (LS was elaborated, where classes of low, medium, high, very high, and extremely high natural erosion potential (NEP were established. Spatial distribution for the factors R, K, LS, and PNE was defined. The highest average R index for the rainy series was 8173.50 MJ ha mm-1 h-1 year-1. The period with data from 30 years (1973 – 2002 showed that the reservoir basin displayed areas susceptible to rill and interill erosion (69.16% of the total. There is a predominance of low erosion potential among the classes, which can be explained due to the soil predominant classes as well as to the low declivity. Areas with medium to extremely high erosion potential require the adoption of measures to avoid start and development of more severe erosion processes (ravines and gullies.

  14. APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Beebe

    2003-05-05

    The OXY-operated Class 2 Project at West Welch is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO{sub 2} injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO{sub 2} flood design based on the reservoir characterization. Although Budget Period 1 for the Project officially ended 12/31/96, reservoir characterization and simulation work continued during the Budget Period 2. During the seventh annual reporting period (8/3/00-8/2/01) covered by this report, work continued on interpretation of the interwell seismic data to create porosity and permeability profiles which were distributed into the reservoir geostatistically. The initial interwell seismic CO{sub 2} monitor survey was conducted and the acquired data processed and interpretation started. Only limited well work and facility construction were conducted in the project area. The CO{sub 2} injection initiated in October 1997 was continued, although the operator had to modify the operating plan in response to low injection rates, well performance and changes in CO{sub 2} supply. CO{sub 2} injection was focused in a smaller area to increase the reservoir processing rate. By the end of the reporting period three producers had shown sustained oil rate increases and six wells had experienced gas (CO{sub 2}) breakthrough.

  15. Analytical Estimation of Water-Oil Relative Permeabilities through Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saboorian-Jooybari Hadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling multiphase flow through fractures is a key issue for understanding flow mechanism and performance prediction of fractured petroleum reservoirs, geothermal reservoirs, underground aquifers and carbon-dioxide sequestration. One of the most challenging subjects in modeling of fractured petroleum reservoirs is quantifying fluids competition for flow in fracture network (relative permeability curves. Unfortunately, there is no standard technique for experimental measurement of relative permeabilities through fractures and the existing methods are very expensive, time consuming and erroneous. Although, several formulations were presented to calculate fracture relative permeability curves in the form of linear and power functions of flowing fluids saturation, it is still unclear what form of relative permeability curves must be used for proper modeling of flow through fractures and consequently accurate reservoir simulation. Basically, the classic linear relative permeability (X-type curves are used in almost all of reservoir simulators. In this work, basic fluid flow equations are combined to develop a new simple analytical model for water-oil two phase flow in a single fracture. The model gives rise to simple analytic formulations for fracture relative permeabilities. The model explicitly proves that water-oil relative permeabilities in fracture network are functions of fluids saturation, viscosity ratio, fluids density, inclination of fracture plane from horizon, pressure gradient along fracture and rock matrix wettability, however they were considered to be only functions of saturations in the classic X-type and power (Corey [35] and Honarpour et al. [28, 29] models. Eventually, validity of the proposed formulations is checked against literature experimental data. The proposed fracture relative permeability functions have several advantages over the existing ones. Firstly, they are explicit functions of the parameters which are known for

  16. The Application of Fractal and Multifractal Theory in Hydraulic-Flow-Unit Characterization and Permeability Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Yao, G.; Cai, J.

    2017-12-01

    Pore structure characteristics are important factors in influencing the fluid transport behavior of porous media, such as pore-throat ratio, pore connectivity and size distribution, moreover, wettability. To accurately characterize the diversity of pore structure among HFUs, five samples selected from different HFUs (porosities are approximately equal, however permeability varies widely) were chosen to conduct micro-computerized tomography test to acquire direct 3D images of pore geometries and to perform mercury injection experiments to obtain the pore volume-radii distribution. To characterize complex and high nonlinear pore structure of all samples, three classic fractal geometry models were applied. Results showed that each HFU has similar box-counting fractal dimension and generalized fractal dimension in the number-area model, but there are significant differences in multifractal spectrums. In the radius-volume model, there are three obvious linear segments, corresponding to three fractal dimension values, and the middle one is proved as the actual fractal dimension according to the maximum radius. In the number-radius model, the spherical-pore size distribution extracted by maximum ball algorithm exist a decrease in the number of small pores compared with the fractal power rate rather than the traditional linear law. Among the three models, only multifractal analysis can classify the HFUs accurately. Additionally, due to the tightness and low-permeability in reservoir rocks, connate water film existing in the inner surface of pore channels commonly forms bound water. The conventional model which is known as Yu-Cheng's model has been proved to be typically not applicable. Considering the effect of irreducible water saturation, an improved fractal permeability model was also deduced theoretically. The comparison results showed that the improved model can be applied to calculate permeability directly and accurately in such unconventional rocks.

  17. Depletion of E. coli in permeable pavement mineral aggregate storage and reuse systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, B R; Beecham, S; van Leeuwen, J A; Keegan, A

    2009-01-01

    Permeable pavement reservoirs provide an important opportunity for the harvesting and storage of stormwater for reuse. This research aims to determine whether storage in dolomite, calcite and quartzite mineral aggregates in the base course of a permeable pavement impacts on the survival of the pathogen indicator organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) in storage. The reasons for depletion were also investigated. Twelve model permeable pavement storage reservoirs were filled, in triplicate, with dolomite, calcite and quartzite. Three reservoirs contained no aggregate. After filling with pathogen spiked rainwater, the concentration of E. coli was examined for 22 days in the reservoirs. The reservoirs were then agitated to determine if there was E. coli present which was not in aqueous suspension. The results of the experiments show that there is no significant difference in the depletion of E. coli found in reservoirs without aggregate, and those filled with dolomite or calcite. The rate of depletion was found to be significantly lower in the quartzite filled reservoirs. Agitation of the reservoirs yielded increases in the aqueous concentration of E. coli in all reservoir types, suggesting that the bacteria are adhering to the surface of the mineral aggregate and to the reservoir walls.

  18. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types...

  19. Integration of Multi-Tension Permeametry and Photogrammetric Textural Segmentation for Estimating Directional Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Hanford’s Science and Technology Vadose Zone- Groundwater Integration Project. Tests were not performed at Hanford as the Science and Technology... Upscaling Vertical Permeability within a Fluvio-Aeolian Reservoir. Paper presented at the 4th International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference

  20. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  1. Upscaling of permeability field of fractured rock system: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, K.

    2012-01-01

    When the permeability field of a given porous medium domain is heterogeneous by the existence of randomly distributed fractures such that numerical investigation becomes cumbersome, another level of upscaling may be required. That is such complex permeability field could be relaxed (i.e., smoothed) by constructing an effective permeability field. The effective permeability field is an approximation to the real permeability field that preserves certain quantities and provides an overall acceptable description of the flow field. In this work, the effective permeability for a fractured rock system is obtained for different coarsening scenarios starting from very coarse mesh all the way towards the fine mesh simulation. In all these scenarios, the effective permeability as well as the pressure at each cell is obtained. The total flux at the exit boundary is calculated in all these cases, and very good agreement is obtained.

  2. Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations

  3. Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völcker, Carsten

    With an increasing demand for oil and diculties in nding new major oil elds, research on methods to improve oil recovery from existing elds is more necessary now than ever. The subject of this thesis is to construct ecient numerical methods for simulation and optimization of oil recovery...... programming (SQP) with line-search and BFGS approximations of the Hessian, and the adjoint method for ecient computation of the gradients. We demonstrate that the application of NMPC for optimal control of smart-wells has the potential to increase the economic value of an oil reservoir....... with emphasis on optimal control of water ooding with the use of smartwell technology. We have implemented immiscible ow of water and oil in isothermal reservoirs with isotropic heterogenous permeability elds. We use the method of lines for solution of the partial differential equation (PDE) system that governs...

  4. Effective Local-Global Upscaling of Fractured Reservoirs under Discrete Fractured Discretization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The subsurface flow in fractured reservoirs is strongly affected by the distribution of fracture networks. Discrete fracture models, which represent all fractures individually by unstructured grid systems, are thus developed and act as a more accurate way for fractured reservoir simulation. However, it is usually not realistic to directly apply discrete fracture models to simulate field scale models for efficiency reasons. There is a need for upscaling techniques to coarsen the high resolution fracture descriptions to sizes that can be accommodated by reservoir simulators. In this paper, we extended the adaptive local-global upscaling technique to construct a transmissibility-based dual-porosity dual-permeability model from discrete fracture characterizations. An underlying unstructured fine-scale grid is firstly generated as a base grid. A global coarse-scale simulation is performed to provide boundary conditions for local regions and local upscaling procedures are carried out in every local region for transmissibility calculations. Iterations are performed until the consistency between the global and local properties is achieved. The procedure is applied to provide dual-porosity dual-permeability (DPDK parameters including coarse-scale matrix-matrix, fracture-fracture and matrix-fracture flux transmissibilities. The methodology is applied to several cases. The simulation results demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Determination of Three-Phase Relative Permeabilities under Reservoir Conditions by Hot Water and Steamflood Experiments Détermination de perméabilités relatives tri-phasiques en conditions de réservoir, à partir d'expériences de balayages à l'eau chaude et à la vapeur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quettier L.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to help the physical and numerical interpretation of Emeraude's steam pilot, two-phase waterfloods at four temperatures (between 30 and 240°C and a steamflood were performed in the laboratory using the same porous medium (compacted silt and under reservoir conditions. Dynamic isothermal displacements were interpreted with a thermal simulator taking into account capillary end effects. The corresponding oil-water relative permeability curves were obtained by matching observed pressure drop and oil production. Results show that temperature influences the end-point saturations but not the shape of the curves. The steamflood experiment was carried out in an adiabatic core holder. Oil stripping and production of a large amount of CO2 caused by dissolution of carbonates were pointed out. The numerical interpretation of this experiment, by making use of the oil-water relative permeabilities, provided the three-phase oil relative permeability which is an essential datum for numerical interpretation of a steam drive pilot. Then a parameter study was used to quantify the influence of the different mechanisms involved in hot water and steam floods. Dans le but de faciliter l'interprétation physique et numérique du pilote vapeur d' Emeraude, des balayages eau-huile à quatre températures (entre 30 et 240°C et un balayage à la vapeur ont été réalisés au laboratoire. Toutes ces expériences ont été effectuées sur le même milieu poreux (silt compacté et en conditions de réservoir. Les déplacements bi-phasiques isothermes, en écoulement transitoire, ont été interprétés avec un modèle numérique thermique qui prend en compte les effets capillaires aux extrémités de l'échantillon. Les courbes de perméabilités relatives dynamiques eau-huile sont déterminées par calage, sur les courbes expérimentales, de la différence de pression et de la production d'huile simulées. Les résultats montrent que la température influe sur les

  6. Stress- and Chemistry-Mediated Permeability Enhancement/Degradation in Stimulated Critically-Stressed Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham S. Grader; Chris Marone; Phillip Halleck; Peter Rose; Igor Faoro; Joshua Taron; André Niemeijer; Hideaki Yasuhara

    2009-03-30

    This work has investigated the interactions between stress and chemistry in controlling the evolution of permeability in stimulated fractured reservoirs through an integrated program of experimentation and modeling. Flow-through experiments on natural and artificial fractures in Coso diorite have examined the evolution of permeability under paths of mean and deviatoric stresses, including the role of dissolution and precipitation. Models accommodating these behaviors have examined the importance of incorporating the complex couplings between stress and chemistry in examining the evolution of permeability in EGS reservoirs. This document reports the findings of experiment [1,2] and analysis [3,4], in four sequential chapters.

  7. The effect of river water circulation on the distribution and functioning of reservoir microbial communities as determined by a relative distance approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Karel; Comerma, M.; García, J. C.; Nedoma, Jiří; Marcé, R.; Armengol, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2011), s. 1-14 ISSN 1432-9840 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/08/0015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : canyon-shaped reservoir * ongitudinal gradients * relative distance model * river-reservoir ecosystem * water circulation patterns * plankton succession * microbial dynamics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.495, year: 2011

  8. Impact of overpressures on subsurface exploration and reservoir management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, P.

