WorldWideScience

Sample records for reservoir fluid movement

  1. Movement of geothermal fluid in the Cerro Prieto field as determined from well log and reservoir engineering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfman, S.E.; Lippmann, M.J.; Zelwer, R.

    1982-01-01

    A hydrogeologic model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in its undisturbed state, developed on the basis of well log and reservoir engineering data, is discussed. According to this model, geothermal fluid enters the field from the east through a deep (>10,000 ft) sandstone aquifer which is overlain by a thick shale unit which locally prevents the upward migration of the fluid. As it flows westward, the fluid gradually rises through faults and sandy gaps in the shale unit. Eventually, some of the fluid leaks to the surface in the western part of the field, while the rest mixes with surrounding colder waters.

  2. Fluid movement and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-11-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation, cognitive flexibility, and remote associations. Alternative mechanisms such as enhanced mood and motivation were also examined. These results suggest that creativity can be influenced by certain types of physical movement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Magnetic movement of biological fluid droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Antonio A.; Egatz-Gomez, Ana; Lindsay, Solitaire A.; Dominguez-Garcia, P.; Melle, Sonia; Marquez, Manuel; Rubio, Miguel A.; Picraux, S.T.; Yang, Dongqing; Aella, P.; Hayes, Mark A.; Gust, Devens; Loyprasert, Suchera; Vazquez-Alvarez, Terannie; Wang, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to control the movement of aqueous drops on non-patterned, silicon nanowire superhydrophobic surfaces. Drops of aqueous and biological fluids are controlled by introducing magnetizable carbonyl iron microparticles into the liquid. Key elements of operations such as movement, coalescence, and splitting of water and biological fluid drops, as well as electrochemical measurement of an analyte are demonstrated. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared using vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth systems followed by coating with a perfluorinated hydrocarbon molecule. Drops were made from aqueous and biological fluid suspensions with magnetizable microparticle concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 wt%

  4. Magnetic movement of biological fluid droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Antonio A. [Harrington Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)]. E-mail: tony.garcia@asu.edu; Egatz-Gomez, Ana [Harrington Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Lindsay, Solitaire A. [Harrington Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Dominguez-Garcia, P. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Melle, Sonia [Harrington Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Departamento de Optica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalon s/n, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Marquez, Manuel [Harrington Department of Bioengineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Research Center, Philip Morris USA, Richmond, VA 23234 (United States); Rubio, Miguel A. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Picraux, S.T. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, MST-CINT, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Yang, Dongqing [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Aella, P. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hayes, Mark A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 8528 (United States); Gust, Devens [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 8528 (United States); Loyprasert, Suchera [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Vazquez-Alvarez, Terannie [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Wang, Joseph [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic fields can be used to control the movement of aqueous drops on non-patterned, silicon nanowire superhydrophobic surfaces. Drops of aqueous and biological fluids are controlled by introducing magnetizable carbonyl iron microparticles into the liquid. Key elements of operations such as movement, coalescence, and splitting of water and biological fluid drops, as well as electrochemical measurement of an analyte are demonstrated. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared using vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth systems followed by coating with a perfluorinated hydrocarbon molecule. Drops were made from aqueous and biological fluid suspensions with magnetizable microparticle concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 wt%.

  5. Monitoring of magnetic EOR fluids in reservoir under production by using the electromagnetic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, S.; Min, D. J.; Moon, S.; Kim, W. K.; Shin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    To increase the amount of oil and gas extracted during production, some techniques like EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) are applied by injecting some materials such as water and CO2. Recently, there are some researches for injecting magnetic nanoparticles with fluids during EOR. The size of particle is nano-scale, which can prevent particles from adhering to the pores of reservoir. The main purpose of injecting magnetic nanoparticles is to monitor movement or distribution of EOR fluids. To monitor the injected magnetic EOR fluids in the reservoir, CSEM (controlled source electromagnetic method) can be the most optimized geophysical method among various geophysical monitoring methods. Depending on the reservoir circumstances, we can control the electric or magnetic sources to monitor reservoir during oil or gas production. In this study, we perform numerical simulation of CSEM for 3D horizontal-layered models assuming a reservoir under production. We suppose that there are two wells: one is for the controlled source; the other is for the receiver. By changing the distribution, movement and magnetization of EOR fluids, we compare the electric or magnetic fields recorded at the receiver. Maxwell's equations are the governing equation of CSEM and are approximated by using the edge-based finite-element method. Direct solver is applied to solve the linear equations. Because injected magnetic nanoparticle changes the conductivity of EOR fluid, there is high contrast of conductivity of reservoir. This high contrast of conductivity induces secondary electric or magnetic fields that are recorded at the receiver well. We compare these recorded secondary fields generated by various movement or distribution of magnetic EOR fluid. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" grant funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries of Korea, by the "Civil Military Technology Cooperation Center", and by the International

  6. Imaging fluid/solid interactions in hydrocarbon reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwins, P J; Baker, J C; Mackinnon, I D

    1993-08-01

    The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) has been used to image liquid hydrocarbons in sandstones and oil shales. Additionally, the fluid sensitivity of selected clay minerals in hydrocarbon reservoirs was assessed via three case studies: HCl acid sensitivity of authigenic chlorite in sandstone reservoirs, freshwater sensitivity of authigenic illite/smectite in sandstone reservoirs, and bleach sensitivity of a volcanic reservoir containing abundant secondary chlorite/corrensite. The results showed the suitability of using ESEM for imaging liquid hydrocarbon films in hydrocarbon reservoirs and the importance of simulating in situ fluid-rock interactions for hydrocarbon production programmes. In each case, results of the ESEM studies greatly enhanced prediction of reservoir/borehole reactions and, in some cases, contradicted conventional wisdom regarding the outcome of potential engineering solutions.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    Nielsen, P.V. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement. Indoor Air, International Journal of Indoor Environment and Health, Vol. 14, Supplement 7, pp. 134-143, 2004. ABSTRACT Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and new developments of CFD in the indoor environment as well as quality...... considerations are important elements in the study of energy consumption, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in buildings. The paper discusses the quality level of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the involved schemes (first, second and third order schemes) by the use of the Smith and Hutton problem...

  8. The movements of pikeperch in a shallow reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Niels; Koed, Anders; Økland, F.

    1999-01-01

    The movements of 12 female (62-74 cm) and eight male pikeperch (55-64 cm) radiotagged in early March 1997 in the shallow and turbid Bygholm Reservoir, peaked during the summer, but all fish were also active during the winter. Females moved more than males and their activity was correlated...... with water temperature. Rate of movement was correlated positively with body size for both male and female pikeperch. During the breeding season (April-May) males became stationary for 14-47 days. Spawning sites, inferred from movements of males, were at depths of 2.0-2.5 m on hard substrata, mainly gravel...

  9. Tracing fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.E.; Adams, M.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A family of fluorescent compounds, the polycyclic aromatic sulfonates, were evaluated for application in intermediate- and high-temperature geothermal reservoirs. Whereas the naphthalene sulfonates were found to be very thermally stable and reasonably detectable, the amino-substituted naphthalene sulfonates were found to be somewhat less thermally stable, but much more detectable. A tracer test was conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir using one of the substituted naphthalene sulfonates, amino G, and fluorescein. Four of 9 production wells showed tracer breakthrough during the first 200 days of the test. Reconstructed tracer return curves are presented that correct for the thermal decay of tracer assuming an average reservoir temperature of 227{degrees}C. In order to examine the feasibility of using numerical simulation to model tracer flow, we developed simple, two-dimensional models of the geothermal reservoir using the numerical simulation programs TETRAD and TOUGH2. By fitting model outputs to measured return curves, we show that numerical reservoir simulations can be calibrated with the tracer data. Both models predict the same order of elution, approximate tracer concentrations, and return curve shapes. Using these results, we propose a method for using numerical models to design a tracer test.

  10. Modeling Study of High Pressure and High Temperature Reservoir Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad

    S-characterization combinations and 260 reservoir fluids. PC-SAFT with the new general characterization method is shown to give the lowest AAD% and maximum deviation in calculation of saturation pressure, density and STO density, among all the tested characterization methods for PC-SAFT. Application of the new characterization...... be highly rewarding if successfully produced. This PhD project is part of the NextOil (New Extreme Oil and Gas in the Danish North Sea) project which is intended to reduce the uncertainties in HPHT field development. The main focus of this PhD is on accurate description of the reservoir fluid behavior under...... HPHT conditions to minimize the production risks from these types of reservoirs. In particular, the study has thoroughly evaluated several non-cubic Equations of State (EoSs) which are considered promising for HPHT fluid modeling, showing their advantages and short comings based on an extensive...

  11. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M. [Hattenburg Dilley & Linnell, LLC, Anchorage, AL (United States)

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate the relationship between geothermal fluid processes and the compositions of the fluid inclusion gases trapped in the reservoir rocks; and 2) develop methodologies for interpreting fluid inclusion gas data in terms of the chemical, thermal and hydrological properties of geothermal reservoirs. Phase 1 of this project was designed to conduct the following: 1) model the effects of boiling, condensation, conductive cooling and mixing on selected gaseous species; using fluid compositions obtained from geothermal wells, 2) evaluate, using quantitative analyses provided by New Mexico Tech (NMT), how these processes are recorded by fluid inclusions trapped in individual crystals; and 3) determine if the results obtained on individual crystals can be applied to the bulk fluid inclusion analyses determined by Fluid Inclusion Technology (FIT). Our initial studies however, suggested that numerical modeling of the data would be premature. We observed that the gas compositions, determined on bulk and individual samples were not the same as those discharged by the geothermal wells. Gases discharged from geothermal wells are CO2-rich and contain low concentrations of light gases (i.e. H2, He, N, Ar, CH4). In contrast many of our samples displayed enrichments in these light gases. Efforts were initiated to evaluate the reasons for the observed gas distributions. As a first step, we examined the potential importance of different reservoir processes using a variety of commonly employed gas ratios (e.g. Giggenbach plots). The second technical target was the development of interpretational methodologies. We have develop methodologies for the interpretation of fluid inclusion gas data, based on the results of Phase 1, geologic interpretation of fluid inclusion data, and integration of the data. These methodologies can be used in conjunction with the relevant geological and hydrological information on the system to

  12. General approach to characterizing reservoir fluids for EoS models using a large PVT database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Yan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Fluid characterization is needed when applying any EoS model to reservoir fluids. It is important especially for non-cubic models such as PC-SAFT where fluid characterization is less mature. Furthermore, there is a great interest to apply non-cubic models to high pressure high temperature reservoir...

  13. Fluid Assisted Compaction and Deformation of Reservoir Lithologies; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Chester, F.M.; Chester, J.S.; Hajash, A.; He, W.; Karner, S.; Lenz, S.

    2002-01-01

    The compaction and diagenesis of sandstones that form reservoirs to hydrocarbons depend on mechanical compaction processes, fluid flow at local and regional scales, and chemical processes of dissolution, precipitation and diffusional solution transport. The compaction and distortional deformation of quartz aggregates exposed to reactive aqueous fluids have been investigated experimentally at varying critical and subcritical stress states and time scales. Pore fluid compositions and reaction rates during deformation have been measured and compared with creep rates. Relative contributions of mechanical and chemical processes to deformation and pore structure evolution have been evaluated using acoustic emission (AE) measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. At the subcritical conditions investigated, creep rates and acoustic emission rates fit transient logarithmic creep laws. Based on AE and SEM observations, we conclude that intragranular cracking and grain rearrangement are the dominant strain mechanisms. Specimens show little evidence of stress-enhanced solution transfer. At long times under wet conditions, the dominant strain mechanism gradually shifts from critical cracking at grain contacts with high stress concentrations to fluid-assisted sub-critical cracking

  14. Does reduction of amniotic fluid affect fetal movements?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sival, D A; Visser, G H; Prechtl, H F

    The effect of the amount of amniotic fluid on the form of fetal general movements was studied longitudinally in 19 pregnancies complicated by premature rupture of the amniotic membranes (PROM). Before birth, general movements were studied weekly by means of 1-h ultrasound observations, performed

  15. The rotating movement of three immiscible fluids - A benchmark problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mark; Oude Essink, Gualbert; Langevin, Christian D.

    2004-01-01

    A benchmark problem involving the rotating movement of three immiscible fluids is proposed for verifying the density-dependent flow component of groundwater flow codes. The problem consists of a two-dimensional strip in the vertical plane filled with three fluids of different densities separated by

  16. Estimation of reservoir fluid volumes through 4-D seismic analysis on Gullfaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veire, H.S.; Reymond, S.B.; Signer, C.; Tenneboe, P.O.; Soenneland, L.; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla

    1998-12-31

    4-D seismic has the potential to monitor hydrocarbon movement in reservoirs during production, and could thereby supplement the predictions of reservoir parameters offered by the reservoir simulator. However 4-D seismic is often more band limited than the vertical resolution required in the reservoir model. As a consequence the seismic data holds a composite response from reservoir parameter changes during production so that the inversion becomes non-unique. A procedure where data from the reservoir model are integrated with seismic data will be presented. The potential of such a procedure is demonstrated through a case study from a recent 4-D survey over the Gullfaks field. 2 figs.

  17. Acid Fluid-Rock Interactions with Shales Comprising Unconventional Hydrocarbon Reservoirs and with Shale Capping Carbon Storage Reservoirs: Experimental Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Bratcher, J.; Marcon, V.; Herz-Thyhsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of HCl is often a first stage in the hydraulic fracturing process. These acidic fluids react with marls or shales in unconventional reservoirs, reactions generally comparable to reaction between shale caprocks and acidic, carbonated formation waters in a carbon storage reservoir. Hydrothermal experiments examine acid fluid-rock interaction with 1) an unconventional shale reservoir and 2) a model shale capping a carbon storage reservoir. In the former, unconventional reservoir rock and hydraulic fracturing fluid possessing a range of ionic strengths (I = 0.01, 0.15) and initial pH values (2.5 and 7.3) reacted at 115°C and 35 MPa for 28 days. In the latter, a model carbon storage reservoir (Fe-rich dolomite), shale caprock (illite), and shale-reservoir mixture each reacted with formation water (I = 0.1 and pH 6.3) at 160°C and 25 MPa for ~15 days. These three experiments were subsequently injected with sufficient CO2 to maintain CO2 saturation in the water and allowed to react for ~40 additional days. Acidic frac fluid was rapidly buffered (from pH 2.5 to 6.2 after 38 hrs) by reaction with reservoir rock whereas the pH of near-neutral frac fluid decreased (from 7.3 to 6.9) after 47 hrs. Carbonate dissolution released Ca and Sr into solution and feldspar dissolution released SiO2 and Li; the extent of reaction was greater in the experiment containing acidic frac fluid. All three carbon storage experiments displayed a similar pH decrease of 1.5 units after the addition of CO2. The pH remained low for the duration of the experiments because the immiscible supercritical CO2 phase provided an infinite reservoir of carbonic acid that could not be consumed by reaction with the rock. In all three experiments, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and SO4 increase with injection, but slowly decline through termination of the experiments. This trend suggests initial dissolution followed by re-precipitation of carbonates, which can be seen in modeling and SEM results. New clay minerals

  18. On the feasibility of inducing oil mobilization in existing reservoirs via wellbore harmonic fluid action

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Chanseok

    2011-03-01

    Although vibration-based mobilization of oil remaining in mature reservoirs is a promising low-cost method of enhanced oil recovery (EOR), research on its applicability at the reservoir scale is still at an early stage. In this paper, we use simplified models to study the potential for oil mobilization in homogeneous and fractured reservoirs, when harmonically oscillating fluids are injected/produced within a well. To this end, we investigate first whether waves, induced by fluid pressure oscillations at the well site, and propagating radially and away from the source in a homogeneous reservoir, could lead to oil droplet mobilization in the reservoir pore-space. We discuss both the fluid pore-pressure wave and the matrix elastic wave cases, as potential agents for increasing oil mobility. We then discuss the more realistic case of a fractured reservoir, where we study the fluid pore-pressure wave motion, while taking into account the leakage effect on the fracture wall. Numerical results show that, in homogeneous reservoirs, the rock-stress wave is a better energy-delivery agent than the fluid pore-pressure wave. However, neither the rock-stress wave nor the pore-pressure wave is likely to result in any significant residual oil mobilization at the reservoir scale. On the other hand, enhanced oil production from the fractured reservoir\\'s matrix zone, induced by cross-flow vibrations, appears to be feasible. In the fractured reservoir, the fluid pore-pressure wave is only weakly attenuated through the fractures, and thus could induce fluid exchange between the rock formation and the fracture space. The vibration-induced cross-flow is likely to improve the imbibition of water into the matrix zone and the expulsion of oil from it. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. The rotating movement of three immiscible fluids - A benchmark problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, M.; Oude, Essink G.H.P.; Langevin, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    A benchmark problem involving the rotating movement of three immiscible fluids is proposed for verifying the density-dependent flow component of groundwater flow codes. The problem consists of a two-dimensional strip in the vertical plane filled with three fluids of different densities separated by interfaces. Initially, the interfaces between the fluids make a 45??angle with the horizontal. Over time, the fluids rotate to the stable position whereby the interfaces are horizontal; all flow is caused by density differences. Two cases of the problem are presented, one resulting in a symmetric flow field and one resulting in an asymmetric flow field. An exact analytical solution for the initial flow field is presented by application of the vortex theory and complex variables. Numerical results are obtained using three variable-density groundwater flow codes (SWI, MOCDENS3D, and SEAWAT). Initial horizontal velocities of the interfaces, as simulated by the three codes, compare well with the exact solution. The three codes are used to simulate the positions of the interfaces at two times; the three codes produce nearly identical results. The agreement between the results is evidence that the specific rotational behavior predicted by the models is correct. It also shows that the proposed problem may be used to benchmark variable-density codes. It is concluded that the three models can be used to model accurately the movement of interfaces between immiscible fluids, and have little or no numerical dispersion. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  1. Analysis of pressure variation of fluid in bounded circular reservoirs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result obtained at the wellbore was compared with the results obtained by Van Everdigen and Hurst. It was shown that there was a strong positive correlation between the results. The result obtained from the analysis also shows the pressure variation outside wellbore of the same reservoir. It is important to note that ...

  2. Analysis of pressure variation of fluid in bounded circular reservoirs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result obtained at the wellbore was compared with the results obtained by Van Everdigen and Hurst. It was shown that there was a strong positive correlation between the results. Keywords: Bounded circular reservoir, constant terminal rate, dimensionless variables, diffusivity equation, and Crank-Nicholson scheme.

  3. pressure analysis and fluid contact prediction for alpha reservoir

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    1, 3, CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN INTEGRATED PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND EVALUATION STUDIES (IPEES),UNIVERSITY. OF BENIN, BENIN ... economic value of the asset. Early oil rim development can be negatively impacted by water coning and/or early gas breakthrough.[1].Oil rim reservoirs are common in.

  4. Discrimination of reservoir fluid contacts using compressional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved fluid detection and lithology discrimination using rock properties and attributes cross plots have been attempted using well log data in an Onshore Niger Delta field. Rock properties and attributes were extracted using empirical rock physics models on well logs and used to validate their potentials as pore fluid ...

  5. Basement Fault Reactivation by Fluid Injection into Sedimentary Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Eichhubl; Fan, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Many suspected injection-induced earthquakes occur in crystalline basement rather than in the overlying sedimentary injection reservoir. To address why earthquakes nucleate in the basement rather than the injection layer we investigate the relationship between pore pressure diffusion, rock matrix deformation, and induced fault reactivation through 3D fully coupled poroelastic finite element models. These models simulate the temporal and spatial perturbation of pore pressure and solid stresses within a basement fault that extends into overlying sedimentary layers and that is conductive for flow along the fault but a barrier for flow across. We compare the effects of direct pore pressure communication and indirect poroelastic stress transfer from the injection reservoir to the fault on increasing the Coulomb failure stress that could reactivate the basement fault for normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting stress regimes. Our numerical results demonstrate that volumetric expansion of the reservoir causes a bending of the fault near the injector and induces shear tractions along the downdip direction of the fault in the basement. These induced shear tractions act to increase the Coulomb failure stress for a normal faulting stress regime, and decrease the Coulomb failure stress for a reverse faulting regime. For a strike-slip faulting stress regime, the induced shear tractions increase the Coulomb failure stress both in the reservoir and basement. The induced normal traction on the fault reduces the Coulomb failure stress in all three tectonic regimes, but is larger in the reservoir than in the basement due to the more pronounced poroelastic effect in the reservoir. As a result, strike-slip stress regimes favor fault reactivation in the basement. Whereas the magnitude of the direct pore pressure increase exceeds the magnitude of induced poroelastic stress change, the poroelastic stress change increases the Coulomb failure stress in the basement fault for the normal

  6. Liquid–liquid equilibria for reservoir fluids+monoethylene glycol and reservoir fluids+monoethylene glycol+water: Experimental measurements and modeling using the CPA EoS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2013-01-01

    The complex phase equilibrium between reservoir fluids and associating compounds like water and glycols has become more and more important as the increasing global energy demand pushes the oil industry to use advanced methods to increase oil recovery, such as increasing the use of various chemicals....... Promising results are also obtained with CPA EoS for ternary mixtures, with some deviations for the solubility of MEG/water in the hydrocarbon phase and for the hydrocarbons in the polar phase....... to ensure a constant and safe production. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems and gas condensates, containing associating compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using modified correlations...

  7. Phase Envelope Calculations for Reservoir Fluids in the Presence of Capillary Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemus, Diego; Yan, Wei; Michelsen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir fluids are multicomponent mixtures in confined spaces, where the role of capillary force becomes important when the average pore size is on the order of tens of nanometers, such as in tight rocks and shale. We present an algorithm for calculating the phase envelope of multicomponent...... the bubble and dew point curves but also other quality lines with vapor fractions between 0 and 1. The algorithm has been used to calculate the phase envelopes of binary, multicomponent and reservoir fluid systems for pore radius from 10 to 50 nm. The presence of capillary pressure changes the saturation...

  8. Interaction between Proppant Packing, Reservoir Depletion, and Fluid Flow in Pore Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M.; McClure, J. E.; Han, Y.; Chen, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the oil and gas industry, the performance of proppant pack in hydraulically created fractures has a significant influence on fracture conductivity. A better understanding of proppant transport and deposition pattern in a hydraulic fracture is vital for effective and economical production within oil and gas reservoirs. In this research, a numerical modeling approach, combining Particle Flow Code (PFC) and GPU-enhanced lattice Boltzmann simulator (GELBS), is adopted to advance the understanding of the interaction between proppant particle packing, depletion of reservoir formation, and transport of reservoir flow through the pore space. In this numerical work flow, PFC is used to simulate effective stress increase and proppant particle movement and rearrangement under increasing mechanical loading. The pore structure of the proppant pack evolves subsequently and the geometrical data are output for lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation of proppant pack permeability. Three different proppant packs with fixed particle concentration and 12/18, 16/30, and 20/40 mesh sizes are generated. These proppant packs are compressed with specified loading stress and their subsequent geometries are used for fluid flow simulations. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations, e.g., the conductivity of proppant packs decreases with increasing effective stress. Three proppant packs with the same average diameter were generated using different coefficients of variation (COVs) for the proppant diameter (namely cov5%, cov20%, and cov30%). By using the coupled PFC-LBM work flow, the proppant pack permeability as functions of effective stress and porosity is investigated. The results show that the proppant pack with a higher proppant diameter COV has lower permeability and porosity under the same effective stress, because smaller particles fill in the pore space between bigger particles. The relationship between porosity and permeability is also consistent with

  9. Mechanisms of arsenic enrichment in geothermal and petroleum reservoirs fluids in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkle, Peter; Bundschuh, Jochen; Sracek, Ondra

    2010-11-01

    The lack of chemical similarity between thermal fluids in geothermal and petroleum reservoirs in Mexico indicates a distinct origin for arsenic in both types of reservoirs. Deep fluids from geothermal reservoirs along the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) are characterized by elevated arsenic concentrations, within a range between 1 and 100 mg L(-1) at a depth from 600 to 3000 m b.s.l. Based on hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), arsenic is linked to typical geothermal species like lithium, silica, and boron. The lack of correlation between arsenic and salinity reflects the importance of secondary water-rock interaction processes. The predominance of arsenic compared to Fe- and Cu-concentrations, and the occurrence of secondary minerals (sulfides and clay minerals) in temperature-dependent hydrothermal zones, supports this hypothesis. Neither magmatic fluids input, nor As mineralization is a prerequisite for As enrichment in Mexican geothermal fluids. In contrast, petroleum reservoir waters from sedimentary basins in SE-Mexico show maximum As concentrations of 2 mg L(-1), at depths from 2900 to 6100 m b.s.l. The linear chloride-arsenic correlation indicates that evaporated seawater represents the major source for aqueous arsenic in oil reservoirs, and only minor arsenic proportions are derived from interaction with carbonate host rock. Speciation modeling suggests the lack of arsenic solubility control in both geothermal and petroleum reservoirs, but precipitation/co-precipitation of As with secondary sulfides could occur in petroleum reservoirs with high iron concentrations. Geothermal fluids from magmatic-type reservoirs (Los Azufres and Los Humeros at the TMVB and Las Tres Vírgenes with a granodioritic basement) show relative constant arsenic concentrations through varying temperature conditions, which indicates that temperatures above 230-250 °C provide optimal and stable conditions for arsenic mobility. In contrast, temperature conditions for sedimentary

  10. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability

  11. Radar Mapping of Fractures and Fluids in Hydrocarbon Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarczyk, L. G.; Wattley, G. G.; Caffey, T. W.

    2001-05-01

    A stepped-frequency radar has been developed for mapping of fractures and fluids within 20 meters of the wellbore. The operating range has been achieved by using a radiating magnetic dipole operating in the low- and medium-frequency bands. Jim Wait has shown that the electromagnetic (EM) wave impedance in an electrically conductive media is largely imaginary, enabling energy to be stored in the near field instead of dissipated, as in the case for an electric dipole. This fact, combined with the low attenuation rate of a low-frequency band EM wave, enables radiation to penetrate deeply into the geology surrounding the wellbore. The radiation pattern features a vertical electric field for optimum electric current induction into vertical fractures. Current is also induced in sedimentary rock creating secondary waves that propagate back to the wellbore. The radiation pattern is electrically driven in azimuth around the wellbore. The receiving antenna is located in the null field of the radiating antenna so that the primary wave is below the thermal noise of the receiver input. By stepping the frequency through the low- and medium-frequency bands, the depth of investigation is varied, and enables electrical conductivity profiling away from the wellbore. Interpretation software has been developed for reconstructive imaging in dipping sedimentary layers. Because electrical conductivity can be related to oil/water saturation, both fractures and fluids can be mapped. Modeling suggests that swarms of fractures can be imaged and fluid type determined. This information will be useful in smart fracking and sealing. Conductivity tomography images will indicate bed dip, oil/water saturation, and map fluids. This paper will provide an overview of the technology development program.

  12. Modeling of movement-induced and flow-induced fluid forces in fast switching valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Schmidt, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Fast switching fluid power valves set strict requirements on performance, size and energy efficiency and simulation models are therefore needed to obtain good designs of such components. The valve moving member is subject to fluid forces depending on the valve flow rate and movement of the valve...... member itself. These fluid forces may be accurately simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, but such models suffer from being computationally expensive and is not suited for optimization routines. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive method for modeling the fluid forces...... is proposed, which includes both the flow-induced fluid forces and the movement-induced fluid forces resulting from movement of the valve moving member. The movement-induced fluid force model is based on a known solution to the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. A method for accurately simulating the flow...

  13. The application of SEM in analyzing the damage to the petroleum reservoirs caused by drilling fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Razak Ismail

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to analyze the damage to the potential oil and gas reservoirs due to the invasion of drilling fluid during drilling operation. Two types of rock samples representing low and high permeability were used to stimulate the petroleum reservoirs. Sea water based drilling fluids were used in this study. Detail observations to the rock samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of both permeability restoration and SEM observation showed that severe permeability impairments were obtained for high permeability rock. These results indicate that the relative size of the barite particles and the pore size distribution and characteristics of the formation play an important role in determining the damage caused by the drilling fluids

  14. Characterization of microbial community and the alkylscccinate synthase genes in petroleum reservoir fluids of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lei; Mu, Bo-Zhong [University of Science and Technology (China)], email: bzmu@ecust.edu.cn; Gu, Ji-Dong [The University of Hong Kong (China)], email: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2011-07-01

    Petroleum reservoirs represent a special ecosystem consisting of specific temperature, pressure, salt concentration, oil, gas, water, microorganisms and, enzymes among others. This paper presents the characterization of microbial community and the alkyl succinate synthase genes in petroleum reservoir fluids in China. A few samples were analyzed and the physical and chemical characteristics are given in a tabular form. A flow chart shows the methods and procedures for microbial activities. Six petroleum reservoirs were studied using an archaeal 16S rRNA gene-based approach to establish the presence of archaea and the results are given. The correlation of archaeal and bacterial communities with reservoir conditions and diversity of the arachaeal community in water-flooding petroleum reservoirs at different temperatures is also shown. From the study, it can be summarized that, among methane producers, CO2-reducing methanogens are mostly found in oil reservoir ecosystems and as more assA sequences are revealed, more comprehensive molecular probes can be designed to track the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading organisms in the environment.

  15. Formation Damage due to Drilling and Fracturing Fluids and Its Solution for Tight Naturally Fractured Sandstone Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianbo Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drilling and fracturing fluids can interact with reservoir rock and cause formation damage that impedes hydrocarbon production. Tight sandstone reservoir with well-developed natural fractures has a complex pore structure where pores and pore throats have a wide range of diameters; formation damage in such type of reservoir can be complicated and severe. Reservoir rock samples with a wide range of fracture widths are tested through a multistep coreflood platform, where formation damage caused by the drilling and/or fracturing fluid is quantitatively evaluated and systematically studied. To further mitigate this damage, an acidic treating fluid is screened and evaluated using the same coreflood platform. Experimental results indicate that the drilling fluid causes the major damage, and the chosen treating fluid can enhance rock permeability both effectively and efficiently at least at the room temperature with the overburden pressure.

  16. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid and methane migration through fault zones in shale gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherdangkoo, Reza; Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operation in shale gas reservoir has gained growing interest over the last few years. Groundwater contamination is one of the most important environmental concerns that have emerged surrounding shale gas development (Reagan et al., 2015). The potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing could be studied through the possible pathways for subsurface migration of contaminants towards overlying aquifers (Kissinger et al., 2013; Myers, 2012). The intent of this study is to investigate, by means of numerical simulation, two failure scenarios which are based on the presence of a fault zone that penetrates the full thickness of overburden and connect shale gas reservoir to aquifer. Scenario 1 addresses the potential transport of fracturing fluid from the shale into the subsurface. This scenario was modeled with COMSOL Multiphysics software. Scenario 2 deals with the leakage of methane from the reservoir into the overburden. The numerical modeling of this scenario was implemented in DuMux (free and open-source software), discrete fracture model (DFM) simulator (Tatomir, 2012). The modeling results are used to evaluate the influence of several important parameters (reservoir pressure, aquifer-reservoir separation thickness, fault zone inclination, porosity, permeability, etc.) that could affect the fluid transport through the fault zone. Furthermore, we determined the main transport mechanisms and circumstances in which would allow frack fluid or methane migrate through the fault zone into geological layers. The results show that presence of a conductive fault could reduce the contaminant travel time and a significant contaminant leakage, under certain hydraulic conditions, is most likely to occur. Bibliography Kissinger, A., Helmig, R., Ebigbo, A., Class, H., Lange, T., Sauter, M., Heitfeld, M., Klünker, J., Jahnke, W., 2013. Hydraulic fracturing in unconventional gas reservoirs: risks in the geological system, part 2. Environ Earth Sci 70, 3855

  17. Can introduction of hydraulic fracturing fluids induce biogenic methanogenesis in the shale reservoirs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Wilson, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Borton, M.; O'Banion, B.

    2017-12-01

    The hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFF) injected into the shale formation are composed primarily of water, proppant and some chemical additives ( 0.5- 2% by volume). The additives contain a lot of organic and inorganic compounds like ammonium sulfate, guar gum, boric acid, hydrochloric acid, citric acid, potassium carbonate, glutaraldehyde, ethylene glycols which serve as friction reducers, gelling agents, crosslinkers, biocides, corrosion/scale inhibitors, etc. The water and additives introduced into the formation ensue a variety of microbiogechmical reactions in the reservoir. For this study produced, water and gas samples were collected from several old and new Marcellus wells in SE Pennsylvania and NE West Virginia to better understand these microbe-water-rock interactions. The carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in the produced fluids and CO2 in produced gas (δ13CCO2) are highly enriched with values > +10‰ and +14 ‰ V-PDB respectively. The injected hydraulic fracturing fluid had low δ13CDIC values of < -8‰ V-PDB. The high carbon isotope values in produced fluids and gas possibly indicate 1) dissolution of 13C enriched carbonates in the host rock of reservoir, cement or drilling muds or 2) biogenic methanogenesis in the reservoir. The carbon signatures of carbonates in and around the landing zone and all possible sources of carbon put downhole were analyzed for their 13C signatures. The cement and silica sand had no detectable carbon in them. The drilling mud and carbonate veins had δ13C values of -1.8 and < 2.0 ‰ V-PDB respectively. Therefore, the high δ13CDIC signatures in produced water are possibly due to the microbial utilization of lighter carbon (12C) by microbes or methanogenic bacteria in the reservoir. It is possible that introduction of C containing nutrients like guar, methanol, methylamines, etc. stimulates certain methanogen species in the reservoir to produce biogenic methane. Genomic analysis reveals

  18. PVT modeling of reservoir fluids using PC-SAFT EoS and Soave-BWR EoS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Varzandeh, Farhad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2015-01-01

    Cubic equations of state, such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) and the Peng-Robinson (PR) EoS, are still the mostly used models in PVT modeling of reservoir fluids, and almost the exclusively used models in compositional reservoir simulations. Nevertheless, it is promising that recently developed...... non-cubic EoS models, such as the Perturbed Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) EoS and the Soave modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (Soave-BWR) EoS, may partly replace the roles of these classical cubic models in the upstream oil industry. Here, we attempt to make a comparative study...... of non-cubic models (PC-SAFT and Soave-BWR) and cubic models (SRK and PR) in several important aspects related to PVT modeling of reservoir fluids, including density description for typical pure components in reservoir fluids, description of binary VLE, prediction of multicomponent phase envelopes...

  19. Quantifying Fracture Heterogeneity in Different Domains of Folded Carbonate Rocks to Improve Fractured Reservoir Analog Fluid Flow Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisdom, K.; Bertotti, G.; Gauthier, B.D.M.; Hardebol, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs is largely controlled by multiscale fracture networks. Significant variations of fracture network porosity and permeability are caused by the 3D heterogeneity of the fracture network characteristics, such as intensity, orientation and size. Characterizing fracture

  20. Adaptive forward-inverse modeling of reservoir fluids away from wellbores; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziagos, J P; Gelinas, R J; Doss, S K; Nelson, R G

    1999-01-01

    This Final Report contains the deliverables of the DeepLook Phase I project entitled, ''Adaptive Forward-Inverse Modeling of Reservoir Fluids Away from Wellbores''. The deliverables are: (i) a description of 2-D test problem results, analyses, and technical descriptions of the techniques used, (ii) a listing of program setup commands that construct and execute the codes for selected test problems (these commands are in mathematical terminology, which reinforces technical descriptions in the text), and (iii) an evaluation and recommendation regarding continuance of this project, including considerations of possible extensions to 3-D codes, additional technical scope, and budget for the out-years. The far-market objective in this project is to develop advanced technologies that can help locate and enhance the recovery of oil from heterogeneous rock formations. The specific technical objective in Phase I was to develop proof-of-concept of new forward and inverse (F-I) modeling techniques[Gelinas et al, 1998] that seek to enhance estimates (images) of formation permeability distributions and fluid motion away from wellbore volumes. This goes to the heart of improving industry's ability to jointly image reservoir permeability and flow predictions of trapped and recovered oil versus time. The estimation of formation permeability away from borehole measurements is an ''inverse'' problem. It is an inseparable part of modeling fluid flows throughout the reservoir in efforts to increase the efficiency of oil recovery at minimum cost. Classic issues of non-uniqueness, mathematical instability, noise effects, and inadequate numerical solution techniques have historically impeded progress in reservoir parameter estimations. Because information pertaining to fluid and rock properties is always sampled sparsely by wellbore measurements, a successful method for interpolating permeability and fluid data between the measurements must be: (i) physics-based, (ii) conditioned by signal

  1. Natural radium and radon tracers to quantify water exchange and movement in reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Radon and radium isotopes are routinely used to quantify exchange rates between different hydrologic reservoirs. Since their recognition as oceanic tracers in the 1960s, both radon and radium have been used to examine processes such as air-sea exchange, deep oceanic mixing, benthic inputs, and many others. Recently, the application of radon-222 and the radium-quartet (223,224,226,228Ra) as coastal tracers has seen a revelation with the growing interest in coastal groundwater dynamics. The enrichment of these isotopes in benthic fluids including groundwater makes both radium and radon ideal tracers of coastal benthic processes (e.g. submarine groundwater discharge). In this chapter we review traditional and recent advances in the application of radon and radium isotopes to understand mixing and exchange between various hydrologic reservoirs, specifically: (1) atmosphere and ocean, (2) deep and shallow oceanic water masses, (3) coastal groundwater/benthic pore waters and surface ocean, and (4) aquifer-lakes. While the isotopes themselves and their distribution in the environment provide qualitative information about the exchange processes, it is mixing/exchange and transport models for these isotopes that provide specific quantitative information about these processes. Brief introductions of these models and mixing parameters are provided for both historical and more recent studies.

  2. Mutual Solubility of MEG, Water and Reservoir Fluid: Experimental Measurements and Modeling using the CPA Equation of State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium data of binary MEG-reservoir fluid and ternary MEG-water-reservoir fluid systems at temperatures 275-326 K and at atmospheric pressure. The reservoir fluid consists of a natural gas condensate from a Statoil operated gas field in the North Sea...... fluid and polar compounds such as water and MEG. Satisfactory results are obtained for mutual solubility of MEG and gas condensate whereas some deviations are observed for the ternary system of MEG-water-gas condensate........ Prediction of mutual solubility of water, MEG and hydrocarbon fluids is important for the oil industry to ensure production and processing as well as to satisfy environmental regulations. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems containing associating...

  3. Fluid Micro-Reservoirs Array Design with Auto-Pressure Regulation for High-Speed 3D Printers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Einat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D printing technology is rapidly evolving such that printing speed is now a crucial factor in technological developments and future applications. For printing heads based on the inkjet concept, the number of nozzles on the print head is a limiting factor of printing speed. This paper offers a method to practically increase the number of nozzles unlimitedly, and thus to dramatically ramp up printing speed. Fluid reservoirs are used in inkjet print heads to supply fluid through a manifold to the jetting chambers. The pressure in the reservoir’s outlet is important and influences device performance. Many efforts have been made to regulate pressure inside the fluid reservoirs so as to obtain a constant pressure in the chambers. When the number of nozzles is increased too much, the regulation of uniform pressure among all the nozzles becomes too complicated. In this paper, a different approach is taken. The reservoir is divided into an array of many micro-reservoirs. Each micro-reservoir supports one or a few chambers, and has a unique structure with auto-pressure regulation, where the outlet pressure is independent of the fluid level. The regulation is based on auto-compensation of the gravity force and a capillary force having the same dependence on the fluid level; this feature is obtained by adding a wedge in the reservoir with a unique shape. When the fluid level drops, the gravitational force and the capillary force decrease with it, but at similar rates. Terms for the force balance are derived and, consequently, a constant pressure in the fluid micro-reservoir segment is obtained automatically, with each segment being autonomous. This micro reservoir array is suggested for the enlargement of an inkjet print head and the achievement of high-speed 3D printing.

  4. STRUCTURAL HETEROGENEITIES AND PALEO FLUID FLOW IN AN ANALOG SANDSTONE RESERVOIR 2001-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, David; Aydin, Atilla

    2005-01-01

    Fractures and faults are brittle structural heterogeneities that can act both as conduits and barriers with respect to fluid flow in rock. This range in the hydraulic effects of fractures and faults greatly complicates the challenges faced by geoscientists working on important problems: from groundwater aquifer and hydrocarbon reservoir management, to subsurface contaminant fate and transport, to underground nuclear waste isolation, to the subsurface sequestration of CO2 produced during fossil-fuel combustion. The research performed under DOE grant DE-FG03-94ER14462 aimed to address these challenges by laying a solid foundation, based on detailed geological mapping, laboratory experiments, and physical process modeling, on which to build our interpretive and predictive capabilities regarding the structure, patterns, and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in sandstone reservoirs. The material in this final technical report focuses on the period of the investigation from July 1, 2001 to October 31, 2004. The Aztec Sandstone at the Valley of Fire, Nevada, provides an unusually rich natural laboratory in which exposures of joints, shear deformation bands, compaction bands and faults at scales ranging from centimeters to kilometers can be studied in an analog for sandstone aquifers and reservoirs. The suite of structures there has been documented and studied in detail using a combination of low-altitude aerial photography, outcrop-scale mapping and advanced computational analysis. In addition, chemical alteration patterns indicative of multiple paleo fluid flow events have been mapped at outcrop, local and regional scales. The Valley of Fire region has experienced multiple episodes of fluid flow and this is readily evident in the vibrant patterns of chemical alteration from which the Valley of Fire derives its name. We have successfully integrated detailed field and petrographic observation and analysis, process-based mechanical modeling, and numerical

  5. STRUCTURAL HETEROGENEITIES AND PALEO FLUID FLOW IN AN ANALOG SANDSTONE RESERVOIR 2001-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, David; Aydin, Atilla

    2005-02-22

    Fractures and faults are brittle structural heterogeneities that can act both as conduits and barriers with respect to fluid flow in rock. This range in the hydraulic effects of fractures and faults greatly complicates the challenges faced by geoscientists working on important problems: from groundwater aquifer and hydrocarbon reservoir management, to subsurface contaminant fate and transport, to underground nuclear waste isolation, to the subsurface sequestration of CO2 produced during fossil-fuel combustion. The research performed under DOE grant DE-FG03-94ER14462 aimed to address these challenges by laying a solid foundation, based on detailed geological mapping, laboratory experiments, and physical process modeling, on which to build our interpretive and predictive capabilities regarding the structure, patterns, and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in sandstone reservoirs. The material in this final technical report focuses on the period of the investigation from July 1, 2001 to October 31, 2004. The Aztec Sandstone at the Valley of Fire, Nevada, provides an unusually rich natural laboratory in which exposures of joints, shear deformation bands, compaction bands and faults at scales ranging from centimeters to kilometers can be studied in an analog for sandstone aquifers and reservoirs. The suite of structures there has been documented and studied in detail using a combination of low-altitude aerial photography, outcrop-scale mapping and advanced computational analysis. In addition, chemical alteration patterns indicative of multiple paleo fluid flow events have been mapped at outcrop, local and regional scales. The Valley of Fire region has experienced multiple episodes of fluid flow and this is readily evident in the vibrant patterns of chemical alteration from which the Valley of Fire derives its name. We have successfully integrated detailed field and petrographic observation and analysis, process-based mechanical modeling, and numerical

  6. Fluid contacts and net-pay identification in three phase reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Cuesta, J.; Altamar, R.; Sanabria, M. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Petrodelta; Gil, J. [Fusion Petroleum Technologies, The Woodlands, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The Uracoa Field is located in the Monagas Sur area, close to the Orinoco belt in eastern Venezuela. Fluid contacts within the heavy oil reservoirs in Block 2 of the oilfield were identified using an integrated interpretation of three-dimensional seismic attributes, spectral decomposition and pseudo-impedances. This paper discussed the theory background on the quest for the oil bearing interval in the reservoir. The two step workflow and data testing were also described. This included well-seismic data; production data match; and de-tuning curve. The study was conducted by Petrodelta, a joint venture between Petroleos de Venezuela SA and Harvest Vinccler. It was concluded that the final product is a breakthrough for Petrodelta's development plan, and is the result of multidisciplinary interpretation and workstation capabilities. Two new drilling locations have been established. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

  8. Hydrogeologic controls on induced seismicity in crystalline basement rocks due to fluid injection into basal reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yipeng; Person, Mark; Rupp, John; Ellett, Kevin; Celia, Michael A; Gable, Carl W; Bowen, Brenda; Evans, James; Bandilla, Karl; Mozley, Peter; Dewers, Thomas; Elliot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A series of Mb 3.8-5.5 induced seismic events in the midcontinent region, United States, resulted from injection of fluid either into a basal sedimentary reservoir with no underlying confining unit or directly into the underlying crystalline basement complex. The earthquakes probably occurred along faults that were likely critically stressed within the crystalline basement. These faults were located at a considerable distance (up to 10 km) from the injection wells and head increases at the hypocenters were likely relatively small (∼70-150 m). We present a suite of simulations that use a simple hydrogeologic-geomechanical model to assess what hydrogeologic conditions promote or deter induced seismic events within the crystalline basement across the midcontinent. The presence of a confining unit beneath the injection reservoir horizon had the single largest effect in preventing induced seismicity within the underlying crystalline basement. For a crystalline basement having a permeability of 2 × 10(-17)  m(2) and specific storage coefficient of 10(-7) /m, injection at a rate of 5455 m(3) /d into the basal aquifer with no underlying basal seal over 10 years resulted in probable brittle failure to depths of about 0.6 km below the injection reservoir. Including a permeable (kz  = 10(-13)  m(2) ) Precambrian normal fault, located 20 m from the injection well, increased the depth of the failure region below the reservoir to 3 km. For a large permeability contrast between a Precambrian thrust fault (10(-12)  m(2) ) and the surrounding crystalline basement (10(-18)  m(2) ), the failure region can extend laterally 10 km away from the injection well. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Numerical simulation of groundwater movement and managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir, Hurricane Bench area, Washington County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Thomas M.; Heilweil, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Bench area of Washington County, Utah, is a 70 square-mile area extending south from the Virgin River and encompassing Sand Hollow basin. Sand Hollow Reservoir, located on Hurricane Bench, was completed in March 2002 and is operated primarily as a managed aquifer recharge project by the Washington County Water Conservancy District. The reservoir is situated on a thick sequence of the Navajo Sandstone and Kayenta Formation. Total recharge to the underlying Navajo aquifer from the reservoir was about 86,000 acre-feet from 2002 to 2009. Natural recharge as infiltration of precipitation was approximately 2,100 acre-feet per year for the same period. Discharge occurs as seepage to the Virgin River, municipal and irrigation well withdrawals, and seepage to drains at the base of reservoir dams. Within the Hurricane Bench area, unconfined groundwater-flow conditions generally exist throughout the Navajo Sandstone. Navajo Sandstone hydraulic-conductivity values from regional aquifer testing range from 0.8 to 32 feet per day. The large variability in hydraulic conductivity is attributed to bedrock fractures that trend north-northeast across the study area.A numerical groundwater-flow model was developed to simulate groundwater movement in the Hurricane Bench area and to simulate the movement of managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir through the groundwater system. The model was calibrated to combined steady- and transient-state conditions. The steady-state portion of the simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data that represented average conditions for 1975. The transient-state portion of the simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data collected from 1976 to 2009. Areally, the model grid was 98 rows by 76 columns with a variable cell size ranging from about 1.5 to 25 acres. Smaller cells were used to represent the reservoir to accurately simulate the reservoir bathymetry and nearby monitoring wells; larger

  10. Experiments and Simulations of Fluid Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoir Models - Emphasis on Impacts from Crossbeds and Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerresen, Knut Arne

    1996-12-31

    Hydrocarbon recovery from subsurface reservoirs has become increasingly dependent on advanced recovery techniques that require improved understanding of the physics of fluid flow within and across geological units including small-scale heterogeneities and fractures. In this thesis, impacts from heterogeneities on local fluid flow are studied experimentally by means of imaging techniques to visualize fluid flow in two dimensions during flooding of larger reservoir models. Part 1 reflects the multi-disciplinary collaboration, by briefly introducing the relevant geology, the literature on experiments on fluid flow in bedded structures, and outlining the applied numerical simulator and imaging techniques applied to visualize fluid flow. The second part contains a synopsis of displacement experiments in naturally laminated sandstones and in crossbed laboratory models, and of the impact from incipient shear fractures on oil recovery. The detailed results obtained from the experiments and simulations are described in six papers, all included. 215 refs., 108 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Impact of Reservoir Fluid Saturation on Seismic Parameters: Endrod Gas Field, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Abdel Moktader A.; El Sayed, Nahla A.

    2017-12-01

    Outlining the reservoir fluid types and saturation is the main object of the present research work. 37 core samples were collected from three different gas bearing zones in the Endrod gas field in Hungary. These samples are belonging to the Miocene and the Upper - Lower Pliocene. These samples were prepared and laboratory measurements were conducted. Compression and shear wave velocity were measured using the Sonic Viewer-170-OYO. The sonic velocities were measured at the frequencies of 63 and 33 kHz for compressional and shear wave respectively. All samples were subjected to complete petrophysical investigations. Sonic velocities and mechanical parameters such as young’s modulus, rigidity, and bulk modulus were measured when samples were saturated by 100%-75%-0% brine water. Several plots have been performed to show the relationship between seismic parameters and saturation percentages. Robust relationships were obtained, showing the impact of fluid saturation on seismic parameters. Seismic velocity, Poisson’s ratio, bulk modulus and rigidity prove to be applicable during hydrocarbon exploration or production stages. Relationships among the measured seismic parameters in gas/water fully and partially saturated samples are useful to outline the fluid type and saturation percentage especially in gas/water transitional zones.

  12. Fluid Mixing in the Eye Under Rapid Eye Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinglin; Gharib, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    Drug injection is an important technique in certain treatments of eye diseases. The efficacy of chemical mixing plays an important role in determining pharmacokinetics of injected drugs. In this study, we build a device to study the chemical mixing behavior in a spherical structure. The mixing process is visualized and analyzed qualitatively. We hope to understand the chemical convection and diffusion behaviors in correlation with controlled rapid mechanical movements. The results will have potential applications in treatment of eye diseases. Resnick Institute at Caltech.

