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Sample records for resected diabetic foot

  1. Comparison of Metatarsal Head Resection Versus Conservative Care in Treatment of Neuropathic Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar Motamedi, Alireza; Ansari, Mohammad

    Complications from diabetic foot ulcers often lead to increased patient morbidity. Much debate still ensues concerning surgical versus conservative management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcerations. The present study assessed and compared the efficacy of metatarsal head resection and medical approach in the treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers located at the plantar surface of metatarsal heads. In a retrospective cohort study, 24 consecutive neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in the lower area of the metatarsal heads that had undergone metatarsal head resection were included as the operative group. For the control group, we included 25 similar ulcers that were scheduled for medical therapy. With respect to postoperative complications, wound healing occurred earlier in the operative group, and the recurrence rate was inversely greater in the medical treatment group. Also, the hospitalization rate was significantly greater in the medical treatment group. Overall, the long-term complication rate was lower in the operative than in the medical treatment group. Also, the infection rate was greater in the medical treatment group than in the operative group. Comparing early and late clinical outcomes of metatarsal head resection surgery and medical treatment showed complete superiority for the surgical approach, and metatarsal head resection is more completely cost beneficial than the medical approach. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Halil Akbulut; Umit Aydogan; Y. Cetin Doganer

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a multisystemic disease progressively seen more frequently in the general population. Diabetes foot, seen in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus, is a frequent result of improper foot care and requires long and serious treatment. The disease plays an important role in terms of public health and can be a cause for high morbidity and mortality rates. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(4.000): 375-382

  3. Analysis of Ulcer Recurrences After Metatarsal Head Resection in Patients Who Underwent Surgery to Treat Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Corbalán, Irene; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; Molines-Barroso, Raúl; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier

    2015-06-01

    Metatarsal head resection is a common and standardized treatment used as part of the surgical routine for metatarsal head osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to define the influence of the amount of the metatarsal resection on the development of reulceration or ulcer recurrence in patients who suffered from plantar foot ulcer and underwent metatarsal surgery. We conducted a prospective study in 35 patients who underwent metatarsal head resection surgery to treat diabetic foot osteomyelitis with no prior history of foot surgeries, and these patients were included in a prospective follow-up over the course of at least 6 months in order to record reulceration or ulcer recurrences. Anteroposterior plain X-rays were taken before and after surgery. We also measured the portion of the metatarsal head that was removed and classified the patients according the resection rate of metatarsal (RRM) in first and second quartiles. We found statistical differences between the median RRM in patients who had an ulcer recurrence and patients without recurrences (21.48 ± 3.10% vs 28.12 ± 10.8%; P = .016). Seventeen (56.7%) patients were classified in the first quartile of RRM, which had an association with ulcer recurrence (P = .032; odds ratio = 1.41; 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.92). RRM of less than 25% is associated with the development of a recurrence after surgery in the midterm follow-up, and therefore, planning before surgery is undertaken should be considered to avoid postsurgical complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Diabetic Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage your nerves or blood vessels. Nerve damage from diabetes can cause you to lose feeling in your feet. You may not feel a cut, a blister or a sore. Foot injuries such as these can cause ulcers and infections. ...

  5. Haemorheology in diabetic foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karandikar S

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to study the haemorheology in patients with diabetic foot lesions. Haemorheology of 30 patients with foot lesions and 30 age and sex matched controls was studied. The haemorheological parameters evaluated were whole blood and plasma viscosity and RBC filter ability. Plasma viscosity was significantly increased (p < 0.05. It substantiates the need for using rheomodulators in management of diabetic foot lesions.

  6. [Minor foot amputations in diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, C; Eckhard, M; Szalay, G; Heiss, C

    2016-10-01

    The treatment strategy for diabetic foot syndrome must take into account protective sensibility of the foot, open wounds, infection status, and the rules of septic bone surgery. Interventions are classified as elective, prophylactic, curative, or emergency. Amputations in the forefoot and midfoot region are performed as ray amputations (including metatarsal), which can often be carried out as "inner" amputations. Gentle tissue treatment mandatory because of greater risk of revision with re-amputation compared to classical amputation. Good demarcation of infection, acute osteomyelitis, osteolytic lesions, neurotropic ulcer, arterial and venous blood flow to the other toes, gangrene of other toes with metatarsal affection. Arterial occlusive disease, infection of neighboring areas, avoidable amputations, poorly healing ulcers on the lower leg. Primary dorsal approach; minimal incisional distance (5 cm) to minimize skin necrosis risk. Atraumatic preparation, minimize hemostasis to not compromise the borderline perfusion situation. In amputations, plantar skin preparation and longer seams placed as dorsal as possible, either disarticulated and maintain cartilage, or round the cortical metatarsal bone after resection. Diabetes control. Braun splint, mobilization in a shoe with forefoot decompression and hindfoot support, physiotherapy. Antibiotics based on resistance testing. If no complications, dressing change on postoperative day 1. Optimal wound drainage by lowering foot several times a day; drainage removal after 12-24 h. Insoles and footwear optimization. Amputations require continued attention and if necessary treatment to avoid sequelae. Insufficient treatment associated with recurrent ulceration and altered anatomy.

  7. Education for diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Batista

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to stratify the risk in a consecutive group of diabetic patients presenting, for the first time, in a diabetic foot clinic. Additional aims were to investigate the preventive measures in the local health system and to evaluate the level of patient’s awareness about diabetic foot-associated morbidity. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult diabetic patients referred to a Diabetic Foot Clinic of a Municipal Public Hospital comprised the sample for this observational study. The enrollment visit was considered as the first health-system intervention for potential foot morbidity. The average time elapsed since a diagnosis of diabetes among patients was five years. Rresults: At the time of presentation, 94% of sample was not using appropriate footwear. Pedal pulses (dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial arteries were palpable in 76% of patients. Thirty subjects (60% had signs of peripheral neuropathy. Twenty-one subjects (42% had clinical deformity. There was a positive correlation between a history of foot ulcer, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and the presence of foot deformity (p < 0.004 in each correlation. Cconclusions: Informing and educating the patients and those interested in this subject and these problems is essential for favorable outcomes in this scenario.

  8. Pathophysiology diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafril, S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is known to have many complications. Diabetes and its complications are rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and one of the most distressing is Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU). Chronic wound complications are a growing concern worldwide, and the effect is a warning to public health and the economy. The etiology of a DFU is multifaceted, and several components cause added together create a sufficient impact on ulceration: neuropathy, vasculopathy, immunopathy, mechanical stress, and neuroarthropathy. There are many classifications of the diabetic foot. About 50% of patients with foot ulcers due to DM present clinical signs of infection. It is essential to manage multifactorial etiology of DFU to get a good outcome.

  9. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    P. Rajagopal; S. Senthilvel; N. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to o...

  10. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  11. Imaging the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tong, D.T.F. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crim, J.R. [Durham Radiology Associates, Durham, NC (United States); Seeger, L.L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a {sup 111}In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  12. The Charcot Foot in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykberg, Robert G.; Armstrong, David G.; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Edmonds, Michael; Van, Georges Ha; Hartemann, Agnes; Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Jirkovska, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Morbach, Stephan; Morrison, William B.; Pinzur, Michael; Pitocco, Dario; Sanders, Lee; Wukich, Dane K.; Uccioli, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint disorganization secondary to underlying neuropathy, trauma, and perturbations of bone metabolism. An international task force of experts was convened by the American Diabetes Association and the American Podiatric Medical Association in January 2011 to summarize available evidence on the pathophysiology, natural history, presentations, and treatment recommendations for this entity. PMID:21868781

  13. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, R; Khairul, A; Sunita, K; Suresh, C

    2006-02-01

    Infection plays a pivotal role in enhancing a diabetic foot at risk toward amputation. Effective antibiotic therapy against the offending pathogens is an important component of treatment of diabetic foot infections. Recognition of the pathogen is always difficult as the representative deep tissue sample for culture is surrounded by ulcer surface harbouring colonies of organisms frequently labelled as skin commensals. The emergent of resistant strains represents a compounding problem standing against efforts to prevent amputation. This study was undertaken to identify the pathogens associated with diabetic foot infection in terms of their frequency and sensitivity against certain commonly used antibiotics. Forty-four consecutive patients with open diabetic foot infections had wound swab taken for culture and sensitivity testing. Cultures positive were observed in 89% of the cases with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa encountered in 20%, 14% and 14% of cases respectively. Mixed growths were isolated in 6% of cultures. All Staphylcoccus aureus isolates were resistant to Penicillin but 80% were sensitive to Erythromycin and Co-trimoxazole. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were sensitive to Methicillin and Gentamycin in 80% and 60% of cases respectively, and resistant to Ampicillin and Ceftazidime in 83% and 50% respectively. All Pseudomonas aeroginosa isolates were sensitive to Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin but 50% were resistant to Gentamycin. There was no single antibiotic possessing good coverage for all common organisms isolated from diabetic foot lesions. Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant cause of diabetic foot infections followed by Klebsiela pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most infections are monomicrobial. The emergence of multiresistant organisms is a worrying feature in diabetic foot infections.

  14. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they do not stretch or “breathe.” When buying shoes, make sure they feel good and have ... thorough foot exam, including a check of the feeling and pulses in your feet. Get a thorough ...

  15. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rajagopal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to over 380 million people by the year 2025. Many people with diabetes develop complications that seriously affect their quality and length of life. Lower limb complications are common, particularly foot ulcers and gangrene. Development of these complications is attributed to individual risk factors, poverty, racial and ethnic differences, and quality of local and national health care systems. The wide variations noted suggest that best practices in low incidence areas could easily be adapted in high incidence areas to reduce the burden of complications. Almost every infection begins in a wound, often as neuropathic ulceration or a traumatic break in the skin. Infections that begin as a small problem may progress to involve soft tissue, bones and joints. Because of these morbidity and occasional mortality by these foot infections several authoritative groups have recently developed guidelines for assessing and treating diabetic foot. METHODOLOGY 100 Diabetic patients with foot ulcers were admitted and wounds were classified using wagner’s classification. Pus was sent for culture and sensitivity and treated accordingly. RESULTS In our study the most common organism cultured from the wound with diabetes mellitus was staphylococcus. The most sensitive drug for these organisms was found to be chloramphenicol on most occasions. CONCLUSION The rationale of pus culture and sensitivity is not only to definitively treat the diabetic wound after the culture sensitivity report is

  16. Management of diabetic foot infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, M.; Amin, Z.; Chaudhary, T. H.; Shaheen, J.; Alvi, Z. R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the infecting agent in diabetic food infection with the susceptibility pattern, and to evaluate the effect of wound infection, was culopathy, neuropathy and control of diabetes mellitus on the outcome of the patients. Design: A descriptive and observational study. Place and duration of study: Patients with diabetic foot, admitted in surgical unit 1, B.V. Hospital Bahawalpur, from April 1999 to April 2000, were included in this study. Subject and methods: A total of 60 known diabetic patients were studied, out of these 47 were males and 13 females. They were assessed for angiopathy, neuropathy and extend of foot involvement. Necessary investigations, including x-ray foot, ECG, serum urea and creatinine, pus culture and sensitivity were carried out. Diabetes was controlled on insulin of the basis of serum sugar and urine sugar chart and treated accordingly. Results: The most common age of foot involvement was between 40-70 years. Right side was involved more often than the left (67%: 37%). Most of the infections were due to staphylococcus (50%), pseudomonas (25%) and streptococci (8%). Antibiotic was started based on sensitivity report. Fluoro quinolone plus clindamycin was used in 50%, fluoro quinolone plus metronidazole in 20% and amoxicillin/clavulanate in 23%. Most of the patients (61.7%) were in grade iii or iv of Meggit wagner classification of diabetic foot. Three patients (5%) were treated by below knee amputations while 1.7% patient by above knee amputation. In twenty-four (40%) patients some form of to amputation/ray amputation had to be done,while 32(53.3%) patients had complete healing of would without any amputation. Mortality was 3.33% all the 4 patients (6.7%) who presented late, having uncontrolled diabetes, with angiopathy (absent foot pulses), neuropathy, infection of the foot (grade iii or above) resulted in major amputation sooner or latter. The 32 patients (53.3%) having controlled diabetes mellitus with no angiopathy or

  17. What is the diabetic foot?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    79 age group had diabetes. This estimate is expected to ... unable to detect trauma or discomfort and as a result wounds often go .... should be considered when underlying bone is exposed or can be palpated with a blunt probe or in any chronic non-healing wound. Bone is infected in up to 20% of patients with foot ulcers ...

  18. Avoiding foot complications in diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) issued a call to action in 2005 in ... by the IWGDF.4 The Diabetic Foot Working Group (DFWG), a multidisciplinary organisation, was formed in 2007, with the aim .... team management.3,8,9. This comprehensive approach works in developed ...

  19. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  20. Diabetes: foot ulcers and amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Dereck L

    2011-08-26

    Diabetic foot ulceration is full-thickness penetration of the dermis of the foot in a person with diabetes. Severity is classified using the Wagner system, which grades it from 1 to 5. The annual incidence of ulcers among people with diabetes is 2.5% to 10.7% in resource-rich countries, and the annual incidence of amputation for any reason is 0.25% to 1.8%. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent foot ulcers and amputations in people with diabetes? What are the effects of treatments in people with diabetes with foot ulceration? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 50 systematic reviews and RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: debridement, human cultured dermis, human skin equivalent, patient education, pressure off-loading with felted foam or pressure-relief half-shoe, pressure off-loading with total-contact or non-removable casts, screening and referral to foot-care clinics, systemic hyperbaric oxygen for non-infected ulcers, systemic hyperbaric oxygen in infected ulcers, therapeutic footwear, topical growth factors, and wound dressings.

  1. Priorities in offloading the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play an important role in diabetic foot disease. Reducing high foot pressures (i.e. offloading) is one of the main goals in healing and preventing foot ulceration. Evidence-based guidelines show the strong association between the efficacy to offload the foot and clinical

  2. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  3. Holistic management of diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. DFUs are complex, chronic wounds, which have a major long-term impact on the morbidity, mortality and quality of patients’ lives. Individuals who develop a DFU are at greater risk of premature death, myocardial infarction and fatal stroke than those without a history of DFU. Unlike other chronic wounds, the development and progression of DFU is often complicated by wideranging diabetic changes, such as neuropathy and vascular disease. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases.

  4. [The role of vascular surgery in the multidisciplinary approach to the diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumkov, O A; Liubarskiĭ, M S; Altukhov, I A; Soluianov, M Iu; Smagin, M A

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of the percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty in patients with critical ischemia of the lower limbs and diabetes mellitus was analyzed. The study included 102 patients with septic complications of the diabetic foot syndrome. The main group consisted of 37 patients, who received both the traditional conservative therapy and the endovascular angioplasty. The study proves that the endovascular interventions by diabetic foot syndrome are effective and justified. Revascularisation permits the minimal resectional interventions on the foot, stop the ischemia and minimize the number of repeated necrectomies and high amputations. The diabetic foot syndrome is represented as a multidisciplinary problem.

  5. Osteomyelitis in diabetic foot: A comprehensive overview

    OpenAIRE

    Giurato, Laura; Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Uccioli, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Foot infection is a well recognized risk factor for major amputation in diabetic patients. The osteomyelitis is one of the most common expression of diabetic foot infection, being present approximately in present in 10%-15% of moderate and in 50% of severe infectious process. An early and accurate diagnosis is required to ensure a targeted treatment and reduce the risk of major amputation. The aim of this review is to report a complete overview about the management of diabetic foot osteomyeli...

  6. Surgical revascularization techniques for diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Kota, Siva Krishna; Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Sahoo, Satyajit; Mohapatra, Sudeep; Modi, Kirtikumar Dharmsibhai

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis. The diabetic foot is characterized by the presence of arteriopathy and neuropathy. The vascular damage includes non-occlusive microangiopathy and macroangiopathy. Diabetic foot wounds are responsible for 5–10% of the cases of major or minor amputations. In fact, the risk of amputation of the lower limbs is 15–20% higher in diabetic populations than in the general population. The University of Texas classification is the reference class...

  7. Preventing Diabetic Foot Complications : Strategic Recommendations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diabetic foot is the commonest cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation in the developed and developing nations. Several risk factors predispose the diabetic patient to foot ulceration and peripheral neuropathy, with peripheral vascular disease are the commonest risk factors. Clinical examination for these risk ...

  8. VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE IN DIABETIC FOOT MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Moganakannan; `Prema; Arun Sundara Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Comparision of vacuum assisted closure vs conventional dressing in management of diabetic foot patients. 30 patients were taken in that 15 underwent vacuum therapy and remaining 15 underwent conventional dressing.They were analysed by the development of granulation tissue and wound healing.The study showed Vac therapy is the best modality for management of diabetic foot patients.

  9. Classification of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Frances

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the relative importance of factors involved in the development of diabetic foot problems can vary in both their presence and severity between patients and lesions. This may be one of the reasons why outcomes seem to vary centre to centre and why some treatments may seem more effective in some people than others. There is a need therefore to classify and describe lesions of the foot in patients with diabetes in a manner that is agreed across all communities but is simple to use in clinical practice. No single system is currently in widespread use, although a number have been published. Not all are well validated outside the system from which they were derived, and it has not always been made clear the clinical purposes to which such classifications should be put to use, whether that be for research, clinical description in routine clinical care or audit. Here the currently published classification systems, their validation in clinical practice, whether they were designed for research, audit or clinical care, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are explored. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Diabetic foot ulcer teams in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberstad, Mari; Bentsen, Signe Berit; Berg, Tore Julsrud; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-09-19

    The national clincial guidelines for diabetes recommend that diabetic foot ulcers be treated by interdisciplinary diabetic foot ulcer teams. This study aims to survey the extent of diabetic foot ulcer teams in the specialist health service in Norwegian hospitals and to describe their clinical composition, organisation and working routines. The study is cross-sectional with the use of a questionnaire survey. The criteria for participating were somatic hospitals with 24-hour operations and a specialist function for patients with diabetes mellitus. A total of 41 hospitals participated of the 51 that fulfilled the criteria. Altogether 17 of 41 hospitals had diabetic foot ulcer teams. The teams had a broad clinical composition and followed national recommendations for surveying risk factors and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Nine foot ulcer teams had written routines for assessment, five used the Noklus diabetes patient records to document ulcer treatment, and ten had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Only one-quarter of the teams included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration. The diabetic foot ulcer teams had broad clinical competence and followed national clinical guidelines. The teams had a short waiting time for the initial consultation, half had written guidelines, and 60 % had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Far fewer had included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration.

  11. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  12. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guarneri, Gabriella; Corazza, Stefano; Donà, Giulia; Denti, Paolo; Facchinetti, Andrea; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2009-10-23

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation) were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate the major sources of variation (true variation in the subject

  13. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denti Paolo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. Methods A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Results Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Conclusion Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate

  14. [Diabetic foot: from diagnosis to therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchi, P; Ferrari, P; Spina, M L

    2005-01-01

    Four percent of Italians are affected by diabetes mellitus. There are 120 million diabetics worldwide: it is expected that 15% of them will have wounds on their feet during their lifetime. In industrialized countries diabetes mellitus is the main cause of non-accidental amputation and this risk is approximately 15 times higher in diabetics than in any other population. The vasculopathy and/or the diabetic neuropathy represent the basic pathogenic elements in the development of diabetic foot: 15% of diabetics are affected by arteriopathy after 10 yrs of illness and just 40% have neuropathy after 25 yrs. The infection is the third, and often, concomitant pathogenetic factor in the diabetic ulcera. The diagnostics of the vasculopathic diabetic foot makes use of a careful objective check; doppler ultrasonography and arteriography (with the therapeutic application of the PTCA). In addition to the objective check, EMG and the neuropathy autonomy test are fundamental in the neuropathic diabetic foot. Osteomyelitis represents the most fearful complication in the diabetic foot; it can often be solved only through surgical destructive therapy. Therapy of the diabetic foot must come from careful and synergic team work, in which dietician, vascular surgeon, orthopedist and dermatologist make available their own skill with humility and endless patience.

  15. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandi C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical grading and bacteriological study of 107 patients with diabetic foot lesions revealed polymicrobial aetiology in 69 (64.4% and single aetiology in 21 (19.6%. Among 107 patients 62 had ulcer. Of these 31 had mixed aerobes. Twenty six patients with cellulitis and 12 with gangrene had more than 5 types of aerobes and anaerobes such as E.coli, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Enterobactor spp., Enterococci spp., Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp. It was noted that 50 out of 62 patients with ulcer, and all the patients with cellulitis and gangrene were given surgical management and treated with appropriate antibiotics based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  16. CLINICOMICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar Palaniappan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors affecting all organs in the body. Foot ulcers are one of the common and serious long-term complications of diabetes leads to recurrent and chronic infections, which results in limb loss when treatment is delayed. The aim of this study is to find out the clinical outcome and microbiological profile in patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study conducted between November 2008 to November 2009 over 50 patients with history of foot ulceration and diabetes. 50 patients were admitted with diabetic foot ulcer over a period of one year between November 2008-2009. They were studied after getting written consent. A predesigned pro forma was used to get the parameters comprising age, gender, duration, type of diabetes mellitus, presence of neuropathy, nephropathy (serum creatinine, urine albumin, retinopathy (screening funduscopy by ophthalmologist. RESULTS Among 50 patients admitted and treated for diabetic foot ulcers with mean stay of 18 days, 29 (58% had complete healing on conservative management, 18 (36% underwent minor amputation (toes, 3 (6% had major amputation (below knee/above knee. No mortality among the study groups encountered. Gram-negative aerobes E. coli (36%, Pseudomonas (52%, Klebsiella (28%, Proteus vulgaris (20% and Acinetobacter (16% were most frequently isolated followed by gram-positive aerobes MRSA (14%, Enterococcus (6%, Strep pyogenes (4% and no anaerobic growth. CONCLUSION Diabetic foot infections are frequently polymicrobial and predominantly gram-negative aerobic bacteria at presentation. Multidrug resistance pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA in diabetic foot ulcer is at its emergence and life threatening. Initial aggressive multimodal approach with surgical intervention, culture specific and sensitive targeted combined broad-spectrum antibiotics decreases the morbidity and mortality

  17. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberlee B. Hobizal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Common causes for non-healing of diabetic foot ulcers are infection and/or ischaemia. Diabetic patients are compromised hosts as far as wound healing is concerned. Diabetes mellitus is associated with a defective cellular and humoral immunity. In particular, decreased chemotaxis, decreased

  19. [Diabetic foot care. importance of education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreguitart, Maite Valverde

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent chronic disease at present. It is estimated that approximately 250 million people worldwide have diabetes, representing 5.9% of the adult population. According to a study published recently in Spain, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes varies between 10 and 15%. Cardiovascular complications associated with the disease produce a high social and health costs significantly reducing the quality of life of patients and their families and are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Complications of diabetes with higher economic costs are the "diabetic foot", which consume about 20% of resources devoted to the care of these patients. Each year more than 1 million people worldwide suffer from a leg amputation due to this condition. Between 50% and 70% of non-traumatic amputations occur in patients with diabetes. Most of these amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer The most important factors related to the development of these ulcers are loss of sensation due to neuropathy minor trauma, foot deformity and peripheral vascular disease. According to the International Diabetes Federation, 15% of people with diabetes will develop foot ulcers during their lifetime. Interventions aimed at preventing foot ulcers in patients such as the comprehensive control, education of people with diabetes and their families as well as health professionals, have been shown to reduce lower extremity amputations by 50% and 85%.

  20. A review of the biomechanics of the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, C. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    In general, diabetic foot ulcers result from abnormal mechanical loading of the foot, such as repetitive moderate pressure applied to the plantar aspect of the foot while walking. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy causes changes in foot structure, affecting foot function and subsequently leading to

  1. The diabetic foot management - recent advance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinwar, Prabhu Dayal

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic ulceration of the foot represents a major global medical, social and economic problem. It is the commonest major end-point of diabetic complications. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in foot ulceration and may act alone, together, or in combination with other factors such as microvascular disease, biomechanical abnormalities, limited joint mobility and increased susceptibility to infection. In the diabetic foot, distal sensory polyneuropathy is seen most commonly. The advent of insulin overcame the acute problems of ketoacidosis and infection, but could not prevent the vascular and neurological complications. Management of diabetic neuropathic ulcer by appropriate and timely removal of callus, control of infection and reduction of weight bearing forces. Management of diabetic ischaemic foot are medical management, surgical management and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of stenosed and occluded lower extremity arteries. Foot ulceration in persons with diabetes is the most frequent precursor to amputation. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  3. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  4. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  5. Diabetic foot and PAD: the endovascular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, J. A.; Lammer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is recognized as one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Active revascularisation plays a crucial role in achieving ulcer healing. Non-surgical, minimally invasive, revascularisation options for DFU have expanded over the last decade and have become a

  6. [Quality of life of patients at late terms after surgical treatment of complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, T V; Levchik, E Iu

    2010-01-01

    Quality of life were explored in an open prospective controlled study in 116 patients with complicated diabetic foot syndrome (experimental group) and 30 diabetics without this syndrome (control group) by questioning of quality of life (questionnaires SF-36, Functional Scale of Lower Extremity) in long terms (6-18 months) after surgical treatment. Advantages of foot "saving" resections in surgical treatment of complicated diabetic boot syndrome were detected: patients without amputations had the physical wellbeing score and the Functional Scale of Lower Extremity number, comparable with the group of diabetics without diabetic foot syndrome. The integral mental wellbeing scores were low in all observed groups of patients.

  7. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot: A multidisciplinary approach accounting for the complex pathobiology and biomechanics of the diabetic foot is crucial to decrease the rate of amputations.

  8. Knowledge evaluation and educating diabetic patients on self foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion and recommendation: A considerable number of diabetic patients have poor self foot care knowledge and the level of knowledge on self foot care improved prominently following foot care education session. Therefore there is a need for establishment and strengthening effective foot care education for diabetic ...

  9. The diabetic foot: recognition and principles of management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lynne Tudhope is President of the Diabetic Foot Working Group of South Africa and an editorial board member for diabetes in the Journal of Wound Healing of South .... foot care team is the most effective way to provide patient education, manage foot ulceration, infection and deformity. Palpation of foot pulses is crucial in.

  10. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, Robert M.; Lokin, Joost L. C.; Nielen, Mark M.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Koelemay, Mark J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies were conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9-2.6%. Since then the prevalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that

  11. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, R.M.; Lokin, J.L.C.; Nielen, M.M.; Stoers, E.S.G.; Koelemay, M.J.W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies w ere conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9–2.6%. Since then the revalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that

  12. Foot structure and footwear prescription in diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2008-01-01

    Foot structure abnormalities such as foot deformity and limited joint mobility are common and well established components of the diabetic foot which are associated with increased levels of mechanical stress on the foot and the development of ulcers. Our understanding of foot structure abnormality in

  13. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ulcers of the foot are one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. So far, there are few published data in relation to the high-risk diabetic foot in Ethiopian ...

  14. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Abstract. Background: Ulcers of the foot are one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. So far, there are few published data in relation to the high-risk diabetic foot in ...

  15. [Diabetic foot osteomyelitis: is conservative treatment possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordano-Montañez, Queralt; Muñiz-Tatay, Montse; Viadé-Julià, Jordi; Jaen-Manzanera, Angeles; Royo-Serrando, Josep; Cuchí-Burgos, Eva; Anglada-Barceló, Jordi; de la Sierra-Iserte, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the proportion of foot ulcers, complicated by osteomyelitis in diabetic patients, that heal without amputation. Furthermore, an attempt is made to analyze the main clinical and microbiological characteristics of episodes, and to identify potential predictive factors leading to the failure of conservative treatment. A prospective observational study was carried out between 2007 and 2009 on diabetic patients with a foot lesion and attending a diabetic foot clinic. A percutaneous bone biopsy was required to be included in the study. A total of 81 episodes of diabetic foot osteomyelitis in 64 patients were evaluated. Staphylococcus aureus (28/81) and coagulase negative Staphylococcus (22/81) were the most frequent organisms isolated. Among the gramnegative group (34/81), non-fermenting gram negative bacteria were the most prevalent organisms isolated (14/81). Conservative treatment was successful in 73% of episodes. After a logistic regression analysis using the most significant prognostic variables, only lesion size greater than 2cm independently predicted failure of conservative treatment. Culture guided antibiotic treatment was associated with a better prognosis. Conservative treatment, including culture-guided antibiotics, is successful without amputation in a large proportion of diabetic patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Considering empiric therapy directed at non-fermenting gramnegative bacteria could be advisable in some cases, because they are frequently isolated in our setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  17. What is the diabetic foot?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-03

    Jan 3, 2011 ... 1). These include peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformities, external trauma and peripheral oedema. With the exception of trauma, it is usually a combination of problems ... commonly find that moving, standing or walking alleviates the pain.7 .... on specific imaging tests. Wound ...

  18. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoekenbroek, Robert M; Lokin, Joost L C; Nielen, Mark M; Stroes, Erik S G; Koelemay, Mark J W

    2017-07-01

    Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies were conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9-2.6%. Since then the prevalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that quantify the occurrence of diabetic foot ulcers are required and could serve as baseline measures for future studies. Individuals with diabetes (n = 81,793) were identified from the NIVEL (Netherlands institute for health services research) Primary Care Database, which contains data for standardised routine care and is representative of the Dutch population. The annual incidence rates of ulcers and other foot abnormalities were calculated using data collected between 2010 and 2013. To account for inaccuracies, incidence rates were calculated using: (1) only individuals with a documented foot examination; (2) all individuals; and (3) individuals with explicit documentation of present/absent foot ulceration. There were 412 individuals with documented ulceration during the registration period (0.50%). The annual incidence rate of foot ulcers was 0.34% (range 0.22-1.08%). Of those individuals with a documented foot examination, 14.6% had absent pedal pulsations, 17.3% had neuropathy and 10.1% had callus/pressure marks. The annual incidence rate of foot ulcers in the current study was lower than previously reported. This observation could reflect the efficacy of screening practices and an increased awareness among professionals and patients. Nevertheless, approximately one in every five diabetic individuals had at least one identifiable risk factor on foot examination. This signifies the importance of preventive screening.

  19. [Subintimal angioplasty and diabetic foot revascularisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Charles; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Bordier, Lise; Blin, Emmanuel; Duverger, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic wounds foot are responsible for 5-10% minor or major amputation in France. In fact, amputation risk of lower limbs is 15-30% higher for diabetic patients. University of Texas classification (UT) is the reference for diabetic foot wound. It distinguish non ischemic and ischemic wound with more amputation. If ischaemia is combined, revascularization may be considered for salvage of the limb. Some revascularization techniques are well known: as surgical by-pass, angioplasty with or without stent, or hybrid procedures with the both. Subintimal angioplasty is a more recent endovascular technique, in assessment for old patients who are believed to be unsuitable candidates for conventional by-pass or angioplasty. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A Simple New Classification for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    C Jain, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AbstractGangrene, infections like abscesses and ulcers are some of the common diabetic foot complications. Of all these, diabetic foot ulcers pose a major public health problem. Around 80% of all the lower limb amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer. There are various classifications for diabetic foot ulcers out of which the two commonly used classifications are Wagner’s ulcer classification and the classification of University of Texas. The author proposes another simple new classification...

  1. Living With Diabetes: Foot Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Insurance Health Insurance Update The Health Insurance Marketplace Health Insurance From an Employer Options for the ... Generation of Brilliant Researchers Diabetes Pro: Professional Resources Online We Support Your Doctor Clinical Practice Guidelines Patient ...

  2. Assessment of signs of foot infection in diabetes patients using photographic foot imaging and infrared thermography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Constantijn E. V. B.; van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Sjef G.; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetic foot disease require frequent screening to prevent complications and may be helped through telemedical home monitoring. Within this context, the goal was to determine the validity and reliability of assessing diabetic foot infection using photographic foot imaging and infrared

  3. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim S. Al-Busaidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman.