    2009-04-01

    possible within the subsurface. An important matter is the prediction of the hydrocarbon phase distribution within overpressured reservoirs. In many areas, source rocks are also contained within the overpressured realm. Consequently these overpressures control the general presence of hydrocarbons and the distribution of their phases. Based on the PVT-data of the final products, modern modelling techniques allow the prediction of gas-/oil-ratios and distributions in reservoirs at different depths and pressure regimes. Field development and production within overpressured reservoirs are often hampered by the heterogeneous distribution of porosity and permeability which leads to low or inconsistent production rates. A widely know phenomenon is the general deterioration of reservoir properties by diagenetic processes. Another feature is the plugging of porosity by salt, bitumen and other movable phases by way of secondary processes. Optimised strategies for future successful exploration campaigns, field development and production from overpressured fields can only be achieved by the integration of methods with the final aim of a dynamic reservoir model. This includes the amalgamation of various modelling techniques (thermal, chemical, reservoir, diagenetic, structural) combined with advanced 4-D (time lapse) seismic techniques.

  9. Effects of Formation Damage on Productivity of Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I.C. Anyadiegwu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the effects of formation damage on the productivity of gas storage reservoirs was performed with depleted oil reservoir (OB-02, located onshore, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Information on the reservoir and the fluids from OB-02 were collected and used to evaluate the deliverabilities of the gas storage reservoir over a 10-year period of operation. The results obtained were used to plot graphs of deliverability against permeability and skin respectively. The graphs revealed that as the permeability decreased, the skin increased, and hence a decrease in deliverability of gas from the reservoir during gas withdrawal. Over the ten years of operating the reservoir for gas storage, the deliverability and permeability which were initially 2.7 MMscf/d and 50 mD, with a skin of 0.2, changed to new values of 0.88 MMscf/d and 24 mD with the skin as 4.1 at the tenth year.

  10. Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

  11. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Science.gov (United States)

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m2, lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m3 tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry de

  12. Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2005-11-09

    This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault

  13. Adaptive forward-inverse modeling of reservoir fluids away from wellbores; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziagos, J P; Gelinas, R J; Doss, S K; Nelson, R G

    1999-01-01

    This Final Report contains the deliverables of the DeepLook Phase I project entitled, ''Adaptive Forward-Inverse Modeling of Reservoir Fluids Away from Wellbores''. The deliverables are: (i) a description of 2-D test problem results, analyses, and technical descriptions of the techniques used, (ii) a listing of program setup commands that construct and execute the codes for selected test problems (these commands are in mathematical terminology, which reinforces technical descriptions in the text), and (iii) an evaluation and recommendation regarding continuance of this project, including considerations of possible extensions to 3-D codes, additional technical scope, and budget for the out-years. The far-market objective in this project is to develop advanced technologies that can help locate and enhance the recovery of oil from heterogeneous rock formations. The specific technical objective in Phase I was to develop proof-of-concept of new forward and inverse (F-I) modeling techniques[Gelinas et al, 1998] that seek to enhance estimates (images) of formation permeability distributions and fluid motion away from wellbore volumes. This goes to the heart of improving industry's ability to jointly image reservoir permeability and flow predictions of trapped and recovered oil versus time. The estimation of formation permeability away from borehole measurements is an ''inverse'' problem. It is an inseparable part of modeling fluid flows throughout the reservoir in efforts to increase the efficiency of oil recovery at minimum cost. Classic issues of non-uniqueness, mathematical instability, noise effects, and inadequate numerical solution techniques have historically impeded progress in reservoir parameter estimations. Because information pertaining to fluid and rock properties is always sampled sparsely by wellbore measurements, a successful method for interpolating permeability and fluid data between the measurements must be: (i) physics-based, (ii) conditioned by signal

  14. Towards the rational design of novel drugs based on solubility, partitioning/distribution, biomimetic permeability and biological activity exemplified by 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkova, T. V.; Terekhova, I. V.; Silyukov, O. I.

    2017-01-01

    Novel 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivatives as potent neuroprotectors were synthesized and identified. Their ability to inhibit the glutamate stimulated Ca2+ uptake was investigated. The solubility of thiadiazoles was measured in a buffer solution (pH 7.4) at 298 K. The distribution coefficients in 1-oct...

  15. A method for examining the geospatial distribution of CO2 storage resources applied to the Pre-Punta Gorda Composite and Dollar Bay reservoirs of the South Florida Basin, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Ashby, Tina; Brandon N. Ashby,

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates geospatial modification of the USGS methodology for assessing geologic CO2 storage resources, and was applied to the Pre-Punta Gorda Composite and Dollar Bay reservoirs of the South Florida Basin. The study provides detailed evaluation of porous intervals within these reservoirs and utilizes GIS to evaluate the potential spatial distribution of reservoir parameters and volume of CO2 that can be stored. This study also shows that incorporating spatial variation of parameters using detailed and robust datasets may improve estimates of storage resources when compared to applying uniform values across the study area derived from small datasets, like many assessment methodologies. Geospatially derived estimates of storage resources presented here (Pre-Punta Gorda Composite = 105,570 MtCO2; Dollar Bay = 24,760 MtCO2) were greater than previous assessments, which was largely attributed to the fact that detailed evaluation of these reservoirs resulted in higher estimates of porosity and net-porous thickness, and areas of high porosity and thick net-porous intervals were incorporated into the model, likely increasing the calculated volume of storage space available for CO2 sequestration. The geospatial method for evaluating CO2 storage resources also provides the ability to identify areas that potentially contain higher volumes of storage resources, as well as areas that might be less favorable.

  16. Heterogeneous porous media permeability field characterization from fluid displacement data; Integration de donnees de deplacements de fluides dans la caracterisation de milieux poreux heterogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretz, V.

    2002-11-01

    The prediction of oil recovery or pollutant dispersion requires an accurate knowledge of the permeability field distribution. Available data are usually measurements in well bores, and, since a few years, 4D-seismic data (seismic mappings repeated in time). Such measurements allow to evaluate fluids displacements fronts evolution. The purpose of the thesis is to evaluate the possibility to determinate permeability fields from fluid displacement measurements in heterogeneous porous media. At the laboratory scale, experimental studies are made on a model and on numerical simulations. The system uses blocks of granular materials whose individual geometries and permeabilities are controlled. The fluids displacements are detected with an acoustical. The key parameters of the study are the size and spatial correlation of the permeability heterogeneity distribution, and the influence of viscosity and gravity contrasts between the injected ant displaced fluid. Then the inverse problem - evaluating the permeability field from concentration fronts evolution - is approached. At the reservoir scale, the work will mainly be focused on the integration of 4D-seismic data into inversion programs on a 3D synthetic case. A particular importance will be given to the calculation of gradients, in order to obtain a complementary information about the sensitivity of data. The information provided by 4D-seismic data consists in maps showing the vertical average of oil saturation or the presence of gas. The purpose is to integrate this qualitative information in the inversion process and to evaluate the impact on the reservoir characterization. Comparative studies - with or without 4D-seismic data - will be realized on a synthetic case. (author)

  17. Changes in permeability caused by transient stresses: field observations, experiments, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Michael; Beresnev, Igor; Brodsky, Emily E.; Elkhoury, Jean E.; Elsworth, Derek; Ingebritsen, Steve E.; Mays, David C.; Wang, Chi-Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10–6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level in wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated values over a period of months to years. Mechanisms that can change permeability at such small stresses include unblocking pores, either by breaking up permeability-limiting colloidal deposits or by mobilizing droplets and bubbles trapped in pores by capillary forces. The recovery time over which permeability returns to the prestimulated value is governed by the time to reblock pores, or for geochemical processes to seal pores. Monitoring permeability in geothermal systems where there is abundant seismicity, and the response of flow to local and regional earthquakes, would help test some of the proposed mechanisms and identify controls on permeability and its evolution.

  18. A Step Forward to Closing the Loop between Static and Dynamic Reservoir Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancelliere M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current trend for history matching is to find multiple calibrated models instead of a single set of model parameters that match the historical data. The advantage of several current workflows involving assisted history matching techniques, particularly those based on heuristic optimizers or direct search, is that they lead to a number of calibrated models that partially address the problem of the non-uniqueness of the solutions. The importance of achieving multiple solutions is that calibrated models can be used for a true quantification of the uncertainty affecting the production forecasts, which represent the basis for technical and economic risk analysis. In this paper, the importance of incorporating the geological uncertainties in a reservoir study is demonstrated. A workflow, which includes the analysis of the uncertainty associated with the facies distribution for a fluvial depositional environment in the calibration of the numerical dynamic models and, consequently, in the production forecast, is presented. The first step in the workflow was to generate a set of facies realizations starting from different conceptual models. After facies modeling, the petrophysical properties were assigned to the simulation domains. Then, each facies realization was calibrated separately by varying permeability and porosity fields. Data assimilation techniques were used to calibrate the models in a reasonable span of time. Results showed that even the adoption of a conceptual model for facies distribution clearly representative of the reservoir internal geometry might not guarantee reliable results in terms of production forecast. Furthermore, results also showed that realizations which seem fully acceptable after calibration were not representative of the true reservoir internal configuration and provided wrong production forecasts; conversely, realizations which did not show a good fit of the production data could reliably predict the reservoir

  19. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  20. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

    2009-10-15

    Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

  1. Characterization of heterogeneous reservoirs: sentinels method and quantification of uncertainties; Caracterisation des reservoirs heterogenes: methode des sentinelles et quantification des incertitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, M.

    1999-02-11

    The aim of this thesis is to propose a new inversion method to allow both an improved reservoir characterization and a management of uncertainties. In this approach, the identification of the permeability distribution is conducted using the sentinel method in order to match the pressure data. This approach, based on optimal control theory, can be seen as an alternative of least-squares method. Here, we prove the existence of exact sentinels under regularity hypothesis. From a numerical point of view, we consider regularized sentinels. We suggest a novel approach to update the penalization coefficient in order to improve numerical robustness. Moreover, the flexibility of the sentinel method enables to develop a way to treat noisy pressure data. To deal with geostatistical modelling of permeability distribution, we propose to link the pilot point method with sentinels to reach the identification of permeability. We particularly focus on the optimal location of pilot points. Finally, we present an original method, based on adjoint state computations, to quantify the dynamic data contribution to the characterisation of a calibrated geostatistical model. (author) 67 refs.

  2. Quantifying the clay content with borehole depth and impact on reservoir flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath Kumar, Aaraellu D.; Chattopadhyay, Pallavi B.

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the application of reservoir well log data and 3D transient numerical model for proper optimization of flow dynamics and hydrocarbon potential. Fluid flow through porous media depends on clay content that controls porosity, permeability and pore pressure. The pressure dependence of permeability is more pronounced in tight formations. Therefore, preliminary clay concentration analysis and geo-mechanical characterizations have been done by using wells logs. The assumption of a constant permeability for a reservoir is inappropriate and therefore the study deals with impact of permeability variation for pressure-sensitive formation. The study started with obtaining field data from available well logs. Then, the mathematical models are developed to understand the efficient extraction of oil in terms of reservoir architecture, porosity and permeability. The fluid flow simulations have been done using COMSOL Multiphysics Software by choosing time dependent subsurface flow module that is governed by Darcy's law. This study suggests that the reservoir should not be treated as a single homogeneous structure with unique porosity and permeability. The reservoir parameters change with varying clay content and it should be considered for effective planning and extraction of oil. There is an optimum drawdown for maximum production with varying permeability in a reservoir.

  3. Stress dependence of permeability of intact and fractured shale cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Reinier; Yarushina, Viktoriya

    2016-04-01

    Whether a shale acts as a caprock, source rock, or reservoir, understanding fluid flow through shale is of major importance for understanding fluid flow in geological systems. Because of the low permeability of shale, flow is thought to be largely confined to fractures and similar features. In fracking operations, fractures are induced specifically to allow for hydrocarbon exploration. We have constructed an experimental setup to measure core permeabilities, using constant flow or a transient pulse. In this setup, we have measured the permeability of intact and fractured shale core samples, using either water or supercritical CO2 as the transporting fluid. Our measurements show decreasing permeability with increasing confining pressure, mainly due to time-dependent creep. Furthermore, our measurements show that for a simple splitting fracture, time-dependent creep will also eliminate any significant effect of this fracture on permeability. This effect of confinement on fracture permeability can have important implications regarding the effects of fracturing on shale permeability, and hence for operations depending on that.