  13. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weislogel, Amy [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  14. Phase Behaviors of Reservoir Fluids with Capillary Eff ect Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Zhiwei

    2013-05-06

    The study of phase behavior is important for the oil and gas industry. Many approaches have been proposed and developed for phase behavior calculation. In this thesis, an alternative method is introduced to study the phase behavior by means of minimization of Helmholtz free energy. For a system at fixed volume, constant temperature and constant number of moles, the Helmholtz free energy reaches minimum at the equilibrium state. Based on this theory, a stochastic method called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, is implemented to compute the phase diagrams for several pure component and mixture systems. After comparing with experimental and the classical PT-ash calculation, we found the phase diagrams obtained by minimization of the Helmholtz Free Energy approach match the experimental and theoretical diagrams very well. Capillary effect is also considered in this thesis because it has a significant influence on the phase behavior of reservoir fluids. In this part, we focus on computing the phase envelopes, which consists of bubble and dew point lines. Both fixed and calculated capillary pressure from the Young-Laplace equation cases are introduced to study their effects on phase envelopes. We found that the existence of capillary pressure will change the phase envelopes. Positive capillary pressure reduces the dew point and bubble point temperatures under the same pressure condition, while the negative capillary pressure increases the dew point and bubble point temperatures. In addition, the change of contact angle and pore radius will affect the phase envelope. The effect of the pore radius on the phase envelope is insignificant when the radius is very large. These results may become reference for future research and study. Keywords: Phase Behavior; Particle Swarm Optimization; Capillary Pressure; Reservoir Fluids; Phase Equilibrium; Phase Envelope.

  15. Reservoir monitoring using borehole radars to improve oil recovery : Suggestions from 3D electromagnetic and fluid modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, F.; Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Hu, Xiangyun

    2018-01-01

    The recently developed smart well technology allows for sectionalized production control by means of downhole inflow control valves and monitoring devices. We consider borehole radars as permanently installed downhole sensors to monitor fluid evolution in reservoirs, and it provides the

  16. Analysis of the Movement of Sanzhouxi Landslide in Three-Gorges Reservoir, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Du; Kunlong, Yin; Yiping, Wu; Lixia, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Since the initial impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir in June 2003, a number of new landslides occurred and many dormant landslides were reactivated. Sanzhouxi Landslide located in Wanzhou, the city of Chongqing, 286.9 km west of the Three Gorges Dam and began to deform noticeably after the first impoundment in June 2003. Based on the collection of geological and monitoring data and field investigation, the geological conceptual model was established and the formation mechanism was studied synthetically. Firstly, the intrinsic geological condition, slope structure and material component were analyzed to obtain the geological basis of the landslide formation. Secondly, through the field investigation and analysis of monitoring data, the function of triggering factors, including rainfall and fluctuation of reservoir water level, were discussed. The result indicted that the hydrostatic pressure and buoyancy pressure caused by the rise up of reservoir water level are the main triggering factors for the deformation of landside. Finally, the formation pattern of the landslide was summarized, the formation process is the transition from retrogressive deformation caused by rainfall to the advancing sliding under the action of fluctuation of reservoir water level. The detail formation process is: (1) the top of landslide moved triggered by rainfall, (2) tension cracks occurred in the tongue and middle part of landslide caused by fluctuation of reservoir water level, (3) the tongue and middle part of landslide deformed periodically by the iterative action of rainfall and fluctuation of reservoir water level, (4) the unitive sliding plane formed and the tongue and middle part of landslide moved, (5) the top of landslide slid because of losing bottom supporting.

  17. Movements of two strains of radio tagged Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts through a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Kim; Jepsen, Niels; Rasmusssen, Gorm

    1999-01-01

    Smolt migration through a shallow and turbid hydro-reservoir in a major Danish river system was investigated using radiotelemetry. Hatchery-reared 1+-year-old Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts of equal size from two different non- native strains were radio-tagged and followed during...... their downstream migration through the 12-km-long reservoir. A total of 50 salmon smolts, 25 of Swedish (Atran River) and 25 of Irish (Burrishoole River) origin, were surgically implanted with miniature radiotransmitters. The tagged smolts were tracked daily over a 3-week period in May 1996. The Atran smolts...

  18. Movements of two strains of radio tagged Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts through a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Kim; Jepsen, Niels; Rasmusssen, Gorm

    1999-01-01

    Smolt migration through a shallow and turbid hydro-reservoir in a major Danish river system was investigated using radiotelemetry. Hatchery-reared 1+-year-old Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts of equal size from two different non- native strains were radio-tagged and followed during their d...

  19. A Mathematical Model for the Analysis of the Pressure Transient Response of Fluid Flow in Fractal Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Zhou Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses similar construction method of solution (SCMS to solve mathematical models of fluid spherical flow in a fractal reservoir which can avoid the complicated mathematical deduction. The models are presented in three kinds of outer boundary conditions (infinite, constant pressure, and closed. The influence of wellbore storage effect, skin factor, and variable flow rate production is also involved in the inner boundary conditions. The analytical solutions are constructed in the Laplace space and presented in a pattern with one continued fraction—the similar structure of solution. The pattern can bring convenience to well test analysis programming. The mathematical beauty of fractal is that the infinite complexity is formed with relatively simple equations. So the relation of reservoir parameters (wellbore storage effect, the skin factor, fractal dimension, and conductivity index, the formation pressure, and the wellbore pressure can be learnt easily. Type curves of the wellbore pressure and pressure derivative are plotted and analyzed in real domain using the Stehfest numerical invention algorithm. The SCMS and type curves can interpret intuitively transient pressure response of fractal spherical flow reservoir. The results obtained in this study have both theoretical and practical significance in evaluating fluid flow in such a fractal reservoir and embody the convenience of the SCMS.

  20. Mineral Reactions in Shale Gas Reservoirs: Barite Scale Formation from Reusing Produced Water As Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukert Vankeuren, Amelia N; Hakala, J Alexandra; Jarvis, Karl; Moore, Johnathan E

    2017-08-15

    Hydraulic fracturing for gas production is now ubiquitous in shale plays, but relatively little is known about shale-hydraulic fracturing fluid (HFF) reactions within the reservoir. To investigate reactions during the shut-in period of hydraulic fracturing, experiments were conducted flowing different HFFs through fractured Marcellus shale cores at reservoir temperature and pressure (66 °C, 20 MPa) for one week. Results indicate HFFs with hydrochloric acid cause substantial dissolution of carbonate minerals, as expected, increasing effective fracture volume (fracture volume + near-fracture matrix porosity) by 56-65%. HFFs with reused produced water composition cause precipitation of secondary minerals, particularly barite, decreasing effective fracture volume by 1-3%. Barite precipitation occurs despite the presence of antiscalants in experiments with and without shale contact and is driven in part by addition of dissolved sulfate from the decomposition of persulfate breakers in HFF at reservoir conditions. The overall effect of mineral changes on the reservoir has yet to be quantified, but the significant amount of barite scale formed by HFFs with reused produced water composition could reduce effective fracture volume. Further study is required to extrapolate experimental results to reservoir-scale and to explore the effect that mineral changes from HFF interaction with shale might have on gas production.

  1. APPLICATION OF INTEGRATED RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Bergeron; Tom Blasingame; Louis Doublet; Mohan Kelkar; George Freeman; Jeff Callard; David Moore; David Davies; Richard Vessell; Brian Pregger; Bill Dixon; Bryce Bezant

    2000-03-01

    , and to monitor pressure and preferential fluid movement in the reservoir is demonstrated. These techniques are: long-term production and injection data analysis, pressure transient analysis, and advanced open and cased hole well log analysis. The major contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.

  2. analysis of pressure variation of fluid in an infinite acting reservoir

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diffusivity equation was used in the analysis. The work covers the transient state where the reservoir is acting as if it was infinite in size. The finite element technique, using Lagrange quadratic shape elements was employed to carry out the analysis over the cross-section of the reservoir. The analysis was done with the ...

  3. Damage evaluation on oil-based drill-in fluids for ultra-deep fractured tight sandstone gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the damage mechanisms and improve the method to evaluate and optimize the performance of formation damage control of oil-based drill-in fluids, this paper took an ultra-deep fractured tight gas reservoir in piedmont configuration, located in the Cretaceous Bashijiqike Fm of the Tarim Basin, as an example. First, evaluation experiments were conducted on the filtrate invasion, the dynamic damage of oil-based drill-in fluids and the loading capacity of filter cakes. Meanwhile, the evaluating methods were optimized for the formation damage control effect of oil-based drill-in fluids in laboratory: pre-processing drill-in fluids before grading analysis; using the dynamic damage method to simulate the damage process for evaluating the percentage of regained permeability; and evaluating the loading capacity of filter cakes. The experimental results show that (1 oil phase trapping damage and solid phase invasion are the main formation damage types; (2 the damage degree of filtrate is the strongest on the matrix; and (3 the dynamic damage degree of oil-based drill-in fluids reaches medium strong to strong on fractures and filter cakes show a good sealing capacity for the fractures less than 100 μm. In conclusion, the filter cakes' loading capacity should be first guaranteed, and both percentage of regained permeability and liquid trapping damage degree should be both considered in the oil-based drill-in fluids prepared for those ultra-deep fractured tight sandstone gas reservoirs.

  4. An Embedded 3D Fracture Modeling Approach for Simulating Fracture-Dominated Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Henry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Cong [Colorado School of Mines; Winterfeld, Philip [Colorado School of Mines; Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines

    2018-02-14

    An efficient modeling approach is described for incorporating arbitrary 3D, discrete fractures, such as hydraulic fractures or faults, into modeling fracture-dominated fluid flow and heat transfer in fractured geothermal reservoirs. This technique allows 3D discrete fractures to be discretized independently from surrounding rock volume and inserted explicitly into a primary fracture/matrix grid, generated without including 3D discrete fractures in prior. An effective computational algorithm is developed to discretize these 3D discrete fractures and construct local connections between 3D fractures and fracture/matrix grid blocks of representing the surrounding rock volume. The constructed gridding information on 3D fractures is then added to the primary grid. This embedded fracture modeling approach can be directly implemented into a developed geothermal reservoir simulator via the integral finite difference (IFD) method or with TOUGH2 technology This embedded fracture modeling approach is very promising and computationally efficient to handle realistic 3D discrete fractures with complicated geometries, connections, and spatial distributions. Compared with other fracture modeling approaches, it avoids cumbersome 3D unstructured, local refining procedures, and increases computational efficiency by simplifying Jacobian matrix size and sparsity, while keeps sufficient accuracy. Several numeral simulations are present to demonstrate the utility and robustness of the proposed technique. Our numerical experiments show that this approach captures all the key patterns about fluid flow and heat transfer dominated by fractures in these cases. Thus, this approach is readily available to simulation of fractured geothermal reservoirs with both artificial and natural fractures.

  5. Mineral-microbial interaction in long term experiments with sandstones and reservoir fluids exposed to CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasina, Monika; Morozova, Daria; Pellizzari, Linda; Würdemann, Hilke

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms represent very effective geochemical catalysts, and may influence the process of the CO2 storage significantly. The goal of this study is to characterize the interactions between minerals and microorganisms during their exposure to the CO2 in a long term experiment in high pressure vessels to better understand the influence of biological processes on the composition of the reservoir sandstones and the long term stability of CO2 storage. The natural gas reservoir, proposed for the CO2 storage is characterized by high salinity (up to 420 g/l) and temperatures around 130°C, at depth of approximately 3.5 km. Microbial community of the reservoir fluid samples was dominated by different H2-oxidising, thiosulfate-oxidising and biocorrosive thermophilic bacteria as well as microorganisms similar to representatives from other deep environments, which have not previously been cultivated. The cells were attached to particles and were difficult to detect because of low cell numbers (Morozova et al., 2011). For the long term experiments, the autoclaved rock core samples from the core deposit were grinded, milled to the size of 0.5 mm and incubated with fresh reservoir fluids as inoculum for indigenous microorganisms in a N2/CH4/H2-atmosphere in high pressure vessels at a temperature of 80°C and pressure of 40 bars. Incubation was performed under lower temperature than in situ in order to favor the growth of the dormant microorganisms. After three months of incubation samples were exposed to high CO2 concentrations by insufflating it into the vessels. The sampling of rock and fluid material was executed 10 and 21 months after start of the experiment. Mineralogical analyses performed using XRD and SEM - EDS showed that main mineral components are quartz, feldspars, dolomite, anhydrite and calcite. Chemical fluid analyses using ICP-MS and ICP-OES showed that after CO2 exposure increasing Si4+ content in the fluid was noted after first sampling (ca. 25 relative

  6. Numerical Modeling and Investigation of Fluid-Driven Fracture Propagation in Reservoirs Based on a Modified Fluid-Mechanically Coupled Model in Two-Dimensional Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing rock mass permeability for shale gas development, enhanced geothermal systems, and geological carbon sequestration by the high-pressure injection of a fracturing fluid into tight reservoir rocks. Although significant advances have been made in hydraulic fracturing theory, experiments, and numerical modeling, when it comes to the complexity of geological conditions knowledge is still limited. Mechanisms of fluid injection-induced fracture initiation and propagation should be better understood to take full advantage of hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents the development and application of discrete particle modeling based on two-dimensional particle flow code (PFC2D. Firstly, it is shown that the modeled value of the breakdown pressure for the hydraulic fracturing process is approximately equal to analytically calculated values under varied in situ stress conditions. Furthermore, a series of simulations for hydraulic fracturing in competent rock was performed to examine the influence of the in situ stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and fluid viscosity on the borehole pressure history, the geometry of hydraulic fractures, and the pore-pressure field, respectively. It was found that the hydraulic fractures in an isotropic medium always propagate parallel to the orientation of the maximum principal stress. When a high fluid injection rate is used, higher breakdown pressure is needed for fracture propagation and complex geometries of fractures can develop. When a low viscosity fluid is used, fluid can more easily penetrate from the borehole into the surrounding rock, which causes a reduction of the effective stress and leads to a lower breakdown pressure. Moreover, the geometry of the fractures is not particularly sensitive to the fluid viscosity in the approximate isotropic model.

  7. The Magnetic Nanoparticle Movement in Magnetic Fluid Characterized by the Laser Dynamic Speckle Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual scanning laser speckle interferometry experiment was designed to observe the dynamic behavior of the magnetic fluid actuated by a magnetic field. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the dynamic speckle measurement, the phase delay scanning was used to compensate the additional phase variation which was caused by the transverse scanning. The correlation coefficients corresponding to the temporal dynamic speckle patterns within the same time interval scattering from the nanoparticles were calculated in the experiment on nanoscale magnetic clusters. In the experiment, the speckle of the magnetic nanoparticle fluid movement has been recorded by the lens unmounted CCD within the interferometry strips, although the speckle led to the distinguished annihilation of the light coherence. The results have showed that the nanoparticle fluid dynamic properties appeared synergistically in the fringe speckles. The analyses of the nanoparticle's relative speed and the speckle pattern moving amount in the fringes have proved the nanoparticle’s movement in a laminar flow in the experiment.

  8. Analysis of pressure falloff tests of non-Newtonian power-law fluids in naturally-fractured bounded reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo Omosebi

    2015-12-01

    This article presents an analytic technique for interpreting pressure falloff tests of non-Newtonian Power-law fluids in wells that are located near boundaries in dual-porosity reservoirs. First, dimensionless pressure solutions are obtained and Stehfest inversion algorithm is used to develop new type curves. Subsequently, long-time analytic solutions are presented and interpretation procedure is proposed using direct synthesis. Two examples, including real field data from a heavy oil reservoir in Colombian eastern plains basin, are used to validate and demonstrate application of this technique. Results agree with conventional type-curve matching procedure. The approach proposed in this study avoids the use of type curves, which is prone to human errors. It provides a better alternative for direct estimation of formation and flow properties from falloff data.

  9. Estimation of particle size and initial growth kinetics of asphaltene particles using spectral analysis of reservoir fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaluddin, A.; Joshi, N.; Mullins, O. [Schlumberger Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Creek, J. [Chevron Canada Resources, Calgary, AB (Canada); McFadden, J. [BHD Petroleum, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-06-01

    One of the challenges facing heavy oil reservoir management and production operations is to minimize the impact of asphaltene deposition, the most aromatic and heaviest fraction of a crude oil. A study was conducted in which both fixed wavelength near infrared (NIR) and variable wavelength spectral analysis methods were applied to two individual crude oil samples obtained from one reservoir. The objective was to assess asphaltene properties. The samples were collected using 2 different sampling chambers and techniques. Both were homogenized and treated identically. The macroscopic properties of both samples were similar, but the microscopic asphaltene particle properties varied significantly in the asphaltene particle size, as did the formation kinetics between the 2 samples. The paper also presented estimates of asphaltene particle size and initial growth kinetics from the acquired data. The properties were used to determine the basic differences between fluid samples collected using different techniques. 14 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  10. Summary review of workshop on movement of fluids in largely impermeable rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    As a starting point for the workshop, the following general question was posed, ''What data base, analytical methodology, and technology are necessary to adequately forecast the physical behavior of the subsurface disposal facility.'' The critical consideration was the movement of fluids through fractured rock masses. The first day of the workshop was devoted to general discussions of selected topics. On the second day, the participants were divided into six working groups: (1) definition and characterization of the fracture system; (2) in-situ measurement of fluid flow; (3) effects of perturbations on the flow system; (4) role of numerical modeling; (5) isotopic and geochemical methods; and (6) monitoring programs to verify flow system. The reports prepared by each working group were edited to some extent.

  11. Aseismic Motions Drive a Sparse Seismicity During Fluid Injections Into a Fractured Zone in a Carbonate Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboeuf, Laure; De Barros, Louis; Cappa, Frédéric; Guglielmi, Yves; Deschamps, Anne; Seguy, Simon

    2017-10-01

    An increase in fluid pressure in faults can trigger seismicity and large aseismic motions. Understanding how fluid and faults interact is an essential goal for seismic hazard and reservoir monitoring, but this key relation remains unclear. We developed an in situ experiment of fluid injections at a 10 meter scale. Water was injected at high pressure in different geological structures inside a fault damaged zone, in limestone at 280 m depth in the Low Noise Underground Laboratory (France). Induced seismicity, as well as strains, pressure, and flow rate, was continuously monitored during the injections. Although nonreversible deformations related to fracture reactivations were observed for all injections, only a few tests generated seismicity. Events are characterized by a 0.5-to-4 kHz content and a small magnitude (approximately -3.5). They are located within 1.5 m accuracy between 1 and 12 m from the injections. Comparing strain measurements and seismicity shows that more than 96% of the deformation is aseismic. The seismic moment is also small compared to the one expected from the injected volume. Moreover, a dual seismic behavior is observed as (1) the spatiotemporal distribution of some cluster of events is clearly independent from the fluid diffusion (2) while a diffusion-type pattern can be observed for some others clusters. The seismicity might therefore appear as an indirect effect to the fluid pressure, driven by aseismic motion and related stress perturbation transferred through failure.

  12. Changes of Substance P in the Crevicular Fluid in relation to Orthodontic Movement Preliminary Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substance P (SP is a tachykinin released from both the central and the peripheral endings of primary afferent neurons and functions as a neurotransmitter. As a transmitter signaling pain, substance P is involved in nociception and is an extremely potent vasodilator. We found several studies about this neuropeptide especially in relation to parodontology and a few orthodontic reviews. This is because in the past the importance of this neuropeptide in dental element undergoing periodontal inflammation was observed. The aims of the present pilot study was to investigate whether the substance P was present in gingival crevicular fluid in dental elements undergoing orthodontic treatment with Invisalign technique compared to teeth belonging to the same series but not undergoing orthodontic movement. We analysed gengival crevicular fluid (GCF collected from four young subjects, using a paper cone for a time of 60 seconds. The results showed that SP is present in the gengival sulcus in elements undergoing orthodontic forces during treatment with Invisalign technique and not in the control teeth. During the literature analysis, we have found a lot of papers describing involvement of SP in periodontitis and inflammatory diseases, but further studies are needed in order to demonstrate the role of this neuropeptide during teeth movement.

  13. Invasion of geothermal fluids into hydrocarbon reservoirs; La invasion de fluidos geotermicos en yacimientos de hidrocarburos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez Arriaga, Mario Cesar [Universidad Michoacana, Facultad de Ciencias, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: msuarez@umich.mx

    2009-01-15

    Oil reservoirs beneath the coast of the Gulf of Mexico contain geothermal brine at 150 degrees Celsius and produce a mixture of hot brine and oil. Water from an aquifer 6000 m deep flows vertically through conductive faults. These nonisothermal conditions affect the effective saturations and the relative permeability of the immiscible phases. Dynamic viscosities of oil and water diminish, affecting the displacement of both fluids. Studied wells produce from the oil-saturated zone above the aquifer, yet the total volume of produced water can equal or exceed the volume of oil. The presence of water is a severe problem. We produced an original numerical model able to predict the critical production when the wells start to be invaded by geothermal brine. The model has a single equation in partial derivatives, of a parabolic and nonlineal type, which is a function of water saturation, three-dimension space and time. A gas phase can be included in the model. This equation is a generalization of the classic isothermal result of Buckley-Leverett, in a single dimension. The model is solved numerically by using the Finite Element method on a nonstructured network. The historic effect of water invasion observed in some critical cases is reproduced. After production with both phases stable, a sudden brine invasion can occur with a sharp reduction of the oil volume produced. The immediate objective is to optimize the production so the well will be able to produce a stable water-oil mix where oil always prevails. [Spanish] Se reportan reservorios de aceite situados en la costa del Golfo de Mexico que son invadidos por salmuera geotermica con una temperatura de 150 grados centigrados, produciendo una mezcla variable de agua caliente y aceite. El agua de un acuifero, a 6000 metros de profundidad, fluye verticalmente por fallas conductivas. Estas condiciones no isotermicas afectan las saturaciones efectivas y las permeabilidades relativas de las fases inmiscibles. Las viscosidades

  14. Field demonstration of an active reservoir pressure management through fluid injection and displaced fluid extractions at the Rock Springs Uplift, a priority geologic CO2 storage site for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zunsheng [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-04-05

    This report provides the results from the project entitled Field Demonstration of Reservoir Pressure Management through Fluid Injection and Displaced Fluid Extraction at the Rock Springs Uplift, a Priority Geologic CO2 Storage Site for Wyoming (DE-FE0026159 for both original performance period (September 1, 2015 to August 31, 2016) and no-cost extension (September 1, 2016 to January 6, 2017)).

  15. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka’aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes. PMID:29326977

  16. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes.

  17. The Controls of Pore-Throat Structure on Fluid Performance in Tight Clastic Rock Reservoir: A Case from the Upper Triassic of Chang 7 Member, Ordos Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of porosity and permeability in tight clastic rock reservoir have significant difference from those in conventional reservoir. The increased exploitation of tight gas and oil requests further understanding of fluid performance in the nanoscale pore-throat network of the tight reservoir. Typical tight sandstone and siltstone samples from Ordos Basin were investigated, and rate-controlled mercury injection capillary pressure (RMICP and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were employed in this paper, combined with helium porosity and air permeability data, to analyze the impact of pore-throat structure on the storage and seepage capacity of these tight oil reservoirs, revealing the control factors of economic petroleum production. The researches indicate that, in the tight clastic rock reservoir, largest throat is the key control on the permeability and potentially dominates the movable water saturation in the reservoir. The storage capacity of the reservoir consists of effective throat and pore space. Although it has a relatively steady and significant proportion that resulted from the throats, its variation is still dominated by the effective pores. A combination parameter (ε that was established to be as an integrated characteristic of pore-throat structure shows effectively prediction of physical capability for hydrocarbon resource of the tight clastic rock reservoir.

  18. Occurrence and distribution characteristics of fluids in tight sandstone reservoirs in the Shilijiahan zone, northern Ordos Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongqiang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available High-yield gas layers, low-yield gas layers and (gas bearing water layers of Upper Paleozoic coexist in the Shilijiahan zone in the northern Ordos Basin, but gas–water distribution characteristics, laws and influence factors are not understood well, so the exploration and development of natural gas in this zone are restricted. In this paper, statistical analysis was carried out on the data of Upper Paleozoic formation water in this zone, e.g. salinity, pH value and ion concentration. It is shown that the formation water in this zone is of CaCl2 type. Then, the origin, types, controlling factors and spatial distribution characteristics of formation water were figured out by using core, mud logging, well logging and testing data, combined with the classification and evaluation results of geochemical characteristics of formation water. Besides, the logging identification chart of gas, water and dry layers in this zone was established. Finally, the occurrence and distribution laws of reservoir fluids were defined. The formation water of CaCl2 type indicates a good sealing capacity in this zone, which is favorable for natural gas accumulation. It is indicated that the reservoir fluids in this zone exist in the state of free water, capillary water and irreducible water. Free water is mainly distributed in the west of this zone, irreducible water in the east, and capillary water in the whole zone. The logging identification chart has been applied in many wells in this zone like Well Jin 86. The identification result is basically accordant with the gas testing result. It is verified that gas and water layers can be identified effectively based on this logging identification chart.

  19. The multiphase flow system used in exploiting depleted reservoirs: water-based Micro-bubble drilling fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-hui, Zheng; Xiao-qing, He; Li-xia, Fu; Xiang-chun, Wang

    2009-02-01

    Water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid, which is used to exploit depleted reservoirs, is a complicated multiphase flow system that is composed of gas, water, oil, polymer, surfactants and solids. The gas phase is separate from bulk water by two layers and three membranes. They are "surface tension reducing membrane", "high viscosity layer", "high viscosity fixing membrane", "compatibility enhancing membrane" and "concentration transition layer of liner high polymer (LHP) & surfactants" from every gas phase centre to the bulk water. "Surface tension reducing membrane", "high viscosity layer" and "high viscosity fixing membrane" bond closely to pack air forming "air-bag", "compatibility enhancing membrane" and "concentration transition layer of LHP & surfactants" absorb outside "air-bag" to form "incompact zone". From another point of view, "air-bag" and "incompact zone" compose micro-bubble. Dynamic changes of "incompact zone" enable micro-bubble to exist lonely or aggregate together, and lead the whole fluid, which can wet both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface, to possess very high viscosity at an extremely low shear rate but to possess good fluidity at a higher shear rate. When the water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid encounters leakage zones, it will automatically regulate the sizes and shapes of the bubbles according to the slot width of fracture, the height of cavern as well as the aperture of openings, or seal them by making use of high viscosity of the system at a very low shear rate. Measurements of the rheological parameters indicate that water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid has very high plastic viscosity, yield point, initial gel, final gel and high ratio of yield point and plastic viscosity. All of these properties make the multiphase flow system meet the requirements of petroleum drilling industry. Research on interface between gas and bulk water of this multiphase flow system can provide us with information of synthesizing effective agents to

  20. Method to form a barrier in a reservoir with a magnetorheological fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitha, P.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of winning oil from a source via a bored well, wherein a magnetorheological fluid is introduced into the source via the bored well to re duce the water content of the oil won. Oil drilling is resumed in the presence of a magnetic field, thereby increasing the oil

  1. Similar expression of through-and-through fluid movement along orthograde apical plugs of MTA Bio and white Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, G; Audi, C; Murad, C; Fidel, S; Fidel, R

    2008-12-01

    To compare the sealing ability of four hydraulic cements when used as an apical plug in teeth with wide-open apices. A sample of 70 maxillary central incisors were divided into four groups (n = 15) and a further 10 teeth served as controls. An artificial open apex was created in the teeth using Gates Glidden drills numbers 6-1 in a crown-down manner until the size 1 bur passed through the foramen. A divergent open apex was prepared to a size of 1.24 mm at the foramen by retrograde apical transportation using a number 8 (0.60) Profile Series 29 0.4 taper instrument inserted to the length of the cutting blade. In G1, the open apices were repaired with WMTA Angelus whilst in G2, G3 and G4 MTA Bio, Pro-Root MTA and Portland cement was employed respectively. Each root was assembled in a hermetic cell to allow the evaluation of fluid filtration. Leakage was measured by the movement of an air bubble travelling within a pipette connected to the teeth. Measurements of the air bubble movement were made after 10 min at a constant pressure of 50 cm H(2)O. The Kruskal-Wallis H-test was applied to the fluid flow data to detect differences between the experimental groups (P 0.05). Fluid movement through teeth with open apices and filled with four hydraulic cements was similar. All cements allowed fluid movement.

  2. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2004-11-01

    Contamination of crude oils by surface-active agents from drilling fluids or other oil-field chemicals is more difficult to detect and quantify than bulk contamination with, for example, base fluids from oil-based muds. Bulk contamination can be detected by gas chromatography or other common analytical techniques, but surface-active contaminants can be influential at much lower concentrations that are more difficult to detect analytically, especially in the context of a mixture as complex as a crude oil. In this report we present a baseline study of interfacial tensions of 39 well-characterized crude oil samples with aqueous phases that vary in pH and ionic composition. This extensive study will provide the basis for assessing the effects of surface-active contaminant on interfacial tension and other surface properties of crude oil/brine/rock ensembles.

  3. Final Report to DOE EERE – Geothermal Technologies Program Project Title: Monitoring and modeling of fluid flow in a developing enhanced geothermal system (EGS) reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehler, Michael [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-04-19

    The primary objective of this project was to improve our ability to predict performance of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir over time by relating, in a quantitative manner, microseismic imaging with fluid and temperature changes within the reservoir. Historically, microseismic data have been used qualitatively to place bounds on the growth of EGS reservoirs created by large hydraulic fracturing experiments. Previous investigators used an experimentally based fracture opening relationship (fracture aperture as a function of pressure), the spatial extent of microseismic events, and some assumptions about fracture frequency to determine the size of an EGS reservoir created during large pumping tests. We addressed a number of issues (1) locating microearthquakes that occur during hydraulic fracturing, (2) obtaining more information about a reservoir than the microearthquake locations from the microearthquake data, for example, information about the seismic velocity structure of the reservoir or the scattering of seismic waves within the reservoir, (3) developing an improved methodology for estimating properties of fractures that intersect wellbores in a reservoir, and (4) developing a conceptual model for explaining the downward growth of observed seismicity that accompanies some hydraulic injections into geothermal reservoirs. We used two primary microseismic datasets for our work. The work was motivated by a dataset from the Salak Geothermal Field in Indonesia where seismicity accompanying a hydraulic injection was observed to migrate downward. We also used data from the Soultz EGS site in France. We also used Vertical Seismic Profiling data from a well in the United States. The work conducted is of benefit for characterizing reservoirs that are created by hydraulic fracturing for both EGS and for petroleum recovery.

  4. Method to form a barrier in a reservoir with a magnetorheological fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Zitha, P.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of winning oil from a source via a bored well, wherein a magnetorheological fluid is introduced into the source via the bored well to re duce the water content of the oil won. Oil drilling is resumed in the presence of a magnetic field, thereby increasing the oil yield and/or decreasing the water content of the drilled oil.

  5. Final Report: Development of a Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2, Fluid and Rock in EGS Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Brian J. [University of Utah; Pan, Feng [University of Utah

    2014-09-24

    This report summarizes development of a coupled-process reservoir model for simulating enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that utilize supercritical carbon dioxide as a working fluid. Specifically, the project team developed an advanced chemical kinetic model for evaluating important processes in EGS reservoirs, such as mineral precipitation and dissolution at elevated temperature and pressure, and for evaluating potential impacts on EGS surface facilities by related chemical processes. We assembled a new database for better-calibrated simulation of water/brine/ rock/CO2 interactions in EGS reservoirs. This database utilizes existing kinetic and other chemical data, and we updated those data to reflect corrections for elevated temperature and pressure conditions of EGS reservoirs.

  6. DHI evaluation by combining rock physics simulation and statistical techniques for fluid identification of Cambrian-to-Cretaceous clastic reservoirs in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nisar; Khalid, Perveiz; Shafi, Hafiz Muhammad Bilal; Connolly, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    The use of seismic direct hydrocarbon indicators is very common in exploration and reservoir development to minimise exploration risk and to optimise the location of production wells. DHIs can be enhanced using AVO methods to calculate seismic attributes that approximate relative elastic properties. In this study, we analyse the sensitivity to pore fluid changes of a range of elastic properties by combining rock physics studies and statistical techniques and determine which provide the best basis for DHIs. Gassmann fluid substitution is applied to the well log data and various elastic properties are evaluated by measuring the degree of separation that they achieve between gas sands and wet sands. The method has been applied successfully to well log data from proven reservoirs in three different siliciclastic environments of Cambrian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous ages. We have quantified the sensitivity of various elastic properties such as acoustic and extended elastic (EEI) impedances, elastic moduli ( K sat and K sat- μ), lambda-mu-rho method ( λρ and μρ), P-to-S-wave velocity ratio ( V P/ V S), and Poisson's ratio ( σ) at fully gas/water saturation scenarios. The results are strongly dependent on the local geological settings and our modeling demonstrates that for Cambrian and Cretaceous reservoirs, K sat- μ, EEI, V P/ V S, and σ are more sensitive to pore fluids (gas/water). For the Jurassic reservoir, the sensitivity of all elastic and seismic properties to pore fluid reduces due to high overburden pressure and the resultant low porosity. Fluid indicators are evaluated using two metrics: a fluid indicator coefficient based on a Gaussian model and an overlap coefficient which makes no assumptions about a distribution model. This study will provide a potential way to identify gas sand zones in future exploration.

  7. Monitoring artificially stimulated fluid movement in the Cretaceous Dakota aquifer, western Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Allen; Förster, Andrea; Merriam, Daniel; Schrötter, Jörg; Healey, John

    2002-10-01

    Aquifer properties can be evaluated by monitoring artificially stimulated fluid movements between wells, if the fluid is heated. Changes in the temperature profile recorded in observation wells indicate the flow path of the heated fluid, which in effect acts as a tracer. A fluid-flow experiment in the Cretaceous Dakota Formation at the Hodgeman County site, west-central Kansas, demonstrated the advantage of using the distributed optical-fiber temperature sensing method for monitoring transient temperature conditions in this hydrological application. The fluid flow in the aquifer was increased by producing water from a pumping well and injecting heated water in an injection well 13 m (43 ft) distant from the pumping well. The time-temperature series data obtained and compared with results from previous pumping tests point to interwell heterogeneity of the aquifer and to a zone in the sandstone aquifer of high hydraulic conductivity. However, the experiment would have allowed further clarification of aquifer heterogeneity and thermal properties if at least one observation well had been present between the injection and production wells. Résumé. Les caractéristiques d'un aquifère peuvent être évaluées en effectuant un suivi des mouvements du fluide stimulés artificiellement entre des puits, si le fluide est chauffé. Les variations de profils de température enregistrés dans les puits d'observation donnent des informations sur les directions d'écoulement du fluide chauffé, qui en fait se comporte comme un traceur. Réalisée dans la formation crétacée de Dakota, sur le site du Comté de Hodgeman (centre-ouest du Kansas), une expérience a démontré l'intérêt d'utiliser la méthode de détection distribuée de température par fibres optiques pour suivre les variations de température dans cette application hydrologique. L'écoulement du fluide dans l'aquifère a été favorisé en extrayant de l'eau par pompage et en injectant de l'eau chaude dans un

  8. Enhanced Wellbore Stabilization and Reservoir Productivity with Aphron Drilling Fluid Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Growcock

    2004-03-31

    During this second Quarter of the Project, the first four tasks of Phase I--all focusing on the behavior of aphrons--were continued: (a) Aphron Visualization--evaluate and utilize various methods of monitoring and measuring aphron size distribution at elevated pressure; (b) Fluid Density--investigate the effects of pressure, temperature and chemical composition on the survivability of aphrons; (c) Aphron Air Diffusivity--determine the rate of loss of air from aphrons during pressurization; and (d) Pressure Transmissibility--determine whether aphron bridges created in fractures and pore throats reduce fracture propagation. The project team expanded the laboratory facilities and purchased a high-pressure system to measure bubble size distribution, a dissolved oxygen (DO) probe and computers for data acquisition. Although MASI Technologies LLC is not explicitly ISO-certified, all procedures are being documented in a manner commensurate with ISO 9001 certification, including equipment inventory and calibration, data gathering and reporting, chemical inventory and supplier data base, waste management procedures and emergency response plan. Several opportunities presented themselves to share the latest aphron drilling fluid technology with potential clients, including presentation of papers and working exhibit booths at the IADC/SPE Drilling Conference and the SPE Coiled Tubing Conference & Exhibition. In addition, a brief trip to the Formation Damage Symposium resulted in contacts for possible collaboration with ActiSystems, the University of Alberta and TUDRP/ACTS at the University of Tulsa. Preliminary results indicate that the Aphron Visualization and Pressure Transmissibility tasks should be completed on time. Although the Aphron Air Diffusivity task has been impeded by the lack of a suitable DO probe, it is hoped to be completed on time, too. The Fluid Density task, on the other hand, has had significant delays caused by faulty equipment and will likely require an

  9. Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Pennington; Mohamed Ibrahim; Roger Turpening; Sean Trisch; Josh Richardson; Carol Asiala; Walid Mabrouk

    2008-09-30

    Crosswell seismic surveys were conducted at two fields in northern Michigan. One of these, Springdale, included two monitor wells that are located external to the reef, and the other, Coldspring, employed two production wells within the reef. The Springdale wells extended to much greater depths than the reef, and imaging was conducted from above and from beneath the reef. The resulting seismic images provide the best views of pinnacle Niagaran reefs obtained to date. The tops of the reservoirs can be clearly distinguished, and their lateral extent or dipping edges can be observed along the profile. Reflecting events internal to the reef are evident; some of them are fairly continuous across the reef and others are discontinuous. Inversion of the seismic data indicates which events represent zones of higher porosity and which are lower porosity or even anhydrite plugged. The full stacked image includes angles that are beyond critical for many of the interfaces, and some reflections are visible only for a small range of angles, presumably near their critical angle. Stacking these angles in provides an opportunity for these events to be seen on the stacked image, where otherwise they would have been unrecognized. For inversion, however, the complexity associated with phase changes beyond critical can lead to poor results, and elastic inversion of partial angle stacks may be best conducted with restrictions to angles less than critical. Strong apparent attenuation of signals occurs when seismic ray paths pass through the upper part of the Springdale reservoir; this may be due to intrinsic attenuation and/or scattering of events due to the locally strongly varying gas saturation and extremely low fluid pressures. Signal-to-noise limitations become evident far from the source well in the Coldspring study, probably because the raw data were strongly affected by tube-wave noise generated by flow through the perforation of the receiver well. The seismic images obtained, and

  10. Geochemistry of formation waters from the Wolfcamp and “Cline” shales: Insights into brine origin, reservoir connectivity, and fluid flow in the Permian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Reyes, Francisco R.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Orem, William H.; Lin, Ma; Ianno, Adam J.; Westphal, Tiffani M.; Xu, Pei; Carroll, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most important oil producing provinces in the United States, information on basinal hydrogeology and fluid flow in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico is lacking. The source and geochemistry of brines from the basin were investigated (Ordovician- to Guadalupian-age reservoirs) by combining previously published data from conventional reservoirs with geochemical results for 39 new produced water samples, with a focus on those from shales. Salinity of the Ca–Cl-type brines in the basin generally increases with depth reaching a maximum in Devonian (median = 154 g/L) reservoirs, followed by decreases in salinity in the Silurian (median = 77 g/L) and Ordovician (median = 70 g/L) reservoirs. Isotopic data for B, O, H, and Sr and ion chemistry indicate three major types of water. Lower salinity fluids (Saline (>100 g/L), isotopically heavy (O and H) water in Leonardian [Permian] to Pennsylvanian reservoirs (2–3.2 km depth) is evaporated, Late Permian seawater. Water from the Permian Wolfcamp and Pennsylvanian “Cline” shales, which are isotopically similar but lower in salinity and enriched in alkalis, appear to have developed their composition due to post-illitization diffusion into the shales. Samples from the “Cline” shale are further enriched with NH4, Br, I and isotopically light B, sourced from the breakdown of marine kerogen in the unit. Lower salinity waters (3 km depth), which plot near the modern local meteoric water line, are distinct from the water in overlying reservoirs. We propose that these deep meteoric waters are part of a newly identified hydrogeologic unit: the Deep Basin Meteoric Aquifer System. Chemical, isotopic, and pressure data suggest that despite over-pressuring in the Wolfcamp shale, there is little potential for vertical fluid migration to the surface environment via natural conduits.

  11. Analysis of nitrogen injection as alternative fluid to steam in heavy oil reservoir; Analise da injecao de nitrogenio como fluido alternativo ao vapor em reservatorio de oleo pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Marcos Allyson Felipe; Galvao, Edney Rafael Viana Pinheiro; Barillas, Jennys Lourdes; Mata, Wilson da; Dutra Junior, Tarcilio Viana [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Many of hydrocarbon reserves existing in the world are formed by heavy oils (deg API between 10 and 20). Moreover, several heavy oil fields are mature and, thus, offer great challenges for oil industry. Among the thermal methods used to recover these resources, steam flooding has been the main economically viable alternative. Latent heat carried by steam heats the reservoir, reducing oil viscosity and facilitating the production. This method has many variations and has been studied both theoretically and experimentally (in pilot projects and in full field applications). In order to increase oil recovery and reduce steam injection costs, the injection of alternative fluid has been used on three main ways: alternately, co-injected with steam and after steam injection interruption. The main objective of these injection systems is to reduce the amount of heat supplied to the reservoir, using cheaper fluids and maintaining the same oil production levels. In this paper, the use of N{sub 2} as an alternative fluid to the steam was investigated. The analyzed parameters were oil recoveries and net cumulative oil productions. The reservoir simulation model corresponds to an oil reservoir of 100 m x 100 m x 28 m size, on a Cartesian coordinates system (x, y and z directions). It is a semi synthetic model with some reservoir data similar to those found in Potiguar Basin, Brazil. All studied cases were done using the simulator STARS from CMG (Computer Modelling Group, version 2009.10). It was found that N{sub 2} injection after steam injection interruption achieved the highest net cumulative oil compared to others injection system. Moreover, it was observed that N2 as alternative fluid to steam did not present increase on oil recovery. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the changes of interleukin- 6 level in gingival cervical fluid (GCF during orthodontic movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safavi SMR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In recent years, different substances have been considered in gingival cervical fluid (GCF as diagnostic markers due to the evaluation of biologic events and biochemical process related to bone turnover during orthodontic movements. IL-6 concentration increases in GCF during the first week after force loading. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of IL-6 in GCF during orthodontic movements.Materials and Methods: Fourteen orthodontic patients (9 females and 5 males, mean age 15.1±2.5 years with "nCl I malocclusion needing first bicuspid extraction participated in this clinical trial. In each patient one maxillary canine was distalized (DC with a NiTi push coil spring. The contra-lateral canine (CC was included in the orthodontic appliance but was not subjected to the orthodontic force  and one of the mandibular canines was used as control with no orthodontic appliance (Antagonist canine: AC. The concentration of IL-6 was evaluated at the baseline and 14th and 28th days after intervention. GCF was taken with periopapers from both mesial and distal sides of tooth before appliance activation, on the 14th and 28th days. Concentration of IL-6 in DC, CC, and AC detected by ELISA reader was compared by repeated measure ANOVA and LSD multiple comparison, P<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Although the inflammatory gingival indices increased in both DC and CC teeth but it was not significant. The amount of IL-6 in GCF increased on day 14th in DC teeth in comparison with AC and CC teeth. In addition, the concentration of IL-6 in DC teeth was significantly greater than the 1st and 28th days. The maximum concentration of IL-6 was detected in both pressure and tension sides of DCs at T14. At T28, although the IL-6 levels were significantly higher than baseline levels but, it was significantly less than T14.Conclusion: The results of this study support the hypothesis that mechanical stimuli cause an

  13. Movement of Sediment Associated With Lowered Reservoir Levels in the Rio La Venta Arm of the Presa Netzahualcoyotl, Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, S.; de La Fuente, J.; Lisle, T. E.; Velasquez, J.; Allison, B.; Olson, B.; Quinones, R.

    2003-12-01

    A joint sedimentation study is currently underway at the Netzahualcoyotl reservoir in Chiapas, Mexico, involving the Comision Nacional de Areas Naturales Protegidas (CONANP) of the Secretaria de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales and the USDA Forest Service. The reservoir is adjacent to the Reserva de la Biosfera, Selva El Ocote, administered by CONANP. Ongoing research is intended to provide watershed and reservoir managers with strategies to protect the resources of Rio La Venta canyon. The Rio La Venta arm of the reservoir is incised into karst terrain, with near-vertical limestone walls up to 300 meters high. The canyon is fed by two rivers, Rio La Selva and Rio Negro, and is surrounded by pristine tropical forest. The majority of the clastic sediment (predominantly sand and fine gravel) entering the reservoir originates in the headwaters of the two rivers which are underlain by weathered and dissected granitic terrain. Rapid sedimentation of the partially inundated canyon poses a threat to the aquatic ecosystem, as well as to recreational resources. Longitudinal and transverse profiles were surveyed in the inundated canyon in March of 2002 and repeated in April of 2003 when the reservoir level was 15 meters lower. The 2002 longitudinal profile shows an inflection from a slope of 0.0017 to one of 0.0075 at 7.2 km downstream of the mouth of Rio Negro. In 2003, the two slopes remained the same, but the bed lowered about 5 meters and the inflection point moved downstream about 2.3 km. We calculated that reservoir lowering in 2003 allowed the transport of 2.5 million cubic meters of sand further out into the reservoir. This volume is more than the average annual rate of filling up to the 2002 level since 1984 when sedimentation was not as advanced (De la Fuente et al., 2002), which was calculated disregarding loss of sediment to the main reservoir. Field observations at late dry season low flows in 2003 revealed active transport of sand and pebbles and formation

  14. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and osteopontin in human gingival crevicular fluid during initial tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Oswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: During orthodontic treatment, the early response of periodontal tissues to mechanical stress involves several metabolic changes that allow tooth movement. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate osteopontin (OPN and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of human teeth exposed to orthodontic force. Materials and Methods: GCF samples were obtained from 15 healthy orthodontic patients (age, 12-22 years. In each patient, the left maxillary canine having the fixed orthodontic appliance was used as the test tooth, and its antagonist, with no appliance, was the control. Orthodontic force, 75 g was applied using a 16 × 22 beta titanium closing loop. The GCF sampling on the disto-buccal aspects of experimental and control tooth was performed at specific time interval with sterilized absorbent paper point. Processing was carried out with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect OPN and MMP-7 levels. Results: The peak level of OPN was seen after 1 h application of orthodontic force which was 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02. The peak level of MMP-7 was seen at 0 h which was 598.3 pg/ml ± 107.5. The levels of OPN after 1 h increased to 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02, and they decreased at 24 h to 1012.86 pg/ml ± 168.47 (P = 0.001. The levels of MMP-7 after 1 h decreased to 478 pg/ml ± 99.7 which increased at 24 h to 526.9 pg/ml ± 99.2. Conclusions: Orthodontic forces affect both OPN and MMP-7 protein levels on the compression side in a time-dependent fashion.

  15. Multiphase Calcite Cementation and Fluids Evolution of a Deeply Buried Carbonate Reservoir in the Upper Ordovician Lianglitag Formation, Tahe Oilfield, Tarim Basin, NW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas have been found in the Upper Ordovician Lianglitag Formation carbonates in the Tahe Oilfield, Tarim Basin, NW China. This study documents the origin of diagenetic fluids by using a combination of petrology, SIMS, fluid inclusion, and radiogenic isotope analysis. Six stages of calcite cements were revealed. C1-C2 formed in marine to early burial environments. C3 has relatively low δ18OVPDB values (−8.45‰ to −6.50‰ and likely has a meteoric origin. Meteoric water probably fluxed into aquifers during the Early Paleozoic and Late Paleozoic uplift. C4 has δ18OVPDB values typically 3‰ higher than those of C3, and probably formed during shallow burial. C5 displays relatively negative δ18OVPDB values (−8.26‰ to −5.12‰, and the moderate-to-high fluid-inclusion temperatures imply that it precipitated in burial environments. C6 shows homogenization temperatures (up to 200°C higher than the maximum burial and much lower salinities (<10.61 wt% NaCl, which may suggest that the fluid was deeply recycled meteoric water. The average 87Sr/86Sr ratios of fracture- and vug-filling calcite cements are much higher, indicative of incorporation of radiogenic Sr. Caves and fractures constitute the dominant reservoir spaces. A corresponding diagenesis-related reservoir evolution model was established that favors exploration and prediction.

  16. On the Versatility of Rheoreversible, Stimuli-responsive Hydraulic-Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Effect of Reservoir pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Shao, Hongbo; Bonneville, Alain; Varga, Tamas; Zhong, Lirong

    2016-04-25

    Abstract The primary challenge for the feasibility of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs inside deep crystalline bedrock. Although fracturing fluids are commonly used for oil/gas, standard fracturing methods are not developed or proven for EGS temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the environmental impacts of currently used fracturing methods are only recently being determined. These authors recently reported an environmentally benign, CO2-activated, rheoreversible fracturing fluid that enhances permeability through fracturing due to in situ volume expansion and gel formation. The potential of this novel fracturing fluid is evaluated in this work towards its application at geothermal sites under different pH conditions. Laboratory-scale fracturing experiments using Coso Geothermal rock cores under different pH environments were performed followed by X-ray microtomography characterization. The results demonstrate that CO2-reactive aqueous solutions of environmentally amenable polyallylamine (PAA) consistently and reproducibly creates/propagates fracture networks through highly impermeable crystalline rock from Coso EGS sites at considerably lower effective stress as compared to conventional fracturing fluids. In addition, permeability was significantly enhanced in a wide range of formation-water pH values. This effective, and environmentally-friendly fracturing fluid technology represents a potential alternative to conventional fracturing fluids.