  4. Diabetic foot infection treatment and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Emanuele; Fino, Pasquale; Onesti, Maria G; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-04-01

    Foot infections in diabetic patients are a common, complex and costly problem. They are potentially adverse with progression to deeper spaces and tissues and are associated with severe complications. The management of diabetic foot infection (DFI) requires a prompt and systematic approach to achieve more successful outcomes and to ultimately avoid amputations. This study reviews a multi-step treatment for DFIs. Between September 2010 and September 2012, a total of about 37 patients were consulted for DFI. The treatment algorithm included four steps, that is, several types of debridement according to the type of wound, the application of negative pressure therapy (NPT), other advanced dressings, a targeted antibiotic therapy local or systemic as the case may, and, if necessary, reconstructive surgery. This treatment protocol showed excellent outcomes, allowing us to avoid amputation in most difficult cases. Only about 8% of patients require amputation. This treatment protocol and a multidisciplinary approach with a specialised team produced excellent results in the treatment of DFI and in the management of diabetic foot in general, allowing us to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients and also to ensure cost savings. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  6. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    : This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two......INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS...... and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  7. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (P<0.05), decreased contact surface on the hindfoot (P<0.03). While results indicated the important role of foot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the Sagittal Saw Blade as an Intraoperative Fomite During Diabetic Foot Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Corine L; Malan, Jared R; Meyr, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Surgical site infection is a major potential complication of all operative interventions, and the diabetic foot is particularly at risk for bacterial recontamination and infectious sequelae. The objective of this study was to identify whether the sagittal saw blade used during partial foot amputations and diabetic foot debridements carries the potential to serve as a bacterial fomite. We physically cultured the sagittal saw blade during 20 foot debridements involving the resection of bone in patients diagnosed with a diabetic foot infection. The culture was taken after the initial debridement and during the irrigation phase of the procedure. We observed 16 positive routine intraoperative culture results, with positive saw blade culture results in 15 (93.8%; 15/16) of these cases. In 14 (93.3%; 14/15) of these cases, the saw blade culture grew at least one of the same bacteria as our other routine intraoperative cultures. We observed 4 negative routine intraoperative culture results, with negative saw blade culture results in 3 (75.0%; 3/4) of these cases. This results in agreement between routine intraoperative cultures and saw blade culture of 85.0% (17/20). The results of this investigation demonstrate that the sagittal saw blade used for osseous resection during diabetic foot debridements and partial foot amputations carries the potential for intraoperative bacterial transmission. We recommend changing at least the sagittal saw blade if more bone is resected following irrigation, particularly if it is used to obtain a "clean margin" for microbiological or histological examination. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  9. Multidisciplinary valuation of the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Sánchez Reyes

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional classifications for diabetic foot, among them, Wagner Classification, do not contemplate the criteria or sichemia, neuropathy and infection, pillars that sustain the etiopathogy of this syndrome. With Modified Wagner Classification (MWC, there are cleary defined the phase and characteristics of the wound, incorporatin into the anatomical description by a graphical way (letters in capital letter or small one the mentioned props (infection, neuropathy and ischemia. In this way not only the language is equal (comes to an agreement to avoid interpretation mistakes, but also it is orientated by just one number and a letter towards a prognosis and treatment criteria. Cases received before and after the use of the MWC are compared perfoming a review, by two different professional groups, being catalogued by the same numbers in a high percentage. That is why we recommend its diffusion and generalized the employment for the managing of the diabetic foot.

  10. Recurrent Admissions for Diabetic Foot Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang CL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot complications are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Patients who undergo recurrent admissions for the same diabetic foot problems represent a difficult subgroup to treat. From July 2007 to June 2008, there were 38 such patients who were admitted recurrently. Eighteen patients (47% were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgical treatment. Eighteen patients (47% received treatment as necessary but were still readmitted for recurrent infection at the same wound site. Assessment of patients’ compliance to outpatient treatment was found to be generally lacking. As a significant proportion were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgery, a trained counselor may be suitable in counselling patients for debridement or amputation surgery.

  11. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  12. Surgical revascularization techniques for diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Siva Krishna; Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Sahoo, Satyajit; Mohapatra, Sudeep; Modi, Kirtikumar Dharmsibhai

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis. The diabetic foot is characterized by the presence of arteriopathy and neuropathy. The vascular damage includes non-occlusive microangiopathy and macroangiopathy. Diabetic foot wounds are responsible for 5-10% of the cases of major or minor amputations. In fact, the risk of amputation of the lower limbs is 15-20% higher in diabetic populations than in the general population. The University of Texas classification is the reference classification for diabetic wounds. It distinguishes non-ischemic wounds from ischemic wounds which are associated with a higher rate of amputation. The first principles of treatment are the control of pain of an eventual infection. When ischemia is diagnosed, restoration of pulsatile blood flow by revascularization may be considered for salvaging the limb. The treatment options are angioplasty with or without stenting and surgical bypass or hybrid procedures combining the two. Distal reconstructions with anastomosis to the leg or pedal arteries have satisfactory limb-salvage rates. Subintimal angioplasty is a more recent endovascular technique. It could be suggested for elderly patients who are believed to be unsuitable candidates for a conventional bypass or angioplasty. The current article would focus on the various revascularization procedures.

  13. [Vacuum assisted closure (VAC) in the treatment of advanced diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciuchowicz, Lukasz; Espinosa, Gaudencio; Grochowicz, Lukasz

    2009-10-01

    Deep diabetic foot lesions pose an enormous therapeutic problem. The purpose of this study was to present the experience of the use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) in the treatment of advanced and complicated diabetic foot lesions. Five cases of advanced diabetic foot that were treated with VAC were prospectively studied. Three patients were diagnosed with renal failure, including one with renal transplant, who were receiving immunosuppression therapy. Four patients had undergone local foot surgery. The foot lesions were classified as grade 3 or 4 according to the Wagner classification. In all patients extensive debridement was performed that resulted in open minor amputations in four cases and resection of the metatarsophalangeal joint in one case. The VAC was applied during the same procedure. The median follow-up period of the patients was 9 months. Foot salvage was achieved in all cases. The median number of changes of VAC was 16 within median period of 8 weeks. Half of the changes were performed as an outpatient procedure. There were no major complications or clinical signs of infection observed. In one case before treatment with VAC began, angioplasty of the iliac artery and superficial femoral artery was performed. Other interventions carried out after the treatment was started were, two distal revascularizations and two partial transmetatarsal amputations. VAC appears to be very useful in the treatment of advanced diabetic foot lesions.

  14. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.......INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS...... feet was the most used method of diagnosing Charcot foot. Along with clinical inspection, temperature difference was also the measurement used for monitoring of healing. None of the suggested formalised classification systems were used to any extent. Most responders use detachable bandages...

  15. Management of diabetic foot by natural honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoom, Asadullah; Khan, Muhammad Shoaib; Lagahari, Muhammad Ayub; Rahopoto, Muhammad Qasim; Tahir, Syed Muhammad; Siddiqui, Khaleeque Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that honey has antibacterial activity in vitro, and a small number of clinical case studies have shown that application of honey to severely infected cutaneous wounds is capable of clearing infection from the wound and improving tissue healing. Research has also indicated that honey may possess anti-inflammatory activity and stimulate immune responses within a wound. The overall effect is to reduce infection and to enhance wound healing in burns, ulcers, and other cutaneous wounds. The objective of the study was to find out the results of topical wound dressings in diabetic wounds with natural honey. The study was conducted at department of Orthopaedics, Unit-1, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro from July 2006 to June 2007. Study design was experimental. The inclusion criteria were patients of either gender with any age group having diabetic foot Wagner type I, II, III and II. The exclusion criteria were patients not willing for studies and who needed urgent amputation due to deteriorating illness. Initially all wounds were washed thoroughly and necrotic tissues removed and dressings with honey were applied and continued up to healing of wounds. Total number of patients was 12 (14 feet). There were 8 males (66.67%) and 4 females (33.33%), 2 cases (16.67%) were presented with bilateral diabetic feet. The age range was 35 to 65 years (46 +/- 9.07 years). Amputations of big toe in 3 patients (25%), second and third toe ray in 2 patients (16.67%) and of fourth and fifth toes at the level of metatarsophalengeal joints were done in 3 patients (25%). One patient (8.33%) had below knee amputation. In our study we observed excellent results in treating diabetic wounds with dressings soaked with natural honey. The disability of diabetic foot patients was minimized by decreasing the rate of leg or foot amputations and thus enhancing the quality and productivity of individual life.

  16. Diabetic foot care: Self reported knowledge and practice among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot complications are a leading cause of mortality in developing countries and the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase in the next decades in these countries. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and practice of foot care among diabetes patients attending ...

  17. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a gradually increasing portion of our health care budget. Whenever possible the focus should be on prevention rather than cure. All diabetic patients must have both ...

  18. Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Current Trends In Management | Igbinovia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Diabetic foot is the commonest complication of Diabetes and is a leading cause of hospitalization and prolonged in – patient treatment. Diabetic foot ulcer is far and away the most frequent indication for non traumatic lower limb amputations. ppropriate preventive measures as well as patient education will markedly

  19. Are we telling the diabetic patients adequately about foot care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Jadoon, R.J.; Farooq, U.; Alam, M.A.; Qureshi, A.; Shah, S.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus affects more than 285 million people worldwide. The prevalence is expected to rise to 439 million by the year 2030. Diabetic foot ulcers precede 84 percentage of non-traumatic amputations in diabetics. One lower limb is lost every 30 seconds around the world because of diabetic foot ulceration. Apart from being lengthy, the treatment of diabetic foot is also very expensive. There is very limited emphasis on foot care in diabetic patients. Even in developed countries patients feel that they do not have adequate knowledge about foot care. This study was conducted to find out how much information is imparted by doctors to diabetic patients about foot care. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in admitted patients of the Department of Medicine, DHQ Hospital, Abbottabad from May 2014 to June 2015. 139 diabetic patients more than 25 years of age were included by non-probability consecutive sampling. Results: The mean age was 57.17 ( percentage 11.1) years. 35.3 percentage of patients were male and 64.7 percentage were female. The mean duration of diabetes in patients was 8.3 (±6) years. Only 36.7 percentage of patients said that their doctor told them about foot care. Less than 40 percentage of patients knew that they should daily inspect their feet, wash them with gentle warm water, and dry them afterwards. Only 25.2 percentage of the participants knew how to manage corns or calluses on feet. 66.5 percentage of patients knew that they should not walk bare foot. Overall, 63 percentage of our patients had less than 50 percentage knowledge of the 11 points regarding foot care that the investigators asked them. Conclusion: Diabetic foot problems are the one of the costliest, most disabling and disheartening complication of diabetes mellitus. Doctors are not properly telling diabetic patients about foot care. There is a deficiency of knowledge among the diabetic patients regarding foot care. (author)

  20. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  1. Malignant melanoma misdiagnosed as diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Dawei; Ran, Xingwu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Acral lentiginous melanoma (AML) does not exhibit the classic signs of malignant melanoma. ALM is frequently misdiagnosed because of its unusual sites and atypical clinical morphologies, which lead to poor prognosis. Patient concerns: A female patient aged 78 years was presented to our center with two ulcers on her right foot. Diabetic foot ulcer was considered as the primary diagnosis. The ulcers failed to improve after 2 weeks’ therapy. Diagnoses: An incisional biopsy of the lesion revealed malignant melanoma. Interventions: The patient received wide excision, skin grafting as well as biotherapy. Outcomes: The lesion was healed and no other metastasis has been founded until now. Lessons: Clinicians must maintain a high level of suspicion in distinguishing malignant melanoma from other more benign skin lesions of the foot. The need for early biopsy of ulcer, even when clinical suspicion is low, can not be overemphasized. Only in this way can we reduce misdiagnosis rate and improve survival rate in patients with foot ulcer. PMID:28723771

  2. Diabetic foot workshop: Improving technical and educational skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Shahbazi, Samimeh; Shayeganmehr, Zahra; Abooeirad, Maryam; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as one of the most common metabolic disorders has some complications, one of the main ones is diabetic foot (DF). Appropriate care and education prevents 85% of diabetic foot amputations. An ideal management to prevent and treat diabetic foot necessitates a close collaboration between the health team members and the diabetic patient. Therefore, improving nurses' knowledge about DF care and advancement in the quality of care provided by the nurses could significantly improve diabetic foot prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of DF workshop was to improve technical and educational skills of the nurses to prevent and manage diabetic foot. Considering the vital role of the nurses in providing DF care, EMRI decided to conduct Diabetic foot workshop for them. The following five steps were designed for the 14 coordinating sessions in the workshop: Goals definition, deciding about attendees, location selection, creating agenda, and developing a follow-up plan. "Diabetic Foot Workshop for Nurses" provides appropriate training to DF nurses at the national level; and combining theory and practice in this workshop not only increases nurses' knowledge, but also improves their skills in the field of the diabetic foot. Providing education and care to patients by DF nurse specialists instead of general nurses could be an important output of this workshop, which may lead to DF prevention and amputation decrease in the long term.

  3. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana

    2015-01-01

    (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials in any setting, recruiting people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed...... following treatment for diabetic foot ulcers (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.94; P value 0.56, low quality of evidence)Although 11 trials reported time to complete healing of the foot ulcers in people with diabetes , meta-analysis was not possible for this outcome due to the unique comparisons within each trial......, failure to report data, and high number of withdrawals. Data on quality of life were not reported. Growth factors showed an increasing risk of overall adverse event rate compared with compared with placebo or no growth factor (255/498 (51.20%) versus 169/332 (50.90%); RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72 to 0.96; I(2...

  4. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  5. Assessment of signs of foot infection in diabetes patients using photographic foot imaging and infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenberg, Constantijn E V B; van Netten, Jaap J; van Baal, Sjef G; Bus, Sicco A

    2014-06-01

    Patients with diabetic foot disease require frequent screening to prevent complications and may be helped through telemedical home monitoring. Within this context, the goal was to determine the validity and reliability of assessing diabetic foot infection using photographic foot imaging and infrared thermography. For 38 patients with diabetes who presented with a foot infection or were admitted to the hospital with a foot-related complication, photographs of the plantar foot surface using a photographic imaging device and temperature data from six plantar regions using an infrared thermometer were obtained. A temperature difference between feet of >2.2 °C defined a "hotspot." Two independent observers assessed each foot for presence of foot infection, both live (using the Perfusion-Extent-Depth-Infection-Sensation classification) and from photographs 2 and 4 weeks later (for presence of erythema and ulcers). Agreement in diagnosis between live assessment and (the combination of ) photographic assessment and temperature recordings was calculated. Diagnosis of infection from photographs was specific (>85%) but not very sensitive (90%) but not very specific (60%) and specific (>79%). Intra-observer agreement between photographic assessments was good (Cohen's κ=0.77 and 0.52 for both observers). Diagnosis of foot infection in patients with diabetes seems valid and reliable using photographic imaging in combination with infrared thermography. This supports the intended use of these modalities for the home monitoring of high-risk patients with diabetes to facilitate early diagnosis of signs of foot infection.

  6. Role of footcare education in diabetic foot status and glycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of type 2 diabetes among the adult population is rising globally. As the case detection rates of diabetes increase in adult Nigerians, managing the attendant (foot) complications has become an important health challenge. Poor practice of foot care and poor glycaemic control is potential risk for ...

  7. Foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-01

    Sep 1, 2007 ... OBJECTIVES: To relate skin health, footwear practices and foot care education with occurrence of foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in. Kenya. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred and nineteen patients attending the diabetic clinic at the Kikuyu Mission Hospital (99 males ...

  8. STUDIES ON DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS IN PATIENTS AT JOS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiologcal and microbiological studies of diabetic foot ulcers were carried out in our hospital, with a view to reducing the amputation and mortality rate associated with the disease. Wound swabs from 38 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot ulcer patients were investigated using culture methods for both strict aerobes and ...

  9. Risk factors and prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers and the risk factors in a clinic-based setting. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya. Subjects: Patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus who had active foot ulcers in both outpatient and inpatient units. Main outcome ...

  10. fungal infections among diabetic foot ulcer- patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... a period of four months, from August to November. 2009 at Kenyatta National Hospital diabetic clinic. Patients presenting with foot ulcer(s) and those admitted to the surgical wards with diabetes were recruited. Those without visible foot ulcer and/or superficial lesions or declined consent to participate ...

  11. The Pattern and Surgical Management of Diabetic Foot at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at determining the pattern and the surgical management of patients with Diabetic Foot at Muhimbili National Hospital, from March to December 2008. Methods: All in-patients with diabetic foot who were admitted in the hospital during the study period were included into the study. Results: A total of 67 ...

  12. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of vascular insufficiency either by bypass grafting or endovascular ... evidence, however, that diabetes mellitus increases perioperative cardiac morbidity or ... endovascular treatment of the neuroischaemic diabetic foot and heads the multidisciplinary foot clinics at Montana and Wilgers hospitals in Pretoria.

  13. Foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVES: To relate skin health, footwear practices and foot care education with occurrence of foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in Kenya. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred and nineteen patients attending the diabetic clinic at the Kikuyu Mission Hospital (99 males, 120 females) ...

  14. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; Knight, C.; McCalla, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  15. [Management of a diabetic foot ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha Van, G

    2008-09-01

    A chronic diabetic foot ulcer requires a search for the etiology. The three main causes to search for are poor off-loading compliance, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular disease. The level of severity is measured with the U.T. classification and the level of infection with the classification of the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot. Peripheral vascular disease must be precisely evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, which describes all the arteries of the lower limb. Angiography is required only in case of revascularization. Treatment of the ulcer includes strict off-loading, topical treatment, optimal treatment of hyperglycemia, and antibiotic therapy on a case-by-case basis for osteomyelitis and/or, angioplasty or by-pass procedures. Osteomyelitis can be treated by associating conservative surgery, antibiotic therapy, and off-loading. No amputation, even of one toe, must be done without a previous vascular check-up. Off-loading of the ulcer must be regularly checked. Poor off-loading compliance must be systematically investigated if the ulcer worsens or healing is delayed.

  16. Socioeconomic profile of diabetic patients with and without foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To identify the differences in a socioeconomic profile between two cohorts of diabetic patients – one with diabetic foot problems and another without diabetic foot problems. Materials and methods: The cohort with diabetic foot problems (including cellulitis, abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, gangrene, ulcers, or Charcot joint disease consisted of 122 diabetic patients, while the other cohort without foot problems consisted of 112 diabetic patients. Both were seen at the National University Hospital from January to April 2007. A detailed protocol was designed and the factors studied included patient profile, average monthly household income, education, compliance to diabetic medication, attendance at clinics for diabetic treatment, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, gender, and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C level. These were studied for significant differences using univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: With multivariate analysis, Malay ethnicity (p<0.001, education of up to secondary school only (p=0.021, low average monthly household income of less than SGD $2,000 (p=0.030, lack of exercise (at least once a week, p=0.04, and elevated HbA1C level (>7.0%; p=0.015 were found to be significantly higher in the cohort with diabetic foot problems than the cohort without. Conclusions: There are significant differences in the socioeconomic factors between diabetic patients with diabetic foot problems and those without.

  17. The German and Belgian accreditation models for diabetic foot services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbach, Stephan; Kersken, Joachim; Lobmann, Ralf; Nobels, Frank; Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien

    2016-01-01

    The International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot recommends that auditing should be part of the organization of diabetic foot care, the efforts required for data collection and analysis being balanced by the expected benefits. In Germany legislature demands measures of quality management for in- and out-patient facilities, and, in 2003, the Germany Working Group on the Diabetic Foot defined and developed a certification procedure for diabetic foot centres to be recognized as 'specialized'. This includes a description of management facilities, treatment procedures and outcomes, as well as the organization of mutual auditing visits between the centres. Outcome data is collected at baseline and 6 months on 30 consecutive patients. By 2014 almost 24,000 cases had been collected and analysed. Since 2005 Belgian multidisciplinary diabetic foot clinics could apply for recognition by health authorities. For continued recognition diabetic foot clinics need to treat at least 52 patients with a new foot problem (Wagner 2 or more or active Charcot foot) per annum. Baseline and 6-month outcome data of these patients are included in an audit-feedback initiative. Although originally fully independent of each other, the common goal of these two initiatives is quality improvement of national diabetic foot care, and hence exchanges between systems has commenced. In future, the German and Belgian accreditation models might serve as templates for comparable initiatives in other countries. Just recently the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot initiated a working group for further discussion of accreditation and auditing models (International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot AB(B)A Working Group). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Progress in stem cell therapy for the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Lu, De-Bin; Chen, Bing

    2012-07-01

    The diabetic foot is a common and severe complication of diabetes comprising a group of lesions including vasculopathy, neuropathy, tissue damage and infection. Vasculopathy due to ischemia is a major contributor to the pathogenesis, natural history and outcome of the diabetic foot. Despite conventional revascularization interventions including angioplasty, stenting, atherectomy and bypass grafts to vessels, a high incidence of amputation persists. The need to develop alternative therapeutic options is compelling; stem cell therapy aims to increase revascularization and alleviate limb ischemia or improve wound healing by stimulating new blood vessel formation, and brings new hope for the treatment of the diabetic foot. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of antibacterial therapy on bone scan indices at foot inflammation in diabetes mellitus accompanied by diabetic foot syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnov, V.M.; Bolgars'ka, S.V.; Taran, E.V.; Markov, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of antibacterial therapy on bone scan indices at foot inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) accompanied by diabetic foot syndrome was studied. Bone scan was performed using scintillation tomographic gamma-camera hours after intravenous injection of 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate

  20. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Reveiz, Ludovic; Oliva, Patricio; Cedeño-Taborda, Jorge

    2015-10-28

    Foot ulcers are a major complication of diabetes mellitus, often leading to amputation. Growth factors derived from blood platelets, endothelium, or macrophages could potentially be an important treatment for these wounds but they may also confer risks. To assess the benefits and harms of growth factors for foot ulcers in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. In March 2015 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Randomised clinical trials in any setting, recruiting people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed with a foot ulcer. Trials were eligible for inclusion if they compared a growth factor plus standard care (e.g., antibiotic therapy, debridement, wound dressings) versus placebo or no growth factor plus standard care, or compared different growth factors against each other. We considered lower limb amputation (minimum of one toe), complete healing of the foot ulcer, and time to complete healing of the diabetic foot ulcer as the primary outcomes. Independently, we selected randomised clinical trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using the I(2) statistic. We subjected our analyses to both fixed-effect and random-effects model analyses. We identified 28 randomised clinical trials involving 2365 participants. The cause of foot ulcer (neurologic, vascular, or combined) was poorly defined in all trials. The trials were conducted in ten countries. The trials assessed 11 growth factors in 30 comparisons: platelet-derived wound healing formula, autologous growth factor, allogeneic platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth

  1. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  2. Epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Baba, Mendel; Lazzarini, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot disease is associated with major morbidity, mortality, costs, and reduction of a person?s quality of life. Investigating the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease is the backbone of diabetic foot research and clinical practice, yet the full burden of diabetic foot disease in Australia is unknown. This study aims to describe the protocol for a systematic review of the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia. Me...

  3. Current endovascular management of the ischaemic diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerassimidis, T; Karkos, CD; Karamanos, D; Kamparoudis, A

    2008-01-01

    Ischaemic diabetic foot ulcers pose a significant problem which is associated with a high likelihood of amputation. With the advent of endovascular surgery, the management of lower limb arterial lesions in the diabetic population has become more appealing. Coronary 0.014 monorail guide wires, appropriate sized angioplasty balloons and stents, and subintimal recanalisation, are all useful adjuncts and techniques to achieve revascularization. This article reviews the modern endovascular management of the diabetic foot. PMID:18923656

  4. Foot structure and footwear prescription in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A

    2008-01-01

    Foot structure abnormalities such as foot deformity and limited joint mobility are common and well established components of the diabetic foot which are associated with increased levels of mechanical stress on the foot and the development of ulcers. Our understanding of foot structure abnormality in diabetes has improved recently, mainly through the findings from in vivo imaging studies. Several examples will be discussed in this review. A limited understanding, however, still exists about several aspects related to the assessment, etiology, and consequences of change in foot structure in diabetes. Knowledge on these matters is needed if we are to better deal with the implications of foot structure change in diabetes. Diabetic patients with neuropathy and foot deformity are commonly prescribed with custom footwear, in particular after ulcer healing. The goal of this footwear is to redistribute and reduce plantar foot pressures, and to prevent ulcer recurrence. However, the available evidence for the effectiveness of custom footwear in secondary ulcer prevention is not yet strong. This may be associated with several factors, including a lack of standardized or systematic approach (a set of guidelines) in footwear prescription and evaluation or with the significant variability that exists across patients in the offloading effect of different footwear interventions, which increases the difficulty of predicting what works for a given patient. Objective evaluation tools such as in-shoe plantar pressure analysis can be helpful in this regard in order to ensure efficacy of an intervention. This provides a more optimal footwear solution that may lower the risk for ulceration.

  5. Characteristics of diabetic foot ulcers in Western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Zaine, Norafizah; Burns, Joshua; Vicaretti, Mauro; Fletcher, John P; Begg, Lindy; Hitos, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Australia is ranked ninth of 39 countries in the Western Pacific region most affected by diabetes. Patients with diabetes are at high risk of developing foot ulcerations that can develop into non-healing wounds. Recent studies suggest that the lifetime risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer is as high as 25%. Few studies have reported the prevalence of, risk factors and socioeconomic status associated with, diabetic foot ulcers in Australia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary referral outpatient hospital setting in Western Sydney, Australia. From January-December 2011, a total of 195 outpatients with diabetes were retrospectively extracted for analysis from the Westmead Hospital's Foot Wound Clinic Registry. Data on demographics, socioeconomic status, co-morbidities, foot ulcer characteristics and treatment were recorded on a standardised form. Demographics and physical characteristics were: 66.2% male, median age 67 years (IQR: 56-76), median body mass index (BMI) of 28 kg/m(2) (IQR: 25.2-34.1), 75.4% had peripheral neuropathy and the median postcode score for socioeconomic status was 996 (IQR: 897-1022). Diabetic foot ulcer characteristics were: median cross sectional area of 1.5 cm(2) (IQR: 0.5-7.0), median volume of 0.4 cm(3) (IQR: 0.11-3.0), 45.1% on the plantar aspect of the foot, 16.6% UT Wound Grade of 0C to 3C (with ischaemia) and 11.8% with a Grade 0D to 3D (with infection and ischaemia) and 25.6% with osteomyelitis. Five patients required an amputation: 1 major and 4 minor amputations. In accordance with other international studies, foot ulcers are more likely to present on the plantar surface of the foot and largely affect overweight older males with a long standing history diabetes in our outpatient hospital in Western Sydney.

  6. MR imaging evaluation of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; McCalla, M.; Knight, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint were evaluated with MR imaging to identify the presence and extent of infection and also to exclude coexistent infection in the neuropathic joint. Osteomyelitis (n = 8), abscess (n = 7), septic arthritis (n = 4), tenosynovitis (n = 4), and neuropathic joint (n = 5) were diagnosed with MR imaging. Osteomyelitis and/or abscess were excluded by MR findings in 13 instances. Most patients with infection had one more than one site of involvement. Clinical or surgical confirmation of the MR diagnoses was obtained in all but nine of the infection sites or cases of neuropathic joint. Only one false-negative diagnosis of osteomyelitis was made in this series. It is concluded that MR imaging provided accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection and that this information was decisive in patient management

  7. Minimally invasive surgery for diabetic plantar foot ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complications of diabetes mellitus constitute the most common indications for hospitalization and non-traumatic amputations in the USA. The most important risk factors for the development of diabetic foot ulcerations include the presence of peripheral neuropathy, vasculopathy, limited joint mobility, and pre-existing foot deformities. In our study, 500 diabetic patients treated for plantar forefoot ulcerations were enrolled in a prospective study from 2000 to 2008 at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty-two patients in the study met the criteria and underwent surgical treatment consisting of percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening to treat plantar forefoot ulcerations. The postoperative follow-up demonstrated prevention of recurrent foot ulcerations in 92% of these diabetic patients that maintained an improved foot function. In conclusion, our study supports that identification and treatment of ankle equinus in the diabetic population may potentially lead to decreased patient morbidity, including reduced risk for both reulceration, and potential lower extremity amputation.

  8. Clinical methods for assessing the diabetes foot at risk of ulceration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The diabetic foot at risk of ulceration is the diabetic foot with risk factors for foot ulceration but without actual ulcers–graded 0 by the Wagener algorithm for the diabetic foot. Peripheral Neuropathy (PN) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are the major risk factor predisposing individuals with diabetes mellitus ...

  9. A Descriptive Study Of Foot Complications In Diabetic Patients With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in a diabetic patient may be associated with the presence of other foot complications, which may otherwise be overlooked. Objective We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of symptomatic peripheral neuropathy among diabetic patients attending the diabetes ...

  10. Fungal Infections among Diabetic Foot Ulcer- Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To isolate and identify fungal pathogens associated with dermatophytoses in diabetic patients and identify the spectrum of yeasts colonising diabetic foot ulcers at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A cross sectional Laboratory based study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital diabetic clinic. Subjects: Sixty ...

  11. RISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-01-01

    Jan 1, 2003 ... While most of the population of diabetics studied were type 2, there is an observed high proportion of patients on insulin. This reflects not more of type 1 diabetes included in the study but more patients of type. 2 diabetes exhibiting beta cell failure over time and sepsis of foot ulcers thus requiring insulin for ...

  12. The Diabetic Foot in a Multidisciplinary Team Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbek, T E; Jansen, R B; Jørgensen, B

    2016-01-01

    Wound Healing Center (CWHC) at Bispebjerg Hospital from 1996-2013. Results: 777 diabetes patients treated with minor amputations were included. 77% were males and 23% were females. 80% had T2 diabetes and 20% had T1 diabetes. 89% of the patients had a foot ulcer at first contact. There was a total of 1...

  13. Role of procalcitonin in infected diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Ho; Suh, Dong Hun; Kim, Hak Jun; Lee, Yong In; Kwak, Il Hoon; Choi, Gi Won

    2017-06-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) has been recently accepted as a marker for diagnosing infection. The aim of the present study was to determine whether PCT levels are associated with infection severity of diabetic foot ulcers and whether PCT levels would be helpful to differentiate infected diabetic foot ulcer (IDFU) from IDFU associated with other infectious diseases (IDFU+O). We prospectively included 123 diabetic patients hospitalized for IDFU. Infection severity of diabetic foot ulcers was graded according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America-International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot clinical classification of diabetic foot infection. Chest radiograph, urinalysis, urine microscopy, urine culture, and blood cultures (if fever was present) were performed for all patients to diagnose other infectious diseases. Laboratory parameters were measured from blood venous samples. PCT (Spearman's ρ=0.338, Pdiabetic foot ulcers. However, only PCT levels could differentiate patients with associated infectious diseases from patients with no concomitant infection (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve 0.869, Pdiabetic foot ulcers and PCT levels>0.59ng/mL in patients with IDFU may be associated with other systemic bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS......: This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two...... feet was the most used method of diagnosing Charcot foot. Along with clinical inspection, temperature difference was also the measurement used for monitoring of healing. None of the suggested formalised classification systems were used to any extent. Most responders use detachable bandages...

  15. Prospective study on microangiopathy in type 2 diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiordaliso, Fabio; Clerici, Giacomo; Maggioni, Serena; Caminiti, Maurizio; Bisighini, Cinzia; Novelli, Deborah; Minnella, Daniela; Corbelli, Alessandro; Morisi, Riccardo; De Iaco, Alberto; Faglia, Ezio

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the significance of microangiopathy in the development of foot ulcer, which is still disputed. We assessed microangiopathy by histological analysis of the capillary ultrastructure using transmission electron microscopy and capillary density and arteriolar morphology in paraffin-embedded sections from the skin of type 2 diabetic patients: 30 neuroischaemic patients (Isc) revascularised with peripheral angioplasty and 30 neuropathic patients (Neu) with foot ulcer, compared with ten non-diabetic volunteers. In the diabetic patients, capillaries in the dermal papillary layer were fewer (-22.2%, 159 ± 43 vs 205 ± 52 mm(2) in non-diabetic volunteers, p foot skin. The predominance of arteriolar occlusions with neuroischaemia indicated the existence of an additional 'small vessel disease' that did not affect an effective revascularisation and did not worsen the prognosis of major amputations but slowed the healing process of the neuroischaemic foot ulcer. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02610036.

  16. Anaplerosis in Complex Treatment of Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Bezrodny

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the improvement of anaplerosis in patients with diabetic foot syndrome using skin flaps on vascular pedicle of the perforating vessels. The study involved patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with diabetic foot syndrome of neuroischemic form and chronic wounds of the lower extremities that do not heal for more than 21 days from the date of occurrence. The wounds were cleaned with ultrasonic cavitation. There was applied bandage with sorption antibacterial remedy base on nanodispersed silicon dioxide. There was applied a drainage vacuum bandage on a wound on the third day (VAC therapy. The flap is forming fitting to the size and configuration of a wound on a foot. Fourteen patients (93 % in the basic group were found to have survived flaps. Long-term follow up in 6 months demonstrated full maintenance of supporting function and good survived skin graft, absence of foot ulcers. In a control group 7 patients had recurrent foot ulcer. Improved techniques of autodermoplasty in patients with diabetic foot syndrome include glycemia control, preparation of a wound using vacuum apparatus bandage. Usage of split-skin graft combined with vacuum apparatus bandage allows close acute and chronic wounds effectively, maintain supporting function of an extremity, decrease in-hospital staying, and improve quality of patient’s life. Adequate foot wound closure prevents high-level amputation of low extremities in diabetic patients.

  17. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: management of diabetes-related foot ulceration - a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shan M; Gurr, Joel M; Allard, Bernard P; Holland, Emma L; Horsley, Mark W; Kamp, Maarten C; Lazzarini, Peter A; Nube, Vanessa L; Sinha, Ashim K; Warnock, Jason T; Alford, Jan B; Wraight, Paul R

    2012-08-20

    Appropriate assessment and management of diabetes-related foot ulcers (DRFUs) is essential to reduce amputation risk. Management requires debridement, wound dressing, pressure off-loading, good glycaemic control and potentially antibiotic therapy and vascular intervention. As a minimum, all DRFUs should be managed by a doctor and a podiatrist and/or wound care nurse. Health professionals unable to provide appropriate care for people with DRFUs should promptly refer individuals to professionals with the requisite knowledge and skills. Indicators for immediate referral to an emergency department or multidisciplinary foot care team (MFCT) include gangrene, limb-threatening ischaemia, deep ulcers (bone, joint or tendon in the wound base), ascending cellulitis, systemic symptoms of infection and abscesses. Referral to an MFCT should occur if there is lack of wound progress after 4 weeks of appropriate treatment.