  4. Synthetic well test modelling in a high net-to-gross outcrop system for turbidite reservoir description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E.; Corbett, P.W.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Hurst, A.; Satur, N.; Cronin, B.T. [Aberdeen Univ., Dept. of Petroleum Geology, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Synthetic well tests have been produced using a 3D model of an outcropping turbidite sandstone unit from the Cingoz region in southern Turkey. The model contains realistic sand sheet, tongue, lobe and background sand facies architecture (i.e. geometry and stacking) mapped from an outcrop study. The geometric information is useful as an analogue for high net-to-gross turbidite oil fields. The facies have been assigned petrophysical properties from a subsurface analogue. There is little shale in this system. Well test responses were then derived from the high net-to-gross tubidite model using various architectural, porosity-permeability scenarios and completion strategies. The impact on well test derivatives of various sand body geometries and permeability contrasts could then be determined. Two completion strategies - partial penetration and fully perforated intervals - were assessed for the applicability in the high net-to-gross system. The geological model is effectively a sandbox, and shows a very uniform testing response from the rather uniform property distributions. However, when the level of permeability heterogeneity is increased by populating the model with varying contrasts of permeability and porosity, the sand body geometry can be seen to influence the well tests. Partial completions in sand bodies are particularly effective in detecting sand body geometry. The geometry controls the flow regimes in a well test response despite variations in the permeability contrasts. The effect of varying geometry is illustrated and an external linear flow regime is identified. Where there is sufficient sand body thickness, partial perforation results in spherical flow, from which a vertical permeability can be obtained. In the model, the vertical permeability thus obtained is a local (to the volume investigated) effective permeability of stacked isotropic facies. This work was undertaken to give guidance on the description of hydrocarbon reservoirs by well testing. If

  5. Play-level distributions of estimates of recovery factors for a miscible carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery method used in oil reservoirs in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2016-03-02

    In a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study, recovery-factor estimates were calculated by using a publicly available reservoir simulator (CO2 Prophet) to estimate how much oil might be recovered with the application of a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method to technically screened oil reservoirs located in onshore and State offshore areas in the conterminous United States. A recovery factor represents the percentage of an oil reservoir’s original oil in place estimated to be recoverable by the application of a miscible CO2-EOR method. The USGS estimates were calculated for 2,018 clastic and 1,681 carbonate candidate reservoirs in the “Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States Database” prepared by Nehring Associates, Inc. (2012).

  6. Reservoir Identification: Parameter Characterization or Feature Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J.

    2017-12-01

    The ultimate goal of oil and gas exploration is to find the oil or gas reservoirs with industrial mining value. Therefore, the core task of modern oil and gas exploration is to identify oil or gas reservoirs on the seismic profiles. Traditionally, the reservoir is identify by seismic inversion of a series of physical parameters such as porosity, saturation, permeability, formation pressure, and so on. Due to the heterogeneity of the geological medium, the approximation of the inversion model and the incompleteness and noisy of the data, the inversion results are highly uncertain and must be calibrated or corrected with well data. In areas where there are few wells or no well, reservoir identification based on seismic inversion is high-risk. Reservoir identification is essentially a classification issue. In the identification process, the underground rocks are divided into reservoirs with industrial mining value and host rocks with non-industrial mining value. In addition to the traditional physical parameters classification, the classification may be achieved using one or a few comprehensive features. By introducing the concept of seismic-print, we have developed a new reservoir identification method based on seismic-print analysis. Furthermore, we explore the possibility to use deep leaning to discover the seismic-print characteristics of oil and gas reservoirs. Preliminary experiments have shown that the deep learning of seismic data could distinguish gas reservoirs from host rocks. The combination of both seismic-print analysis and seismic deep learning is expected to be a more robust reservoir identification method. The work was supported by NSFC under grant No. 41430323 and No. U1562219, and the National Key Research and Development Program under Grant No. 2016YFC0601

  7. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, P.K.

    1996-11-01

    This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Methane Hydrate Reservoirs: Effects of Reservoir Parameters on Gas Productivity and Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Gaddipati, M.; Nyayapathi, L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on production rates of natural gas from gas hydrates by the method of depressurization, using CMG STARS. Seven factors/parameters were considered as perturbations from a base-case hydrate reservoir description based on Problem 7 of the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study led by the Department of Energy and the USGS. This reservoir is modeled after the inferred properties of the hydrate deposit at the Prudhoe Bay L-106 site. The included sensitivity variables were hydrate saturation, pressure (depth), temperature, bottom-hole pressure of the production well, free water saturation, intrinsic rock permeability, and porosity. A two-level (L=2) Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to study the relative effects of these factors. The measured variable was the discounted cumulative gas production. The discount rate chosen was 15%, resulting in the gas contribution to the net present value of a reservoir. Eight different designs were developed for conducting sensitivity analysis and the effects of the parameters on the real and discounted production rates will be discussed. The breakeven price in various cases and the dependence of the breakeven price on the production parameters is given in the paper. As expected, initial reservoir temperature has the strongest positive effect on the productivity of a hydrate deposit and the bottom-hole pressure in the production well has the strongest negative dependence. Also resulting in a positive correlation is the intrinsic permeability and the initial free water of the formation. Negative effects were found for initial hydrate saturation (at saturations greater than 50% of the pore space) and the reservoir porosity. These negative effects are related to the available sensible heat of the reservoir, with decreasing productivity due to decreasing available sensible heat. Finally, we conclude that for the base case reservoir, the break-even price (BEP

  9. Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

    2002-05-21

    The purpose of this work was to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production.

  10. Spatial distribution of the .i.Daphnia longispina./i. species complex and other planktonic crustaceans in the heterogeneous environment of canyon-shaped reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seďa, Jaromír; Petrusek, A.; Macháček, Jiří; Šmilauer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2007), s. 619-628 ISSN 0142-7873 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/04/0190 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : Daphnia longispina species complex * canyon-shaped reservoirs Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2007

  11. Geothermal prospection in the Greater Geneva Basin (Switzerland and France): Structural and reservoir quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusillon, Elme; Clerc, Nicolas; Makhloufi, Yasin; Brentini, Maud; Moscariello, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    A reservoir assessment was performed in the Greater Geneva Basin to evaluate the geothermal resources potential of low to medium enthalpy (Moscariello, 2016). For this purpose, a detail structural analysis of the basin was performed (Clerc et al., 2016) simultaneously with a reservoir appraisal study including petrophysical properties assessment in a consistent sedimentological and stratigraphical frame (Brentini et al., 2017). This multi-disciplinary study was organised in 4 steps: (1) investigation of the surrounding outcrops to understand the stratigraphy and lateral facies distribution of the sedimentary sequence from Permo-Carboniferous to Lower Cretaceous units; (2) development of 3D geological models derived from 2D seismic and well data focusing on the structural scheme of the basin to constrain better the tectonic influence on facies distribution and to assess potential hydraulic connectivity through faults between reservoir units ; (3) evaluation of the distribution, geometry, sedimentology and petrophysical properties of potential reservoir units from well data; (4) identification and selection of the most promising reservoir units for in-depth rock type characterization and 3D modeling. Petrophysical investigations revealed that the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian Reef Complex and the underlying Calcaires de Tabalcon units are the most promising geothermal reservoir targets (porosity range 10-20%; permeability to 1mD). Best reservoir properties are measured in patch reefs and high-energy peri-reefal depositional environments, which are surrounded by synchronous tight lagoonal deposits. Associated highly porous dolomitized intervals reported in the western part of the basin also provide enhanced reservoir quality. The distribution and geometry of best reservoir bodies is complex and constrained by (1) palaeotopography, which can be affected by synsedimentary fault activity during Mesozoic times, (2) sedimentary factors such as hydrodynamics, sea level variations

  12. Steam-water relative permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  13. Ichthyofauna of the reservoirs of Central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Stolbunov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Species composition, distribution and abundance of fish in the pelagic and littoral zone of four reservoirs of Central Vietnam (Suoi Chau, Kam Lam, Da Ban and Suoi Dau were studied first. According to the research data the fish community of the reservoirs is represented by 43 species of 19 fish families.

  14. A new method for the experimental determination of three-phase relative permeabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Carrillo, Edgar Ricardo; Jose Francisco Zapata Arango; Santos Santos, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Petroleum reservoirs under primary, secondary or tertiary recovery processes usually experience simultaneous flow of three fluids phases (oil, water and gas). Reports on some mathematical models for calculating three-phase relative permeability are available in the Literature. Nevertheless, many of these models were designed based on certain experimental conditions and reservoir rocks and fluids. Therefore, special care has to be taken when applying them to specific reservoirs. At the laboratory level, three-phase relative permeability can be calculated using experimental unsteady-state or steady state methodologies. This paper proposes an unsteady-state methodology to evaluate three-phase relative permeability using the equipment available at the petrophysical analysis Laboratory of the Instituto Colombiano del Petroleo (ICP) of Ecopetrol S.A. Improvements to the equipment were effected in order to achieve accuracy in the unsteady-state measurement of three-phase relative permeability. The target of improvements was directed toward to the attainment of two objectives:1) the modification of the equipment to obtain more reliable experimental data and 2) the appropriate interpretation of the data obtained. Special attention was given to the differential pressure and uncertainty measurement in the determination of fluid saturation in the rock samples. Three experiments for three-phase relative permeability were conducted using a sample A and reservoir rock from the Colombian Foothills. Fluid tests included the utilization of synthetic brine, mineral oil, reservoir crude oil and nitrogen. Two runs were conducted at the laboratory conditions while one run was conducted at reservoir conditions. Experimental results of these tests were compared using 16 mathematical models of three-phase relative permeability. For the three-phase relative permeability to oil, the best correlations between experimental data and tests using Blunt, Hustad Hasen, and Baker's models were

  15. Petrophysical Evaluation of Reservoir Sand Bodies in Kwe Field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    B has an average NTG (65.6 %), Ø (26.0 %), K (95.90 md), Sw (28.87 %) and Sh (71.13 %) while Reservoir C has an average NTG .... The presence of parallel to ripple laminated sandy heteroliths suggests deposition in tidally ... of the reservoir ranges from 25 – 32 % with an average value of 27.50 % while permeability ...

  16. Numerical modeling of shear stimulation in naturally fractured geothermal reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Ucar, Eren

    2018-01-01

    Shear-dilation-based hydraulic stimulations are conducted to create enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) from low permeable geothermal reservoirs, which are initially not amenable to energy production. Reservoir stimulations are done by injecting low-pressurized fluid into the naturally fractured formations. The injection aims to activate critically stressed fractures by decreasing frictional strength and ultimately cause a shear failure. The shear failure leads to a permanent ...

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a

  18. Impact of Reservoir Operation to the Inflow Flood - a Case Study of Xinfengjiang Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.