  17. Understanding the interaction of injected CO2 and reservoir fluids in the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field (MS, USA) by non-radiogenic noble gas isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyore, Domokos; Stuart, Finlay; Gilfillan, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the mechanism by which the injected CO2 is stored in underground reservoirs is a key challenge for carbon sequestration. Developing tracing tools that are universally deployable will increase confidence that CO2 remains safely stored. CO2 has been injected into the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field (MS, USA) since 2008 and significant amount of CO2 has remained (stored) in the reservoir. Noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) are present as minor natural components in the injected CO2. He, Ne and Ar previously have been shown to be powerful tracers of the CO2 injected in the field (Györe et al., 2015). It also has been implied that interaction with the formation water might have been responsible for the observed CO2 loss. Here we will present work, which examines the role of reservoir fluids as a CO2 sink by examining non-radiogenic noble gas isotopes (20Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr, 132Xe). Gas samples from injection and production wells were taken 18 and 45 months after the start of injection. We will show that the fractionation of noble gases relative to Ar is consistent with the different degrees of CO2 - fluid interaction in the individual samples. The early injection samples indicate that the CO2 injected is in contact with the formation water. The spatial distribution of the data reveal significant heterogeneity in the reservoir with some wells exhibiting a relatively free flow path, where little formation water is contacted. Significantly, in the samples, where CO2 loss has been previously identified show active and ongoing contact. Data from the later stage of the injection shows that the CO2 - oil interaction has became more important than the CO2 - formation water interaction in controlling the noble gas fingerprint. This potentially provides a means to estimate the oil displacement efficiency. This dataset is a demonstration that noble gases can resolve CO2 storage mechanisms and its interaction with the reservoir fluids with high resolution

  18. Reduced order modelling techniques for mesh movement strategies as applied to fluid structure interactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bogaers, Alfred EJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we implement the method of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to generate a reduced order model (ROM) of an optimization based mesh movement technique. In the study it is shown that POD can be used effectively to generate a ROM...

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bildt, Miriam; Bloemen, M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Von Den Hoff, Johannes W

    2009-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement requires extensive re-modelling of the periodontium. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix during re-modelling, while their activity is regulated by the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). The aim of this study was to investigate

  20. Matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bildt, M.M.; Bloemen, M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2009-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement requires extensive re-modelling of the periodontium. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix during re-modelling, while their activity is regulated by the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). The aim of this study was to investigate

  1. Quantification of a maximum injection volume of CO2 to avert geomechanical perturbations using a compositional fluid flow reservoir simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hojung; Singh, Gurpreet; Espinoza, D. Nicolas; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2018-02-01

    Subsurface CO2 injection and storage alters formation pressure. Changes of pore pressure may result in fault reactivation and hydraulic fracturing if the pressure exceeds the corresponding thresholds. Most simulation models predict such thresholds utilizing relatively homogeneous reservoir rock models and do not account for CO2 dissolution in the brine phase to calculate pore pressure evolution. This study presents an estimation of reservoir capacity in terms of allowable injection volume and rate utilizing the Frio CO2 injection site in the coast of the Gulf of Mexico as a case study. The work includes laboratory core testing, well-logging data analyses, and reservoir numerical simulation. We built a fine-scale reservoir model of the Frio pilot test in our in-house reservoir simulator IPARS (Integrated Parallel Accurate Reservoir Simulator). We first performed history matching of the pressure transient data of the Frio pilot test, and then used this history-matched reservoir model to investigate the effect of the CO2 dissolution into brine and predict the implications of larger CO2 injection volumes. Our simulation results -including CO2 dissolution- exhibited 33% lower pressure build-up relative to the simulation excluding dissolution. Capillary heterogeneity helps spread the CO2 plume and facilitate early breakthrough. Formation expansivity helps alleviate pore pressure build-up. Simulation results suggest that the injection schedule adopted during the actual pilot test very likely did not affect the mechanical integrity of the storage complex. Fault reactivation requires injection volumes of at least about sixty times larger than the actual injected volume at the same injection rate. Hydraulic fracturing necessitates much larger injection rates than the ones used in the Frio pilot test. Tested rock samples exhibit ductile deformation at in-situ effective stresses. Hence, we do not expect an increase of fault permeability in the Frio sand even in the presence of

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Fluid Flow in Continental Carbonate Reservoir Rocks and in Upscaled Rock Models Generated with Multiple-Point Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcomputed tomography (μCT and Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM simulations were applied to continental carbonates to quantify fluid flow. Fluid flow characteristics in these complex carbonates with multiscale pore networks are unique and the applied method allows studying their heterogeneity and anisotropy. 3D pore network models were introduced to single-phase flow simulations in Palabos, a software tool for particle-based modelling of classic computational fluid dynamics. In addition, permeability simulations were also performed on rock models generated with multiple-point geostatistics (MPS. This allowed assessing the applicability of MPS in upscaling high-resolution porosity patterns into large rock models that exceed the volume limitations of the μCT. Porosity and tortuosity control fluid flow in these porous media. Micro- and mesopores influence flow properties at larger scales in continental carbonates. Upscaling with MPS is therefore necessary to overcome volume-resolution problems of CT scanning equipment. The presented LBM-MPS workflow is applicable to other lithologies, comprising different pore types, shapes, and pore networks altogether. The lack of straightforward porosity-permeability relationships in complex carbonates highlights the necessity for a 3D approach. 3D fluid flow studies provide the best understanding of flow through porous media, which is of crucial importance in reservoir modelling.

  3. Fluids acidity in Los Humeros geothermal reservoir, Puebla, Mexico: Mineralogical evaluation; Acidez de los fluidos del yacimiento geotermico de Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico: Evaluacion mineralogica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo M, Georgina; Arellano G, Victor Manuel; Portugal M, Enrique; Aragon A, Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Martinez, Ignasio [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    2000-12-01

    The occurrence of the acidity in fluids from Los Humeros geothermal reservoir has been noticeable due to the accelerated corrosion of pipes lines of wells located mainly in the area known as Collapse Central and wells along the East direction of the field. On the base of the evaluation of all available chemical and mineralogical information for Los Humeros geothermal field the main objective of this work was to recognize evidences on the origin of geothermal fluids acidity. Considering the occurrence of HCl in other geothermal systems, no relation to the available information from Los Humeros was found. It is possible that the geothermal fluids acidity would be recent. It could be generated when the deep reservoir was reached by drilling wells. However, the occurrence of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is evident due to the advance argillic alteration of surface rocks in some areas of the field. It is probable that the model proposed by D' Amore, may be valid for the geothermal field of Los Humeros. Considering that the origin of the vapor phase from the deep reservoir would be a fluid (of very high salinity) that favored the formation of the HCl gas; which moved to the vapor zone when exploitation began being transported in the vapor phase toward the upper reservoir forming aqueous HCl. [Spanish] La presencia de acidez en los fluidos producidos por el yacimiento geotermico de Los Humeros se ha evidenciado por la acelerada corrosion de las tuberias de algunos pozos localizados principalmente en la zona conocida como Colapso central y en direccion Este del campo. Con el objeto de identificar evidencias que permitan establecer el origen de la acidez en los fluidos geotermicos, se llevo a cabo la evaluacion de la informacion quimica y mineralogica existente para el campo geotermico de Los Humeros. Empleando los criterios conocidos sobre la presencia de HCl en otros sistemas geotermicos no se encontro relacion con la informacion evaluada. Por lo que se sugiere que la acidez en

  4. The use of paleo-thermo-barometers and coupled thermal, fluid flow and pore fluid pressure modelling for hydrocarbon and reservoir prediction in fold and thrust belts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roure, F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Callot, J.P.; Ferket, H.; Gonzales, E.; Guilhaumou, N.; Hardebol, N.J.; Lacombe, O.; Malandain, J.; Mougin, P.; Muska, K.; Ortuno, S.; Sassi, W.; Swennen, R.; Vilasi, N.

    2010-01-01

    Basin modelling tools are now more efficient to reconstruct palinspastic structural cross sections and compute the history of temperature, pore-fluid pressure and fluid flow circulations in complex structural settings. In many cases and especially in areas where limited erosion occurred, the use of

  5. Complete genome sequence of a nonculturable Methanococcus maripaludis strain extracted in a metagenomic survey of petroleum reservoir fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Greenfield, Paul; Li, Dongmei; Hendry, Philip; Volk, Herbert; Sutherland, Tara D

    2011-10-01

    Extraction of genome sequences from metagenomic data is crucial for reconstructing the metabolism of microbial communities that cannot be mimicked in the laboratory. A complete Methanococcus maripaludis genome was generated from metagenomic data derived from a thermophilic subsurface oil reservoir. M. maripaludis is a hydrogenotrophic methanogenic species that is common in mesophilic saline environments. Comparison of the genome from the thermophilic, subsurface environment with the genome of the type species will provide insight into the adaptation of a methanogenic genome to an oil reservoir environment.

  6. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF NON-NEWTONIAN DRILLING FLUIDS DURING THE OCCURRENCE OF A GAS KICK IN A PETROLEUM RESERVOIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, a simplified kick simulator is developed using the ANSYS® CFX software in order to better understand the phenomena called kick. This simulator is based on the modeling of a petroleum well where a gas kick occurs. Dynamic behavior of some variables like pressure, viscosity, density and volume fraction of the fluid is analyzed in the final stretch of the modeled well. In the simulations nine different drilling fluids are used of two rheological categories, Ostwald de Waele, also known as Power-Law, and Bingham fluids, and the results are compared among them. In these comparisons what fluid allows faster or slower invasion of gas is analyzed, as well as how the gas spreads into the drilling fluid. The pressure behavior during the kick process is also compared t. It is observed that, for both fluids, the pressure behavior is similar to a conventional leak in a pipe.

  7. Study on Filtration and Damage Characteristics of Modified Dry CO2 Fracturing Fluid in Shale Gas Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guixi; Wang, Shuzhong; Luo, Xiangrong; Jing, Zefeng

    2017-11-01

    The filtration and damage characteristics of modified dry CO2 fracturing fluid in the shale is studied in this paper. The results show that the modified dry CO2 fracturing fluid has good leak-off characteristics. Compared with liquid CO2, supercritical CO2 has a better permeation and diffusion capacity in the porous medium. The damage rate of the modified dry CO2 fracturing fluid to shale core is only between 0.63%~3.84% with obvious little damage. Under liquid conditions, the increase of temperature makes the fracturing fluid more harmful to shale formation.

  8. Application of the CPA equation of state to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2009-01-01

    reservoirs. Conventional equation of state (EoS) with classical mixing rules cannot satisfactorily predict or even correlate the phase equilibrium of those systems. A promising model for such systems is the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) EoS, which has been successfully applied to well-defined systems...

  9. Drilling fluids engineering to drill extra-heavy oil reservoir on the Orinoco Oil Belt, eastern Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, R.; Gonazalez, W. [Proamsa, Maturin, Monagas (Venezuela)

    2008-07-01

    Petrocedeno is an exploration and development company operating in Venezuela. As part of a multidisciplinary group, Proamsa has been working with Petrocedeno to drill horizontal wells while minimizing issues related to the handling of drilling fluids. Proamsa is the only 100 per cent Venezuelan Company involved in drilling extra-heavy oil wells. The drilling plan for Petrocedeno was divided into two campaigns. More than 400 horizontal wells were drilled during the first campaign from 1999 to 2003 which represented over 2,500,000 drilled feet into the Oficina Formation (pay zone of the field). From 2006, during the second drilling campaign, and another 154 horizontal wells having been drilled until 2006 utilizing the xantam gum viscoelastic fluid. This paper discussed the field geology of the Orinoco oil belt. Well design was also explained and discussed and drilling fluid design and new fluid formations were presented. The benefits of xantam gum viscoelastic fluid were also discussed. It was concluded that recycling of drilling fluid from well to well minimized volume and reduced costs. In addition, centrifugation of drilling fluids either on intermediate or horizontals sections while the rig was skidding was always a very good practice avoiding mixing additional volumes. It was also demonstrated that the initial idea to provide a drilling fluid service company with a 100 per cent national value was a success, as demonstrated by the high performance shown by Proamsa during the second drilling campaign with external technologic support. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Assessment of myeloperoxidase activity at different force levels in gingival crevicular fluid during initial phase of orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey Gurbaxani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthodontic movements promote remodeling of the alveolar bone, which is mediated by inflammatory reactions such as characterized by vascular changes and infiltration of leukocytes. Changes in the periodontium occur, depending on the magnitude, duration, and direction of applied force. These changes are often seen in the saliva and gingival fluids through the various substances secreted in them. Aim: The present study aimed to assess myeloperoxidase (MPO activity at different force levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF during the initial phase of orthodontic tooth movement by varying the effective force levels to 50, 75, 100, and 150 g. Materials and Methods: A total of thirty participants between the age groups of 18–25 years requiring upper first premolar extractions were included in the study. They were divided into three groups (I, II, and III of ten individuals each, again subdivided into two Subgroups A and B depending on the amount of force applied to the canine. Subgroup A of all the three groups used 150 g, whereas Subgroup B used 50, 75, and 100 g of force, respectively. GCF was collected at 2 h, 7 days, and 14 days of force application. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test and ANOVA test were used to provide the descriptive statistics of mean optical density to detect the presence of MPO in GCF. Results and Conclusion: There was a highly significant increase in the MPO levels in the GCF at 14th day after force application which can be correlated to the onset of inflammatory reactions in the periodontium.

  11. New dimension of slow food movement using supercritical fluid technology and methods to influence society by effective marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Ruhan Aşkın

    2016-07-01

    Although slow food movement is a well-known movement nowadays, in order to make it more widespread to the society, necessity to develop and to adapt new techniques has become inevitable for healthier consumption age. For this purpose, possibility of increased usage of healthy foods with addition of natural extracts using new techniques came out from relevant questionaries applied to people of different age groups. In this study, specific properties of supercritical carbon dioxide at distinct temperatures and water in subcritical conditions were used to obtain extracts rich in water-soluble organic compounds. Experiments were carried out at pressures of 10, 20, 30, and 40 MPa and temperatures ranging from 40 to 200 ℃ with and without modifier for 2 h of extraction time. The flow rate was kept at 4 and 1 ml/min for CO2 and water, respectively. The highest water-soluble organic compound recovery yield was 78.10%. Results were supported by marketing strategies to announce this new application and products to the society. Group of sample questions was prepared to investigate (a) frequency of staple food usage, (b) the brand names and relevant reasons that bring up consumers to buy specifically same branded products, (c) knowledge about the ingredients and how advertising effects purchasing decision, etc. Finally, efficiency increase in slow food consumption was proved with supercritical fluid technology to draw attention to the health of consumers with newer and functional healthy foods. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Bone marker levels in gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic intrusive tooth movement: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, F; Sayinsu, K; Arun, T; Unlüçerçi, Y

    2005-05-15

    The aim of the present study is to observe the changes in bone turnover markers, deoxypyridinoline (Dpd), osteocalcin, n-telopeptide (NTx), and bone alkaline phosphatase (balp) during the experimental orthodontic intrusion of maxillary premolar teeth. The study population required fixed appliance therapy involving the extraction of the maxillary first premolar teeth. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected from each patient by using paper strips before the appliances were fitted and 1, 24, and 168 hours after the activation of appliances. After the second activation on the 21st, 22nd, and 28th days of the study, samples were collected. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests were performed following manufacturer's recommendations. The results of the study indicate Dpd, osteocalcin, and balp values decrease with force application. Among the tested parameters only Dpd values showed statistically significant changes through time. One, 7, 22, and 28 day results show a significant amount of decrease when compared to 0 days. The extra decrease on the 22nd day (the day after the second activation) is also significantly lower. NTx crosslink values could not be detected in the experimental samples.

  13. Influence of the geothermal fluid rheology in the large scale hydro-thermal circulation in Soultz-sous-Forêts reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Bérénice; Magnenet, Vincent; Fond, Christophe; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Many numerical models have been developed in deep geothermal reservoir engineering to interpret field measurements of the natural hydro-thermal circulations or to predict exploitation scenarios. They typically aim at analyzing the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical and Chemical (THMC) coupling including complex rheologies of the rock matrix like thermo-poro-elasticity. Few approaches address in details the role of the fluid rheology and more specifically the non-linear sensitivity of the brine rheology with temperature and pressure. Here we use the finite element Code_Aster to solve the balance equations of a 2D THM model of the Soultz-sous-Forêts reservoir. The brine properties are assumed to depend on the fluid pressure and the temperature as in Magnenet et al. (2014). A sensitive parameter is the thermal dilatation of the brine that is assumed to depend quadratically with temperature as proposed by the experimental measurements of Rowe and Chou (1970). The rock matrix is homogenized at the scale of the equation resolution assuming to have a representative elementary volume of the fractured medium smaller than the mesh size. We still chose four main geological units to adjust the rock physic parameters at large scale: thermal conductivity, permeability, radioactive source production rate, elastic and Biot parameters. We obtain a three layer solution with a large hydro-thermal convection below the cover-basement transition. Interestingly, the geothermal gradient in the sedimentary layer is controlled by the radioactive production rate in the upper altered granite. The second part of the study deals with an inversion approach of the homogenized solid and fluid parameters at large scale using our direct THM model. The goal is to compare the large scale inverted estimates of the rock and brine properties with direct laboratory measurements on cores and discuss their upscaling in the context of a fractured network hydraulically active. Magnenet V., Fond C., Genter A. and

  14. Assessment of anatomic morphology of the connective structures among brain ventricles and cerebrospinal fluid movement in them by cerebrospinal fluid spin-labeling MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ling; Shi Dapeng; Wang Ying; Liu Liya; Shen Hao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the anatomic morphology of the connective structures among brain ventricles and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in them by CSF spin-labeling MR imaging. Methods: According to the order of registration, 50 healthy volunteers were randomly selected and received cerebrospinal fluid spin-labeling MR scan with time-spatial labeling inversion recovery single-shot fast spin echo sequence (SLIR-SSFSE). The tagged CSF was used as an endogenous tracer. The anatomic morphology of the connective structures of brain ventricles and the flow direction of CSF were observed. The longitudinal diameter and transverse diameter of bilateral foramina of monro, midbrain aqueduct, and the central and bilateral lateral apertures of the fourth ventricle of each subject were measured and calculated based on multiple measurements. The flow rate of CSF was calculated based on the flow distance of CSF in the connective structures between brain ventricles during different TI time. The mean value of each indicator was acquired. Results: Two-way flow state of CSF was observed in all connective structures, including bilateral foramina of monro, midbrain aqueduct, and the central and bilateral lateral apertures of the fourth ventricle. On the coronal planes, foramen of monro appears as a 'Y'-type tubular structure locating among the both sides of the anteriomedial thalamus and fornix, which connect upward with bilateral lateral ventricles and downward with the third ventricle. The longitudinal diameter and transverse diameter of the left side of foramen of monro were 3.50-5.50 mm [mean (4.37±0.47) mm] and 1.00-1.40 mm [mean (1.21± 0.13) mm], respectively. The longitudinal diameter and transverse diameter of the right side of foramen of' monro were 4.20-4.80 mm [mean (4.42±0.20) mm] and 1.00-1.60 mm [mean (1.21± 0.19) mm], respectively. On the sagittal planes, foramen of monro appeared as an oblique fine tubular structure with the angle of 55°-58° between the both sides

  15. Mathematical simulation of oil reservoir properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESQIE-UPALM-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met., Edif. ' Z' y Edif. 6 planta baja., Mexico City c.p. 07300 (Mexico)], E-mail: adalop123@mailbanamex.com; Romero, A.; Chavez, F. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESQIE-UPALM-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met., Edif. ' Z' y Edif. 6 planta baja., Mexico City c.p. 07300 (Mexico); Carrillo, F. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN, Altamira Tamaulipas) (Mexico); Lopez, S. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo - Molecular Engineering Researcher (Mexico)

    2008-11-15

    The study and computational representation of porous media properties are very important for many industries where problems of fluid flow, percolation phenomena and liquid movement and stagnation are involved, for example, in building constructions, ore processing, chemical industries, mining, corrosion sciences, etc. Nevertheless, these kinds of processes present a noneasy behavior to be predicted and mathematical models must include statistical analysis, fractal and/or stochastic procedures to do it. This work shows the characterization of sandstone berea core samples which can be found as a porous media (PM) in natural oil reservoirs, rock formations, etc. and the development of a mathematical algorithm for simulating the anisotropic characteristics of a PM based on a stochastic distribution of some of their most important properties like porosity, permeability, pressure and saturation. Finally a stochastic process is used again to simulated the topography of an oil reservoir.

  16. Integrating SANS and fluid-invasion methods to characterize pore structure of typical American shale oil reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Jin, Zhijun; Hu, Qinhong; Jin, Zhenkui; Barber, Troy J; Zhang, Yuxiang; Bleuel, Markus

    2017-11-13

    An integration of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), low-pressure N 2 physisorption (LPNP), and mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) methods was employed to study the pore structure of four oil shale samples from leading Niobrara, Wolfcamp, Bakken, and Utica Formations in USA. Porosity values obtained from SANS are higher than those from two fluid-invasion methods, due to the ability of neutrons to probe pore spaces inaccessible to N 2 and mercury. However, SANS and LPNP methods exhibit a similar pore-size distribution, and both methods (in measuring total pore volume) show different results of porosity and pore-size distribution obtained from the MICP method (quantifying pore throats). Multi-scale (five pore-diameter intervals) inaccessible porosity to N 2 was determined using SANS and LPNP data. Overall, a large value of inaccessible porosity occurs at pore diameters pores in these shales. While each method probes a unique aspect of complex pore structure of shale, the discrepancy between pore structure results from different methods is explained with respect to their difference in measurable ranges of pore diameter, pore space, pore type, sample size and associated pore connectivity, as well as theoretical base and interpretation.

  17. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  18. Quantification of oil recovery efficiency, CO 2 storage potential, and fluid-rock interactions by CWI in heterogeneous sandstone oil reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyyedi, Mojtaba; Sohrabi, Mehran; Sisson, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Significant interest exists in improving recovery from oil reservoirs while addressing concerns about increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. The combination of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and safe geologic storage of CO2 in oil reservoirs is appealing and can be achieved by carbonated (...... for oil recovery and CO2 storage potential on heterogeneous cores. Since not all the oil reservoirs are homogenous, understanding the potential of CWI as an integrated EOR and CO2 storage scenario in heterogeneous oil reservoirs is essential.......Significant interest exists in improving recovery from oil reservoirs while addressing concerns about increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. The combination of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and safe geologic storage of CO2 in oil reservoirs is appealing and can be achieved by carbonated (CO...

  19. The Effects of Orthodontic Forces during Canine Retraction Using Self-ligating Brackets on Gingival Crevicular Fluid Enzyme Activity, Canine Movement and Root Resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohaya Megat Abdul Wahab; Albira Sintian; Zaidah Zainal Arifin; Zaidah Zainal Ariffin; Shahrul Hisham Zainal Ariffin

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were studied as bio markers of canine movement. Root resorption was also evaluated in canines subjected to the orthodontic forces. Nineteen subjects randomly received 100 and 150 g force using self-ligating brackets (SLB) either on the right or left site of maxillary arch. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected at distal sites of canines for five consecutive weeks. The activities of ALP, TRAP and AST were assayed and measured spectrophotometrically. Canine movement was measured for five consecutive weeks while root resorption was monitored at baseline, week 0 and week 5 using periapical radiographs. In 100 g group, TRAP activity significantly increased in week 3-5 when compared to TRAP baseline activity. However, ALP and AST activities slightly increased. In 150 g group, ALP and TRAP activities slightly increased when compared with their baseline activities. However, AST significantly increased in week 5. Canine movement and root resorption were not significantly different (p<0.05) in both groups. A force of 100 and 150 g slightly increased the bone modeling process and resulted in similar canine movement and root resorption. Therefore, 100 g force could be an optimum force for canine retraction and is preferable (compared with 150 g force) in canine retraction using SLB. (author)

  20. Investigation of oil-pool formation from the homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions and biomarkers in reservoir rocks: a genetic model for the Deng-2 oil-pool in the Jiyuan Depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Weiwei [Geochemical Institute of Chinese Academy, Guizhou (China); University of Petroleum, Shandong (China); Li Zhaoyang [University of Petroleum, Shandong (China); Jin Qiang; Wang Weifeng [Geochemical Institute of Chinese Academy, Guizhou (China)

    2002-11-01

    The Jiyuan Depression is a frontier area for oil and gas exploration in Henan Province, China. In recent years, oil was discovered in the Deng-2 well in the lower Tertiary, though the tectonics and petroleum geology of the Depression are very complex. A series of experiments on fluid inclusions in the oil-bearing sandstones from the Deng-2 well were made that included measurement of the homogenization temperatures of gas-liquid inclusions and GC-MS analysis of biomarkers either in the sandstone pores or in the fluid inclusions. The Deng-2 oil-reservoir was formed at about 78{sup o}C, corresponding to a burial depth of about 2200 m. The present burial depth is about 700 m because of erosion and fault-block uplift in Oligocene time. Although oil in the sandstone pores is now heavily biodegraded, the biomarkers in the inclusions show slight biodegradation representing a watering and biodegradation process that did not occur before formation of the Deng-2 oil- pool. Having investigated the structural evolution of the Deng-2 trap, it is concluded that the oil discovered in the Tertiary reservoir of Deng-2 well migrated from Mesozoic reservoirs through active faults around the Deng-2 trap. As the oil migrated from the Mesozoic to the Tertiary reservoir, the Deng-2 trap was uplifted close to the depth of active biodegradation (subsurface temperature lower than 80{sup o}C and to a burial depth shallower than 2250 m from the thermal gradient of 3.1{sup o}C/100 m) so that the oil in the inclusions shows a slight biodegradation. Because of the continuous uplift of the Deng-2 trap during the Tertiary and Quaternary, the reservoired oil has been more heavily biodegraded compared to that in the inclusions. (author)

  1. Advantageous Reservoir Characterization Technology in Extra Low Permeability Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutian Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper took extra low permeability reservoirs in Dagang Liujianfang Oilfield as an example and analyzed different types of microscopic pore structures by SEM, casting thin sections fluorescence microscope, and so on. With adoption of rate-controlled mercury penetration, NMR, and some other advanced techniques, based on evaluation parameters, namely, throat radius, volume percentage of mobile fluid, start-up pressure gradient, and clay content, the classification and assessment method of extra low permeability reservoirs was improved and the parameter boundaries of the advantageous reservoirs were established. The physical properties of reservoirs with different depth are different. Clay mineral variation range is 7.0%, and throat radius variation range is 1.81 μm, and start pressure gradient range is 0.23 MPa/m, and movable fluid percentage change range is 17.4%. The class IV reservoirs account for 9.56%, class II reservoirs account for 12.16%, and class III reservoirs account for 78.29%. According to the comparison of different development methods, class II reservoir is most suitable for waterflooding development, and class IV reservoir is most suitable for gas injection development. Taking into account the gas injection in the upper section of the reservoir, the next section of water injection development will achieve the best results.

  2. Study on estimating fluid force acting on a hull during maneuvering movement; Soju undoji no sentai ni sayosuru ryutairyoku no suitei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, K.; Kijima, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    With types of general cargo vessel and VLCC vessel as the object of discussion, a method was discussed to estimate fluid force acting theoretically on a hull during maneuvering movement, taking frame line shape into consideration. A vortex model was improved by giving consideration of time-based decay on intensity of discrete vortex lines based on the Rankine vortex. Modeling of flow fields around a hull was attempted to deal with movements in which width and draft are small as compared with the ship length, and turning angle speed and deviation angle are small. It was assumed that the ship speed is slow and effects of waves can be disregarded. Specular images of the hull were taken with regard to free surface, and handled as a double body model. Speed potential to express flow fields around a hull is required to satisfy the following five boundary conditions of Laplace, substance surface, free vortex layers, infinity and exfoliation. The potential may be handled as a two-dimensional problem in a field near the hull by using assumption of a slender and long body and conformal mapping. It was found possible to estimate hull fluid force with relatively good accuracy. Fine linear coefficients derived from the estimation were used to have performed highly accurate determination on course stabilization. 5 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum

  4. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Geothermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-01-01

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum

  5. Water coning in porous media reservoirs for compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, L.E.; McCann, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The general purpose of this work is to define the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a CAES porous media reservoir subjected to simulated air mass cycling. This research will assist in providing design guidelines for the efficient and stable operation of the air storage reservoir. This report presents the analysis and results for the two-phase (air-water), two-dimensional, numerical modeling of CAES porous media reservoirs. The effects of capillary pressure and relative permeability were included. The fluids were considered to be immisicible; there was no phase change; and the system was isothermal. The specific purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the reservoir parameters that were believed to be important to water coning. This phenomenon may occur in reservoirs in which water underlies the air storage zone. It involves the possible intrusion of water into the wellbore or near-wellbore region. The water movement is in response to pressure gradients created during a reservoir discharge cycle. Potential adverse effects due to this water movement are associated with the pressure response of the reservoir and the geochemical stability of the near-wellbore region. The results obtained for the simulated operation of a CAES reservoir suggest that water coning should not be a severe problem, due to the slow response of the water to the pressure gradients and the relatively short duration in which those gradients exist. However, water coning will depend on site-specific conditions, particularly the fluid distributions following bubble development, and, therefore, a water coning analysis should be included as part of site evaluation.

  6. Reservoir management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satter, A.; Varnon, J.E.; Hoang, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    A reservoir's life begins with exploration leading to discovery followed by delineation of the reservoir, development of the field, production by primary, secondary and tertiary means, and finally to abandonment. Sound reservoir management is the key to maximizing economic operation of the reservoir throughout its entire life. Technological advances and rapidly increasing computer power are providing tools to better manage reservoirs and are increasing the gap between good and neutral reservoir management. The modern reservoir management process involves goal setting, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans. Setting a reservoir management strategy requires knowledge of the reservoir, availability of technology, and knowledge of the business, political, and environmental climate. Formulating a comprehensive management plan involves depletion and development strategies, data acquisition and analyses, geological and numerical model studies, production and reserves forecasts, facilities requirements, economic optimization, and management approval. This paper provides management, engineers geologists, geophysicists, and field operations staff with a better understanding of the practical approach to reservoir management using a multidisciplinary, integrated team approach

  7. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  8. Juveniles versus adults: differences in PGE2 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chibebe, Priscilla Campanatti; Starobinas, Nancy; Pallos, Debora

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate age-related changes in the biosynthetic capacity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during one month of orthodontic treatment. Twenty-five juvenile subjects (mean age 13 ± 2.1 years) and 23 adults (mean age 24 ± 2.1 years) were included. GCF was collected immediately before the force application at the baseline, 2, 21 and 28 days, with periopaper inserted into the gingival crevice of the maxillary lateral incisors. The mediator le...

  9. Osteocalcin and N-telopeptides of type I collagen marker levels in gingival crevicular fluid during different stages of orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaqeeh, Sarah A; Anil, Sukumaran

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to quantitatively and qualitatively analyze changes in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during orthodontic movement by assessing the levels of cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen marker (NTx) and osteocalcin (OC) activity. Twenty patients requiring all first premolars to be extracted were selected and treated with conventional straight-wire mechanotherapy. The canines were retracted with closed-coil springs. The maxillary canine on one side acted as the experimental site, and the contralateral canine was the control. GCF was collected from around the canines before retraction, and 1 hour, 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days after retraction. GCF NTx and OC levels were estimated and compared with the control side. The results showed statistically significant changes in NTx and OC levels on days 7, 14, and 21 when we compared the experimental and control sides. The peak in all activity of the variables occurred on day 14 after retraction. The study showed that NTx and OC levels can be successfully estimated in the GCF, and its increased levels might indicate the active tooth movement phase in orthodontic therapy. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluid machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Hyeon; Son, Byeong Jin

    2001-04-01

    This book tells of definition and classification of fluid machinery, energy equation of incompressible fluid, principle of momentum, classification and structure of pump, size, safety of centrifugal pump, theory and operation of contraction pump, reciprocating pump, rotary pump, special pump, using of water power, classification of water turbine, impulse water turbine, reaction water turbine, pump water turbine, liquid movement apparatus, fluid type control machinery and solid and gas type pneumatic machine.

  11. Development of gas and gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    In the study of gas reservoir development, the first year topics are restricted on reservoir characterization. There are two types of reservoir characterization. One is the reservoir formation characterization and the other is the reservoir fluid characterization. For the reservoir formation characterization, calculation of conditional simulation was compared with that of unconditional simulation. The results of conditional simulation has higher confidence level than the unconditional simulation because conditional simulation considers the sample location as well as distance correlation. In the reservoir fluid characterization, phase behavior calculations revealed that the component grouping is more important than the increase of number of components. From the liquid volume fraction with pressure drop, the phase behavior of reservoir fluid can be estimated. The calculation results of fluid recombination, constant composition expansion, and constant volume depletion are matched very well with the experimental data. In swelling test of the reservoir fluid with lean gas, the accuracy of dew point pressure forecast depends on the component characterization. (author). 28 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Effects of post-burial siliceous diagenesis deformations on the microthermometric behaviour of fluid inclusions: an example in the Francevillian uraniferous sandstone reservoir (Gabon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Weber, F.

    1984-01-01

    New data about fluid inclusions associated to a siliceous diagenesis show that a deformation phase in the first stage of catagenesis disturbed their microthermometric behaviour. Nevertheless, temperature and pressure of fluids associated to the uraniferous paragenesis and contemporary with the Oklo natural reactors are estimated at 140-160 0 C and 250-500 bar [fr

  13. Hydrocarbon origin and reservoir forming model research of Longwangmiao Formation, Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindong Jin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the Longwangmiao gas reservoir in Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan Basin. Starting from the tectonic evolution perspective, though comparing biological marker compound and analyzing fluid inclusions, the oil & gas origin and accumulation evolution of Longwangmiao Formation are systematic studied with reference to the burial-thermal evolution of single well geological history in the study area. It is suggested that the oil & gas reservoir is generally characterized by early accumulation, multi-stage filling, late cracking and later adjustment. The oil and gas were mainly sourced from lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi Formation, partly from the Permian source rock. During the geological period, 3 major oil & gas fillings occurred in the Longwangmiao Formation, namely Caledonian-Hercynian filling that was small in scale and produced the first phase of paleo-oil reservoir that soon destroyed by Caledonian movement uplift, large-scale Permian filling that gave rise to the second-phase of paleo-oil reservoir and the Triassic-Jurassic filling that enriched the second phase of paleo-oil reservoir. Finally, the paleo-oil reservoir experienced an in-situ cracking during the cretaceous period that gave rise to a natural gas reservoir and left behind carbonaceous bitumen and oily bitumen in the holes of the Longwangmiao Formation.

  14. Juveniles versus adults: differences in PGE2 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Campanatti Chibebe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate age-related changes in the biosynthetic capacity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF during one month of orthodontic treatment. Twenty-five juvenile subjects (mean age 13 ± 2.1 years and 23 adults (mean age 24 ± 2.1 years were included. GCF was collected immediately before the force application at the baseline, 2, 21 and 28 days, with periopaper inserted into the gingival crevice of the maxillary lateral incisors. The mediator levels were determined with an EIA kit. The results showed that the PGE2 concentrations were significantly elevated from the baseline to 21 days (129.35 and 198.84 pg/µL, p = 0.0169 in juvenile subjects and reduced from 21 to 28 days (198.84 to 112.60 pg/µL, p = 0.0032. Adults, however, had no significant changes in the PGE2 levels. The total amounts of PGE2 from both groups changed between the baseline to 21 and 21 to 28 days (p = 0.0119 and p = 0.0076, respectively. The PGE2 initial and final levels showed significant differences between the juveniles and adults, being higher in adults (baseline: juvenile = 129.35 pg/µL vs. adult = 163.20 pg/µL, p = 0.0379; t3: juvenile = 112.60 pg/µL and adult = 175.30 pg/µL, p = 0.0005. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the presence of variation in the PGE2 levels according to age and the orthodontic activation period, which can explain why the speed of orthodontics treatment may be different in adults vs. juveniles.

  15. Juveniles versus adults: differences in PGE2 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibebe, Priscilla Campanatti; Starobinas, Nancy; Pallos, Debora

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate age-related changes in the biosynthetic capacity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during one month of orthodontic treatment. Twenty-five juvenile subjects (mean age 13 +/- 2.1 years) and 23 adults (mean age 24 +/- 2.1 years) were included. GCF was collected immediately before the force application at the baseline, 2, 21 and 28 days, with periopaper inserted into the gingival crevice of the maxillary lateral incisors. The mediator levels were determined with an EIA kit. The results showed that the PGE2 concentrations were significantly elevated from the baseline to 21 days (129.35 and 198.84 pg/microL, p = 0.0169) in juvenile subjects and reduced from 21 to 28 days (198.84 to 112.60 pg/microL, p = 0.0032). Adults, however, had no significant changes in the PGE2 levels. The total amounts of PGE2 from both groups changed between the baseline to 21 and 21 to 28 days (p = 0.0119 and p = 0.0076, respectively). The PGE2 initial and final levels showed significant differences between the juveniles and adults, being higher in adults (baseline: juvenile = 129.35 pg/microL vs. adult = 163.20 pg/microL, p = 0.0379; t3: juvenile = 112.60 pg/microL and adult = 175.30 pg/microL, p = 0.0005). In conclusion, the results demonstrate the presence of variation in the PGE2 levels according to age and the orthodontic activation period, which can explain why the speed of orthodontics treatment may be different in adults vs. juveniles.

  16. Origin and evolution of formation water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, Gulf of Mexico. Part 2: Isotopic and field-production evidence for fluid connectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, Peter, E-mail: birkle@iie.org.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), Gerencia de Geotermia, Cuernavaca 62490, Morelos (Mexico); Garcia, Bernardo Martinez; Milland Padron, Carlos M. [PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion, Region Sur, Activo Integral Bellota-Jujo, Diseno de Explotacion, Cardenas, Tabasco (Mexico); Eglington, Bruce M. [Saskatchewan Isotope Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    The chemical and isotopic characterization of formation water from 18 oil production wells, extracted from 5200 to 6100 m b.s.l. at the Jujo-Tecominoacan carbonate reservoir in SE-Mexico, and interpretations of historical production records, were undertaken to determine the origin and hydraulic behavior of deep groundwater systems. The infiltration of surface water during Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene time is suggested by {sup 14}C-concentrations from 2.15 to 31.86 pmC, and by {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr-ratios for high-salinity formation water (0.70923-0.70927) that are close to the composition of Holocene to modern seawater. Prior to infiltration, the super-evaporation of seawater reached maximum TDS concentrations of 385 g/L, with lowest {delta}{sup 18}O values characterizing the most hypersaline samples. Minor deviations of formation water and dolomite host rocks from modern and Jurassic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr-seawater composition, respectively, suggest ongoing water-rock interaction, and partial isotopic equilibration between both phases. The abundance of {sup 14}C in all sampled formation water, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr-ratios for high-salinity water close to Holocene - present seawater composition, a water salinity distribution that is independent of historic water-cut, and a total water extraction volume of 2.037 MMm{sup 3} (1/83-4/07) excludes a connate, oil-leg origin for the produced water of the Jurassic-Cretaceous mudstone-dolomite sequence. Temporal fluctuations of water chemistry in production intervals, the accelerated migration of water fronts from the reservoir flanks, and isotopic mixing trends between sampled wells confirms the existence of free aquifer water below oil horizons. Vertical and lateral hydraulic mobility has probably been accelerated by petroleum extraction. The combination of interpreting historical fluctuations of salinity and water percentage in production wells with chemical-isotopic analysis of formation water resulted in a

  17. Origin and evolution of formation water at the Jujo-Tecominoacan oil reservoir, Gulf of Mexico. Part 2: Isotopic and field-production evidence for fluid connectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkle, Peter; Garcia, Bernardo Martinez; Milland Padron, Carlos M.; Eglington, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic characterization of formation water from 18 oil production wells, extracted from 5200 to 6100 m b.s.l. at the Jujo-Tecominoacan carbonate reservoir in SE-Mexico, and interpretations of historical production records, were undertaken to determine the origin and hydraulic behavior of deep groundwater systems. The infiltration of surface water during Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene time is suggested by 14 C-concentrations from 2.15 to 31.86 pmC, and by 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-ratios for high-salinity formation water (0.70923-0.70927) that are close to the composition of Holocene to modern seawater. Prior to infiltration, the super-evaporation of seawater reached maximum TDS concentrations of 385 g/L, with lowest δ 18 O values characterizing the most hypersaline samples. Minor deviations of formation water and dolomite host rocks from modern and Jurassic 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-seawater composition, respectively, suggest ongoing water-rock interaction, and partial isotopic equilibration between both phases. The abundance of 14 C in all sampled formation water, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-ratios for high-salinity water close to Holocene - present seawater composition, a water salinity distribution that is independent of historic water-cut, and a total water extraction volume of 2.037 MMm 3 (1/83-4/07) excludes a connate, oil-leg origin for the produced water of the Jurassic-Cretaceous mudstone-dolomite sequence. Temporal fluctuations of water chemistry in production intervals, the accelerated migration of water fronts from the reservoir flanks, and isotopic mixing trends between sampled wells confirms the existence of free aquifer water below oil horizons. Vertical and lateral hydraulic mobility has probably been accelerated by petroleum extraction. The combination of interpreting historical fluctuations of salinity and water percentage in production wells with chemical-isotopic analysis of formation water resulted in a successful method to distinguish four groundwater bodies

  18. Challenges of reservoir properties and production history matching in a CHOPS reservoir study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Mahbub [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In order to meet increasing world energy demand, wells have to be drilled within very thin reservoir beds. This paper, we present one of the solutions for optimizing the reservoir characterization. Reservoir characterization is the process between the discovery of a property and the reservoir management phase. Principal data for reservoir modeling are: 4D Seismic interpretation, wireline log interpretation, core analysis, and petrophysical analysis. Reservoir conditions, perforation and completion technology are the key issues to the production rate of cold production. Reservoir modeling intends to minimize the risk factor, maximize production, and help determine the location for infill drillings. Cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) is a method for enhancing primary production from heavy oil reservoirs. Gravitational forces, natural fluid pressure gradients and foamy oil flow phenomena are the major driving forces of the CHOPS mechanism. Finally, Reservoir characterization allows better understanding of permeability and porosity prediction.

  19. Reservoir Simulations of Low-Temperature Geothermal Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedre, Madhur Ganesh

    The eastern United States generally has lower temperature gradients than the western United States. However, West Virginia, in particular, has higher temperature gradients compared to other eastern states. A recent study at Southern Methodist University by Blackwell et al. has shown the presence of a hot spot in the eastern part of West Virginia with temperatures reaching 150°C at a depth of between 4.5 and 5 km. This thesis work examines similar reservoirs at a depth of around 5 km resembling the geology of West Virginia, USA. The temperature gradients used are in accordance with the SMU study. In order to assess the effects of geothermal reservoir conditions on the lifetime of a low-temperature geothermal system, a sensitivity analysis study was performed on following seven natural and human-controlled parameters within a geothermal reservoir: reservoir temperature, injection fluid temperature, injection flow rate, porosity, rock thermal conductivity, water loss (%) and well spacing. This sensitivity analysis is completed by using ‘One factor at a time method (OFAT)’ and ‘Plackett-Burman design’ methods. The data used for this study was obtained by carrying out the reservoir simulations using TOUGH2 simulator. The second part of this work is to create a database of thermal potential and time-dependant reservoir conditions for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs by studying a number of possible scenarios. Variations in the parameters identified in sensitivity analysis study are used to expand the scope of database. Main results include the thermal potential of reservoir, pressure and temperature profile of the reservoir over its operational life (30 years for this study), the plant capacity and required pumping power. The results of this database will help the supply curves calculations for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the United States, which is the long term goal of the work being done by the geothermal research group under Dr. Anderson at

  20. Stability and economy analysis based on computational fluid dynamics and field testing of hybrid-driven underwater glider with the water quality sensor in Danjiangkou Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new kind of unmanned platform for water quality monitoring. It has advantages such as high controllability and maneuverability, low cost, easy operation, and ability to carry multiple sensors. This article develops a hybrid-driven underwater glider, PETRELII, and integrates a water quality monitoring sensor. Considering stability and economy, an optimal layout scheme is selected from four candidates by simulation using computational fluid dynamics method. Trials were carried out in Danjiangkou Reservoir—important headwaters of the Middle Route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project. In the trials, a monitoring strategy with polygonal mixed-motion was adopted to make full use of the advantages of the unmanned platform. The measuring data, including temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, turbidity, chlorophyll, and ammonia nitrogen, are obtained. These data validate the practicability of the theoretical layout obtained using computational fluid dynamics method and the practical performance of PETRELII with sensor.

  1. Effects of diode laser (980 nm) on orthodontic tooth movement and interleukin 6 levels in gingival crevicular fluid in female subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, S; Aghili, H; Afshari, J Tavakol; Bagherpour, A; Eslami, F

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) and the interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during orthodontic treatment. In this randomized split-mouth double blind clinical trial, 11 female patients aged 14 to 25 years (mean 19 ± 4.21 year), who required canine retraction following four first premolars extraction, were selected. The GaAlAs laser diode laser (A.R.C. Laser GmbH, Nürnberg, Germany) (980 nm, 100 mW, 5.6 J/cm 2 , three points from the buccal side and three from lingual side of the tooth, 56 s, running in continuous mode) was used for canine retraction in only one maxillary quadrant (LG). The irradiation time for each cervical and middle third of the tooth was 10 s, and 8 s for the apical third of the tooth. The other maxillary quadrant served as the control group (CG) using the laser pseudo-application in this side. The laser irradiation was applied on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 of each month during the canine retraction phase. Canine retraction was done using closed coil spring with 150 g force on rectangular wires after the alignment and leveling. This study was done in 11 months. Dental casts were made at different time points during the treatment, and the amount of tooth movement was measured. To evaluate the levels of IL-6, GCF samples were collected from the distal side of the maxillary canine teeth on both quadrants at the beginning of the trial, the end of aligning phase, and on day 21 of each month during canine retraction. Although the mean rate of canine retraction was higher in the LG (0.013) than the CG (0.012) and there was definitely a tendency for more canine retraction in the LLLI, but the results failed to show any significant difference between the mean rate of canine retraction of both groups (P = 0.068). A paired t test showed that there was no significant difference in the mean concentration of IL

  2. Modelling by the SPH method of the impact of a shell containing a fluid; Modelisation par la methode SPH de l'impact d'un reservoir rempli de fluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurel, B

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work was to develop a numerical simulation tool using a mesh-less approach, able to simulate the deformation and the rupture of thin structures under the impact of a fluid. A model of thick mesh-less shell (Mindlin-Reissner) based on the SPH method has then been carried out. A contact algorithm has moreover been perfected for the interactions between the structure and the fluid, it is modelled too by the SPH method. These studies have been carried out and been included in the CEA Europlexus fast dynamics software. (O.M.)

  3. Application of MRIL-WD (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging While Drilling) for irreducible water saturation, total reservoir, free-fluid, bound-fluid porosity measurements and its value for the petrophysical analysis of RT/RM data from the Shah Deniz well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    Sperry-Sun (Sperry Drilling Services) is the leader in MWD/LWD reliability, has developed the industry's first LWD NMR/MRIL-WD (nuclear magnetic resonance) tool. The MRIL-WD (magnetic resonance imaging logging-while-drilling) service directly measures the T1 component of hydrogen in subsurface rock units while drilling to obtain total reservoir porosity and to dissect the observed total porosity into its respective components of free fluid and bound fluid porosity. These T1 data are used to secure accurate total, free-fluid, capillary-bound water, and clay-bound water porosity of the reservoir sections which can be drilled in the several Runs. Over the last decade, results from Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs (NMR) have added significant value to petrophysical analysis and understanding by providing total, free-fluid and bound-fluid porosities, combined with fluid typing capabilities. With MRIL-WD very valuable Real-Time or Recorded Memory data/information is now available during or shortly after the drilling operation (formation properties measurement can be taken right after a drill bit penetration), while trip in and trip out as well. A key point in utilizing MRIL in an LWD environment is motion-tolerant measurements. Recent MRIL-WD logging runs from the Shah Deniz wells located in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic helped to delineate and assess hydrocarbon bearing zones. Acquired results demonstrate how MRIL data can be acquired while-drilling and provide reliable/high quality measurements. Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs at some developments wells have become a cornerstone in formation evaluation and petrophysical understanding. By providing total, free-fluid, and bound-fluid porosities together with fluid typing, MRIL results have significantly added to the assessment of reservoirs. In order to reduce NPT (Non-Productive Time) and save the rig operations time, there is always the desire to obtain logging results as soon as possible

  4. Fluid-flow, diagenesis and generation of secondary porosity-permeability in the Cretaceous Jandaira Formation, Brazil - an analogue of karstified carbonate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, F. H.; Cazarin, C. L.; Srivastava, N. K.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the diagenetic processes that generated secondary porosity-permeability in carbonates. Our study area is the Jandaira Formation, a post-rift unit, 50-700 m thick, which occurs over an area of 70 x 260 km in the Potiguar Basin, Equatorial margin of Brazil. The Jandaira Formation formed in the Turonian-Campanian and is the major exposed Cretaceous carbonate platform in the eastern continental margin of South America. Little folding and nearly flat-lying layers characterize this unit. We used a multidisciplinary approach, which included drone imagery, petrographic, petrophysical, petrological, and structural studies. Our results indicate that several levels of dissolution occurred in mudstone, grainstone, and wackestone facies along faults, fractures, and bedding planes. Fracture and faults provided vertical leaching pathways and sedimentary bedding provided horizontal pathways of increased secondary porosity and permeability. Dissolution resulted in a multi-scale karst system that could reach voids 5 m wide and 1 km long. Dissolution mostly affect the dolomitized sedimentary facies in the form of vugular, moldic, interparticular, and intercrystalline porosity. It also generated a new modified facies that we defined as karstified facies. Dissolution increased permeability in carbonate rocks from primary values of 0.0-0.94 mD to as much as 1370.11 mD. Micritization, lixiviation of evaporites, meteoric water infiltration and dolomitization during late diagenesis could have triggered dissolution processes. The Jandaira Formation serves as an analog of fractured and karstified carbonate reservoirs, where faults, joints, and bedding acted as pathways of high permeability.

  5. Apparatus and Methods for Fluid Storage and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazynski, Scott E. (Inventor); Bue, Grant C. (Inventor); Schaefbauer, Mark E. (Inventor); Urban, Kase C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for storing and delivering fluid to a person comprises, in at least one specific embodiment, a fluid reservoir having an internal volume therein with an opening disposed through a first wall or a second wall of the fluid reservoir and located toward a first end of the fluid reservoir. A first portion of a tube can be exterior to the fluid reservoir and a second portion of the tube can be disposed through the opening and within the internal volume. At least one insulation layer can be disposed about the exterior of the first wall of the fluid reservoir. The second wall of the fluid reservoir can be configured for transferring heat from or to the internal volume or from the person. At least one baffle is disposed within the internal volume and connected to the first wall and the second wall of the fluid reservoir.