  18. The treatment of diabetic foot infections: focus on ertapenem

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonds, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Michael EdmondsDiabetic Foot Clinic, King’s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, UKAbstract: Clinically, 3 distinct stages of diabetic foot infection may be recognized: localized infection, spreading infection and severe infection. Each of these presentations may be complicated by osteomyelitis. Infection can be caused by Gram-positive aerobic, and Gramnegative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, singly or in combination. The underlying principles are to diagnose infection, culture t...

  19. THE ANALYSIS OF THE DIABETIC FOOT OSTEOMYELITIS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Mithun N; Pattanashetty; Reshmina; Sharath Babu; Harikrishna; Sreedhar Reddy; Ramakrishna J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : India is considered as the diabetic capital of the world. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis is considered as one of the severe complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis tends to complicate around one third of diabetic foot infections. In v iew of this we conducted a prospective study on the bacteriological analysis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis at a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective study was perform...

  20. Peripheral arterial angiography and interventional treatment in diabetic foot ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaohua; Cheng Yongde; Hu Suying; He Jianrong; Lin Kaiqin; Jin Honglai; Shi Shijie

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the changes of peripheral arteries and choice of interventional treatment in diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Thirty-six diabetic patients with foot ulcers were examined by lower extremity DSA with simultaneous ultrasonic Doppler examination for correlative study and interventional treatment carried out in 17 segmental stenotic cases. Among them, 12 patients were treated by PTA and 5 patients by intravascular stenting. Results: Irregular stenoses and obstruction were observed in all patients with peripheral foot ulcers. DSA examination was more reliable comparing with Doppler examination for demonstration of the arterial injury above the level of popliteal artery. PTA and primary stenting were effective in all of these subjects outcoming with promotion of the lower extremity arterial blood perfusion and foreseen curing efficacy. Conclusions: Peripheral arterial stenoses were common in diabetic patients with foot ulcers. In clinical practice, DSA examination and interventional treatment could give a fertile prognosis and reduce disabling

  1. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, S Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 - the foot at risk, Class 2 - superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 - the crippled foot and Class 4 - the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot.

  2. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot. PMID:28216809

  3. Epidemiology and outcome in patients of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.N.; Rehman, K.U.; Malik, K.I.; Iqbal, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of study was detailed analysis of the presentation of diabetic foot ulcers, characteristics and predictors of outcome (incidence of amputation in neuropathic, ischemic, neuro ischemic) in patients presenting with diabetic foot at our hospital. Methods: This prospective analytic study was conducted from January 2009-August 2010 at POF Hospital Wah Cantt. Diabetic patients who presented with foot ulcers were enrolled in this study. Demographics of patients along with ulcer size, type, site and Grade according to Wagner Classification were recorded. Wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and de-sloughing of necrotic tissue along with appropriate antibiotic cover. Patients were followed over period until wound healed completely or a lower limb amputation performed, the outcome noted and patient was deemed to have completed study. Results: One hundred and fifteen patients with mean age 55.46 +- 8.23 years, both male and female were included in this study. Out of 115 patients 111 patients had Type-II diabetes while only 4 presented with Type-I. Mean Duration of diabetes was 14.61 +- 2.17 years. With respect to underlying causes 18.3% foot ulcers were ischemic, 22.6% were neuropathic and 59% were neuro-ischemic. Median ulcer size was 74% of ulcer classified as Wagner grade-II and III while 24% were of Grade-V. Lower limb amputation were performed in 25% of patients whereas limb salvage achieved in 75% of patients with wounds healed (median healing time 5 (3-10 weeks). Conclusion: Preservation of the limb function without endangering the patient must be a goal of treating diabetic foot. Once foot amputation is successful, rehabilitation with orthotic or prosthetic devices may allow years of a functional extremity along with preventive measures like cessation of smoking, daily foot hygiene and foot inspection. (author)

  4. Diabetic Foot Syndrome as a Possible Cardiovascular Marker in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality; in fact, some authors showed a higher prevalence of major, previous and new-onset, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot ulcers than in those without these complications. This is consistent with the fact that in diabetes there is a complex interplay of several variables with inflammatory metabolic ...

  5. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... Age alone is also not a contraindication to arterial reconstruction. ... over the age of 90 years if their functional and physiological status ... Lynne Tudhope is President of the Diabetic Foot Working Group of South Africa and an editorial board member for diabetes in the Journal of Wound Healing of.

  6. Risk factors, ulcer grade and management outcome of diabetic foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The objective was to determine the risk factors, ulcer grade, and management outcome of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) managed in a tropical tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observational study of all consecutive diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with DFU admitted in the ...

  7. Quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JWG; Trip, J; Jaegers, SMHJ; Links, TP; Smits, AJ; Groothoff, JW; Eisma, WH

    Purpose : To compare Quality of Life (QoL) between diabetic patients with (former or present) and without foot ulcers. Methods : Two patient groups of comparable age, sex distribution, type distribution and duration of diabetes were studied. Fourteen patients with former or present, but clinically

  8. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; van Netten, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on healing. In this article, we argue that a shift in priorities is needed. For the prevention of a first foot ulcer, we need more insight into the effect of interventions and practices already applied globally in many settings. This requires systematic recording of interventions and outcomes, and well-designed randomized controlled trials that include analysis of cost-effectiveness. After healing of a foot ulcer, the risk of recurrence is high. For the prevention of a recurrent foot ulcer, home monitoring of foot temperature, pressure-relieving therapeutic footwear, and certain surgical interventions prove to be effective. The median effect size found in a total of 23 studies on these interventions is large, over 60%, and further increases when patients are adherent to treatment. These interventions should be investigated for efficacy as a state-of-the-art integrated foot care approach, where attempts are made to assure treatment adherence. Effect sizes of 75-80% may be expected. If such state-of-the-art integrated foot care is implemented, the majority of problems with foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes can be resolved. It is therefore time to act and to set a new target in diabetic foot care. This target is to reduce foot ulcer incidence with at least 75%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. [Therapeutic uses of ortho-podiatry in the diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; Carabantes Alarcón, David; Padín Galea, José Manuel

    2011-10-01

    The neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers are a major public health problem given by different situations: the chronic nature of the injury, a low response to treatment, relapse rates, etc. Therefore pose a serious personal, family health and social, with a significant expenditure of human and material resources. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary team which integrates a podiatrist as part of it. He will address especially the pre-ulcers, and have a singular care in diabetic foot by treatment with orthosis. Since your question can be seen changes in the feet of diabetic patients could be treated on an outpatient basis.

  10. [Factors associated with amputation in diabetic patients with foot ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real Collado, J T; Valls, M; Basanta Alario, M L; Ampudia Blasco, F J; Ascaso Gimilio, J F; Carmena Rodríguez, R

    2001-02-01

    To analyse risk factors for amputation in diabetic foot ulcers. We have studied 152 diabetic patients (in 14 food ulcers treatment was amputation) who were attendance between January 1996 and June 1998 in the diabetic foot Unit. Subjects with gangrene were excluded. Risk factors for amputation were: previous history of amputation (odds ratio 3.7; 1.0113.7), proliferative retinopathy, osteomielitis, and independently clinical signs of peripheral vasculopathy (7.1; 1.88-27.2) and severe infection (14.4; 2.92-71.2). Diabetic subjects with foot ulcers and previous history of amputation, proliferative retinopathy, osteomielitis, clinical signs of peripheral vasculopathy and/or severe infection were a high risk group for amputation and in this group aggressive therapeutical and preventive approaches should be done in order to prevent amputation.

  11. Assessment of sensory neuropathy in patients with diabetic foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three different modalities for testing sensory neuropathy in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot problems. The three devices used included the pin-prick testing using the Neurotip® (PPT, the Semmes–Weinstein 5.07/10 g monofilament testing (SWMT, and the rapid-current perception threshold (R-CPT measurements using the Neurometer® testing. Our study population consisted of 54 patients (108 feet with diabetic foot problems treated at the National University Hospital in Singapore by our multi-disciplinary diabetic foot care team. Our results showed no difference in sensory neuropathy detected by PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT in both the pathological and normal foot. In the pathological foot, there was significant increase in sensory neuropathy detected by the Neurometer® device at both the big toe and ankle sites as compared to PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT. In the normal foot, there was a significant increase in sensory neuropathy detected by the Neurometer® device at the big toe site only as compared to PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT. Finally, the Neurometer® measurements detected a statistically higher proportion of feet with sensory neuropathy as compared to detection by the PPT or 5.07/10 g SWMT.

  12. The treatment of diabetic foot infections: focus on ertapenem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Edmonds

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael EdmondsDiabetic Foot Clinic, King’s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, UKAbstract: Clinically, 3 distinct stages of diabetic foot infection may be recognized: localized infection, spreading infection and severe infection. Each of these presentations may be complicated by osteomyelitis. Infection can be caused by Gram-positive aerobic, and Gramnegative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, singly or in combination. The underlying principles are to diagnose infection, culture the bacteria responsible and treat aggressively with antibiotic therapy. Localized infections with limited cellulitis can generally be treated with oral antibiotics on an outpatient basis. Spreading infection should be treated with systemic antibiotics. Severe deep infections need urgent admission to hospital for wide-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Clinical and microbiological response rates have been similar in trials of various antibiotics and no single agent or combination has emerged as most effective. Recently, clinical and microbiological outcomes for patients treated with ertapenem were equivalent to those for patients treated with piperacillin/tazobactam. It is also important to judge the need for debridement and surgery, to assess the arterial supply to the foot and consider revascularization either by angioplasty or bypass if the foot is ischemic. It is also important to achieve metabolic control. Thus infection in the diabetic foot needs full multidisciplinary treatment.Keywords: diabetes, foot, infection, antibiotics, ertapenem

  13. DIABETIC FOOT DISEASE IN KING GEORGE HOSPITAL, VISHAKAPATNAM: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON 100 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Babu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot as the leading cause of lower limb amputation is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus. Effective treatment and formulation of prevention guidelines for diabetic foot require a thorough understanding of characteristics of diabetic foot patients and their ulcers, so we conducted this study to investigate these characteristics . INTRODUCTION : Necessary data was collected from case sheets of 100 diabetic foot patients admitted in King Goerge Hospital, Vishakapatnam in the year 2014

  14. [Salvation of the diabetic foot through a comprehensive individualized treatment of the patient with type 2 diabetes: case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanderová, Ivana

    This is a case of men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot. The patient was in danger of limb amputation. After improvement of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia therapies a comprehensive treatment of diabetic foot including angioplasty, antibiotics and local maggot therapy was used for diabetic foot management. Therapy result was very satisfying for the patient. Despite of amputation of the 2nd digit due to advanced gangrene, the whole foot function was saved.Key words: diabetes foot - maggot therapies - type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Wu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie C Wu1, Vickie R Driver1, James S Wrobel2, David G Armstrong21Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research,William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, and National Center of Limb Salvage, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research, Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a common-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced

  16. Intensive versus conventional glycaemic control for treating diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu E; Seneviratne, Ridmee M; Tan, Yong Mong; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sangla, Kunwarjit S; Cunningham, Margaret; Buttner, Petra G; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-13

    The estimated likelihood of lower limb amputation is 10 to 30 times higher amongst people with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Of all non-traumatic amputations in people with diabetes, 85% are preceded by a foot ulcer. Foot ulceration associated with diabetes (diabetic foot ulcers) is caused by the interplay of several factors, most notably diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and changes in foot structure. These factors have been linked to chronic hyperglycaemia (high levels of glucose in the blood) and the altered metabolic state of diabetes. Control of hyperglycaemia may be important in the healing of ulcers. To assess the effects of intensive glycaemic control compared to conventional control on the outcome of foot ulcers in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In December 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; EBSCO CINAHL; Elsevier SCOPUS; ISI Web of Knowledge Web of Science; BioMed Central and LILACS. We also searched clinical trial databases, pharmaceutical trial databases and current international and national clinical guidelines on diabetes foot management for relevant published, non-published, ongoing and terminated clinical trials. There were no restrictions based on language or date of publication or study setting. Published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were considered for inclusion where they investigated the effects of intensive glycaemic control on the outcome of active foot ulcers in people with diabetes. Non randomised and quasi-randomised trials were excluded. In order to be included the trial had to have: 1) attempted to maintain or control blood glucose levels and measured changes in markers of glycaemic control (HbA1c or fasting, random, mean, home capillary or urine glucose

  17. Management of peripheral arterial disease and the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, R O; Hinchliffe, R J

    2014-04-01

    The management of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is complex and there is a lack of robust evidence to guide definitive treatment strategies. Due to the distinct differences in etiology, disease distribution and treatment outcomes patients with diabetes, PAD and foot ulceration should be considered separately from those without diabetes. There is no randomized trial data to compare angioplasty and surgical bypass for revascularization in patients with DFU and PAD and the decision of whether, and how, to revascularize should be taken by experienced surgeons, in a multidisciplinary setting. Revascularization is only part of a treatment regimen which includes aggressive management of infection, neuropathy, foot deformity and cardiovascular risk. The burden and challenge of DFU in the context of PAD is continuing to increase and new research studies should be targeted specifically towards this ever-expanding group of patients.

  18. A rational recognition of interventional teatment for diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Maoquan; Cheng Yongde

    2006-01-01

    According to program of vascular examination of diabetic foot, the first choice is vascular ultrasonography as the general survey, followed by CTA and MRA for assessment of bilateral lower extremities arterial morphological changes. Lastly, arterial angiography including DSA still remain as the gold standard for estimation. The main pathologic changes of diabetic foot including arteriolar and microvascular disorders induce the extremely important interventional treatment especially the local thrombolytic infusion to be the real practical management besides local PTA and stenting are furthermore in consideration. As a general metabolic disease, the serial treatment should also include promoting blood flow, removing blood stasis and improving microcirculation. Evaluation of interventional treatment for diabetic foot should undertake not only the vascular stenosis and restenosis, but also the relief of clinical symptom and improvement of amputation level. (authors)

  19. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  20. The Influence of an Interdisciplinary Diabetic Foot Team on the Outcome of Patients with Diabetic Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Management of diabetic foot infection (DFI is challenging; a multidisciplinary approach has been shown to reduce amputation rates. There is limited information on the effect of having an interdisciplinary diabetic foot team (IDT on patient load and outcomes at infectious disease departments. We aim to investigate the effect of the IDT approach on patient characteristics, the length of hospitalization, and amputation rates in patients hospitalized for DFI at the department of infectious disease. Material and Method: We retrospectively reviewed the files of patients who were hospitalized in the infectious disease department for DFI between January 2005 and October 2014. Patients hospitalized before the establishment of IDT (October 8, 2013 formed Group-1 and those hospitalized after the establishment of IDT formed Group-2. The members of IDT evaluated and treated all of the patients in Group-2. The groups were compared for patient characteristics, clinical findings, length of hospitalization, laboratory results, and outcome. Results: There were 53 patients in Group-1 and 39 patients in Group-2. The patient hospitalization rate increased after IDT (0.5 patients per month vs. 3.25 patients per month. Patients hospitalized after IDT had more advanced stage (Wagner grade 4-5 wounds (26.4% vs. 51.3%; p=0.013. However, the length of hospitalization did not change after IDT (23.4±11.0 vs. 21.0±14.5; p=0.478. Foot ulcers healed without surgical intervention in 13 (24.5% and 11 (28.2% patients in Group-1 and Group-2, respectively (p=0.691. Minor and major amputation rates were 30.2% and 9.4% in Group-1 and 30.8% and 7.7% in Group-2 (p=0.786. Discussion: Despite the fact that patients admitted after the establishment of IDT had more severe wounds, neither the length of hospitalization nor the amputation rate increased. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of IDT in the management of DFI.

  1. Computer vision algorithm for diabetic foot injury identification and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda M, C. L.; Solis S, L. O.; Martinez B, M. R.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Castaneda M, R.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: lsolis@uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Diabetic foot is one of the most devastating consequences related to diabetes. It is relevant because of its incidence and the elevated percentage of amputations and deaths that the disease implies. Given the fact that the existing tests and laboratories designed to diagnose it are limited and expensive, the most common evaluation is still based on signs and symptoms. This means that the specialist completes a questionnaire based solely on observation and an invasive wound measurement. Using the questionnaire, the physician issues a diagnosis. In the sense, the diagnosis relies only on the criteria and the specialists experience. For some variables such as the lesions area or their location, this dependency is not acceptable. Currently bio-engineering has played a key role on the diagnose of different chronic degenerative diseases. A timely diagnose has proven to be the best tool against diabetic foot. The diabetics foot clinical evaluation, increases the possibility to identify risks and further complications. The main goal of this paper is to present the development of an algorithm based on digital image processing techniques, which enables to optimize the results on the diabetics foot lesion evaluation. Using advanced techniques for object segmentation and adjusting the sensibility parameter, allows the correlation between the algorithms identified wounds and those observed by the physician. Using the developed algorithm it is possible to identify and assess the wounds, their size, and location, in a non-invasive way. (Author)

  2. Computer vision algorithm for diabetic foot injury identification and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda M, C. L.; Solis S, L. O.; Martinez B, M. R.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Castaneda M, R.; Vega C, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic foot is one of the most devastating consequences related to diabetes. It is relevant because of its incidence and the elevated percentage of amputations and deaths that the disease implies. Given the fact that the existing tests and laboratories designed to diagnose it are limited and expensive, the most common evaluation is still based on signs and symptoms. This means that the specialist completes a questionnaire based solely on observation and an invasive wound measurement. Using the questionnaire, the physician issues a diagnosis. In the sense, the diagnosis relies only on the criteria and the specialists experience. For some variables such as the lesions area or their location, this dependency is not acceptable. Currently bio-engineering has played a key role on the diagnose of different chronic degenerative diseases. A timely diagnose has proven to be the best tool against diabetic foot. The diabetics foot clinical evaluation, increases the possibility to identify risks and further complications. The main goal of this paper is to present the development of an algorithm based on digital image processing techniques, which enables to optimize the results on the diabetics foot lesion evaluation. Using advanced techniques for object segmentation and adjusting the sensibility parameter, allows the correlation between the algorithms identified wounds and those observed by the physician. Using the developed algorithm it is possible to identify and assess the wounds, their size, and location, in a non-invasive way. (Author)

  3. The Assessment of Social Support and Self-Care Requisites for Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Diabetic Foot Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot as one of the most common complications of diabetes is involved in more than %25 of diabetic patients’ lives, and if not treated properly can lead to amputation up to %20. The lack of self-care is the underlying cause of mortality, morbidity and chronic complications of diabetes. Identification and rectifying of diabetic foot care needs of patients can additionally reduce readmission; also, %85 of diabetic foot problems can be prevented. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 130patients with diabetic foot from Shahid Modarres hospital were selected using census method. Data in forms of demographic questionnaire, self-care requisites assessment tool for preventing diabetic foot ulcer, and Social Support Behavior Scale were completed by patients and then were collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant relationship was found between self-care and social support (P<0.05. This means that people with better social support reported better self-care than those with weaker social support. A significant relationship in level of education and monthly income with self-care was seen, as well as in level of education, monthly income and marital status with social support (P<0.001. Conclusions: The results showed that social support can be considered as an effective factor in individual self-care behaviors, and with regard to this factor in educational, treatment and care programs of patients, can improve their self-care, in addition to decreasing economic costs, and improve their qualities of lives as well.

  4. Lower limb biomechanical characteristics of patients with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: the diabetes foot ulcer study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Cunningham, Margaret; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-10-23

    Foot ulceration is the main precursor to lower limb amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide. Biomechanical factors have been implicated in the development of foot ulceration; however the association of these factors to ulcer healing remains less clear. It may be hypothesised that abnormalities in temporal spatial parameters (stride to stride measurements), kinematics (joint movements), kinetics (forces on the lower limb) and plantar pressures (pressure placed on the foot during walking) contribute to foot ulcer healing. The primary aim of this study is to establish the biomechanical characteristics (temporal spatial parameters, kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressures) of patients with plantar neuropathic foot ulcers compared to controls without a history of foot ulcers. The secondary aim is to assess the same biomechanical characteristics in patients with foot ulcers and controls over-time to assess whether these characteristics remain the same or change throughout ulcer healing. The design is a case-control study nested in a six-month longitudinal study. Cases will be participants with active plantar neuropathic foot ulcers (DFU group). Controls will consist of patients with type 2 diabetes (DMC group) and healthy participants (HC group) with no history of foot ulceration. Standardised gait and plantar pressure protocols will be used to collect biomechanical data at baseline, three and six months. Descriptive variables and primary and secondary outcome variables will be compared between the three groups at baseline and follow-up. It is anticipated that the findings from this longitudinal study will provide important information regarding the biomechanical characteristic of type 2 diabetes patients with neuropathic foot ulcers. We hypothesise that people with foot ulcers will demonstrate a significantly compromised gait pattern (reduced temporal spatial parameters, kinematics and kinetics) at base line and then throughout the follow-up period

  5. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impact of Diabetes and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease on the Functional Microcirculation at the Plantar Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kabbani, MD

    2013-10-01

    Conclusions: Functional microcirculation at the plantar foot differs between healthy subjects and patients suffering from diabetes or PAOD of the same age. Patients with either diabetes or PAOD demonstrate deteriorated cutaneous oxygen saturation with equivalent blood perfusion at the plantar foot. More clinical studies have to be conducted to evaluate therapeutical methods that might ameliorate cutaneous oxygen saturation within diabetic foot disease and PAOD.

  7. Wound management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers: from the basics to regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Karen L; Houdek, Matthew T; Kiemele, Lester J

    2015-02-01

    Hospital-based studies have shown that mortality rates in individuals with diabetic foot ulcers are about twice those observed in individuals with diabetes without foot ulcers. To assess the etiology and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Literature review. Systematic review of the literature discussing management of diabetic foot ulcers. Since there were only a few randomized controlled trials on this topic, articles were selected to attempt to be comprehensive rather than a formal assessment of study quality. Chronic nonhealing foot ulcers occur in approximately 15% of patients with diabetes. Many factors contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing. Risk factors include peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, limited joint mobility, foot deformities, abnormal foot pressures, minor trauma, a history of ulceration or amputation, and impaired visual acuity. With the current treatment for nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, a significant number of patients require amputation. Diabetic foot ulcers are optimally managed by a multidisciplinary integrated team. Offloading and preventative management are important. Dressings play an adjunctive role. There is a critical need to develop novel treatments to improve healing of diabetic foot ulcers. The goal is to have wounds heal and remain healed. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are major factors involved in a diabetic foot ulcer. Despite current treatment modalities for nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, there are a significant number of patients who require amputations. No known therapy will be effective without concomitant management of ischemia, infection, and adequate offloading. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  8. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  9. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on

  10. A prospective study of risk factors for foot ulceration: The West of Ireland Diabetes Foot Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2013-09-25

    BackgroundThis is the first study to examine risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration in Irish general practice.AimTo determine the prevalence of established risk factors for foot ulceration in a community-based cohort, and to explore the potential for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to act as a novel risk factor.DesignA prospective observational study.MethodsPatients with diabetes attending 12 (of 17) invited general practices were invited for foot screening. Validated clinical tests were carried out at baseline to assess for vascular and sensory impairment and foot deformity. Ulcer incidence was ascertained by patient self-report and medical record. Patients were re-assessed 18 months later. ResultsOf 828 invitees, 563 (68%) attended screening. On examination 23-25% had sensory dysfunction and 18-39% had evidence of vascular impairment. Using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network risk stratification system we found the proportion at moderate and high risk of future ulceration to be 25% and 11% respectively. At follow-up 16\\/383 patients (4.2%) developed a new foot ulcer (annual incidence rate of 2.6%). We observed an increasing probability of abnormal vascular and sensory test results (pedal pulse palpation, doppler waveform assessment, 10g monofilament, vibration perception and neuropathy disability score) with declining eGFR levels. We were unable to show an independent association between new ulceration and reduced eGFR [Odds ratio 1.01; p=0.64].ConclusionsOur data show the extent of foot complications in a representative sample of diabetes patients in Ireland. Use of eGFR did not improve identification of patients at risk of foot ulceration.

  11. Current endovascular management of the ischaemic diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Gerassimidis, T; Karkos, CD; Karamanos, D; Kamparoudis, A

    2008-01-01

    Ischaemic diabetic foot ulcers pose a significant problem which is associated with a high likelihood of amputation. With the advent of endovascular surgery, the management of lower limb arterial lesions in the diabetic population has become more appealing. Coronary 0.014 monorail guide wires, appropriate sized angioplasty balloons and stents, and subintimal recanalisation, are all useful adjuncts and techniques to achieve revascularization. This article reviews the modern endovascular mana...

  12. Pedographic classification and ulcer detection in the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldecker, Ute

    2012-03-01

    Plantar pressure is a cause of foot ulceration in diabetes. Attempts to determine a pressure threshold have failed. The aim of this study was to determine a pedographic classification to identify patients at risk for a foot ulcer. 210 diabetics and controls categorized into 4 groups with deformities of the forefoot were analyzed. For the pedographic measurement peak pressure, force and their integrals were analyzed using a percentage and an anatomic mask. A multivariant logistic regression analysis was performed. Logistic regression analysis using pedographic variables of a percentage mask revealed a combination of 4 variables (pressure time integral forefoot, peak pressure midfoot, pressure time integral heel, and peak pressure heel) identifying the foot ulcer with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 87%. The analysis using an anatomic mask identified 8 variables (pressure time integral mask 4 (metatarsal 2), force mask 9 (2. toe), force time integral mask 8 (great toe), peak pressure mask 6 (metatarsal 4), pressure time integral mask 6 (metatarsal 4), peak pressure mask 8 (great toe), peak pressure mask 7 (metatarsal 5), and force mask 6 (metatarsal 4)) that characterized a pedal ulcer with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 90%. This screening method identifies diabetics who are at risk for a foot ulcer. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Healing of skin lesions in diabetic foot syndrome during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkovská, A

    2006-05-01

    Wound healing during the diabetic foot disease is indicated to in-patient treatment in case of non-healing wound, in case of serious infection and/or critical ischemia and in case of necessity of surgical treatment. Diabetic foot disease is the main reason for in-patient treatment of people with diabetes, which our experience confirms. Chronic wound is characterised by non-healing for at least 4 weeks. Ischemia and recurrent trauma caused by incomplete off-loading, prolong inflammation and infection are the main reasons for difficult healing of chronic wound. Infection is also leading cause for prolonged hospitalisation of patients with diabetic foot disease. Local decrease of grow factors and increase of tissue protease are characteristics of chronic wound. The process of wound healing is characterized by a cascade of interrelated events involving infection and inflammatory factors. The results of these investigations led to the moist wound healing concept and use of growth factors and bioengineered skin substitutes. We have good experience with the use of xenotransplant skin substitues in the treatment of diabetic foot. Off loading techniques including total contact casting, local therapy by debridement and skin substitutes had the best evidence based efficacy. We are introducing new method of the treatment of diabetic foot--VAC--vacuum assisted closure. The fundamental principle in the therapy during in-patient period, is comprehensive approach; the omitting of any of the principle of the therapy--e.g. the off-loading of the ulcers, the infection and ischemia control, may contribute to its failure.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  16. Malignant melanoma misdiagnosed as diabetic foot ulcer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Dawei; Ran, Xingwu

    2017-07-01

    Acral lentiginous melanoma (AML) does not exhibit the classic signs of malignant melanoma. ALM is frequently misdiagnosed because of its unusual sites and atypical clinical morphologies, which lead to poor prognosis. A female patient aged 78 years was presented to our center with two ulcers on her right foot. Diabetic foot ulcer was considered as the primary diagnosis. The ulcers failed to improve after 2 weeks' therapy. An incisional biopsy of the lesion revealed malignant melanoma. The patient received wide excision, skin grafting as well as biotherapy. The lesion was healed and no other metastasis has been founded until now. Clinicians must maintain a high level of suspicion in distinguishing malignant melanoma from other more benign skin lesions of the foot. The need for early biopsy of ulcer, even when clinical suspicion is low, can not be overemphasized. Only in this way can we reduce misdiagnosis rate and improve survival rate in patients with foot ulcer.

  17. MRI spectrum of bone changes in the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roug, Inger K.; Pierre-Jerome, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Purposes: (1) To assess the prevalence of bone marrow changes in the diabetic foot and (2) to discuss the clinical significance of these changes. Methods: 85 patients with radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) foot examinations were selected. Inclusion criteria were clinical diagnosis of diabetes and bone changes on radiographs and MRI. The material was selected from the image storage (PACS) system. We searched for vascular (infarct and necrosis), traumatic (bruise and occult fractures), destruction and debris, dislocation, osteochondritis, osteomyelitis. Five patients had bilateral examinations. A total of 90 feet were evaluated. Results: From 90 feet, 17 (18.9%) presented with vascular changes, from them, 11 feet had infarct and 6 feet had necrosis. Twenty (22.2%) feet had traumatic changes; of them, 10 (50%) had edema on MRI. Five (25%) cases had occult fracture on MRI; and 5 (25%) had visible fracture on both X-ray and MRI. Bone destruction was detected in 8 (8.9%) feet. Bony debris was visualized in three of them. Bone dislocation was visualized in 11 (12.2%) feet. There was evidence of osteochondritis in twenty-four (26.7%) feet. Osteomyelitis was diagnosed in ten (11.1%) feet. Conclusion: Diabetic foot is a challenge for both clinicians and radiologists due to its complexity. The bone derangements inherent to the diabetic foot can be evaluated with high accuracy with MRI.

  18. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability

  19. Pains of amputation amongst diabetic foot ulcer patients in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diabetic patient has a foot at risk of developing infections when not properly cared for. Ulcer prevalence of over 40% T2DM accounts for over 50% of major amputations with high morbidities and mortalities. The pathophysiology of DFU is multi factorial consisting of peripheral polyneuropathy, arterial disease, and ...

  20. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and sensation is essential. This will influence the appropriate management of the patient with a diabetic foot ulcer prior to commencement of conservative ... ulcers. Cold fluids may contribute to pain and should be avoided. Dressings. Alginate and collagen-alginate products. Collagen-alginate dressings have not been.

  1. STUDIES ON BACTERIAL INFECTIONS OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    ABSTRACT. Microbial study for aerobic organisms from 100 cases of diabetic foot ulcers was carried out to determine the etiological agents and their antibiogram. Polymicrobial infection was observed in all the cases. The most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas ...

  2. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, C.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Bus, Sicco A.

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the

  3. Diabetic Microangiopathy Is an Independent Predictor of Incident Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeya, Yusuke; Okisugi, Mari; Katsuki, Takeshi; Oikawa, Yoichi; Atsumi, Yoshihito; Matsuoka, Kempei; Shimada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine the diabetic foot ulcer incidence and examine its association with microangiopathy complications, including diabetic retinopathy (DR) and albuminuria (Alb), in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of 1,305 patients with type 2 diabetes who were assigned to the following groups: Category 1, normoalbuminuria without DR (n = 712); Category 2, Alb without DR (n = 195); Category 3, normoalbuminuria with DR (n = 185); and Category 4, Alb with DR (n = 213). Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the risks of developing diabetic foot ulcers across the categories. Results. During 14,249 person-years of follow-up, 50 subjects developed diabetic foot ulcers, with incidence rates of 1.6/1,000, 1.5/1,000, 3.4/1,000, and 12.5/1,000 person-years in Categories 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. After adjusting for the presence of diabetic neuropathy and macroangiopathy, the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.18–2.36), 1.72 (95% CI, 0.67–4.42), and 3.17 (95% CI, 1.52–6.61) in Categories 2, 3, and 4, respectively, compared with Category 1. Conclusion. The presence of DR and Alb significantly increases the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development. PMID:27034962

  4. Comparison platelet indices in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardia, A. I.; Gatot, D.; Lindarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a group of metabolic disease which incidence increases every year. Some diabetic patients have diabetic foot ulcer as acomplication. The occurrence of ulcers in diabetic patients can be caused by the presence of thrombosis due to increased platelet function. Therefore, a cross-sectional study on 40 diabetic patients was performed at RSUP Adam Malik Medan to see whether there were differences in platelet indices between diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcers. Platelets indices were examined and looked for differences in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcers. Data were analyzed using Chi-Square and Mann-Whitney U test with 95% CI. P-value<0.05 was considered statistically significant. There were differences in hemostasis function (prothrombin time, thrombin time, INR, aPTT, and fibrinogen) between the two groups with p values of 0.001; 0.004; 0.015; 0.021; 0.009, respectively. From the platelet indices examination, there were differences in the number of platelets, PDW and PCT with p values of 0.041; 0.027; 0.007, respectively, whereas there was no difference for MPV value (p=0,05). Platelet indices were found to increase in diabetic patients with diabetic foot ulcers indicating more reactive and aggregatable platelet function.