    2017-12-01

    Building of reservoir shall impact the runoff production and routing characteristics, and changes the flood formation. This impact, called as reservoir flood effect, could be divided into three parts, including routing effect, volume effect and peak flow effect, and must be evaluated in a whole by using hydrological model. After analyzing the reservoir flood formation, the Liuxihe Model for reservoir flood forecasting is proposed. The Xinfengjiang Reservoir is studied as a case. Results show that the routing effect makes peak flow appear 4 to 6 hours in advance, volume effect is bigger for large flood than small one, and when rainfall focus on the reservoir area, this effect also increases peak flow largely, peak flow effect makes peak flow increase 6.63% to 8.95%. Reservoir flood effect is obvious, which have significant impact to reservoir flood. If this effect is not considered in the flood forecasting model, the flood could not be forecasted accurately, particularly the peak flow. Liuxihe Model proposed for Xinfengjiang Reservoir flood forecasting has a good performance, and could be used for real-time flood forecasting of Xinfengjiang Reservoir.Key words: Reservoir flood effect, reservoir flood forecasting, physically based distributed hydrological model, Liuxihe Model, parameter optimization

  19. Integration of rock typing methods for carbonate reservoir characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliakbardoust, E; Rahimpour-Bonab, H

    2013-01-01

    Reservoir rock typing is the most important part of all reservoir modelling. For integrated reservoir rock typing, static and dynamic properties need to be combined, but sometimes these two are incompatible. The failure is due to the misunderstanding of the crucial parameters that control the dynamic behaviour of the reservoir rock and thus selecting inappropriate methods for defining static rock types. In this study, rock types were defined by combining the SCAL data with the rock properties, particularly rock fabric and pore types. First, air-displacing-water capillary pressure curues were classified because they are representative of fluid saturation and behaviour under capillary forces. Next the most important rock properties which control the fluid flow and saturation behaviour (rock fabric and pore types) were combined with defined classes. Corresponding petrophysical properties were also attributed to reservoir rock types and eventually, defined rock types were compared with relative permeability curves. This study focused on representing the importance of the pore system, specifically pore types in fluid saturation and entrapment in the reservoir rock. The most common tests in static rock typing, such as electrofacies analysis and porosity–permeability correlation, were carried out and the results indicate that these are not appropriate approaches for reservoir rock typing in carbonate reservoirs with a complicated pore system. (paper)

  20. Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems. Annual report, September 25, 1994--September 24, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1996-05-01

    The objectives of the research program are to (1) identify and develop polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) develop methods to predict their performance in field applications. The research focused on four types of gel systems -- KUSP1 systems which contain an aqueous polysaccharide designated KUSP1, phenolic-aldehyde systems composed of resorcinol and formaldehyde, colloidal-dispersion systems composed of polyacrylamide and aluminum citrate, and a chromium-based system where polyacrylamide is crosslinked by chromium(III). Gelation behavior of the resorcinol-formaldehyde systems and the KUSP1-borate system was examined. Size distributions of aggregates that form in the polyacrylamide-aluminum colloidal-dispersion gel system were determined. Permeabilities to brine of several rock materials were significantly reduced by gel treatments using the KUSP1 polymer-ester (monoethylphthalate) system, the KUSP1 polymer-boric acid system, and the sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde system. The KUSP1 polymer-ester system and the sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde system were also shown to significantly reduce the permeability to super-critical carbon dioxide. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the behavior of a chromium redox-polyacrylamide gel system that is injected through a wellbore into a multi-layer reservoir in which crossflow between layers is allowed. The model describes gelation kinetics and filtration of pre-gel aggregates in the reservoir. Studies using the model demonstrated the effect filtration of gel aggregates has on the placement of gel systems in layered reservoirs.

  1. Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems. Final report, September 25, 1992--July 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Buller, C.; McCool, S.; Vossoughi, S.; Michnick, M.

    1997-06-01

    The objectives of the research program were to (1) identify and develop polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) develop methods to predict their performance in field applications. The research focused on four types of gel systems--KUSP1 systems that contain an aqueous polysaccharide designated KUSP1, phenolic-aldehyde systems composed of resorcinol and formaldehyde, colloidal-dispersion systems composed of polyacrylamide and aluminum citrate, and a chromium-based system where polyacrylamide is crosslinked by chromium(III). Gelation behavior of the resorcinol-formaldehyde systems and the KUSP1-borate system was examined. Size distributions of aggregates that form in the polyacrylamide-aluminum colloidal-dispersion gel system were determined. Permeabilities to brine of several rock materials were significantly reduced by gel treatments using the KUSP1 polymer-ester (monoethyl phthalate) system, the KUSP1 polymer-boric acid system, and the sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde system were also shown to significantly reduce the permeability to supercritical carbon dioxide. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the behavior of a chromium redox-polyacrylamide gel system that is injected through a wellbore into a multi-layer reservoir in which crossflow between layers is allowed. The model describes gelation kinetics and filtration of pre-gel aggregates in the reservoir. Studies using the model demonstrated the effect filtration of gel aggregates has on the placement of gel systems in layered reservoirs.

  2. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

  3. Modified permeability modeling of coal incorporating sorption-induced matrix shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Aman

    The variation in the cleat permeability of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is attributed primarily to two cardinal processes, with opposing effects. Increase in effective stresses with reduction in pore pressure tends to decrease the cleat permeability, whereas the sorption-induced coal matrix shrinkage actuates reduction in the effective stresses which increases the reservoir permeability. The net effect of the two processes determines the pressure-dependent-permeability and, hence, the overall trend of CBM production with depletion. Several analytical models have been developed and used to predict the dynamic behavior of CBM reservoir permeability during production through pressure depletion, all based on combining the two effects. The purpose of this study was to introduce modifications to two most commonly used permeability models, namely the Palmer and Mansoori, and Shi and Durucan, for permeability variation and evaluate their performance when projecting gas production. The basis for the modification is the linear relationship between the volume of sorbed gas and the associated matrix shrinkage. Hence, the impact of matrix shrinkage is incorporated as a function of the amount of gas produced, or that remaining in coal, at any time during production. Since the exact production from a reservoir is known throughout its life, this significantly simplifies the process of permeability modeling. Furthermore, the modification is also expected to streamline the process of modeling by classifying the shrinkage parameters for coals of different regions, but with similar characteristics. A good analogy is the San Juan basin, where sorption characteristics of coal are so well understood and defined that operators no longer carry out laboratory sorption work. The goal is to achieve the same for incorporation of the matrix shrinkage behavior. Another modification is to incorporate the matrix, or grain, compressibility effect of coal as a correction factor in the Shi and

  4. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; Bustin, Mark [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less

  5. Is the permeability of naturally fractured rocks scale dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizmohammadi, Siroos; Matthäi, Stephan K.

    2017-09-01

    The equivalent permeability, keq of stratified fractured porous rocks and its anisotropy is important for hydrocarbon reservoir engineering, groundwater hydrology, and subsurface contaminant transport. However, it is difficult to constrain this tensor property as it is strongly influenced by infrequent large fractures. Boreholes miss them and their directional sampling bias affects the collected geostatistical data. Samples taken at any scale smaller than that of interest truncate distributions and this bias leads to an incorrect characterization and property upscaling. To better understand this sampling problem, we have investigated a collection of outcrop-data-based Discrete Fracture and Matrix (DFM) models with mechanically constrained fracture aperture distributions, trying to establish a useful Representative Elementary Volume (REV). Finite-element analysis and flow-based upscaling have been used to determine keq eigenvalues and anisotropy. While our results indicate a convergence toward a scale-invariant keq REV with increasing sample size, keq magnitude can have multi-modal distributions. REV size relates to the length of dilated fracture segments as opposed to overall fracture length. Tensor orientation and degree of anisotropy also converge with sample size. However, the REV for keq anisotropy is larger than that for keq magnitude. Across scales, tensor orientation varies spatially, reflecting inhomogeneity of the fracture patterns. Inhomogeneity is particularly pronounced where the ambient stress selectively activates late- as opposed to early (through-going) fractures. While we cannot detect any increase of keq with sample size as postulated in some earlier studies, our results highlight a strong keq anisotropy that influences scale dependence.

  6. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Smith, Leslie; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Durr, Hans H.; Manning, Andrew H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of -5 x 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  8. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  9. Analysis of Fluvial Sediment Discharges into Kubanni Reservoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sediment discharges into the Kubanni Reservoir (KR) has been measured and analysed in this study. The predominant sandy-clay sediment in the reservoir has an estimated total sediment load of 20,387,000 kg/year. The depth and area coverage of the reservoir was surveyed using a defined distributed grid line ...

  10. Production induced boiling and cold water entry in the Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoir indicated by chemical and physical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, M.A. (DSIR, Wellington, New Zealand); Truesdell, A.H.; Manon, A.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical and physical data suggest that the relatively shallow western part of the Cerro Prieto reservoir is bounded below by low permeability rocks, and above and at the sides by an interface with cooler water. There is no continuous permeability barrier around or immediately above the reservoir. Permeability within the reservoir is dominantly intergranular. Mixture with cooler water rather than boiling is the dominant cooling process in the natural state, and production causes displacement of hot water by cooler water, not by vapor. Local boiling occurs near most wells in response to pressure decreases, but no general vapor zone has formed.

  11. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  12. Simulation of deep coalbed methane permeability and production assuming variable pore volume compressibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonnsen, R.R.; Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presented an alternative view of deep coalbed methane (CBM) permeability, questioning the assumption of using constant pore volume compressibility for modelling permeability changes that would be part of deep CBM production. The sensitivity of coal permeability to changes in stress has led to the assumption that deep coals have limited permeability, but this belief takes for granted that a coal's porosity/cleat system maintains a constant pore volume compressibility during changing stress conditions. Exponentially declining (variable) pore volume compressibility was employed to model changes in permeability related to changing stress conditions within the coalbed. The assumption of constant or variable pore volume compressibility affects modelled permeability changes. Deep coals may maintain higher values during production than previously indicated. The modelled compressibility and permeability results were applied to the simulation of deep CBM reservoirs to determine the practical difference the compressibility assumption has on a coal's simulated production. With the assumption of variable pore volume compressibility, the modelled permeability decreases less than previously indicated, resulting in greater production. The simulation results may justify exploration for deeper CBM reservoirs, although economic production rates are shown to be possible only when the coal is modelled with zero water saturation in the cleat system. 21 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs.

  13. Development of a segmentation method for analysis of Campos basin typical reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rego, Eneida Arendt; Bueno, Andre Duarte [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia e Exploracao de Petroleo (LENEP)]. E-mails: eneida@lenep.uenf.br; bueno@lenep.uenf.br

    2008-07-01

    This paper represents a master thesis proposal in Exploration and Reservoir Engineering that have the objective to development a specific segmentation method for digital images of reservoir rocks, which produce better results than the global methods available in the bibliography for the determination of rocks physical properties as porosity and permeability. (author)

  14. Non-parametric Bayesian networks for parameter estimation in reservoir engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zilko, A.A.; Hanea, A.M.; Hanea, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate goal in reservoir engineering is to optimize hydrocarbon recovery from a reservoir. To achieve the goal, good knowledge of the subsurface properties is crucial. One of these properties is the permeability. Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is the most common tool used to deal with this

  15. In-situ stress, pore pressure and stress-dependent permeability in the Southern Qinshui Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Z.P.; Zhang, J.C.; Wang, R. [Shell Exploration & Production Co, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-01-15

    This study focuses on the in-situ stress, pore pressure and permeability in the Southern Qinshui Basin, one of largest coalbed methane basins in China. Well tests show that permeability in this basin is higher than other coalbed methane reservoirs. This is because it is located in an extensional basin, where the normal faulting stress regime is dominated. This in-situ stress regime is advantageous to keep coal cleats open. Hydraulic fracturing tests indicate that the fracture gradient or minimum horizontal stress is much lower than the shales in the Gulf of Mexico and other oil basins. The minimum horizontal stress model is proposed with consideration of the stress coefficient based on the uniaxial strain method. This model provides a fairly good prediction on the minimum stress. Permeability data show that the effective stress-dependent permeability is pronounced in the coalbed methane reservoir. This is significant for the dual-porosity and dual-permeability coal reservoirs, which consist of coal porous matrices and cleats. The reason is that a rapid increase in effective stress can induce the closure of cleats, which may cause a permanent loss of permeability in the cleats. This reduces the connectivity between the cleats and coal matrices, hence the coal matrices cannot deliver gas pressure to the cleats for supporting the cleat space. Therefore, slowing down the effective stress change during production (e.g. slowing reservoir drawdown) can decelerate the permeability reduction. This is particularly important for the reservoir in which the pore pressure is not significantly overpressured, such that in the Southern Qinshui Basin.

  16. [Distribution and risk assessment of mercury species in soil of the water-level-fluctuating zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Ding-Yong; Sun, Rong-Guo; Zhang, Jin-Yang

    2014-03-01

    To investigate pollution level and ecological risk of mercury in soils of the water-level-fluctuating zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region, 192 surface soil samples from 14 counties (districts) in Chongqing were obtained. Concentrations of THg and Hg species, bioavailable Hg were analyzed and discussed. Geoaccumulation index (I(geo)) and Håkanson potential ecological risk index (E(r)) were applied to assess the pollution status and potential ecological risk of THg and Hg species, respectively. The results showed that significant differences in the concentration of THg were found in soils of water-level-fluctuating zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir. The THg concentration ranged from 22.4 to 393.5 microg x kg(-1), with an average of (84.2 +/- 54.3) microg x kg(-1). 76.6% of the samples' THg content was higher than the soil background value in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region. The percentage of five mercury species (water-soluble Hg, HCl-soluble Hg, KOH-soluble Hg, H2O2-soluble Hg, residue Hg) in soils were 4.1%, 15.5%, 18.3%, 10.9%, 51.3%, respectively. The average concentrations of bioavailable mercury varied between 19.7-36.6 microg x kg(-1), and the percentage of bioavailable Hg was 22.1%-51.6% of THg. According to the geoaccumulation index, the soils were lightly polluted by Hg. Håkanson single potential ecological risk index evaluation showed that Hg species had a low potential ecological risk, moreover, soils of water-level-fluctuating zone in the Three Gorges Reservoir were at low ecological risk levels as evaluated by bioavailable Hg. While, the assessment results based on THg of soils was much higher than that based on the Hg species. Two methods of evaluation showed that the I(geo) and E(r) values calculated based on the Hg species better reflected the actual pollution levels of soils and its hazard to aquatic organisms.