  6. Understanding the True Stimulated Reservoir Volume in Shale Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Maaruf

    2017-06-06

    Successful exploitation of shale reservoirs largely depends on the effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing stimulation program. Favorable results have been attributed to intersection and reactivation of pre-existing fractures by hydraulically-induced fractures that connect the wellbore to a larger fracture surface area within the reservoir rock volume. Thus, accurate estimation of the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) becomes critical for the reservoir performance simulation and production analysis. Micro-seismic events (MS) have been commonly used as a proxy to map out the SRV geometry, which could be erroneous because not all MS events are related to hydraulic fracture propagation. The case studies discussed here utilized a fully 3-D simulation approach to estimate the SRV. The simulation approach presented in this paper takes into account the real-time changes in the reservoir\\'s geomechanics as a function of fluid pressures. It is consisted of four separate coupled modules: geomechanics, hydrodynamics, a geomechanical joint model for interfacial resolution, and an adaptive re-meshing. Reservoir stress condition, rock mechanical properties, and injected fluid pressure dictate how fracture elements could open or slide. Critical stress intensity factor was used as a fracture criterion governing the generation of new fractures or propagation of existing fractures and their directions. Our simulations were run on a Cray XC-40 HPC system. The studies outcomes proved the approach of using MS data as a proxy for SRV to be significantly flawed. Many of the observed stimulated natural fractures are stress related and very few that are closer to the injection field are connected. The situation is worsened in a highly laminated shale reservoir as the hydraulic fracture propagation is significantly hampered. High contrast in the in-situ stresses related strike-slip developed thereby shortens the extent of SRV. However, far field nature fractures that were not connected to

  7. Geothermal reservoir management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

    1978-02-01

    The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

  8. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  9. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  10. Analysis of injection tests in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.M.

    1984-12-01

    The objective was to develop procedures for analyzing nonisothermal injection test data during the early phases of injection. In particular, methods for determining the permeability-thickness of the formation, skin factor of the well and tracking the movement of the thermal front have been developed. The techniques developed for interpreting injection pressure transients are closely akin to conventional groundwater and petroleum techniques for evaluating these parameters. The approach taken was to numerically simulate injection with a variety of temperatures, reservoir parameters and flowrates, in order to determine the characteristic responses due to nonisothermal injection. Two characteristic responses were identified: moving front dominated behavior and composite reservoir behavior. Analysis procedures for calculating the permeability-thickness of the formation and the skin factor of the well have been developed for each of these cases. In order to interpret the composite reservior behavior, a new concept has been developed; that of a ''fluid skin factor'', which accounts for the steady-state pressure buildup due to the region inside the thermal front. Based on this same concept, a procedure for tracking the movement of the thermal front has been established. The results also identify the dangers of not accounting the nonisothermal effects when analyzing injection test data. Both the permeability-thickness and skin factor of the well can be grossly miscalculated if the effects of the cold-region around the well are not taken into consideration. 47 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

  12. Physical Aspects in Upscaling of Fractured Reservoirs and Improved Oil Recovery Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, H.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with upscaled models for waterflooded naturally fractured reservoirs (NFRs). Naturally fractured petroleum reservoirs provide over 20% of the world’s oil reserves and production. From the fluid-flow point of view, a fractured reservoir is defined as a reservoir in which a

  13. Measurement and Prediction of Volumetric and Transport Properties of Reservoir Fluids At High Pressure Mesure et prédiction des propriétés volumétriques et des propriétés de transport des fluides de gisement à haute pression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sant'ana H. B.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Discoveries of oil and gas fields under severe conditions of temperature (above 150°C or pressure (in excess of 50 MPa have been made in various regions of the world. In the North Sea, production is scheduled from deep reservoirs at 190°C and 110 MPa. This brings with it important challenges for predicting the properties of reservoir fluids, both from an experimental and a theoretical standpoint. In order to perform fluid studies for these reservoir conditions, IFP has developed a specific mercury-free high pressure apparatus with sapphire windows, a phase sampling device and viscosity determination by the capillary tube method. Its application is illustrated here using examples of real fluids and model mixtures. This equipment was first used to measure volumetric properties for gases. It has been shown that very high compressibility factors can be found with HP-HT gas condensates. This has a strong influence on recovery factors during primary depletion. In order to predict more accurately the volumetric properties of mixtures under these conditions, we propose to use a conventional equation of state, such as Peng-Robinson, with two improvements :- a modified temperature-dependent volume translation method, calibrated for high pressure density data; the method is simple, more accurate than other volume translation methods and fully consistent with lumping procedures;- a quadratic mixing rule on the covolume. Specific phase behavior can also be found. At low temperatures, wax crystallization can occur from a fluid which is a gas condensate at reservoir temperature. This feature is due to the simultaneous presence of abundant methane and heavy paraffins. A study of model fluids in a sapphire cell has allowed us to identify the possible types of phase diagrams. Although generally not considered to be an important parameter, gas viscosity may have some importance in the production of HP-HT accumulations, because of high flow rates. Viscosity

  14. Reservoir engineering and hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Summaries are included which show advances in the following areas: fractured porous media, flow in single fractures or networks of fractures, hydrothermal flow, hydromechanical effects, hydrochemical processes, unsaturated-saturated systems, and multiphase multicomponent flows. The main thrust of these efforts is to understand the movement of mass and energy through rocks. This has involved treating fracture rock masses in which the flow phenomena within both the fractures and the matrix must be investigated. Studies also address the complex coupling between aspects of thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository in a fractured rock medium. In all these projects, both numerical modeling and simulation, as well as field studies, were employed. In the theoretical area, a basic understanding of multiphase flow, nonisothermal unsaturated behavior, and new numerical methods have been developed. The field work has involved reservoir testing, data analysis, and case histories at a number of geothermal projects

  15. Fluid circulation and diagenesis of carbonated and sandstone reservoirs in the fronts and fore-lands of folded chains: the Salt Range case - Poswar (Pakistan); Circulation des fluides et diagenese des reservoirs carbonates et greseux dans les fronts de chaines plissees et leur avant pays: le cas du Salt Range - Poswar (Pakistan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchilla, L.

    2003-05-01

    The Salt Range-Poswar Province is located in the western foothills of the Himalayas, in northern Pakistan. It extends over 170 km from the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) in the north to the Salt Range in the south. The Salt Range itself is dominantly an ENE-trending structure, but it comprises also a NNW-trending lateral ramp which connects to the west with the Surghar Range. The Salt Range constitutes the frontal part of a detached allochthonous thrust sheet. The sedimentary cover is indeed entirely detached from its substratum along Infracambrian salt horizons. Palaeozoic to Eocene platform series are well exposed in the hanging wall, whereas Neogene molasse has been extensively under-thrust in the footwall of this large over-thrust. The North Potwar Basin is bordered by the Khari-Murat Ridge and coeval back-thrusts in the south, by the northern flank of the Soan syncline in the southeast, and by the MBT in the north. In addition to Neogene outcrops, it also comprises a number of surface anticlines and thrust fronts along which the Eocene platform carbonates are exposed. The Datta Formation is the main Jurassic oil reservoir in the Potwar Basin. It is a fluvio-deltaic deposit which comprises large porous and permeable channels associated to many-calcareous interbeds. The formations crop out well in both the Nammal and Chichali Gorges. The oil field of Toot, located in the western part of the basin, is producing from this reservoir. The petrographic observations show that diagenesis occurred mainly early and was controlled by the fluvio-deltaic environment. (author)

  16. Measuring fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for measuring the pressure of a fluid having characteristics that make it unsuitable for connection directly to a pressure gauge. The method is particularly suitable for the periodic measurement of the pressure of a supply of liquid Na to Na-lubricated bearings of pumps for pumping Na from a reservoir to the bearing via a filter, the reservoir being contained in a closed vessel containing an inert blanket gas, such as Ar, above the Na. (UK)

  17. Geothermal energy production with supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.

    2003-12-30

    There has been invented a method for producing geothermal energy using supercritical fluids for creation of the underground reservoir, production of the geothermal energy, and for heat transport. Underground reservoirs are created by pumping a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide into a formation to fracture the rock. Once the reservoir is formed, the same supercritical fluid is allowed to heat up and expand, then is pumped out of the reservoir to transfer the heat to a surface power generating plant or other application.

  18. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mella, Michael [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.

    2016-08-31

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate an approach for tracking the evolution of circulation immediately following a hydraulic stimulation in an EGS reservoir. Series of high-resolution tracer tests using conservative and thermally reactive tracers were designed at recently created EGS reservoirs in order to track changes in fluid flow parameters such as reservoir pore volume, flow capacity, and effective reservoir temperature over time. Data obtained from the project would be available for the calibration of reservoir models that could serve to predict EGS performance following a hydraulic stimulation.

  19. Joint distributions for interacting fluid queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Dirk; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    Motivated by recent traffic control models in ATM systems, we analyse three closely related systems of fluid queues, each consisting of two consecutive reservoirs, in which the first reservoir is fed by a two-state (on and off) Markov source. The first system is an ordinary two-node fluid tandem

  20. 14 CFR 125.153 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 125.153 Section 125.153....153 Flammable fluids. (a) No tanks or reservoirs that are a part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be located in designated fire zones, except where the fluid contained, the design of...

  1. Relation of soluble RANKL and osteoprotegerin levels in blood and gingival crevicular fluid to the degree of root resorption after orthodontic tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrovola, J.B.; Halazonetis, D.J.; Makou, M.; Perrea, D.; Dontas, I.; Vlachos, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the determination of the levels of osteoprotegerin and soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-(KB) ligand (RANKL) in blood serum and in gingival crevicular fluid relative to the degree of orthodontic root resorption in a rat model. Blood samples and gingival crevicular fluid were collected from fourteen 6-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 350-500 g. A 25-g closed orthodontic coil spring was inserted between each upper right first molar and the upper incisors. After 21 days of loading, both upper first molars (treated and control) were extracted and studied under microcomputed tomography scanning. Statistical analysis demonstrated a positive linear correlation between the initial concentration of RANKL in blood serum and the degree of root resorption. The ratio of the initial concentrations of osteoprotegerin to RANKL in blood serum proved to be an independent prognostic factor of the degree of root resorption. The initial concentration of RANKL in gingival crevicular fluid showed a negative correlation to the initial concentration of RANKL in blood serum and for a finite range of initial concentrations of osteoprotegerin in gingival crevicular fluid, the dental root seemed protected against extreme external root resorption. Finally, the concentration of osteoprotegerin in blood serum decreased significantly in cases of severe root resorption. (author)

  2. Producing Gas-Oil Ratio Performance of Conventional and Unconventional Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Guowen

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of producing gas-oil ratio performance characteristics from conventional reservoir to unconventional reservoir. Numerical simulations of various reservoir fluid systems are included for comparison. In a wide sense of the word, the term of unconventional reservoir is including tight gas sand, coal bed methane, gas hydrate deposits, heavy oil gas shale and etc. In this study we specify the unconventional reservoir to only mean the low and ultra low permea...

  3. Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, P.

    1989-01-01

    The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

  4. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  5. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced recovery methods have become significant in the industry\\'s drive to increase recovery rates from oil and gas reservoirs. For heavy oil reservoirs, the immobility of the oil at reservoir temperatures, caused by its high viscosity, limits the recovery rates and strains the economic viability of these fields. While thermal recovery methods, such as steam injection or THAI, have extensively been applied in the field, their success has so far been limited due to prohibitive heat losses and the difficulty in controlling the combustion process. Electromagnetic (EM) heating via high-frequency EM radiation has attracted attention due to its wide applicability in different environments, its efficiency, and the improved controllability of the heating process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase recovery rates. Limited research has been undertaken so far to capture the nonlinear reservoir dynamics and significantly varying flow rates for thermally heated heavy oil reservoir that may notably change production rates and render conventional history matching frameworks more challenging. We present a new history matching framework for EM heated heavy oil reservoirs incorporating cross-well seismic imaging. Interfacing an EM heating solver to a reservoir simulator via Andrade’s equation, we couple the system to an ensemble Kalman filter based history matching framework incorporating a cross-well seismic survey module. With increasing power levels and heating applied to the heavy oil reservoirs, reservoir dynamics change considerably and may lead to widely differing production forecasts and increased uncertainty. We have shown that the incorporation of seismic observations into the EnKF framework can significantly enhance reservoir simulations, decrease forecasting

  6. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracture propagation in heterogeneous unconventional reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunting; Li, Mingzhong; Hao, Lihua; Hu, Hang

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of the unconventional reservoir fracture network is influenced by many factors. For the natural fracture undeveloped reservoir, the reservoir heterogeneity, construction factors (fracturing fluid flow rate, fluid viscosity, perforation clusters spacing), horizontal stress difference and stress different coefficient are the main factors that affect the fracture propagation. In the study, first, calculate the reservoir physics mechanics parameters that affect the fracture propagation on the base of the logging date from one actual horizontal well. Set the formation parameters according to the calculation that used to simulate the reservoir heterogeneity. Then, using damage mechanics method, the 2D fracture propagation model with seepage-stress-damage coupling of multi-fracture tight sand reservoir was established. Study the influences of different fracturing ways (open whole fracturing and oriented perforation fracturing) and the position of the perforation clusters to the fracture propagation for heterogeneity reservoir. Analyze the effects of flow rate, fracturing fluid viscosity, perforation clusters spacing, horizontal stress difference and stress different coefficient to fracture morphology for the heterogeneity reservoir and contrast with the homogeneous reservoir. The simulation results show that: the fracture morphology is more complexity formed by oriented perforation crack than open whole crack; For natural fracture undeveloped reservoir, as the flow rate or the fracturing fluid viscosity increases within a certain range, the fracture network tends to be more complexity and the effect is more obvious to heterogeneous reservoir than homogeneous reservoir; As the perforation clusters spacing decreases, the interaction of each fracture will increase, it tends to form more complexity fracture network but with short major fracture; If the horizontal stress difference and stress different coefficient is large (The stress different coefficient >0

  7. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ''lower bound'' solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir

  8. Mechanical behavior of concrete and related porous materials under partial saturation: The effective stress and the viscous softening due to movement of nanometer-scale pore fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahinic, Ivan

    It has been said that porous materials are like music: the gaps are as important as the filled-in bits. In other words, in addition to the solid structure, pore characteristics such as size and morphology play a crucial role in defining the overall physical properties of the porous materials. This work goes a step further and examines the behaviors of some porous media that arise when the pore network is occupied by two fluids, principally air and water, as a result of drying or wetting. Such a state gives rise to fluid capillarity which can generate significant negative fluid pressures. In the first part, a constitutive model for drying of an elastic porous medium is proposed and then extended to derive a novel expression for effective stress in partially saturated media. The model is motivated by the fact that in a system that is saturated by two different fluids, two different pressure inherently act on the surfaces of the pore network. This causes a non-uniform strain field in the solid structure, something that is not explicitly accounted for in the classic formulations of this problem. We use some standard micromechanical homogenization techniques to estimate the extent of the 'non-uniformity' and on this basis, evaluate the validity of the classic Bishop effective stress expression for partially saturated materials. In the second part, we examine a diverse class of porous materials which behave in an unexpected (and even counterintuitive) way under the internal moisture fluctuations. In particular, during wetting and drying alike, the solid viscosity of these materials appears to soften, sometimes by an order of magnitude or more. Under load, this can lead to significantly increased rates of deformations. On account of the recent experimental and theoretical findings on the nature of water flow in nanometer-size hydrophillic spaces, we provide a physical explanation for the viscous softening and propose a constitutive law on this basis. To this end, it also

  9. Antivortex Device for Multi-Outlet Liquid Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Gary David (Inventor); Addison, Stephen Michael (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A liquid reservoir with a sump includes at least two outlet ports in fluid communication with a fluid conduit. An anti-vortex device includes a first plate extending across the at least two outlet ports and a second plate coupled to the first plate and extending substantially perpendicular to the first plate. The anti-vortex device is configured to disrupt formation of a vortex formed by liquid passing from the reservoir through said outlet ports.

  10. Chemical conditions of the Japanese neutral geothermal reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, H.

    1991-01-01

    The aqueous speciation were calculated for fluids of seven Japanese geothermal systems. The aqueous composition as well as CO 2 partial pressure of fluid in neutral pH geothermal reservoir are controlled by silicate, calcite and anhydrite minerals. The chemical composition of neutral pH geothermal reservoir can be predictable if two parameters (e.g. temperature and one of the cation activities) are provided. (author)

  11. Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

  12. Borehole radar modeling for reservoir monitoring applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of down-hole sensors and remotely controlled valves in wells provide enormous benefits to reservoir management and oil production. We suggest borehole radar measurements as a promising technique capable of monitoring the arrival of undesired fluids in the proximity of production wells. The

  13. Reservoir fisheries of Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.S. De.

    1990-01-01

    At a workshop on reservoir fisheries research, papers were presented on the limnology of reservoirs, the changes that follow impoundment, fisheries management and modelling, and fish culture techniques. Separate abstracts have been prepared for three papers from this workshop

  14. Large reservoirs: Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2010-01-01

    Large impoundments, defined as those with surface area of 200 ha or greater, are relatively new aquatic ecosystems in the global landscape. They represent important economic and environmental resources that provide benefits such as flood control, hydropower generation, navigation, water supply, commercial and recreational fisheries, and various other recreational and esthetic values. Construction of large impoundments was initially driven by economic needs, and ecological consequences received little consideration. However, in recent decades environmental issues have come to the forefront. In the closing decades of the 20th century societal values began to shift, especially in the developed world. Society is no longer willing to accept environmental damage as an inevitable consequence of human development, and it is now recognized that continued environmental degradation is unsustainable. Consequently, construction of large reservoirs has virtually stopped in North America. Nevertheless, in other parts of the world construction of large reservoirs continues. The emergence of systematic reservoir management in the early 20th century was guided by concepts developed for natural lakes (Miranda 1996). However, we now recognize that reservoirs are different and that reservoirs are not independent aquatic systems inasmuch as they are connected to upstream rivers and streams, the downstream river, other reservoirs in the basin, and the watershed. Reservoir systems exhibit longitudinal patterns both within and among reservoirs. Reservoirs are typically arranged sequentially as elements of an interacting network, filter water collected throughout their watersheds, and form a mosaic of predictable patterns. Traditional approaches to fisheries management such as stocking, regulating harvest, and in-lake habitat management do not always produce desired effects in reservoirs. As a result, managers may expend resources with little benefit to either fish or fishing. Some locally

  15. Stochastic Reservoir Characterization Constrained by Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eide, Alfhild Lien

    1999-07-01

    In order to predict future production of oil and gas from a petroleum reservoir, it is important to have a good description of the reservoir in terms of geometry and physical parameters. This description is used as input to large numerical models for the fluid flow in the reservoir. With increased quality of seismic data, it is becoming possible to extend their use from the study of large geologic structures such as seismic horizons to characterization of the properties of the reservoir between the horizons. Uncertainties because of the low resolution of seismic data can be successfully handled by means of stochastic modeling, and spatial statistics can provide tools for interpolation and simulation of reservoir properties not completely resolved by seismic data. This thesis deals with stochastic reservoir modeling conditioned to seismic data and well data. Part I presents a new model for stochastic reservoir characterization conditioned to seismic traces. Part II deals with stochastic simulation of high resolution impedance conditioned to measured impedance. Part III develops a new stochastic model for calcite cemented objects in a sandstone background; it is a superposition of a marked point model for the calcites and a continuous model for the background.

  16. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jingjing; Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2017-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2016 publications on the focus of the following sections: Stream, lake, and reservoir management • Water quality of stream, lake, and reservoirReservoir operations • Models of stream, lake, and reservoir • Remediation and restoration of stream, lake, and reservoir • Biota of stream, lake, and reservoir • Climate effect of stream, lake, and reservoir.

  17. Reflection Phenomena in Underground Pumped Storage Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pummer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy storage through hydropower leads to free surface water waves in the connected reservoirs. The reason for this is the movement of water between reservoirs at different elevations, which is necessary for electrical energy storage. Currently, the expansion of renewable energies requires the development of fast and flexible energy storage systems, of which classical pumped storage plants are the only technically proven and cost-effective technology and are the most used. Instead of classical pumped storage plants, where reservoirs are located on the surface, underground pumped storage plants with subsurface reservoirs could be an alternative. They are independent of topography and have a low surface area requirement. This can be a great advantage for energy storage expansion in case of environmental issues, residents’ concerns and an unusable terrain surface. However, the reservoirs of underground pumped storage plants differ in design from classical ones for stability and space reasons. The hydraulic design is essential to ensure their satisfactory hydraulic performance. The paper presents a hybrid model study, which is defined here as a combination of physical and numerical modelling to use the advantages and to compensate for the disadvantages of the respective methods. It shows the analysis of waves in ventilated underground reservoir systems with a great length to height ratio, considering new operational aspects from energy supply systems with a great percentage of renewable energies. The multifaceted and narrow design of the reservoirs leads to complex free surface flows; for example, undular and breaking bores arise. The results show excessive wave heights through wave reflections, caused by the impermeable reservoir boundaries. Hence, their knowledge is essential for a successful operational and constructive design of the reservoirs.

  18. Reservoir evaluation of “T-X” field (Onshore, Niger delta) from well ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wireline log analysis was employed in the characterization of the reservoirs in the well studied; the hydrocarbon sands were delineated by the use of gamma ray, resistivity and density/neutron from which the reservoir quality were determined. Fluid types defined in the reservoirs on the basis of neutron/density log ...

  19. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  20. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  1. Integration of rock typing methods for carbonate reservoir characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliakbardoust, E; Rahimpour-Bonab, H

    2013-01-01

    Reservoir rock typing is the most important part of all reservoir modelling. For integrated reservoir rock typing, static and dynamic properties need to be combined, but sometimes these two are incompatible. The failure is due to the misunderstanding of the crucial parameters that control the dynamic behaviour of the reservoir rock and thus selecting inappropriate methods for defining static rock types. In this study, rock types were defined by combining the SCAL data with the rock properties, particularly rock fabric and pore types. First, air-displacing-water capillary pressure curues were classified because they are representative of fluid saturation and behaviour under capillary forces. Next the most important rock properties which control the fluid flow and saturation behaviour (rock fabric and pore types) were combined with defined classes. Corresponding petrophysical properties were also attributed to reservoir rock types and eventually, defined rock types were compared with relative permeability curves. This study focused on representing the importance of the pore system, specifically pore types in fluid saturation and entrapment in the reservoir rock. The most common tests in static rock typing, such as electrofacies analysis and porosity–permeability correlation, were carried out and the results indicate that these are not appropriate approaches for reservoir rock typing in carbonate reservoirs with a complicated pore system. (paper)

  2. Multi Data Reservoir History Matching using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2015-05-01

    Reservoir history matching is becoming increasingly important with the growing demand for higher quality formation characterization and forecasting and the increased complexity and expenses for modern hydrocarbon exploration projects. History matching has long been dominated by adjusting reservoir parameters based solely on well data whose spatial sparse sampling has been a challenge for characterizing the flow properties in areas away from the wells. Geophysical data are widely collected nowadays for reservoir monitoring purposes, but has not yet been fully integrated into history matching and forecasting fluid flow. In this thesis, I present a pioneering approach towards incorporating different time-lapse geophysical data together for enhancing reservoir history matching and uncertainty quantification. The thesis provides several approaches to efficiently integrate multiple geophysical data, analyze the sensitivity of the history matches to observation noise, and examine the framework’s performance in several settings, such as the Norne field in Norway. The results demonstrate the significant improvements in reservoir forecasting and characterization and the synergy effects encountered between the different geophysical data. In particular, the joint use of electromagnetic and seismic data improves the accuracy of forecasting fluid properties, and the usage of electromagnetic data has led to considerably better estimates of hydrocarbon fluid components. For volatile oil and gas reservoirs the joint integration of gravimetric and InSAR data has shown to be beneficial in detecting the influx of water and thereby improving the recovery rate. Summarizing, this thesis makes an important contribution towards integrated reservoir management and multiphysics integration for reservoir history matching.

  3. 14 CFR 29.1185 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 29.1185 Section 29.1185... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 29.1185 Flammable fluids. (a) No tank or reservoir that is part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be in a...

  4. 14 CFR 121.255 - Flammable fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flammable fluids. 121.255 Section 121.255..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.255 Flammable fluids. (a) No tanks or reservoirs that are a part of a system containing flammable fluids or gases may be located in...

  5. Markov-modulated and feedback fluid queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    1998-01-01

    In the last twenty years the field of Markov-modulated fluid queues has received considerable attention. In these models a fluid reservoir receives and/or releases fluid at rates which depend on the actual state of a background Markov chain. In the first chapter of this thesis we give a short

  6. A Study of the Optimal Planning Model for Reservoir Sustainable Management- A Case Study of Shihmen Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The reservoir management in Taiwan faces lots of challenge. Massive sediment caused by landslide were flushed into reservoir, which will decrease capacity, rise the turbidity, and increase supply risk. Sediment usually accompanies nutrition that will cause eutrophication problem. Moreover, the unevenly distribution of rainfall cause water supply instability. Hence, how to ensure sustainable use of reservoirs has become an important task in reservoir management. The purpose of the study is developing an optimal planning model for reservoir sustainable management to find out an optimal operation rules of reservoir flood control and sediment sluicing. The model applies Genetic Algorithms to combine with the artificial neural network of hydraulic analysis and reservoir sediment movement. The main objective of operation rules in this study is to prevent reservoir outflow caused downstream overflow, minimum the gap between initial and last water level of reservoir, and maximum sluicing sediment efficiency. A case of Shihmen reservoir was used to explore the different between optimal operating rule and the current operation of the reservoir. The results indicate optimal operating rules tended to open desilting tunnel early and extend open duration during flood discharge period. The results also show the sluicing sediment efficiency of optimal operating rule is 36%, 44%, 54% during Typhoon Jangmi, Typhoon Fung-Wong, and Typhoon Sinlaku respectively. The results demonstrate the optimal operation rules do play a role in extending the service life of Shihmen reservoir and protecting the safety of downstream. The study introduces a low cost strategy, alteration of operation reservoir rules, into reservoir sustainable management instead of pump dredger in order to improve the problem of elimination of reservoir sediment and high cost.

  7. Iodine-129 chronological study of brines from an Ordovician paleokarst reservoir in the Lunnan oilfield, Tarim Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Dayong; Peng, Ping'an; Ning, Chen; Xiaolin, Hou; Baoshou, Zhang; Zhongyao, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that brines in an Ordovician paleokarst reservoir of the Lunnan oilfield in the Tarim Basin, China, are the product of mixing of paleo-evaporated seawater in the east with paleometeoric waters in the west. In order to put time constraints on the brine and related hydrocarbons in this field, 10 brine samples were collected, for which the iodine concentrations and 129 I/I ratios were measured and discussed. The iodine concentration (3.70–31.2 mg/L) and the 129 I/I ratio (189–897 × 10 −15 ) show that the iodine in the paleoseawater and meteoric water (MW) had different origins and 129 I characteristics. The paleoseawater has a high iodine content (∼31 mg/L), indicating that iodine was introduced into the reservoir along with thermally generated hydrocarbons, possibly in the Cretaceous, from the Caohu Sag in the eastern area. Based on consideration of all possible origins of iodine and 129 I in the brines, it is suggested that the meteoric water maintained its initial iodine content (0.01 mg/L) and 129 I/I ratio (1500 × 10 −15 ), whereas the iodine-enriched paloseawater (IPSW) exhibited a secular 129 I equilibrium (N sq  = 39 atom/μL) as a result of fissiogenic 129 I input in the reservoir over a long period of time. The model of brine evolution developed on that basis confirmed that meteoric water entered the reservoir in the Miocene at about 10 Ma, and partially mixed with the iodine-enriched paleoseawater. The movement of meteoric water was facilitated by faults created during the Himalayan orogeny, then became more dense after dissolving Paleogene halite and infiltrated into the reservoir at high pressure. The iodine and 129 I concentration in the brine contains information about the path and history of the fluid in the reservoir. This may be useful in oil exploration, since the movement of water was, to some extent, related to hydrocarbon migration. - Highlights: • A 129 I chronological study of deep oilfield

  8. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  9. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    Conventional reservoir simulation and modeling is a bottom-up approach. It starts with building a geological model of the reservoir that is populated with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid flow principles are added and solved numerically so as to arrive at a dynamic reservoir model. The dynamic reservoir model is calibrated using the production history of multiple wells and the history matched model is used to strategize field development in order to improve recovery. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling approaches the reservoir simulation and modeling from an opposite angle by attempting to build a realization of the reservoir starting with the measured well production behavior (history). The production history is augmented by core, log, well test and seismic data in order to increase the accuracy of the Top-Down modeling technique. Although not intended as a substitute for the conventional reservoir simulation of large, complex fields, this novel approach to reservoir modeling can be used as an alternative (at a fraction of the cost) to conventional reservoir simulation and modeling in cases where performing conventional modeling is cost (and man-power) prohibitive. In cases where a conventional model of a reservoir already exists, Top-Down modeling should be considered as a compliment to, rather than a competition for the conventional technique, to provide an independent look at the data coming from the reservoir/wells for optimum development strategy and recovery enhancement. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling starts with well-known reservoir engineering techniques such as Decline Curve Analysis, Type Curve Matching, History Matching using single well numerical reservoir simulation, Volumetric Reserve Estimation and calculation of Recovery Factors for all the wells (individually) in the field. Using statistical techniques multiple Production Indicators (3, 6, and 9 months cum

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  11. Flow of a stream through a reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, K.

    1967-01-01

    that of the bottom of the reservoir. However, the strong fluctuations between the day and night temperatures of the reservoir water produced marked rolling movements. Comparisons were made with simultaneously performed dye and salt experiments, but the four isotope experiments carried out at different seasons were found to be more suitable than the other procedures for investigating limnological processes and evaluating them quantitatively. (author)

  12. Analysis of birth-death fluid queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Erik A.; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a survey of techniques for analysing the performance of a reservoir which receives and releases fluid at rates which are determined by the state of a background birth-death process. The reservoir is assumed to be infinitely large, but the state space of the modulating birth-death process

  13. Reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.; Schechter, R.S.

    1992-03-01

    The research in this annual report falls into three tasks each dealing with a different aspect of enhanced oil recovery. The first task strives to develop procedures for accurately modeling reservoirs for use as input to numerical simulation flow models. This action describes how we have used a detail characterization of an outcrop to provide insights into what features are important to fluid flow modeling. The second task deals with scaling-up and modeling chemical and solvent EOR processes. In a sense this task is the natural extension of task 1 and, in fact, one of the subtasks uses many of the same statistical procedures for insight into the effects of viscous fingering and heterogeneity. The final task involves surfactants and their interactions with carbon dioxide and reservoir minerals. This research deals primarily with phenomena observed when aqueous surfactant solutions are injected into oil reservoirs.

  14. Systems and methods for multi-fluid geothermal energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2017-09-19

    A method for extracting geothermal energy from a geothermal reservoir formation. A production well is used to extract brine from the reservoir formation. At least one of nitrogen (N.sub.2) and carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) may be used to form a supplemental working fluid which may be injected into a supplemental working fluid injection well. The supplemental working fluid may be used to augment a pressure of the reservoir formation, to thus drive a flow of the brine out from the reservoir formation.

  15. Application d'une équation d'état à la simulation du comportement thermodynamique des fluides dans les gisements et dans les installations de surface Application of an Equation of State to Simulating the Thermodynamic Behaviour of Fluids in Reservoirs and Surface Installations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La connaissance des propriétés thermodynamiques des fluides pétroliers, en particulier des masses volumiques et des coefficients d'équilibre liquide-vapeur, intervient à divers stades de la production : primaire, secondaire par in-jection de gaz (C02 ou hydrocarbures miscibles, vapeur d'eau, séparation, réseau de collecte et de transport. L'ampleur du domaine de pression et de température à l'intérieur duquel on a besoin de connaître les propriétés des huiles et des gaz à condensat, et le fait que la compo-sition d'ensemble des mélanges diphasiques ne cesse de varier au cours de leur déplacement soit dans les gisements, soit dans les installations d'exploitation, rendent mani-feste l'intérêt de pouvoir calculer ces propriétés, en évi-tant d'avoir recours à des travaux de laboratoire beaucoup trop importants. Pour résoudre ces problèmes, une nouvelle équation d'état appelée Redlich-Kwong Développée (RKD a été mise au point. Au cours de cet exposé, nous verrons que cette équation restitue les enveloppes diphasiques de l'équilibre liquide-vapeur avec une qualité au moins égale à celles des méthodes de Soave et de Peng-Robinson qui jouissent actuellement d'une grande notoriété. L'avantage de ce modèle sur ces dernières méthodes est l'évaluation simultanée des propriétés volumétriques des phases en présence avec une bonne précision, ce qui est d'une grande utilité pour l'application de ce modèle aux problèmes industriels. Knowing the thermodynamic properties of petroleum fluids, and in particular the density and liquid-vapor equilibrium coefficients, is important at different stages of production, i. e. primary production, secondary production by gas flooding (CO2 or miscible hydrocarbons, steam, separation, gathering network and transportation. The pressure and temperature range within which the oil and gas-condensate properties must be known coupled with the fact that the overall composition of

  16. Transport of reservoir fines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Modeling transport of reservoir fines is of great importance for evaluating the damage of production wells and infectivity decline. The conventional methodology accounts for neither the formation heterogeneity around the wells nor the reservoir fines’ heterogeneity. We have developed an integral...

  17. SILTATION IN RESERVOIRS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calls have been made to the government through various media to assist its populace in combating this nagging problem. It was concluded that sediment maximum accumulation is experienced in reservoir during the periods of maximum flow. Keywords: reservoir model, siltation, sediment, catchment, sediment transport. 1.

  18. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady

  19. Reservoir Engineering Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

    1977-12-14

    The Reservoir Engineering Management Program being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory includes two major tasks: 1) the continuation of support to geothermal reservoir engineering related work, started under the NSF-RANN program and transferred to ERDA at the time of its formation; 2) the development and subsequent implementation of a broad plan for support of research in topics related to the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs. This plan is now known as the GREMP plan. Both the NSF-RANN legacies and GREMP are in direct support of the DOE/DGE mission in general and the goals of the Resource and Technology/Resource Exploitation and Assessment Branch in particular. These goals are to determine the magnitude and distribution of geothermal resources and reduce risk in their exploitation through improved understanding of generically different reservoir types. These goals are to be accomplished by: 1) the creation of a large data base about geothermal reservoirs, 2) improved tools and methods for gathering data on geothermal reservoirs, and 3) modeling of reservoirs and utilization options. The NSF legacies are more research and training oriented, and the GREMP is geared primarily to the practical development of the geothermal reservoirs. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. Directional acceleration vector-driven displacement of fluids (DAVD-DOF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Feeback, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Centrifugal analyzer and method for staining biological or non-biological samples in microgravity, wherein the method utilizes an increase in weight of a fluid sample as a function of g-load, to overcome cohesive and frictional forces from preventing its movement in a preselected direction. Apparatus is characterized by plural specimen reservoirs and channels in a slide, each channel being of differing cross-section, wherein respective samples are selectively dispensed, from the reservoirs in response to an imposed g-factor, precedent to sample staining. Within the method, one thus employs microscope slides which define channels, each being of a differing cross-section dimension relative to others. In combination therewith, centrifugal slide mounting apparatus controllably imposes g-vectors of differing magnitudes within a defined structure of the centrifuge such as a chip array.

  1. Physical Model-Based Investigation of Reservoir Sedimentation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chia Huang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation is a serious problem in the operations of reservoirs. In Taiwan, the situation became worse after the Chi-Chi Earthquake recorded on 21 September 1999. The sediment trap efficiency in several regional reservoirs has been sharply increased, adversely affecting the operations on water supplies. According to the field record, the average annual sediment deposition observed in several regional reservoirs in Taiwan has been increased. For instance, the typhoon event recorded in 2008 at the Wushe Reservoir, Taiwan, produced a 3 m sediment deposit upstream of the dam. The remaining storage capacity in the Wushe Reservoir was reduced to 35.9% or a volume of 53.79 million m3 for flood water detention in 2010. It is urgent that research should be conducted to understand the sediment movement in the Wushe Reservoir. In this study, a scale physical model was built to reproduce the flood flow through the reservoir, investigate the long-term depositional pattern, and evaluate sediment trap efficiency. This allows us to estimate the residual life of the reservoir by proposing a modification of Brune’s method. It can be presented to predict the lifespan of Taiwan reservoirs due to higher applicability in both the physical model and the observed data.

  2. Are Geotehrmal Reservoirs Stressed Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Laboso, R. C.; Layland-Bachmann, C. E.; Feigl, K. L.; Foxall, W.; Tabrez, A. R.; Mellors, R. J.; Templeton, D. C.; Akerley, J.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal permeability can be strongly influenced by developing connected networks of open fractures. However, the detailed evolution of a fracture network, its extent, and the persistence of fracture porosity are difficult to analyze. Even in fault-hosted geothermal systems, where heat is brought to the surface from depth along a fault, hydrothermal flow is heterogeneously distributed. This is presumably due to variations in fracture density, connectivity, and attitude, as well as variations in fracture permeability caused by sealing of fractures by precipitated cements or compaction. At the Brady Geothermal field in Nevada, we test the relationship between the modeled local stress state perturbed by dislocations representing fault slip or volume changes in the geothermal reservoir inferred from surface deformation measured by InSAR and the location of successful geothermal wells, hydrothermal activity, and seismicity. We postulate that permeability is favored in volumes that experience positive Coulomb stress changes and reduced compression, which together promote high densities of dilatant fractures. Conversely, permeability can be inhibited in locations where Coulomb stress is reduced, compression promotes compaction, or where the faults are poorly oriented in the stress field and consequently slip infrequently. Over geologic time scales spanning the development of the fault system, these local stress states are strongly influenced by the geometry of the fault network relative to the remote stress driving slip. At shorter time scales, changes in fluid pressure within the fracture network constituting the reservoir cause elastic dilations and contractions. We integrate: (1) direct observations of stress state and fractures in boreholes and the mapped geometry of the fault network; (2) evidence of permeability from surface hydrothermal features, production/injection wells and surface deformations related to pumping history; and (3) seismicity to test the

  3. Sediment management for reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.

    2005-01-01

    All natural lakes and reservoirs whether on rivers, tributaries or off channel storages are doomed to be sited up. Pakistan has two major reservoirs of Tarbela and Managla and shallow lake created by Chashma Barrage. Tarbela and Mangla Lakes are losing their capacities ever since first impounding, Tarbela since 1974 and Mangla since 1967. Tarbela Reservoir receives average annual flow of about 62 MAF and sediment deposits of 0.11 MAF whereas Mangla gets about 23 MAF of average annual flows and is losing its storage at the rate of average 34,000 MAF annually. The loss of storage is a great concern and studies for Tarbela were carried out by TAMS and Wallingford to sustain its capacity whereas no study has been done for Mangla as yet except as part of study for Raised Mangla, which is only desk work. Delta of Tarbala reservoir has advanced to about 6.59 miles (Pivot Point) from power intakes. In case of liquefaction of delta by tremor as low as 0.12g peak ground acceleration the power tunnels I, 2 and 3 will be blocked. Minimum Pool of reservoir is being raised so as to check the advance of delta. Mangla delta will follow the trend of Tarbela. Tarbela has vast amount of data as reservoir is surveyed every year, whereas Mangla Reservoir survey was done at five-year interval, which has now been proposed .to be reduced to three-year interval. In addition suspended sediment sampling of inflow streams is being done by Surface Water Hydrology Project of WAPDA as also some bed load sampling. The problem of Chasma Reservoir has also been highlighted, as it is being indiscriminately being filled up and drawdown several times a year without regard to its reaction to this treatment. The Sediment Management of these reservoirs is essential and the paper discusses pros and cons of various alternatives. (author)

  4. Numerical modeling of shear stimulation in naturally fractured geothermal reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Ucar, Eren

    2018-01-01

    Shear-dilation-based hydraulic stimulations are conducted to create enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) from low permeable geothermal reservoirs, which are initially not amenable to energy production. Reservoir stimulations are done by injecting low-pressurized fluid into the naturally fractured formations. The injection aims to activate critically stressed fractures by decreasing frictional strength and ultimately cause a shear failure. The shear failure leads to a permanent ...

  5. Protest movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucht, D.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes the development of protest movements in postwar Germay and outlines two essential overlapping 'flow cycles'. The first of these was characterised by the restaurative postwar years. It culminated and ended in the students' revolt. This revolt is at the same time the start of a second cycle of protest which encompasses all subsequent individual movement and is initated by an economic, political and sociocultural procrastination of modernisation. This cycle culminates in the late 70s and early 80s and clearly lost momentum over the last few years. The follwoing phases and themes are described profoundly: against restauration and armament in the 1950; the revolutionary impatience of the students' movement, politisation of everyday life by the womens' movement and citizens' action groups, antinuclear- and ecological movement, differentiation and stabilisation of the movement in the 70s and 80s; break-up and continuity in the German protest behaviour. The paper contains a detailed chronicle of protest activities since 1945. (orig.) [de

  6. Fracture Propagation, Fluid Flow, and Geomechanics of Water-Based Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Systems and Electromagnetic Geophysical Monitoring of Fluid Migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihoon; Um, Evan; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fracture propagation induced by hydraulic fracturing with water injection, using numerical simulation. For rigorous, full 3D modeling, we employ a numerical method that can model failure resulting from tensile and shear stresses, dynamic nonlinear permeability, leak-off in all directions, and thermo-poro-mechanical effects with the double porosity approach. Our numerical results indicate that fracture propagation is not the same as propagation of the water front, because fracturing is governed by geomechanics, whereas water saturation is determined by fluid flow. At early times, the water saturation front is almost identical to the fracture tip, suggesting that the fracture is mostly filled with injected water. However, at late times, advance of the water front is retarded compared to fracture propagation, yielding a significant gap between the water front and the fracture top, which is filled with reservoir gas. We also find considerable leak-off of water to the reservoir. The inconsistency between the fracture volume and the volume of injected water cannot properly calculate the fracture length, when it is estimated based on the simple assumption that the fracture is fully saturated with injected water. As an example of flow-geomechanical responses, we identify pressure fluctuation under constant water injection, because hydraulic fracturing is itself a set of many failure processes, in which pressure consistently drops when failure occurs, but fluctuation decreases as the fracture length grows. We also study application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods, because these methods are highly sensitive to changes in porosity and pore-fluid properties due to water injection into gas reservoirs. Employing a 3D finite-element EM geophysical simulator, we evaluate the sensitivity of the crosswell EM method for monitoring fluid movements in shaly reservoirs. For this sensitivity evaluation, reservoir models are generated through the coupled flow

  7. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  8. Editorial: Body Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Assuncao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the juxtaposition between physical bodies and the gameworld is ever more fluid. Virtual Reality headsets are available at game stores with more AAA games being created for the format. The release of the Nintendo Switch and its dynamic JoyCon controllers reintroduce haptic movement based controls.  Pokémon GO’s augmented reality took gamers outdoors and has encouraged the Harry Potter franchise to follow in its mobile footsteps. Each development encourages a step further into the digital world. At the same time, the movement of bodies always has political dimensions. We live in a world where walls seem like solutions to the movement of bodies, while the mere meeting of bodies elsewhere – for sex, marriage and other reasons – is still forbidden by many states’ rules. Games and game-like interfaces have shown the ability to bend those rules, and to sometimes project other worlds and rule systems over our world in order to make bodies move and meet. For this special issue on ‘Body Movements’, Press Start invited authors to focus on embodiment, body movements, political bodies, community bodies, virtual bodies, physical bodies, feminine, masculine, trans- bodies, agency or its lack, and anything else in between. The response to this invitation was variegated, and provocative, as outlined here.

  9. PRESSURE ANALYSIS AND FLUID CONTACT PREDICTION FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As pressure data was not acquired in the water leg of the reservoir, pressure gradient analysis was done with the field-wide hydrostatic profile for contact and fluid prediction. Also, an evaluation of the possibility of having an oil rim within the region of fluid-type uncertainty was carried out. The predicted results revealed that ...

  10. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear......Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...

  11. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well define...

  12. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  13. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  14. Estudo da movimentação de plantas aquáticas imersas presentes no reservatório da UHE Eng. Souza Dias - Jupiá Movement of submerged aquatic weeds in UHE Eng. Souza Dias reservoir - Jupiá, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martins

    2005-06-01

    11 bóias com deslocamento superior a 500 m. Os sítios de reprodução localizados no rio Paraná também contribuíram para o fornecimento de plantas imersas ao reservatório de Jupiá; nove blocos saíram da "Lagoa Pernilongo" e apresentaram deslocamentos superiores a 500 m. Entretanto, os sítios "Lagoa Barrenta" e "Lagoa Ferradura" foram aqueles que mais contribuíram com a chegada de plantas na tomada de água da UHE Eng. Souza Dias, uma vez que foram recolhidos, respectivamente, seis e quatro blocos de plantas provenientes desses locais de dispersão. A metodologia utilizada mostrou-se eficaz quanto à avaliação da movimentação de plantas aquáticas imersas dentro do reservatório de Jupiá.The purpose of this research was to develop a methodology to determine reproduction sites and respective importance on dissemination of E. densa, E. najas and C. demersum in the Jupiá Reservoir in Brazil. Ten sites with high incidence of these aquatic plant were monitored. Two sites were located at the Paraná River on "Ferradura"and "Pernilongo" Lakes, called "Testemunha", "Barrenta", "Vírgula" and "Florida", and on bed river points " Leito Acima da ponte", Abaixo da Ponte", " Baia ao lado da Ponte " and Praia de Itapura". Ten blocs of aquatic plants were released per month and monitored in each reproduction site. The blocs had a volume of 0.14 cm³ and had an external plastic label and an orange identification buoy to be easily located and inspected at long distances. After being released, the blocs were geo-referenced and their movements evaluated every fifteen days using a GPS equipment. The places "Vírgula Lake", "Testemunha Lake"and "Barrenta Lake" showed an outstanding number of blocs (30, 20 and 19 blocs, respectively that moved for distances farther than 500 m and, consequently, left their respective sites of reproduction. Most blocs remained inside the "Flórida Lake" and only 12 blocs reached the bed of the Tietê river. The site "Acima da Ponte" supplied

  15. Fault seal analysis to predict the compartmentalization of gas reservoir: Case study of Steenkool formation Bintuni Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanjar, W. C. B.; Haris, A.; Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    This study is aimed to analyze the mechanism of hydrocarbons trapping in the field on a relatively new play in the Bintuni basin particularly Steenkool formation. The first well in this field has been drilled with a shallow target in the Steenkool formation and the drilling is managed to find new gas reserves in the shale-sandstone layer. In the structure of this gas discovery, there is the potential barrier for compartmentalization that draws attention to analyze how the patterns of structural of fault become a part of reservoir compartment. In order to measure the risk associated with prospects on a field bounded by faults, it is important to understand the processes that contribute to fault seal. The method of Fault Seal Analysis (FSA) is one of the methods used for the analysis of the nature of a fault whether the fault is sealing or leaking the fluid flow in the reservoir. Trapping systems that are limited by faults play an important role in creating a trap of hydrocarbon. The ability of a fault to seal fluid is quantitatively reflected by the value of Shale Gouge Ratio (SGR). SGR is the calculation of the amount of fine-grained material that fills fault plane (fault gouge) as a result of the movement mechanism of fault. The result of this study is a valuable resource for the systematic evaluation of the analysis of hydrocarbon prospects in the field.

  16. Reservoir structure and geological setting of the shallow PEON gas reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Mikalsen, Håkon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the petroleum industry started to look for new, unconventional energy resources. Peon, a shallow gas discovery in the northern North Sea, are being assessed as a possible energy resource. However, there are challenges related to reservoir pressure, sealing mechanism, and fluid migration. In this regard, geophysical and well log analyses is figured out to get a better understanding of the depositional regime and stratigraphy in the Peon area, as well as the structure of Peon a...

  17. Modeling reservoir geomechanics using discrete element method : Application to reservoir monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alassi, Haitham Tayseer

    2008-09-15

    Understanding reservoir geomechanical behavior is becoming more and more important for the petroleum industry. Reservoir compaction, which may result in surface subsidence and fault reactivation, occurs during reservoir depletion. Stress changes and possible fracture development inside and outside a depleting reservoir can be monitored using time-lapse (so-called '4D') seismic and/or passive seismic, and this can give valuable information about the conditions of a given reservoir during production. In this study we will focus on using the (particle-based) Discrete Element Method (DEM) to model reservoir geomechanical behavior during depletion and fluid injection. We show in this study that DEM can be used in modeling reservoir geomechanical behavior by comparing results obtained from DEM to those obtained from analytical solutions. The match of the displacement field between DEM and the analytical solution is good, however there is mismatch of the stress field which is related to the way stress is measured in DEM. A good match is however obtained by measuring the stress field carefully. We also use DEM to model reservoir geomechanical behavior beyond the elasticity limit where fractures can develop and faults can reactivate. A general technique has been developed to relate DEM parameters to rock properties. This is necessary in order to use correct reservoir geomechanical properties during modeling. For any type of particle packing there is a limitation that the maximum ratio between P- and S-wave velocity Vp/Vs that can be modeled is 3 . The static behavior for a loose packing is different from the dynamic behavior. Empirical relations are needed for the static behavior based on numerical test observations. The dynamic behavior for both dense and loose packing can be given by analytical relations. Cosserat continuum theory is needed to derive relations for Vp and Vs. It is shown that by constraining the particle rotation, the S-wave velocity can be

  18. Integrating gravimetric and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for enhancing reservoir history matching of carbonate gas and volatile oil reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2016-08-25

    Reservoir history matching is assuming a critical role in understanding reservoir characteristics, tracking water fronts, and forecasting production. While production data have been incorporated for matching reservoir production levels and estimating critical reservoir parameters, the sparse spatial nature of this dataset limits the efficiency of the history matching process. Recently, gravimetry techniques have significantly advanced to the point of providing measurement accuracy in the microgal range and consequently can be used for the tracking of gas displacement caused by water influx. While gravity measurements provide information on subsurface density changes, i.e., the composition of the reservoir, these data do only yield marginal information about temporal displacements of oil and inflowing water. We propose to complement gravimetric data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar surface deformation data to exploit the strong pressure deformation relationship for enhancing fluid flow direction forecasts. We have developed an ensemble Kalman-filter-based history matching framework for gas, gas condensate, and volatile oil reservoirs, which synergizes time-lapse gravity and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for improved reservoir management and reservoir forecasts. Based on a dual state-parameter estimation algorithm separating the estimation of static reservoir parameters from the dynamic reservoir parameters, our numerical experiments demonstrate that history matching gravity measurements allow monitoring the density changes caused by oil-gas phase transition and water influx to determine the saturation levels, whereas the interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements help to improve the forecasts of hydrocarbon production and water displacement directions. The reservoir estimates resulting from the dual filtering scheme are on average 20%-40% better than those from the joint estimation scheme, but require about a 30% increase in

  19. The Coupling Effect of Rainfall and Reservoir Water Level Decline on the Baijiabao Landslide in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenghao Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall and reservoir level fluctuation are two of the main factors contributing to reservoir landslides. However, in China’s Three Gorges Reservoir Area, when the reservoir water level fluctuates significantly, it comes at a time of abundant rainfall, which makes it difficult to distinguish which factor dominates the deformation of the landslide. This study focuses on how rainfall and reservoir water level decline affect the seepage and displacement field of Baijiabao landslide spatially and temporally during drawdown of reservoir water level in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, thus exploring its movement mechanism. The monitoring data of the landslide in the past 10 years were analyzed, and the correlation between rainfall, reservoir water level decline, and landslide displacement was clarified. By the numerical simulation method, the deformation evolution mechanism of this landslide during drawdown of reservoir water level was revealed, respectively, under three conditions, namely, rainfall, reservoir water level decline, and coupling of the above two conditions. The results showed that the deformation of the Baijiabao landslide was the coupling effect of rainfall and reservoir water level decline, while the latter effect is more pronounced.