  5. People with diabetes foot complications do not recall their foot education: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncken, Julia; Williams, Cylie M; Stolwyk, Rene; Haines, Terry P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document what and how diabetes specific foot health information was provided during a podiatry consultation, and what information was retained at 1 month post consultation. This project was embedded within a prospective cohort study with two groups, podiatrists and people with diabetes. Data collection included the Problem Areas in Diabetes Questionnaire (PAID), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), information covered during the consultation, method of delivery and perceived key educational message from both participant perspectives at the time of the appointment and 1 month post appointment. There were three podiatrists and 24 people with diabetes who provided information at the two time points. Diabetes education provided by the podiatrists was mostly verbal. The key educational message recalled by both groups differed at the time of the appointment (14 out of 24 of responses) and at 1 month post the appointment time (11 out of 24 of responses). Education is a vital component to the treatment regime of people with diabetes. It appears current approaches are ineffective in enhancing understanding of diabetes impact on foot health. This study highlights the need for research investigating better ways to deliver key pieces of information to this population.

  6. The bacteriology of diabetic foot ulcers in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, C N; Obunge, O K; Odia, O J

    2005-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer and/or gangrene is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. The lesions are usually infected and early treatment of the infection will reduce the associated problems. The study was carried out to determine the common bacteriological flora of diabetic foot ulcers in Port Harcourt. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of the isolates was determined to enhance possible empirical treatment. Deep wound swabs were collected from 60 consecutive diabetic patients admitted with foot ulcers and/or gangrene into the medical wards of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital from January 2001 to April 2002. The bacteriological isolation and antimicrobial sensitivity tests of the isolates was carried out by standard microbiological methods. Aerobes and anaerobes constituted 95.4% and 4.6% of the total bacterial isolates respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest bacterial isolate; it was cultured from 32 (56.1%) of infected patients and constituted 24.4% of the total isolate. The mean bacterial isolate per patient infected was 2.3. The aerobic isolates showed significant sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (78.4%), pefloxacine (71.2%), ceftazidime (73.6%) and cefuroxime (69.6%). All the anaerobic isolates were sensitive to metronidazole and clindamycin. Infections of diabetic foot ulcers are usually polymicrobial. From the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the bacterial isolates, diabetic patients presenting with foot ulcers and/or gangrene could be commenced empirically on a combination of clindamycin or metronidazole and either a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin or pefloxacine) or a second or third generation cephalosporin (e.g. cefuroxime or ceftazidime).

  7. Perioperative nursing for patients with diabetic foot receiving endovascular interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Wang Feng; Li Ke; Li Cheng; Ji Donghua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of perioperative nursing on the living quality of patients with diabetic foot who are treated with endovascular interventional therapy. Methods: Specific perioperative nursing care plan was accordingly designed for 43 patients with diabetic foot. Endovascular balloon angioplasty and stent implantation were formed in these patients to treat their diabetic foot. The clinical results were observed. Results: Perioperative nursing effectively improved patient's limb blood supply, enhanced the healing of diabetic foot ulceration and increased the possibility of limb preservation. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy combined with corresponding perioperative nursing care can benefit more patients with diabetic foot. (authors)

  8. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effectiveness of foot care education among people with type 2 diabetes in rural Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes and its foot complications is increasing in India. Prevention of these complications through foot care education should be explored. The objective of our study was to assess the risk factors of poor diabetic foot care and to find the effectiveness of health education in improving foot care practice among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to the outpatients of a rural health center with type 2 diabetes. Awareness regarding diabetes, care of diabetes and foot care practice ware assessed and scored. Individual and group health education focusing on foot care was performed. Foot care practice was reassessed after 2 weeks of education. Results: Only 54% were aware that diabetes could lead to reduced foot sensation and foot ulcers. Nearly 53% and 41% of the patients had good diabetes awareness and good diabetes care respectively. Only 22% of the patients had their feet examined by a health worker or doctor. The patients with poor, satisfactory and good practice scores were 44.7%, 35.9% and 19.4% respectively. Low education status, old age and low awareness regarding diabetes were the risk factors for poor practice of foot care. Average score for practice of foot care improved from 5.90 ± 1.82 to 8.0 ± 1.30 after 2 weeks of health education. Practice related to toe space examination, foot inspection and foot wear inspection improved maximally. Conclusion: Foot care education for diabetics in a primary care setting improves their foot care practice and is likely to be effective in reducing the burden of diabetic foot ulcer.

  10. Telemedical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Jane; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2007-01-01

    Telemedicine allows for remote treatment and access to medical experts no matter where the location of the patient. This enables the monitoring and treatment of conditions like diabetes from one location via video consultations...

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic update on diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Tardáguila-García, Aroa; García-Klepzig, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is the most common infection associated to diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). This review is designed to provide an update on the diagnosis and treatment of DFO based on an analysis of MEDLINE through PubMed using as search criterion "Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis". Authors have included in this review the most relevant manuscripts regarding diagnosis and treatment of DFO. After review and critical analysis of publications, it may be concluded that diagnosis of DFO is not simple because of its heterogeneous presentation. Clinical inflammatory signs, probe-to-bone test, and plain X-rays are postulated as the basic tests for clinical diagnosis when DFO is suspected. Diagnosis should be supported by laboratory tests, of which ESR (>70mm/h) has been shown to be most precise. MRI is the most accurate imaging test, especially for differential diagnosis with Charcot foot. Pathogen isolation by bone culture is essential when the patient is treated with ATB only. Medical or surgical treatment should be based on the clinical characteristics of the patient and the lesion. Surgery should always be an option if medical treatment fails. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetic foot syndrome: Immune-inflammatory features as possible cardiovascular markers in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Diabetic foot syndrome (DFS), as defined by the World Health Organization, is an “ulceration of the foot (distally from the ankle and including the ankle) associated with neuropathy and different grades of ischemia and infection”. Pathogenic events able to cause diabetic foot ulcers are multifactorial. Among the commonest causes of this pathogenic pathway it’s possible to consider peripheral neuropathy, foot deformity, abnormal foot pressures, abnormal joint mobility, trauma, peripheral artery disease. Several studies reported how diabetic patients show a higher mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes and in particular these studies under filled how cardiovascular mortality and morbidity is 2-4 times higher among patients affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. This higher degree of cardiovascular morbidity has been explained as due to the observed higher prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factor, of asymptomatic findings of cardiovascular diseases, and of prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot complications. In diabetes a fundamental pathogenic pathway of most of vascular complications has been reported as linked to a complex interplay of inflammatory, metabolic and procoagulant variables. These pathogenetic aspects have a direct interplay with an insulin resistance, subsequent obesity, diabetes, hypertension, prothrombotic state and blood lipid disorder. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects as reported by Tuttolomondo et al confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the a “adipo-vascular” axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. This “adipo-vascular axis” in patients with type 2 diabetes has been reported as characterized

  13. Biofeedback for foot offloading in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Z; de León Rodriguez, D; Allet, L; Golay, A; Assal, M; Assal, J-P; Hauert, C-A

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of high plantar pressure in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is mandatory for prevention of foot ulcers and amputations. We used a new biofeedback-based method to reduce the plantar pressure at an at-risk area of foot in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Thirteen diabetic patients (age 60.8 +/- 12.3 years, body mass index 29.0 +/- 5.0 kg/m(2)) with peripheral neuropathy of the lower limbs were studied. Patients with memory impairment were excluded. The portable in-shoe foot pressure measurement system (PEDAR) was used for foot offloading training by biofeedback. The learning procedure consisted in sequences of walking (10 steps), each followed by a subjective estimation of performance and objective feedback. The goal was to achieve three consecutive walking cycles of 10 steps, with a minimum of seven steps inside the range of 40-80% of the baseline peak plantar pressure. The peak plantar pressure was assessed during the learning period and at retention tests. A significant difference in peak plantar pressure was recorded between the beginning and the end of the learning period (when the target for plantar pressure was achieved) (262 +/- 70 vs. 191 +/- 53 kPa; P = 0.002). The statistically significant difference between the beginning of learning and all retention tests persisted, even at the 10-day follow-up. Terminal augmented feedback training may positively affect motor learning in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and could possibly lead to suitable foot offloading. Additional research is needed to confirm the maintenance of offloading in the long term.

  14. Diabetic foot syndrome as a possible cardiovascular marker in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality; in fact, some authors showed a higher prevalence of major, previous and new-onset, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot ulcers than in those without these complications. This is consistent with the fact that in diabetes there is a complex interplay of several variables with inflammatory metabolic disorders and their effect on the cardiovascular system that could explain previous reports of high morbidity and mortality rates in diabetic patients with amputations. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the "adipovascular" axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In patients with diabetic foot, this "adipovascular axis" expression in lower plasma levels of adiponectin and higher plasma levels of IL-6 could be linked to foot ulcers pathogenesis by microvascular and inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to focus on the immune inflammatory features of DFS and its possible role as a marker of cardiovascular risk in diabetes patients.

  15. Outcomes of subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy on wounds of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A; Abu-Rumman, Patricia; Espensen, Eric H; Vazquez, Jefferey R; Nixon, Brent P; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate outcomes of people with large diabetic foot wounds treated with subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy immediately following surgical wound debridement. Data were abstracted from the medical records of 31 consecutive patients with diabetes, 77.4% male (n = 24), aged 56.1 +/- 11.7 years, presenting for care at two large multidisciplinary wound care centers. All patients received surgical debridement for indolent diabetic foot wounds and were subsequently started on a regimen of subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy delivered using a vacuum-assisted closure device for a mean of 4.7 +/- 4.2 weeks (mode = 2 weeks) using a protocol that called for cessation of therapy when the wound bed approached 100% coverage with granulation tissue with no exposed tendon, joint capsule, or bone. Outcomes evaluated included time to complete wound closure, proportion of patients achieving wound healing at the level of initial debridement, and complications associated with use of the device. The mean duration of wounds before therapy was 25.4 +/- 23.8 weeks. In patients treated with subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy, 90.3% (n = 28) of wounds healed at the level of debridement without the need for further bony resection in a mean 8.1 +/- 5.5 weeks. The remaining 9.7% (n = 3) went on to higher level amputation (below knee amputation = 3.2%, [n = 1] and transmetatarsal amputation = 6.5% [n = 2]). Complications included periwound maceration (19.4% [n = 6]), periwound cellulitis (3.2% [n = 1]), and deep space infection (3.2% [n = 1]). The authors concluded that appropriate use of subatmospheric pressure dressing therapy to achieve a rapid granular bed in diabetic foot wounds may have promise in treatment of this population at high risk for amputation and that a large, randomized trial is now indicated.

  16. [Incidence of factors favoring recurrent foot ulcers in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouri, A; Slaoui, Z; Chadli, A; El Ghomari, H; Kebbou, M; Marouan, F; Farouqi, A; Ababou, M R

    2002-12-01

    Patients with foot ulcers have a high risk of relapse and amputation. Several studies have reported that 28 to 51% of amputated diabetics will have a second amputation of the lower limb within five years of the first amputation. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of factors favoring relapse within two years. One hundred ten diabetic patients were treated for foot lesions in the Casablanca Ibn Rochd university hospital between 1997 and 2000. Ninety of these patients attended review consultations. There were 42 cases of relapse (46.6%). Male gender predominated in the relapse patients with a sex ratio of 3.2. Mean age at relapse was 55 years; 71.5% of the patients had type 2 diabetes. Lesions observed were neuropathic ulcer (n=23), arterial ulcer (n=6), infected wounds (n=13). Revealing factors were burns and wounds. The main risk factors were neuropathy (n=23, 52%), neuroarteriopathy (n=12, 31%), peur arteriopathy (n=6, 12%). Patients who relapsed (n=42) were significantly different from patients who did not relapse (n=48) for gender, presence or absence of neuropathy, and presence or absence of arteriopathy. Secondary preventive measures against these risk factors, medical care, and specialized follow-up were satisfactory in these patients. our findings illustrate the importance of specialized management of diabetic patients with foot lesions. Adequate care of the lesions and preventive measures against risk factors are needed.

  17. Antimicrobial therapy in infectious complications of diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The treatment of diabetic foot complications is combined, surgical and medical. The aim of our study was to assess the results of antimicrobial therapy in diabetic foot infections. Material and methods: 100 patients with diabetic foot infections admitted in the Surgery Clinic “I. Juvara” between December 2010 and February 2011 were analyzed. Results: Mean age at presentation was 58.4±9.74 years for women and 63.2±10.53 years for men. Mean diabetes duration was 12.3 years in men and 15.7 years in women. Patients with peripheral arterial disease represented 45% of cases, patients with neuropathy represented 16% of cases and patients with both conditions 39% of the cases. 41 patients suffered minor surgical interventions, 36 patients experienced minor amputations and 23 major amputations (below or above the knee. Antibiotic treatment included cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and combinations with Metronidazole. After treatment, 74% of patients had a good postoperative evolution. For 26 patients a change of the antibiotic was necessary but only in 10 cases this was made according to antibiogram. Conclusions: Surgical debridement and wound management, carefully chosen antimicrobial therapy and treatment of comorbidities are very important for a successful outcome. Initial empirical antibiotic selection should be followed by culture-guided definitive therapy.

  18. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  19. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  20. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot: Plain radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dae Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Sim, Jung Suk; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan

    1994-01-01

    To determine the plain film findings of acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot was considered when fragmentation of the articular ends of bone and subluxation of the affected joint developed within eight weeks after clinical onset of diabetic gangrene. Eight toes of six diabetics were satisfactory to our criteria. We analyzed plain radiographic findings of the affected joint and soft tissue, interval changes in followed-up radiographs, and deformities after healing. The time interval between clinical onset of gangrene and bone destruction ranges from 2 weeks to 4 weeks(mean 2.6 weeks). Plane radiographs showed fragmentation of the articular ends, subluxation, and soft tissue swelling of the metatarsophalangeal joint or interphalangeal joint. The significant feature of these patients was rapid progression of the lesions. Clinically, all patients had diabetic gangrene in affected toes, however, there was no evidence of osteomyelitis in our series. Amputation was done in 2 cases, and lesions in 3 of the remaining 4 cases were repaired spontaneously with regression of gangrene, leaving radiological residua such as pointed-end, tapered-end, and ball and socket deformity. Rapid disorganisation of the joint with associated evidence of soft tissue gangrene in plain radiograph is believed to be valuable for the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy

  1. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot: Plain radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dae Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Sim, Jung Suk; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To determine the plain film findings of acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot was considered when fragmentation of the articular ends of bone and subluxation of the affected joint developed within eight weeks after clinical onset of diabetic gangrene. Eight toes of six diabetics were satisfactory to our criteria. We analyzed plain radiographic findings of the affected joint and soft tissue, interval changes in followed-up radiographs, and deformities after healing. The time interval between clinical onset of gangrene and bone destruction ranges from 2 weeks to 4 weeks(mean 2.6 weeks). Plane radiographs showed fragmentation of the articular ends, subluxation, and soft tissue swelling of the metatarsophalangeal joint or interphalangeal joint. The significant feature of these patients was rapid progression of the lesions. Clinically, all patients had diabetic gangrene in affected toes, however, there was no evidence of osteomyelitis in our series. Amputation was done in 2 cases, and lesions in 3 of the remaining 4 cases were repaired spontaneously with regression of gangrene, leaving radiological residua such as pointed-end, tapered-end, and ball and socket deformity. Rapid disorganisation of the joint with associated evidence of soft tissue gangrene in plain radiograph is believed to be valuable for the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy.

  2. Potential Biomolecules and Current Treatment Technologies for Diabetic Foot Ulcer: an Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashim, Zenith; Samuel, Shila; Duraisamy, Nallusamy; Krishnan, Kathiravan

    2017-05-18

    Diabetic foot ulceration remains a major challenge and is one of the most expensive and leading causes of major and minor amputations among patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Hence the purpose of this review is to emphasize on potential molecular markers involved in diabetic foot ulcer physiology, the efficacy of different types of dressing materials, adjunct therapy and newer therapeutic approach like nanoparticles for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. We conducted a systematic literature review search by using Pubmed and other web searches. The quality evidence of diabetic foot ulcer biomolecules and treatments was collected, summarized and compared with other studies. The present investigation suggested that impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is an influence of several factors. All the advanced therapies and foot ulcer dressing materials are not suitable for all types of diabetic foot ulcers, however more prospective follow ups and in vivo and in vitro studies are needed to draw certain conclusion. Several critical wound biomolecules have been identified and are in need to be investigated in diabetic foot ulcers. The application of biocompatible nanoparticles holds a promising approach for designing dressing materials for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. Understanding the cellular and molecular events and identifying the appropriate treatment strategies for different foot ulcer grades will reduce recurrence of foot ulcer and lower limb amputation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Risk factors for occurrence and recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers among Iraqi diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer I. Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a few studies that discuss the medical causes for diabetic foot (DF ulcerations in Iraq, one of them in Wasit province. The aim of our study was to analyze the medical, therapeutic, and patient risk factors for developing DF ulcerations among diabetic patients in Baghdad, Iraq.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients with a foot ulcer. A progress report of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, N. C.; Andros, G.; Apelqvist, J.; Bakker, K.; Lammer, J.; Lepantalo, M.; Mills, J. L.; Reekers, J.; Shearman, C. P.; Zierler, R. E.; Hinchliffe, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWDGF) has produced in 2011 a guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes and a foot ulcer. This document, together with a systematic review that provided the background information on

  5. New Research Methods Developed for Studying Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Brian Davis, one of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's researchers, has been investigating the risk factors related to diabetic foot ulceration, a problem that accounts for 20 percent of all hospital admissions for diabetic patients. He had developed a sensor pad to measure the friction and pressure forces under a person's foot when walking. As part of NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Act Agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Dr. Davis requested Lewis' assistance in visualizing the data from the sensor pad. As a result, Lewis' Interactive Data Display System (IDDS) was installed at the Cleveland Clinic. This computer graphics program is normally used to visualize the flow of air through aircraft turbine engines, producing color two- and three-dimensional images.

  6. The treatment of diabetic foot infections: focus on ertapenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Clinically, 3 distinct stages of diabetic foot infection may be recognized: localized infection, spreading infection and severe infection. Each of these presentations may be complicated by osteomyelitis. Infection can be caused by Gram-positive aerobic, and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, singly or in combination. The underlying principles are to diagnose infection, culture the bacteria responsible and treat aggressively with antibiotic therapy. Localized infections with limited cellulitis can generally be treated with oral antibiotics on an outpatient basis. Spreading infection should be treated with systemic antibiotics. Severe deep infections need urgent admission to hospital for wide-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Clinical and microbiological response rates have been similar in trials of various antibiotics and no single agent or combination has emerged as most effective. Recently, clinical and microbiological outcomes for patients treated with ertapenem were equivalent to those for patients treated with piperacillin/tazobactam. It is also important to judge the need for debridement and surgery, to assess the arterial supply to the foot and consider revascularization either by angioplasty or bypass if the foot is ischemic. It is also important to achieve metabolic control. Thus infection in the diabetic foot needs full multidisciplinary treatment.

  7. Compressed air massage hastens healing of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, M; Desai, Y; Gregory, M A

    2008-02-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers remains a problem. A treatment modality that uses compressed air massage has been developed as a supplement to standard surgical and medical treatment. Compressed air massage is thought to improve local tissue oxygenation around ulcers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of compressed air massage influences the rate of healing of diabetic ulcers. Sixty consecutive patients with diabetes, admitted to one hospital for urgent surgical management of diabetic foot ulcers, were randomized into two groups. Both groups received standard medical and surgical management of their diabetes and ulcer. In addition, one group received 15-20 min of compressed air massage, at 1 bar pressure, daily, for 5 days a week, to the foot and the tissue around the ulcer. Healing time was calculated as the time from admission to the time of re-epithelialization. Fifty-seven patients completed the trial; 28 received compressed air massage. There was no difference in the mean age, Wagner score, ulcer size, pulse status, or peripheral sensation in the two groups. The time to healing in the compressed air massage group was significantly reduced: 58.1 +/- 22.3 days (95% confidence interval: 49.5-66.6) versus 82.7 +/- 30.7 days (95% confidence interval: 70.0-94.3) (P = 0.001). No adverse effects in response to compressed air massage were noted. The addition of compressed air massage to standard medical and surgical management of diabetic ulcers appears to enhance ulcer healing. Further studies with this new treatment modality are warranted.

  8. Implementation of foot thermometry plus mHealth to prevent diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Porras, Maria; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Gilman, Robert H; Malaga, German; Armstrong, David G; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-04-19

    Diabetic foot neuropathy (DFN) is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus; its early diagnosis and intervention can prevent foot ulcers and the need for amputation. Thermometry, measuring the temperature of the feet, is a promising emerging modality for diabetic foot ulcer prevention. However, patient compliance with at-home monitoring is concerning. Delivering messages to remind patients to perform thermometry and foot care might be helpful to guarantee regular foot monitoring. This trial was designed to compare the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) between participants who receive thermometry alone and those who receive thermometry as well as mHealth (SMS and voice messaging) over a year-long study period. This is an evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-month trial. Individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged between 18-80 years, having a present dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet, are in risk group 2 or 3 using the diabetic foot risk classification system (as specified by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot), have an operating cell phone or a caregiver with an operating cell phone, and have the ability to provide informed consent will be eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment will be performed in diabetes outpatient clinics at two Ministry of Health tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. participants in both groups will receive education about foot care at the beginning of the study and they will be provided with a thermometry device (TempStat™). TempStat™ is a tool that captures a thermal image of the feet, which, depending on the temperature of the feet, shows different colors. In this study, if a participant notes a single yellow image or variance between one foot and the contralateral foot, they will be prompted to notify a nurse to evaluate their activity within the previous 2 weeks and make appropriate recommendations. In addition to thermometry, participants in the intervention arm

  9. Total contact cast for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Yaqoob, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the outcome of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers treated with Total Contact Cast (TCC) in terms of percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal. The study included diabetic patients with non-ischemic neuropathic foot ulcers of upto grade 2 of Wagner's classification. Ulcers were debrided off necrotic tissues and Total Contact Cast (TCC) was applied. TCC was renewed every 2 weeks till healing. Cases were labeled as cast failure when there was no reduction in wound size in 4 consecutive weeks or worsening to a higher grade. Main outcome measures were the percentage of ulcers healed and time to heal in the cast. Thirty four (87.17%) patients were males and 5(12.82%) were females. The mean age was 62 +- 13.05 years. All patients had NIDDM. Out of the 52 ulcers, 41(78.84%) healed with TCC in an average 2 casts duration (mean 32 days). There were 11(21.15%) cast failure. Majority (63.63%) of cast failure ulcers were located on pressure bearing area of heel. Most (90%) of the ulcers on forefoot and midsole region healed with TCC (p<0.001). Longer ulcer duration (mean 57.45 +- 29.64 days) significantly reduced ulcer healing (p<0.001). Total contact cast was an effective treatment modality for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers of Wagner's grade 2, located on forefoot and midsole region. (author)

  10. Automatic detection of diabetic foot complications with infrared thermography by asymmetric analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C.; van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Early identification of diabetic foot complications and their precursors is essential in preventing their devastating consequences, such as foot infection and amputation. Frequent, automatic risk assessment by an intelligent telemedicine system might be feasible and cost effective. Infrared

  11. Awareness and practices of foot self-care in patients with diabetes at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-25

    Jan 25, 2013 ... Schmidt S, Mayer H, Panfil EM. Diabetes foot self-care practices in the German population. J Clin Nurs. 2008;17(21): 2920-2926. 16. Jayaprakash P, Bhanseli A, Dutta P, Anatharaman R. Magnitude of foot problems in diabetes in developing world: a study of 1044 patients. Diabet Med. 2009;26(9):939-942.

  12. Current and emerging therapies in the management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karri, Veera Venkata Satyanarayana Reddy; Kuppusamy, Gowthamarajan; Talluri, Siddhartha Venkata; Yamjala, Karthik; Mannemala, Sai Sandeep; Malayandi, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the major causes of mortality in diabetic patients. Very few drugs and therapies have regulatory approval for this indication and several agents from diverse pharmacological classes are currently in various phases of clinical trials for the management of diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of this review is to provide concise information of the drugs and therapies which are approved and present in clinical trials. This review was carried out by systematic searches of relevant guidelines, patents, published articles, reviews and abstracts in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar of all English language articles up to 1 March 2015. The following search terms were used: diabetes, diabetic foot, diabetic foot ulcer, diabetic wound, diabetic foot infections, wound management, randomized controlled trials, approved treatments, new treatments and clinical trials. The various drugs and therapies for the management of diabetic foot ulcers comprise antibiotics, neuropathic drugs, wound dressings, skin substitutes, growth factors and inflammatory modulators. The majority of these therapies target the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers to address the altered biochemical composition of the diabetic wound. However, no single treatment can be definitively recommended for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

  13. The Burden of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects for this study were diabetic patients with foot ulcers/gangrene. Their case files were retrieved and information obtained with regards to age, sex, duration of diabetes mellitus (DM), precipitating factors of diabetic foot ulcers, length of hospitalization and outcome of the ulcer/gangrene. Investigations done included ...

  14. Review Article The challenge of diabetic foot care: Review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control of patients with existing diabetes.5 Since Malawi has a very high prevalence of HIV .... or more toes or part of the forefoot but these will leave the patient with a viable .... Table 1: Diabetic foot ulcer type, treatment, and outcomes for patients attending the diabetic foot clinic at Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Diagnosis. Total.

  15. The Application of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Installation in Diabetic Foot Associated with Phlegmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachal, Krzysztof; Szmyt, Krzysztof; Wachal, Magda; Stanisic, Michał

    2015-03-01

    The negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers was used successfully for many years. In the case of complications associated with infection by this type of wound treatment to give very good results. From many years of sustained research on a device that could combine the advantages of the negative pressure wound therapy and drainage flow. Finally, in the last year, the first V.A.C. Ulta (KCI, USA) devices were included to the Polish hospital departments. In this paper we present a case of a patient of successfully using a negative pressure wound therapy with installation via a set of V.A.C. Ulta in the ischemic diabetic foot syndrome complicated by phlegmon and tissue necrosis. The patient was treated in stages. In first stage was performed angioplasty of critically stenosis of the superficial femoral artery segment. Secondly, the resection of the necrotic bone revised fingers and forefoot was conducted, and in the third step the negative pressure wound therapy with installation was used. Finally, the wound was closed by the intermediate thickness skin graft. The total duration of treatment was 21 days. The patient in good general condition with a completely healed wound was discharged. Currently, after the supply with orthopedic equipment, patient regained full mobility.

  16. Probing community nurses' professional basis: a situational case study in diabetic foot ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun; Laursen, Anders Christian; Bermark, Susan; Hejlesen, Ole Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers.

  17. Atrophy of foot muscles in diabetic patients can be detected with ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Obel, Annette; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a bedside test with ultrasonography for evaluation of foot muscle atrophy in diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle (EDB) and of the muscles of the first interstitium (MILs) were...... than in nonneuropathic diabetic patients (5.8 +/- 2.1 vs. 7.5 +/- 1.7 mm [P Atrophy of intrinsic foot muscles determined at ultrasonography is directly related to foot muscle volume determined by MRI and to various...... measures of diabetic neuropathy. Ultrasonography seems to be useful for detection of foot muscle atrophy in diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  18. Oxidative stress parameters as biomarkers of risk factor for diabetic foot among the patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Pozzi Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma levels of carbonylated proteins, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and reduced protein thiols could be suitable biomarkers of risk factors for diabetic foot. Individuals with type 2 diabetes with normal protective sensation (normal foot group vs. loss of protective sensation and/or signs of peripheral arterial disease and/or foot deformities and/or history of ulcers and/or neuropathic fractures and/or amputation (diabetic foot group were compared. The diabetic foot group showed higher carbonylated protein levels (P = 0.0457 and lower levels of TAC (P = 0.0148 and reduced protein thiols (P = 0.0088, compared with the normal foot group. In general, several other parameters of risk of diabetes complication (blood levels of glycated hemoglobin, glucose and cholesterol, duration of diabetes, body mass index and waist circumference showed a tendency of higher values in the diabetic foot group. The results suggest that the plasma levels of carbonylated proteins, TAC and reduced protein thiols could furnish information about the risk of diabetic foot, considering that the changes in these biomarkers were associated with the loss of sensitivity and foot ulcerations.

  19. The role of foot self-care behavior on developing foot ulcers in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan; Liang, Jersey; Wang, Woan-Shyuan; Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Huang, Tzu-Ting

    2014-12-01

    Although foot self-care behavior is viewed as beneficial for the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration, the effect of foot self-care behavior on the development of diabetic foot ulcer has received little empirical investigation. To explore the relationship between foot self-care practice and the development of diabetic foot ulcers among diabetic neuropathy patients in northern Taiwan. A longitudinal study was conducted at one medical center and one teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. A total of 295 diabetic patients who lacked sensitivity to a monofilament were recruited. Five subjects did not provide follow-up data; thus, only the data of 290 subjects were analyzed. The mean age was 67.0 years, and 72.1% had six or fewer years of education. Data were collected by a modified version of the physical assessment portion of the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and the Diabetes Foot Self-Care Behavior Scale. Cox regression was used to analyze the predictive power of foot self-care behaviors. A total of 29.3% (n=85) of diabetic neuropathy patients developed a diabetic foot ulcer by the one-year follow-up. The total score on the Diabetes Foot Self-Care Behavior Scale was significantly associated with the risk of developing foot ulcers (HR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.07, p=0.004). After controlling for the demographic variables and the number of diabetic foot ulcer hospitalizations, however, the effect was non-significant (HR=1.03, 95% CI=1.00-1.06, p=0.061). Among the foot self-care behaviors, lotion-applying behavior was the only variable that significantly predicted the occurrence of diabetic foot ulcer, even after controlling for demographic variables and diabetic foot ulcer predictors (neuropathy severity, number of diabetic foot ulcer hospitalizations, insulin treatment, and peripheral vascular disease; HR=1.19, 95% CI=1.04-1.36, p=0.012). Among patients with diabetic neuropathy, foot self-care practice may be insufficient to prevent the occurrence of diabetic

  20. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus under Renal Replacement Therapy in Lleida, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Dòria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the prevalence of diabetic foot and other associated conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus under renal replacement in the region of Lleida, Spain. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 92 dialysis-treated diabetic patients. Besides a podiatric examination, we explored the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, late diabetes complications, including peripheral neuropathy, atherosclerotic disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation by logistic regression. Results. Prevalent diabetic foot was found in 17.4% of patients, foot deformities were found in 54.3%, previous ulcer was found in 19.6%, and amputations were found in 16.3%; and 87% of them had some risk of suffering diabetic foot in the future. We observed a high prevalence of patients with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease (89.1% and 64.2%, resp.. Multivariable analysis identified diabetic retinopathy and advanced atherosclerotic disease (stenosing carotid plaques as independent risk factors for foot ulceration (p=0.004 and p=0.023, resp. and diabetic retinopathy also as an independent risk factor for lower-limb amputations (p=0.013. Moreover, there was a temporal association between the initiation of dialysis and the incidence of amputations. Conclusion. Diabetic patients receiving dialysis therapy are at high risk of foot complications and should receive appropriate and intensive foot care.

  1. Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Leila; Nasiri, Morteza; Adarvishi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. Based on National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence strategies, early effective management of DFU can reduce the severity of complications such as preventable amputations and possible mortality, and also can improve overall quality of life. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases. Also, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin and growth factors could be used as adjunct therapies for rapid healing of DFU. So, it’s suggested that with appropriate patient education encourages them to regular foot care in order to prevent DFU and its complications. PMID:25685277

  2. Genetic and molecular basis of diabetic foot ulcers: Clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhamb, Shaurya; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFUs) are major complications associated with diabetes and often correlate with peripheral neuropathy, trauma and peripheral vascular disease. It is necessary to understand the molecular and genetic basis of diabetic foot ulcers in order to tailor patient centred care towards particular patient groups. This review aimed to evaluate whether current literature was indicative of an underlying molecular and genetic basis for DFUs and to discuss clinical applications. From a molecular perspective, wound healing is a process that transpires following breach of the skin barrier and is usually mediated by growth factors and cytokines released by specialised cells activated by the immune response, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, phagocytes, platelets and keratinocytes. Growth factors and cytokines are fundamental in the organisation of the molecular processes involved in making cutaneous wound healing possible. There is a significant role for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in the fluctuation of these growth factors and cytokines in DFUs. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests a key role for epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation from long standing hyperglycemia and non-coding RNAs in the complex interplay between genes and the environment. Genetic factors and ethnicity can also play a significant role in the development of diabetic neuropathy leading to DFUs. Clinically, interventions which have improved outcomes for people with DFUs or those at risk of DFUs include some systemic therapeutic drug interventions which improve microvascular blood flow, surgical interventions, human growth factors, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, skin replacement or shockwave therapy and the use of topical treatments. Future treatment modalities including stem cell and gene therapies are promising in the therapeutic approach to prevent the progression of chronic diabetic complications. Copyright © 2016 Tissue

  3. Midfoot amputations expand limb salvage rates for diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patrick A; Back, Martin R; Armstrong, Paul A; Flaherty, Sarah K; Keeling, W Brent; Johnson, Brad L; Shames, Murray L; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2005-11-01

    The persistent high incidence of limb loss resulting from advanced forefoot tissue loss and infection in diabetic patients prompted an evaluation of transmetatarsal (TMA) and transtarsal/midfoot amputations in achieving foot salvage at our tertiary vascular practice. Over the last 8 years, 74 diabetic patients required 77 TMAs for tissue loss and/or infection. Twelve (16%) of the patients had a contralateral below-knee amputation (BKA) and 26% (n = 20) had dialysis-dependent renal failure. Thirty-five (45%) limbs had concomitant revascularization (bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), 32 (42%) had arterial occlusive disease by noninvasive testing and/or arteriography but were not or could not be revascularized, and seven (13%) had normal hemodynamics. Patient factors, arterial testing, operative complications, operative mortality (foot salvage was possible in 61% (25/41) of nonhealing TMAs. Overall limb salvage for TMA/midfoot procedures was estimated from Kaplain-Meier life tables to be 73%, 68%, and 62% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively, with only 50% of dialysis patients avoiding major amputation. Ankle pressure >100 mm Hg and a biphasic pedal waveform had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 79%, and toe pressure >50 mm Hg had a PPV of 91% for determining healing of TMA/midfoot amputations. One- and 3-year survival rates were only 72% and 69% for the entire cohort from life table estimates. Aggressive attempts at foot salvage are justified in diabetic patients with advanced forefoot tissue loss/infection after assuring adequate arterial perfusion. Transtarsal amputations salvaged over half of nonhealing TMAs with excellent functional results.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs, compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation.