  17. Analysis of Geologic Parameters on the Performance of CO2-Plume Geothermal (CPG) Systems in a Multi-Layered Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, N.; Randolph, J.; Saar, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    -Burman experiments resulting in 16 simulations for the seven parameters investigated. The reservoir is divided into 3-, 4-, or 5- layer systems with log-normal permeability distributions. We consider 10 sets of values for each case resulting in a total of 16x3x10 =480 simulations.We analyze the performance of the system to maximize the amount of heat energy extracted, minimize reservoir temperature depletion and maximize the CO2concentration in the produced fluid. Achieving the latter objective reduces power system problems as Welch and Boyle (GRC Trans. 2009) found that CO2 concentration should be >94% in the systems they investigated.

  18. Reservoir Structure and Wastewater-Induced Seismicity at the Val d'Agri Oilfield (Italy) Shown by Three-Dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs Local Earthquake Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, L.; Bagh, S.; De Gori, P.; Valoroso, L.; Pastori, M.; Piccinini, D.; Chiarabba, C.; Anselmi, M.; Buttinelli, M.

    2017-11-01

    Wastewater injection into a high-rate well in the Val d'Agri oilfield, the largest in onshore Europe, has induced swarm microseismicity since the initiation of disposal in 2006. To investigate the reservoir structure and to track seismicity, we performed a high-spatial resolution local earthquake tomography using 1,281 natural and induced earthquakes recorded by local networks. The properties of the carbonate reservoir (rock fracturing, pore fluid pressure) and inherited faults control the occurrence and spatiotemporal distribution of seismicity. A low-Vp, high-Vp/Vs region under the well represents a fluid saturated fault zone ruptured by induced seismicity. High-Vp, high-Vp/Vs bumps match reservoir culminations indicating saturated liquid-bearing zones, whereas a very low Vp, low Vp/Vs anomaly might represent a strongly fractured and depleted zone of the hydrocarbon reservoir characterized by significant fluid withdrawal. The comprehensive picture of the injection-linked seismicity obtained by integrating reservoir-scale tomography, high-precision earthquake locations, and geophysical and injection data suggests that the driving mechanism is the channeling of pore pressure perturbations through a high permeable fault damage zone within the reservoir. The damage zone surrounds a Pliocene reverse fault optimally oriented in the current extensional stress field. The ruptured damage zone measures 2 km along strike and 3 km along dip and is confined between low permeability ductile formations. Injection pressure is the primary parameter controlling seismicity rate. Our study underlines that local earthquake tomography also using wastewater-induced seismicity can give useful insights into the physical mechanism leading to these earthquakes.

  19. Experimental Study on the Effects of Stress Variations on the Permeability of Feldspar-Quartz Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multistage and discontinuous nature of the injection process used in the geological storage of CO2 causes reservoirs to experience repeated loading and unloading. The reservoir permeability changes caused by this phenomenon directly impact the CO2 injection process and the process of CO2 migration in the reservoirs. Through laboratory experiments, variations in the permeability of sandstone in the Liujiagou formation of the Ordos CO2 capture and storage (CCS demonstration project were analyzed using cyclic variations in injection pressure and confining pressure and multistage loading and unloading. The variation in the micropore structure and its influence on the permeability were analyzed based on micropore structure tests. In addition, the effects of multiple stress changes on the permeability of the same type of rock with different clay minerals content were also analyzed. More attention should be devoted to the influence of pressure variations on permeability in evaluations of storage potential and studies of CO2 migration in reservoirs in CCS engineering.

  20. Reservoir fisheries of Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.S. De.

    1990-01-01

    At a workshop on reservoir fisheries research, papers were presented on the limnology of reservoirs, the changes that follow impoundment, fisheries management and modelling, and fish culture techniques. Separate abstracts have been prepared for three papers from this workshop

  1. Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface. Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozley, Peter [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Evans, James [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2014-10-31

    We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault-to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire

  2. Large reservoirs: Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2010-01-01

    Large impoundments, defined as those with surface area of 200 ha or greater, are relatively new aquatic ecosystems in the global landscape. They represent important economic and environmental resources that provide benefits such as flood control, hydropower generation, navigation, water supply, commercial and recreational fisheries, and various other recreational and esthetic values. Construction of large impoundments was initially driven by economic needs, and ecological consequences received little consideration. However, in recent decades environmental issues have come to the forefront. In the closing decades of the 20th century societal values began to shift, especially in the developed world. Society is no longer willing to accept environmental damage as an inevitable consequence of human development, and it is now recognized that continued environmental degradation is unsustainable. Consequently, construction of large reservoirs has virtually stopped in North America. Nevertheless, in other parts of the world construction of large reservoirs continues. The emergence of systematic reservoir management in the early 20th century was guided by concepts developed for natural lakes (Miranda 1996). However, we now recognize that reservoirs are different and that reservoirs are not independent aquatic systems inasmuch as they are connected to upstream rivers and streams, the downstream river, other reservoirs in the basin, and the watershed. Reservoir systems exhibit longitudinal patterns both within and among reservoirs. Reservoirs are typically arranged sequentially as elements of an interacting network, filter water collected throughout their watersheds, and form a mosaic of predictable patterns. Traditional approaches to fisheries management such as stocking, regulating harvest, and in-lake habitat management do not always produce desired effects in reservoirs. As a result, managers may expend resources with little benefit to either fish or fishing. Some locally

  3. Matrix acidification in carbonate reservoirs; Acidificacoes matriciais em reservatorios carbonaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcio de Oliveira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Carbonate reservoirs are characterized by great diversity of its properties, including permeability and porosity. When submitted to matrix acidification, if no effort is employed, acid will tend to consume carbonates where permeability and porosity are higher, further increasing conductivity of these sites and also increasing permeability and porosity contrast existing before acid effects on formation. That would give limited production as result of small effective producer zone extent, with probable underutilization of potential reservoirs productivity. To overcome this effect and to achieve greater coverage of treatments, divergence techniques should be applied, including associations of them. This paper presents divergence techniques performed in matrix acidification of Campos and Espirito Santo basins wells, which represent great structural diversity and, as consequence, a significant range of situations. Formations tests results are analyzed to verify diversion systems effectiveness, and how they contribute to the growth of productive potential. (author)

  4. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  5. Gasbuggy reservoir evaluation - 1969 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, C.H.; Ward, Don C.; Lemon, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    The December 10, 1967, Project Gasbuggy nuclear detonation followed the drilling and testing of two exploratory wells which confirmed reservoir characteristics and suitability of the site. Reentry and gas production testing of the explosive emplacement hole indicated a collapse chimney about 150 feet in diameter extending from the 4,240-foot detonation depth to about 3,900 feet, the top of the 300-foot-thick Pictured Cliffs gas sand. Production tests of the chimney well in the summer of 1968 and during the last 12 months have resulted in a cumulative production of 213 million cubic feet of hydrocarbons, and gas recovery in 20 years is estimated to be 900 million cubic feet, which would be an increase by a factor of at least 5 over estimated recovery from conventional field wells in this low permeability area. At the end of production tests the flow rate was 160,000 cubic feet per day, which is 6 to 7 times that of an average field well in the area. Data from reentry of a pre-shot test well and a new postshot well at distances from the detonation of 300 and 250 feet, respectively, indicate low productivity and consequently low permeability in any fractures at these locations. (author)

  6. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drillings. Annual technical progress report, June 13, 1996 to June 12, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevans, Jerry W.; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill

    1999-04-27

    Infill drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, does not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations. Other technologies, such as inter-well injection tracers and magnetic flow conditioners, can also aid in the efficient evaluation and operation of both injection and producing wells. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate useful and cost effective methods of exploitation of the shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs of the Permian Basin located in West Texas.

  7. Experimental evaluation on the damages of different drilling modes to tight sandstone reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The damages of different drilling modes to reservoirs are different in types and degrees. In this paper, the geologic characteristics and types of such damages were analyzed. Then, based on the relationship between reservoir pressure and bottom hole flowing pressure corresponding to different drilling modes, the experimental procedures on reservoir damages in three drilling modes (e.g. gas drilling, liquid-based underbalanced drilling and overbalanced drilling were designed. Finally, damage simulation experiments were conducted on the tight sandstone reservoir cores of the Jurassic Ahe Fm in the Tarim Basin and Triassic Xujiahe Fm in the central Sichuan Basin. It is shown that the underbalanced drilling is beneficial to reservoir protection because of its less damage on reservoir permeability, but it is, to some extent, sensitive to the stress and the empirical formula of stress sensitivity coefficient is obtained; and that the overbalanced drilling has more reservoir damages due to the invasion of solid and liquid phases. After the water saturation of cores rises to the irreducible water saturation, the decline of gas logging permeability speeds up and the damage degree of water lock increases. It is concluded that the laboratory experiment results of reservoir damage are accordant with the reservoir damage characteristics in actual drilling conditions. Therefore, this method reflects accurately the reservoir damage characteristics and can be used as a new experimental evaluation method on reservoir damage in different drilling modes.

  8. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse amplitude changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Datta-Gupta, Akhil; Behrens, Ron; Condon, Pat; Rickett, Jame s

    2003-03-13

    Asymptotic methods provide an efficient means by which to infer reservoir flow properties, such as permeability, from time-lapse seismic data. A trajectory-based methodology, much like ray-based methods for medical and seismic imaging, is the basis for an iterative inversion of time-lapse amplitude changes. In this approach a single reservoir simulation is required for each iteration of the algorithm. A comparison between purely numerical and the trajectory-based sensitivities demonstrates their accuracy. An application to a set of synthetic amplitude changes indicates that they can recover large-scale reservoir permeability variations from time-lapse data. In an application of actual time-lapse amplitude changes from the Bay Marchand field in the Gulf of Mexico we are able to reduce the misfit by 81% in twelve iterations. The time-lapse observations indicate lower permeabilities are required in the central portion of the reservoir.

  9. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jingjing; Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2017-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2016 publications on the focus of the following sections: Stream, lake, and reservoir management • Water quality of stream, lake, and reservoirReservoir operations • Models of stream, lake, and reservoir • Remediation and restoration of stream, lake, and reservoir • Biota of stream, lake, and reservoir • Climate effect of stream, lake, and reservoir.

  10. Continuous updating of a coupled reservoir-seismic model using an ensemble Kalman filter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjervheim, Jan-Arild

    2007-07-01

    This work presents the development of a method based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for continuous reservoir model updating with respect to the combination of production data, 3D seismic data and time-lapse seismic data. The reservoir-seismic model system consists of a commercial reservoir simulator coupled to existing rock physics and seismic modelling software. The EnKF provides an ideal-setting for real time updating and prediction in reservoir simulation models, and has been applied to synthetic models and real field cases from the North Sea. In the EnKF method, static parameters as the porosity and permeability, and dynamic variables, as fluid saturations and pressure, are updated in the reservoir model at each step data become available. In addition, we have updated a lithology parameter (clay ratio) which is linked to the rock physics model, and the fracture density in a synthetic fractured reservoir. In the EnKF experiments we have assimilated various types of production and seismic data. Gas oil ratio (GOR), water cut (WCT) and bottom-hole pressure (BHP) are used in the data assimilation. Furthermore, inverted seismic data, such as Poisson's ratio and acoustic impedance, and seismic waveform data have been assimilated. In reservoir applications seismic data may introduce a large amount of data in the assimilation schemes, and the computational time becomes expensive. In this project efficient EnKF schemes are used to handle such large datasets, where challenging aspects such as the inversion of a large covariance matrix and potential loss of rank are considered. Time-lapse seismic data may be difficult to assimilate since they are time difference data, i.e. data which are related to the model variable at two or more time instances. Here we have presented a general sequential Bayesian formulation which incorporates time difference data, and we show that the posterior distribution includes both a filter and a smoother solution. Further, we show

  11. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Quantifying Fracture Heterogeneity in Different Domains of Folded Carbonate Rocks to Improve Fractured Reservoir Analog Fluid Flow Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisdom, K.; Bertotti, G.; Gauthier, B.D.M.; Hardebol, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs is largely controlled by multiscale fracture networks. Significant variations of fracture network porosity and permeability are caused by the 3D heterogeneity of the fracture network characteristics, such as intensity, orientation and size. Characterizing fracture

  13. Applications of resistivity modeling in reservoir development: examples from Balder Field, Norwegian North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Haynes, F.M.; Buretz, O.M.