  20. Optimising reservoir operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Long le

    Anvendelse af optimeringsteknik til drift af reservoirer er blevet et væsentligt element i vandressource-planlægning og -forvaltning. Traditionelt har reservoirer været styret af heuristiske procedurer for udtag af vand, suppleret i en vis udstrækning af subjektive beslutninger. Udnyttelse af...... reservoirer involverer en lang række interessenter med meget forskellige formål (f.eks. kunstig vanding, vandkraft, vandforsyning mv.), og optimeringsteknik kan langt bedre lede frem til afbalancerede løsninger af de ofte modstridende interesser. Afhandlingen foreslår en række tiltag, hvormed traditionelle...... driftsstrategier kan erstattes af optimale strategier baseret på den nyeste udvikling indenfor computer-baserede beregninger. Hovedbidraget i afhandlingen er udviklingen af et beregningssystem, hvori en simuleringsmodel er koblet til en model for optimering af nogle udvalgte beslutningsvariable, der i særlig grad...

  1. Production Decline Analysis for Two-Phase Flow in Multifractured Horizontal Well in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Wei-Yang; Li, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Tan, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Jun-Chao; Wang, Hai-Tao

    2015-01-01

    After multistage fracturing, the flowback of fracturing fluid will cause two-phase flow through hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs. With the consideration of two-phase flow and desorbed gas transient diffusion in shale gas reservoirs, a two-phase transient flow model of multistage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoirs was created. Accurate solution to this flow model is obtained by the use of source function theory, Laplace transform, three-dimensional eigenvalue method, ...

  2. An Integrated Model for Computer Aided Reservoir Description : from Outcrop Study to Fluid Flow Simulations Un logiciel intégré pour une description des gisements assistée par ordinateur : de l'étude d'un affleurement aux simulations de l'écoulement des fluides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerillot D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available An accurate understanding of the internal architecture of a reservoir is required to improve reservoir management for oil recovery. Geostatistical methods give an image of this architecture. The purpose of this paper is to show how this lithological description could be used for reservoir simulation. For this purpose, scale averaging problems must be solved for non-additive variables. A method giving a full effective permeability matrix is proposed. The integrated software described here starts from core analysis and lithologic logs to provide data for reservoir simulators. Each of the steps of this interactive and graphic system is explained here. Pour faire de bonnes prévisions de production pour un gisement pétrolifère, il est nécessaire de connaître précisément son architecture interne. Les méthodes géostatistiques donnent une représentation de cette architecture. L'objectif de cet article est de montrer une façon d'utiliser cette description lithologique pour la simulation des réservoirs. Il faut alors résoudre des problèmes de changement d'échelle pour les variables qui ne sont pas additives. On propose une méthode d'estimation de la perméabilité effective sous la forme d'une matrice pleine. Le logiciel intégré que l'on décrit part de l'analyse des carottes et des diagraphies en lithologies et fournit des données pour les simulateurs de gisement. On détaille ici chaque étape de ce système interactif graphique.

  3. Geothermal reservoir engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Malcolm Alister

    2011-01-01

    As nations alike struggle to diversify and secure their power portfolios, geothermal energy, the essentially limitless heat emanating from the earth itself, is being harnessed at an unprecedented rate.  For the last 25 years, engineers around the world tasked with taming this raw power have used Geothermal Reservoir Engineering as both a training manual and a professional reference.  This long-awaited second edition of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering is a practical guide to the issues and tasks geothermal engineers encounter in the course of their daily jobs. The bo

  4. Session: Reservoir Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  5. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  6. Natural-Fracture Reactivation in Shale Gas Reservoir and Resulting Microseismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, A.S.A.; Wassing, B.B.T.; Fokker, P.A.; Verga, F.

    2015-01-01

    A geomechanical and fluid-flow coupled model was developed to simulate natural-fracture-network reactivation during hydraulicfracturing treatments in shale gas reservoirs. The fractures were modelled using the continuum approach in a commercial finitedifference code, labeled the "softening

  7. Performance analysis for an irreversible variable temperature heat reservoir closed intercooled regenerated Brayton cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenhua; Chen Lingen; Sun Fengrui; Wu Chih

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the theory of finite time thermodynamics is used in the performance analysis of an irreversible closed intercooled regenerated Brayton cycle coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. The analytical formulae for dimensionless power and efficiency, as functions of the total pressure ratio, the intercooling pressure ratio, the component (regenerator, intercooler, hot and cold side heat exchangers) effectivenesses, the compressor and turbine efficiencies and the thermal capacity rates of the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, the pressure recovery coefficients, the heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio, and the cooling fluid in the intercooler and the cold side heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio, are derived. The intercooling pressure ratio is optimized for optimal power and optimal efficiency, respectively. The effects of component (regenerator, intercooler and hot and cold side heat exchangers) effectivenesses, the compressor and turbine efficiencies, the pressure recovery coefficients, the heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio and the cooling fluid in the intercooler and the cold side heat reservoir inlet temperature ratio on optimal power and its corresponding intercooling pressure ratio, as well as optimal efficiency and its corresponding intercooling pressure ratio are analyzed by detailed numerical examples. When the heat transfers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs are executed ideally, the pressure drop losses are small enough to be neglected and the thermal capacity rates of the heat reservoirs are infinite, the results of this paper replicate those obtained in recent literature

  8. Application of the new Gassmann theory in seismic modeling of selected gas reservoirs, offshore Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auduson, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    In the Southern North Sea, Buntsandstein reservoirs which, can be gas- or water-bearing, frequently contain solid (salt) in the pores spaces. Recent literatures on extension of the Gassmann equation investigate the substitution of fluids and solids in the pore space of reservoir rock. Conventional

  9. Ray-based stochastic inversion of pre-stack seismic data for improved reservoir characterisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    To estimate rock and pore-fluid properties of oil and gas reservoirs in the subsurface, techniques can be used that invert seismic data. Hereby, the detailed information about the reservoir that is available at well locations, such as the thickness and porosity of individual layers, is extrapolated

  10. Antinuclear movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Hee; Im, Jaeg Yeong

    1988-08-15

    This book is for antinuclear movement. So, this book introduces many articles on nuclear issues of Asia and the pacific area. The titles of articles are the crusades of Reagan by Werner Plaha, contending between super powers in Europe by Alva Reimer Myrdal, claims of resistance by Daniel Ellsberg, nuclear and the Korean Peninsula by Go, Seung Woo, Liberation but of belief of nuclear weapon by Lee, Young Hee and nuclear weapon in Korea by peter Haze.

  11. Field Characterization of Reservoir Flow Paths Using Miscible and Immiscible Tracer Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Trautz, Robert C.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Doughty, Christine; Benson, Sally M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; McCallum, Scott D.

    2005-01-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 into deep, brine-filled reservoirs may be used to slow the effect that greenhouse gas emissions have on global warming. During injection, the large contrast in fluid densities and viscosities causes immiscible displacement of the brine by CO2, resulting in a two-phase system. We performed a series of tracer tests during the Frio CO2 sequestration pilot program to study immiscible and miscible fluid displacement through the Frio sandstone, a deep saline reservoir...

  12. Reservoir Characterization using Seismic and Well Logs Data (A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During analysis, hydrocarbon saturation in relatively unconsolidated sandstone reservoirs is a pore fluid property that has been successfully mapped using seismic surveys. The presence of hydrocarbon typically lowers the seismic velocity and density of unconsolidated to moderately consolidated sandstone and this in turn ...

  13. rock physics investigation of seismic wave absorption in reservoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    ROCK PHYSICS INVESTIGATION OF SEISMIC WAVE ABSORPTION. IN RESERVOIR ROCKS. W. O. RAJI AND A. RIETBROCK. (Received 2, January 2009; Revision Accepted 19, January 2009). ABSTRACT. This research provides insight into the process of pore- fluid induced absorption which is important for absorption ...

  14. Visualizing the Entropy Change of a Thermal Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbeheim, Elon; Safran, Samuel A.; Yerushalmi, Edit

    2014-01-01

    When a system exchanges energy with a constant-temperature environment, the entropy of the surroundings changes. A lattice model of a fluid thermal reservoir can provide a visualization of the microscopic changes that occur in the surroundings upon energy transfer from the system. This model can be used to clarify the consistency of phenomena such…

  15. unconventional natural gas reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa G, Tomas F; Osorio, Nelson; Restrepo R, Dora P

    2009-01-01

    This work is an exploration about different unconventional gas reservoirs worldwide: coal bed methane, tight gas, shale gas and gas hydrate? describing aspects such as definition, reserves, production methods, environmental issues and economics. The overview also mentioned preliminary studies about these sources in Colombia.

  16. Parallel reservoir simulator computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemanth-Kumar, K.; Young, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The adaptation of a reservoir simulator for parallel computations is described. The simulator was originally designed for vector processors. It performs approximately 99% of its calculations in vector/parallel mode and relative to scalar calculations it achieves speedups of 65 and 81 for black oil and EOS simulations, respectively on the CRAY C-90

  17. Seismic reservoir characterization: how can multicomponent data help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Gang

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the concepts of multicomponent seismology and how it can be applied to characterize hydrocarbon reservoirs, illustrated using a 3D three-component real-data example from southwest China. Hydrocarbon reservoirs formed from subtle lithological changes, such as stratigraphic traps, may be delineated from changes in P- and S-wave velocities and impedances, whilst hydrocarbon reservoirs containing aligned fractures are anisotropic. Examination of the resultant split shear waves can give us a better definition of their internal structures. Furthermore, frequency-dependent variations in seismic attributes derived from multicomponent data can provide us with vital information about fluid type and distribution. Current practice and various examples have demonstrated the undoubted potential of multicomponent seismic in reservoir characterization. Despite all this, there are still substantial challenges ahead. In particular, the improvement and interpretation of converted-wave imaging are major hurdles that need to be overcome before multicomponent seismic becomes a mainstream technology

  18. Seismic reservoir characterization: how can multicomponent data help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Gang

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the concepts of multicomponent seismology and how it can be applied to characterize hydrocarbon reservoirs, illustrated using a 3D three-component real-data example from southwest China. Hydrocarbon reservoirs formed from subtle lithological changes, such as stratigraphic traps, may be delineated from changes in P- and S-wave velocities and impedances, whilst hydrocarbon reservoirs containing aligned fractures are anisotropic. Examination of the resultant split shear waves can give us a better definition of their internal structures. Furthermore, frequency-dependent variations in seismic attributes derived from multicomponent data can provide us with vital information about fluid type and distribution. Current practice and various examples have demonstrated the undoubted potential of multicomponent seismic in reservoir characterization. Despite all this, there are still substantial challenges ahead. In particular, the improvement and interpretation of converted-wave imaging are major hurdles that need to be overcome before multicomponent seismic becomes a mainstream technology.

  19. Assessing distribution and movement of blue catfish in Kansas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Martha E.; Gerber, Kayla M.; Peterson, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    This report is organized into three chapters that address six objectives. The first chapter addresses objectives 1-3. The second chapter addresses objectives 4-5. The third chapter addresses objective 6. The objectives for the project are listed below for reference.

  20. Synergizing Crosswell Seismic and Electromagnetic Techniques for Enhancing Reservoir Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2015-11-18

    Increasing complexity of hydrocarbon projects and the request for higher recovery rates have driven the oil-and-gas industry to look for a more-detailed understanding of the subsurface formation to optimize recovery of oil and profitability. Despite the significant successes of geophysical techniques in determining changes within the reservoir, the benefits from individually mapping the information are limited. Although seismic techniques have been the main approach for imaging the subsurface, the weak density contrast between water and oil has made electromagnetic (EM) technology an attractive complement to improve fluid distinction, especially for high-saline water. This crosswell technology assumes greater importance for obtaining higher-resolution images of the interwell regions to more accurately characterize the reservoir and track fluid-front developments. In this study, an ensemble-Kalman-based history-matching framework is proposed for directly incorporating crosswell time-lapse seismic and EM data into the history-matching process. The direct incorporation of the time-lapse seismic and EM data into the history-matching process exploits the complementarity of these data to enhance subsurface characterization, to incorporate interwell information, and to avoid biases that may be incurred from separate inversions of the geophysical data for attributes. An extensive analysis with 2D and realistic 3D reservoirs illustrates the robustness and enhanced forecastability of critical reservoir variables. The 2D reservoir provides a better understanding of the connection between fluid discrimination and enhanced history matches, and the 3D reservoir demonstrates its applicability to a realistic reservoir. History-matching enhancements (in terms of reduction in the history-matching error) when incorporating both seismic and EM data averaged approximately 50% for the 2D case, and approximately 30% for the 3D case, and permeability estimates were approximately 25

  1. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  2. Tidal phenomena in reservoirs; Fenomeno de mare em reservatorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinilla Cortes, John Freddy

    1997-06-01

    This work models the oceanic tidal effect on reservoirs by coupling geomechanic principles with equations for fluid in a deformable porous media. The coupling revealed the importance of establishing properly the system compressibility under the various possible configurations of the loading system. The basic models for infinite reservoir, constant outer-pressure reservoir and closed reservoir were considered. It was verified that it was possible to apply the superposition of effects on the solution for the basic models by carrying a simple transformation on the solution variable. The problem was treated by in the context of test analysis, concerning dimensionless form of variables and the inclusion of well effects. The solution for the infinite reservoir including tidal effects. The solution for the infinite reservoir including tidal effects was obtained in the Laplace space and was inverted numerically by using Crump's routine. The results were incorporated to conventional type curves, and were validated by comparison with real and simulated pressure test data. Finally, alternate practices were suggested to integrate the well test analysis in reservoirs affected by the tidal effect. (author)

  3. Relative influence of deposition and diagenesis on carbonate reservoir layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Emmanuelle [Total E and P, Courbevoie (France); Javaux, Catherine [Total E and P, Pointe Noire (Congo)

    2008-07-01

    The architecture heterogeneities and petrophysical properties of carbonate reservoirs result from a combination of platform morphology, related depositional environments, relative sea level changes and diagenetic events. The reservoir layering built for static and dynamic modelling purposes should reflect the key heterogeneities (depositional or diagenetic) which govern the fluid flow patterns. The layering needs to be adapted to the goal of the modelling, ranging from full field computations of hydrocarbon volumes, to sector-based fine-scale simulations to test the recovery improvement. This paper illustrates various reservoir layering types, including schemes dominated by depositional architecture, and those more driven by the diagenetic overprint. The examples include carbonate platform reservoirs from different stratigraphic settings (Tertiary, Cretaceous, Jurassic and Permian) and different regions (Europe, Africa and Middle East areas). This review shows how significant stratigraphic surfaces (such as sequence boundaries or maximum flooding) with their associated facies shifts, can be often considered as key markers to constrain the reservoir layering. Conversely, how diagenesis (dolomitization and karst development), resulting in units with particular poroperm characteristics, may significantly overprint the primary reservoir architecture by generating flow units which cross-cut depositional sequences. To demonstrate how diagenetic processes can create reservoir bodies with geometries that cross-cut the depositional fabric, different types of dolomitization and karst development are illustrated. (author)

  4. The influence of open fracture anisotropy on CO2 movement within geological storage complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, C. E.; Wightman, R.; Ringrose, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon mitigation through the geological storage of carbon dioxide is dependent on the ability of geological formations to store CO2 trapping it within a geological storage complex. Secure long-term containment needs to be demonstrated, due to both political and social drivers, meaning that this containment must be verifiable over periods of 100-105 years. The effectiveness of sub-surface geological storage systems is dependent on trapping CO2 within a volume of rock and is reliant on the integrity of the surrounding rocks, including their chemical and physical properties, to inhibit migration to the surface. Oil and gas reservoir production data, and field evidence show that fracture networks have the potential to act as focused pathways for fluid movement. Fracture networks can allow large volumes of fluid to migrate to the surface within the time scales of interest. In this paper we demonstrate the importance of predicting the effects of fracture networks in storage, using a case study from the In Salah CO2 storage site, and show how the fracture permeability is closely controlled by the stress regime that determines the open fracture network. Our workflow combines well data of imaged fractures, with a discrete fracture network (DFN) model of tectonically induced fractures, within the horizon of interest. The modelled and observed fractures have been compared and combined with present day stress data to predict the open fracture network and its implications for anisotropic movement of CO2 in the sub-surface. The created fracture network model has been used to calculate the 2D permeability tensor for the reservoir for two scenarios: 1) a model in which all fractures are permeable, based on the whole DFN model and 2) those fractures determined to be in dilatational failure under the present day stress regime, a sub-set of the DFN. The resulting permeability anisotropy tensors show distinct anisotropies for the predicted CO2 movement within the reservoir. These

  5. Pest Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Bhar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of woody borders surrounding crop fields is desirable for biodiversity conservation. However, for crop pest management, the desirability of woody borders depends on the trade-off between their effects at the local field scale and the landscape scale. At the local scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by increasing predation rates, but they can also increase pest populations by providing complementary habitats and reducing movement rate of pests out of crop fields. At the regional scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by reducing colonization of newly planted crop fields. Our objective was to develop guidelines for maximizing pest control while maintaining woody borders in the landscape. We wished to determine the conditions under which the regional effect of borders on colonization can outweigh local enhancement effects of borders on pest populations. We built a stochastic, individual-based, spatially implicit simulation model of a specialist insect population in a landscape divided into a number of crop fields. We conducted simulations to determine the conditions under which woody borders enhance vs. reduce the regional pest population size. The following factors were considered: landscape fragmentation, crop rotation period, barrier effect of woody borders, disperser success rate, and effect of woody borders on local survival. The simulation results suggest that woody borders are most likely to enhance regional control of crop pests if (1 the woody borders are very effective in reducing insect movement from one crop field to another, and (2 crop rotation is on a very short cycle. Based on these results, our preliminary recommendations are that woody borders should contain dense, tall vegetation to reduce insect movement, and crops should be rotated on as short a cycle as possible. These conditions should ensure that woody borders can be maintained for their conservation value without enhancing crop pest

  6. Oscillating fluid power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  7. Estimation of Reservoir Geotemperatures from Multicomponent and Classical Geothermometry of the Bath Geothermal Reservoir: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    An integrated approach incorporating multicomponent and classical solute geothermometry was used to evaluate its utility to estimate the temperature of the Bath geothermal reservoir, a low-enthalpy system on the island of Jamaica. Reservoir temperatures were estimated from (1) empirical geothermometric equations; (2) simulations of solute geothermometers using SolGeo software; (3) computations of saturation indices [Log(Q/K)] of reservoir minerals from full chemically-analyzed thermal water samples over a temperature range of 25-220°C in PHREEQC; and (4) the Giggenbach Na-K-Mg geothermometer. A principal component analysis (PCA) shows strong, positive correlations between Na+, K+, and Mg2+ and is regarded as significant for these ions in their reliance as useful reservoir geoindicators. However, a negative correlation exists between Na+, K+, Mg2+ and silica (SiO2). The more realistic estimates of the geothermal reservoir temperature were provided by the Na-K and Na-K-Mg geothermometers, whereas the Na-K-Ca geothermometer overestimated reservoir temperatures. Estimated geotemperatures from silica-quartz geothermometers were the lowest. The discrepancy in estimated geotemperatures may be due to processes such as boiling, degassing, dilution, rock dissolution, and mixing during the ascent of geothermal fluids. Log (Q/K) curves cluster over a range of equilibrium temperatures closest to Na-K and Na-K-Mg geothermometers at 80-102°C. Reservoir temperatures estimated for the Bath geothermal system range between 79-118°C. Comparisons of the estimated geotemperatures using the integrated approach to geothermometry show a favorable agreement. Based on the results of this investigation, the integrated geothermometric approach provided a more reliable approach to reconstruct the fluid composition at depth and estimate the geothermal reservoir temperature.

  8. Fracture systems and mesoscale structural patterns in the siliciclastic mesozoic reservoir-caprock succession of the longyearbyen CO2 lab project: Implications for geological CO2 sequestration in central spitsbergen, svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, Kei; Senger, Kim; Braathen, Alvar; Tveranger, Jan; Olaussen, Snorre

    2014-01-01

    In unconventional, naturally fractured reservoirs, networks of structural discontinuities largely control fluid flow. In this study, we mapped and analysed systematic fracture patterns within the Mesozoic succession of Central Spitsbergen to characterise the reservoir-caprock system explored for

  9. Penerapan Dinamika Fluida dalam Perhitungan Kecepatan Aliran dan Perolehan Minyak di Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Listriana Kusumastuti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Water, oil and gas inside the earth are stored in the pores of the reservoir rock. In the world of petroleum industry, calculation of volume of the oil that can be recovered from the reservoir is something important to do. This calculation involves the calculation of the velocity of fluid flow by utilizing the principles and formulas provided by the Fluid Dynamics. The formula is usually applied to the fluid flow passing through a well defined control volume, for example: cylinder, curved pipe, straight pipes with different diameters at the input and output, and so forth. However, because of reservoir rock, as the fluid flow medium, has a wide variety of possible forms of the control volumes, hence, calculation of the velocity of the fluid flow is becoming difficult as it would involve calculations of fluid flow velocity for each control volume. This difficulties is mainly caused by the fact that these control volumes, that existed in the rock, cannot be well defined. This paper will describe a method for calculating this fluid flow velocity of the control volume, which consists of a combination of laboratory measurements and the use of some theories in the Fluid Dynamics. This method has been proofed can be used for calculating fluid flow velocity as well as oil recovery in reservoir rocks, with fairly good accuration.

  10. Uncertainty in forecasting breakthrough of fluid transported through fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Tracer experiments in geothermal reservoirs emphasize the very great variability in rates of fluid movement through fractured rocks. This variability extends from the 10-meter to the kilometer-length scale. Thus tracer returns have been observed at some locations within hours at distances of up to 1 kilometer from the injection point, while other much nearer locations in the same formation do not observe the tracer until much later. In addition, transport rates have sometimes been extremely fast (up to 100 m/hr) even over such distances. This paper discusses the conclusions reached after compiling the results of a large number of tracer tests in several different fractured reservoirs. It is evident in some cases that large-scale geological features, such as faults, are responsible for the variations in tracer return time. In other cases, there is no clear physical description that explains the differences. These results suggest that there will be no a priori way of forecasting transport rates in fractured systems without performing a tracer test

  11. Geological model of supercritical geothermal reservoir related to subduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Following the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power station on 3.11 (11th March) 2011, geothermal energy came to be considered one of the most promising sources of renewable energy for the future in Japan. The temperatures of geothermal fields operating in Japan range from 200 to 300 °C (average 250 °C), and the depths range from 1000 to 2000 m (average 1500 m). In conventional geothermal reservoirs, the mechanical behavior of the rocks is presumed to be brittle, and convection of the hydrothermal fluid through existing network is the main method of circulation in the reservoir. In order to minimize induced seismicity, a rock mass that is "beyond brittle" is one possible candidate, because the rock mechanics of "beyond brittle" material is one of plastic deformation rather than brittle failure. Supercritical geothermal resources could be evaluated in terms of present volcanic activities, thermal structure, dimension of hydrothermal circulation, properties of fracture system, depth of heat source, depth of brittle factures zone, dimension of geothermal reservoir. On the basis of the GIS, potential of supercritical geothermal resources could be characterized into the following four categories. 1. Promising: surface manifestation d shallow high temperature, 2 Probability: high geothermal gradient, 3 Possibility: Aseismic zone which indicates an existence of melt, 4 Potential : low velocity zone which indicates magma input. Base on geophysical data for geothermal reservoirs, we have propose adequate tectonic model of development of the supercritical geothermal reservoirs. To understand the geological model of a supercritical geothermal reservoir, granite-porphyry system, which had been formed in subduction zone, was investigated as a natural analog of the supercritical geothermal energy system. Quartz veins, hydrothermal breccia veins, and glassy veins are observed in a granitic body. The glassy veins formed at 500-550

  12. Reservoir Space Evolution of Volcanic Rocks in Deep Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M.; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; HU, J.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years, large amount of natural gas has been discovered in volcanic rock of Lower Crataceous of Songliao basin. Volcanic reservoirs have become one of the important target reservoir types of eastern basin of China. In order to study the volcanic reservoirs, we need to know the main factors controlling the reservoir space. By careful obsercation on volcanic drilling core, casting thin sections and statistical analysis of petrophysical properties of volcanic reservoir in Songliao basin, it can be suggested that the igneous rock reservoir in Yingcheng formation of Lower Crataceous is composed of different rock types, such ad rohylite, rohylitic crystal tuff, autoclastic brecciation lava and so on. There are different reservoirs storage space in in various lithological igneous rocks, but they are mainly composed of primary stoma, secondary solution pores and fractures.The evolution of storage space can be divided into 3 stage: the pramary reservoir space,exogenic leaching process and burial diagenesis.During the evolution process, the reservoir space is effected by secondary minerals, tectonic movement and volcanic hydrothermal solution. The pore of volcanic reservoirs can be partially filled by secondary minerals, but also may be dissoluted by other chemical volcanic hydrothermal solution. Therefore, the favorable places for better-quality volcanic reservoirs are the near-crater facies of vocanic apparatus and dissolution zones on the high position of paleo-structures.

  13. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  14. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Porous Medium Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Imam; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    Fluid flow and heat transfer in porous medium are an interesting phenomena to study. One kind example of porous medium is geothermal reservoir. By understanding the fluid flow and heat transfer in porous medium, it help us to understand the phenomena in geothermal reservoir, such as thermal change because of injection process. Thermal change in the reservoir is the most important physical property to known since it has correlation with performance of the reservoir, such as the electrical energy produced by reservoir. In this simulation, we investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer in geothermal reservoir as a simple flow in porous medium canal using Lattice Boltzmann Method. In this simulation, we worked on 2 dimension with nine vectors velocity (D2Q9). To understand the fluid flow and heat transfer in reservoir, we varied the fluid temperature that inject into the reservoir and set the heat source constant at 410°C. The first variation we set the fluid temperature 45°C, second 102.5°C, and the last 307.5°C. Furthermore, we also set the parameter of reservoir such as porosity, density, and injected fluid velocity are constant. Our results show that for the first temperature variation distribution between experiment and simulation is 92.86% match. From second variation shows that there is one pick of thermal distribution and one of turbulence zone, and from the last variation show that there are two pick of thermal distribution and two of turbulence zone.

  15. Work reservoirs in thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Joaquim

    2010-05-01

    We stress the usefulness of the work reservoir in the formalism of thermodynamics, in particular in the context of the first law. To elucidate its usefulness, the formalism is then applied to the Joule expansion and other peculiar and instructive experimental situations, clarifying the concepts of configuration and dissipative work. The ideas and discussions presented in this study are primarily intended for undergraduate students, but they might also be useful to graduate students, researchers and teachers.

  16. Environmental effects of solar-thermal power systems. Environmental effects of heat transfer and storage fluids: plant toxicity and movement in soils. [Comparison of Therminol 66, Caloria HT43, and Dow 200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishita, H.; Haug, R.M.

    1981-07-01

    Field experiments on the movement of several heat transfer and storage oils (Therminol 66, Caloria HT43, and Dow 200) in soil and on the plant toxicity of these materials were conducted at Nevada Test Site. These studies were conducted in an area where the soil is nonsaline and calcareous, and the vegetation is mostly Larrea tridentata with Oryzopsis hymenoides, Ambrosia dumosa, and Lycium andersonii. The abiotic factors (air and soil temperatures, rainfall, and soil moisture tension) were monitored during the experimental period and are discussed. The movement of the oils in the soil was determined in two ways - soil columns in plastic boxes and bare-soil plots. In plastic boxes, Therminol 66 moved downward about 6.3 cm in 281 days. Dow 200 moved about 3.8 cm in 281 days and showed virtually no further downward movement to the end of experimental period (555 days). In the bare-soil plots, the limit of downward movement of the oils during the experimental period was 20.6 cm, 18.7, and 14.9 cm for Therminol 66, Caloria HT43, and Dow 200, respectively. The rate of movement was roughly 0.047 cm/day to 16.8-cm depth in 336 days, 0.067 cm/day to 18.7-cm depth in 281 days, and 0.044 cm/day to 14.9-cm depth in 336 days for Therminol 66, Caloria HT43, and Dow 200, respectively. In general, Caloria HT43 showed the greatest movement, while Dow 200 showed the least movement. Of the oils studied, Therminol 66 was the least toxic to native plants, whereas Dow 200 was the most toxic. The toxic effect on plants depended on the growth stage at which the plants were contaminated. Ambrosia dumosa contaminated in its dormant stage was more resistant to the toxic effect of Therminol 66 than when it was contaminated in its green, leafed stage.

  17. Tracing Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

    2004-03-01

    Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

  18. 3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

    2002-11-18

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge

  19. Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1993-04-09

    The general objectives are to (1) to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) to determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. This work focuses on three types of gel systems - an aqueous polysaccharide (KUSPI) system that gels as a function of pH, the chromium-based system where polyacrylamide and xanthan are crosslinked by CR(III) and an organic crosslinked system. Development of the KUSPI system and evaluation and identification of a suitable organic crosslinked system will be done. The laboratory research is directed at the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the gelation process in bulk form and in porous media. This knowledge will be used to develop conceptual and mathematical models of the gelation process. Mathematical models will then be extended to predict the performance of gelled polymer treatments in oil reservoirs. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: development and selection of gelled polymer systems, physical and chemical characterization of gel systems; and mathematical modeling of gel systems.

  20. The impact of hydraulic flow unit & reservoir quality index on pressure profile and productivity index in multi-segments reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Al-Rbeawi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is studying the impact of the hydraulic flow unit and reservoir quality index (RQI on pressure profile and productivity index of horizontal wells acting in finite reservoirs. Several mathematical models have been developed to investigate this impact. These models have been built based on the pressure distribution in porous media, depleted by a horizontal well, consist of multi hydraulic flow units and different reservoir quality index. The porous media are assumed to be finite rectangular reservoirs having different configurations and the wellbores may have different lengths. Several analytical models describing flow regimes have been derived wherein hydraulic flow units and reservoir quality index have been included in addition to rock and fluid properties. The impact of these two parameters on reservoir performance has also been studied using steady state productivity index.It has been found that both pressure responses and flow regimes are highly affected by the existence of multiple hydraulic flow units in the porous media and the change in reservoir quality index for these units. Positive change in the RQI could lead to positive change in both pressure drop required for reservoir fluids to move towards the wellbore and hence the productivity index.

  1. Fluid discrimination based on rock physics templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qian; Yin, Xingyao; Li, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir fluid discrimination is an indispensable part of seismic exploration. Reliable fluid discrimination helps to decrease the risk of exploration and to increase the success ratio of drilling. There are many kinds of fluid indicators that are used in fluid discriminations, most of which are single indicators. But single indicators do not always work well under complicated reservoir conditions. Therefore, combined fluid indicators are needed to increase accuracies of discriminations. In this paper, we have proposed an alternative strategy for the combination of fluid indicators. An alternative fluid indicator, the rock physics template-based indicator (RPTI) has been derived to combine the advantages of two single indicators. The RPTI is more sensitive to the contents of fluid than traditional indicators. The combination is implemented based on the characteristic of the fluid trend in the rock physics template, which means few subjective factors are involved. We also propose an inversion method to assure the accuracy of the RPTI input data. The RPTI profile is an intuitionistic interpretation of fluid content. Real data tests demonstrate the applicability and validity. (paper)

  2. The role of deformation bands controlling reservoir quality in a salt-walled mini-basin, Central North Sea, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Philip; Jones, Stuart; Imber, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    At shallow burial depths, sediments are typically poorly consolidated and subject to low confining pressure and differential stress. Fractures that form in poorly consolidated and therefore non-lithified sediments would be unable to remain open. However, the large amount of pore space present would allow for processes such as grain sliding and grain rolling, resulting in the formation of deformation bands. The structure and style of the resulting deformation bands would depend on the size, shape and sorting of the grains, as well as early cementation, porosity and the orientation and magnitude of the local stresses. Previous studies on deformation bands in general have shown that they produce an anisotropy that can affect fluid flow. Early deformation band formation near the surface may also influence later diagenesis at greater burial depths, and thus have a further impact on fluid flow in sandstone. Dilatant (deformation) bands are commonly reported for poorly consolidated sandstones at surface or near-surface conditions (fractures, faults and deformation bands create a complex system of permeable fluid pathways and cemented baffles at deeper burial. The results presented highlight the importance of constraining the occurrence of dilation and dilatant shear bands along the margins of salt-walled mini-basins to better understand the kinematics of the salt movement and additional loading on adjacent sediments. Furthermore, this research identifies the importance of early formed deformation bands in controlling meteoric water influx and governing later reservoir quality for spatially and temporally complex sedimentary fills of salt-walled mini-basins.

  3. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1996-04-30

    On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

  4. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  5. Gas geochemistry for the Los Azufres (Michoacán geothermal reservoir, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Segovia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Gas data of the Los Azufres geothermal field were analyzed using a method based on equilibrium of the Fischer- Tropsch (FT reaction: CH4 + 2H2O = 4H2 +CO2 and on the combined pyrite-hematite-magnetite (HSH2 reactions: 5/4 H2 +3/2 FeS2 +3/4 Fe2O3 + 7/4 H2O = 3 H2S +Fe3O4 in order to estimate reservoir temperature and excess steam. The solution of equilibrium equations produces a grid (FT-HSH2. This method is suitable for reservoirs with relatively high H2S but low H2 and NH3 concentrations in the fluid as is the case of the Los Azufres well discharges. Reservoir temperature and reservoir excess steam values were estimated for initial and present conditions in representative wells of the field to study the evolution of fluids, because of exploitation and waste fluids reinjection. This method was very useful in estimating reservoir temperatures in vapor wells, while in two-phase wells it was found that as the well produces a smaller fraction of water, the reservoir temperature estimation agrees qualitatively with results from cationic or silica geothermometers. For liquid-dominated wells the reservoir temperature estimations agree with temperatures obtained from the well simulator WELFLO. This indicates that FT-HSH2 results provide the temperature of the fluid entering the well where the last equilibrium occurs. Results show a decrease in reservoir temperatures in the southern zone of the field where intensive reinjection takes place. With exploitation, it was also noted that the deep liquid phase in the reservoir is changing to two-phase increasing the reservoir steam fraction and the non-condensable gases in well discharges.

  6. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  7. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  8. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  9. Reservoir souring: it is all about risk mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijvenhoven, Cor [Shell (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The presence of H2S in produced fluid can be due to various sources, among which are heat/rock interaction and leaks from other reservoirs. This paper discusses the reasons, risk assessment and tools for mitigating reservoir souring. Uncontrolled microorganism activity can cause a sweet reservoir (without H2S) to become sour (production of H2S). The development of bacteria is one of the main causes of reservoir souring in unconventional gas fields. It is difficult to predict souring in seawater due to produced water re-injection (PWRI). Risk assessment and modeling techniques for reservoir souring are discussed. Some of the factors controlling H2S production include injection location, presence of scavenging minerals and biogenic souring. Mitigation methods such as biocide treatment of injection water, sulphate removal from seawater, microbial monitoring techniques such as the molecular microbiology method (MMM), and enumeration by serial dilution are explained. In summary, it can be concluded that reservoir souring is a long-term problem and should be assessed at the beginning of operations.

  10. Sampling from stochastic reservoir models constrained by production data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegstad, Bjoern Kaare

    1997-12-31

    When a petroleum reservoir is evaluated, it is important to forecast future production of oil and gas and to assess forecast uncertainty. This is done by defining a stochastic model for the reservoir characteristics, generating realizations from this model and applying a fluid flow simulator to the realizations. The reservoir characteristics define the geometry of the reservoir, initial saturation, petrophysical properties etc. This thesis discusses how to generate realizations constrained by production data, that is to say, the realizations should reproduce the observed production history of the petroleum reservoir within the uncertainty of these data. The topics discussed are: (1) Theoretical framework, (2) History matching, forecasting and forecasting uncertainty, (3) A three-dimensional test case, (4) Modelling transmissibility multipliers by Markov random fields, (5) Up scaling, (6) The link between model parameters, well observations and production history in a simple test case, (7) Sampling the posterior using optimization in a hierarchical model, (8) A comparison of Rejection Sampling and Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, (9) Stochastic simulation and conditioning by annealing in reservoir description, and (10) Uncertainty assessment in history matching and forecasting. 139 refs., 85 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effects of Formation Damage on Productivity of Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I.C. Anyadiegwu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the effects of formation damage on the productivity of gas storage reservoirs was performed with depleted oil reservoir (OB-02, located onshore, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Information on the reservoir and the fluids from OB-02 were collected and used to evaluate the deliverabilities of the gas storage reservoir over a 10-year period of operation. The results obtained were used to plot graphs of deliverability against permeability and skin respectively. The graphs revealed that as the permeability decreased, the skin increased, and hence a decrease in deliverability of gas from the reservoir during gas withdrawal. Over the ten years of operating the reservoir for gas storage, the deliverability and permeability which were initially 2.7 MMscf/d and 50 mD, with a skin of 0.2, changed to new values of 0.88 MMscf/d and 24 mD with the skin as 4.1 at the tenth year.

  12. Production Decline Analysis for Two-Phase Flow in Multifractured Horizontal Well in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yang Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After multistage fracturing, the flowback of fracturing fluid will cause two-phase flow through hydraulic fractures in shale gas reservoirs. With the consideration of two-phase flow and desorbed gas transient diffusion in shale gas reservoirs, a two-phase transient flow model of multistage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoirs was created. Accurate solution to this flow model is obtained by the use of source function theory, Laplace transform, three-dimensional eigenvalue method, and orthogonal transformation. According to the model’s solution, the bilogarithmic type curves of the two-phase model are illustrated, and the production decline performance under the effects of hydraulic fractures and shale gas reservoir properties are discussed. The result obtained in this paper has important significance to understand pressure response characteristics and production decline law of two-phase flow in shale gas reservoirs. Moreover, it provides the theoretical basis for exploiting this reservoir efficiently.

  13. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...

  15. Advances in photonic reservoir computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Brunner, Daniel; Soriano, Miguel C.

    2017-05-01

    We review a novel paradigm that has emerged in analogue neuromorphic optical computing. The goal is to implement a reservoir computer in optics, where information is encoded in the intensity and phase of the optical field. Reservoir computing is a bio-inspired approach especially suited for processing time-dependent information. The reservoir's complex and high-dimensional transient response to the input signal is capable of universal computation. The reservoir does not need to be trained, which makes it very well suited for optics. As such, much of the promise of photonic reservoirs lies in their minimal hardware requirements, a tremendous advantage over other hardware-intensive neural network models. We review the two main approaches to optical reservoir computing: networks implemented with multiple discrete optical nodes and the continuous system of a single nonlinear device coupled to delayed feedback.

  16. Phenomenology of tremor-like signals observed over hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangel, S.; Schaepman, M. E.; Stoll, E. P.; Carniel, R.; Barzandji, O.; Rode, E.-D.; Singer, J. M.

    2003-11-01

    We have observed narrow-band, low-frequency (1.5-4 Hz, amplitude 0.01-10 μm/s) tremor signals on the surface over hydrocarbon reservoirs (oil, gas and water multiphase fluid systems in porous media) at currently 15 sites worldwide. These 'hydrocarbon tremors' possess remarkably similar spectral and signal structure characteristics, pointing to a common source mechanism, even though the depth (some hundreds to several thousands of meters), specific fluid content (oil, gas, gas condensate of different compositions and combinations) and reservoir rock type (such as sandstone, carbonates, etc.) for each of those sites are quite different. About half of the sites are fully explored or even developed and producing fields, and hard quantitative data on the reservoirs are available (well data, reservoir monitoring data, seismic surveys, etc.). The other areas are essentially either explored prospect areas where we did not have access to hard reservoir data or (in only one case) areas where no exploration wells have been drilled at all. The tremor signal itself was observed over ALL locations investigated so far. The signals weaken at the rim of the reservoirs and are not observed outside the reservoir area. There is a strong correlation of the tremor power with the thickness of the hydrocarbon-bearing layers ('pay zone thickness') determined by borehole log measurements. The overall correlation between surface tremor measurements and accessible subsurface well data is higher than 90%. The phenomenological comparison of hydrocarbon tremor signals with volcanic tremor signals from Stromboli and Arenal volcanoes using both conventional spectral analysis tools and non-linear dynamics methods reveals fundamental similarities between those two phenomena as well as their close relation to bandpass filtered noise. Nevertheless, the specific signal sources are expected to be different for volcanoes and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Using the currently available data we present possible

  17. Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fourth annual report, January 1, 1988--December 1, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, P.

    1989-01-01

    The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

  18. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  19. Thermodynamic evolution of the Los Azufres, Mexico, geothermal reservoir from 1982 to 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, Victor Manuel; Barragan, Rosa Maria [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Torres, Marco Antonio [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Residencia Los Azufres, Campamento Agua Fria, Los Azufres, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2005-10-01

    An investigation has been made of the response of the Los Azufres geothermal reservoir to 20 years of development, beginning in 1982. The simulator WELFLO was used to characterize the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir fluids. The first response to exploitation consisted of a decrease in pressure and an increase in enthalpy. Small decreases in reservoir pressure associated with large increases in fluid enthalpy characterize the long-term response in the northern production area. In the southern production area, long-term changes include decreases in pressure and mass flow rate, increases in steam production and, in wells affected by injection, increases in both pressure and total mass flow rate. These changes reflect the effects of boiling, cooling and fluid mixing, processes resulting from large-scale fluid production. (author)

  20. Forming mechanism of the Ordovician karst carbonate reservoirs on the northern slope of central Tarim Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Fu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ordovician karst carbonate reservoirs on the northern slope of central Tarim Basin are important oil and gas exploration targets in the basin, but their dissolution mechanisms are in controversy. In this paper, based on the integrated study of sedimentation, sequence and reservoir, together with microscopic analysis and macroscopic seismic data analysis, the carbonate karst reservoirs in the study area were divided into three types: dissolved pore-cavity limestone reservoir, pore-cavity dolomite reservoir and fracture-cavity siliceous reservoir, and their forming mechanisms were discussed respectively. Some findings were obtained. First, dissolved pore-cavity limestone reservoirs are distributed in the upper Yingshan Fm and Yijianfang Fm of the Ordovician vertically, while pore-cavity dolomite reservoirs are mainly developed in the Penglai Fm and lower Yingshan Fm of the Ordovician with great thickness. Second, dissolved pore-cavity limestone reservoirs were formed by karstification on the third-order sequence boundary (lowstand tract, while pore-cavity dolomite reservoirs were formed by deep burial dolomitization controlled by karstification on the third-order sequence boundary, both of which are distributed in the highstand tract below the third-order sequence boundary. Third, siliceous reservoirs are developed under the control of faulting, as a result of reworking of deep hydrothermal fluids along faults to the limestone, and the siliceous reservoirs and their hydrothermal solution fracture-cavity systems are distributed near faults. It is further predicted that, in addition to the three types of reservoir above, platform-margin reef-flat reservoirs are developed in the Ordovician on the northern slope of central Tarim Basin.

  1. Unconventional Tight Reservoirs Characterization with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C. J. S.; Solatpour, R.; Kantzas, A.

    2017-12-01

    The increase in tight reservoir exploitation projects causes producing many papers each year on new, modern, and modified methods and techniques on estimating characteristics of these reservoirs. The most ambiguous of all basic reservoir property estimations deals with permeability. One of the logging methods that is advertised to predict permeability but is always met by skepticism is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The ability of NMR to differentiate between bound and movable fluids and providing porosity increased the capability of NMR as a permeability prediction technique. This leads to a multitude of publications and the motivation of a review paper on this subject by Babadagli et al. (2002). The first part of this presentation is dedicated to an extensive review of the existing correlation models for NMR based estimates of tight reservoir permeability to update this topic. On the second part, the collected literature information is used to analyze new experimental data. The data are collected from tight reservoirs from Canada, the Middle East, and China. A case study is created to apply NMR measurement in the prediction of reservoir characterization parameters such as porosity, permeability, cut-offs, irreducible saturations etc. Moreover, permeability correlations are utilized to predict permeability. NMR experiments were conducted on water saturated cores. NMR T2 relaxation times were measured. NMR porosity, the geometric mean relaxation time (T2gm), Irreducible Bulk Volume (BVI), and Movable Bulk Volume (BVM) were calculated. The correlation coefficients were computed based on multiple regression analysis. Results are cross plots of NMR permeability versus the independently measured Klinkenberg corrected permeability. More complicated equations are discussed. Error analysis of models is presented and compared. This presentation is beneficial in understanding existing tight reservoir permeability models. The results can be used as a guide for choosing

  2. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

  3. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  4. Virtual outcrop models of petroleum reservoir outcrop analogues – a review of the current state-of-the-art

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, JK; Howell, JA; Hodgetts, D; Westerman, AR; Hodgson, DM

    2006-01-01

    A subsurface reservoir model is a computer based representation of petrophysical parameters such a porosity, permeability, fluid saturation, etc. Given that direct measurement of these parameters is limited to a few wells it is necessary to extrapolate their distribution. As geology is a first order control on petrophysics, it follows that an understanding of facies and their distribution is central to predicting reservoir quality and architecture. The majority of reservoir modelling systems ...

  5. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, Don W.

    2003-04-08

    Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

  6. Permeability Evolution of Slowly Slipping Faults in Shale Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Reece, Julia S.; Gensterblum, Yves; Zoback, Mark D.

    2017-11-01

    Slow slip on preexisting faults during hydraulic fracturing is a process that significantly influences shale gas production in extremely low permeability "shale" (unconventional) reservoirs. We experimentally examined the impacts of mineralogy, surface roughness, and effective stress on permeability evolution of slowly slipping faults in Eagle Ford shale samples. Our results show that fault permeability decreases with slip at higher effective stress but increases with slip at lower effective stress. The permeabilities of saw cut faults fully recover after cycling effective stress from 2.5 to 17.5 to 2.5 MPa and increase with slip at constant effective stress due to asperity damage and dilation associated with slip. However, the permeabilities of natural faults only partially recover after cycling effective stress returns to 2.5 MPa and decrease with slip due to produced gouge blocking fluid flow pathways. Our results suggest that slowly slipping faults have the potential to enhance reservoir stimulation in extremely low permeability reservoirs.

  7. Identification of Environment Chase in Surround of Sermo Reservoir; and the Influence Possibility for Function and at the Age of Reservoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmadji Sudarmadji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sermo reservoir is the only one belongs to Yogyakarta Special Province; it is relatively a new reservoir with the area of 1.9 kilometer square and its capacity of 25 million cubic meter: It started to operate since 1996 as flood control, irigation, water supply, tourism and fishery purposes. As a reservoir it could be considered to be a manmade lake, as its condition nearly similar to a lake. Since it operated (even during construction period there were some significant environmental changes within the reservoir and in the area around the reservoir due to the human activities. These changes could threat the sustainability of the reservoir itself This research aims to identiflr the human activities living around the reservoir and visitors coming to the area, and to evaluate the potensial of the activities to produce wastes which is discharging in into the reservoir; which may threat the sustainability of the reservoir: The observatorium in the field has been conducted in the area of the reservoir and its sorrounding. I t was firund fiom the observation that activities o f fishery using net (karamba, tourism altogether with its facilities, land use around the reservoir for agriculture purposes, mining of class C ore, have given a lot of contribution to wastes (liquid and solids and sediments into the reservoir: Those activities may cause water quality of the reservoir lo decrease as well as reducing the reservoir depth. Those situation was observed in the northern and north western parts of the reservoir Water quality degradation of the reservoir may threat reservoir as source of domestic water supply, while the sedimentation may reduce the life time of the reservoir The fishery and tourism activities was estimated as a main cause of water quality degradation, beside agricultural and domestic wastes originated from sattlement area around the reservoir: Sediments coming into the reservoir are derived fiom transported and movement of

  8. Modeling of Turbidity Variation in Two Reservoirs Connected by a Water Transfer Tunnel in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Chung Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Andong and Imha reservoirs in South Korea are connected by a water transfer tunnel. The turbidity of the Imha reservoir is much higher than that of the Andong reservoir. Thus, it is necessary to examine the movement of turbidity between the two reservoirs via the water transfer tunnel. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the water transfer tunnel on the turbidity behavior of the two connecting reservoirs and to further understand the effect of reservoir turbidity distribution as a function of the selective withdrawal depth. This study applied the CE-QUAL-W2, a water quality and 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model, for simulating the hydrodynamic processes of the two reservoirs. Results indicate that, in the Andong reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was similar to that without the tunnel. However, in the Imha reservoir, the turbidity of the released water with the water transfer tunnel was lower than that without the tunnel. This can be attributed to the higher capacity of the Andong reservoir, which has double the storage of the Imha reservoir. Withdrawal turbidity in the Imha reservoir was investigated using the water transfer tunnel. This study applied three withdrawal selections as elevation (EL. 141.0 m, 146.5 m, and 152.0 m. The highest withdrawal turbidity resulted in EL. 141.0 m, which indicates that the high turbidity current is located at a vertical depth of about 20–30 m because of the density difference. These results will be helpful for understanding the release and selective withdrawal turbidity behaviors for a water transfer tunnel between two reservoirs.