  5. Self-efficacy of foot care behaviour of elderly patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizatul Nadwa Mohd Razi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly patients with diabetes are at a high risk of contracting diabetic foot problems. Self-efficacy is essential to help improve foot care behaviour. Aim: To identify levels of self-efficacy and foot care behaviour and their relationship with demographic characteristics in elderly patients with diabetes Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two general hospitals in Malaysia from May to June 2015. Diabetes patients aged 60 years with specific inclusion criteria were invited to participate in this study. The respondents were interviewed using a set of validated questionnaires. Data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics (multiple linear regression using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. Results: Levels of foot self-efficacy (mean+31.39; standard deviation=7.76 and foot care behaviour (mean=25.37; SD=5.88 were high. There was a positive significant relationship between foot selfefficacy (β = 0.41, p < 0.001 and gender (β = 0.30, p < 0.001 with foot care behaviour. Conclusion: Self-efficacy can be incorporated in diabetes education to improve foot care behaviour. High-risk patients should be taught proper foot inspection and protection as well as the merits of skin care to prevent the occurrence of diabetic foot problems.

  6. Routine MRI findings of the asymptomatic foot in diabetic patients with unilateral Charcot foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poll Ludger W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging studies of bones in patients with sensory deficits are scarce. Aim To investigate bone MR images of the lower limb in diabetic patients with severe sensory polyneuropathy, and in control subjects without sensory deficits. Methods Routine T1 weighted and T2-fat-suppressed-STIR-sequences without contrast media were performed of the asymptomatic foot in 10 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and unilateral inactive Charcot foot, and in 10 matched and 10 younger, non-obese unmatched control subjects. Simultaneously, a Gadolinium containing phantom was also assessed for reference. T1 weighted signal intensity (SI was recorded at representative regions of interest at the peritendineal soft tissue, the tibia, the calcaneus, and at the phantom. Any abnormal skeletal morphology was also recorded. Results Mean SI at the soft tissue, the calcaneus, and the tibia, respectively, was 105%, 105% and 84% of that at the phantom in the matched and unmatched control subjects, compared to 102% (soft tissue, 112% (calcaneus and 64% (tibia in the patients; differences of tibia vs. calcaneus or soft tissue were highly significant (p Conclusion MR imaging did not reveal grossly abnormal bone marrow signalling in the limbs with severe sensory polyneuropathy, but occult sequelae of previous traumatic injuries.

  7. Characteristics of non-diabetic foot ulcers in Western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Zaine, Norafizah; Hitos, Kerry; Vicaretti, Mauro; Fletcher, John P; Begg, Lindy; Burns, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    There are few studies investigating the characteristics, risk factors and socioeconomic status of patients with non-diabetic foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of non-diabetic foot ulcers in a large tertiary referral outpatient hospital setting in Western Sydney, Australia. From 2011 to 2013, data from 202 patients with non-diabetic foot ulcers during their initial visit were retrospectively extracted for analysis from Westmead Hospital's Foot Wound Clinic Registry. Data including demographics, socioeconomic status and foot ulcer characteristics were recorded on a standardised data collection form. Demographics and physical characteristics were: 54 % male, median age 78 years [interquartile range (IQR): 64-87], median body mass index (BMI) of 23.8 kg/m(2) (IQR: 20-26.9), 35 % had loss of protective sensation and the median postcode score for socioeconomic status was 996 (IQR: 935-1034). Foot ulcer characteristics were: median cross-sectional area of 1.2 cm(2) (IQR: 0.3-5.0), 30.5 % plantar and 27 % dorsal, 22.1 % University of Texas (UT) Wound Classification for Diabetic Foot Ulcers Grade of 1C-3C (with ischaemia). Unlike diabetic foot ulcers, non-diabetic foot ulcers largely affected older males and females. In accordance with diabetic foot ulcer characteristics, socioeconomic status was not related to non-diabetic foot ulcers in Western Sydney. Based on the findings of this study the epidemiological pattern of non-diabetic foot ulceration and its pathogenesis requires further investigation.

  8. A clinical analysis of diabetic patients with hand ulcer in a diabetic foot centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Lv, L; Wen, X; Chen, D; Cen, S; Huang, H; Li, X; Ran, X

    2010-01-01

    Aims The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence and clinical characteristics of hand ulcer in hospitalized patients with diabetes. Methods We analysed 17 subjects with hand ulcer among diabetic inpatients, who were admitted to the Diabetic Foot Care Center, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from April 2003 to December 2008. Results The prevalence of diabetic hand ulcer among hospitalized patients (0.37%) was significantly lower than that of diabetic foot ulcers (9.7%, P= 0.000). The mean age was 62.1 ± 9.4 years. The average known durations of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were 5.3 ± 4.9 years and 10.9 ± 2.4%, respectively. All patients lived in the subtropical zone. Fifteen patients (88.2%) were diagnosed with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Ten patients had hand infection. After therapy, the ulcers healed in 13 patients (76.5%) and none of them experienced amputation. The average hospital stay for patients with local infection was characteristically longer than that for patients without infection (P= 0.012). The prognosis of the hand ulcer was poorer in the patients who had diabetes for > 3 years compared with those who had diabetes for Diabetic hand ulcer is a relatively rare complication of diabetes in South-West China. Long duration of diabetes, poorly controlled blood glucose, minor trauma and delayed treatment are the risk factors. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hand ulcer. Early control of blood glucose with insulin and early anti-microbial therapy with appropriate antibiotics are crucial. Debridement and drainage are necessary for hand abscesses. PMID:20636968

  9. Management of diabetic neuropathic foot and ankle malunions and nonunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Stapleton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of diabetic neuropathic foot and ankle malunions and/or nonunions is often complicated by the presence of broken or loosened hardware, Charcot joints, infection, osteomyelitis, avascular bone necrosis, unstable deformities, bone loss, disuse and pathologic osteopenia, and ulcerations. The author discusses a rational approach to functional limb salvage with various surgical techniques that are aimed at achieving anatomic alignment, long-term osseous stability, and adequate soft tissue coverage. Emphasis is placed on techniques to overcome the inherent challenges that are encountered when surgically managing a diabetic nonunion and/or malunion. Particular attention is directed to the management of deep infection and Charcot neuroarthropathy in the majority of the cases presented.

  10. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, Kristy M; Siersma, Volkert D; Kars, Marleen; Holstein, Per E; Schaper, Nicolaas C

    2013-07-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing. The influence of ulcer location on time to healing of diabetic foot ulcers was analysed by multivariate Cox regression analysis for 1000 patients included in the Eurodiale study, a prospective cohort study of patients with diabetic foot disease. Median time to healing was 147 days for toe ulcers [(95% confidence interval (CI) 135-159 days)], 188 days for midfoot ulcers (95% CI 158-218 days) and 237 days for heel ulcers (95% CI 205-269 days) (p ulcers was 172 days (95% CI 157-187 days) and 155 days (95% CI 138-172 days) for nonplantar ulcers (p = 0.71). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio for ulcer healing for midfoot and heel ulcers compared with toe ulcers was 0.77 (95% CI 0.64-0.92) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.47-0.83), respectively; the hazard ratio for ulcer healing for plantar versus nonplantar ulcers was 1 (95% CI 0.84-1.19). Other factors significantly influencing time to healing were the duration of diabetes, ulcer duration, the presence of heart failure and the presence of peripheral arterial disease. Time to ulcer healing increased progressively from toe to midfoot to heel, but did not differ between plantar and nonplantar ulcers. Our data also indicate that risk factors for longer time to healing differ from factors that affect the ultimate number of ulcers that heal (healing rate). Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Perioperative Approach to Increase Limb Salvage When Treating Foot Ulcers in Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Raelina S; Criscitelli, Theresa; Woods, Jon S; Gillette, Brian M; Brem, Harold; Gorenstein, Scott

    2018-04-01

    Foot ulceration in patients with diabetes increases the risk of lower extremity amputation. Major amputations produce substantial adverse consequences, increase length of hospital stay, diminish quality of life, and increase mortality. In this article, we describe approaches that decrease amputations and improve the quality of life for patients with diabetes and foot ulcers. We highlight the role of the perioperative nurse, who is essential to providing optimal patient care in the perioperative period. Perioperative care of patients with diabetes involves providing optimal surveillance for a break in the skin of the foot, screening for neuropathy, following guidelines for foot ulcer infections, preparing for pathophysiology-based debridement, using adjuvant therapies, and offloading the patient's affected foot. Nurses should understand the disease process and pathophysiology and how to use these approaches in the perioperative setting to assist in curtailing the morbidity and mortality associated with foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. © AORN, Inc, 2018.

  12. Diabetic Septic Foot Lesions in El Obeid, Western Sudan | El Bushra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To study the magnitude, presentations and outcomes of diabetic septic foot lesions in El Obeid, Western Sudan. Patients and Methods: The records of 86 diabetic patients with septic foot lesions admitted to the wards of the University Surgical Unit at El Obeid Teaching Hospital, Western Sudan during the years ...

  13. The relationship between self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Wendling, MSN, RN, FNP, CFCN

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: This study adds to the body of knowledge regarding self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care behaviors. Further research is needed to explore the relationship of gender, diabetes education attendance, and foot self-care behaviors as influencing factors in LEA prevention.

  14. Plantar pressures in diabetic patients with foot ulcers which have remained healed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owings, T. M.; Apelqvist, J.; Stenström, A.; Becker, M.; Bus, S. A.; Kalpen, A.; Ulbrecht, J. S.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    The recurrence of foot ulcers is a significant problem in people with diabetic neuropathy. The purpose of this study was to measure in-shoe plantar pressures and other characteristics in a group of neuropathic patients with diabetes who had prior foot ulcers which had remained healed. This was an

  15. Tissue Augmentation with Allograft Adipose Matrix For the Diabetic Foot in Remission

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    Tala B. Shahin, BS

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion:. The results from this preliminary experience suggest that allograft adipose matrix delivered to the high risk diabetic foot may have promise in reducing tissue stress over pre- and postulcerative lesions. This may ultimately assist the clinician in extending ulcer-free days for patients in diabetic foot remission.

  16. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santema, Trientje B.; Poyck, Paul P. C.; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin

  17. Plantar Pressure as a Risk Assessment Tool for Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Egyptian Patients with Diabetes

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    Olfat A. Fawzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetic foot ulceration is a preventable long-term complication of diabetes. In the present study, peak plantar pressures (PPP and other characteristics were assessed in a group of 100 Egyptian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers. The aim was to study the relationship between plantar pressure (PP and neuropathy with or without ulceration and trying to clarify the utility of pedobarography as an ulceration risk assessment tool in patients with diabetes. Subjects and Methods A total of 100 patients having diabetes were selected. All patients had a comprehensive foot evaluation, including assessment for neuropathy using modified neuropathy disability score (MNDS, for peripheral vascular disease using ankle brachial index, and for dynamic foot pressures using the MAT system (Tekscan. The studied patients were grouped into: (1 diabetic control group (DC, which included 37 patients who had diabetes without neuropathy or ulceration and MNDS ≤ 2; (2 diabetic neuropathy group (DN, which included 33 patients who had diabetes with neuropathy and MNDS >2, without current or a history of ulceration; and (3 diabetic ulcer group (DU, which included 30 patients who had diabetes and current ulceration, seven of those patients also gave a history of ulceration. Results PP parameters were significantly different between the studied groups, namely, forefoot peak plantar pressure (FFPPP, rearfoot peak plantar pressure (RFPPP, forefoot/rearfoot ratio (F/R, forefoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG rearfoot peak pressure gradient (RFPPG, and forefoot peak pressure gradient/rearfoot peak pressure gradient (FFPPG/RFPPG ( P 0.05. FFPPP, F/R ratio, FFPPG, and FFPPG/RFPPG correlated significantly with the severity of neuropathy according to MNDS ( P < 0.05. These same variables as well as MNDS were also significantly higher in patients with foot deformity compared to those without deformity ( P < 0.05. Using the receiver operating

  18. Quality of life of people with diabetic foot

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    Pedro Martins Lima Neto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the quality of life of people with diabetic foot and its association with age and gender. Methods: cross-sectional study conducted with people with diabetic foot seen in the vascular clinic of a municipal hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, lifestyle and evaluation of quality of life SF-36 questionnaires were used. Results: sample was consisted of 48 people. The majority was elderly (58.4%, female (56.3%, non-smoker (93.7%, non-alcoholic (83.4%, with recurrence of ulcers (50.0%, with present secretion (54.2% and absent fetid odor (81.3%. Regarding quality of life, the best result was in the domain vitality and the worse, in the domain physical aspects. All domains, except the vitality, had a score below 50 in the measurement of quality of life. There was no significant difference in the comparison of quality of life between age groups and gender. Conclusion: participants presented domains of quality of life that tend to a poorer health status.

  19. Wound bed preparation for ischemic diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoxin; Lv, Lei; Guan, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate the effect of allograft skin on wound angiogenesis and wound bed preparation of ischemic diabetic foot ulcer. A total of 60 cases of patients with diabetic foot ulcer were randomly divided into the experimental group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). After debridement, in the experimental group, allograft skin was used to cover the wound while in the control group, vaseline and gauze was used to cover the wound. The wound was opened and dressed at 3, 5, 7, 14 days after operation and the growth condition of the granulation tissue was observed and recorded. The wound bed preparation time of the experimental group was 14.37 ± 1.06 days, compared with the control group 25.99 ± 4.03 days, there was statistically significant difference (t = 14.78, P cure time of the experimental group was 32 ± 1.93 days and this time was significantly shortened than the control group 39.73 ± 2.55 days (t = 12.521, P ulcer and shorten the wound bed preparation time and treatment cycle.

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy in patients with diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusal, Ali Engin; Sahin, M Sükrü; Ulusal, Betül; Cakmak, Gökhan; Tuncay, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    In this study our aim was to compare the results of standard dressing treatment to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) performed with a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We assessed the results of 35 patients treated for diabetic foot ulcer between 2006 and 2008. Of these cases, 20 (4 women and 16 men; mean age: 66 years; range: 52-90 years) were treated with standard wet dressings and 16 feet in 15 patients (10 men, 5 women; mean age: 58.9 years; range: 42-83 years) with VAC therapy. The success of treatment was evaluated in terms of hospitalization length and rate of limb salvation. The average hospitalization period with VAC treatment was 32 days compared to 59 days with standard dressing treatment. All patients treated with standard dressings eventually had to undergo amputation. However, the amputation rate was 37% in the VAC treated group and 88% of patients had a functional extremity at the end of treatment. VAC therapy, together with debridement and appropriate antibiotic therapy, enables a higher rate of limb salvage, especially in Wagner Grade 3 and Grade 4 ulcers.

  1. Quality of life of people with diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Martins Lima Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the quality of life of people with diabetic foot and its association with age and gender. Methods: cross-sectional study conducted with people with diabetic foot seen in the vascular clinic of a Municipal Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, lifestyle and evaluation of quality of life SF-36 questionnaires were used. Results: sample was consisted of 48 people. The majority was elderly (58.4%, female (56.3%, non-smoker (93.7%, non-alcoholic (83.4%, with recurrence of ulcers (50.0%, with present secretion (54.2% and absent fetid odor (81.3%. Regarding quality of life, the best result was in the domain vitality and the worse, in the domain physical aspects. All domains, except the vitality, had a score below 50 in the measurement of quality of life. There was no significant difference in the comparison of quality of life between age groups and gender. Conclusion: participants presented domains of quality of life that tend to a poorer health status.

  2. Foot reflexology in feet impairment of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Natália Chantal Magalhães da; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Iunes, Denise Hollanda

    2015-01-01

    AbstractObjective: to evaluate the effect of foot reflexology on feet impairment of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Method: this is a randomized, controlled and blind clinical trial. The sample was comprised by people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who, after being randomized into Treated group (n = 21) and Control group (n = 24), received guidelines on foot self-care. To the Treated Group it was also provided 12 sessions of foot reflexology. The scores of impairment indicators related to...

  3. Evaluation of "care of the foot" as a risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration: the role of internal physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguejiofor, O C; Oli, J M; Odenigbo, C U

    2009-03-01

    Several risk factors predispose the diabetic patient to foot ulceration, including "inadequate care of the foot". This risk factor for foot ulceration has not been previously evaluated among Nigeria diabetic patients and is the objective of this study. One hundred and twenty (120) diabetic patients with and without symptoms of peripheral neuropathy receiving care at the medical outpatient department (MOPD) and the diabetic clinic of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi were recruited consecutively as they presented. They were administered structured questionnaires to assess some variables concerning care of their feet as provided to them by their physicians. Among the 120 diabetic participants, 83 (69.2%) had neuropathic symptoms (the symptomatic participants) while 37 (30.8%) were asymptomatic (the asymptomatic participants). Eighty (80; 96.4%) of the symptomatic vs 36 (97.3%) of the asymptomatic participants had never had their feet examined by their physician. Also, 26 (31.3%) of the symptomatic vs 12 (32.4%) of the asymptomatic participants had never received any form of advice on how to take special care of their feet by their physician, and 26 (31.3%) of the symptomatic vs 6 (16.2%) of the asymptomatic participants walked unshod most times in their immediate surroundings. Physicians do not provide adequate care to the feet of their diabetic patients irrespective of the presence or absence of neuropathic symptoms, making this variable a critical risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration and amputation. Continuing medical education to health care providers emphasizing adequate "care of the foot" of the diabetic patient, will reduce avoidable loss of limbs to diabetes.

  4. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, Kirsty; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries......OBJECTIVE Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation....... RESULTS Among these patients, 159 (28%) underwent an amputation. Independent risk factors for amputation were as follows: periwound edema, foul smell, (non)purulent exudate, deep ulcer, positive probe-to-bone test, pretibial edema, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein. Increasing IWGDF severity...

  5. Knowledge of the Warning Signs of Foot Ulcer Deterioration Among Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Yu, Hsing-Yi; Weng, Li-Chueh

    2017-12-07

    Seeking treatment in a timely manner may prevent lower limb amputation subsequent to diabetic foot ulcers. Knowledge regarding the warning signs is one important factor that is related to the timely treatment seeking of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. However, there is no previous research on which aspects of such knowledge that patients with diabetes are lacking. The aims of this study were to test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that was designed to assess the knowledge of the warning signs of diabetic foot ulcer deterioration and to determine the knowledge of these warning signs among patients with a history of diabetic foot ulcers. A cross-sectional study design was used. Patients with a history of diabetic foot ulcers were recruited using convenience sampling (N = 385). Data were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation and the Mann-Whitney U test. The questionnaire showed good known-group validity, satisfied internal consistency (Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 = .82), and exhibited acceptable 2-week test-retest reliability (Spearman's rho coefficient = .75). More than 30% of the participants were unaware of the warning signs of peripheral vascular insufficiency and severe infection. Of the participants, 75.8% felt that the time to seek medical treatment of diabetic foot ulcers was when they experienced wound deterioration. Those who held this opinion had significantly less knowledge regarding the warning signs of diabetic foot ulcer deterioration than did those who had not. Other factors that were significantly associated with less knowledge included being older, having less education, not having an existing foot ulcer, having no foot ulcer treatment history, and never having received education regarding foot ulcers. The questionnaire showed adequate validity and reliability and thus may be used by healthcare practitioners and researchers to assess the knowledge of at-risk patients regarding the warning signs of diabetic foot ulcer

  6. Social Media as a Platform for Information About Diabetes Foot Care: A Study of Facebook Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Tasnima; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Lasker, Mohammad A A; Ahmed, Syed Walid; Shommu, Nusrat; Rumana, Nahid; Turin, Tanvir C

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is one of the most challenging chronic health conditions in the current era. Diabetes-related foot problems need proper patient education, and social media could a play role to disseminate proper information. A systematic search was performed on Facebook groups using the key words "diabetes foot care", "diabetes foot", "diabetes foot management" and "podiatric care". The search resulted in 57 groups and detailed activity information was collected from those groups. Usefulness of each relevant post was determined. Regression analysis was performed to explore the factors associated with the level of usefulness of diabetes foot care-related Facebook groups. Our search resulted in a total of 16 eligible diabetes foot care-related Facebook groups with a total of 103 eligible posts. The average number of group members for the selected groups were 265.75 with an interquartile range of 3.5-107.75. Of the total 103 timeline posts, 45.6% posts were categorized as useful, while the remaining posts were not useful. Top mentioned diabetes foot care practice was "Checking feet daily". Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the level of usefulness of diabetes foot care-related Facebook groups were significantly associated with the type of posts and no association was found with presence of "likes" and presence of comment. Facebook being a widely used social networking system, patient welfare organizations, doctors, nurses and podiatrists could use this platform to provide support to educating diabetes patients and their caregivers by disseminating useful and authentic knowledge and information related to diabetes foot care. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Risk Classifications in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients at Rajavithi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinnapakorn, Veerasak; Sunthorntepwarakul, Thongkum; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Napartivaumnuay, Navapom

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are a major cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes. In 2014, the Diabetes Association of Thailand issued new guidelines for classifying type 2 diabetes patients' levels of risk of developing foot ulcers, but no research on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes using these new classification criteria had been performed prior to the current study. To study the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers overall and in different risk groups in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Rajavithi Hospital, and to evaluate risk factors of these groups and correlations with ankle brachial index (ABI) and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). 593 type 2 diabetes patients at Rajavithi Hospital were studied and classified into risk groups based on the classification criteria issued by the Thailand Diabetes Association in 2014. ABI measurements were taken from 132 patients, and measurements of CAVI were taken from 101 patients. The prevalence of foot ulcers was 3.4% and 2.2% of patients had a history of amputation. The percentages of patients at low, intermediate and high risk of developing foot ulcers were 55.8%, 33.6% and 10.6%, respectively. Age, duration of diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, nephropathy, cardiovascular disease (CVA), deformity of foot, numbness, abnormal protective sensation, pulse deficit, ulcer, and amputation were factors significantly associated with a high risk of foot ulcers (p diabetes patients were in the groups with an intermediate or high risk of developing foot ulcers. Screening of patients at risk of foot ulceration is necessary in order to classify patients into risk groups and provide appropriate education, as well as proper monitoring and management.

  8. Herbal extracts in the treatment of Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Kustova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most serious complications of diabetes is the formation of Diabetic Foot Syndrome. Herbal extracts that combine high antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be used to treat the resulting neuropathy. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of crude extracts isolated from plants growing in Kazakhstan, which could be used to develop products for treatment of Diabetic Foot Syndrome. Method: Different solvents, including dichloromethane and ethanol, were used to prepare plant extracts. The crude extracts from the plants were tested for antimicrobial activity using a modified version of the CLSI/NCCLS methods. All organisms were obtained from American Type Culture Collection. These included the fungi Candida glabrata ATTC 90030, the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ATCC 43300. The 2,2-diphеnyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS radical scavenging assay were used to analyzed the antioxidant capacity. Results: The results clearly indicate that antibacterial and antifungal activities vary with plant species. Dichloromethane extracts produced favorable results in all assays. Epilobium hirsutum, Rhodiola quadrifida, Rumex confertus showed antifungal activity against Candida glabrata in all extracts where IC50 less than 3 μg/ml. Rumex confertus, Glycyrrhiza Uralensis and Vexibia alopecuroides showed anti-fungal activity against Staphylococcus aureus (IC50 =10.80 μg/ml, (IC50 =11.10 μg/ml, (IC50 =3.05 μg/ml and Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (IC50 =16.20 μg/ml, (IC50 =11.00 μg/ml, (IC50 =2.90 μg/ml respectively.  In spite of this, Vexibia alopecuroides extract showed no antioxidant activity. The other extracts showed a dose dependent ABTS scavenging activity. IC50 values were for the following: 6.6 μg/ml Epilobium hirsutum; 4.5 μg/ml Rumex confertus; 3.8

  9. Features of the Pathogenetic Mechanisms of Regional Blood Flow Disturbances in Diabetic Foot Syndrome (Lliterature Review

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    О.B. Rusak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is recognized as one of the most important noninfectious disease in the world, the prevalence of which became pandemic. In the list of late complications of DM, diabetic foot syndrome is a leader, causing early disability and high mortality. According to the International Diabetes Federation, from 25 to 47 % of hospital admissions of patients with DM is associated with purulent-destructive lesions of the foot as a result of chronic tissue ischemia. This review highlights the main pathophysiological mechanisms of microcirculatory disorders in diabetic foot syndrome, which lead to critical lower limb ischemia.

  10. Local medicamentous treatment of wound infection in patients with diabetic foot syndrome

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    Bugaeva I.O.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the parameters and comparison of wound healing in patients with diabetic foot syndrome using modern dressings and traditional scheme of local treatment of chronic wounds. Materials and methods: Clinical part of the work has been based on the results of a comprehensive investigation of the parameters of wound healing in 154 diabetic foot patients. Results: Optimum results are obtained by treatment of wound infection in patients with neuropathic diabetic foot shape using highly technological dressings. Conclusion: The modern interactive dressings may actively interfere to all phases of wound healing in patients with purulent-necrotic complications of diabetes mellitus

  11. The relationship of the apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism in Turkish Type 2 Diabetic Patients with and without diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmet, Erdogan; Zuhal, Eroglu; Mustafa, Kulaksizoglu; Soner, Solmaz; Aslı, Tetik; Sevki, Cetinkalp

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene polymorphism in the development of diabetic foot ulcers in Type 2 diabetes Turkish patients. The ApoE genotypes were determined retrospectively in 50 patients with diabetic foot and 50 without diabetic foot and a control group of 50 healthy individuals. The genotype ApoE distribution did differ between the control group (E2E3 44%, E3E3 38%, E3E4 18%) and Type 2 Diabetic Patients (E2E3 6%, E3E3 81%, E3E4 16%) (pDiabetic Patients group (E2E3 4%, E3E3 86%, E3E4 4%) and diabetic foot ulcers (E2E3 8%, E3E3 76%, E3E4 16%) (p>0.05). The frequency of the E2,E3,E4 allele in between the control group and Type 2 Diabetic Patients were no similar for the groups (E2 22%, E3 69%, E4 9% and E2 3%, E3 90.5%, E4 6.5%, respectively) (pDiabetic Patients and diabetic foot ulcers were similar for the groups (E2 2%, E3 93%, E4 5% and E2 4%, E3 88%, E4 8%, respectively) (p>0.05). The gene polymorphism of ApoE and E3 allele are a risk factor for diabetes, but gene polymorphism of ApoE is not an independent risk factor for diabetic foot. Lack of association between ApoE gene polymorphism and Type 2 diabetic foot ulcers might be due to ethnic differences. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of the diabetic foot: surgical and organisational aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrup, F

    2005-04-01

    Most patients are older, but increasing numbers of young patients also develop diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). A third of the patients are under 50 years of age. The prevalence in the Western countries is 4-10% and the incidence 2-6%. Only 10-60% of patients are healed after the first three months and the recurrence rate is 44%, 61%, and 70% after one, two and three years, respectively. DFU results in extensive treatment costs, and the hospital treatment cost of DFU counts towards 25-30% of the total hospital expenses of treatment of patients suffering of diabetes. Recent progress in the treatment of patients with DFU has reduced the number of low-extremity amputation (LEA) cases. These improvements have been achieved through an increasing understanding of the importance of the multifactorial background of DFU, and that there should be a multidisciplinary organized structure behind the treatment of DFU. This used to be a topic of interest, but especially focused on the international Consensus on the Diabetic Foot from 1999. Our understanding of the importance of surgery in DFU has increased over the last 30 years. A simple classification based on presents or absents of neuropathy, open wound or infection has been suggested. Treatment is dependable of the type and classification group of the wound. Various surgical correction techniques are available. The team approach and collaboration between all healthcare professionals is required to facilitate good quality holistic care. Recognition of the talent and creativity of all employees in the multidisciplinary team will increase the chance of success in establishment of the concept. This article is based on a presentation focusing on the surgical and organisational aspects in thr treatment of DFU.

  13. Effectiveness of bridge V.A.C. dressings in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Nather, Aziz; Hong, Ng Yau; Lin, Wong Keng; Sakharam, Joshi Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This is a prospective study of the clinical efficacy of the V.A.C. Granufoam Bridge Dressing for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Materials and methods: Five consecutive patients with diabetic foot ulcers were treated with V.A.C. Granufoam Bridge Dressings and studied over a period of 22-48 days. The indications for treatment included diabetic patients with open ray amputation wounds and wounds post-drainage for abscess with exposed deep structures. Clinical outcome was meas...

  14. Cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot: a Markov analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ortegon, Monica; Redekop, Ken; Niessen, Louis Wilhelmus

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate the lifetime health and economic effects of optimal prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot according to international standards and to determine the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in the Netherlands. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A risk-based Markov model was developed to simulate the onset and progression of diabetic foot disease in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes managed with care according to guidelines for their lifetime. M...

  15. A comparative study between total contact cast and pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis in diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sayantan; Biswas, Dibakar; Baidya, Arjun; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2015-03-01

    Off-loading of the ulcer area is extremely important for the healing of plantar ulcers. Off-loading with total contact cast (TCC) may be superior to other off-loading strategies studied so far, but practical limitations can dissuade clinicians from using this modality. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TCC compared with that of a pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis (PRAFO) in healing of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers and their effect on gait parameters. Thirty adult diabetic patients attending the foot clinic with neuropathic plantar ulcers irrespective of sex, age, duration and type of diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 off-loading modalities (TCC and PRAFO). Main outcome measures were ulcer healing after 4 weeks of randomization and effect of each of the modalities on various gait parameters. The percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area at 4 weeks from baseline was 75.75 ± 9.25 with TCC and 34.72 ± 13.07 with PRAFO, which was significantly different (P diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. Further studies are needed involving larger subjects and using 3D gait analysis to collect more accurate data on gait parameters and wound healing with different off-loading devices. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Evaluation of patients' education on foot self-care status in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafaie, Parichehr; Noorbala, Mohamad Taghi; Soheilikhah, Sedigheh; Rashidi, Maryam

    2012-12-01

    Skin problems caused by neuropathy and antipathy are common manifestations of diabetes. The most serious about such problem is the diabetic foot, which may lead to eventual ulceration and amputation, and will decrease a patient's quality of life dramatically. The aim of this study is to assess the level of foot self-care and foot conditions in diabetic patients, and to demonstrate the role of self-care education in diabetic foot care. A total of 80 diabetic patients were included in the study, all of whom had referred to "Yazd Diabetic Research Center." The levels of their foot self-care were recorded in pre-test questionnaires, and then all of the patients were visited and educated by a Dermatologist for their foot self-care on a monthly basis, after which their post-test results were recorded through a second administration of the same questionnaire. Eventually, data from the pre and post-test questionnaires were analyzed to identify the possible effects of education. A total of 80 diabetic patients (34 males, 46 females) with a mean average age of 53.53 ± 10.19 and mean average duration of diabetes 12.42 ± 6.73 years were assessed. A significant increase in foot self-care through education was observed (baseline 27.06 ± 8.77, vs. post education 43.12 ± 8.77; P = 0.0001). After education, foot and nail lesions improved completely in 84% and 62.8%. Moreover, 77.8% of patients had suitable shoes and 79.6% had suitable socks. Our findings showed that foot self-care education could improve knowledge and performance of patients about various foot problems, and was significantly important in preventing ulcers.

  17. Renal failure: implications of chronic kidney disease in the management of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shari; Raj, Dominic; Guzman, Nicolas J

    2012-06-01

    Foot complications are common in patients with diabetes, however, chronic kidney disease has emerged as an independent risk factor for development of foot lesions in the diabetic population. Apart from peripheral arterial disease, infection, and neuropathy, which are classic factors contributing to development of foot lesions, skin disorders specific to renal failure, impaired wound healing from uremia, and psychosocial issues offer further compounded risk. Consequently, there are high ulceration and amputation rates that are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In recent studies, foot-care programs with a multidisciplinary approach within dialysis units have demonstrated improved outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring of diabetic foot ulcer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Gerstrøm, Marie; Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack Brandt

    2018-01-01

    This study compared the cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring with standard monitoring for patients with diabetic foot ulcers. The economic evaluation was nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A total of 374 patients were randomised to either telemonitoring or standard monitoring....... Telemonitoring consisted of two tele-consultations in the patient's own home and one consultation at the outpatient clinic; standard monitoring consisted of three outpatient clinic consultations. Total healthcare costs were estimated over a 6-month period at individual patient level, from a healthcare sector...... perspective. The bootstrap method was used to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and one-way sensitivity analyses were performed. Telemonitoring costs were found to be €2039 less per patient compared to standard monitoring; however, this difference was not statistically significant...