    2001-01-01

    The massive Paleocene oil sands of the Balder Field are overlain by several thinly bedded Eocene sand-prone packages of variable facies and reservoir quality. Although these sands have been penetrated by numerous exploration and development wells, uncertainty remains as to their extent, distribution, and ultimate effect on reservoir performance. The section is geologically complex (thin beds, injected sands, shale clasts and laminae, and faulting), and also contains a field-wide primary gas cap. With a depletion plan involving both gas and water injection, geologic/reservoir characterization of the Eocene is critical for prudent resource management during depletion. With this goal, resistivity modeling and core-based thin bed reservoir description from the first phase of development drilling have been integrated with seismic attribute mapping. Detailed core description, core permeability and grain size distribution data delineate six facies and help in distinguishing laterally continuous massive and laminated sands from potentially non-connected injection sands and non-reservoir quality siltstones and tuffs. Volumetric assessment of the thin sand resource has been enhanced by I-D forward modeling of induction log response using a commercial resistivity modeling program, R,BAN. After defining beds and facies with core and high resolution log data, the AHF60 array induction curve response was approximated using the 6FF40 response. Because many of the beds were thinner than 6FF40 resolution, the modeling is considered to provide a lower bound on R,. However, for most beds this model-based R, is significantly higher than that provided by one-foot vertical resolution shallow resistivity data, and is thought to be the best available estimate of true formation resistivity. Sensitivities in STOOIP were assessed with multiple R, earth models which can later be tested against production results. In addition, water saturation height functions, developed in vertical wells and

  14. Transverse permeability of woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; Loendersloot, Richard; van den Berg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The transverse permeability is an essential input in describing the consolidation process of CETEX® laminates. A two-dimensional, finite difference based, Stokes flow solver has been developed to determine the mesoscopic permeability of arbitrary fabric structures. The use of a multigrid solver

  15. The effect of conductor permeability on electric current transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, M.; Ripka, P.; Chirtsov, A.; Kaspar, P.; Vyhnanek, J.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, experimental works and theoretical analysis are presented to analyze the influence of the conductor permeability on the precision of yokeless current sensors. The results of finite-element method (FEM) fit well the measured field values around the conductor. Finally we evaluate the difference in magnetic fields distribution around non-magnetic and magnetic conductor. The calculated values show that the permeability of the ferromagnetic conductor significally affects the reading of the electric current sensors even at DC.

  16. The system of thermoelectric air conditioning based on permeable thermoelements

    OpenAIRE

    Cherkez R. G.

    2009-01-01

    There is thermoelectric air conditioner unit on the basis of permeable cooling thermoelements presented. In thermoelectric air conditioner unit the thermoelectric effects and the Joule–Thomson effect have been used for the air stream cooling. There have been described the method of temperature distribution analysis, the determinations of energy conversion power characteristics and design style of permeable thermoelement with maximum coefficient of performance described. The results of compute...

  17. A multiple fractal model for estimating permeability of dual-porosity media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-09-01

    A multiple fractal model that considers the fractal properties of both porous matrices and fracture networks is proposed for the permeability of dual-porosity media embedded with randomly distributed fractures. In this model, the aperture distribution is verified to follow the fractal scaling law, and the porous matrix is assumed to comprise a bundle of tortuous capillaries that also follow the fractal scaling law. Analytical expressions for fractal aperture distribution, total flow rate, total equivalent permeability, and dimensionless permeability are established, where the dimensionless permeability is defined as the ratio of permeability of the porous matrices to that of the fracture networks. The dimensionless permeability is closely correlated to the structural parameters (i.e., α, θ, Dtf, Dtp, De, Dp, emax, λmax) of the dual-porosity media, and it is more sensitive to the fractal dimension for the size distribution of fracture aperture than to that for the size distribution of pore/capillary diameter. The maximum pore/capillary diameter has a greater impact on the dimensionless permeability than that of the maximum fracture aperture. The dimensionless permeability of fracture networks constructed by the fractal aperture distribution has close values with those of models with lognormal aperture distribution. The proposed multiple fractal model does not involve any empirical constants that do not have clear physical meanings, which could serve as a quick estimation method for assessing permeability of dual-porosity media.

  18. An index of reservoir habitat impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Hunt, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fish habitat impairment resulting from natural and anthropogenic watershed and in-lake processes has in many cases reduced the ability of reservoirs to sustain native fish assemblages and fisheries quality. Rehabilitation of impaired reservoirs is hindered by the lack of a method suitable for scoring impairment status. To address this limitation, an index of reservoir habitat impairment (IRHI) was developed by merging 14 metrics descriptive of common impairment sources, with each metric scored from 0 (no impairment) to 5 (high impairment) by fisheries scientists with local knowledge. With a plausible range of 5 to 25, distribution of the IRHI scores ranged from 5 to 23 over 482 randomly selected reservoirs dispersed throughout the USA. The IRHI reflected five impairment factors including siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. The factors were weakly related to key reservoir characteristics including reservoir area, depth, age, and usetype, suggesting that common reservoir descriptors are poor predictors of fish habitat impairment. The IRHI is rapid and inexpensive to calculate, provides an easily understood measure of the overall habitat impairment, allows comparison of reservoirs and therefore prioritization of restoration activities, and may be used to track restoration progress. The major limitation of the IRHI is its reliance on unstandardized professional judgment rather than standardized empirical measurements. ?? 2010 US Government.

  19. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013c, Property Modeling Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    rate declines gradually to 1.2 million tons per annum (1.1 MTPA) in year 18 and stays constant. This implies that a minimum of three (3) wells could be required in the Potosi to reach the injection target. The injectivity evaluated in this Task was higher compared to the preceding Task, since the current facies modeling (guided by the porosity map from the seismic inversion) indicated a higher density of vugs within the vugular zones. 5 As the CO2 follows the paths where vugs interconnection exists, a reasonably large and irregular plume extent was created. After 30 years of injection, the plume extends 13.7 mi (22 km) in E-W and 9.7 mi (16 km) in N-S directions. After injection finishes, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 60 years post-injection, the plume extends 14.2 mi (22.8 km) in E-W and 10 mi (16 km) in N-S directions, and remains constant as the remaining pressure gradient has become very low. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 106 million tons (96 MT) be achieved; a much larger plume extent could be expected. The increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 1,200 psia (8,274 kPa) around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 10 psia (69 kPa) beyond 14 mi (23 km) away from injector. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 106 million tons (96 MT) be achieved; a much larger areal pressure increase could be expected. The reservoir pressure declines rapidly during the first 30 years post injection and the initial reservoir pressure is nearly restored after 100 years post-injection. The present evaluation is mainly associated with uncertainty on the vugs permeability and interconnectivity. The use of porosity mapping from seismic inversion might have reduced the uncertainty on the lateral vugs body distributions. However, major uncertainties on the Potosi vugs permeability remains. Therefore, injection

  20. Reservoirs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, G. Earl

    1948-01-01

    Man has engaged in the control of flowing water since history began. Among his early recorded efforts were reservoirs for muncipal water-supplies constructed near ancient Jerusalem to store water which was brought there in masonry conduits. 1/  Irrigation was practiced in Egypt as early as 2000 B. C. There the "basin system" was used from ancient times until the 19th century. The land was divided , into basins of approximately 40,000 acres, separated by earthen dikes. 2/  Flood waters of the Nile generally inundated the basins through canals, many of which were built by the Pharaohs. Even then the economic consequences of a deficient annual flood were recognized. Lake Maeris, which according to Herodotus was an ancient storage reservoir, is said to have had an area of 30,000 acres. In India, the British found at the time of their occupancy of the Presidency of Madras about 50,000 reservoirs for irrigation, many believed to be of ancient construction. 3/ During the period 115-130 A. D. reservoirs were built to improve the water-supply of Athens. Much has been written concerning the elaborate collection and distribution system built to supply Rome, and parts of it remain to this day as monuments to the engineering skill employed by the Romans in solving the problem of large-scale municipal water-supplies.

  1. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  2. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  3. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  4. Surrogate reservoir models for CSI well probabilistic production forecast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Buitrago

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present the construction and use of Surrogate Reservoir Models capable of accurately predicting cumulative oil production for every well stimulated with cyclic steam injection at any given time in a heavy oil reservoir in Mexico considering uncertain variables. The central composite experimental design technique was selected to capture the maximum amount of information from the model response with a minimum number of reservoir models simulations. Four input uncertain variables (the dead oil viscosity with temperature, the reservoir pressure, the reservoir permeability and oil sand thickness hydraulically connected to the well were selected as the ones with more impact on the initial hot oil production rate according to an analytical production prediction model. Twenty five runs were designed and performed with the STARS simulator for each well type on the reservoir model. The results show that the use of Surrogate Reservoir Models is a fast viable alternative to perform probabilistic production forecasting of the reservoir.

  5. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Commer, M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Li, L.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    In Microbial-Enhanced-Hydrocarbon-Recovery (MEHR), preferential bioclogging targets the growth of the biofilms (def. immobilized biopolymers with active cells embodied in it) in highly permeable thief zones to enhance sweep efficiency in oil reservoirs. During MEHR, understanding and controlling bioclogging is hindered by the lack of advanced modeling and monitoring tools; these deficiencies contribute to suboptimal performance. Our focus in this study was on developing a systematic approach to understand and monitor bioclogging at the reservoir scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic). In this study, we created a realistic reservoir model from a heterogeneous gas reservoir in the Southern Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical, nuclear, and NMR logs for hydrologic and geophysical properties. From the simplified 2D log data model, a strip of size 150m x75m with several high permeability streaks is identified for bioclogging simulation experiments. From the NMR log data it is observed that a good linear correlation exist between logarithmic permeability (0.55- 3.34 log (mD)) versus porosity (0.041-0.28). L. mesenteroides was chosen as the model bacteria. In the presence of sucrose, it enzymatically catalyzes the production of dextran, a useful bioclogging agent. Using microbial kinetics from our laboratory experiment and reservoir heterogeneity, a reactive transport model (RTM) is established for two kinds of bioclogging treatments based on whether microbes are present in situ or are supplied externally. In both cases, sucrose media (1.5 M) is injected at the rate of 1 liter/s for 20 days into the center of high permeable strip to stimulate microbes. Simulations show that the high dextran production was deep into the formation from the injection well. This phenomenon can be explained precisely with bacterial kinetics and injection rate. In

  6. A Direct inverse model to determine permeability fields from pressure and flow rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.K.; Fokker, P.A.; Wilschut, F.; Zijl, W.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the permeability field from pressure and flow rate measurements in wells is a key problem in reservoir engineering. This paper presents a Double Constraint method for inverse modeling that is an example of direct inverse modeling. The method is used with a standard

  7. Different effects of temperature and salinity on permeability reduction by fines migration in Berea sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus; Riis, Jacob Fabricius

    2015-01-01

    Hot water injection into geothermal aquifers is considered in order to store energy seasonally. Berea sandstone is often used as a reference formation to study mechanisms that affect permeability in reservoir sandstones. Both heating of the pore fluid and reduction of the pore fluid salinity can...

  8. The effect of offset on fracture permeability of rocks from the Southern Andes Volcanic Zone, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, P.; Wang, G.; Mitchell, T. M.; Meredith, P. G.; Nara, Y.; Sarkar, V.; Cembrano, J.