  9. Thermochemical sulphate reduction can improve carbonate petroleum reservoir quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Worden, Richard H.; Yang, Changbing

    2018-02-01

    Interest in the creation of secondary pore spaces in petroleum reservoirs has increased because of a need to understand deeper and more complex reservoirs. The creation of new secondary porosity that enhances overall reservoir quality in deeply buried carbonate reservoirs is controversial and some recent studies have concluded it is not an important phenomenon. Here we present petrography, geochemistry, fluid inclusion data, and fluid-rock interaction reaction modeling results from Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Sichuan Basin, China, core samples and explore the relative importance of secondary porosity due to thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) during deep burial diagenesis. We find that new secondary pores result from the dissolution of anhydrite and possibly from dissolution of the matrix dolomite. Assuming porosity before TSR was 16% and the percentage of anhydrite was 6%, modelling shows that, due to TSR, 1.6% additional porosity was created that led to permeability increasing from 110 mD (range 72-168 mD within a 95% confidence interval) to 264 mD (range 162-432 mD within a 95% confidence interval). Secondary porosity results from the density differences between reactant anhydrite and product calcite, the addition of new water during TSR, and the generation of acidity during the reaction of new H2S with the siderite component in pre-existing dolomite in the reservoir. Fluid pressure was high during TSR, and approached lithostatic pressure in some samples; this transient overpressure may have led to the maintenance of porosity due to the inhibition of compactional processes. An additional 1.6% porosity is significant for reserve calculations, especially considering that it occurs in conjunction with elevated permeability that results in faster flow rates to the production wells.

  10. A review of reservoir desiltation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Anders

    2000-01-01

    physical geography, hydrology, desilation efficiency, reservoir flushing, density-current venting, sediment slucing, erosion pattern, downstream effects, flow characteristics, sedimentation......physical geography, hydrology, desilation efficiency, reservoir flushing, density-current venting, sediment slucing, erosion pattern, downstream effects, flow characteristics, sedimentation...

  11. Reservoir sedimentation; a literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloff, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of literature is made on reservoir sedimentation, one of the most threatening processes for world-wide reservoir performance. The sedimentation processes, their impacts, and their controlling factors are assessed from a hydraulic engineering point of view with special emphasis on

  12. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  13. Chalk as a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    basin, so stylolite formation in the chalk is controlled by effective burial stress. The stylolites are zones of calcite dissolution and probably are the source of calcite for porefilling cementation which is typical in water zone chalk and also affect the reservoirs to different extent. The relatively...... 50% calcite, leaving the remaining internal surface to the fine grained silica and clay. The high specific surface of these components causes clay- and silica rich intervals to have high irreducible water saturation. Although chalks typically are found to be water wet, chalk with mixed wettability...... stabilizes chemically by recrystallization. This process requires energy and is promoted by temperature. This recrystallization in principle does not influence porosity, but only specific surface, which decreases during recrystallization, causing permeability to increase. The central North Sea is a warm...

  14. Pacifiers: a microbial reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Elodie; Marion, Karine; Renaud, François N R; Dore, Jeanne; Bergeron, Emmanuelle; Freney, Jean

    2006-12-01

    The permanent contact between the nipple part of pacifiers and the oral microflora offers ideal conditions for the development of biofilms. This study assessed the microbial contamination on the surface of 25 used pacifier nipples provided by day-care centers. Nine were made of silicone and 16 were made of latex. The biofilm was quantified using direct staining and microscopic observations followed by scraping and microorganism counting. The presence of a biofilm was confirmed on 80% of the pacifier nipples studied. This biofilm was mature for 36% of them. Latex pacifier nipples were more contaminated than silicone ones. The two main genera isolated were Staphylococcus and Candida. Our results confirm that nipples can be seen as potential reservoirs of infections. However, pacifiers do have some advantages; in particular, the potential protection they afford against sudden infant death syndrome. Strict rules of hygiene and an efficient antibiofilm cleaning protocol should be established to answer the worries of parents concerning the safety of pacifiers.

  15. Cased-hole log analysis and reservoir performance monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses vital issues, such as the evaluation of shale gas reservoirs and their production. Topics include the cased-hole logging environment, reservoir fluid properties; flow regimes; temperature, noise, cement bond, and pulsed neutron logging; and casing inspection. Production logging charts and tables are included in the appendices. The work serves as a comprehensive reference for production engineers with upstream E&P companies, well logging service company employees, university students, and petroleum industry training professionals. This book also: ·       Provides methods of conveying production logging tools along horizontal well segments as well as measurements of formation electrical resistivity through casing ·       Covers new information on fluid flow characteristics in inclined pipe and provides new and improved nuclear tool measurements in cased wells ·       Includes updates on cased-hole wireline formation testing  

  16. Reactive Tracers for Characterizing Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Adam J.

    Multi-component tracer tests were conducted at a 10 x 10 m well field located in the Altona Flat Rocks of northern New York. Temperature advancement between two wells separated by 14 m was monitored throughout the well field during progressive heating of the reservoir over 6 d. Multiple approaches to predicting heat transport were applied to field data and compared to temperature rise recorded during reservoir heat-up. Tracer analysis incorporated both an analytical one-dimensional model and a two-dimensional numerical model for non-uniform fractures experiencing "flow-channeling." Modeling efforts demonstrated that estimating heat transfer surface area using a combined inert/adsorbing tracer (cesium-iodide) could provide accurate forecasting of premature thermal breakthrough. In addition, thermally degrading tracer tests were used to monitor inter-well temperature during progressive reservoir heating. Inert tracers alone were, in general, inadequate in forecasting thermal performance. In fact, moment analysis shows that, mathematically, thermal breakthrough is independent of parameters that primarily influence inert tracers. The most accurate prediction of thermal breakthrough using inert tracer alone was produced by treating hydrodynamic dispersion as a truly Fickian process with known and accurate mathematical models. Under this assumption, inert tracer data was matched by solving an inverse problem for non-uniform fracture aperture. Early arrival of the thermal front was predicted at the production, but was less accurate than using a combined inert/adsorbing tracer test. The spatial distribution of fluid flow paths in the plane of the fracture were identified using computational models, Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS), and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imaging of saline tracer flow paths in the target fracture. Without exception, fluid flow was found to be concentrated in a roughly 1 m wide flow channel directly between the two wells. The

  17. Advances in photonic reservoir computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van der Sande Guy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We review a novel paradigm that has emerged in analogue neuromorphic optical computing. The goal is to implement a reservoir computer in optics, where information is encoded in the intensity and phase of the optical field. Reservoir computing is a bio-inspired approach especially suited for processing time-dependent information. The reservoir’s complex and high-dimensional transient response to the input signal is capable of universal computation. The reservoir does not need to be trained, which makes it very well suited for optics. As such, much of the promise of photonic reservoirs lies in their minimal hardware requirements, a tremendous advantage over other hardware-intensive neural network models. We review the two main approaches to optical reservoir computing: networks implemented with multiple discrete optical nodes and the continuous system of a single nonlinear device coupled to delayed feedback.

  18. A reservoir management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allis, R.G.

    1989-06-16

    There are numerous documented cases of extraction of fluids from the ground causing surface subsidence. The cases include groundwater, oil and gas, as well as geothermal fluid withdrawal. A recent comprehensive review of all types of man-induced land subsidence was published by the Geological Survey of America. At the early stages of a geothermal power development project it is standard practice in most countries for an environmental impact report to be required. The possibility of geothermal subsidence has to be addressed, and usually it falls on the geophysicists and/or geologists to make some predictions. The advice given is vital for planning the power plant location and the borefield pipe and drain layout. It is not so much the vertical settlement that occurs with subsidence but the accompanying horizontal ground strains that can do the most damage to any man-made structure.

  19. Intraventricular therapy of cryptococcal meningitis via a subcutaneous reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, B; Depman, M R; Gold, J W; Galicich, J H; Armstrong, D

    1986-07-01

    Intraventricular administration of amphotericin B for meningitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans is usually reserved for selected, seriously ill patients with recurrent disease. Between September 1973 and November 1983, 10 of 23 patients treated for cryptococcal meningitis at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center received intraventricular amphotericin B through subcutaneous reservoirs, in addition to systemic therapy. The value of intraventricular amphotericin B was assessed in the 13 patients treated for first episodes of meningitis with systemic amphotericin B and flucytosine. Death during therapy occurred in one of six patients with intraventricular and systemic therapy compared with six of seven patients with systemic therapy alone (p = 0.025). The cerebrospinal fluid was sterilized in six of six patients given systemic and intraventricular therapy compared with three of seven given systemic therapy alone (p = 0.049), and the cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen titer declined in six of six patients given systemic and intraventricular therapy compared with two of seven given systemic therapy alone (p = 0.016). In the 10 patients who received intraventricular therapy, there were no complications related to reservoir insertion; however, complications related to reservoir use requiring replacement or revision occurred in two patients, and bacterial infection occurred in one but was treated successfully without removal of the reservoir. Although these data are retrospective, they suggest that early therapy with intraventricular amphotericin B in combination with systemic therapy may be beneficial and relatively safe in patients with cryptococcal meningitis and a poor prognosis.

  20. analysis of pressure variation of fluid in bounded circular reservoirs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    chosen for PD should be at least quadratic in D r so that there are no terms in eq. 20 that are identically zero. Since the primary variable is simply the function itself, the Lagrange family of interpolation functions is admissible. We proposed that D. P is the approximation over a typical finite element domain by the expression:.

  1. discrimination of reservoir fluid contacts using compressional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lithology discrimination, imaging structure through gas clouds and fracture detection by analysis of shear wave splitting, among other applications (Garotta et al., .... showing very low acoustic impedance and high resistivity are regions of high hydrocarbon saturation. However, the unavailability of neutron log and SP log.

  2. Fluid Behavior and Fluid-Solid Interactions in Nanoporous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although shale oil/gas production in the US has increased exponentially, the low energy recovery is a daunting problem needed to be solved for its sustainability and continued growth, especially in light of the recent oil/gas price decline. This is apparently related to the small porosity (a few to a few hundred nm) and low permeability (10-16-10-20 m2) of tight shale formations. The fundamental question lies in the anomalous behavior of fluids in nanopores due to confinement effects, which, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined experimental characterization and observations, particularly using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with pore-scale modeling using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), to examine the fluid behavior and fluid-solid interactions in nanopores at reservoir conditions. Experimentally, we characterized the compositions and microstructures of a shale sample from Wolfcamp, Texas, using a variety of analytical techniques. Our analyses reveal that the shale sample is made of organic-matter (OM)-lean and OM-rich layers that exhibit different chemical and mineral compositions, and microstructural characteristics. Using the hydrostatic pressure system and gas-mixing setup we developed, in-situ SANS measurements were conducted at pressures up to 20 kpsi on shale samples imbibed with water or water-methane solutions. The obtained results indicate that capillary effect plays a significant role in fluid-nanopore interactions and the associated changes in nanopore structures vary with pore size and pressure. Computationally, we performed LBM modeling to simulate the flow behavior of methane in kerogen nanoporous structure. The correction factor, which is the ratio of apparent permeability to intrinsic permeability, was calculated. Our results show that the correction factor is always greater than one (non-continuum/non-Darcy effects) and increases with decreasing nanopore size, intrinsic permeability and pressure. Hence, the

  3. Schroedinger fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  4. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  5. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The

  6. Selecting an Appropriate Upscaled Reservoir Model Based on Connectivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preux Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir engineers aim to build reservoir models to investigate fluid flows within hydrocarbon reservoirs. These models consist of three-dimensional grids populated by petrophysical properties. In this paper, we focus on permeability that is known to significantly influence fluid flow. Reservoir models usually encompass a very large number of fine grid blocks to better represent heterogeneities. However, performing fluid flow simulations for such fine models is extensively CPU-time consuming. A common practice consists in converting the fine models into coarse models with less grid blocks: this is the upscaling process. Many upscaling methods have been proposed in the literature that all lead to distinct coarse models. The problem is how to choose the appropriate upscaling method. Various criteria have been established to evaluate the information loss due to upscaling, but none of them investigate connectivity. In this paper, we propose to first perform a connectivity analysis for the fine and candidate coarse models. This makes it possible to identify shortest paths connecting wells. Then, we introduce two indicators to quantify the length and trajectory mismatch between the paths for the fine and the coarse models. The upscaling technique to be recommended is the one that provides the coarse model for which the shortest paths are the closest to the shortest paths determined for the fine model, both in terms of length and trajectory. Last, the potential of this methodology is investigated from two test cases. We show that the two indicators help select suitable upscaling techniques as long as gravity is not a prominent factor that drives fluid flows.

  7. Monitoring Subsurface Fluid Flow Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers: Another Tool Potentially Available for Subsurface Fluid Flow Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorocarbon Tracers (PFTs) Complement stable Isotopes and Geochemistry for Verifying, Assessing or Modeling Fluid Flow. Geochemistry, Isotopes and PFT’s complement Geophysics to monitor and verify plume movement, leakage to shallow aquifers or surface

  8. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  9. Well testing in gas hydrate reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Kome, Melvin Njumbe

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir testing and analysis are fundamental tools in understanding reservoir hydraulics and hence forecasting reservoir responses. The quality of the analysis is very dependent on the conceptual model used in investigating the responses under different flowing conditions. The use of reservoir testing in the characterization and derivation of reservoir parameters is widely established, especially in conventional oil and gas reservoirs. However, with depleting conventional reserves, the ...

  10. Nutrition: a reservoir for integrative science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisel, S H; Allen, L H; Coburn, S P; Erdman, J W; Failla, M L; Freake, H C; King, J C; Storch, J

    2001-04-01

    In the last twenty years, powerful new molecular techniques were introduced that made it possible to advance knowledge in human biology using a reductionist approach. Now, the need for scientists to deal with complexity should drive a movement toward an integrationist approach to science. We propose that nutritional science is one of the best reservoirs for this approach. The American Society for Nutritional Sciences can play an important role by developing and delivering a cogent message that convinces the scientific establishment that nutrition fills this valuable niche. The society must develop a comprehensive strategy to develop our image as the reservoir for life sciences integration. Our efforts can start with our national meeting and publications, with the research initiatives for which we advocate, with our graduate training programs and with the public relations image we project for ourselves. Defining the image and future directions of nutrition as the discipline that can integrate scientific knowledge from the cell and molecule to the whole body and beyond to populations can be the most important task that our society undertakes. If we do not effectively meet this challenge, a golden opportunity will pass to others and nutritional scientists will be left to follow them.

  11. Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. Final report, September 29, 1993--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W.W.; Buckley, J.S.; Ouenes, A.

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this three-year project was to provide a quantitative definition of reservoir heterogeneity. This objective was accomplished through the integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering databases into a multi-disciplinary understanding of reservoir architecture and associated fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. This interdisciplinary effort integrated geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation to quantify reservoir architecture and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. An improved reservoir description allows greater accuracy and confidence during simulation and modeling as steps toward gaining greater recovery efficiency from existing reservoirs. A field laboratory, the Sulimar Queen Unit, was available for the field research. Several members of the PRRC staff participated in the development of improved reservoir description by integration of the field and laboratory data as well as in the development of quantitative reservoir models to aid performance predictions. Subcontractors from Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin (UT) collaborated in the research and participated in the design and interpretation of field tests. The three-year project was initiated in September 1993 and led to the development and application of various reservoir description methodologies. A new approach for visualizing production data graphically was developed and implemented on the Internet. Using production data and old gamma rays logs, a black oil reservoir model that honors both primary and secondary performance was developed. The old gamma ray logs were used after applying a resealing technique, which was crucial for the success of the project. In addition to the gamma ray logs, the development of the reservoir model benefitted from an inverse Drill Stem Test (DST) technique which provided initial estimates of the reservoir permeability at different wells.

  12. Direct hydrocarbon exploration and gas reservoir development technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Young Hoon; Oh, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Jin [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    In order to enhance the capability of petroleum exploration and development techniques, three year project (1994 - 1997) was initiated on the research of direct hydrocarbon exploration and gas reservoir development. This project consists of four sub-projects. (1) Oil(Gas) - source rock correlation technique: The overview of bio-marker parameters which are applicable to hydrocarbon exploration has been illustrated. Experimental analysis of saturated hydrocarbon and bio-markers of the Pohang E and F core samples has been carried out. (2) Study on surface geochemistry and microbiology for hydrocarbon exploration: the test results of the experimental device for extraction of dissolved gases from water show that the device can be utilized for the gas geochemistry of water. (3) Development of gas and gas condensate reservoirs: There are two types of reservoir characterization. For the reservoir formation characterization, calculation of conditional simulation was compared with that of unconditional simulation. In the reservoir fluid characterization, phase behavior calculations revealed that the component grouping is more important than the increase of number of components. (4) Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and full waveform inversion: Three individual sections are presented. The first one is devoted to the inversion theory in general sense. The second and the third sections deal with the frequency domain pseudo waveform inversion of seismic reflection data and refraction data respectively. (author). 180 refs., 91 figs., 60 tabs.

  13. An adaptive nonlinear solution scheme for reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, G.S. [Scientific Software - Intercomp, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Numerical reservoir simulation involves solving large, nonlinear systems of PDE with strongly discontinuous coefficients. Because of the large demands on computer memory and CPU, most users must perform simulations on very coarse grids. The average properties of the fluids and rocks must be estimated on these grids. These coarse grid {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} properties are costly to determine, and risky to use, since their optimal values depend on the fluid flow being simulated. Thus, they must be found by trial-and-error techniques, and the more coarse the grid, the poorer the results. This paper describes a numerical reservoir simulator which accepts fine scale properties and automatically generates multiple levels of coarse grid rock and fluid properties. The fine grid properties and the coarse grid simulation results are used to estimate discretization errors with multilevel error expansions. These expansions are local, and identify areas requiring local grid refinement. These refinements are added adoptively by the simulator, and the resulting composite grid equations are solved by a nonlinear Fast Adaptive Composite (FAC) Grid method, with a damped Newton algorithm being used on each local grid. The nonsymmetric linear system of equations resulting from Newton`s method are in turn solved by a preconditioned Conjugate Gradients-like algorithm. The scheme is demonstrated by performing fine and coarse grid simulations of several multiphase reservoirs from around the world.

  14. Beginning Continuous Fluid Motion in the Music Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, Todd G.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on how to include movement education into the music classroom. Discusses the techniques developed by three movement specialists: (1) Edwin Gordon's Continuous Fluid Motion (CFM); (2) Rudolf von Laban's effort/flow elements; and (3) Phyllis Weikart's taxonomy of movement. Includes a bibliography of resources. (CMK)

  15. Sediment Characteristics of Tennessee Streams and Reservoirs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trimble, Stanley W; Carey, William P

    1984-01-01

    Suspended-sediment and reservoir sedimentation data have been analyzed to determine sediment yields and transport characteristics of Tennessee streams Data from 31 reservoirs plus suspended-sediment...

  16. Changes to the Bakomi Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubinský Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the analysis and evaluation of the changes of the bottom of the Bakomi reservoir, the total volume of the reservoir, ecosystems, as well as changes in the riparian zone of the Bakomi reservoir (situated in the central Slovakia. Changes of the water component of the reservoir were subject to the deposition by erosion-sedimentation processes, and were identifed on the basis of a comparison of the present relief of the bottom of reservoir obtained from feld measurements (in 2011 with the relief measurements of the bottom obtained from the 1971 historical maps, (i.e. over a period of 40 years. Changes of landscape structures of the riparian zone have been mapped for the time period of 1949–2013; these changes have been identifed with the analysis of ortophotomaps and the feld survey. There has been a signifcant rise of disturbed shores with low herb grassland. Over a period of 40 years, there has been a deposition of 667 m3 of sediments. The results showed that there were no signifcant changes in the local ecosystems of the Bakomi reservoir in comparison to the other reservoirs in the vicinity of Banská Štiavnica.

  17. TRITIUM RESERVOIR STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE PREDICTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.S.; Morgan, M.J

    2005-11-10

    The burst test is used to assess the material performance of tritium reservoirs in the surveillance program in which reservoirs have been in service for extended periods of time. A materials system model and finite element procedure were developed under a Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program to predict the structural response under a full range of loading and aged material conditions of the reservoir. The results show that the predicted burst pressure and volume ductility are in good agreement with the actual burst test results for the unexposed units. The material tensile properties used in the calculations were obtained from a curved tensile specimen harvested from a companion reservoir by Electric Discharge Machining (EDM). In the absence of exposed and aged material tensile data, literature data were used for demonstrating the methodology in terms of the helium-3 concentration in the metal and the depth of penetration in the reservoir sidewall. It can be shown that the volume ductility decreases significantly with the presence of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, in the metal, as was observed in the laboratory-controlled burst tests. The model and analytical procedure provides a predictive tool for reservoir structural integrity under aging conditions. It is recommended that benchmark tests and analysis for aged materials be performed. The methodology can be augmented to predict performance for reservoir with flaws.

  18. Real-time reservoir geological model updating using the hybrid EnKF and geostatistical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Chen, S.; Yang, D. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada). Petroleum Technology Research Centre

    2008-07-01

    Reservoir simulation plays an important role in modern reservoir management. Multiple geological models are needed in order to analyze the uncertainty of a given reservoir development scenario. Ideally, dynamic data should be incorporated into a reservoir geological model. This can be done by using history matching and tuning the model to match the past performance of reservoir history. This study proposed an assisted history matching technique to accelerate and improve the matching process. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) technique, which is an efficient assisted history matching method, was integrated with a conditional geostatistical simulation technique to dynamically update reservoir geological models. The updated models were constrained to dynamic data, such as reservoir pressure and fluid saturations, and approaches geologically realistic at each time step by using the EnKF technique. The new technique was successfully applied in a heterogeneous synthetic reservoir. The uncertainty of the reservoir characterization was significantly reduced. More accurate forecasts were obtained from the updated models. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Production performance laws of vertical wells by volume fracturing in CBM reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liehui Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume fracturing technology has been widely applied in the development of coalbed methane (CBM reservoirs. As for the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV created by volume fracturing, the seepage laws of fluids are described more accurately and rationally in the rectangular composite model than in the traditional radial composite model. However, the rectangular composite model considering SRV cannot be solved using the analytical or semi-analytical function method, and its solution from the linear flow model has larger errors. In view of this, SRV areas of CBM reservoirs were described by means of dual-medium model in this paper. The complex CBM migration mechanisms were investigated comprehensively, including adsorption, desorption, diffusion and seepage. A well testing model for rectangular composite fracturing wells in CBM reservoirs based on unsteady-state diffusion was built and solved using the boundary element method combined with Laplace transformation, Stehfest numerical inversion and computer programming technology. Thus, production performance laws of CBM reservoirs were clarified. The flow regimes of typical well testing curves were divided and the effects on change laws of production performance from the boundary size of gas reservoirs, permeability of volume fractured areas, adsorption gas content, reservoir permeability and SRV size were analyzed. Eventually, CBM reservoirs after the volume fracturing stimulation were described more accurately and rationally. This study provides a theoretical basis for a better understanding of the CBM migration laws and an approach to evaluating and developing CBM reservoirs efficiently and rationally.

  20. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

    1999-10-15

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

  1. A reservoir simulation approach for modeling of naturally fractured reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohammadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the Warren and Root model proposed for the simulation of naturally fractured reservoir was improved. A reservoir simulation approach was used to develop a 2D model of a synthetic oil reservoir. Main rock properties of each gridblock were defined for two different types of gridblocks called matrix and fracture gridblocks. These two gridblocks were different in porosity and permeability values which were higher for fracture gridblocks compared to the matrix gridblocks. This model was solved using the implicit finite difference method. Results showed an improvement in the Warren and Root model especially in region 2 of the semilog plot of pressure drop versus time, which indicated a linear transition zone with no inflection point as predicted by other investigators. Effects of fracture spacing, fracture permeability, fracture porosity, matrix permeability and matrix porosity on the behavior of a typical naturally fractured reservoir were also presented.

  2. THE SURDUC RESERVOIR (ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niculae Iulian TEODORESCU

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Surduc reservoir was projected to ensure more water when water is scarce and to thus provide especially the city Timisoara, downstream of it with water.The accumulation is placed on the main affluent of the Bega river, Gladna in the upper part of its watercourse.The dam behind which this accumulation was created is of a frontal type made of enrochements with a masque made of armed concrete on the upstream part and protected/sustained by grass on the downstream. The dam is 130m long on its coping and a constructed height of 34 m. It is also endowed with spillway for high water and two bottom outlets formed of two conduits, at the end of which is the microplant. The second part of my paper deals with the hydrometric analysis of the Accumulation Surduc and its impact upon the flow, especially the maximum run-off. This influence is exemplified through the high flood from the 29th of July 1980, the most significant flood recorded in the basin with an apparition probability of 0.002%.

  3. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  4. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

  5. Waste-aware fluid volume assignment for flow-based microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Alexander Rüdiger; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    complex Fluidic Units (FUs) such as switches, micropumps, mixers and separators can be constructed. When running a biochemical application on a FBMB, fluid volumes are dispensed from input reservoirs and used by the FUs. Given a biochemical application and a biochip, we are interested in determining...... is able to minimize the fluid consumption through optimal fluid assignment and reuse of fluid waste. Due to the algorithm's low complexity, fluid requirements can also be calculated during runtime for error recovery or statically unknown cases....

  6. Breathing of magma reservoir beneath Nevado del Ruiz Volcano in Colombia inferred from repeated seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Vargas, Carlos A.; Gladkov, Valery; Lopez, Cristian M.; Gomez, Eliana; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2017-04-01

    The Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia is one of the most hazardous volcanoes in the world, causing the death of 25,000 people in 1985. Using a new algorithm for repeated tomography, we detected a clear seismic anomaly beneath the volcano that changes amplitude and shape during the present unrest period, which started in 2010. We propose that this anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio is associated with a significant amount of liquid fluid that was accumulated beneath the volcano prior to the eruption. In 2010, degassing of these fluids triggered the beginning of the volcanic unrest that continues until now. In 2011-2014, most of the fluids escaped through the crater that led to the emptying of the reservoir. In 2015-2016, a new inflation of the reservoir was accompanied by increase of volcanic activity. It is possible that recurrent "breathing" of the volcano reservoir is the main cause of the NRV eruptions.

  7. 4-dimensional studies of fluid-rock interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Macente, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Successful management of hydrocarbon reservoirs, geothermal energy extraction sites, radioactive waste and CO2 storage sites depends on a detailed knowledge of fluid transport properties, porosity and permeability. Amongst deformation processes, fluid-rock interaction plays an important role in controlling the petrophysical properties of a rock. The presence of fluids in the rocks induce chemical and physical changes in compositions and texture, affecting porosity and permeabil...

  8. Gravity Effect on Two-Phase Immiscible Flows in Communicating Layered Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2012-01-01

    An upscaling method is developed for two-phase immiscible incompressible flows in layered reservoirs with good communication between the layers. It takes the effect of gravity into consideration. Waterflooding of petroleum reservoirs is used as a basic example for application of this method....... An asymptotic analysis is applied to a system of 2D flow equations for incompressible fluids at high-anisotropy ratios, but low to moderate gravity ratios, which corresponds to the most often found reservoir conditions. The 2D Buckley–Leverett problem is reduced to a system of 1D parabolic equations...

  9. Production forecasting and economic evaluation of horizontal wells completed in natural fractured reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for optimizing recovery of hydrocarbons from naturally fractured reservoirs using horizontal well technology was proposed. The technique combines inflow performance analysis, production forecasting and economic considerations, and is based on material balance analysis and linear approximations of reservoir fluid properties as functions of reservoir pressure. An economic evaluation model accounting for the time value of cash flow, interest and inflation rates, is part of the package. Examples of using the technique have been demonstrated. The method is also applied to a gas well producing from a horizontal wellbore intersecting discrete natural fractures. 11 refs., 2 tabs,. 10 figs

  10. A Novel Integrated Approach to Modelling of Depletion-Induced Change in Full Permeability Tensor of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Izadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than half of all hydrocarbon reservoirs are Naturally Fractured Reservoirs (NFRs, in which production forecasting is a complicated function of fluid flow in a fracture-matrix system. Modelling of fluid flow in NFRs is challenging due to formation heterogeneity and anisotropy. Stress sensitivity and depletion effect on already-complex reservoir permeability add to the sophistication. Horizontal permeability anisotropy and stress sensitivity are often ignored or inaccurately taken into account when simulating fluid flow in NFRs. The aim of this paper is to present an integrated approach for evaluating the dynamic and true anisotropic nature of permeability in naturally fractured reservoirs. Among other features, this approach considers the effect of reservoir depletion on reservoir permeability tensor, allowing more realistic production forecasts. In this approach the NFR is discretized into grids for which an analytical model yields full permeability tensors. Then, fluid flow is modelled using the finite-element method to obtain pore-pressure distribution within the reservoir. Next, another analytical model evaluates the change in the aperture of individual fractures as a function of effective stress and rock mechanical properties. The permeability tensor of each grid is then updated based on the apertures obtained for the current time step. The integrated model proceeds according to the next prescribed time increments.

  11. The use of chemical tracers to water injection processes applied on Romanian reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zecheru M.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The hydrocarbon reservoirs are extremely complex, each reservoir having its own identity. Reservoirs heterogeneity (mainly regarding the layered ones frequently results in low recovery efficiencies, both under the primary regime and when different agents are injected from the surface. EOR processes efficiency depends on how detailed the reservoir is known and on the information related to fluids flow through reservoir. There are certain analyzes, investigations and tests providing good knowledge about the reservoir. The tracer tests are among them, being frequently used to water injection processes. Depending on the method used, IWTT (Interwell tracer test, SWTT (Single-Well Tracer Test, TWTT (Two-Well Tracer Test, information are obtained as related to: the setting of the preferential flow path of the injected fluid, the identification of water channels, evidencing the geological barriers, determining the residual oil saturation, around the well bore or along the tracer's path between two wells. This paper is focused on ICPT Câmpina efforts related to the use of the chemical tracers to the water injection processes applied to the oil reservoirs of Romania. It describes the usual tracers and the methods used to detect them in the reaction wells. Up to now, more than 50 tests with IWTT tracers have been performed on-site and this work presents some of their results.

  12. Adaptive Liquid Lens Actuated by Droplet Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report an adaptive liquid lens actuated by droplet movement. Four rectangular PMMA (Polymethyl Methacrylate substrates are stacked to form the device structure. Two ITO (Indium Tin Oxide sheets stick on the bottom substrate. One PMMA sheet with a light hole is inserted in the middle of the device. A conductive droplet is placed on the substrate and touches the PMMA sheet to form a small closed reservoir. The reservoir is filled with another immiscible non-conductive liquid. The non-conductive liquid can form a smooth concave interface with the light hole. When the device is applied with voltage, the droplet stretches towards the reservoir. The volume of the reservoir reduces, changing the curvature of the interface. The device can thus achieve the function of an adaptive lens. Our experiments show that the focal length can be varied from −10 to −159 mm as the applied voltage changes from 0 to 65 V. The response time of the liquid lens is ~75 ms. The proposed device has potential applications in many fields such as information displays, imaging systems, and laser scanning systems.

  13. Failure of the inflatable penile prosthesis due to abnormal folding of a low-profile reservoir – A selected case from an overall series and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Alejandro Navarrete

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case from a running series of inflatable penile prosthesis failure due to improper folding of the Conceal™ reservoir. The Conceal™ Low-Profile reservoir gained popularity due to claims of improved cosmesis and ease of implantation. As the number of patients receiving this and other low-profile reservoirs increases, it is imperative to review and document any novel complications. While the Conceal™ reservoir may be preferred in ectopic placement, it may be more prone to fluid lockout facilitated by conformational change. Our review did not identify prior reports of improper folding, which we believe is unique to these low-profile reservoirs.

  14. IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid B. Grigg; Robert K. Svec; Zheng-Wen Zeng; Liu Yi; Baojun Bai

    2004-01-01

    A three-year contract for the project, DOE Contract No. DE-FG26-01BC15364, ''Improving CO 2 Efficiency for Recovering Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'', was started on September 28, 2001. This project examines three major areas in which CO 2 flooding can be improved: fluid and matrix interactions, conformance control/sweep efficiency, and reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery. The project has received a one-year, no-cost extension to September 27, 2005. During this extra time additional deliverables will be (1) the version of MASTER that has been debugged and a foam option added for CO 2 mobility control and (2) adsorption/desorption data on pure component minerals common in reservoir rock that will be used to improve predictions of chemical loss to adsorption in reservoirs. This report discusses the activity during the six-month period covering October 1, 2003 through March 31, 2004 that comprises the first and second fiscal quarters of the project's third year. During this period of the project several areas have advanced: reservoir fluid/rock interactions and their relationships to changing injectivity, and surfactant adsorption on quarried core and pure component granules, foam stability, and high flow rate effects. Presentations and papers included: a papers covered in a previous report was presented at the fall SPE ATCE in Denver in October 2003, a presentation at the Southwest ACS meeting in Oklahoma City, presentation on CO 2 flood basic behavior at the Midland Annual CO 2 Conference December 2003; two papers prepared for the biannual SPE/DOE Symposium on IOR, Tulsa, April 2004; one paper accepted for the fall 2004 SPE ATCE in Houston; and a paper submitted to an international journal Journal of Colloid and Interface Science which is being revised after peer review

  15. Monitoring gas reservoirs by seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Priolo, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise can be used to image spatial anomalies in the subsurface, without the need of recordings from seismic sources, such as earthquakes or explosions. Furthermore, the temporal variation of ambient seismic noise's can be used to infer temporal changes of the seismic velocities in the investigated medium. Such temporal variations can reflect changes of several physical properties/conditions in the medium. For example, they may be consequence of stress changes, variation of hydrogeological parameters, pore pressure and saturation changes due to fluid injection or extraction. Passive image interferometry allows to continuously monitor small temporal changes of seismic velocities in the subsurface, making it a suitable tool to monitor time-variant systems such as oil and gas reservoirs or volcanic environments. The technique does not require recordings from seismic sources in the classical sense, but is based on the processing of noise records. Moreover, it requires only data from one or two seismic stations, their locations constraining the sampled target area. Here we apply passive image interferometry to monitor a gas storage reservoir in northern Italy. The Collalto field (Northern Italy) is a depleted gas reservoir located at 1500 m depth, now used as a gas storage facility. The reservoir experience a significant temporal variation in the amount of stored gas: the injection phases mainly occur in the summer, while the extraction take place mostly in winter. In order to monitor induced seismicity related to gas storage operations, a seismic network (the Collalto Seismic Network) has been deployed in 2011. The Collalto Seismic Network is composed by 10 broadband stations, deployed within an area of about 20 km x 20 km, and provides high-quality continuous data since January 1st, 2012. In this work we present preliminary results from ambient noise interferometry using a two-months sample of continuous seismic data, i.e. from October 1st, 2012, to the

  16. Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

  17. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  18. Effect of shale-water recharge on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of shale-water recharge has often been discussed and preliminary assessments of its significance in the recovery of geopressured fluids have been given previously. The present study uses the Pleasant Bayou Reservoir data as a base case and varies the shale formation properties to investigate their impact on brine and gas recovery. The parametric calculations, based on semi-analytic solutions and finite-difference techniques, show that for vertical shale permeabilities which are at least of the order of 10/sup -5/ md, shale recharge will constitute an important reservoir drive mechanism and will result in much larger fluid recovery than that possible in the absence of shale dewatering.

  19. FORMATE-BASED FLUIDS: FORMULATION AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Formate-based fluids has been successfully used in over hunders HPHT well operations since they introduced in field practice. They have many advantages when compared with conventional HPHT drilling and completion fluids such as: minimal formation damage, maintenance of additve properties at high temperatures, reduced hydraulic flow resistance, low potential for differential sticking, naturally lubricating, very low corrosion rates, biodegradable and pose little risk to the environment etc. Formate-based fluids can be applied during deep slim hole drilling, shale drilling, reservoir drilling, salt and gas hydrate formations drilling. The laboratory research was carried out to evaluate the rheological behavior of formate-based fluids as a function of temperature. Formate-based fluids were formulated using potassium formate brine, xanthan polymer, PAC, starch and calcium carbonate. Experimental results show that potassium formate improves the thermal stability of polymers.

  20. Fluid mixing and ore deposition during the geodynamic evolution of the Sierra Almagrera (Betics, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyja, Vanessa; Tarantola, Alexandre; Hibsch, Christian; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Marine and continental intramountaineous basins developed during the Neogene orographic evolution of the Betico-rifan orogenic wedge, as well as the related uplifted ranges within the Sierra Almagrera Metamorphic Core Complexes (MCC). The NNE-SSW striking trans-Alboran transcurrent fault system crosscuts the MCC post-dating the extensional exhumation stages recorded in the metamorphic fabric. Iron ores (± Pb, Cu, Zn) are encountered either as stratabound ore deposits in the Neogene basins or as vein networks crosscutting the metamorphic fabric of graphitic phyllites from the Sierra Almagrera. These Late Miocene ore deposits are related to the activity of the N-S striking Palomares fault segment of the Trans-Alboran fault system. Three sets of quartz veins (Vα, Vαβ and Vβ) and one set of mineralized vein (Vγ, siderite, barite) are distinguished. The Vα and Vαβ respectively are totally or partially transposed into the foliation. The Vβ and Vγ veins are discordant to the foliation. The problem addressed in this study concerns the nature of the fluids involved in the metal deposits and their relationships with the main reservoir fluids, e.g. the deep metamorphic fluids, the basinal fluids, and eventually the recharge meteoric fluids. This study focuses thus on the evolution of the fluids at different stages of ductile-brittle exhumation of the metamorphic ranges (Sierras) and their role during the exhumation and later on in relation with the hydrothermalism and metal deposition at a regional scale. Paleofluids were studied as inclusions in quartz, siderite and barite from veins by microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy, and a stable isotope study is in progress. Earliest fluids recorded in (Vαβ) quartz veins are H2O- NaCl + CaCl2 (17 wt. %) - (traces of CO2, CH4, N2) metamorphic brines trapped at the ductile brittle transition at a minimum trapping temperatures (Th) of 340 °C. Older metamorphic fluids in (Vα) veins were lost during the complete

  1. Petroleum reservoir data for testing simulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, J.M.; Harrison, W.

    1980-09-01

    This report consists of reservoir pressure and production data for 25 petroleum reservoirs. Included are 5 data sets for single-phase (liquid) reservoirs, 1 data set for a single-phase (liquid) reservoir with pressure maintenance, 13 data sets for two-phase (liquid/gas) reservoirs and 6 for two-phase reservoirs with pressure maintenance. Also given are ancillary data for each reservoir that could be of value in the development and validation of simulation models. A bibliography is included that lists the publications from which the data were obtained.

  2. Superposition method used for treating oilfield interference in Iranian water-drive reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, K. [National Iranian South Oil Company, (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Water-drive oil fields that share a common aquifer are in hydrodynamic communication. Production from such fields is accompanied by pressure loss that manifests itself as pressure interference because the decline in pressure is transmitted through the aquifer to other fields even several miles away from a producing pool. In order to address the challenge of discovering new Iranian oil reserves, attention has focused on the efficient development of existing reservoirs. The Asmari reservoir consists of a high permeability sand and carbonate section in an elongated anticlinal structure. A drop in reservoir pressure was observed in field 'A' in 1974. This drop in pressure was noted one year after field 'B' in the same reservoir reached peak oil production of 1.1 MMBPD. A practical analytical method was developed to help the reservoir engineer analyze oilfield interference problems. Reservoir performance indicates that the aquifer from field 'A' has strong communication with field 'B'. The most practical method for treating oilfield interference in water-drive Iranian reservoirs was the superposition technique. It was emphasized that the impact of nearby fields should be considered in all reservoir simulations to accurately identify regional aquifer effects on flow rates and oil-water contact movement. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  3. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement-based intera......In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  4. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from aGeologic Storage Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-09

    The amounts of CO2 that would need to be injected intogeologic storage reservoirs to achieve a significant reduction ofatmospheric emissions are very large. A 1000 MWe coal-fired power plantemits approximately 30,000 tonnes of CO2 per day, 10 Mt per year(Hitchon, 1996). When injected underground over a typical lifetime of 30years of such a plant, the CO2 plume may occupy a large area of order 100km2 or more, and fluid pressure increase in excess of 1 bar(corresponding to 10 m water head) may extend over an area of more than2,500 km2 (Pruess, et al., 2003). The large areal extent expected for CO2plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered,such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape fromthe primary storage reservoir. Under most subsurface conditions oftemperature and pressure, CO2 is buoyant relative to groundwaters. If(sub-)vertical pathways are available, CO2 will tend to flow upward and,depending on geologic conditions, may eventually reach potablegroundwater aquifers or even the land surface. Leakage of CO2 could alsooccur along wellbores, including pre-existing and improperly abandonedwells, or wells drilled in connection with the CO2 storage operations.The pressure increases accompanying CO2 injection will give rise tochanges in effective stress that could cause movement along faults,increasing permeability and potential for leakage.Escape of CO2 from aprimary geologic storage reservoir and potential hazards associated withits discharge at the land surface raise a number of concerns, including(1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard whenleaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase inatmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy,eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In orderto gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address theseissues

  5. Gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Glegola, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the added value of gravity observations for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring and characterization is investigated. Reservoir processes and reservoir types most suitable for gravimetric monitoring are identified. Major noise sources affecting time-lapse gravimetry are analyzed. The added value of gravity data for reservoir monitoring and characterization is analyzed within closed-loop reservoir management concept. Synthetic 2D and 3D numerical experiments are performed where var...

  6. MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Fengjun Zhang; Yannong Dong; Jan Arild Skjervheim; Ning Liu

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. But while the volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade, it is not yet possible to make use of all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. The goal of this project is to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem is necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management. Facies (defined here as regions of relatively uniform petrophysical properties) are common features of all reservoirs. Because the flow properties of the various facies can vary greatly, knowledge of the location of facies boundaries is of utmost importance for the prediction of reservoir performance and for the optimization of reservoir management. When the boundaries between facies are fairly well known, but flow properties are poorly known, the average properties for all facies can be determined using traditional techniques. Traditional history matching honors dynamic data by adjusting petrophysical properties in large areas, but in the process of adjusting the reservoir model ignores the static data and often results in implausible reservoir

  7. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  8. Cross-fault pressure depletion, Zechstein carbonate reservoir, Weser-Ems area, Northern German Gas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, F.V.; Brauckmann, F.; Beckmann, H.; Gobi, A.; Grassmann, S.; Neble, J.; Roettgen, K. [ExxonMobil Production Deutschland GmbH (EMPG), Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    A cross-fault pressure depletion study in Upper Permian Zechstein Ca2 carbonate reservoir was undertaken in the Weser-Ems area of the Northern German Gas Basin. The primary objectives are to develop a practical workflow to define cross-fault pressures scenarios for Zechstein Ca2 reservoir drillwells, to determine the key factors of cross-fault pressure behavior in this platform carbonate reservoir, and to translate the observed cross-fault pressure depletion to fault transmissibility for reservoir simulation models. Analysis of Zechstein Ca2 cross-fault pressures indicates that most Zechstein-cutting faults appear to act as fluid-flow baffles with some local occurrences of fault seal. Moreover, there appears to be distinct cross-fault baffling or pressure depletion trends that may be related to the extent of the separating fault or fault system, degree of reservoir flow-path tortuosity, and quality of reservoir juxtaposition. Based on the above observations, a three-part workflow was developed consisting of (1) careful interpretation and mapping of faults and fault networks, (2) analysis of reservoir juxtaposition and reservoir juxtaposition quality, and (3) application of the observed cross-fault pressure depletion trends. This approach is field-analog based, is practical, and is being used currently to provide reliable and supportable pressure prediction scenarios for subsequent Zechstein fault-bounded drill-well opportunities.

  9. MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Yannong Dong; Ning Liu; Guohua Gao; Fengjun Zhang; Ruijian Li

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. The volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade. The techniques developed in this research will make it easier to use all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. In this project, we have developed computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Specifically, we have developed methods for adjusting porosity and permeability fields to match both production and time-lapse seismic data and have also developed a procedure to adjust the locations of boundaries between facies to match production data. In all cases, the history matched rock property fields are consistent with a prior model based on static data and geologic information. Our work also indicates that it is possible to adjust relative permeability curves when history matching production data.

  10. Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong [Univ. of Petroleum Changping, Beijing (China)

    1997-08-01

    Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

  11. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  12. Geological and production characteristics of strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.; Jackson, S.; Madden, M.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Salamy, S.P.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) primary mission in the oil research program is to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. The Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program supports DOE`s mission through cost-shared demonstrations of improved Oil Recovery (IOR) processes and reservoir characterization methods. In the past 3 years, the DOE has issued Program Opportunity Notices (PONs) seeking cost-shared proposals for the three highest priority, geologically defined reservoir classes. The classes have been prioritized based on resource size and risk of abandonment. This document defines the geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of the fourth reservoir class, strandplain/barrier islands. Knowledge of the geological factors and processes that control formation and preservation of reservoir deposits, external and internal reservoir heterogeneities, reservoir characterization methodology, and IOR process application can be used to increase production of the remaining oil-in-place (IOR) in Class 4 reservoirs. Knowledge of heterogeneities that inhibit or block fluid flow is particularly critical. Using the TORIS database of 330 of the largest strandplain/barrier island reservoirs and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (sufactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000.

  13. Reservoir-induced seismicity at Castanhao reservoir, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, B.; do Nascimento, A.; Ferreira, J.; Bezerra, F.

    2012-04-01

    Our case study - the Castanhão reservoir - is located in NE Brazil on crystalline rock at the Borborema Province. The Borborema Province is a major Proterozoic-Archean terrain formed as a consequence of convergence and collision of the São Luis-West Africa craton and the São Francisco-Congo-Kasai cratons. This reservoir is a 60 m high earth-filled dam, which can store up to 4.5 billion m3 of water. The construction begun in 1990 and finished in October 2003.The first identified reservoir-induced events occurred in 2003, when the water level was still low. The water reached the spillway for the first time in January 2004 and, after that, an increase in seismicity occured. The present study shows the results of a campaign done in the period from November 19th, 2009 to December 31th, 2010 at the Castanhão reservoir. We deployed six three-component digital seismographic station network around one of the areas of the reservoir. We analyzed a total of 77 events which were recorded in at least four stations. To determine hypocenters and time origin, we used HYPO71 program (Lee & Lahr, 1975) assuming a half-space model with following parameters: VP= 5.95 km/s and VP/VS=1.73. We also performed a relocation of these events using HYPODD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000) programme. The input data used we used were catalogue data, with all absolute times. The results from the spatio-temporal suggest that different clusters at different areas and depths are triggered at different times due to a mixture of: i - pore pressure increase due to diffusion and ii - increase of pore pressure due to the reservoir load.

  14. Recent crustal movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelzer, H.

    Calculation of temporal height changes for the determination of recent vertical crustal movements in northern, western, and southern Germany is described. Precise geodetic measurements and their analysis for the determination of recent crustal movements in north-eastern Iceland, western Venezuela, and central Peru are described. Determination of recent vertical crustal movements by leveling and gravity data; geodetic modeling of deformations and recent crustal movements; geodetic modeling of plate motions; and instrumental developments in geodetic measuring are discussed.

  15. Electrical characteristics of rocks in fractured and caved reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tianzhi; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Haining; Jiang, Liming; Liu, Tangyan; Meng, He; Wang, Feifei

    2017-12-01

    The conductive paths formed by fractures and cave in complex reservoirs differ from those formed by pores and throats in clastic rocks. In this paper, a new formation model based on fractured and caved reservoirs is established, and the electrical characteristics of rocks are analyzed with different pore structures using resistance law to understand their effects on rock resistivity. The ratio of fracture width to cave radius (C e value) and fracture dip are employed to depict pore structure in this model. Our research shows that the electrical characteristics of rocks in fractured and caved reservoirs are strongly affected by pore structure and porous fluid distribution. Although the rock electrical properties associated with simple pore structure agree well with Archie formulae, the relationships between F and φ or between I and S w , in more complicated pore structures, are nonlinear in double logarithmic coordinates. The parameters in Archie formulae are not constant and they depend on porosity and fluid saturation. Our calculations suggest that the inclined fracture may lead to resistivity anisotropy in the formation. The bigger dip the inclining fracture has, the more anisotropy the formation resistivity has. All of these studies own practical sense for the evaluation of oil saturation using resistivity logging data.

  16. Understanding and Mitigating Reservoir Compaction: an Experimental Study on Sand Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, M.; Hangx, S.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Fossil fuels continue to provide a source for energy, fuels for transport and chemicals for everyday items. However, adverse effects of decades of hydrocarbons production are increasingly impacting society and the environment. Production-driven reduction in reservoir pore pressure leads to a poro-elastic response of the reservoir, and in many occasions to time-dependent compaction (creep) of the reservoir. In turn, reservoir compaction may lead to surface subsidence and could potentially result in induced (micro)seismicity. To predict and mitigate the impact of fluid extraction, we need to understand production-driven reservoir compaction in highly porous siliciclastic rocks and explore potential mitigation strategies, for example, by using compaction-inhibiting injection fluids. As a first step, we investigate the effect of chemical environment on the compaction behaviour of sand aggregates, comparable to poorly consolidated, highly porous sandstones. The sand samples consist of loose aggregates of Beaujean quartz sand, sieved into a grainsize fraction of 180-212 µm. Uniaxial compaction experiments are performed at an axial stress of 35 MPa and temperature of 80°C, mimicking conditions of reservoirs buried at three kilometres depth. The chemical environment during creep is either vacuum-dry or CO2-dry, or fluid-saturated, with fluids consisting of distilled water, acid solution (CO2-saturated water), alkaline solution (pH 9), aluminium solution (pH 3) and solution with surfactants (i.e., AMP). Preliminary results show that compaction of quartz sand aggregates is promoted in a wet environment compared to a dry environment. It is inferred that deformation is controlled by subcritical crack growth when dry and stress corrosion cracking when wet, both resulting in grain failure and subsequent grain rearrangement. Fluids inhibiting these processes, have the potential to inhibit aggregate compaction.