  19. [Tumor-segmental resection of hand-foot-giant cell tumor of bone and autologous iliac bone graft reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jianhua; Chen, Ge; Zhang, Zhongjie; Wan, Yongxian; Lu, Xiaobo

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of tumor-segmental resection and autologous iliac bone graft reconstruction combined with internal fixation in treating hand-foot-giant cell tumor of bone. Between August 1997 and April 2008, 8 cases of hand-foot-giant cell tumor of bone were treated, including 3 males and 5 females with an average age of 28.5 years (range, 16-42 years). The locations were metacarpal bones in 3 cases, metatarsal bones in 4 cases, and phalanges of toes in 1 case. According to Campanacci's gradation of X-ray films, there were 1 case of grade I and 7 cases of grade II; according to pathological examination before operation, there were 3 cases of grade I to II, 4 cases of grade II, and 1 case of grade II to III; and according to TNM staging, there were 1 case of TisN0M0, 4 cases of T1N0M0, and 3 cases of T2N0M0. There were 2 cases of recurrence, the time from the first operation to recurrence were 11 and 14 months, respectively. The tumor size was 1.8 cm x 1.0 cm to 6.0 cm x 2.0 cm, the cortical bone became thinner, and the boundary between tumor and periosteum was clear. All patients underwent tumor-segmental resection combined with autologous iliac bone graft reconstruction, and miniplate internal fixation by lumbar anesthesia or trachea cannula anesthesia. All incision healed by first intention. Eight patients were followed up 10 to 84 months with an average of 46 months. Radiographs showed that fracture union was achieved at 3 to 9 months (mean, 5 months). No significant rotation, angular, and shortening deformity occurred in iliac bone graft. The function of iliac bone donor site recovered excellently. The pathological examination showed giant cell tumor of bone in all cases, including 2 case of grade I-II, 5 cases of grade II, and 1 case of grade II-III. The hand or foot function recovered excellently. No tumor recurrence or lung metastasis occurred during follow-up. Tumor-segmental resection combined with autologous iliac bone graft reconstruction

  20. [Multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients with diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pityk, O I; Prasol, V O; Boĭko, V V; Babynkin, A B

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is considered now the main cause of amputations of lower limbs. The analysis of the results of 266 percutaneous endovascular interventions (EV) performed during 2008-2012 in 245 patients with ischemic and neuroishemic DF was carried out. 76% of the patients underwent percutaneous balloon angioplasty (PBA), 24%--PBA + stenting. 91% of EV were technically successful. In 95% of the patients who achieved recovery of the main flow in the occluded arterial segment, clinical improvement was observed in the form of disappearance of the pain and start of the healing of ulcer-necrotic lesions of the foot. The main causes of technical failure (9%) were impossibility to pass through long calcified occlusions of infrainguinal arteries. The complication rate was 10.5%, major amputation--5.2%, mortality--0.8%. Long-term results were shown by the combined rate of amputation-free survival after 1, 3 and 5 years follow-up which made up respectively, 86%, 70% and 43%. EV is an effective treatment for patients with DF and an integrated multidisciplinary approach to achieve high limb salvage rates in the long-term period.

  1. Relationship and susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus infection diabetic foot ulcers with Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Aza Bahadeen

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot infection with the patient's endogenous flora as the principal source. Nasal carriage of S. aureus has been identified as an important risk factor for the acquisition of diabetic foot infections. The study assessment the associations of S. aureus with methicillin resistant S. aureus were isolation from diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage of the same patients and their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Diagnosis of S. aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus were carried out by using standard procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles were determent by breakpoint dilution method. Out of 222 S. aureus isolation, 139 (62.61%) were isolated from the diabetic foot and 83 (37.39%) from the nasal carriage. Seventy one (30.87%) of the patients were S. aureus infection diabetic foot with nasal carriage. Among diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage patients, 40.85% of S. aureus were considered as methicillin resistant S. aureus. Rifampicin (96.40%) and Levofloxacin (91.44%) were active against S. aureus. Patients at strong risk for methicillin resistant S. aureus nasal carriage and subsequent diabetic foot infection with high resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diabetic foot wound care practices among patients visiting a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the most common and devastating preventable complications of diabetes resulting in major economic consequences for the patients, their families, and the society. Aims & Objectives: The present study was carried out to assess knowledge, attitude and practices of Diabetic Foot Wound Care among the patients suffering from Diabetic Foot and to correlate them with the socio-demographic parameters. Material & Methods: It was a Hospital based cross-sectional study involving clinically diagnosed adult (>18 years patients of Diabetic Foot visiting the Surgery and Medicine OPDs at Teerthankar Mahaveer Medical College & Research Centre, Moradabad, India. Results: Significant association KAP (Knowledge, Attitude and Practices score was seen with age of the patient, education, addiction, family history of Diabetes Mellitus, prior receipt of information regarding Diabetic foot-care practices, compliance towards the treatment and the type of foot wear used. Conclusions: The results highlight areas especially Health education, use of safe footwear and life style adjustments, where efforts to improve knowledge and practice may contribute to the prevention of development of Foot ulcers and amputation. 

  3. Using computer graphics to preserve function in resection of malignant melanoma of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M; Vantuyl, A; Japour, C; Ghosh, B C

    2001-08-01

    The increasing incidence of malignant melanoma challenges physicians to find innovative ways to preserve function and appearance in affected areas that require partial resection. We carefully planned the resection of a malignant lesion between the third and fourth toes of a 77-year-old man with the aid of computer technology. The subsequent excision of the third, fourth, and fifth digits was executed such that the new metatarsal arc formed would approximate the dimensions of the optimal hyperbola, thereby minimizing gait disturbance.

  4. Managing the diabetic foot in resource-poor settings: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas ZG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zulfiqarali G Abbas1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Abbas Medical Centre, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common noncommunicable diseases globally. In Africa, rates of diabetes are increasing, so there is a parallel increase of foot complications. Peripheral neuropathy is the main risk factor for foot ulceration in people with diabetes in developing nations, but peripheral arterial disease is also increasing in number owing to the change in lifestyle and increasing urbanization. Ulceration arising from peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, and trauma are highly susceptible to secondary infection and gangrene, and are hence associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Government funding is very limited in many developing countries, and diabetes and its complications impose a heavy burden on health services. In particular, the outcomes of foot complications are often poor, and this is the result of various factors including lack of awareness of the need for foot care among patients, relatives, and health care providers; relatively few professionals with an interest in the diabetic foot and with the training to provide specialist treatment; nonexistent podiatry services; long distances for patients to travel to the clinic; delays among patients in seeking medical care, or the late referral of patients for specialist opinion; and lack of the awareness of the importance of a team approach to care, and the lack of training programs for health care professionals. Many of these can, however, potentially be tackled without exorbitant spending of financial resources. Cost-effective educational efforts should be targeted at both health care workers and patients. These include implementation of sustainable training programs for health care professionals with a special interest in foot

  5. Three dimensional design, simulation and optimization of a novel, universal diabetic foot offloading orthosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Chand; Ramachandran, K. I.

    2016-09-01

    Leg amputation is a major consequence of aggregated foot ulceration in diabetic patients. A common sense based treatment approach for diabetic foot ulceration is foot offloading where the patient is required to wear a foot offloading orthosis during the entire treatment course. Removable walker is an excellent foot offloading modality compared to the golden standard solution - total contact cast and felt padding. Commercially available foot offloaders are generally customized with huge cost and less patient compliance. This work suggests an optimized 3D model of a new type light weight removable foot offloading orthosis for diabetic patients. The device has simple adjustable features which make this suitable for wide range of patients with weight of 35 to 74 kg and height of 137 to 180 cm. Foot plate of this orthosis is unisexual, with a size adjustability of (US size) 6 to 10. Materials like Aluminum alloy 6061-T6, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) and Polyurethane acted as the key player in reducing weight of the device to 0.804 kg. Static analysis of this device indicated that maximum stress developed in this device under a load of 1000 N is only 37.8 MPa, with a small deflection of 0.150 cm and factor of safety of 3.28, keeping the safety limits, whereas dynamic analysis results assures the load bearing capacity of this device. Thus, the proposed device can be safely used as an orthosis for offloading diabetic ulcerated foot.

  6. Development and validation of a diabetes foot self-care behavior scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan; Huang, Tzu-Ting

    2013-03-01

    Foot self-care practice is one of the most important self-management behaviors to prevent the occurrence of diabetic foot ulcers. A tool that measures all aspects of daily foot care routines and demonstrates good reliability and validity is essential to pinpointing specific foot ulcer problems and evaluating intervention outcomes. There is currently no such tool available. This study developed a diabetes foot self-care behavior scale (DFSBS) and tested its psychometric properties. The researchers reviewed the literature to generate the initial item pool. After expert confirmation of final draft scale content validity, we used convenience sampling to recruit 295 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy who completed the scale. We analyzed results to determine the scale''s psychometric properties, including construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. The final scale consisted of a one-factor structure with seven items. The analysis of the scale indicated the DFSBS score as significantly correlated with the foot care subscale score of the Chinese version of the summary of diabetes self-care activity questionnaire (rho = .87, p foot ulcers (Mann-Whitney Z = -3.09, p validity and reliability. Clinicians may use the DFSBS to screen patients'' foot self-care behavior, and researchers can use it to elucidate foot self-care issues.

  7. Diabetic Foot Due to Aeromonas Hydrophila and Pseudomonas Oryzihabitans: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Talan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot infections are the most common cause of amputations in diabetic patients. The main predisposing reasons for the development of foot ulcers and subsequent infection in diabetic patients are sensory neuropathy, vascular insufficiency and immune system abnormalities due to hyperglycemia. Limb-threatening infections are often polymicrobial. Staphylococcus aureus, group B streptococci, enterococci and facultative gram-negative bacilli are the most common pathogens. Here, we present two cases of diabetic foot infected by extremely rare microorganisms: Aeromonas hydrophila, and Pseudomonas (Flavimonas oryzihabitans. Turk Jem 2014; 18: 100-102

  8. Diabetic foot ulcer severity predicts mortality among veterans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Meghan B; Hess, Timothy M; Bartle, Brian; Cooper, Jennifer M; Kang, Jonathan; Huang, Elbert S; Smith, Maureen; Sohn, Min-Woong; Crnich, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are associated with an increased risk of death. We evaluated whether ulcer severity at presentation predicts mortality. Patients from a national, retrospective, cohort of veterans with type 2 diabetes who developed incident diabetic foot ulcers between January 1, 2006 and September 1, 2010, were followed until death or the end of the study period, January 1, 2012. Ulcers were characterized as early stage, osteomyelitis, or gangrene at presentation. Cox proportional hazard regression identified independent predictors of death, controlling for comorbidities, laboratory parameters, and healthcare utilization. 66,323 veterans were included in the cohort and followed for a mean of 27.7months: 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 80.80%, 69.01% and 28.64%, respectively. Compared to early stage ulcers, gangrene was associated with an increased risk of mortality (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.57-1.83, pdiabetic foot ulcer severity is a more significant predictor of subsequent mortality than coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, or stroke. Unrecognized or under-estimated vascular disease and/or sepsis secondary to gangrene should be explored as possible causal explanations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Audit of Diabetic Soft Tissue Infection and Foot Disease in Accra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Soft tissue infection and foot disease are well known complications among diabetes mellitus patients. With an increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Africa, management of these complications is expected to become a major problem. OBJECTIVE: To audit the surgical management of diabetic

  10. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavery, Lawrence A.; Peters, Edgar J. G.; Armstrong, David G.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Murdoch, Douglas P.; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    Aims: Osteomyelitis worsens the prognosis in the diabetic foot, but predisposing factors remain largely undefined, In a prospectively followed cohort we assessed risk factors for developing osteomyelitis. Methods: We enrolled consecutive persons with diabetes who presented to a managed-care diabetes

  11. Health-related quality of life in patients with diabetic foot problems in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlina, M; Shamsul, A S; Jeffery, F A Saini

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of foot problems on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with diabetes in Malaysia. Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire was used to assess the HRQoL of 140 diabetic patients with foot problems attending outpatient diabetic foot clinic in a tertiary hospital, University Malaya Medical Centre. Their HRQoL were compared with 134 diabetic patients without foot problems attending the same clinic. The median score of all the eight SF-36 domains differed significantly between the two groups, where patients with foot problems having statistically significant lower scores. The two domains that were most severely compromised were components of the physical health: Physical Functioning and Role Physical domains. The SF-36 scale scores in diabetic patients with foot problems were also lower than those of the SF-36 norms for the Malaysian population. In conclusion, the results showed that diabetic foot problems negatively affect the patients' HRQoL in both physical and mental health aspects based on the SF-36.

  12. The Problems and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Diabetic Foot Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Keskin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hospitalization in patients with diabetic foot infection usually increases costs due to required long-term medical treatments and surgical managements. We aimed to investigate the ethiological factors of diabetic foot infections, frequency of osteomyelitis and amputation and the cost of diabetic foot infection treatments.Materials and Method: Patients with DM and diabetic foot infections that was admitted to our Endocrinology clinic between January 2009 and January 2010 was reviewed retrospectively. Demographic properties, phisical examinations, laboratuary tests, treatments, hospitalization time and cost informations of patients were investigated.Results: The mean age of 80 patients with 59 males and 21 females was 62±11 years. All patients were diagnosed as Type 2 DM except four patients (5% with Type 1 DM. The mean duration of DM in our study group was 15.6 years, the mean hospitalization time was 22.1 days and mean cost per patient was 2573 $.Discussion: Diabetic foot infection is an important complication of DM due to impaired quality of life, loss of work, developement of psychosocial trauma, increased frequency and duration of hospitalization, increased cost of treatment recently. Daily foot care and examination by patients seem an important factor to reduce cost of diabetic foot infections. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 10-3

  13. Fibrinogen: A Marker in Predicting Diabetic Foot Ulcer Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine whether fibrinogen levels are a valuable biomarker for assessing disease severity and monitoring disease progression in patients with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Methods. A retrospective study was designed to examine the utility of fibrinogen in estimating disease severity in patients with DFU admitted to our hospital between January 2015 and January 2016. In total, 152 patients with DFU were enrolled in the study group, and 52 age and gender matched people with diabetes but no DFU were included as the control group. DFU severity was assessed using Wagner criteria. Results. Patients with DFU were divided into 2 subgroups based on the Wagner criteria. Mean fibrinogen values were significantly higher in patients with DFU grade ≧ 3 compared to those with DFU grades 1-2 (5.23 ± 1.37 g/L versus 3.61 ± 1.04 g/L. Using ROC statistic, a cut-off value of 5.13 g/L indicated the possible amputation with a sensitivity of 81.8% and a specificity of 78.9% (positive predictive value [PPV] 78.6%, negative predictive value [89.0%]. Fibrinogen values were found to be correlated with CRP levels, neutrophil, and WBC count. Conclusions. Fibrinogen levels might be a valuable tool for assessing the disease severity and monitoring the disease progression in patients with DFU.

  14. Screening for Osteomyelitis Using Thermography in Patients with Diabetic Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Oe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious complications of diabetic foot (DF is osteomyelitis, and early detection is important. To assess the validity of thermography to screen for osteomyelitis, we investigated thermographic findings in patients with both DF and osteomyelitis. The subjects were 18 diabetic patients with 20 occurrences of DF who visited a dermatology department at a hospital in Tokyo and underwent evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and thermography between June 2010 and July 2012. Osteomyelitis was identified by MRI. Thermographs were taken of the wounds and legs after bed rest of more than 15 minutes. Two wound management researchers evaluated the range of increased skin temperature. There were three types of distribution of increased skin temperature: the periwound, ankle, and knee patterns. Fisher’s exact test revealed that the ankle pattern was significantly more common in the group with osteomyelitis than in the group without osteomyelitis (P=0.011. The positive predictive value was 100%, and the negative predictive value was 71.4%. Our results suggest that an area of increased skin temperature extending to the ankle can be a sign of osteomyelitis. Thermography might therefore be useful for screening for osteomyelitis in patients with DF.

  15. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: practical guideline on the provision of footwear for people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shan M; Nube, Vanessa L; Alford, Jan B; Allard, Bernard P; Gurr, Joel M; Holland, Emma L; Horsley, Mark W; Kamp, Maarten C; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sinha, Ashim K; Warnock, Jason T; Wraight, Paul R

    2013-02-26

    Trauma, in the form of pressure and/or friction from footwear, is a common cause of foot ulceration in people with diabetes. These practical recommendations regarding the provision of footwear for people with diabetes were agreed upon following review of existing position statements and clinical guidelines. The aim of this process was not to re-invent existing guidelines but to provide practical guidance for health professionals on how they can best deliver these recommendations within the Australian health system. Where information was lacking or inconsistent, a consensus was reached following discussion by all authors. Appropriately prescribed footwear, used alone or in conjunction with custom-made foot orthoses, can reduce pedal pressures and reduce the risk of foot ulceration. It is important for all health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes to both assess and make recommendations on the footwear needs of their clients or to refer to health professionals with such skills and knowledge. Individuals with more complex footwear needs (for example those who require custom-made medical grade footwear and orthoses) should be referred to health professionals with experience in the prescription of these modalities and who are able to provide appropriate and timely follow-up. Where financial disadvantage is a barrier to individuals acquiring appropriate footwear, health care professionals should be aware of state and territory based equipment funding schemes that can provide financial assistance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people living in rural and remote areas are likely to have limited access to a broad range of footwear. Provision of appropriate footwear to people with diabetes in these communities needs be addressed as part of a comprehensive national strategy to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications on the health system.

  16. WAGNER’S GRADING OF DIABETIC FOOT LESIONS-A TERTIARY CARE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE OF STUDY: Diabetic foot is the most common complication of diabetes. Amputation which is the end result of diabetic foot disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Since it is crucial to identify those at an increased risk of diabetic foot complications, a detailed study of the natural history of diabetic foot, various clinical characteristics, according to Wagner grading of lesions, their outcome and management protocol followed in our hospital was undertaken in our hospital. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of diabetic foot lesions based on Wagner grading system, outcome and management protocol followed in our hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study done on hundred diabetic foot patients in our own hospital over a period of one and half year. Data was obtained from a questionnaire developed to record the medical history, examination details, investigations reports, treatment details and final outcome at the end of stay. Infection was classified based on Meggitt-Wagner, classification/grading. RESULTS: Diabetic foot was very common in elderly age group (>55yrs 54% and male dominant (87%. Majority of them had diabetes for more than five years (47% and complications of diabetes were present on admission in 15% of them. Grade I(29%, Grade III (27% & Grade IV (24% lesions based on Wagner’s grading accounted for majority of diabetic foot lesions. Multiple toe disarticulation/ above knee / below knee amputation accounted for a quarter (23% of surgical interventions in our hospital. The glycemic control in most of patients was very poor with RBS>200 mg/dl (70% and glycosylated hemoglobin>7g% (74% of them. A quarter of the patients stayed for at least a month in the hospital (25%. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that diabetic foot in various forms accounts for significant morbidity in the surgical wards. Wagner’s grade I (29% Grade III (27%, Grade IV (24% constituted majority of lesions. Factors contributing

  17. [Diabetic foot syndrome from the perspective of internist educated in podiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkovská, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Podiatry is the science dealing with the diagnostics and treatment of the foot and ankle and associated tissues and structures by all appropriate methods and also with the local manifestation of the overall processes in this area. Diabetic foot disease is defined as infection, ulceration or destruction of tissues of the foot associated with neuropathy and/or peripheral artery disease in the lower extremity of people with diabetes according to the latest edition of the International Consensus. Successful treatment and prevention of diabetic foot syndrome depends on a holistic approach, in which it is seen as part of the multiple organ involvement. Teamwork of series of experts is therefore necessary. Internist with diabetes and podiatric education plays a key role in this team in particular, when control diabetes and in the prevention and treatment of co-morbidities, in the diagnosis of malnutrition and in the nutritional therapy and in the early diagnosis and effective treatment of infections. Last but not least, internist in collaboration with other professionals works when treatment of lower limb ischemia, suitable offloading of the ulcer and topical therapy and in the prevention of ulcers. Recurrent ulcerations are the major problem in podiatry and it can occur in up to 40% of patients in the first year after healing. Follow-up of patients with diabetic foot syndrome by experienced internist can help reduce the serious consequences, including amputation and cardiovascular mortality.Key words: diabetic foot - internal medicine - podiatry.

  18. Risk Factors For Diabetic Foot In Tetouan, Morocco - A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham AOUFI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction  Diabetes is a globally major public health problem. Its evolution is insidious and silent before the appearance of serious complications as a consequence in terms of morbidity than of mortality.  Complications in the feet are among the most frequent and feared. This study helps identify factors associated with diabetic foot in diabetic patients in the province of Tetouan in public and private sector.Methods This is a case-control study in which 136 diabetic patients monitored in the public and private sector in the province of Tetouan were chosen. 68 patients had diabetic foot and 68 were diabetic patients without this complication. Data were collected from patients’ records and supplemented by interviews. The factors compared between the two groups were socio-demographic, biological and related to diabetes and lifestyle. These risk factors were determined by bivariate and multivariate analyses.Results Statistically significant associations were found between diabetic foot and several factors including: the irregular monitoring of patients: ORadjusted = 7.7 [1.9-23], the rate of glycated hemoglobin: ORadjusted = 1.7 [1.2-2.3], diabetes duration: ORadjusted = 1.2 [1.03-1.26], and physical activity ORadjusted = 1.1 [0.02-0.9]. However, no association was found between diabetic foot and the level of education or occupation.Conclusion To prevent the development of diabetic foot, more attention should be given to diabetic patients whose diabetes duration is long, patient monitoring should be regular and diabetes control should be optimal. In addition, physical activity is recommended for diabetic patients as part of promoting healthy lifestyles

  19. The prevention of diabetic foot ulceration: how biomechanical research informs clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E. DiLiberto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Implementation of interprofessional clinical guidelines for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration has demonstrated positive effects regarding ulceration and amputation rates. Current foot care recommendations are primarily based on research regarding the prevention of ulcer recurrence and focused on reducing the magnitude of plantar stress (pressure overload. Yet, foot ulceration remains to be a prevalent and debilitating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus. There is limited evidence targeting the prevention of first-time ulceration, and there is a need to consider additional factors of plantar stress to supplement current guidelines. Objectives The first purpose of this article is to discuss the biomechanical theory underpinning diabetic foot ulcerations and illustrate how plantar tissue underloading may precede overloading and breakdown. The second purpose of this commentary is to discuss how advances in biomechanical foot modeling can inform clinical practice in the prevention of first-time ulceration. Discussion Research demonstrates that progressive weight-bearing activity programs to address the frequency of plantar stress and avoid underloading do not increase ulceration risk. Multi-segment foot modeling studies indicate that dynamic foot function of the midfoot and forefoot is compromised in people with diabetes. Emerging research demonstrates that implementation of foot-specific exercises may positively influence dynamic foot function and improve plantar stress in people with diabetes. Conclusion Continued work is needed to determine how to best design and integrate activity recommendations and foot-specific exercise programs into the current interprofessional paradigm for the prevention of first-time ulceration in people with Diabetes Mellitus.

  20. The validity and reliability of diagnosing foot ulcers and pre-ulcerative lesions in diabetes using advanced digital photography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, C. E. V. B.; van Baal, J. G.; Manning, Erik; Bril, Adriaan; Bus, Sicco A.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of assessing the presence of plantar foot ulceration and pre-ulcerative lesions in diabetes patients from digital photographs that were produced using a new photographic foot imaging device. In 32 diabetes patients who had a foot

  1. Early revascularization after admittance to a diabetic foot center affects the healing probability of ischemic foot ulcer in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgzyri, T; Larsson, J; Nyberg, P; Thörne, J; Eriksson, K-F; Apelqvist, J

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information about whether time from recognition of decreased perfusion to revascularization affects the probability of healing in a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer. The aim of the present study was to examine whether time to revascularization after referral to a multidisciplinary foot center was related to the outcome of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes and severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Patients with diabetes, a foot ulcer, and a systolic toe pressure foot center, and considered for revascularization according to a preset protocol. All patients underwent invasive revascularization, either percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) or reconstructive vascular surgery. All patients had continuous follow-up until healing or death irrespective of the type of revascularization. A total of 478 patients were included (age 74 [range 66-80] years, 60% males), of whom 315 patients (66%) had PTA, and 163 (34%) had reconstructive surgery. Of the 478 patients, 217 (45%) healed primarily, 88 (19%) healed after a minor amputation, 76 (16%) healed after a major amputation and 92 patients (19%) died unhealed. The median time from inclusion in the study to revascularization was 8 weeks (3-18 weeks). Time to vascular intervention within 8 weeks (p foot ulcer in patients with diabetes over time. In the presence of a decreased perfusion in a patient with diabetes and a foot ulcer not only revascularization per se but also timing of revascularization is important for the possibility of healing without a major amputation. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Telemedical and Standard Outpatient Monitoring of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin S B; Froekjaer, Johnny; Bjerregaard, Mads R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of telemedical monitoring in diabetic foot ulcer care is still uncertain. Our aim was to compare telemedical and standard outpatient monitoring in the care of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in a randomized controlled trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Of the 736 screened...... individuals with diabetic foot ulcers, 401 met the eligibility criteria and were randomized between October 2010 and November 2014. The per-protocol telemedical monitoring consisted of two consultations in the patient's own home and one consultation at the outpatient clinic. Standard practice consisted...... monitoring, a higher mortality throws into question the role of telemedicine in monitoring diabetic foot ulcers. Further studies are needed to investigate effects of telemedicine on mortality and other clinical outcomes and to identify patient subgroups that may have a poorer outcome through telemedical...

  3. High osteoprotegerin is associated with development of foot ulcer in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zobel, Emilie H; von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Lajer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The bone-related peptide osteoprotegerin has been linked to vascular calcification and peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the association between osteoprotegerin and development of foot complications in persons with type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective...

  4. Determinants of Microbial Load in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriou, M.; Papanas, N.; Panopoulou, M.; Papatheodorou, K.; Maltezos, E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the determinants of microbial load in infected diabetic foot ulcers in 62 patients (38 men and 24 women, mean age: 65.63 ± 12.71 years) with clinically infected diabetic foot ulcers. Tissue cultures were taken from ulcers by 4 mm punches. Ulcer grade (University of Texas classification), neuropathy disability score (NDS), neuropathy symptom score (NSS), ankle-brachial index (ABI), perfusion, extent, depth, infection, and sensation (PEDIS) grade of diabetic foot infection, and laboratory parameters were evaluated in all patients. Total microbial load was positively correlated with the number of isolates on tissue cultures (r s = 0.544, P diabetic foot ulcer exhibit a positive correlation of total microbial load with the number of isolates on tissue cultures, WBC and PLT. PMID:23878539

  5. Patient and professional delay in the referral trajectory of patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, A.P.; Stoeldraaijers, L.G.M.C.; Pero, M.W.M.; Hermkes, P.J.; Carolina, R.C.A.; Elders, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: A cohort study investigated referral and treatment trajectories of patients with diabetic foot ulceration consulting podiatrists. The study aims were to quantify patient, professional and treatment (=total) delay and to identify relationships between patient- or professional-related

  6. Factors related to outcome of neuroischemic/ischemic foot ulcer in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelqvist, Jan; Elgzyri, Targ; Larsson, Jan; Löndahl, Magnus; Nyberg, Per; Thörne, Johan

    2011-06-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is an important limiting factor for healing in neuroischemic or ischemic diabetic foot ulcer. The purpose of this study was to identify factors related to healing in patients with diabetes with foot ulcers and severe PVD. Patients with diabetes with a foot ulcer, consecutively presenting at a multidisciplinary foot center with a systolic toe pressure angioplasty (PTA; 39%) or reconstructive surgery (24%). Nine percent of the patients had one or more complications after angiography. PTA was multisegmental in 46% and to the crural arteries in 46%. Reconstructive surgery was distal in 51%. Age (P diabetes with severe PVD. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between Caveolin-1 expression and pathophysiological progression of femoral nerves in diabetic foot amputation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Min

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pathological changes of femoral nerves and the levels of caveolin-1 in diabetic foot amputation patients with neuropathy, and evaluate the association between caveolin-1 and neuropathy development.

  8. Prevention of foot ulcers in the at-risk patient with diabetes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, J. J.; Price, P. E.; Lavery, L. A.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; Rasmussen, A.; Jubiz, Y.; Bus, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is extremely important to help reduce the enormous burden of foot ulceration on both patient and health resources. A comprehensive analysis of reported interventions is not currently available, but is needed to better inform caregivers about

  9. Risk factors for plantar foot ulcer recurrence in neuropathic diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijman, Roelof; de Haart, Mirjam; Arts, Mark L. J.; Wever, Daniel; Verlouw, Anke J. W. E.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention. As part of a footwear trial, 171

  10. Differential impact of obesity and diabetes mellitus on survival after liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amptoulach, Sousana; Gross, Gillis; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-12-01

    Data on the potential effect of obesity and diabetes mellitus on survival after liver resection due to colorectal cancer (CRC) metastases are very limited. Patients undergoing liver resection for CRC metastases in a European institution in 2004-2011 were retrospectively enrolled. Relevant data, such as body mass index, extent of resection, chemotherapy, and perioperative outcome, were collected from medical records. The relation of obesity and diabetes mellitus with overall and disease-free survival was assessed using adjusted Cox models. Thirty of 207 patients (14.4%) included in the study were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and 25 (12%) had diabetes mellitus. Major hepatectomy was performed in 46%. Although both obese patients and those with diabetes had higher American Society of Anesthesiologist scores (P obesity nor diabetes was significantly related to primary tumor characteristics, liver metastasis features, extent or radicality of resection, extrahepatic disease at hepatectomy, preoperative or postoperative oncologic therapy, or perioperative outcome (P > 0.05 for all). Patients were followed up for a median of 39 mo posthepatectomy (interquartile range, 13-56 mo). After adjustment for confounders, obesity was an independent predictor of improved (hazard ratio, 0.305, 95% confidence interval, 0.103-0.902) and diabetes of worse overall survival (hazard ratio, 3.298, 95% confidence interval, 1.306-8.330). Obese patients with diabetes had also worse disease-free survival compared with the rest of the cohort (P obesity does not seem to be associated to poor outcome while diabetes mellitus has a negative impact on prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated characterization of diabetic foot using nonlinear features extracted from thermograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Muhammad; Ng, Eddie Y. K.; Oh, Shu Lih; Heng, Marabelle L.; Hagiwara, Yuki; Tan, Jen Hong; Tong, Jasper W. K.; Acharya, U. Rajendra

    2018-03-01

    Diabetic foot is a major complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). The blood circulation to the foot decreases due to DM and hence, the temperature reduces in the plantar foot. Thermography is a non-invasive imaging method employed to view the thermal patterns using infrared (IR) camera. It allows qualitative and visual documentation of temperature fluctuation in vascular tissues. But it is difficult to diagnose these temperature changes manually. Thus, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) system may help to accurately detect diabetic foot to prevent traumatic outcomes such as ulcerations and lower extremity amputation. In this study, plantar foot thermograms of 33 healthy persons and 33 individuals with type 2 diabetes are taken. These foot images are decomposed using discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and higher order spectra (HOS) techniques. Various texture and entropy features are extracted from the decomposed images. These combined (DWT + HOS) features are ranked using t-values and classified using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Our proposed methodology achieved maximum accuracy of 89.39%, sensitivity of 81.81% and specificity of 96.97% using only five features. The performance of the proposed thermography-based CAD system can help the clinicians to take second opinion on their diagnosis of diabetic foot.

  12. Reparation effects of vacuum wound therapy in patients with diabetic foot syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Besedin, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum Therapy (Vacuum-assisted closure, VAC) - a method of complex therapy which is used to improve the healing of both acute chronic wounds in patients with diabetic foot syndrome. Due to widespread introduction of this technique, unique cell, extracellular and general effects of its use in the treatment of patients with purulent-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome, a technique of vacuum wound therapy has been successfully used in many surgical departments of Ukraine. Despite t...

  13. Epidemiology of Diabetic Foot Infections in an Eastern Caribbean Population: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Shariful; Harnarayan, Patrick; Cawich, Shamir O; Budhooram, Steve; Bheem, Vinoo; Mahabir, Vijai; Ramsewak, Shiva; Aziz, Imran; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Of all patients with diabetic foot infec-tions who were admitted to tertiary care hospitals (446) from July 2011 to June 2012, most had Type 2 diabetes (93.3%). Despite most patients claiming compliance with treatment, 75% had glycosylated hemoglobin levels above 7.1%, and 49.3% continued unhealthy lifestyles. Only 57.4% of patients reported ever be-ing counseled or taught about foot care by medical personnel.

  14. Comorbidities associated with Egyptian diabetic foot disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N. Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Special attention should be paid toward the identification of patients who are at risk of foot ulceration to help prevent foot problems. Comorbid conditions must also be identified early and managed aggressively.