    2017-11-01

    The Southern Andes Volcanic Zone (SVZ) represents one of the largest undeveloped geothermal provinces in the world. Development of the geothermal potential requires a detailed understanding of fluid transport properties of its main lithologies. The permeability of SVZ rocks is altered by the presence of fracture damage zones produced by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). We have therefore measured the permeability of four representative lithologies from the volcanic basement in this area: crystalline tuff, andesitic dike, altered andesite and granodiorite. For comparative purposes, we have also measured the permeability of samples of Seljadalur basalt, an Icelandic rock with widely studied and reported hydraulic properties. Specifically, we present the results of a systematic study of the effect of fractures and fracture offsets on permeability as a function of increasing effective pressure. Baseline measurements on intact samples of SVZ rocks show that the granodiorite has a permeability (10-18 m2), two orders of magnitude higher than that of the volcanic rocks (10-20 m2). The presence of throughgoing mated macro-fractures increases permeability by between four and six orders of magnitude, with the highest permeability recorded for the crystalline tuff. Increasing fracture offset to produce unmated fractures results in large increases in permeability up to some characteristic value of offset, beyond which permeability changes only marginally. The increase in permeability with offset appears to depend on fracture roughness and aperture, and these are different for each lithology. Overall, fractured SVZ rocks with finite offsets record permeability values consistent with those commonly found in geothermal reservoirs (>10-16 m2), which potentially allow convective/advective flow to develop. Hence, our results demonstrate that the fracture damage zones developed within the SVZ produce permeable regions, especially within the

  9. The seismo-hydromechanical behavior during deep geothermal reservoir stimulations: open questions tackled in a decameter-scale in situ stimulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Amann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we present a review of scientific research results that address seismo-hydromechanically coupled processes relevant for the development of a sustainable heat exchanger in low-permeability crystalline rock and introduce the design of the In situ Stimulation and Circulation (ISC experiment at the Grimsel Test Site dedicated to studying such processes under controlled conditions. The review shows that research on reservoir stimulation for deep geothermal energy exploitation has been largely based on laboratory observations, large-scale projects and numerical models. Observations of full-scale reservoir stimulations have yielded important results. However, the limited access to the reservoir and limitations in the control on the experimental conditions during deep reservoir stimulations is insufficient to resolve the details of the hydromechanical processes that would enhance process understanding in a way that aids future stimulation design. Small-scale laboratory experiments provide fundamental insights into various processes relevant for enhanced geothermal energy, but suffer from (1 difficulties and uncertainties in upscaling the results to the field scale and (2 relatively homogeneous material and stress conditions that lead to an oversimplistic fracture flow and/or hydraulic fracture propagation behavior that is not representative of a heterogeneous reservoir. Thus, there is a need for intermediate-scale hydraulic stimulation experiments with high experimental control that bridge the various scales and for which access to the target rock mass with a comprehensive monitoring system is possible. The ISC experiment is designed to address open research questions in a naturally fractured and faulted crystalline rock mass at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland. Two hydraulic injection phases were executed to enhance the permeability of the rock mass. During the injection phases the rock mass deformation across fractures and

  10. The seismo-hydromechanical behavior during deep geothermal reservoir stimulations: open questions tackled in a decameter-scale in situ stimulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Florian; Gischig, Valentin; Evans, Keith; Doetsch, Joseph; Jalali, Reza; Valley, Benoît; Krietsch, Hannes; Dutler, Nathan; Villiger, Linus; Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Kittilä, Anniina; Madonna, Claudio; Wiemer, Stefan; Saar, Martin O.; Loew, Simon; Driesner, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi; Giardini, Domenico

    2018-02-01

    In this contribution, we present a review of scientific research results that address seismo-hydromechanically coupled processes relevant for the development of a sustainable heat exchanger in low-permeability crystalline rock and introduce the design of the In situ Stimulation and Circulation (ISC) experiment at the Grimsel Test Site dedicated to studying such processes under controlled conditions. The review shows that research on reservoir stimulation for deep geothermal energy exploitation has been largely based on laboratory observations, large-scale projects and numerical models. Observations of full-scale reservoir stimulations have yielded important results. However, the limited access to the reservoir and limitations in the control on the experimental conditions during deep reservoir stimulations is insufficient to resolve the details of the hydromechanical processes that would enhance process understanding in a way that aids future stimulation design. Small-scale laboratory experiments provide fundamental insights into various processes relevant for enhanced geothermal energy, but suffer from (1) difficulties and uncertainties in upscaling the results to the field scale and (2) relatively homogeneous material and stress conditions that lead to an oversimplistic fracture flow and/or hydraulic fracture propagation behavior that is not representative of a heterogeneous reservoir. Thus, there is a need for intermediate-scale hydraulic stimulation experiments with high experimental control that bridge the various scales and for which access to the target rock mass with a comprehensive monitoring system is possible. The ISC experiment is designed to address open research questions in a naturally fractured and faulted crystalline rock mass at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland). Two hydraulic injection phases were executed to enhance the permeability of the rock mass. During the injection phases the rock mass deformation across fractures and within intact rock

  11. Elements and gas enrichment laws of sweet spots in shale gas reservoir: A case study of the Longmaxi Fm in Changning block, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renfang Pan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of sweet spot is of great significance in confirming shale gas prospects to realize large-scale economic shale gas development. In this paper, geological characteristics of shale gas reservoirs were compared and analyzed based on abundant data of domestic and foreign shale gas reservoirs. Key elements of sweet spots were illustrated, including net thickness of gas shale, total organic carbon (TOC content, types and maturity (Ro of organic matters, rock matrix and its physical properties (porosity and permeability, and development characteristics of natural fractures. After the data in Changning and Weiyuan blocks, the Sichuan Basin, were analyzed, the geologic laws of shale gas enrichment were summarized based on the economic exploitation characteristics of shale gas and the correlation between the elements. The elements of favorable “sweet spots” of marine shale gas reservoirs in the Changning block and their distribution characteristics were confirmed. Firstly, the quality of gas source rocks is ensured with the continuous thickness of effective gas shale larger than 30 m, TOC > 2.0% and Ro = 2.4–3.5%. Secondly, the quality of reservoir is ensured with the brittle minerals content being 30–69%, the clay mineral content lower than 30% and a single lamination thickness being 0.1–1.0 m. And thirdly, the porosity is higher than 2.0%, the permeability is larger than 50 nD, gas content is higher than 1.45 m3/t, and formation is under normal pressure–overpressure system, which ensures the production modes and capacities. Finally, the primary and secondary elements that control the “sweet spots” of shale gas reservoirs were further analyzed and their restrictive relationships with each other were also discussed.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  13. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  14. The geometric mean concept for interpreting the permeability of heterogeneous geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Selvadurai, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. The general consensus is that the flow path in a test needs to be drastically reduced if steady state tests are considered as a suitable experimental technique. The disadvantage of flow path reduction is that the tested volume may not be altogether representative of the rock, particularly if it displays heterogeneity in the scale of the sample being tested. Also, if the sample is not correctly restrained, the differential pressures needed to initiate steady flow can introduce damage in the sample leading to erroneous estimates of permeability. The alternative approach is to use large enough samples that can capture the spatial heterogeneity but develop testing procedures that can test examine the steady state flow process as a problem in three-dimensional fluid flow that can capture the spatial distribution of permeability. The paper discusses theoretical and computational approaches that have been developed for the estimation of the spatial distribution of permeability in a cuboidal Indiana Limestone sample measuring 450 mm. The "Patch Permeability Test" developed in connection with the research allows the measurements of the surface permeability of the block and through kriging techniques estimate the permeability within the block sample. The research promotes the use of the "Geometric Mean" concept for the description of the effective permeability of the heterogeneous porous medium where the spatial distribution conforms to a lognormal pattern. The effectiveness of the approach is that the techniques can be applied to examine the effective permeability of heterogeneous low permeability materials such as

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus)-size fish near the floating surface collector in the North Fork Reservoir, Oregon, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Noah S.; Smith, Collin D.

    2017-06-26

    Acoustic cameras were used to assess the behavior and abundance of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus)-size fish at the entrance to the North Fork Reservoir juvenile fish floating surface collector (FSC). The purpose of the FSC is to collect downriver migrating juvenile salmonids at the North Fork Dam, and safely route them around the hydroelectric projects. The objective of the acoustic camera component of this study was to assess the behaviors of bull trout-size fish observed near the FSC, and to determine if the presence of bull trout-size fish influenced the collection or abundance of juvenile salmonids. Acoustic cameras were deployed near the surface and floor of the entrance to the FSC. The acoustic camera technology was an informative tool for assessing abundance and spatial and temporal behaviors of bull trout-size fish near the entrance of the FSC. Bull trout-size fish were regularly observed near the entrance, with greater abundances on the deep camera than on the shallow camera. Additionally, greater abundances were observed during the hours of sunlight than were observed during the night. Behavioral differences also were observed at the two depths, with surface fish traveling faster and straighter with more directed movement, and fish observed on the deep camera generally showing more milling behavior. Modeling potential predator-prey interactions and influences using collected passive integrated transponder (PIT) -tagged juvenile salmonids proved largely unpredictable, although these fish provided relevant timing and collection information. Overall, the results indicate that bull trout-size fish are present near the entrance of the FSC, concomitant with juvenile salmonids, and their abundances and behaviors indicate that they may be drawn to the entrance of the FSC because of the abundance of prey-sized fish.

  16. Facies Distribution and Petrophysical Properties of Shoreface-Offshore Transition Environment in Sandakan Formation, NE Sabah Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, M. Firdaus A.; Suhaili Ismail, M.; Rahman, A. Hadi A.; Azfar Mohamed, M.

    2017-10-01

    Newly exposed outcrop of Miocene shallow marine sandstone in Sandakan Formation, allows characterization of the facies distribution and petrophysical properties of shoreface to offshore transition environment. Six facies are defined: (1) Poorly bioturbated Hummocky Cross Stratified (HCS) sandstone (F1), (2) Moderately bioturbated HCS sandstone (F2), (3) Well bioturbated HCS sandstone (F3), (4) Poorly bioturbated Swaley Cross Stratified (SCS) sandstone (F4), (5) Interbedded HCS sandstone with sand-silt mudstone, (6) Heterolithic mudstone. The sedimentary successions were deposited in upper to lower shoreface, and offshore transition environment. Facies F3, F4 and F5 shows good reservoir quality with good porosity and fair permeability values from 20% to 21% and 14 mD to 33 mD respectively. While Facies F1 exhibits poor reservoir quality with low permeability values 3.13 mD.

  17. Mathematical and field analysis of longitudinal reservoir infill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, W. T.; Capart, H.

    2016-12-01

    In reservoirs, severe problems are caused by infilled sediment deposits. In long term, the sediment accumulation reduces the capacity of reservoir storage and flood control benefits. In the short term, the sediment deposits influence the intakes of water-supply and hydroelectricity generation. For the management of reservoir, it is important to understand the deposition process and then to predict the sedimentation in reservoir. To investigate the behaviors of sediment deposits, we propose a one-dimensional simplified theory derived by the Exner equation to predict the longitudinal sedimentation distribution in idealized reservoirs. The theory models the reservoir infill geomorphic actions for three scenarios: delta progradation, near-dam bottom deposition, and final infill. These yield three kinds of self-similar analytical solutions for the reservoir bed profiles, under different boundary conditions. Three analytical solutions are composed by error function, complementary error function, and imaginary error function, respectively. The theory is also computed by finite volume method to test the analytical solutions. The theoretical and numerical predictions are in good agreement with one-dimensional small-scale laboratory experiment. As the theory is simple to apply with analytical solutions and numerical computation, we propose some applications to simulate the long-profile evolution of field reservoirs and focus on the infill sediment deposit volume resulting the uplift of near-dam bottom elevation. These field reservoirs introduced here are Wushe Reservoir, Tsengwen Reservoir, Mudan Reservoir in Taiwan, Lago Dos Bocas in Puerto Rico, and Sakuma Dam in Japan.

  18. Upscaling of Two-Phase Immiscible Flows in Communicating Stratified Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for upscaling two-phase immiscible flows in heterogeneous porous media is described. This method is developed for stratified reservoirs with perfect communication between layers (the case of vertical equilibrium), in a viscous dominant regime, where the effects of capillary....... They are solved numerically, based on an upstream finite difference algorithm. Self-similarity of the solution makes it possible to compute pseudofractional flow functions depending on the average saturation. The computer partial differential equation solver COMSOL is used for comparison of the complete 2D...... solutions with averaged 1D simulations. Cases of both discrete and continuous (log-normal) permeability distribution are studied. Generally, saturation profiles of the 1D model are only slightly different from the 2D simulation results. Recovery curves and fractional flow curves fit well. Calculations show...