  17. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  18. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  19. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  20. Fluid characterization for miscible EOR projects and CO2 sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kristian; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2007-01-01

    to condition an EOS model before application in performance evaluation of miscible displacements. However, no clear understanding exists of the impact on the resultant accuracy of the selected characterization procedure when the fluid description is subsequently included in reservoir simulation. In this paper......, we present a detailed analysis of the quality of two different characterization procedures over a broad range of reservoir fluids (13 samples) for which experimental swelling-test and slinitube-displacement data are available. We explore the impact of including swelling-test and slimtube experiments......Accurate performance prediction of miscible enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) projects or CO, sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs relies in part on the ability of an equation-of-state (EOS) model to adequately represent the properties of a wide range of mixtures of the resident fluid...

  1. Mineralogical controls on porosity and water chemistry during O2-SO2-CO2 reaction of CO2 storage reservoir and cap-rock core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Julie K.; Golab, Alexandra; Dawson, Grant K.W.; Knuefing, Lydia; Goodwin, Carley; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Reservoir and cap-rock core samples with variable lithology's representative of siliciclastic reservoirs used for CO 2 storage have been characterized and reacted at reservoir conditions with an impure CO 2 stream and low salinity brine. Cores from a target CO 2 storage site in Queensland, Australia were tested. Mineralogical controls on the resulting changes to porosity and water chemistry have been identified. The tested siliciclastic reservoir core samples can be grouped generally into three responses to impure CO 2 -brine reaction, dependent on mineralogy. The mineralogically clean quartzose reservoir cores had high porosities, with negligible change after reaction, in resolvable porosity or mineralogy, calculated using X-ray micro computed tomography and QEMSCAN. However, strong brine acidification and a high concentration of dissolved sulphate were generated in experiments owing to minimal mineral buffering. Also, the movement of kaolin has the potential to block pore throats and reduce permeability. The reaction of the impure CO 2 -brine with calcite-cemented cap-rock core samples caused the largest porosity changes after reaction through calcite dissolution; to the extent that one sample developed a connection of open pores that extended into the core sub-plug. This has the potential to both favor injectivity but also affect CO 2 migration. The dissolution of calcite caused the buffering of acidity resulting in no significant observable silicate dissolution. Clay-rich cap-rock core samples with minor amounts of carbonate minerals had only small changes after reaction. Created porosity appeared mainly disconnected. Changes were instead associated with decreases in density from Fe-leaching of chlorite or dissolution of minor amounts of carbonates and plagioclase. The interbedded sandstone and shale core also developed increased porosity parallel to bedding through dissolution of carbonates and reactive silicates in the sandy layers. Tight interbedded cap

  2. Simulation study of huff-n-puff air injection for enhanced oil recovery in shale oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first attempt to evaluate huff-n-puff air injection in a shale oil reservoir using a simulation approach. Recovery mechanisms and physical processes of huff-n-puff air injection in a shale oil reservoir are investigated through investigating production performance, thermal behavior, reservoir pressure and fluid saturation features. Air flooding is used as the basic case for a comparative study. The simulation study suggests that thermal drive is the main recovery mechanism for huff-n-puff air injection in the shale oil reservoir, but not for simple air flooding. The synergic recovery mechanism of air flooding in conventional light oil reservoirs can be replicated in shale oil reservoirs by using air huff-n-puff injection strategy. Reducing huff-n-puff time is better for performing the synergic recovery mechanism of air injection. O2 diffusion plays an important role in huff-n-puff air injection in shale oil reservoirs. Pressure transmissibility as well as reservoir pressure maintenance ability in huff-n-puff air injection is more pronounced than the simple air flooding after primary depletion stage. No obvious gas override is exhibited in both air flooding and air huff-n-puff injection scenarios in shale reservoirs. Huff-n-puff air injection has great potential to develop shale oil reservoirs. The results from this work may stimulate further investigations.

  3. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-01-01

    Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

  4. Fluid Flow in Low Permeable, Porous Media Écoulements fluides dans un milieu poreux peu perméable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta N. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Migration of hydrocarbons deals with the subsequent movement of petroleum after expulsion from the source rock through water saturated reservoirs or through permeability created by fractures and faults. Although the underlying principles that control the fluid movement in porous media (reservoirs are well understood by reservoir engineers, less is known about the flow characteristics in low-permeable, porous media, such as clays and shales. For flow considerations, the primary parameters are porosity, permeability and the fluid potential gradients. For clays and shales, these parameters are poorly known; yet these control the time periods during which fluid flow occurs in sedimentary basins (100 years to 100 million years. In this paper, I examine the parametric dependence of the time constantsof fluid flow in low permeability sediments on its porosity and permeability. This is accomplished in two parts. In the first part, a technique is presented to investigate the effect of fluid flow in shales which causes undercompaction and buildup of fluid pressures in excess of normal hydrostatic pressure. The technique is pre-drill in nature; it uses seismic velocity analysis of common depth point gather of surface seismic data and is based on the concept developed by Hottmann and Johnson (1965 and Pennebaker (1968. In the second part of the paper, the flow characteristics are discussed in the basin scale. I develop a model that describes the fluid flow in a continuously accreting and subsiding clastics basins, such as the Gulf of Mexico. I examine the pressure characteristics of such a basin by digital simulations and study the effect of the permeability variation of shales on the geologic time dependence of the fluid flux in the sediments, the basin subsidence rate and the pressure buildup with depth. The model incorporates both mechanical compaction and burial diagenesis involving smectite to illite conversion of shales. The latter is based on a

  5. Cloud computing and Reservoir project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, S.; Maraschini, A.; Pacini, F.; Biran, O.

    2009-01-01

    The support for complex services delivery is becoming a key point in current internet technology. Current trends in internet applications are characterized by on demand delivery of ever growing amounts of content. The future internet of services will have to deliver content intensive applications to users with quality of service and security guarantees. This paper describes the Reservoir project and the challenge of a reliable and effective delivery of services as utilities in a commercial scenario. It starts by analyzing the needs of a future infrastructure provider and introducing the key concept of a service oriented architecture that combines virtualisation-aware grid with grid-aware virtualisation, while being driven by business service management. This article will then focus on the benefits and the innovations derived from the Reservoir approach. Eventually, a high level view of Reservoir general architecture is illustrated.

  6. Reservoir effects in radiocarbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The radiocarbon dating technique depends essentially on the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide containing the cosmogenic radioisotope 14 C enters into a state of equilibrium with all living material (plants and animals) as part of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Terrestrial reservoir effects occur when the atmospheric 14 C signal is diluted by local effects where systems depleted in 14 C mix with systems that are in equilibrium with the atmosphere. Naturally, this can occur with plant material growing close to an active volcano adding very old CO 2 to the atmosphere (the original 14 C has completely decayed). It can also occur in highly industrialised areas where fossil fuel derived CO 2 dilutes the atmospheric signal. A terrestrial reservoir effect can occur in the case of fresh water shells living in rivers or lakes where there is an input of ground water from springs or a raising of the water table. Soluble bicarbonate derived from the dissolution of very old limestone produces a 14 C dilution effect. Land snail shells and stream carbonate depositions (tufas and travertines) can be affected by a similar mechanism. Alternatively, in specific cases, these reservoir effects may not occur. This means that general interpretations assuming quantitative values for these terrestrial effects are not possible. Each microenvironment associated with samples being analysed needs to be evaluated independently. Similarly, the marine environment produces reservoir effects. With respect to marine shells and corals, the water depth at which carbonate growth occurs can significantly affect quantitative 14 C dilution, especially in areas where very old water is uplifted, mixing with top layers of water that undergo significant exchange with atmospheric CO 2 . Hence, generalisations with respect to the marine reservoir effect also pose problems. These can be exacerbated by the mixing of sea water with either terrestrial water in estuaries, or ground water where

  7. Coupling relationship between reservoir diagenesis and gas accumulation in Xujiahe Formation of Yuanba–Tongnanba area, Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between reservoir tightening time and gas charge period are the key subjects that have not been well solved considering the studies on the tight sand gas accumulation mechanism and enrichment regularity. The diagenetic evolution history, interaction sequence of organic–inorganic in aquiferous rock, gas charge history, the tightening mechanism of tight sandstone reservoir and the relationship between reservoir tightening time and gas accumulation period of the Xujiahe Formation have been analyzed in the Yuanba–Tongnanba area of the Sichuan Basin. It has been confirmed that the main reason for the tight sandstone reservoir formation is the intensive mechanical compaction which has dramatically reduced the sandstone reservoir quality, and it resulted to a semi-closed to a closed diagenetic fluid system formation at the early diagenetic stage. In the semi-closed to a closed diagenetic fluid system, at the later part of the diagenetic stage, the fluid circulation is not smooth, and the migration of the dissolution products are blocked, hence, the dissolution products mainly undergo the in situ precipitation and cementation. Such dissolution products block the dissolution pores and the residual primary pores; and the stronger the dissolution is, the higher the cement content is, which makes the reservoir further tightened. The hydrocarbon generation and expulsion history of source rocks and reservoir fluid inclusion characteristics in the Xujiahe Formation show that the charge of natural gas occurs in the Middle Jurassic–Early Cretaceous (mainly Early Cretaceous. A comprehensive analysis of the reservoir tightening history, gas charge history, and interaction sequence of organic–inorganic aquiferous in rock indicate that the sandstone reservoir experienced a tightening process when gas charging took place in the Xujiahe Formation in the Yuanba–Tongnanba area of the Sichuan Basin.

  8. Sedimentological and Geomorphological Effects of Reservoir Flushing: The Cachi Reservoir, Costa Rica, 1996

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Anders; Swenning, Joar

    1999-01-01

    Physical geography, hydrology, geomorphology, sediment transport, erosion, sedimentation, dams, reservoirs......Physical geography, hydrology, geomorphology, sediment transport, erosion, sedimentation, dams, reservoirs...

  9. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. K. Pande

    1998-10-29

    Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

  10. SIRIU RESERVOIR, BUZAU RIVER (ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Constantin DIACONU

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Siriu reservoir, owes it`s creation to the dam built on the river Buzau, in the town which bears the same name. The reservoir has a hydro energetic role, to diminish the maximum flow and to provide water to the localities below. The partial exploitation of the lake, began in 1984; Since that time, the initial bed of the river began to accumulate large quantities of alluvia, reducing the retention capacity of the lake, which had a volume of 125 million m3. The changes produced are determined by many topographic surveys at the bottom of the lake.

  11. On the mechanisms of reservoir-induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linyue

    Reservoir-induced seismicity (RIS) is caused by failure of pre-existing fractures due to reservoir impoundment or water level changes. More than one hundred RIS cases have been observed around the world, with the largest event reaching a magnitude M6.3. We have used detailed data collected around the world to study the mechanisms of RIS. Impoundment of a reservoir can change the frictional strength of a fault by elastic loading and by pore pressure diffusion. Stress and strength changes were calculated for 53 well-located earthquakes at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina where detailed information of the fault planes and reservoir filling was known. The calculations showed that the diffusion of pore pressure is primarily responsible for the earthquakes, and that strength changes ≤0.1 MPa are enough to trigger RIS, indicating that large parts of crust are very near the state of critical failure. Monticello Reservoir was impounded in 1977 and the seismicity had decayed to background level by 1992. There was a sudden increase in seismicity starting at the end of 1996, at a time when there were no water level changes in the reservoir. This new seismicity occurred in isolated new hypocentral areas with no previous earthquakes. Analyses showed that the new seismicity was caused by the coupled effects of chemical reactions and pore pressure diffusion. Of the nineteen cases of RIS in China, fifteen are located in carbonate rocks. Chemical reactions between water and the carbonate rocks are responsible for the seismicity. Detailed spatial and temporal data of seismicity associated with reservoir impoundment, geothermal and oilfield exploitation and fluid injection were collected in the study. Hydraulic diffusivity and permeability values in the seismogenic areas were estimated from these data. The results showed that in the seismogenic areas with induced seismicity, hydraulic diffusivity values lie in the range of 0.1 to 10 m2/s and the permeability values are in the

  12. New geomechanical developments for reservoir management; Desenvolvimentos experimentais e computacionais para analises geomecanicas de reservatorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Antonio C.; Menezes Filho, Armando Prestes; Silvestre, Jose R. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The common assumption that oil is produced under a constant rate only considering reservoir depletion has been questioned for some time. An usual hypothesis is that the physical properties of a reservoir are not constants during time, but they vary according to the properties of reservoir rock and the characteristics of the external loads. More precisely, as soon as a reservoir is explored, the volume of fluid diminishes, decreasing the static pressure and increasing the effective stress over the rock skeleton, which, depending on the nature of rock, can lead to a gradual deformation and alteration of reservoir's porosity and permeability, and oil productivity as well. This paper aims at showing numerical and experimental achievements, developed by the Well bore Engineering Technology Department of CENPES, devoted to the characterization of the influence of stress-strain states on the permeability and production of reservoir rocks. It is believed that these developments can possibly bring some light to the understanding of this complex phenomenon, besides allowing the establishment of more realistic relations involving stress-strain-permeability in coupled fluid dynamic problems. (author)

  13. Quantifying the clay content with borehole depth and impact on reservoir flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath Kumar, Aaraellu D.; Chattopadhyay, Pallavi B.

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the application of reservoir well log data and 3D transient numerical model for proper optimization of flow dynamics and hydrocarbon potential. Fluid flow through porous media depends on clay content that controls porosity, permeability and pore pressure. The pressure dependence of permeability is more pronounced in tight formations. Therefore, preliminary clay concentration analysis and geo-mechanical characterizations have been done by using wells logs. The assumption of a constant permeability for a reservoir is inappropriate and therefore the study deals with impact of permeability variation for pressure-sensitive formation. The study started with obtaining field data from available well logs. Then, the mathematical models are developed to understand the efficient extraction of oil in terms of reservoir architecture, porosity and permeability. The fluid flow simulations have been done using COMSOL Multiphysics Software by choosing time dependent subsurface flow module that is governed by Darcy's law. This study suggests that the reservoir should not be treated as a single homogeneous structure with unique porosity and permeability. The reservoir parameters change with varying clay content and it should be considered for effective planning and extraction of oil. There is an optimum drawdown for maximum production with varying permeability in a reservoir.

  14. Simulation and resistivity modeling of a geothermal reservoir with waters of different salinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Wilt, M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1982-10-01

    Apparent resistivities measured by means of repetitive dipole-dipole surveys show significant changes within the Cerro Prieto reservoir. The changes are attributed to production and natural recharge. To better understand the observed geophysical phenomena a simple reservoir simulation study combined with the appropriate DC resistivity calculations to determine the expected magnitude of apparent resistivity change. We consider production from a liquid-dominated reservoir with dimensions and parameters of the Cerro Prieto A reservoir and assume lateral and vertical recharge of colder and less saline waters. Based on rather schematic one- and two-dimensional reservoir simulations, we calculate changes in formation resistivity which we then transform into changes in apparent resistivity that would be observed at the surface. Simulated changes in apparent resistivities over the production zone show increases of 10 to 20% over a 3 year period at the current rate of fluid extraction. Changes of this magnitude are not only within our ability to discern using proper field techniques, but are consistent in magnitude with some of the observed effects. However, the patterns of apparent resistivity changes in the simulated dipole-dipole pseudosection only partially resemble the observed field data. This is explained by the fact that the actual fluid recharge into the A reservoir is more complicated than assumed in our simple, schematic recharge models.

  15. Seismic history matching of fluid fronts using the ensemble kalman filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trani, M.; Arts, R.; Leeuwenburgh, O.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic data provide information on the dynamics of multiphase reservoir fluid flow in places where no production data from wells are available. This information, in principle, could be used to estimate unknown reservoir properties. However, the amount, resolution, and character of the

  16. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  17. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The following data from the reopening of an abandoned well are presented: reservoir pressure drawdown and buildup data, Institute of Gas Technology test data, Insitute of Gas Technology sample log, reservoir fluid analysis, produced gas/water ratio, chemical analysis procedures, surface flow data, third party sampling and reports, sand detectors charts, and Horner-type buildup data. (MHR)

  18. Coupling of a reservoir model and of a poro-mechanical model. Application to the study of the compaction of petroleum reservoirs and of the associated subsidence; Couplage d'un modele de gisement et d'un modele mecanique. Application a l'etude de la compaction des reservoirs petroliers et de la subsidence associee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevillon, D.

    2000-11-30

    The aim of this study is to provide a better description of the rock contribution to fluid flows in petroleum reservoirs. The production of oil/gas in soft highly compacting reservoirs induces important reduction of the pore volume, which increases oil productivity. This compaction leads to undesirable effects such as surface subsidence or damage of well equipment. Analysis of compaction and subsidence can be performed using either engineering reservoir models or coupled poro-mechanical models. Poro-mechanical model offers a rigorous mechanical framework, but does not permit a complete description of the fluids. The reservoir model gives a good description of the fluid phases, but the description of the mechanic phenomenon is then simplified. To satisfy the set of equations (mechanical equilibrium and diffusivity equations), two simulators can be used together sequentially. Each of the two simulators solves its own system independently, and information passed both directions between simulators. This technique is usually referred to the partially coupled scheme. In this study, reservoir and hydro-mechanical simulations show that reservoir theory is not a rigorous framework to represent the evolution of the high porous rocks strains. Then, we introduce a partially coupled scheme that is shown to be consistent and unconditionally stable, which permits to describe correctly poro-mechanical theory in reservoir models. (author)

  19. Robust processing of optical flow of fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Ashish; Bors, Adrian G

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes a new approach, coupling physical models and image estimation techniques, for modelling the movement of fluids. The fluid flow is characterized by turbulent movement and dynamically changing patterns which poses challenges to existing optical flow estimation methods. The proposed methodology, which relies on Navier-Stokes equations, is used for processing fluid optical flow by using a succession of stages such as advection, diffusion and mass conservation. A robust diffusion step jointly considering the local data geometry and its statistics is embedded in the proposed framework. The diffusion kernel is Gaussian with the covariance matrix defined by the local second derivatives. Such an anisotropic kernel is able to implicitly detect changes in the vector field orientation and to diffuse accordingly. A new approach is developed for detecting fluid flow structures such as vortices. The proposed methodology is applied on artificially generated vector fields as well as on various image sequences.

  20. Fluid/structure interaction in piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellner, A.; Schoenfelder, C.

    1982-01-01

    The global movement of piping systems caused by pressure pulses as well as the associated loads on bends, nozzles and piping support structures are usually computed by using the pressures given by a hydrodynamic calculation as driving functions in a consecutive dynamic structure analysis without taking into account the secondary pressure pulses induced by the piping movement in the fluid. It is shown how including this feed-back of the structure dynamics on the fluid can lead to a drastic reduction of the computed loads

  1. Alien fish species in reservoir systems in Turkey: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Innal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkey’s natural river systems have been anthropogenically altered in the past century. Native fish communities of river systems have comeunder increasing pressure from water engineering projects, pollution, overfishing and the movements of alien fish species. Introduction ofalien fishes is one of the main threats to the survival and genetic integrity of native fishes around the world. In Turkey, alien freshwater fish are continuing to increase in number of species, abundance, and distribution. The present paper reviews fish stocking studies in Turkey’s reservoirs.

  2. Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  3. Reservoir Sedimentation Based on Uncertainty Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Imanshoar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reservoir sedimentation can result in loss of much needed reservoir storage capacity, reducing the useful life of dams. Thus, sufficient sediment storage capacity should be provided for the reservoir design stage to ensure that sediment accumulation will not impair the functioning of the reservoir during the useful operational-economic life of the project. However, an important issue to consider when estimating reservoir sedimentation and accumulation is the uncertainty involved in reservoir sedimentation. In this paper, the basic factors influencing the density of sediments deposited in reservoirs are discussed, and uncertainties in reservoir sedimentation have been determined using the Delta method. Further, Kenny Reservoir in the White River Basin in northwestern Colorado was selected to determine the density of deposits in the reservoir and the coefficient of variation. The results of this investigation have indicated that by using the Delta method in the case of Kenny Reservoir, the uncertainty regarding accumulated sediment density, expressed by the coefficient of variation for a period of 50 years of reservoir operation, could be reduced to about 10%. Results of the Delta method suggest an applicable approach for dead storage planning via interfacing with uncertainties associated with reservoir sedimentation.

  4. Differential Muon Tomography to Continuously Monitor Changes in the Composition of Subsurface Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Max; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; Spooner, Neil J.; Fung, Cora; Gluyas, John

    2013-01-01

    Muon tomography has been used to seek hidden chambers in Egyptian pyramids and image subsurface features in volcanoes. It seemed likely that it could be used to image injected, supercritical carbon dioxide as it is emplaced in porous geological structures being used for carbon sequestration, and also to check on subsequent leakage. It should work equally well in any other application where there are two fluids of different densities, such as water and oil, or carbon dioxide and heavy oil in oil reservoirs. Continuous monitoring of movement of oil and/or flood fluid during enhanced oil recovery activities for managing injection is important for economic reasons. Checking on leakage for geological carbon storage is essential both for safety and for economic purposes. Current technology (for example, repeat 3D seismic surveys) is expensive and episodic. Muons are generated by high- energy cosmic rays resulting from supernova explosions, and interact with gas molecules in the atmosphere. This innovation has produced a theoretical model of muon attenuation in the thickness of rock above and within a typical sandstone reservoir at a depth of between 1.00 and 1.25 km. Because this first simulation was focused on carbon sequestration, the innovators chose depths sufficient for the pressure there to ensure that the carbon dioxide would be supercritical. This innovation demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using the natural cosmic-ray muon flux to generate continuous tomographic images of carbon dioxide in a storage site. The muon flux is attenuated to an extent dependent on, amongst other things, the density of the materials through which it passes. The density of supercritical carbon dioxide is only three quarters that of the brine in the reservoir that it displaces. The first realistic simulations indicate that changes as small as 0.4% in the storage site bulk density could be detected (equivalent to 7% of the porosity, in this specific case). The initial

  5. Structural controls on fractured coal reservoirs in the southern Appalachian Black Warrior foreland basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groshong, R.H.; Pashin, J.C.; McIntyre, M.R. [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Geological Science

    2009-09-15

    Coal is a nearly impermeable rock type for which the production of fluids requires the presence of open fractures. Basin-wide controls on the fractured coal reservoirs of the Black Warrior foreland basin are demonstrated by the variability of maximum production rates from coalbed methane wells. Reservoir behavior depends on distance from the thrust front. Far from the thrust front, normal faults are barriers to fluid migration and compartmentalize the reservoirs. Close to the thrust front, rates are enhanced along some normal faults, and a new trend is developed. The two trends have the geometry of conjugate strike-slip faults with the same sigma(1) direction as the Appalachian fold-thrust belt and are inferred to be the result of late pure-shear deformation of the foreland. Face cleat causes significant permeability anisotropy in some shallow coal seams but does not produce a map-scale production trend.

  6. Structural controls on fractured coal reservoirs in the southern Appalachian Black Warrior foreland basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groshong, Richard H., Jr.; Pashin, Jack C.; McIntyre, Marcella R.

    2009-09-01

    Coal is a nearly impermeable rock type for which the production of fluids requires the presence of open fractures. Basin-wide controls on the fractured coal reservoirs of the Black Warrior foreland basin are demonstrated by the variability of maximum production rates from coalbed methane wells. Reservoir behavior depends on distance from the thrust front. Far from the thrust front, normal faults are barriers to fluid migration and compartmentalize the reservoirs. Close to the thrust front, rates are enhanced along some normal faults, and a new trend is developed. The two trends have the geometry of conjugate strike-slip faults with the same σ1 direction as the Appalachian fold-thrust belt and are inferred to be the result of late pure-shear deformation of the foreland. Face cleat causes significant permeability anisotropy in some shallow coal seams but does not produce a map-scale production trend.

  7. An experimental study of tracers for labelling of injection gas in oil reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugstad, Oe.

    1992-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of the PMCP and PMCH as tracers in field experiments. These compounds have properties which make them as well suited for well to well studies as the more common tracers CH 3 T and 85 Kr. In an injection project carried out at the Gullfaks field in the North Sea the two PFCs verified communication between wells. This implies communication between different geological layers in the reservoir and also communication across faults within the same layers. Laboratory studies carried out have focused on the retention of the tracers in dynamic flooding experiments under conditions comparable with those in the petroleum reservoirs. Simultaneous injection of a variety of tracers has shown individual variations in tracer retention which are caused by important reservoir parameters as fluid saturation and rock properties. By proper design of field injection programs the tracers response may therefore be used to estimate fluid saturation if actual rock properties are known. 45 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly

  9. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzie, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

  10. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  11. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  12. Data assimilation in reservoir management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommelse, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims at improving computer models that allow simulations of water, oil and gas flows in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This is done by integrating, or assimilating, measurements into physics-bases models. In recent years petroleum technology has developed

  13. Reservoirs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, G. Earl

    1948-01-01

    Man has engaged in the control of flowing water since history began. Among his early recorded efforts were reservoirs for muncipal water-supplies constructed near ancient Jerusalem to store water which was brought there in masonry conduits. 1/  Irrigation was practiced in Egypt as early as 2000 B. C. There the "basin system" was used from ancient times until the 19th century. The land was divided , into basins of approximately 40,000 acres, separated by earthen dikes. 2/  Flood waters of the Nile generally inundated the basins through canals, many of which were built by the Pharaohs. Even then the economic consequences of a deficient annual flood were recognized. Lake Maeris, which according to Herodotus was an ancient storage reservoir, is said to have had an area of 30,000 acres. In India, the British found at the time of their occupancy of the Presidency of Madras about 50,000 reservoirs for irrigation, many believed to be of ancient construction. 3/ During the period 115-130 A. D. reservoirs were built to improve the water-supply of Athens. Much has been written concerning the elaborate collection and distribution system built to supply Rome, and parts of it remain to this day as monuments to the engineering skill employed by the Romans in solving the problem of large-scale municipal water-supplies.

  14. Reasons for reservoir effect variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    , aquatic plants and fish from the rivers Alster and Trave range between zero and about 3,000 radiocarbon years. The reservoir age of water DIC depends to a large extent on the origin of the water and is for example correlated with precipitation amounts. These short-term variations are smoothed out in water...

  15. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  16. Application of magnetic method to assess the extent of high temperature geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soengkono, S.; Hochstein, M.P.

    1995-01-26

    The extent of thermally altered rocks in high temperature geothermal reservoirs hosted by young volcanic rocks can be assessed from magnetic surveys. Magnetic anomalies associated with many geothermal field in New Zealand and Indonesia can be interpreted in terms of thick (up to 1 km) demagnetized reservoir rocks. Demagnetization of these rocks has been confirmed by core studies and is caused by hydrothermal alteration produced from fluid/rock interactions. Models of the demagnetized Wairakei (NZ) and Kamojang (Indonesia) reservoirs are presented which include the productive areas. Magnetic surveys give fast and economical investigations of high temperature prospects if measurements are made from the air. The magnetic interpretation models can provide important constraints for reservoir models. Magnetic ground surveys can also be used to assess the extent of concealed near surface alteration which can be used in site selection of engineering structures.

  17. Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

    1997-08-01

    A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Natural Gas Flow in Anisotropic Shale Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2015-11-09

    Shale gas resources have received great attention in the last decade due to the decline of the conventional gas resources. Unlike conventional gas reservoirs, the gas flow in shale formations involves complex processes with many mechanisms such as Knudsen diffusion, slip flow (Klinkenberg effect), gas adsorption and desorption, strong rock-fluid interaction, etc. Shale formations are characterized by the tiny porosity and extremely low-permeability such that the Darcy equation may no longer be valid. Therefore, the Darcy equation needs to be revised through the permeability factor by introducing the apparent permeability. With respect to the rock formations, several studies have shown the existence of anisotropy in shale reservoirs, which is an essential feature that has been established as a consequence of the different geological processes over long period of time. Anisotropy of hydraulic properties of subsurface rock formations plays a significant role in dictating the direction of fluid flow. The direction of fluid flow is not only dependent on the direction of pressure gradient, but it also depends on the principal directions of anisotropy. Therefore, it is very important to take into consideration anisotropy when modeling gas flow in shale reservoirs. In this work, the gas flow mechanisms as mentioned earlier together with anisotropy are incorporated into the dual-porosity dual-permeability model through the full-tensor apparent permeability. We employ the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) method to handle the full-tensor apparent permeability. We combine MPFA method with the experimenting pressure field approach, i.e., a newly developed technique that enables us to solve the global problem by breaking it into a multitude of local problems. This approach generates a set of predefined pressure fields in the solution domain in such a way that the undetermined coefficients are calculated from these pressure fields. In other words, the matrix of coefficients

  19. Carbon dioxide sequestration induced mineral precipitation healing of fractured reservoir seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, N.; Crawshaw, J.

    2017-12-01

    Initial experiments and the thermodynaic basis for carbon dioxide sequestration induced mineral precipitation healing of fractures through reservoir seals will be presented. The basis of this work is the potential exists for the dissolution of reservoir host rock formation carbonate minerals in the acidified injection front of CO2 during sequestration or EOR. This enriched brine and the bulk CO2 phase will then flow through the reservoir until contact with the reservoir seal. At this point any fractures present in the reservoir seal will be the preferential flow path for the bulk CO2 phase as well as the acidified brine front. These fractures would currently be filled with non-acidified brine saturated in seal formation brine. When the acidifeid brine from the host formation and the cap rock brine mix there is the potential for minerals to fall out of solution, and for these precipitated minerals to decrease or entirely cut off the fluid flow through the fractures present in a reservoir seal. Initial equilibrium simulations performed using the PHREEQC1 database drived from the PHREEQE2 database are used to show the favorable conditions under which this mineral precipitation can occurs. Bench scale fluid mixing experiments were then performed to determine the kinetics of the mineral precipitation process, and determine the progress of future experiemnts involving fluid flow within fractured anhydrite reservoir seal samples. 1Parkhurst, D.L., and Appelo, C.A.J., 2013, Description of input and examples for PHREEQC version 3—A computer program for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, book 6, chap. A43, 497 p., available only at https://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/06/a43/. 2Parkhurst, David L., Donald C. Thorstenson, and L. Niel Plummer. PHREEQE: a computer program for geochemical calculations. No. 80-96. US Geological Survey, Water Resources Division,, 1980.

  20. Geological Model of Supercritical Geothermal Reservoir on the Top of the Magma Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, N.

    2017-12-01

    We are conducting supercritical geothermal project, and deep drilling project named as "JBBP: Japan Beyond Brittle Project" The temperatures of geothermal fields operating in Japan range from 200 to 300 °C (average 250 °C), and the depths range from 1000 to 2000 m (average 1500 m). In conventional geothermal reservoirs, the mechanical behavior of the rocks is presumed to be brittle, and convection of the hydrothermal fluid through existing network is the main method of circulation in the reservoir. In order to minimize induced seismicity, a rock mass that is "beyond brittle" is one possible candidate, because the rock mechanics of "beyond brittle" material is one of plastic deformation rather than brittle failure. To understand the geological model of a supercritical geothermal reservoir, granite-porphyry system, which had been formed in subduction zone, was investigated as a natural analog of the supercritical geothermal energy system. Quartz veins, hydrothermal breccia veins, and glassy veins are observed in a granitic body. The glassy veins formed at 500-550 °C under lithostatic pressures, and then pressures dropped drastically. The solubility of silica also dropped, resulting in formation of quartz veins under a hydrostatic pressure regime. Connections between the lithostatic and hydrostatic pressure regimes were key to the formation of the hydrothermal breccia veins, and the granite-porphyry system provides useful information for creation of fracture clouds in supercritical geothermal reservoirs. A granite-porphyry system, associated with hydrothermal activity and mineralization, provides a suitable natural analog for studying a deep-seated geothermal reservoir where stockwork fracture systems are created in the presence of supercritical geothermal fluids. I describe fracture networks and their formation mechanisms using petrology and fluid inclusion studies in order to understand this "beyond brittle" supercritical geothermal reservoir, and a geological

  1. Reservoir monitoring and characterization for heavy-oil thermal recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankaj, P.; Pathak, V. [Indian School of Mines (India)

    2005-11-01

    Cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) techniques can become uneconomical in their later cycles, as the oil to steam ratio can drop significantly. Time-lapse seismic assisted follow-up programs can improve oil to steam ratios and production rates within 1 cycle. This study presented the results of an optimized quantitative cross-calibration and cross-training stream that was developed for time-lapse seismic data analysis using data normalization as a bridge. It was anticipated that the stream would provide more consistent results than independent training for reservoir monitoring. In order to compensate for the redundancy of conventional seismic attributes, seismic attributes calculated from principal component decomposition of the seismic data were developed and used for reservoir monitoring. Time-lapse data sets were analyzed by the merging of 2 data sets. Attributes were calculated separately from individual surveys. A significant improvement was noted on time lapse data analysis. Post-stack inversion was applied to time lapse data sets, as the time lapse data normalization was no longer required because the wavelets were extracted independently from each data set. Vertical conformance revealed that sequence architecture had a significant influence on steam migration. A sequence with a high mud content limited both the vertical and horizontal migration of the steam chamber. It was determined that the functional relation of P- to S- wave velocities played an important role in extracting S-wave information from pre-stack data. The mud-rock line established from in-situ P- and S- wave velocity measurements was optimized for Cold Lake clastic rocks. It was concluded that with an optimized mud-rock line and high frequency seismic data, reservoir heterogeneity can be well defined by fluid factor. When applied to reservoir monitoring, this method defined steam channels and successfully identified lithological barriers within the reservoir. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a reservoir cathode to improve performance in both ion and Hall-effect thrusters. We propose to adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this...

  3. 49 CFR 236.792 - Reservoir, equalizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Reservoir, equalizing. An air reservoir connected with and adding volume to the top portion of the equalizing piston chamber of the automatic brake valve, to provide uniform service reductions in brake pipe...

  4. Dissolved methane in Indian freshwater reservoirs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvenkar, G.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Kurian, S.; Shenoy, D.M.; Pratihary, A.K.; Naik, H.; Patil, S.; Sarkar, A.; Gauns, M.

    Emission of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, from tropical reservoirs is of interest because such reservoirs experience conducive conditions for CH4 production through anaerobic microbial activities. It has been suggested that Indian...

  5. The Methane Hydrate Reservoir System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P. B.; Liu, X.

    2007-12-01

    We use multi phase flow modeling and field examples (Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon and Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina) to demonstrate that the methane hydrate reservoir system links traditional and non- traditional hydrocarbon system components: free gas flow is a fundamental control on this system. As in a traditional hydrocarbon reservoir, gas migrates into the hydrate reservoir as a separate phase (secondary migration) where it is trapped in a gas column beneath the base of the hydrate layer. With sufficient gas supply, buoyancy forces exceed either the capillary entry pressure of the cap rock or the fracture strength of the cap rock, and gas leaks into the hydrate stability zone, or cap rock. When gas enters the hydrate stability zone and forms hydrate, it becomes a very non traditional reservoir. Free gas forms hydrate, depletes water, and elevates salinity until pore water is too saline for further hydrate formation: salinity and hydrate concentration increase upwards from the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) to the seafloor and the base of the hydrate stability zone has significant topography. Gas chimneys couple the free gas zone to the seafloor through high salinity conduits that are maintained at the three-phase boundary by gas flow. As a result, significant amounts of gaseous methane can bypass the RHSZ, which implies a significantly smaller hydrate reservoir than previously envisioned. Hydrate within gas chimneys lie at the three-phase boundary and thus small increases in temperature or decreases in pressure can immediately transport methane into the ocean. This type of hydrate deposit may be the most economical for producing energy because it has very high methane concentrations (Sh > 70%) located near the seafloor, which lie on the three-phase boundary.

  6. Enhanced oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs in mexico, technical challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia H, Francisco; Meza P, Edgar; Moran O, Oscar [PEMEX - Petroleos Mexicanos, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Unlike single porosity reservoirs, naturally fractured reservoirs have several problems to implant any additional recovery processes (secondary or enhanced) due to a great amount of oil is trapped in the matrix and the injected fluids bypass matrix through fractures because of they have a greater capacity to allow flow. So far there, there is not a complete knowledge of improved recovery processes that can be applied to naturally fractured reservoirs, there are some laboratory tests, tests pilot in fields and very few projects in execution. All this make an opportunity area to develop more investigation. Taking into account the previous limitations is possible to begin to evaluate several processes for naturally fractured reservoirs as: gas injection, chemical treatments and thermal processes, but a common process to all of them is gravity drainage which implies new considerations in operation to extract hydrocarbons of the fractured reservoirs. There are many challenges to implant additional recovery processes in naturally fractured reservoirs and we mentioned in this work, moreover we show Mexican experience in EOR processes in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, too. (author)

  7. Disconjugate eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Dominik

    2007-01-01

    To foveate targets in different depths, the movements of the two eyes must be disconjugate. Fine measurements of eye rotations about the three principal axes have demonstrated that disconjugate eye movements may appear not only in the horizontal, but also in the vertical and torsional directions. In the presence of visual targets, disconjugate eye movements are driven by the vergence system, but they may also appear during vestibular stimulation. Disconjugate eye movements are highly adaptable by visual disparities, but under normal condition the effects of adaptation only persist when one eye is covered. Finally, disorders of the brainstem and cerebellum may lead to abnormal disconjugate eye movements that are often specific for the topography of the lesion. This chapter reviews the literature on the phenomenology of disconjugate eye movements over the last 15 years.

  8. Reservoir characterization of the Snorre Field

    OpenAIRE

    Gjestvang, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering The fluvial sandstone in the Snorre field consists of braided to meander streams deposited in arid and in humid climate that show a clear differences in the sedimentology and reservoir properties, especially the silt content in large part of the reservoir which decrease the reservoir properties and water saturation. The heterogeneity of these fluvial formations combined with the faulting history makes this reservoir highly complex with many local an...

  9. Reservoir resistivity characterization incorporating flow dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Arango, Santiago

    2016-04-07

    Systems and methods for reservoir resistivity characterization are provided, in various aspects, an integrated framework for the estimation of Archie\\'s parameters for a strongly heterogeneous reservoir utilizing the dynamics of the reservoir are provided. The framework can encompass a Bayesian estimation/inversion method for estimating the reservoir parameters, integrating production and time lapse formation conductivity data to achieve a better understanding of the subsurface rock conductivity properties and hence improve water saturation imaging.

  10. Petrofacies analysis - the petrophysical tool for geologic/engineering reservoir characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watney, W.L.; Guy, W.J.; Gerlach, P.M. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Petrofacies analysis is defined as the characterization and classification of pore types and fluid saturations as revealed by petrophysical measures of a reservoir. The word {open_quotes}petrofacies{close_quotes} makes an explicit link between petroleum engineers concerns with pore characteristics as arbiters of production performance, and the facies paradigm of geologists as a methodology for genetic understanding and prediction. In petrofacies analysis, the porosity and resistivity axes of the classical Pickett plot are used to map water saturation, bulk volume water, and estimated permeability, as well as capillary pressure information, where it is available. When data points are connected in order of depth within a reservoir, the characteristic patterns reflect reservoir rock character and its interplay with the hydrocarbon column. A third variable can be presented at each point on the crossplot by assigning a color scale that is based on other well logs, often gamma ray or photoelectric effect, or other derived variables. Contrasts between reservoir pore types and fluid saturations will be reflected in changing patterns on the crossplot and can help discriminate and characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Many hundreds of analyses of well logs facilitated by spreadsheet and object-oriented programming have provided the means to distinguish patterns typical of certain complex pore types for sandstones and carbonate reservoirs, occurrences of irreducible water saturation, and presence of transition zones. The result has been an improved means to evaluate potential production such as bypassed pay behind pipe and in old exploration holes, or to assess zonation and continuity of the reservoir. Petrofacies analysis is applied in this example to distinguishing flow units including discrimination of pore type as assessment of reservoir conformance and continuity. The analysis is facilitated through the use of color cross sections and cluster analysis.

  11. Toxic anterior segment syndrome caused by autoclave reservoir wall biofilms and their residual toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Andrew L; Sorenson, Robert L; Evans, David J

    2016-11-01

    To identify etiology of toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) after uneventful phacoemulsification. EyeMD Laser and Surgery Center, Oakland, California. Retrospective case series. Patient charts with TASS were reviewed. Reservoirs of 2 autoclaves associated with these cases were cultured for bacterial contamination. Cultures were performed on 23 other autoclave reservoirs at surgery centers in the local area. The main outcome measures were the incidence of TASS and prevalence of bacterial biofilm contamination of autoclave reservoirs. From 2010 to 2013, 11 935 consecutive cataract surgeries were performed at 1 center by multiple surgeons with no reported TASS. Between January 1, 2014, and January 15, 2015, 10 cases of TASS occurred out of 3003 cataract surgeries; these patients' charts were reviewed. Cultures of 2 Statim autoclave reservoir walls grew Bacillus species, Williamsia species, Mycobacterium mucogenicum, and Candida parapsilosis. Scanning electron microscopy of reservoir wall sections showed prominent biofilm. The 2 autoclaves were replaced in January 2015. Subsequently, 2875 cataract surgeries were performed with no reported TASS (P autoclaves were also contaminated with bacterial biofilms. Toxic anterior segment syndrome was strongly associated with bacterial biofilm contamination of autoclave reservoirs. An etiological mechanism might involve transport of heat-stable bacterial cell antigens in the steam with deposition on surgical instrumentation. Data suggest widespread prevalence of bacterial biofilms on fluid-reservoir walls, despite adherence to manufacturer guidelines for cleaning and maintenance. Prevention or elimination of autoclave fluid-reservoir biofilms might reduce the risk for postoperative TASS. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of diffusivity coefficient of Asmari reservoir by well test analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadizadeh, S.R. [Petroleum Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amiri, M.; Zaferanieh, M. [National Iranian Oil Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing petroleum engineers is to characterize the physical nature of subterranean reservoirs from which crude oil is produced. The quality of reservoir description determines the results of numerical simulations of reservoir performance. The ways by which information can be obtained include seismic and geological studies; well drilling data; well pressure testing; and analysis of reservoir performance through history matching. This paper presented the results of a study in which the Asmari field in southern onshore Iran was characterized. The field went into production in 1970. To date, a total of 39 wells have been completed in the Asmari and Bangestan groups of this field. Pan System software was used in this study to analyze the well test data. Parameters such as permeability, skin factor, wellbore storage, average reservoir pressure, diffusivity coefficient and productivity index are calculated for each well. In particular, the diffusivity coefficient for the Asmari sedimentary layer was determined. This dimensionless reservoir parameter is a ratio of a medium's capacity for transmissibility of fluid to capacity. Diffusivity offers a quantitative measure for the rate of response during transient fluid flow. All available information such as petrophysical data, PVT data, production data and pressure build up data of the completed wells in Asmari formation were collected. Twenty one data tests were then analyzed. A correlation between productivity index and the diffusivity coefficient for the Asmari formation was subsequently obtained. It was concluded that permeability is one of the most important parameter in reservoir engineering calculations. Different completion of well number 1 showed that the diffusivity coefficient and productivity index of carbonate layer is less than in the sandstone layer. It was determined that the western part of the reservoir is suitable for drilling new wells.13 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  13. Anti-Vaccination Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The current anti-vaccination movements that have established themselves in the United States as well as other regions in the world are like a hydra of discourse. Right when one effective measure is created to convince people to vaccinate two more anti-vaccination movements sprout up in its place. These anti-vaccination movements are driven by cultural beliefs, ideologies, medical exemption laws, non-medical exemption laws, distrust of the government, distrust of large pharmaceutical companies...

  14. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  15. 32 CFR 644.4 - Reservoir Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reservoir Projects. 644.4 Section 644.4 National... HANDBOOK Project Planning Civil Works § 644.4 Reservoir Projects. (a) Joint land acquisition policy for reservoir projects. The joint policies of the Department of the Interior and the Department of the Army...

  16. Sensation of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sensation of Movement will discuss the role of sensation in the control of action, bodily self-recognition, and sense of agency. Sensing movement is dependent on a range of information received by the brain, from signalling in the peripheral sensory organs to the establishment of higher order goals....... This volume will question whether one type of information is more relevant for the ability to sense and control movements, and demonstrate the importance of integrating neuroscientific knowledge with philosophical perspectives, in order to arrive at new insights into how sensation of movement can be studied...

  17. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  18. Amplitude various angles (AVA) phenomena in thin layer reservoir: Case study of various reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    thfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia))" data-affiliation=" (Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Basic Science Center A 4thfloor, Physics Dept., FMIPA, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Bandung (Indonesia))" >Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Susilowati

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude various offset is widely used in petroleum exploration as well as in petroleum development field. Generally, phenomenon of amplitude in various angles assumes reservoir’s layer is quite thick. It also means that the wave is assumed as a very high frequency. But, in natural condition, the seismic wave is band limited and has quite low frequency. Therefore, topic about amplitude various angles in thin layer reservoir as well as low frequency assumption is important to be considered. Thin layer reservoir means the thickness of reservoir is about or less than quarter of wavelength. In this paper, I studied about the reflection phenomena in elastic wave which considering interference from thin layer reservoir and transmission wave. I applied Zoeppritz equation for modeling reflected wave of top reservoir, reflected wave of bottom reservoir, and also transmission elastic wave of reservoir. Results show that the phenomena of AVA in thin layer reservoir are frequency dependent. Thin layer reservoir causes interference between reflected wave of top reservoir and reflected wave of bottom reservoir. These phenomena are frequently neglected, however, in real practices. Even though, the impact of inattention in interference phenomena caused by thin layer in AVA may cause inaccurate reservoir characterization. The relation between classes of AVA reservoir and reservoir’s character are different when effect of ones in thin reservoir and ones in thick reservoir are compared. In this paper, I present some AVA phenomena including its cross plot in various thin reservoir types based on some rock physics data of Indonesia

  19. Prognostic Significance of Preterm Isolated Decreased Fetal Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Karahanoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim is to evaluate the prognostic significance of isolated, preterm decreased fetal movement following normal initial full diagnostic workup. Study design: A retrospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The applied protocol was approved by the Medical Research Ethics Department of the hospital where the research was conducted. Obstetrics outcomes of preterm- and term-decreased fetal movement were compared following an initial, normal diagnostic work up. Evaluated outcomes were birth weight, mode of delivery, stillbirth rate, induction of labour, development of gestational hypertension, small for gestational age and oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios during the follow up period. Result: Obstetric complications related to placental insufficiency develops more frequently for decreased fetal movement in preterm cases with respect to that of in term cases. Following the diagnosis of decreased fetal movement, pregnancy hypertension occurred in 17% of preterm decreased fetal movement cases and in 4.7% of term decreased fetal movement cases. Fetal growth restriction developed in 6.6% of preterm decreased fetal movement and in 2.3% of term decreased fetal movement. Amniotic fluid abnormalities more frequently developed in preterm decreased fetal movement. Conclusion: Following an initial normal diagnostic workup, preterm decreased fetal movement convey a higher risk for the development of pregnancy complications associated with placental insufficiency. The patient should be monitored closely and management protocols must be developed for initial normal diagnostic workups in cases of preterm decreased fetal movement.

  20. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  1. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-10-01

    increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow

  2. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  3. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...... of sound, site and the social, and how the spatial, the visual, and the bodily interact in sonic environments, how they are constructed and how they are entangled in other practices. With the Seismograf special issue Fluid Sounds, we bring this knowledge into the dissemination of audio research itself...

  4. Principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  5. Heavy oil reservoir evaluation : performing an injection test using DST tools in the marine region of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaiza, J.; Ruiz, P. [Halliburton, Mexico City (Mexico); Barrera, D.; Gutierrez, F. [Pemex, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described an injection test conducted to evaluate heavy oil reserves in an offshore area of Mexico. The drill-stem testing (DST) evaluation used a fluid injection technique in order to eliminate the need for artificial lift and coiled tubing. A pressure transient analysis method was used to determine the static pressure of the reservoir, effective hydrocarbon permeability, and formation damage. Boundary effects were also characterized. The total volume of the fluid injection was determined by analyzing various reservoir parameters. The timing of the shut-in procedure was determined by characterizing rock characteristics and fluids within the reservoir. The mobility and diffusivity relationships between the zones with the injection fluids and reservoir fluids were used to defined sweep fluids. A productivity analysis was used to predict various production scenarios. DST tools were then used to conduct a pressure-production assessment. Case histories were used to demonstrate the method. The studies showed that the method provides a cost-effective means of providing high quality data for productivity analyses. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs.

  6. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  7. Estimation of Oil Production Rates in Reservoirs Exposed to Focused Vibrational Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Chanseok

    2014-01-01

    Elastic wave-based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is being investigated as a possible EOR method, since strong wave motions within an oil reservoir - induced by earthquakes or artificially generated vibrations - have been reported to improve the production rate of remaining oil from existing oil fields. To date, there are few theoretical studies on estimating how much bypassed oil within an oil reservoir could be mobilized by such vibrational stimulation. To fill this gap, this paper presents a numerical method to estimate the extent to which the bypassed oil is mobilized from low to high permeability reservoir areas, within a heterogeneous reservoir, via wave-induced cross-flow oscillation at the interface between the two reservoir permeability areas. This work uses the finite element method to numerically obtain the pore fluid wave motion within a one-dimensional fluid-saturated porous permeable elastic solid medium embedded in a non-permeable elastic semi-infinite solid. To estimate the net volume of mobilized oil from the low to the high permeability area, a fluid flow hysteresis hypothesis is adopted to describe the behavior at the interface between the two areas. Accordingly, the fluid that is moving from the low to the high permeability areas is assumed to transport a larger volume of oil than the fluid moving in the opposite direction. The numerical experiments were conducted by using a prototype heterogeneous oil reservoir model, subjected to ground surface dynamic loading operating at low frequencies (1 to 50 Hz). The numerical results show that a sizeable amount of oil could be mobilized via the elastic wave stimulation. It is observed that certain wave frequencies are more effective than others in mobilizing the remaining oil. We remark that these amplification frequencies depend on the formation’s elastic properties. This numerical work shows that the wave-based mobilization of the bypassed oil in a heterogeneous oil reservoir is feasible, especially

  8. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, M.L.; Evans, R.D.; Brown, R.L.; Gupta, A.

    2001-03-28

    This report focuses on integrating geoscience and engineering data to develop a consistent characterization of the naturally fractured reservoirs. During this reporting period, effort was focused on relating seismic data to reservoir properties of naturally fractured reservoirs, scaling well log data to generate interwell descriptors of these reservoirs, enhancing and debugging a naturally fractured reservoir simulator, and developing a horizontal wellbore model for use in the simulator.