  15. Effectiveness of Heberprot P for Diabetic Foot Ulcer in a Health Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisell Mariela Mass Basulto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: many papers on the effectiveness of Heberprot P in granulation and healing of diabetic foot ulcer in outpatient settings have been published, but very few stem from Primary Health Care. Objective: to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of Herberprot P in patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: a descriptive, case series study was conducted in 15 patients with diabetic foot treated with Herberprot P in the Area IV Community Teaching Polyclinic from January to December 2012. Variables analyzed were age, sex, clinical classification of the disease and classification and evolution of the lesion. Results: diabetic foot ulcer was more frequent in patients aged 60-69 years, predominantly females. Most patients were diagnosed with neuroinfectious diabetic foot, and the most frequent lesion was deep ulcer, developed by 9 patients. Complete healing was observed in 11 patients, 6 of them in a period of 20-30 days. Conclusion: results show, and especially confirm the effectiveness of Heberprot P in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcer in Primary Health Care.

  16. The Effect of Foot Exercises on Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With a Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydin, Şahizer; Avşar, Gülçin

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot exercises on wound healing in type 2 diabetic patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Sixty-five patients from an outpatient clinic with grade 1 or 2 ulcers (Wagner classification) who met study criteria agreed to participate; 60 patients completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Subjects were followed up between February 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were recruited by the researchers in the clinics where they received treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Data were collected using investigator-developed forms: patient information form and the diabetic foot exercises log. Patients in the intervention group received standard wound care and performed daily foot exercises for 12 weeks; the control group received standard wound care but no exercises. The ulcers of the patients in both the intervention and control groups were examined and measured at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks. The groups were compared in terms of the ulcer size and depth. To analyze and compare the data, frequency distribution, mean (standard deviation), variance analysis, and the independent samples t test and the χ test were used. The mean ulcer areas were 12.63 (14.43), 6.91 (5.44), 4.30 (3.70), and 3.29 (3.80) cm (P diabetic foot ulcer sizes in the study intervention group in the 4th and 12th weeks compared to beginning baseline (P ≤ .05). However, only the 12th week was different from the beginning in the control group (P = .000). The mean depths of the ulcers were 0.56 (0.85), 0.42 (0.68), 0.36 (0.50), and 0.28 (0.38) cm in the study intervention group (P ulcer areas decreased significantly in the study intervention group compared to the control group during the 3 follow-up measurements. An important finding in this study was the DFU area decreased more in those who exercised more. Findings suggests foot exercises should

  17. Impact of health-care accessibility and social deprivation on diabetes related foot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, G P; Feng, Z; Leese, R M; Dibben, C; Emslie-Smith, A

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether geography and/or social deprivation influences the occurrence of foot ulcers or amputations in patients with diabetes. A population-based cohort of people with diabetes (n = 15 983) were identified between 2004 and 2006. Community and hospital data on diabetes care, podiatry care and onset of ulceration and amputation was linked using a unique patient identifier, which is used for all patient contacts with health-care professionals. Postcode was used to calculate social deprivation and distances to general practice and hospital care. Over 3 years' follow-up 670 patients with diabetes developed new foot ulcers (42 per 1000) and 99 proceeded to amputation (6 per 1000). The most deprived quintile had a 1.7-fold (95% CI 1.2-2.3) increased risk of developing a foot ulcer. Distance from general practitioner or hospital clinic and lack of attendance at community retinal screening did not predict foot ulceration or amputation. Previous ulcer (OR 15.1, 95% CI 11.6-19.6), insulin use (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.1-3.5), absent foot pulses (5.9: 4.7-7.5) and impaired monofilament sensation (OR 6.5, 95% CI 5.0-8.4) all predicted foot ulceration. Previous foot ulcer, absent pulses and impaired monofilaments also predicted amputation. Social deprivation is an important factor, especially for the development of foot ulcers. Geographical aspects such as accessibility to the general practitioner or hospital clinic are not associated with foot ulceration or amputation in this large UK cohort study. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  18. Association of diabetic foot ulcer and death in a population-based cohort from the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J W; Hoffstad, O J; Sullivan, M O; Margolis, D J

    2016-11-01

    The presence of diabetic foot ulcers is strongly associated with an increased risk of death. In this study, we investigate whether the effects of diabetes-associated complications can explain the apparent relationship between diabetic foot ulcers and death. We analysed data from 414 523 people with diabetes enrolled in practices associated with The Health Improvement Network in the United Kingdom. Our methods were designed to control for potential confounders in order to isolate the relationship between diabetic foot ulcers and death. Using proportional hazards models and the area under the receiver operator curve, we evaluated the effects of diabetic foot ulcers and the covariates on death. Among the patients, 20 737 developed diabetic foot ulcers; 5.0% of people with new ulcers died within 12 months of their first foot ulcer visit and 42.2% of people with foot ulcers died within 5 years. After controlling for major known complications of diabetes that might influence mortality, the correlation between diabetic foot ulcers and death remained strong with a fully adjusted hazard ratio of 2.48 (95% confidence interval: 2.43, 2.54). Geographic variance existed but was not spatially associated. Diabetic foot ulcers are linked to an increased risk of death. This cannot be explained by other common risk factors. These results suggest that either there are major unknown risk factors associated with both diabetic foot ulcers and death, or that diabetic foot ulceration itself is a serious threat, which seems unlikely. A diabetic foot ulcer should be seen as a major warning sign for mortality, necessitating closer medical follow-up. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  19. Predictive factors for lower extremity amputations in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zameer Aziz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs and its predictive factors for lower extremity amputations. A prospective study of 100 patients with DFIs treated at the National University Hospital of Singapore were recruited in the study during the period of January 2005–June 2005. A protocol was designed to document patient's demographics, type of DFI, presence of neuropathy and/or vasculopathy and its final outcome. Predictive factors for limb loss were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the study population was 59.8 years with a male to female ratio of about 1:1 and with a mean follow-up duration of about 24 months. All patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common DFIs included abscess (32%, wet gangrene (29%, infected ulcers (19%, osteomyelitis (13%, necrotizing fasciitis (4% and cellulitis (3%. Thirteen patients were treated conservatively, while surgical debridement or distal amputation was performed in 59 patients. Twenty-eight patients had major amputations (below or above knee performed. Forty-eight percent had monomicrobial infections compared with 52% with polymicrobial infections. The most common pathogens found in all infections (both monomicrobial and polymicrobial were Staphylococcus aureus (39.7%, Bacteroides fragilis (30.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.0% and Streptococcus agalactiae (21.0%. Significant univariate predictive factors for limb loss included age above 60 years, gangrene, ankle-brachial index (ABI <0.8, monomicrobial infections, white blood cell (WBC count ≥ 15.0×109/L, erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥100 mm/hr, C-reactive protein ≥15.0 mg/dL, hemoglobin (Hb ≤10.0g/dL and creatinine ≥150 µmol/L. Upon stepwise logistic regression, only gangrene, ABI <0.8, WBC ≥ 15.0×109/L and Hb ≤10.0g/dL were significant.

  20. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional - observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (pdiabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (pdiabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (pdiabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers.

  1. Improving diabetic foot screening at a primary care clinic: A quality improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Allen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foot screening is an important part of diabetic care as it prevents significant morbidity, loss of function and mortality from diabetic foot complications. However, foot screening is often neglected.Aim: This project was aimed at educating health care workers (HCWs in a primary health care clinic to increase diabetic foot screening practices. Setting: A primary health care clinic in the Western Cape province of South AfricaMethods: A quality improvement project was conducted. HCWs’ needs were assessed using a questionnaire. This was followed by focus group discussions with the HCWs, which were recorded, transcribed and assessed using a general inductive approach. An intervention was designed based on common themes. Staff members were trained on foot screening and patient information pamphlets and screening tools were made available to all clinic staff. Thirty-two consecutive diabetic patient folders were audited to compare screening in 2013 with that in 2014 after initiation of the quality improvement cycle.Results: HCWs’ confidence in conducting foot screening using the diabetic foot assessment questionnaire improved markedly after training. Diabetic foot screening practices increased from 9% in 2013 to 69% in 2014 after the first quality improvement cycle. A strengths, opportunities, aspirations and results (SOAR analysis showed promise for continuing quality improvement cycles.Conclusion: The findings showed a significant improvement in the number of diabetic patients screened. Using strategic planning with appreciative intent based on SOAR, proved to be motivational and can be used in the planning of the next cycle.

  2. Is walking barefoot a risk factor for diabetic foot disease in developing countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Saroj A; Atukorala, Inoshi; Gunethilleke, Bhagya; Siriwardena, Viraj; Herath, Samantha C; De Abrew, Kusum

    2007-01-01

    Walking barefoot is common in poorer developing countries which have large rural populations. Although high rates of foot injury could be expected among those who walk barefoot, walking barefoot as a risk factor for diabetic foot disease is rarely documented in the literature. Two preliminary clinical studies were undertaken to investigate whether there is a causal link between walking barefoot and diabetic foot ulcers. The first study investigated whether being barefoot was a factor in initiating foot ulceration. In the second study, 204 consecutive diabetic outpatients were studied to further investigate the association between diabetic foot disease and walking barefoot. In the first study, of the 75 consecutive diabetics admitted for foot ulceration of less than 4 weeks, 32 (42.4%) had foot ulcers resulting from injuries by sharp or hard objects. Of those injured, 27 (84%) were barefoot at the time of the injury. This suggested that walking barefoot is a risk factor for foot ulcers, and that using footwear has the potential to prevent foot ulcers. In the second study, the relative risk of foot ulcers among barefoot diabetics was 2.21 (95% CI 1.55 to 3.14) compared with those using some form of footwear. A history of foot ulcers was more frequent in the group who wore footwear less than 10 hours per day, compared with those who used footwear more than 10 hours. The prevalence of web space and nail infections was also higher in the group who wore footwear less than 10 hours per day, compared with those who used footwear for more than 10 hours. The data suggest that walking barefoot is a risk factor for diabetic foot disease. Thus, public health messages in developing countries with large rural populations who walk barefoot should strongly advise diabetics to use footwear for a greater part of the day. This may be overlook in literature originating from affluent countries where footwear use is the norm. Further studies are indicated to investigate potential

  3. Clinical profile and management outcome of diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, K.; Akhtar, T.; Talib, A.; Naqvi, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    To determine major risk factors and management outcome of diabetic foot ulcers in order to prevent amputation. One-hundred and sixteen consecutive diabetic patients, with foot ulcers of Wagner's grade 1 to 4 were assessed at baseline for demographic information, detailed history, neuropathy, peripheral pulses and frequency of diabetic complication. Glycemic control was determined on the basis of HbA1c levels. Appropriate medical and surgical treatments were carried out and patients were followed-up until healing or for 6 months as end point of study. Outcome was recorded as healed, incomplete healing and amputated. Results: A majority of subjects had type 2 diabetes (95.7%) with male predominance (66%). The mean age was 54.29 +- 7.71 years. Most of the patients were overweight, hyperglycemic and had diabetes > 10 years duration. Neuropathic ulcers were found in 91 (78.4%) patients, while rest of the 25 (22.6 %) had neuroischemic ulcers. Wound cultures revealed polymicrobial organisms. Foot ulcers of 89 (77.7%) patients healed without amputation and 17 (14.7%) patients had minor or major amputations. Long-duration of diabetes, poor glycemic control and type of foot ulcers had effect on prognosis (p<0.05). Effective glycemic control, optimal wound care, aggressive medical management and timely surgical intervention may decrease disabling morbidity with better outcome of diabetic foot ulcer. (author)

  4. Burden of Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers on Hospital Admissions and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Selvarajah, Shalini; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald E; Hines, Kathryn F; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Costs related to diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) care are greater than $1 billion annually and rising. We sought to describe the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on foot ulcer admissions in the United States, and to investigate potential explanations for rising hospital costs. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2005-2010) was queried using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes for a primary diagnosis of foot ulceration. Multivariable analyses were used to compare outcomes and per-admission costs among patients with foot ulceration and DM versus non-DM. In total, 962,496 foot ulcer patients were admitted over the study period. The overall rate of admissions was relatively stable over time, but the ratio of DM versus non-DM admissions increased significantly (2005: 10.2 vs. 2010: 12.7; P foot ulcers, respectively, and significantly increased cost of care (DM: $1.38 vs. non-DM: $0.13 billion/year; P Diabetes increases the incidence of foot ulcer admissions by 11-fold, accounting for more than 80% of all amputations and increasing hospital costs more than 10-fold over the 5 years. The majority of these costs are related to the treatment of infected foot ulcers. Education initiatives and early prevention strategies through outpatient multidisciplinary care targeted at high-risk populations are essential to preventing further increases in what is already a substantial economic burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence and risk factors for developing infection in patients presenting with uninfected diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tony J.; Kinnear, Ewan M.; Derhy, Patrick H.; Alvarado, Ann M.; Huygens, Flavia

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a paucity of research on patients presenting with uninfected diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) that go on to develop infection. We aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors for developing infection in a large regional cohort of patients presenting with uninfected DFUs. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data collected from a validated prospective state-wide clinical diabetic foot database in Queensland (Australia). Patients presenting for their first visit with an uninfected DFU to a Diabetic Foot Service in one of thirteen Queensland regions between January 2012 and December 2013 were included. Socio-demographic, medical history, foot disease history, DFU characteristics and treatment variables were captured at the first visit. Patients were followed until their DFU healed, or if their DFU did not heal for 12-months, to determine if they developed a foot infection in that period. Results Overall, 853 patients were included; mean(standard deviation) age 62.9(12.8) years, 68.0% male, 90.9% type 2 diabetes, 13.6% indigenous Australians. Foot infection developed in 342 patients for an overall incidence of 40.1%; 32.4% incidence in DFUs healed foot deformity (1.4 (1.0–2.0)), female gender (1.5 (1.1–2.1)) and years of age (0.98 (0.97–0.99)) (all pfoot deformity, younger age, female gender and DFUs that have not healed by 3 months after presentation. PMID:28545120

  6. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-WahbiDepartment of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyahd, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetic foot complications are a leading cause of lower extremity amputation. With the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the Arab world, specifically in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the rate of amputation will rise significantly. A diabetic foot care program was implemented at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2002. The program was directed at health care staff and patients to increase their awareness about diabetic foot care and prevention of complications. The purpose of this study was to perform a primary evaluation of the program’s impact on the rate of lower extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications.Method: This pilot study was the first analysis of the diabetic foot care program and examined two groups of participants for comparison, ie, a “before” group having had diabetic foot ulcers managed between 1983, when the hospital was first established, and 2002 when the program began and an “after group” having had foot ulcers managed between 2002 and 2004, in the program’s initial phase. A total of 41 charts were randomly chosen retrospectively. A data sheet containing age, gender, medical data, and the presentation, management, and outcome of diabetic foot cases was used for the analysis.Results: The before group contained 20 patients (17 males and the after group contained 21 patients (16 males. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to age and comorbidities. The rate of amputation was 70% in the before group and 61.9% in the after group. There was a decrease in the percentage of toe amputation in the after group and an increase in the percentage of below-knee amputation in the before group. However, these changes were not significant.Conclusion: The program, although evaluated at an early

  7. Profile, Bacteriology, and Risk Factors for Foot Ulcers among Diabetics in a Tertiary Hospital in Calabar, Nigeria

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    Akaninyene Asuquo Otu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot disease is a major medical, social, and economic problem. This retrospective study assessed the profile of diabetes mellitus patients with foot ulcers in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH, Nigeria. Admission records of all patients admitted unto the medical wards of UCTH over a 5 year period were analysed. The records of diabetic patients were retrieved. Data on patient characteristics and possible risk factors for diabetes mellitus foot ulcers was extracted. Of the 3,882 patients admitted, 297 (7% were on account of complications of diabetes mellitus. Foot ulcers accounted for 63 (21.2% of all diabetic admissions. The elderly constituted the majority of patients admitted with foot ulcers. The average duration of stay of diabetics with foot ulcers was 38.5 days. Diabetics admitted for other conditions had average duration of admission of 15.8 days. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism isolated from swabs of foot ulcers. Most of the organisms identified from ulcer swab cultures were sensitive to quinolones and resistant to penicillins. These diabetic foot ulcers were significantly associated with peripheral sensory neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, intermittent claudication, and walking barefoot. An effective diabetes foot programme is required to address these risk factors and reverse the current trend.

  8. Diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetic foot syndrome in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Thoiba; Kamath, Yogish Subraya; Rao, Lavanya G; Rao, Krishna Addoor; Shenoy, Shailaja Bhat; Bhandary, Sulatha V

    2018-04-01

    The purpose was to study the retinopathy status in diabetic patients with a risk of diabetic foot (DF) syndrome visiting a tertiary care hospital in South India. In this cross sectional study all patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) with a risk of DF syndrome, visiting a tertiary care hospital during the study period, underwent an ophthalmological evaluation for documentation of their retinopathy status. One hundred and eighty-two patients diagnosed to have a risk profile for DF syndrome were included in the study. Their mean age was 59.28 years and 75.27% were males. The mean duration of Type 1 and Type 2 variants of DM was 14.9 years and 10.9 years, respectively. Of the 182 patients, 67.58% had retinopathy changes. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR) constituted 17.88% of the total patients with retinopathy. An increased presence of retinopathy in patients with an increased risk grade of DF was found significant by the Chi-square test (P < 0.001). Our study found an increased presence of DR in a South Indian cohort with DF syndrome. The severity of retinopathy was greater in patients with higher grades of risk for DF. The establishment of an association between DR and DF syndrome will help in developing an integrated management strategy for these two debilitating consequences of diabetes.

  9. Comparison of demographic and clinical characteristics influencing health-related quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and those without foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekta, Zahra; Pourali, Reza; Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of studies have demonstrated that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is negatively affected by diabetic foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to compare HRQoL in diabetic patients with and without foot ulcers and to determine demographic and clinical factors influencing HRQoL. Methods There were no variables affecting HRQoL except for gender in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded and HRQoL was evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) survey for all participants. The summary physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) and eight domains of HRQoL were compared in the two groups. Linear regression analysis was also used to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as predictors of quality of life as measured by SF-36. Results The overall score, PCS, and MCS, were significantly higher in patients without diabetic foot ulcers. Except for gender, none of the variables affected HRQoL in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Male gender had a higher score in all domains of quality of life than female gender in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Living alone, a low educational level, and having at least one complication were all associated with a lower HRQoL score in patients with foot ulcers. High-grade ulcers determined by Wagner’s classification and poor glycemic control as measured by HbA1C predicted HRQoL impairment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Conclusion Because Wagner’s grade was one of the strongest variables associated with HRQoL, this scale is recommended for monitoring of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in order to prevent continuing deterioration of HRQoL by treatment of foot ulcers at an earlier stage. PMID:22253537

  10. Comparison of demographic and clinical characteristics influencing health-related quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and those without foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekta, Zahra; Pourali, Reza; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is negatively affected by diabetic foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to compare HRQoL in diabetic patients with and without foot ulcers and to determine demographic and clinical factors influencing HRQoL. There were no variables affecting HRQoL except for gender in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded and HRQoL was evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) survey for all participants. The summary physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) and eight domains of HRQoL were compared in the two groups. Linear regression analysis was also used to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as predictors of quality of life as measured by SF-36. The overall score, PCS, and MCS, were significantly higher in patients without diabetic foot ulcers. Except for gender, none of the variables affected HRQoL in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Male gender had a higher score in all domains of quality of life than female gender in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Living alone, a low educational level, and having at least one complication were all associated with a lower HRQoL score in patients with foot ulcers. High-grade ulcers determined by Wagner's classification and poor glycemic control as measured by HbA(1C) predicted HRQoL impairment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Because Wagner's grade was one of the strongest variables associated with HRQoL, this scale is recommended for monitoring of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in order to prevent continuing deterioration of HRQoL by treatment of foot ulcers at an earlier stage.

  11. Feelings of powerlessness in individuals with either venous or diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, S A; Salomé, Geraldo Magela; Dutra, R A A; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2014-08-01

    To assess feelings of powerlessness in patients with either venous or diabetic foot ulcers. This was an exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted from May 2010 to August 2012. Two hundred adult patients with either venous leg ulcers (N=100) or diabetic foot ulcers (N=100) were consecutively recruited from an outpatient wound care clinic of a university hospital in the city of São Paulo (Brazil). Eligibility criteria included patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes and foot ulcers, and those with venous leg ulcers and ankle-arm index between 0.8 and 1.0. Patients unable to respond to a questionnaire due to physical or cognitive deficit were excluded. Two instruments were used for data collection: a questionnaire assessing sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and the Powerlessness Assessment Tool (PAT) for adult patients. Most patients were women, aged 60-70 years, and smokers. Fifty-seven patients (57%) with diabetes had had foot ulcers for 3-6 years and 55 (55%) patients had had venous ulcers for 7-10 years. Wound odor and exudate were present in most ulcers. The total PAT score was significantly higher (P=0.002) for patients with foot ulcers (mean, 57.10) than for patients with venous ulcers (mean, 55.12). The highest mean scores for patients with venous and diabetic foot ulcers were 58.09 and 58.10, respectively, on the "self-perception of decision-making capacity" domain. Patients with venous and diabetic foot ulcers had very strong feelings of powerlessness, but these feelings were significantly stronger in those with foot ulcerations. Copyright © 2014 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors Associated with Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Benin – City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are the most common causes of prolonged hospitalization (associated with considerable economic costs) in persons with diabetes mellitus (DM). In resource-poor countries such as Nigeria, it becomes necessary to identify the risk/precipitating factors of DFU in order to ...

  13. IWGDF guidance on the prevention of foot ulcers in at-risk patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, S. A.; van Netten, J. J.; Lavery, L. A.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; Rasmussen, A.; Jubiz, Y.; Price, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations To identify a person with diabetes at risk for foot ulceration, examine the feet annually to seek evidence for signs or symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease. (GRADE strength of recommendation: strong; Quality of evidence: low) In a person with diabetes who

  14. Reproducibility of foot structure measurements in neuropathic diabetic patients using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Maas, Mario; Lindeboom, Robert

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the intra- and interobserver agreement of commonly reported foot structure measurements in diabetic patients with neuropathy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 23 neuropathic diabetic patients and five age-matched healthy controls, sagittal-plane MR

  15. Spectrum of bacteria associated with diabetic foot ulcer and biofilm formation: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Banu

    2015-09-01

    The organisms causing chronic diabetic foot ulcers were commonly multidrug-resistant; this was also observed among biofilm formers. Therefore, screening for biofilm formation, along with the usual antibiogram, needs to be performed as a routine procedure in chronic diabetic ulcers to formulate effective treatment strategies for these patients.

  16. Podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Dekker, E.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems and to explore the changes in knowledge, self-care behaviour and physical functioning after podiatric care. the treatment characteristics of 26 diabetic patients referred to podiatry were assessed. Prior

  17. Awareness and practices of foot self-care in patients with diabetes at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine awareness and foot self-care practices in patients with diabetes. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting and subjects: This study was conducted on 120 consecutive patients with diabetes at the outpatient department of Dr Yusuf Dadoo district hospital, Krugersdorp, Johannesburg.

  18. Foot progression angle and medial loading in individuals with diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy, and a foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Mary K; Gelber, Judy R; Isaac, Elena J; Bohnert, Kathryn L; Strube, Michael J; Sinacore, David R

    2010-06-01

    Foot progression angle (FPA) and duration of foot medial column loading during walking were studied in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM), peripheral neuropathy (PN), and a forefoot ulcer (DMPN), and in age-matched control subjects. FPA was calculated from EMED-ST P-2 pressure maps as the angle formed between the longitudinal axis of the foot and the forward line of progression during walking. The medial loading duration was calculated as the amount of time the center of pressure line spent in the medial side of the foot pressure map. FPA was increased in the DMPN group, on the involved and uninvolved sides [15(9) degrees and 13(4) degrees respectively] compared the control group [9(4) degrees ]. FPA and medial loading duration were significantly correlated in the DMPN group on the involved and uninvolved sides (r>0.54, p0.82). This study provides evidence that FPA is an important biomechanical contributor to the pattern of foot loading in individuals with DM, PN, and a forefoot ulcer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary squamous cell carcinoma with mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Nirmal Kumar; Mookerjee, Sekhar Kumar; Chaudhuri, Bhaskarnarayan

    2013-02-01

    The diabetic foot ulcer is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus leading to prolonged hospital stay. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetes may be due to peripheral neuropathy and/or vasculopathy. Non-healing occurs following a trivial trauma due to loss of local immunity and increased infection by bacteria and fungus. Candida and mucormycosis are common fungal infection in diabetic foot ulcer. Squamous cell carcinoma in any non-healing ulcer is a common occurrence. But squamous cell carcinoma in non-healing diabetic foot ulcer is rarely reported. Here, mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer which turned into squamous cell carcinoma is reported in a 62-year-old male with poor glycaemic control for last 21 years who presented with a non-healing ulcer of 8 months' duration over dorsum of left forefoot. Microbiological examination revealed presence of mucormycosis infection and histopathology of ulcer showed infiltrating well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinicians and pathologists should be aware of these combinations because only eradication of mucormycosis may not cure the ulcer, rather presence of squamous cell carcinoma may be ignored that may be an immediate threat to the patient's life.

  20. A review of becaplermin gel in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert C Fang, Robert D GalianoDivision of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Wound Healing Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers represent a serious health care burden to patients and to society. While the management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers has improved in recent years, it remains a frustrating problem for a variety of clinicians. This review examines the scientific underpinnings supporting the use of becaplermin (Regranex®; Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ, or recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB, in diabetic forefoot wounds. An emphasis is placed upon proper medical and surgical care of diabetic foot wounds, as multiple studies have demonstrated that the success of this growth factor in accelerating healing is ultimately dependent on proper ulcer care. A focus on the cost-effectiveness of this form of therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers is also outlined.Keywords: becaplermin, diabetes, foot ulcer, growth factor

  1. Treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer with platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak H Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Among diabetes mellitus-related complications, foot ulceration is the most common, affecting approximately 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. The pathogenesis of diabetic ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, calluses, oedema and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic ulcer is managed by adequate control of infections and blood sugar levels, surgical debridement with various dressings and off loading of the foot from pressure. In spite of these standard measures, some recalcitrant non-healing ulcers need additional growth factors for healing. Autologous platelet-rich plasma is easy and cost-effective method in treating diabetic ulcers as it provides necessary growth factors which enhance healing.

  2. The role of nerve growth factor in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiaka, Elisavet K; Papanas, Nikolaos; Manolakis, Anastassios C; Maltezos, Efstratios

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are still particularly difficult to heal. Therefore, preventing and therapeutic adjuncts are increasingly being explored. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a promising agent exhibiting beneficial actions on both diabetic peripheral neuropathy, one of the main causes of foot ulcers, and on ulcer healing. Indeed, preclinical research in animal models of diabetes has revealed the trophic effect of NGF on small C-fibres, while phase 2 human trials have provided evidence for a favourable effect on sensory neuropathy. However, the results of a phase 3 trial were moderate and, therefore, not enough to encourage widespread use of NGF in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Available literature on the role of NGF on diabetic wound healing is sparse but encouraging. Exogenous supplementation of NGF or the use of alternative techniques to increase its endogenous expression could emerge as a protective and therapeutic modality for diabetic foot ulcers in addition to standard treatment and other growth factors. The present review provides an outlook on the role of NGF in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22928161

  3. Prevention of foot ulcers in the at-risk patient with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, J J; Price, P E; Lavery, L A; Monteiro-Soares, M; Rasmussen, A; Jubiz, Y; Bus, S A

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes is extremely important to help reduce the enormous burden of foot ulceration on both patient and health resources. A comprehensive analysis of reported interventions is not currently available, but is needed to better inform caregivers about effective prevention. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the effectiveness of interventions to prevent first and recurrent foot ulcers in persons with diabetes who are at risk for ulceration. The available medical scientific literature in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane database was searched for original research studies on preventative interventions. Both controlled and non-controlled studies were selected. Data from controlled studies were assessed for methodological quality by two independent reviewers. From the identified records, a total of 30 controlled studies (of which 19 RCTs) and another 44 non-controlled studies were assessed and described. Few controlled studies, of generally low to moderate quality, were identified on the prevention of a first foot ulcer. For the prevention of recurrent plantar foot ulcers, multiple RCTs with low risk of bias show the benefit for the use of daily foot skin temperature measurements and consequent preventative actions, as well as for therapeutic footwear that demonstrates to relieve plantar pressure and that is worn by the patient. To prevent recurrence, some evidence exists for integrated foot care when it includes a combination of professional foot treatment, therapeutic footwear and patient education; for just a single session of patient education, no evidence exists. Surgical interventions can be effective in selected patients, but the evidence base is small. The evidence base to support the use of specific self-management and footwear interventions for the prevention of recurrent plantar foot ulcers is quite strong, but is small for the use of other, sometimes widely applied, interventions and is

  4. Diagnosing diabetic foot infection: the role of imaging and a proposed flow chart for assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, O.; Sconfienza, L. M.; Lipsky, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a major current epidemic, is frequently complicated by foot infections that are associated with high morbidity. Diagnosing these infections, especially whether or not underlying bone is involved, poses clinical challenges, but is crucial to making proper decisions regarding therapeutic strategies. The most effective means of managing patients with a diabetic foot infection is within the framework of a multidisciplinary team. Present diagnostic efforts are aimed at developing better methods to differentiate uninfected from infected soft tissue wounds, to determine when bone infection is present, and to more clearly define when infection has resolved with treatment. Imaging studies play a major role in diagnosis. This usually begins with plain radiographs, but when advanced imaging is needed, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice. Newer techniques, such as molecular hybrid imaging, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission (SPECT)/CT using various radiotracers, play an increasing role. These tests may redefine the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of diabetic foot wounds, potentially leading to substantial improvements in patient management. As experts in infectious diseases, radiology and nuclear medicine, we reviewed the available literature on diagnosing diabetic foot infections, especially the currently available imaging techniques, and developed a proposed diagnostic flow chart, for evaluating patients with a diabetic foot wound

  5. Integrated kinematics-kinetics-plantar pressure data analysis: a useful tool for characterizing diabetic foot biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guiotto, Annamaria; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental cause of lower-extremity complications in diabetes is chronic hyperglycemia leading to diabetic foot ulcer pathology. While the relationship between abnormal plantar pressure distribution and plantar ulcers has been widely investigated, little is known about the role of shear stress. Moreover, the mutual relationship among plantar pressure, shear stress, and abnormal kinematics in the etiology of diabetic foot has not been established. This lack of knowledge is determined by the lack of commercially available instruments which allow such a complex analysis. This study aims to develop a method for the simultaneous assessment of kinematics, kinetics, and plantar pressure on foot subareas of diabetic subjects by means of combining three commercial systems. Data were collected during gait on 24 patients (12 controls and 12 diabetic neuropathics) with a motion capture system synchronized with two force plates and two baropodometric systems. A four segment three-dimensional foot kinematics model was adopted for the subsegment angles estimation together with a three segment model for the plantar sub-area definition during gait. The neuropathic group exhibited significantly excessive plantar pressure, ground reaction forces on each direction, and a reduced loading surface on the midfoot subsegment (p<0.04). Furthermore the same subsegment displayed excessive dorsiflexion, external rotation, and eversion (p<0.05). Initial results showed that this methodology may enable a more appropriate characterization of patients at risk of foot ulcerations, and help planning prevention programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Network Analysis of MPO and Other Relevant Proteins Involved in Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Other Diabetic Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumya, Mathew; Subin, E K; Suchithra, T V

    2017-09-13

    Network analysis and visualization of genes are very important to understand large complex biological data in a better manner. Large data on genes and proteins in the biological systems are analyzed on the occurrence, interactions, co-expression, and co-regulations of various genes. Here we have visualized the genes involved in type 1 diabetes (T1D), type 2 diabetes (T2D), and foot ulcer condition to put light on the corrective measures to the problem of impaired healing. The goal of this study was to identify the important genes involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications and foot ulcer and its association with the free radical-producing enzyme, the myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this study, we have used bioinformatics tools for the analysis of 24 genes that play a major role in diabetes mellitus and its complications, especially diabetic foot ulcer to reveal the relation between the genes and proteins involved in these disease conditions. We could conclude from the network model that MPO is related to foot ulcer and involved in pathogenesis of various co-associated diseases, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, peripheral vascular disease, and other related diabetes complications.