  19. Integrated Approach to Drilling Project in Unconventional Reservoir Using Reservoir Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Jerzy; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Wojnarowski, Paweł; Janiga, Damian; Skrzypaszek, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    Accumulation and flow mechanisms in unconventional reservoir are different compared to conventional. This requires a special approach of field management with drilling and stimulation treatments as major factor for further production. Integrated approach of unconventional reservoir production optimization assumes coupling drilling project with full scale reservoir simulation for determine best well placement, well length, fracturing treatment design and mid-length distance between wells. Full scale reservoir simulation model emulate a part of polish shale - gas field. The aim of this paper is to establish influence of technical factor for gas production from shale gas field. Due to low reservoir permeability, stimulation treatment should be direct towards maximizing the hydraulic contact. On the basis of production scenarios, 15 stages hydraulic fracturing allows boost gas production over 1.5 times compared to 8 stages. Due to the possible interference of the wells, it is necessary to determine the distance between the horizontal parts of the wells trajectories. In order to determine the distance between the wells allowing to maximize recovery factor of resources in the stimulated zone, a numerical algorithm based on a dynamic model was developed and implemented. Numerical testing and comparative study show that the most favourable arrangement assumes a minimum allowable distance between the wells. This is related to the volume ratio of the drainage zone to the total volume of the stimulated zone.

  20. Extracting maximum petrophysical and geological information from a limited reservoir database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M.; Chawathe, A.; Ouenes, A. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The characterization of old fields lacking sufficient core and log data is a challenging task. This paper describes a methodology that uses new and conventional tools to build a reliable reservoir model for the Sulimar Queen field. At the fine scale, permeability measured on a fine grid with a minipermeameter was used in conjunction with the petrographic data collected on multiple thin sections. The use of regression analysis and a newly developed fuzzy logic algorithm led to the identification of key petrographic elements which control permeability. At the log scale, old gamma ray logs were first rescaled/calibrated throughout the entire field for consistency and reliability using only four modem logs. Using data from one cored well and the rescaled gamma ray logs, correlations between core porosity, permeability, total water content and gamma ray were developed to complete the small scale characterization. At the reservoir scale, outcrop data and the rescaled gamma logs were used to define the reservoir structure over an area of ten square miles where only 36 wells were available. Given the structure, the rescaled gamma ray logs were used to build the reservoir volume by identifying the flow units and their continuity. Finally, history-matching results constrained to the primary production were used to estimate the dynamic reservoir properties such as relative permeabilities to complete the characterization. The obtained reservoir model was tested by forecasting the waterflood performance and which was in good agreement with the actual performance.

  1. A new method of well test analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs based on elliptical flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igbokoyi, A.O.; Tiab, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Well testing analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs is usually based on the radial flow model. However, this model is only applicable to purely homogeneous system and long time solution and cannot provide complete formation analysis in a reservoir that exhibits anisotropy. This paper presented a new method of estimating permeability anisotropy in naturally fractured reservoirs. Maximum and minimum permeability were obtained in one well test. The paper discussed the mathematical formulation for the study which used Warren and Root's matrix pseudo-steady state model. The paper presented the assumptions for this model which included an isotropic homogeneous or anisotropic homogeneous formation; a slightly compressible fluid with single phase flow in both the matrix and fracture; initial reservoir pressure; two-dimensional flow; and laminar flow which obeys Darcy's law. The paper also discussed the computation of wellbore pressure and interpretation methods for both early linear flow and the long time radial flow regimes. Anisotropy was also outlined as the purpose of the study was to use an elliptical flow model in quantifying the permeability anisotropy of the reservoir. The type curve model was also explained to demonstrate the validity of the method of quantifying the permeability anisotropy with a known problem. Last, the paper explained the direct method with several example. It was concluded that the elliptical flow model is the most appropriate method of analyzing pressure transient data in naturally fractured reservoirs. 22 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs., 3 appendices.

  2. Analysis of Analytical Models Developed under the Uniaxial Strain Condition for Predicting Coal Permeability during Primary Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanming Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The stress-dependent permeability of coal during coalbed methane production has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. However, how permeability changes as a function of stress variation is somewhat unclear to date, and currently used analytical models fail to accurately predict permeability evolution with gas depletion. Considering that the role played by changes in in situ stress in permeability evolution is critical, a comprehensive theoretical study was first conducted, through which it was found that coal permeability is determined by mean effective stress. Moreover, the influence of matrix shrinkage on cleat deformation and then coal permeability was overestimated by currently used models, leading to inaccuracy of the predicted permeability. By taking both mean effective stress and the influence of matrix shrinkage on cleat deformation into account, a new permeability model was developed under the uniaxial strain condition in order to precisely estimate permeability evolution during gas depletion. An in-depth investigation and comparison among four commonly-used permeability models, the Palmer and Mansoori (P&M model, Improved P&M model, Shi and Durucan (S&D model, and Cui and Bustin (C&B model, was then conducted. It was experimentally verified that a good match can be achieved between the lab data and the results predicted by the proposed model. Permeability variation of coalbed reservoirs associated with gas depletion is a consequence of two opposing effects: mechanical compaction and matrix shrinkage. In comparison, it was found that the coefficients of these two effects incorporated in those four models have a significant impact on permeability variation; and the accuracy of the values of initial cleat porosity and cleat compressibility, the bridges connecting permeability, and those two effects in analytical models, is extremely critical to permeability estimations. This study can shed light on improving the

  3. Water Saturation Relations and Their Diffusion-Limited Equilibration in Gas Shale: Implications for Gas Flow in Unconventional Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Shen, Weijun; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhang, Yingqi; Finsterle, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of water are used for hydraulic fracturing of low permeability shale reservoirs to stimulate gas production, with most of the water remaining unrecovered and distributed in a poorly understood manner within stimulated regions. Because water partitioning into shale pores controls gas release, we measured the water saturation dependence on relative humidity (rh) and capillary pressure (Pc) for imbibition (adsorption) as well as drainage (desorption) on samples of Woodford Shale. Experiments and modeling of water vapor adsorption into shale laminae at rh = 0.31 demonstrated that long times are needed to characterize equilibrium in larger (5 mm thick) pieces of shales, and yielded effective diffusion coefficients from 9 × 10-9 to 3 × 10-8 m2 s-1, similar in magnitude to the literature values for typical low porosity and low permeability rocks. Most of the experiments, conducted at 50°C on crushed shale grains in order to facilitate rapid equilibration, showed significant saturation hysteresis, and that very large Pc (˜1 MPa) are required to drain the shales. These results quantify the severity of the water blocking problem, and suggest that gas production from unconventional reservoirs is largely associated with stimulated regions that have had little or no exposure to injected water. Gravity drainage of water from fractures residing above horizontal wells reconciles gas production in the presence of largely unrecovered injected water, and is discussed in the broader context of unsaturated flow in fractures.

  4. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ''legally tight'' reservoirs. Additional production from ''geologically tight'' reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA's tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government's regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs

  5. Outcrop-based reservoir modeling of a naturally fractured siliciclastic CO 2 sequestration site, Svalbard, Arctic Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senger, K.; Ogata, K.; Tveranger, J.; Braathen, A.; Olaussen, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a geological model of an unconventional siliciclastic reservoir projected for CO2 sequestration near Longyearbyen, Svalbard. The reservoir is characterized by a substantial sub-hydrostatic pressure regime, very low matrix porosity and -permeability values, extensive natural fracturing and

  6. Outcrop-based reservoir modeling of a naturally fractured siliciclastic CO2 sequestration site, Svalbard, Arctic Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senger, K.; Ogata, K.; Tveranger, J.; Braathen, A.; Olaussen, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a geological model of an unconventional siliciclastic reservoir projected for CO2 sequestration near Longyearbyen, Svalbard. The reservoir is characterized by a substantial sub-hydrostatic pressure regime, very low matrix porosity and -permeability values, extensive natural fracturing and

  7. Influence of habitat and seasonal variation on wild mammal diversity and distribution with special reference to the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense host-reservoir in Bipindi (Cameroon)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anselme Massussi, J.; Djieto-Lordon, C.; Nijokou, F.; Laveissière, C.; Ploeg, van der J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the role of wildlife in the resurgence and perenisation of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), we investigated the influence of habitat and seasonal variations on the diversity and spatial distribution of wild mammals, with special reference to those recognised as potential

  8. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  9. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservior Fisheries, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, Bradley B.

    1985-06-01

    We are evaluating the potential impacts of Libby Reservoir operation on the fishery in Libby Reservoir. The sampling program has been tested and modified to provide data for developing an understanding of how reservoir operation impacts the reservoir fishery. Temperature appears to be an important variable influenced by reservoir operation which regulates fish and fish food production and distribution. 39 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr; Martin J. Blunt

    1998-03-31

    This project performs research in four main areas: laboratory experiments to measure three-phase relative permeability; network modeling to predict three-phase relative perme- ability; benchmark simulations of gas injection and waterfl ooding at the field scale; and the development of fast streamline techniques to study field-scale oil. The aim of the work is to achieve a comprehensive description of gas injection processes from the pore to the core to the reservoir scale. In this report we provide a detailed description of our measurements of three-phase relative permeability.

  11. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  12. Transport of reservoir fines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Modeling transport of reservoir fines is of great importance for evaluating the damage of production wells and infectivity decline. The conventional methodology accounts for neither the formation heterogeneity around the wells nor the reservoir fines’ heterogeneity. We have developed an integral...

  13. SILTATION IN RESERVOIRS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calls have been made to the government through various media to assist its populace in combating this nagging problem. It was concluded that sediment maximum accumulation is experienced in reservoir during the periods of maximum flow. Keywords: reservoir model, siltation, sediment, catchment, sediment transport. 1.

  14. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady

  15. Linking gas-sorption induced changes in coal permeability to directional strains through a modulus reduction ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jishan; Chen, Zhongwei [Shool of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, WA, 6009 (Australia); Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Penn State University, PA 16802-5000 (United States); Miao, Xiexing; Mao, Xianbiao [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology (China)

    2010-07-01

    Although coal-gas interactions have been comprehensively investigated, most prior studies have focused on one or more component processes of effective stress or sorption-induced deformation and for resulting isotropic changes in coal permeability. In this study a permeability model is developed to define the evolution of gas sorption-induced permeability anisotropy under the full spectrum of mechanical conditions spanning prescribed in-situ stresses through constrained displacement. In the model, gas sorption-induced coal directional permeabilities are linked into directional strains through an elastic modulus reduction ratio, R{sub m}. It defines the ratio of coal bulk elastic modulus to coal matrix modulus (0 < R{sub m} < 1) and represents the partitioning of total strain for an equivalent porous coal medium between the fracture system and the matrix. Where bulk coal permeability is dominated by the cleat system, the portioned fracture strains may be used to define the evolution of the fracture permeability, and hence the response of the bulk aggregate. The coal modulus reduction ratio provides a straightforward index to link anisotropy in deformability characteristics to the evolution of directional permeabilities. Constitutive models incorporating this concept are implemented in a finite element model to represent the complex interactions of effective stress and sorption under in-situ conditions. The validity of the model is evaluated against benchmark cases for uniaxial swelling and for constant volume reservoirs then applied to match changes in permeability observed in a field production test within a coalbed reservoir. (author)

  16. Determining the explosion effects on the Gasbuggy reservoir from computer simulation of the postshot gas production history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Leo A.

    1970-01-01

    Analysis of the gas production data from Gasbuggy to deduce reservoir properties outside the chimney is complicated by the large gas storage volume in the chimney because the gas flow from the surrounding reservoir into the chimney cannot be directly measured. This problem was overcome by developing a chimney volume factor F (M 2 CF/PSI) based upon analysis of rapid drawdowns during the production tests. The chimney volume factor was in turn used to construct the time history of the required influx of gas into the chimney from the surrounding reservoir. The most probable value of F to describe the chimney is found to be 0.150 M 2 CF/PSI. Postulated models of the reservoir properties outside the chimney are examined by calculating the pressure distribution and flow of gas through the reservoir with the experimentally observed chimney pressure history applied to the cavity wall. The calculated influx from the reservoir into the chimney is then compared to the required influx