  9. Time-lapse cased hole reservoir evaluation based on the dual-detector neutron lifetime log: the CHES II approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, M.R.; Fertl, W.

    1977-01-01

    A newly developed cased hole analysis technique provides detailed information on (1) reservoir rock properties, such as porosity, shaliness, and formation permeability, (2) reservoir fluid saturation, (3) distinction of oil and gas pays, (4) state of reservoir depletion, such as cumulative hydrocarbon-feet at present time and cumulative hydrocarbon-feet already depleted (e.g., the sum of both values then giving the cumulative hydrocarbon-feet originally present), and (5) monitoring of hydrocarbon/water and gas/oil contacts behind pipe. The basic well log data required for this type of analysis include the Dual-Detector Neutron Lifetime Log, run in casing at any particular time in the life of a reservoir, and the initial open-hole resistivity log. In addition, porosity information from open-hole porosity log(s) or core data is necessary. Field examples from several areas are presented and discussed in the light of formation reservoir and hydrocarbon production characteristics

  10. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  11. Reservoir microseismicity at the Ekofisk Oil Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D. [Nambe Geophysical, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Albright, J.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boade, R.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Dangerfield, J.; Landa, G.H. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Tananger (Norway)

    1994-07-01

    A triaxial, downhole geophone was deployed within the Ekofisk oil reservoir for monitoring ambient microseismicity as a test to determine if microearthquake signals generated from discrete shear failure of the reservoir rock could be detected. The results of the test were positive. During 104 hours of monitoring, 572 discrete events were recorded which have been identified as shear-failure microearthquakes. Reservoir microseismicity was detected at large distances (1000 m) from the monitor borehole and at rates (> 5 events per hour) which may allow practical characterization of the reservoir rock and overburden deformation induced by reservoir pressure changes.

  12. Smart Waterflooding in Carbonate Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel

    During the last decade, smart waterflooding has been developed into an emerging EOR technology both for carbonate and sandstone reservoirs that does not require toxic or expensive chemicals. Although it is widely accepted that different salinity brines may increase the oil recovery for carbonate...... reservoirs, understanding of the mechanism of this increase is still developing. To understand this smart waterflooding process, an extensive research has been carried out covering a broad range of disciplines within surface chemistry, thermodynamics of crude oil and brine, as well as their behavior...... that a heavy oil (that with a large fraction of heavy components) exhibited viscosity reduction in contact with brine, while a light crude oil exhibited emulsion formation. Most of reported high salinity waterflooding studies were carried out with outcrop chalk core plugs, and by performing spontaneous...

  13. Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völcker, Carsten

    With an increasing demand for oil and diculties in nding new major oil elds, research on methods to improve oil recovery from existing elds is more necessary now than ever. The subject of this thesis is to construct ecient numerical methods for simulation and optimization of oil recovery...... programming (SQP) with line-search and BFGS approximations of the Hessian, and the adjoint method for ecient computation of the gradients. We demonstrate that the application of NMPC for optimal control of smart-wells has the potential to increase the economic value of an oil reservoir....... with emphasis on optimal control of water ooding with the use of smartwell technology. We have implemented immiscible ow of water and oil in isothermal reservoirs with isotropic heterogenous permeability elds. We use the method of lines for solution of the partial differential equation (PDE) system that governs...

  14. Multilevel techniques for Reservoir Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour

    for both variational upscaling and the construction of linear solvers. In particular, it is found to be beneficial (or even necessary) to apply an AMGe based multigrid solver to solve the upscaled problems. It is found that the AMGe upscaling changes the spectral properties of the matrix, which renders...... is extended to include a hybrid strategy, where FAS is combined with Newton’s method to construct a multilevel nonlinear preconditioner. This method demonstrates high efficiency and robustness. Second, an improved IMPES formulated reservoir simulator is implemented using a novel variational upscaling approach...... based on element-based Algebraic Multigrid (AMGe). In particular, an advanced AMGe technique with guaranteed approximation properties is used to construct a coarse multilevel hierarchy of Raviart-Thomas and L2 spaces for the Galerkin coarsening of a mixed formulation of the reservoir simulation...

  15. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  16. Exploring pedestrian movement patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orellana, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop an approach for exploring, analysing and interpreting movement patterns of pedestrians interacting with the environment. This objective is broken down in sub-objectives related to four research questions. A case study of the movement of visitors in a

  17. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  18. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  19. MIKROMITSETY- MIGRANTS IN MINGECHEVIR RESERVOIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Salmanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. It is hardly possible to predict the continued stability of the watercourse ecosystems without the study of biological characteristics and composition of organisms inhabiting them. In the last 35-40 years, environmental conditions of the Mingachevir reservoir are determined by the stationary anthropogenic pressure. It was found that such components of plankton as algae, bacteria and fungi play a leading role in the transformation and migration of pollutants. The role of the three groups of organisms is very important in maintaining the water quality by elimination of pollutants. Among the organisms inhabiting the Mingachevir Reservoir, micromycetes have not yet been studied. Therefore, the study of the species composition and seasonal dynamics, peculiarities of their growth and development in the environment with the presence of some of the pollutants should be considered to date.Methods. In order to determine the role of micromycetes-migrants in the mineralization of organic substrates, as an active participant of self-purification process, we used water samples from the bottom sediments as well as decaying and skeletonized stalks of cane, reeds, algae, macrophytes, exuvia of insects and fish remains submerged in water.Findings. For the first time, we obtained the data on the quality and quantity of microscopic mycelial fungi in freshwater bodies on the example of the Mingachevir water reservoir; we also studied the possibilities for oxygenating the autochthonous organic matter of allochthonous origin with micromycetes-migrants.Conclusions. It was found that the seasonal development of micromycetes-migrants within the Mingachevir reservoir is characterized by an increase in the number of species in the summer and a gradual reduction in species diversity in the fall. 

  20. Reservoir Model Information System: REMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Lee, Kwang-Wu; Rhee, Taehyun; Neumann, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel data visualization framework named Reservoir Model Information System (REMIS) for the display of complex and multi-dimensional data sets in oil reservoirs. It is aimed at facilitating visual exploration and analysis of data sets as well as user collaboration in an easier way. Our framework consists of two main modules: the data access point module and the data visualization module. For the data access point module, the Phrase-Driven Grammar System (PDGS) is adopted for helping users facilitate the visualization of data. It integrates data source applications and external visualization tools and allows users to formulate data query and visualization descriptions by selecting graphical icons in a menu or on a map with step-by-step visual guidance. For the data visualization module, we implemented our first prototype of an interactive volume viewer named REMVR to classify and to visualize geo-spatial specific data sets. By combining PDGS and REMVR, REMIS assists users better in describing visualizations and exploring data so that they can easily find desired data and explore interesting or meaningful relationships including trends and exceptions in oil reservoir model data.

  1. Acoustic and mechanical response of reservoir rocks under variable saturation and effective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzoli, C L; Santos, J E; Carcione, J M

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the acoustic and mechanical properties of a reservoir sandstone saturated by two immiscible hydrocarbon fluids, under different saturations and pressure conditions. The modeling of static and dynamic deformation processes in porous rocks saturated by immiscible fluids depends on many parameters such as, for instance, porosity, permeability, pore fluid, fluid saturation, fluid pressures, capillary pressure, and effective stress. We use a formulation based on an extension of Biot's theory, which allows us to compute the coefficients of the stress-strain relations and the equations of motion in terms of the properties of the single phases at the in situ conditions. The dry-rock moduli are obtained from laboratory measurements for variable confining pressures. We obtain the bulk compressibilities, the effective pressure, and the ultrasonic phase velocities and quality factors for different saturations and pore-fluid pressures ranging from normal to abnormally high values. The objective is to relate the seismic and ultrasonic velocity and attenuation to the microstructural properties and pressure conditions of the reservoir. The problem has an application in the field of seismic exploration for predicting pore-fluid pressures and saturation regimes.

  2. Live Imaging of Micro-Wettability Experiments Performed for Low-Permeability Oil Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Clarkson, Christopher R; DeBuhr, Chris; Ghanizadeh, Amin

    2017-06-28

    Low-permeability (unconventional) hydrocarbon reservoirs exhibit a complex nanopore structure and micro (µm) -scale variability in composition which control fluid distribution, displacement and transport processes. Conventional methods for characterizing fluid-rock interaction are however typically performed at a macro (mm) -scale on rock sample surfaces. In this work, innovative methods for the quantification of micro-scale variations in wettability and fluid distribution in a low-permeability oil reservoir was enabled by using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Live imaging of controlled water condensation/evaporation experiments allowed micro-droplet contact angles to be evaluated, while imaging combined with x-ray mapping of cryogenically frozen samples facilitated the evaluation of oil and water micro-droplet contact angles after successive fluid injection. For the first time, live imaging of fluids injected through a micro-injection system has enabled quantification of sessile and dynamic micro-droplet contact angles. Application of these combined methods has revealed dramatic spatial changes in fluid contact angles at the micro-scale, calling into question the applicability of macro-scale observations of fluid-rock interaction.

  3. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  4. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoak, T. [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  5. Hydrocarbon accumulation characteristics and enrichment laws of multi-layered reservoirs in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sichuan Basin represents the earliest area where natural gas is explored, developed and comprehensively utilized in China. After over 50 years of oil and gas exploration, oil and gas reservoirs have been discovered in 24 gas-dominant layers in this basin. For the purpose of predicting natural gas exploration direction and target of each layer in the Sichuan Basin, the sedimentary characteristics of marine and continental strata in this basin were summarized and the forms of multi-cycled tectonic movement and their controlling effect on sedimentation, diagenesis and hydrocarbon accumulation were analyzed. Based on the analysis, the following characteristics were identified. First, the Sichuan Basin has experienced the transformation from marine sedimentation to continental sedimentation since the Sinian with the former being dominant. Second, multiple source–reservoir assemblages are formed based on multi-rhythmed deposition, and multi-layered reservoir hydrocarbon accumulation characteristics are vertically presented. And third, multi-cycled tectonic movement appears in many forms and has a significant controlling effect on sedimentation, diagenesis and hydrocarbon accumulation. Then, oil and gas reservoir characteristics and enrichment laws were investigated. It is indicated that the Sichuan Basin is characterized by coexistence of conventional and unconventional oil and gas reservoirs, multi-layered reservoir hydrocarbon supply, multiple reservoir types, multiple trap types, multi-staged hydrocarbon accumulation and multiple hydrocarbon accumulation models. Besides, its natural gas enrichment is affected by hydrocarbon source intensity, large paleo-uplift, favorable sedimentary facies belt, sedimentary–structural discontinuity plane and structural fracture development. Finally, the natural gas exploration and research targets of each layer in the Sichuan Basin were predicted according to the basic petroleum geologic conditions

  6. Effects of pressure drawdown and recovery on the Cerro Prieto beta reservoir in the CP-III area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truesdell, A.H. [Truesdell (Alfred H.), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lippmann, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The production characteristics of wells in the northwestern Cerro Prieto III area changed greatly when the Cp-III power plant went on line in 1986. Fluid extraction in the field more than doubled and reservoir-wide boiling started immediately, greatly increasing the enthalpy of produced fluids. Some well fluids showed a decrease in chloride due to adiabatic steam condensation in the well and separator, and others were enriched in chloride due to boiling. As reservoir drawdown increased, entrance of cooler and more dilute groundwaters into the reservoir became evident (i.e., condensation stopped, and there was a decrease in enthalpy and chloride in produced fluids). Although some groundwater inflow was from the leaky western margin of the reservoir, the majority is in the northeast, inferred to be local and downward, possibly through more permeable zones associated with the normal fault H. This natural recharge and some reinjection have slowed and possibly reversed pressure drawdown throughout CP-III. Enthalpy has decreased and liquid saturation has increased as the steam-rich zone in the upper part of the reservoir has either disappeared or become thinner.

  7. Effect of chaotic movements of nanoparticles for nanofluid heat transfer augmentation by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Wenzheng; Shen, Zhaojie; Yang, Jianguo; Wu, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Through Molecular Dynamics simulation, the chaotic movements of nanoparticles in base fluid are investigated. Based on the simulated results of translational and rotational velocities of nanoparticles, the effect of nanoparticle movements for heat transfer in nanofluids is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of nanoparticle movements for the base fluid is studied. The fluid near a nanoparticle is divided into three levels: (1) absorption layer, (2) rotating fluid, and (3) spherical existential space, or called rotating fluid element. And the microscopic structure of nanofluid which is composed of countless rotating fluid elements is proposed. - Highlights: • The orders of magnitude of translational and rotational motions for nanoparticles are given. • The microscopic structure around a nanoparticle is proposed. • Mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement in nanofluids are discussed

  8. Optimal Energy Extraction From a Hot Water Geothermal Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabi, Kamal; Scherer, Charles R.; Tsang, Chin Fu; Mozumder, Sashi

    1981-01-01

    An analytical decision model is presented for determining optimal energy extraction rates from hot water geothermal reservoirs when cooled brine is reinjected into the hot water aquifer. This applied economic management model computes the optimal fluid pumping rate and reinjection temperature and the project (reservoir) life consistent with maximum present worth of the net revenues from sales of energy for space heating. The real value of product energy is assumed to increase with time, as is the cost of energy used in pumping the aquifer. The economic model is implemented by using a hydrothermal model that relates hydraulic pumping rate to the quality (temperature) of remaining heat energy in the aquifer. The results of a numerical application to space heating show that profit-maximizing extraction rate increases with interest (discount) rate and decreases as the rate of rise of real energy value increases. The economic life of the reservoir generally varies inversely with extraction rate. Results were shown to be sensitive to permeability, initial equilibrium temperature, well cost, and well life.

  9. Hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in the Sinian Dengying Fm, central Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiang Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Sinian Dengying Fm is the focus of natural gas exploration in the central part of the Sichuan Basin (central Sichuan Basin in recent years. Especially, epigenic karstification and its resulted reservoir-seepage spaces have always been the focal points in researches. Based on the petrographic characteristics of drilling cuttings and core samples, and through experimental analysis by using trace elements, isotopes, and cathodoluminescence, the Dengying Fm dolomite was demonstrated to have matrix recrystallized dolomite (MRD, filled saddle dolomite (FSD (the mean homogenization temperature of inclusion: 178.5 °C, high concentrations of Fe & Mn, slightly positive 87Sr/86Sr value and hydrothermal minerals combination (including sphalerite, galena, pyrite, and quartz, etc.. Thus, it was proposed that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies (HDRF exist in the Dengying Fm dolomite, in other words, the dolomite reservoir is composed of hydrothermal dissolved pores, intercrystalline pores of hydrothermal origin, hydrothermal caverns and expanded fractures, and was formed due to the reworking of hydrothermal fluid on tight matrix dolomite. Identification marks are presented in terms of petrography and geochemistry so that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies can be effectively recognized and identified. It is concluded that the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in this area are preliminary controlled by deep and large basement faults and the strength of hydrothermal fluids.

  10. A Viscoelastic Deadly Fluid in Carnivorous Pitcher Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Laurence; Forterre, Yoel

    2008-07-01

    We study the rheology of the digestive fluid secreted by the carnivorous pitcher plants Nepenthes rafflesiana and its role in the mechanism of insects trapping. Using a combination of physical measurements (surface tension, wetting properties, extensional and shear rheometry), insects bioessays and high-speed video, we show that the digestive fluid of Nepenthes rafflesiana is a highly viscoelastic fluid and that this property is crucial for the retention of insect in its trap. Trapping efficiency is shown to remain strong even when the fluid is highly diluted by water, as long as the elastic relaxation time of the fluid is higher than the typical time scale of insect movements (large Deborah numbers).

  11. Gyroelastic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  12. Gyroelastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch

  13. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and

  14. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  15. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity; Final report, November 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope comprises one of the Nation`s and the world`s most prolific oil province. Original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at nearly 70 BBL (Kamath and Sharma, 1986). Generalized reservoir descriptions have been completed by the University of Alaska`s Petroleum Development Laboratory over North Slope`s major fields. These fields include West Sak (20 BBL OOIP), Ugnu (15 BBL OOIP), Prudhoe Bay (23 BBL OOIP), Kuparuk (5.5 BBL OOIP), Milne Point (3 BBL OOIP), and Endicott (1 BBL OOIP). Reservoir description has included the acquisition of open hole log data from the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC), computerized well log analysis using state-of-the-art computers, and integration of geologic and logging data. The studies pertaining to fluid characterization described in this report include: experimental study of asphaltene precipitation for enriched gases, CO{sup 2} and West Sak crude system, modeling of asphaltene equilibria including homogeneous as well as polydispersed thermodynamic models, effect of asphaltene deposition on rock-fluid properties, fluid properties of some Alaskan north slope reservoirs. Finally, the last chapter summarizes the reservoir heterogeneity classification system for TORIS and TORIS database.

  16. Impact of overpressures on subsurface exploration and reservoir management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, P.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of overpressures in the subsurface poses major problems for safety and cost efficient well design, but less well known is their importance for exploration and reservoir development. Overpressures reduce the vertical effective stress (VES, the difference between the vertical stress and fluid pressure) experienced by the sediment. As sediment compaction is primarily an irreversible function of VES, a reduction in VES will halt compaction. Similarly, a reduction in its rate of increase will reduce the rate of porosity loss. Porosity and other key rock properties will therefore reflect changes in vertical effective stress. Any measurement that senses porosity, or seismic velocity (e.g. sonic, density or resistivity logs) will provide a means of estimating overpressures. The reduction of porosity with vertical effective stress is exponential in nature. Consequently, overpressures generated early in the burial history, such as those generated by disequilibrium compaction, will have a greater impact on rock properties than those generated or emplaced during late burial. Indeed, late overpressuring, so-called inflation, may have little or no impact on rock properties and therefore methods for the prediction of overpressures from properties such as seismic velocity will not provide reliable pressure estimates. In order for fluid pressures to rise in a basin, the pressures have to be contained by rocks with sufficiently low permeability. Overpressures are transient and gradually leak away when the generation mechanism ceases to operate. In some areas, such as in parts of the central North Sea and the Middle East, fluid pressures have built up until the failure envelope of the seal is reached, leading to a subsequent loss of the sealing capacity. The failure envelope is usually considered to be determined by the minimum horizontal stress. The failure pressure for the seal systematically increases with depth and this variation will control the maximum pressures

  17. Application of Reservoir Flow Simulation Integrated with Geomechanics in Unconventional Tight Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Menglu; Chen, Shengnan; Mbia, Ernest; Chen, Zhangxing

    2018-01-01

    Multistage hydraulic fracturing techniques, combined with horizontal drilling, have enabled commercial production from the vast reserves of unconventional tight formations. During hydraulic fracturing, fracturing fluid and proppants are pumped into the reservoir matrix to create the hydraulic fractures. Understanding the propagation mechanism of hydraulic fractures is essential to estimate their properties, such as half-length. In addition, natural fractures are often present in tight formations, which might be activated during the fracturing process and contribute to the post-stimulation well production rates. In this study, reservoir simulation is integrated with rock geomechanics to predict the well post-stimulation productivities. Firstly, a reservoir geological model is built based on the field data collected from the Montney formation in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. The hydraulic fracturing process is then simulated through an integrated approach of fracturing fluid injection, rock geomechanics, and tensile failure criteria. In such a process, the reservoir pore pressure increases with a continuous injection of the fracturing fluid and proppants, decreasing the effective stress exerted on the rock matrix accordingly as the overburden pressure remains constant. Once the effective stress drops to a threshold value, tensile failure of the reservoir rock occurs, creating hydraulic fractures in the formation. The early production history of the stimulated well is history-matched to validate the predicted fracture geometries (e.g., half-length) generated from the fracturing simulation process. The effects of the natural fracture properties and well bottom-hole pressures on well productivity are also studied. It has been found that nearly 40% of hydraulic fractures propagate in the beginning stage (the pad step) of the fracturing schedule. In addition, well post-stimulation productivity will increase significantly if the natural fractures are propped or

  18. 3D architecture modeling of reservoir compartments in a Shingled Turbidite Reservoir using high-resolution seismic data and sparse well control, example from Mars {open_quotes}Pink{close_quotes} reservoir, Mississippi Canyon Area, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, M.A.; Mahaffie, M.J.; Tiller, G.M. [Shell Exploration and Production Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Economics of most deep-water development projects require large reservoir volumes to be drained with relatively few wells. The presence of reservoir compartments must therefore be detected and planned for in a pre-development stage. We have used 3-D seismic data to constrain large-scale, deterministic reservoir bodies in a 3-D architecture model of Pliocene-turbidite sands of the {open_quotes}E{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Pink{close_quotes} reservoir, Prospect Mars, Mississippi Canyon Areas 763 and 807, Gulf of Mexico. Reservoir compartmentalization is influenced by stratigraphic shingling, which in turn is caused by low accommodation space predentin the upper portion of a ponded seismic sequence within a salt withdrawal mini-basin. The accumulation is limited by updip onlap onto a condensed section marl, and by lateral truncation by a large scale submarine erosion surface. Compartments were suggested by RFT pressure variations and by geochemical analysis of RFT fluid samples. A geological interpretation derived from high-resolution 3-D seismic and three wells was linked to 3-D architecture models through seismic inversion, resulting in a reservoir all available data. Distinguishing subtle stratigraphical shingles from faults was accomplished by detailed, loop-level mapping, and was important to characterize the different types of reservoir compartments. Seismic inversion was used to detune the seismic amplitude, adjust sandbody thickness, and update the rock properties. Recent development wells confirm the architectural style identified. This modeling project illustrates how high-quality seismic data and architecture models can be combined in a pre-development phase of a prospect, in order to optimize well placement.

  19. 3D architecture modeling of reservoir compartments in a Shingled Turbidite Reservoir using high-resolution seismic data and sparse well control, example from Mars [open quotes]Pink[close quotes] reservoir, Mississippi Canyon Area, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, M.A.; Mahaffie, M.J.; Tiller, G.M. (Shell Exploration and Production Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Economics of most deep-water development projects require large reservoir volumes to be drained with relatively few wells. The presence of reservoir compartments must therefore be detected and planned for in a pre-development stage. We have used 3-D seismic data to constrain large-scale, deterministic reservoir bodies in a 3-D architecture model of Pliocene-turbidite sands of the [open quotes]E[close quotes] or [open quotes]Pink[close quotes] reservoir, Prospect Mars, Mississippi Canyon Areas 763 and 807, Gulf of Mexico. Reservoir compartmentalization is influenced by stratigraphic shingling, which in turn is caused by low accommodation space predentin the upper portion of a ponded seismic sequence within a salt withdrawal mini-basin. The accumulation is limited by updip onlap onto a condensed section marl, and by lateral truncation by a large scale submarine erosion surface. Compartments were suggested by RFT pressure variations and by geochemical analysis of RFT fluid samples. A geological interpretation derived from high-resolution 3-D seismic and three wells was linked to 3-D architecture models through seismic inversion, resulting in a reservoir all available data. Distinguishing subtle stratigraphical shingles from faults was accomplished by detailed, loop-level mapping, and was important to characterize the different types of reservoir compartments. Seismic inversion was used to detune the seismic amplitude, adjust sandbody thickness, and update the rock properties. Recent development wells confirm the architectural style identified. This modeling project illustrates how high-quality seismic data and architecture models can be combined in a pre-development phase of a prospect, in order to optimize well placement.

  20. New boundary conditions for oil reservoirs with fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyanova, Elena; Astafev, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Based on the fact that most of oil fields are on the late stage of field development, it becomes necessary to produce hard-to-extract oil, which can be obtained only by use of enhance oil recovery methods. For example many low permeable or shale formations can be developed only with application of massive hydraulic fracturing technique. In addition, modern geophysical researches show that mostly oil bearing formations are complicated with tectonic faults of different shape and permeability. These discontinuities exert essential influence on the field development process and on the well performance. For the modeling of fluid flow in the reservoir with some area of different permeability, we should determine the boundary conditions. In this article for the first time the boundary conditions for the problem of fluid filtration in the reservoir with some discontinuity are considered. This discontinuity represents thin but long area, which can be hydraulic fracturing of tectonic fault. The obtained boundary condition equations allow us to take into account pressure difference above and below the section and different values of permeability.

  1. An analytical thermohydraulic model for discretely fractured geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Don B.; Koch, Donald L.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    2016-09-01

    In discretely fractured reservoirs such as those found in Enhanced/Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS), knowledge of the fracture network is important in understanding the thermal hydraulics, i.e., how the fluid flows and the resulting temporal evolution of the subsurface temperature. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model of the fluid flow and heat transport in a discretely fractured network that can be used for a wide range of modeling applications and serve as an alternative analysis tool to more computationally intensive numerical codes. Given the connectivity and structure of a fracture network, the flow in the system was solved using a linear system of algebraic equations for the pressure at the nodes of the network. With the flow determined, the temperature in the fracture was solved by coupling convective heat transport in the fracture with one-dimensional heat conduction perpendicular to the fracture, employing the Green's function derived solution for a single discrete fracture. The predicted temperatures along the fracture surfaces from the analytical solution were compared to numerical simulations using the TOUGH2 reservoir code. Through two case studies, we showed the capabilities of the analytical model and explored the effect of uncertainty in the fracture apertures and network structure on thermal performance. While both sources of uncertainty independently produce large variations in production temperature, uncertainty in the network structure, whenever present, had a predominant influence on thermal performance.

  2. Fracture characterization in a deep geothermal reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Hehn, Vera; Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Tischner, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    At the geothermal research drilling Horstberg in North West Germany studies for the characterization of a vertical fracture are performed. The fracture was created by a massive hydraulic stimulation in 2003 in approx. 3700 m depth within rocks of the middle Buntsandstein. The fracture surface is in the order of 100,000 m2, depending on the flow rate at which water is injected. Besides hydraulic characterization, multiple tracer tests are planned. At the depth of interest the reservoir temperature is around 150 °C, pressure is around 600 bar (60 MPa) and due to salinity the water density is around 1200 kg/m3. Knowledge of tracer stability and behavior at these reservoir conditions is limited. Additionally, the planned tracer tests will be performed within one single borehole. In a closed cycle water is injected into the inner pipe of the well (tubing), which is separated by a permanent packer from the outer pipe (annulus). The water is produced back from the annulus approximately 150 m above the injection point. Thus, the circulation of thermal water between two sandstone layers via an artificial fracture can be achieved. Tests will be carried out with different flow rates and accordingly with different pressures, resulting in different fracture areas. Due to this test setup tracer signals will be stacked and will remain for a longer time in the fracture - which is the reason why different tracers are required. For an optimal characterization both conservative and reactive tracers will be used and different injection methods (continuous, instantaneous and pulsed) will be applied. For a proper setup of the tracer test numerical modelling studies are performed in advance. The relevant thermal, hydraulic and chemical processes (mainly adsorption and degredation) are coupled, resulting in a THC model; additionally the dependence of fracture aperture and area on fluid pressure has to be considered. Instead of applying a mechanically coupled model (THMC) a simplified

  3. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.O.

    2001-01-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.

  4. Study on the enhancement of hydrocarbon recovery by characterization of the reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Young Hoon; Son, Jin Dam; Oh, Jae Ho [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Three year project is being carried out on the enhancement of hydrocarbon recovery by the reservoir characterization. This report describes the results of the second year's work. This project deals with characterization of fluids, bitumen ad rock matrix in the reservoir. New equipment and analytical solutions for naturally fractured reservoir were also included in this study. Main purpose of the reservoir geochemistry is to understand the origin of fluids (gas, petroleum and water) and distribution of the bitumens within the reservoir and to use them not only for exploration but development of the petroleum. For the theme of reservoir geochemistry, methods and principles of the reservoir gas and bitumen characterization, which is applicable to the petroleum development, are studied. and case study was carried out on the gas, water and bitumen samples in the reservoir taken form Haenam area and Ulleung Basin offshore Korea. Gases taken form the two different wells indicate the different origin. Formation water analyses show the absence of barrier within the tested interval. With the sidewall core samples from a well offshore Korea, the analysis using polarizing microscope, scanning electron microscope with EDX and cathodoluminoscope was performed for the study on sandstone diagenesis. The I/S changes were examined on the cuttings samples from a well, offshore Korea to estimate burial temperature. Oxygen stable isotope is used to study geothermal history in sedimentary basin. Study in the field is rare in Korea and basic data are urgently needed especially in continental basins to determine the value of formation water. In the test analyses, three samples from marine basins indicate final temperature from 55 deg.C to 83 deg.C and one marine sample indicate the initial temperature of 36 deg.C. One sample from continental basin represented the final temperature from 53 and 80 deg.C. These temperatures will be corrected because these values were based on assumed

  5. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.

    2015-07-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  7. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces.

  8. Seismic profile analysis of sediment deposits in Brownlee and Hells Canyon Reservoirs near Cambridge, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, James; Kelso, Kyle; Fosness, Ryan; Welcker, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, in cooperation with the USGS Idaho Water Science Center and the Idaho Power Company, collected high-resolution seismic reflection data in the Brownlee and Hells Canyon Reservoirs, in March of 2013.These reservoirs are located along the Snake River, and were constructed in 1958 (Brownlee) and 1967 (Hells Canyon). The purpose of the survey was to gain a better understanding of sediment accumulation within the reservoirs since their construction. The chirp system used in the survey was an EdgeTech Geo-Star Full Spectrum Sub-Bottom (FSSB) system coupled with an SB-424 towfish with a frequency range of 4 to 24 kHz. Approximately 325 kilometers of chirp data were collected, with water depths ranging from 0-90 meters. These reservoirs are characterized by very steep rock valley walls, very low flow rates, and minimal sediment input into the system. Sediments deposited in the reservoirs are characterized as highly fluid clays. Since the acoustic signal was not able to penetrate the rock substrate, only the thin veneer of these recent deposits were imaged. Results from the seismic survey indicate that throughout both of the Brownlee and Hells Canyon reservoirs the accumulation of sediments ranged from 0 to 2.5 m, with an average of 0.5 m. Areas of above average sediment accumulation may be related to lower slope, longer flooding history, and proximity to fluvial sources.

  9. CO2 storage in depleted gas reservoirs: A study on the effect of residual gas saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Raza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Depleted gas reservoirs are recognized as the most promising candidate for carbon dioxide storage. Primary gas production followed by injection of carbon dioxide after depletion is the strategy adopted for secondary gas recovery and storage practices. This strategy, however, depends on the injection strategy, reservoir characteristics and operational parameters. There have been many studies to-date discussing critical factors influencing the storage performance in depleted gas reservoirs while little attention was given to the effect of residual gas. In this paper, an attempt was made to highlight the importance of residual gas on the capacity, injectivity, reservoir pressurization, and trapping mechanisms of storage sites through the use of numerical simulation. The results obtained indicated that the storage performance is proportionally linked to the amount of residual gas in the medium and reservoirs with low residual fluids are a better choice for storage purposes. Therefore, it would be wise to perform the secondary recovery before storage in order to have the least amount of residual gas in the medium. Although the results of this study are useful to screen depleted gas reservoirs for the storage purpose, more studies are required to confirm the finding presented in this paper.

  10. Results of high resolution seismic imaging experiments for defining permeable pathways in fractured gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Daley, T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    As part of its Department of Energy (DOE) Industry cooperative program in oil and gas, Berkeley Lab has an ongoing effort in cooperation with Industry partners to develop equipment, field techniques, and interpretational methods to further the practice of characterizing fractured heterogeneous reservoirs. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the combined use of state-of-the-art technology in fluid flow modeling and geophysical imaging into an interdisciplinary approach for predicting the behavior of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoirs. The efforts in this program have mainly focused on using seismic methods linked with geologic and reservoir engineering analysis for the detection and characterization of fracture systems in tight gas formations, i.e., where and how to detect the fractures, what are the characteristics of the fractures, and how the fractures interact with the natural stresses, lithology, and their effect on reservoir performance. The project has also integrated advanced reservoir engineering methods for analyzing flow in fractured systems such that reservoir management strategies can be optimized. The work at Berkeley Lab focuses on integrating high resolution seismic imaging, (VSP, crosswell, and single well imaging), geologic information and well test data to invert for flow paths in fractured systems.

  11. Impact of Petrophysical Properties on Hydraulic Fracturing and Development in Tight Volcanic Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghao Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The volcanic reservoir is an important kind of unconventional reservoir. The aqueous phase trapping (APT appears because of fracturing fluids filtration. However, APT can be autoremoved for some wells after certain shut-in time. But there is significant distinction for different reservoirs. Experiments were performed to study the petrophysical properties of a volcanic reservoir and the spontaneous imbibition is monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and pulse-decay permeability. Results showed that natural cracks appear in the samples as well as high irreducible water saturation. There is a quick decrease of rock permeability once the rock contacts water. The pores filled during spontaneous imbibition are mainly the nanopores from NMR spectra. Full understanding of the mineralogical effect and sample heterogeneity benefits the selection of segments to fracturing. The fast flow-back scheme is applicable in this reservoir to minimize the damage. Because lots of water imbibed into the nanopores, the main flow channels become larger, which are beneficial to the permeability recovery after flow-back of hydraulic fracturing. This is helpful in understanding the APT autoremoval after certain shut-in time. Also, Keeping the appropriate production differential pressure is very important in achieving the long term efficient development of volcanic gas reservoirs.

  12. A new method of well test analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs based on elliptical flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igbokoyi, A.O.; Tiab, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Well testing analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs is usually based on the radial flow model. However, this model is only applicable to purely homogeneous system and long time solution and cannot provide complete formation analysis in a reservoir that exhibits anisotropy. This paper presented a new method of estimating permeability anisotropy in naturally fractured reservoirs. Maximum and minimum permeability were obtained in one well test. The paper discussed the mathematical formulation for the study which used Warren and Root's matrix pseudo-steady state model. The paper presented the assumptions for this model which included an isotropic homogeneous or anisotropic homogeneous formation; a slightly compressible fluid with single phase flow in both the matrix and fracture; initial reservoir pressure; two-dimensional flow; and laminar flow which obeys Darcy's law. The paper also discussed the computation of wellbore pressure and interpretation methods for both early linear flow and the long time radial flow regimes. Anisotropy was also outlined as the purpose of the study was to use an elliptical flow model in quantifying the permeability anisotropy of the reservoir. The type curve model was also explained to demonstrate the validity of the method of quantifying the permeability anisotropy with a known problem. Last, the paper explained the direct method with several example. It was concluded that the elliptical flow model is the most appropriate method of analyzing pressure transient data in naturally fractured reservoirs. 22 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs., 3 appendices.

  13. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  14. Functional Movement Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychogenic movement may develop as part of a conversion disorder (in which a psychological event causes physical symptoms ... distracted. Many individuals with psychogenic tremor have a conversion disorder. Psychogenic dystonia involves involuntary muscle contractions that cause ...

  15. Automatic fluid dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaris, P. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid automatically flows to individual dispensing units at predetermined times from a fluid supply and is available only for a predetermined interval of time after which an automatic control causes the fluid to drain from the individual dispensing units. Fluid deprivation continues until the beginning of a new cycle when the fluid is once again automatically made available at the individual dispensing units.

  16. Petroacoustic Modelling of Heterolithic Sandstone Reservoirs: A Novel Approach to Gassmann Modelling Incorporating Sedimentological Constraints and NMR Porosity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Lovell, M.; Davies, S. J.; Pritchard, T.; Sirju, C.; Abdelkarim, A.

    2012-12-01

    Heterolithic or 'shaly' sandstone reservoirs constitute a significant proportion of hydrocarbon resources. Petroacoustic models (a combination of petrophysics and rock physics) enhance the ability to extract reservoir properties from seismic data, providing a connection between seismic and fine-scale rock properties. By incorporating sedimentological observations these models can be better constrained and improved. Petroacoustic modelling is complicated by the unpredictable effects of clay minerals and clay-sized particles on geophysical properties. Such effects are responsible for erroneous results when models developed for "clean" reservoirs - such as Gassmann's equation (Gassmann, 1951) - are applied to heterolithic sandstone reservoirs. Gassmann's equation is arguably the most popular petroacoustic modelling technique in the hydrocarbon industry and is used to model elastic effects of changing reservoir fluid saturations. Successful implementation of Gassmann's equation requires well-constrained drained rock frame properties, which in heterolithic sandstones are heavily influenced by reservoir sedimentology, particularly clay distribution. The prevalent approach to categorising clay distribution is based on the Thomas - Stieber model (Thomas & Stieber, 1975), this approach is inconsistent with current understanding of 'shaly sand' sedimentology and omits properties such as sorting and grain size. The novel approach presented here demonstrates that characterising reservoir sedimentology constitutes an important modelling phase. As well as incorporating sedimentological constraints, this novel approach also aims to improve drained frame moduli estimates through more careful consideration of Gassmann's model assumptions and limitations. A key assumption of Gassmann's equation is a pore space in total communication with movable fluids. This assumption is often violated by conventional applications in heterolithic sandstone reservoirs where effective porosity, which

  17. Constraints on geothermal reservoir volume change calculations from InSAR surface displacements and injection and production data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaven, J. Ole; Barbour, Andrew J.; Ali, Tabrez

    2017-04-01

    Continual production of geothermal energy at times leads to significant surface displacement that can be observed in high spatial resolution using InSAR imagery. The surface displacement can be analyzed to resolve volume change within the reservoir revealing the often-complicated patterns of reservoir deformation. Simple point source models of reservoir deformation in a homogeneous elastic or poro-elastic medium can be superimposed to provide spatially varying, kinematic representations of reservoir deformation. In many cases, injection and production data are known in insufficient detail; but, when these are available, the same Green functions can be used to constrain the reservoir deformation. Here we outline how the injection and production data can be used to constrain bounds on the solution by posing the inversion as a quadratic programming with inequality constraints and regularization rather than a conventional least squares solution with regularization. We apply this method to InSAR-derived surface displacements at the Coso and Salton Sea Geothermal Fields in California, using publically available injection and production data. At both geothermal fields the available surface deformation in conjunction with the injection and production data permit robust solutions for the spatially varying reservoir deformation. The reservoir deformation pattern resulting from the constrained quadratic programming solution is more heterogeneous when compared to a conventional least squares solution. The increased heterogeneity is consistent with the known structural controls on heat and fluid transport in each geothermal reservoir.

  18. Movement and personality development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida M. Aylamazyan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of the movement in the process of shaping the personality, its importance as a mechanism for personality development is considered. The issue of the movement has always occupied a central place in Russian psychology. However, subsequently the movement began to be considered primarily as an executive action in human life. The role of movement in personality development can vary depending on the level it occupies in the hierarchical structure of activity, and also on the type of movement, its character, and the way it is constructed. Under certain conditions, the movement can express the attitude of the subject to the surrounding world and people. Many foreign and Russian psychologists point to a special place of the postural tonic component of the motor movement, the posture in personal regulation. The posture reflects his/her personal attitudes, the system of relationships, and, above all, the emotional attitude or emotional assessment of the current situation, the interest in the actions performed. Mastering the tonic level of motor management is based on the emotional regulation, so the ability to regulate one’s own pose is an important stage in the personality development. Posture tonic regulation of motor movements in humans reveals a qualitatively different character than in animals, this being due to the person’s facing the task of mastering his’her posture, arbitrary retention of the body in one or another position. Maintaining a vertical posture requires constant activity at an arbitrary and involuntary level of mental regulation. Mastering the posture of an unstable equilibrium presupposes the emergence of the «I» and is the last stage of the development. The way a person solves the motor task of maintaining the vertical position of the body reflects his/her specific personal strategy or attitude.

  19. The Circular Camera Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    It has been an accepted precept in film theory that specific stylistic features do not express specific content. Nevertheless, it is possible to find many examples in the history of film in which stylistic features do express specific content: for instance, the circular camera movement is used re...... such as the circular camera movement. Keywords: embodied perception, embodied style, explicit narration, interpretation, style pattern, television style...

  20. Nonlinear Multigrid for Reservoir Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max la Cour; Eskildsen, Klaus Langgren; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2016-01-01

    modeled after local linearization, leading to a nonlinear multigrid method in the form of the full-approximation scheme (FAS). It is demonstrated through numerical experiments that, without loss of robustness, the FAS method can outperform the conventional techniques in terms of algorithmic and numerical...... efficiency for a black-oil model. Furthermore, the use of the FAS method enables a significant reduction in memory usage compared with conventional techniques, which suggests new possibilities for improved large-scale reservoir simulation and numerical efficiency. Last, nonlinear multilevel preconditioning...

  1. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  2. Fluid transport phenomena in ocular epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candia, Oscar A; Alvarez, Lawrence J

    2008-03-01

    This article discusses three largely unrecognized aspects related to fluid movement in ocular tissues; namely, (a) the dynamic changes in water permeability observed in corneal and conjunctival epithelia under anisotonic conditions, (b) the indications that the fluid transport rate exhibited by the ciliary epithelium is insufficient to explain aqueous humor production, and (c) the evidence for fluid movement into and out of the lens during accommodation. We have studied each of these subjects in recent years and present an evaluation of our data within the context of the results of others who have also worked on electrolyte and fluid transport in ocular tissues. We propose that (1) the corneal and conjunctival epithelia, with apical aspects naturally exposed to variable tonicities, are capable of regulating their water permeabilities as part of the cell-volume regulatory process, (2) fluid may directly enter the anterior chamber of the eye across the anterior surface of the iris, thereby representing an additional entry pathway for aqueous humor production, and (3) changes in lens volume occur during accommodation, and such changes are best explained by a net influx and efflux of fluid.

  3. Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technology to improve recovery and economic in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. First quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.M.

    1995-05-04

    The focus of the project is to show that the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of CO{sub 2} projects in low permeability reservoirs. The approach involves the use of tomography, 3-D seismic and detailed petrophysical descriptions to enhance reservoir characterization. Cyclic CO{sub 2} stimulations and model designed frac treatments will be used to increase and facilitate oil recovery to improve project economics. The detailed reservoir characterization will be used to create a geological model for use in simulation to arrive at an optimum operating plan to be instituted during the second budget period. Objectives to be accomplished during the third quarter include: (1) Complete petrophysical description on cores from observation wells. (2) Apply petrophysical data to geologic model. (3) Conduct additional laboratory analysis on cores and fluids. (4) Refine 3-D seismic interpretations. (5) Complete tomography surveys. (6) Process tomography data. (7) Establish relationship between seismic and tomography interpretations. (8) Conduct preliminary simulator runs with improved geologic model. (9) Evaluate results of cyclic CO{sub 2} stimulation treatments. (10) Design frac treatment for linear flood fronts. All of the above objectives were worked on during the current quarter and the overall project is fairly well on schedule. The area of greatest concern time-wise is reservoir simulation. The simulator depends on the geologic model, which in turn depends on the petrophysical, 3-D seismic and tomography interpretations. Hence, the final geologic model won`t be available until all of the reservoir characterization work is completed.

  4. Effect of reservoir heterogeneity on air injection performance in a light oil reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Air injection is a good option to development light oil reservoir. As well-known that, reservoir heterogeneity has great effect for various EOR processes. This also applies to air injection. However, oil recovery mechanisms and physical processes for air injection in heterogeneous reservoir with dip angle are still not well understood. The reported setting of reservoir heterogeneous for physical model or simulation model of air injection only simply uses different-layer permeability of porous media. In practice, reservoir heterogeneity follows the principle of geostatistics. How much of contrast in permeability actually challenges the air injection in light oil reservoir? This should be investigated by using layered porous medial settings of the classical Dykstra-Parsons style. Unfortunately, there has been no work addressing this issue for air injection in light oil reservoir. In this paper, Reservoir heterogeneity is quantified based on the use of different reservoir permeability distribution according to classical Dykstra-Parsons coefficients method. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on physical process and production performance of air injection in light oil reservoir through numerical reservoir simulation approach. The basic model is calibrated based on previous study. Total eleven pseudo compounders are included in this model and ten complexity of reactions are proposed to achieve the reaction scheme. Results show that oil recovery factor is decreased with the increasing of reservoir heterogeneity both for air and N2 injection from updip location, which is against the working behavior of air injection from updip location. Reservoir heterogeneity sometimes can act as positive effect to improve sweep efficiency as well as enhance production performance for air injection. High O2 content air injection can benefit oil recovery factor, also lead to early O2 breakthrough in heterogeneous reservoir. Well

  5. Assessing Reservoir Depositional Environments to Develop and Quantify Improvements in CO2 Storage Efficiency. A Reservoir Simulation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okwen, Roland [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Frailey, Scott [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Leetaru, Hannes [University of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Moulton, Sandy [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The storage potential and fluid movement within formations are dependent on the unique hydraulic characteristics of their respective depositional environments. Storage efficiency (E) quantifies the potential for storage in a geologic depositional environment and is used to assess basinal or regional CO2 storage resources. Current estimates of storage resources are calculated using common E ranges by lithology and not by depositional environment. The objectives of this project are to quantify E ranges and identify E enhancement strategies for different depositional environments via reservoir simulation studies. The depositional environments considered include deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. Strategies considered for enhancing E include CO2 injection via vertical, horizontal, and deviated wells, selective completions, water production, and multi-well injection. Conceptual geologic and geocellular models of the depositional environments were developed based on data from Illinois Basin oil fields and gas storage sites. The geologic and geocellular models were generalized for use in other US sedimentary basins. An important aspect of this work is the development of conceptual geologic and geocellular models that reflect the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Different injection well completions methods were simulated to investigate methods of enhancing E in the presence of geologic heterogeneity specific to a depositional environment. Modeling scenarios included horizontal wells (length, orientation, and inclination), selective and dynamic completions, water production, and multiwell injection. A Geologic Storage Efficiency Calculator (GSECalc) was developed to calculate E from reservoir simulation output. Estimated E values were normalized to diminish their dependency on fluid relative permeability. Classifying depositional environments according to

  6. Data Compression of Hydrocarbon Reservoir Simulation Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Chavez, Gustavo Ivan

    2015-05-28

    A dense volumetric grid coming from an oil/gas reservoir simulation output is translated into a compact representation that supports desired features such as interactive visualization, geometric continuity, color mapping and quad representation. A set of four control curves per layer results from processing the grid data, and a complete set of these 3-dimensional surfaces represents the complete volume data and can map reservoir properties of interest to analysts. The processing results yield a representation of reservoir simulation results which has reduced data storage requirements and permits quick performance interaction between reservoir analysts and the simulation data. The degree of reservoir grid compression can be selected according to the quality required, by adjusting for different thresholds, such as approximation error and level of detail. The processions results are of potential benefit in applications such as interactive rendering, data compression, and in-situ visualization of large-scale oil/gas reservoir simulations.

  7. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Understanding the Impact of Reservoir Operations on Temperature Hydrodynamics at Shasta Lake through 2D and 3D Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallnan, R.; Busby, D.; Saito, L.; Daniels, M.; Danner, E.; Tyler, S.

    2016-12-01

    Stress on California's salmon fisheries as a result of recent drought highlights a need for effective temperature management in the Sacramento River. Cool temperatures are required for Chinook salmon spawning and rearing. At Shasta Dam in northern California, managers use selective reservoir withdrawals to meet downstream temperature thresholds set for Chinook salmon populations. Shasta Dam is equipped with a temperature control device (TCD) that allows for water withdrawals at different reservoir depths. A two-dimensional CE-QUAL-W2 (W2) model of Shasta Reservoir has been used to understand the impacts of TCD operations on reservoir and discharge dynamics at Shasta. W2 models the entire reservoir based on hydrologic and meteorological inputs, and therefore can be used to simulate various hydroclimatic conditions, reservoir operations, and resulting reservoir conditions. A limitation of the W2 model is that it only captures reservoir conditions in two dimensions (length and depth), which may not represent local hydrodynamic effects of TCD operations that could affect simulation of discharge temperatures. Thus, a three-dimensional (3D) model of the TCD and the immediately adjacent upstream reservoir has been constructed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in ANSYS Fluent. This 3D model provides additional insight into the mixing effects of different TCD operations, and resulting reservoir outflow temperatures. The drought conditions of 2015 provide a valuable dataset for assessing the efficacy of modeling the temperature profile of Shasta Reservoir under very low inflow volumes, so the W2 and CFD models are compared for model performance in late 2015. To assist with this assessment, data from a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) deployment at Shasta Lake since August 2015 are used. This presentation describes model results from both W2 as well as the CFD model runs during late 2015, and discuss their efficacy for modeling drought conditions.

  9. Carbonate reservoirs modified by magmatic intrusions in the Bachu area, Tarim Basin, NW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil and gas exploration in carbonate rocks was extremely successful in recent years in the Ordovician in Tarim Basin, NW China. Here, we investigate the carbonate reservoirs in the Bachu area of the Tarim Basin through petrological and geochemical studies combined with oil and gas exploration data. Geochemical analysis included the major, trace, and rare earth elements; fluid inclusion thermometry; clay mineral characterization; and carbon and oxygen isotopes of the carbonate rocks. Homogenization temperatures of the fluid inclusions of Well He-3 in the Bachu area indicate three groups, 60–80 °C, 90–130 °C, and 140–170 °C, and suggest that the carbonate rocks experienced modification due to heating events. The porosity in the reservoir is defined by fractures and secondary pores, and there is a notable increase in the porosity of the carbonate reservoirs in proximity to magmatic intrusion, particularly approximately 8–10 m from the intrusive rocks. The development of secondary pores was controlled by lithofacies and corrosion by various fluids. We identify supercritical fluids with high density (138.12–143.97 mg/cm3 in the Bachu area. The negative correlations of δ13C (−2.76‰ to −0.97‰ and δ18O (−7.91‰ to −5.07‰ suggest that the carbonate rocks in the study area were modified by high-salinity hydrothermal fluid. The formation of clay minerals, such as illite and montmorillonite, caused a decrease in porosity. Our study demonstrates the effect of magmatic intrusions in modifying the reservoir characteristics of carbonate rocks and has important implications for oil and gas exploration.

  10. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    decades, mainly due to the rapid improvement in computational efficiency, cameras, optics and instrumentation, both computational and experimental techniques have improved significantly, allowing researchers in Fluid Mechanics to build better mechanistic and analytical models for processes involving dynamics of fluids.

  11. Geochemical modeling of fluid-fluid and fluid-mineral interactions during geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C.; Ji, X.; Lu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The long time required for effective CO2 storage makes geochemical modeling an indispensable tool for CCUS. One area of geochemical modeling research that is in urgent need is impurities in CO2 streams. Permitting impurities, such as H2S, i