  7. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, Kristy; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen; Apelqvist, Jan; Bakker, Karel; Edmonds, Michael; Holstein, Per; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Mauricio, Didac; Piaggesi, Alberto; Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Reike, Heinrich; Spraul, Maximilian; Uccioli, Luigi; Urbancic, Vilma; van Acker, Kristien; van Baal, Jeff; Schaper, Nicolaas

    2015-05-01

    Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries. Among these patients, 159 (28%) underwent an amputation. Independent risk factors for amputation were as follows: periwound edema, foul smell, (non)purulent exudate, deep ulcer, positive probe-to-bone test, pretibial edema, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein. Increasing IWGDF severity of infection also independently predicted amputation. We developed a risk score for any amputation and for amputations excluding the lesser toes (including the variables sex, pain on palpation, periwound edema, ulcer size, ulcer depth, and peripheral arterial disease) that predicted amputation better than the IWGDF system (area under the ROC curves 0.80, 0.78, and 0.67, respectively). For individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we identified independent predictors of amputation, validated the prognostic value of the IWGDF classification system, and developed a new risk score for amputation that can be readily used in daily clinical practice. Our risk score may have better prognostic accuracy than the IWGDF system, the only currently available system, but our findings need to be validated in other cohorts. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcer in Visegrad countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcová, Jana; Hlinková, Edita; Farský, Ivan; Žiaková, Katarína; Jarošová, Darja; Zeleníková, Renáta; Bužgová, Radka; Janíková, Eva; Zdzieblo, Kazimiera; Wiraszka, Grazyna; Stepien, Renata; Nowak-Starz, Grazyna; Csernus, Mariann; Balogh, Zoltan

    2017-05-01

    To identify the quality of life of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in the Visegrad countries. The diabetics with foot ulcers are principally evaluated on the basis of physical parameters, but this does not always reveal much about the patient's experience of life with ulceration. The cross-sectional study. The standardised generic questionnaire World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF was used. The sample was made up of 525 participants and the calculations were performed using the IBM spss statistical program. The significant negative correlations between demographic data such as age, duration of diabetes mellitus, duration of diabetic ulceration treatment and a lower level of quality of life were found across the sample. The statistically significant differences according to clinical characteristics such as Wagner classification, frequency of foot ulcers, present peripheral vascular disease and pain in terms of quality of life were also revealed. Significant differences of quality of life among Visegrad countries were revealed: Hungary's participants had a worse quality of life than others, while Slovak participants expressed lower satisfaction with their health than Czech. Socio-demographic factors and clinical characteristics influence the quality of life of patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Significant differences between patients of Visegrad countries were found in all domains of quality of life: physical, psychological, social and environmental. The quality of life of patients with diabetic foot ulcer reflects the conditions and healthcare system in each of the Visegrad countries. We have to respect socio-demographic factors and clinical characteristics in nursing care. This could have an impact on managing patient care not only with regard to their diabetic foot ulcer but also with regard to the patient as a personality with their own problems in relation to physical, psychosocial and environmental conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Rare Form of Melanoma Masquerading as a Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM is a less-common form of melanoma in US, and it accounts for about 5% of all diagnosed melanomas in US. ALM is often overlooked until it is well advanced because of the lesion’s location and its atypical appearance in the early stages. We present a case of ALM initially presented as a diabetic foot ulcer. Case Report. An 81-year-old man initially presented to the primary care clinic with a right foot diabetic ulcer. There was a large plantar, dark-colored ulcer that bled easy. Initial excision biopsy revealed Clark’s Level IV ALM. Subsequent definitive wide excision and sentinel node biopsy confirmed ALM with metastasis to inguinal lymph nodes (stage IIIb. The treatment included wide margin excision of the lesion with en bloc amputations of 4th and 5th toes, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Discussion. The development of ALM may potentially relate to diabetes as a reported higher prevalence of diabetes with ALM patients. Conclusion. The difficulty in early diagnosing of ALM remains as a formidable challenge particularly in diabetic patients who commonly develop plantar foot ulcers due to the diabetic neuropathy. This case reiterates the importance of a thorough foot exam in such patients.

  10. Vacuum assisted closure improves the quality of life in patients with diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatepe, O; Eken, I; Acet, E; Unal, O; Mert, M; Koc, B; Karahan, S; Filizcan, U; Ugurlucan, M; Aksoy, M

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is the most common endocrine disease worldwide. One of the most important chronic complications of this disease is the development of diabetic foot. The management of diabetic foot wounds is quite important with respect to public health. To determine the effect of Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) therapy on the quality of life in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers and compare it with standart wound care. Between May 2007 to December 2008, 67 consecutive patients with diabetic foot ulcers were randomly assigned to VAC therapy (Group 1, n : 30) or standart wound care (Group 2, n : 37). The SF-36 questionnaire was administered the day before and in the month following wound healing. Global analyses of the 8 domains and 2 comprehensive indexes of SF-36, Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) were performed. Clinical measures included standard antidiabetic treatment, daily wound care including antiseptic bath, debridement, toe removal for gangrene when necessary, and wound care with conventional methods or VAC. Healing time was calculated as the time from hospital admission to the time of re-epithelization. There were no differences in the mean age, ulcer size and pulse status of the patients in both groups. Healing time in the VAC group was significantly reduced (p VAC therapy. Vacuum Assisted Closure therapy was found to be effective in the treatment of chronic diabetic ulcers. The improvement of quality of life demonstrates a clear-cut indication in this particular group of patients.

  11. The role of joint mobility in evaluating and monitoring the risk of diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Seghieri, Giuseppe; Gulisano, Massimo; De Bellis, Alessandra; Toni, Sonia; Tedeschi, Anna; Anichini, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation of how ankle joint mobility (AJM) can be useful in the identification of patients with diabetes at risk of foot ulcer (FU). Plantar and dorsal flexion of foot were evaluated using an inclinometer in 87 patients (54 type 2 and 33 type 1), and 35 healthy sex- and age-matched control subjects. Patients with diabetes were followed up for diagnosis of FU over the next 8 years and subsequently, patients were subdivided into: those without a history of FU (18 type 1 and 33 type 2), those who had a history of FU detected before baseline evaluation (14 type 2) and those who had history of first ulceration detected by the 8th year of the evaluation period (7 type 2). Aging and diabetes caused a significant reduction in mobility of each of the movements investigated (pulceration was detected in the same foot presenting lower AJM in 17 of the 22 subjects with diabetes with history of ulcer (77.27%). Diabetes and aging reduce AJM although diabetes seems to reduce plantar flexion to a more specific extent. Reduced AJM is mostly associated with a previous history of FU. The evaluation of AJM is a valid and reliable ulcer risk scale that indicates which foot is at higher ulcer risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Podiatrist care and outcomes for patients with diabetes and foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Teresa B; Driver, Vickie R; Wrobel, James S; Christina, James R; Bagalman, Erin; DeFrancis, Roy; Garoufalis, Matthew G; Carls, Ginger S; Gatwood, Justin

    2014-12-01

    We examined whether outcomes of care (amputation and hospitalisation) among patients with diabetes and foot ulcer differ between those who received pre-ulcer care from podiatrists and those who did not. Adult patients with diabetes and a diagnosis of a diabetic foot ulcer were found in the MarketScan Databases, 2005-2008. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models estimated the hazard of amputation and hospitalisation. Logistic regression estimated the likelihood of these events. Propensity score weighting and regression adjustment were used to adjust for potentially different characteristics of patients who did and did not receive podiatric care. The sample included 27 545 patients aged greater than 65+ years (Medicare-eligible patients with employer-sponsored supplemental insurance) and 20 208 patients aged lesser than 65 years (non Medicare-eligible commercially insured patients). Care by podiatrists in the year prior to a diabetic foot ulcer was associated with a lower hazard of lower extremity amputation, major amputation and hospitalisations in both non Medicare-eligible commercially insured and Medicare-eligible patient populations. Systematic differences between patients with diabetes and foot ulcer, receiving and not receiving care from podiatrists were also observed; specifically, patients with diabetes receiving care from podiatrists tend to be older and sicker. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Recurrent and other new foot ulcers after healed plantar forefoot diabetic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication in patients with diabetes. In most outcome studies of this condition, there is a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. Plantar ulcers are usually localized to the forefoot, and constitute a quarter of all diabetic foot ulcers. There are a limited number of studies regarding development of new ulcers following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer, and there are no uniform definitions of recurrent and other new ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients with diabetes mellitus and a healed planter forefoot ulcer (n = 617) with regard to development, characteristics, and outcome of recurrent and other new ulcers. Patients were followed consecutively and prospectively with a 2-year follow-up, according to a preset protocol. Out of 617 patients, 250 (41%) did not develop any new ulcer, 262 (42%) developed a new ulcer, 87 (14%) died and 18 (3%) were lost at 2 years following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer. Thirty-four percent developed other new ulcers (112 on the same foot and 99 on the contralateral foot), whereas 51 patients (8%) developed a recurrent ulcer (at the same site and foot). Of the patients who died within 2 years, 30 patients had developed other new ulcers. The risk of a recurrent ulcer in patients with diabetes and a healed plantar forefoot ulcer was only 8% within 2 years, whereas other new ulcers, on the same foot or on the contralateral foot, was seen in 4 out of 10 patients indicating the need for further preventive measures and surveillance in these patients. We suggest a concise definition for new ulcer to be used in future research. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. A Mobile Health Service to Manage Diabetic Foot in Homeless Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Marco; Scaringi, Claudia; Carella, Paola; Fruttaldo, Luca; Angeloni, Ulrico; Laurenza, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    Homeless people live in poverty, with limited access to public health services. They are likely to experience chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes mellitus; however, they do not always receive the necessary services to prevent complications. This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of a volunteer health service outreach to reduce disparity in diabetic foot care for homeless people. The research was conducted on 21 patients with diabetic ulcers of 930 homeless people visited between 2008 and 2013. Each ulcer was treated with regular medication every week for a mean ± SD of 17.6 ± 12 months. The inclusion criteria were 1) homeless with a previous diagnosis of diabetes or a blood glucose level greater than 126 mg/dL at first check and 2) foot ulcer caused by diabetic vasculopathy or neuropathy. The efficacy of the interventions was assessed against the number of successfully cured diabetic feet based on a reduced initial Wagner classification score for each ulcer. Clinical improvement was observed in 18 patients (86%), whose pathologic condition was completely resolved after 3 years and, therefore, no longer needed medication. One patient died of septic shock and kidney failure, and two patients needed amputation owing to clinical worsening of ulcers (Wagner class 4 at the last visit). Most homeless people who have diabetes and diabetic foot encounter many difficulties managing their disease, and a volunteer health-care unit could be a suitable option to bridge these gaps.

  15. A Prophage in Diabetic Foot Ulcer-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Impairs Invasiveness by Limiting Intracellular Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Rémy, Catherine; Sapin, Anaïs; Messad, Nourredine; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Dupieux, Céline; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-11-15

    The mechanisms that drive the transition from commensality to invasiveness in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. We recently reported that >50% of S. aureus isolates from uninfected diabetic foot ulcers in French patients harbor a prophage, ROSA-like, that is absent from invasive isolates from diabetic foot infections, including osteomyelitis. Here we show that the ROSA-like insertion abolishes the ability of S. aureus to replicate within osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, greatly reducing damage to infected cells. These results unravel an important mechanism by which particular S. aureus strains are maintained in a commensal state in diabetic foot ulcers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Topical propolis improves wound healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Aboutorabi, Robab; Ravari, Hassan; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Ataei Azimi, Sajad; Javadian Langaroodi, Adineh; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Ali; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-08-22

    In this randomized controlled trial, diabetic patients with foot ulcers (Wagner grades 1 and 2) were randomly assigned to conventional therapies for diabetic foot ulcer plus topical propolis ointment (5%; twice daily) or conventional therapies alone. The process of ulcer healing was observed during 4 weeks and compared between the two groups regarding the size, erythema, exudates, white blood cell (WBC) count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The process of ulcer size reduction during the four-week period of study was significantly different between the groups. However, this difference was not significant between the third and fourth weeks. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding erythema and exudate reduction as well as WBC count and ESR. Administration of topical propolis ointment in addition to the conventional treatments of diabetic foot ulcer could reduce the size of ulcers with Wagner grades 1 and 2.

  17. Outcome of ischemic foot ulcer in diabetic patients who had no invasive vascular intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgzyri, T; Larsson, J; Thörne, J; Eriksson, K-F; Apelqvist, J

    2013-07-01

    There is limited information regarding outcome in patients not available for revascularisation. Our aim was to identify factors related to ulcer healing in diabetic patients with severe peripheral arterial disease who were not available for revascularisation. Diabetic patients with a foot ulcer, consecutively presenting at a multidisciplinary foot centre with systolic toe pressure 50 mmHg affected the outcome of the ulcers. Diabetic patients with ischemic foot ulcers not available for revascularisations are not excluded from healing without major amputation. Factors strongly related to outcome were co-morbidity, severity of peripheral arterial disease, and extent of tissue destruction. Our findings reinforce the need for a classification system considering these factors at decision-making for vascular intervention. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at High Risk for Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anil S; Dixit, Abhinav; Garg, M K; Girish, R

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus at high risk for foot ulcers. We screened patients attending diabetic clinic for identifying patients at high risk for foot ulcers. Those with foot risk category 1, 2 and 3 as per criteria of Foot Care Interest Group were subjected to battery of cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Those with one abnormal test were termed as probable CAN and those with two abnormal tests as definite CAN. Those with postural fall in blood pressure with one other abnormal test were termed to have advanced CAN. A total of 74 patients were recruited in the study. The prevalence of abnormal cardiovascular autonomic reflex test was sustained hand grip 81%, E/I ratio 66.2%, 30:15 ratio 28.3% and orthostatic hypotension 13.5%. The prevalence of possible CAN was 31.0% (23/74) and definite CAN was 66.2% (49/74). Ten patients had advanced CAN. There was no observable difference in presence of probable or definite CAN in three risk category for foot ulcers. We found a high prevalence of CAN in subgroup of diabetic patients at increased risk for foot ulcer.

  19. Diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis in diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Samir, Sieza

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Excellent inter-observer agreement of ADC of bony lesions in diabetic foot. • ADC can differentiate diabetic osteoarthropathy from osteomylitis. • Diffusion MR imaging can added to routine MR imaging of diabetic foot. - Abstract: Purpose: To study the diagnostic performance of diffusion weighted MR imaging in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis in diabetic foot. Patients and methods: This prospective study was carried out on 41 patients with diabetic foot, 22 males and 19 females with mean age of 51 years. They underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the foot. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the bony lesions were calculated by two reviewers and correlated with the surgical findings or biopsy. The kappa statistic (k) was used to estimate the proportion of inter-observer agreement of two reviewers. Results: The mean ADC of acute diabetic osteoarthropathy was 1.27 ± 0.19 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s for reviewer 1 and 1.26 ± 0.21 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s for reviewer 2. The mean ADC value in diabetic osteomyelitis was 0.86 ± 0.11 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s for reviewer 1 and 0.85 ± 0.12 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s for reviewer 2. There was excellent inter-observer agreement of ADC value of bony lesions in diabetic foot by both reviewers (K = 0.93). There was statistically significant difference in the ADC values of both groups (P = 0.001). The cut-off point of ADC value of both reviewers used in differentiating acute diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis were 0.98 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s and 1.04 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s with an accuracy of 94% and 93% and area under the curve of 0.94 and 0.93 respectively. Conclusion: We conclude that the ADC value is a non-invasive imaging parameter that can help in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy from osteomyelitis with excellent inter-observer agreement.

  20. Diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis in diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek, E-mail: arazek@mans.edu.eg; Samir, Sieza, E-mail: Sieza_s@mans.edu.eg

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Excellent inter-observer agreement of ADC of bony lesions in diabetic foot. • ADC can differentiate diabetic osteoarthropathy from osteomylitis. • Diffusion MR imaging can added to routine MR imaging of diabetic foot. - Abstract: Purpose: To study the diagnostic performance of diffusion weighted MR imaging in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis in diabetic foot. Patients and methods: This prospective study was carried out on 41 patients with diabetic foot, 22 males and 19 females with mean age of 51 years. They underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the foot. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the bony lesions were calculated by two reviewers and correlated with the surgical findings or biopsy. The kappa statistic (k) was used to estimate the proportion of inter-observer agreement of two reviewers. Results: The mean ADC of acute diabetic osteoarthropathy was 1.27 ± 0.19 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s for reviewer 1 and 1.26 ± 0.21 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s for reviewer 2. The mean ADC value in diabetic osteomyelitis was 0.86 ± 0.11 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s for reviewer 1 and 0.85 ± 0.12 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s for reviewer 2. There was excellent inter-observer agreement of ADC value of bony lesions in diabetic foot by both reviewers (K = 0.93). There was statistically significant difference in the ADC values of both groups (P = 0.001). The cut-off point of ADC value of both reviewers used in differentiating acute diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis were 0.98 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and 1.04 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s with an accuracy of 94% and 93% and area under the curve of 0.94 and 0.93 respectively. Conclusion: We conclude that the ADC value is a non-invasive imaging parameter that can help in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy from osteomyelitis with excellent inter-observer agreement.

  1. Cost of diabetic foot in France, Spain, Italy, Germany and United Kingdom: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchero, Huidi; Kangambega, Pauline; Lin, Lucien; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Brunet-Houdard, Solenne; Briatte, Christine; Retali, Gerald Reparate; Rusch, Emmanuel

    2018-04-01

    Cost estimates for diabetic foot are available for developed countries based on cost data for different years. This study aimed to provide a comparison of the cost of diabetic foot in E5 (France, Spain, Italy, Germany, and the United Kingdom) and its characteristics across different conditions. PubMed, Central and Embase databases were searched in February 2017 for English language publications. Bibliographies of relevant papers were also searched manually. Reviews and research papers from E5 regions reporting on cost of diabetic foot were included. Reported cost was converted to equivalent 2016 $ for comparison purposes. All the costs presented are mean cost per patient per year in 2016 $. Nine studies were included in the analysis. The total cost of amputation ranged from $ 15,046 in 2001 to $ 38,621 in 2005. The direct cost of amputation ranged from $ 13,842 in 2001 to $ 83,728 during 2005-2009. Indirect cost of amputation was more uniform, ranging from between $ 1,043 to $ 1,442. The direct cost of gangrene ranged from $ 3,352 in 2003 to $ 8,818 in Germany. Although, for the same year, 2003, the cost for Spain was almost double that for Germany. The total cost of an uninfected ulcer was $ 6,174 in 2002, but increased to $ 14,441 in 2005; for an infected ulcer the cost increased from $ 2,637 to $ 2,957. The different countries showed variations in the components used to calculate the cost of diabetic foot. The E5 incurs a heavy cost from diabetic foot and its complications. There is an unmet need for the identification of cost-cutting strategies, as diabetic foot costs more than major cardiac diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larijani B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some diabetic foot ulcers, which are notoriously difficult to cure, are one of the most common health problems in diabetic patients .There are several surgical and medical options which already have been introduced for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, so some patient will require amputation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a naive herbal extract to accelerate healing of diabetic foot ulcers. A multi-centric randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate intravenous Semelil for healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Sixteen diabetic patients were treated with intravenous Semelil, and nine other patients were treated with placebo as control group. Both groups were otherwise treated by wound debridement and irrigation with normal saline solution, systemic antibiotic therapy and daily wound dressing. Before and after intervention, the foot ulcer surface area was measured, by digital photography, mapping and planimetry. After 4 weeks, the mean foot ulcer surface area decreased from 479.93±379.75 mm2 to 198.93±143.75 mm2 in the intervention group (p = 0.000 and from 766.22±960.50 mm2 to 689.11±846.74 mm2 in the control group (p = 0.076. Average wound closure in the treatment group was significantly greater than placebo group (64% vs. 25%, p= 0.015. This herbal extract by intravenous rout in combination with conventional therapy is more effective than conventional therapy by itself probably without side effect. However, further studies are required in the future to confirm these results in larger population.

  3. Acute phase reactants predict the risk of amputation in diabetic foot infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Baris; Yener, Serkan; Yesil, Sena; Yapar, Nur; Kucukyavas, Yasin; Bayraktar, Firat

    2011-01-01

    prediction of amputation would aid clinicians in the management of diabetic foot infections. We aimed to assess the predictive value of baseline and post-treatment levels of acute phase reactants in the outcome of patients with diabetic foot infections. we collected data prospectively during minimum follow-up of 6 months in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers hospitalized in Dokuz Eylul University Hospital between January 1, 2003, and January 1, 2008. After excluding patients who did not attend the hospital for follow-up visits regularly (n = 36), we analyzed data from 165 foot ulcer episodes. limb ischemia and osteomyelitis were much more frequent in patients who underwent amputation. Wagner grade, which assesses ulcer depth and the presence of osteomyelitis or gangrene, was higher in patients who needed amputation. Ulcer size was slightly larger in the amputation group. Baseline and post-treatment C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, white blood cell counts, and platelet counts were significantly elevated in patients who underwent amputation. Albumin levels were significantly suppressed in the amputation group. Univariate analysis showed that a 1-SD increase in baseline and post-treatment C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and white blood cell counts and a 1-SD decrease in post-treatment albumin levels were significantly associated with increased risk of amputation. Post-treatment C-reactive protein level was strongly associated with amputation risk. circulating levels of acute phase reactants were associated with amputation risk in diabetic foot infections.

  4. A systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to enhance the healing of chronic ulcers of the foot in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, R J; Valk, G D; Apelqvist, J; Armstrong, D G; Bakker, K; Game, F L; Hartemann-Heurtier, A; Löndahl, M; Price, P E; van Houtum, W H; Jeffcoate, W J

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of management of diabetic foot ulcers is poor and there is uncertainty concerning optimal approaches to management. We have undertaken a systematic review to identify interventions for which there is evidence of effectiveness. A search was made for reports of the effectiveness of interventions assessed in terms of healing, ulcer area or amputation in controlled clinical studies published prior to December 2006. Methodological quality of selected studies was independently assessed by two reviewers using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. Selected studies fell into the following categories: sharp debridement and larvae; antiseptics and dressings; chronic wound resection; hyperbaric oxygen (HBO); reduction of tissue oedema; skin grafts; electrical and magnetic stimulation and ultrasound. Heterogeneity of studies prevented pooled analysis of results. Of the 2251 papers identified, 60 were selected for grading following full text review. Some evidence was found to support hydrogels as desloughing agents and to suggest that a systemic (HBO) therapy may be effective. Topical negative pressure (TNP) may promote healing of post-operative wounds, and resection of neuropathic plantar ulcers may be beneficial. More information was needed to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these and other interventions. No data were found to justify the use of any other topically applied product or dressing, including those with antiseptic properties. Further evidence to substantiate the effect of interventions designed to enhance the healing of chronic ulcers is urgently needed. Until such evidence is available from robust trials, there is limited justification for the use of more expensive treatments and dressings.

  5. Diabetic Foot Complications and Their Risk Factors from a Large Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al Derwish, Mohammad; Ouizi, Samir; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ibrahim, Heba M.; Alamri, Bader N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR), being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of (3.16%–3.44%), whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%–2.16%), 0.19% (0.16%–0.22%), and 1.06% (0.98%–1.14%), respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD), poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD), male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16–99.62), 14.47 (8.99–23.31), 12.06 (10.54–13.80), 7.22 (6.10–8.55), 4.69 (4.28–5.14), 4.45 (4.05–4.89), 2.88 (2.43–3.40), 2.81 (2.31–3.43), 2.24 (1.98–2.45), 2.02 (1.84–2.22), 1.54 (1.29–1.83), and 1.51 (1.38–1.65), respectively. Conclusions Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact

  6. Diabetic foot complications and their risk factors from a large retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR, being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem.This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥ 25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors.The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI of (3.16%-3.44%, whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%-2.16%, 0.19% (0.16%-0.22%, and 1.06% (0.98%-1.14%, respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD, neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥ 10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥ 45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD, poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD, male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16-99.62, 14.47 (8.99-23.31, 12.06 (10.54-13.80, 7.22 (6.10-8.55, 4.69 (4.28-5.14, 4.45 (4.05-4.89, 2.88 (2.43-3.40, 2.81 (2.31-3.43, 2.24 (1.98-2.45, 2.02 (1.84-2.22, 1.54 (1.29-1.83, and 1.51 (1.38-1.65, respectively.Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact of the complications. Other measurements, such as decompression of lower

  7. Association of limited joint mobility and increased plantar hardness in diabetic foot ulceration in north Asian Indian: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, R; Anand, Sneh; Ammini, A C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the association of limited joint mobility and foot sole hardness in north Asian Indian type 2 diabetic patients. Limited joint mobility and hardness of the foot sole were measured for 39 subjects attending the AIIMS Endocrinology & Metabolism Clinic. The total subject divided into three groups: 13 control subjects (nondiabetic), 13 diabetic patients without neuropathy and 13 diabetic neuropathy patients. Neuropathy status was assessed using 10 gm Semen's Weinstein monofilament. Joint mobility parameters, such as ankle dorsiflexion/plantar flexion and metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, are measured using a goniometer. Foot sole hardness was measured using a durometer or shore meter. We found that diabetic patients with a neuropathic foot had significantly reduced joint mobility and increased foot sole hardness, placing them at risk for subsequent ulceration. Metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion of both feet of diabetic patients had significant correlation (at p hardness in both feet of diabetic neuropathy subjects. Also linear regression analysis showed that duration of diabetes was significantly associated with the joint mobility parameters. In this study we conclude that joint mobility had reduced further if neuropathy and increased foot sole hardness coexisted owing to high plantar pressures. Hence, both limited joint mobility and increased foot sole hardness appears to be important determinants of foot sole ulceration in diabetic neuropathic subject.

  8. Offloading effect of therapeutic footwear in patients with diabetic neuropathy at high risk for plantar foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, M. L. J.; Waaijman, R.; de Haart, M.; Keukenkamp, R.; Nollet, F.; Bus, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 29, 15341541 (2012) Abstract Aims Custom-made therapeutic footwear is often prescribed to patients with diabetic neuropathy, foot deformity and a healed plantar foot ulcer. Offloading these feet is important to prevent ulcer recurrence. The aim was to evaluate the offloading effect of

  9. Who cares about foot care? Barriers and enablers of foot self-care practices among non-institutionalized older adults diagnosed with diabetes: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricciani, Lisa; Jones, Sara

    2015-02-01

    Appropriate and timely foot self-care practices may prevent diabetes-related foot complications. However, self-care practices are often neglected, particularly by older adults. The purpose of this study was to conduct an integrative, systematic literature review of the psychosocial barriers and enablers of foot self-care practices among older adults diagnosed with diabetes. An integrative, systematic literature review and a deductive thematic analysis was conducted to determine psychosocial barriers and enablers of foot self-care practices among older adults. A total of 130 different studies were retrieved from the search strategy. From these, 9 studies were identified and included for review. Physical ability, perceived importance, patient knowledge, provision of education, social integration, risk status, and patient-provider communication were identified as key barriers and enablers of foot self-care. Participants at high risk of foot complications were found to perceive themselves at greater risk of complications, receive more education, and engage in better overall foot self-care practices compared to those at low risk of foot complications. Foot self-care practices appear underutilized as primary prevention measures by older adults and are instead adopted only once complications have already occurred. Likewise, facilitators of foot self-care practices, such as education, appear to be reserved for individuals who have already developed foot complications. Health care professionals such as diabetes educators, podiatrists, and general practitioners may play an important role in the prevention of foot complications among older adults by recognizing, referring, and providing early education to older adults. © 2014 The Author(s).

  10. Procalcitonin and proinflammatory parameters in diabetic foot infection as new predictive factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheem, Shler Gh.; Al-Barzinji, Ruqaya M.; Mansoor, Husham Y.; Al-Dabbagh, Ali A.

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic foot is a common complication of diabetes due to changes in blood vessels and nerves, often leads to ulceration and subsequent limb amputation if not treated early. A new diagnostic marker of bacterial infections is procalcitonin. C-reactive protein, Interleukin1β, Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α as proinflammatory parameters increased in Diabetic foot infection. We evaluated above parameters in patients with diabetic foot infections in different grades. A total of 130 diabetic patients were enrolled in this case control study between June 2011 and March 2012 in Rizgary, Emergency and Hawler Teaching Hospitals, 90 of them with diabetic foot lesion as a patient group. 40 without foot lesion, as a patient control and 20 individuals as healthy control. Assessment of above parameters in sera of study groups and also bacteriological tests (bacterial isolation and identification) were done. Serum procalcitonin levels significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot with higher Wagner grades (III, IV and V) (0.28 ± 0.04, 0.30 ± 0.07 and 0.60 ± 0.11) respectively (P<0.01), indication for amputation (0.45 ± 0.06) (P<0.01), and polymicrobial infection (0.345 ± 0.043) (P<0.05). The severity of foot ulcer based on Wagner classification system was also associated with circulating levels of C-reactive protein, Interleukin1β, Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (G III, IV and V) (5.36 ± 0.70, 6.38 ± 0.65, and 9.13 ± 0.88), (1.21 ± 0.08, 1.56 ± 0.16 and 2.02 ± 0.07), (23.02 ± 2.98, 36.32 ± 5.75 and 43.36 ± 6.16), and (215.39 ± 16.8, 259.21 ± 40.7 and 398.45 ± 33.4) respectively (P<0.01). A new useful diagnostic parameter in infected diabetic foot patients may be a procalcitonin especially in those with higher Wagner grades and with polymicrobial infection.

  11. Pervasive Home Care - Technological support for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo

    2006-01-01

    of the patient in collaboration with patient and home care clinicians. My main research method has been qualitative analysis of the empirical results generated during an experimental project using Participatory Design (PD) to investigate potential futures in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers...... quality in the treatment and managing of long-term conditions such as diabetic foot ulcers.......Pervasive Healthcare has been used as a collective name for research in Pervasive Computing taking starting point in healthcare related issues and scenarios. Pervasive Healthcare can, however, also be seen as made pervasive", i.e. omnipresent. With the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases...

  12. The diabetic foot risks profile in Selebi Phikwe Government Hospital, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Tshitenge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aimed: (1 to evaluate the proportion of each diabetic foot (DF risk category, according to the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF consensus, in patients attending the diabetic clinic in Selebi Phikwe Government Hospital (SPGH and (2 to examine some of the factors that may be associated with the progression to higher risk categories such as anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c and lipid profile.Methods: A retrospective, cross sectional chart review of patients who had attended the diabetic clinic in SPGH from January 2013 to December 2013 was performed. Patients were included if they had undergone a foot examination. Patients with amputation due to accident were excluded. The DF risk category was assessed by determining the proportion of patients in each of four risk categories, as described by the IWGDF consensus.Results: The study encompassed 144 records from patients reviewed for foot examination from January to December 2013. Patients’ ages were between 16 and 85 years, 46 (40% were male and 98 (60% were female. The majority (122, [85%] of patients were in DF risk category 0, whilst a limited number of patients were classified in risk category 1 (10, [6.9%], risk category 2 (7, [4.9%] and risk category 3 (5, [3.5%]. Most of the patients had the type 2 diabetes mellitus (139, [97%; 95% CI 92% − 99%]. Patients’ ages were associated with the progressively higher DF risk categories. The adjusted odd ratio was 1.1 (95% CI 1.03−1.14; p = 0.004.Conclusion: The present study revealed that about 15% of patients attending the SPGH diabetic clinic were categorised in higher risk groups for diabetic foot; patients’ ages were linked to the higher DF risk categories.

  13. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for monitoring diabetic foot ulcer - A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Sujatha, N.; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, Richa

    2014-02-01

    Foot ulceration due to diabetes mellitus is a major problem affecting 12-25% of diabetic subjects in their lifetime. An untreated ulcer further gets infected which causes necrosis leading to amputation of lower extremities. Early identification of risk factors and treatment for these chronic wounds would reduce health care costs and improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. Recent clinical investigations have shown that a series of factors including reduced oxygen delivery and disturbed metabolism have been observed on patients with foot ulceration due to diabetes. Also, these factors can impair the wound healing process. Optical techniques based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provide characteristic spectral finger prints shed light on tissue oxygenation levels and morphological composition of a tissue. This study deals with the application of diffuse reflectance intensity ratios based on oxyhemoglobin bands (R542/R580), ratios of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin bands (R580/R555), total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation between normal and diabetic foot ulcer sites. Preliminary results obtained are found to be promising indicating the application of reflectance spectroscopy in the assessment of foot ulcer healing.

  14. Painful ulceration and quality of life of patients with the diabetic foot syndrome

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    Radka Vymětalová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pain on quality of life of patients with diabetic foot syndrome. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Quality of life was assessed using a Czech version of the Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale (DFS, a standardized questionnaire. The sample consisted of 247 patients with diabetic foot syndrome. The intensity of pain in diabetic ulcers was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS from 0 (no pain to 10 (maximum pain. Data was collected between April 2014 and December 2014 in 18 podiatric and chronic wound outpatient clinics throughout the Czech Republic. Results: Quality of life in patients with permanent pain was lower in all domains of the DFS questionnaire in comparison with patients who reported no pain. For patients who attended chronic wound outpatient clinics quality of life was significantly lower in four domains of the DFS (Leisure, Physical health, Emotions, and Friends than for patients who did not attend chronic pain outpatient clinics. A statistically significant moderate negative correlation was found between intensity of pain and quality of life in the following domains: Physical health (r = -0.592, Daily activities (r = -0.456, Emotions (r = -0.503, and Treatment (r = -0.434. Conclusion: Pain ulceration affects quality of life of patients with diabetic foot syndrome.

  15. Effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, Aziz; Chionh, Siok Bee; Han, Audrey Y Y; Chan, Pauline P L; Nambiar, Ajay

    2010-05-01

    This is the fi rst prospective study done locally to determine the effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. An electronic vacuum pump was used to apply controlled negative pressure evenly across the wound surface. Changes in wound dimension, presence of wound granulation and infection status of diabetic foot ulcers in 11 consecutive patients with diabetes were followed over the course of VAC therapy. Healing was achieved in all wounds. Nine wounds were closed by split-skin grafting and 2 by secondary closure. The average length of treatment with VAC therapy was 23.3 days. Ten wounds showed reduction in wound size. All wounds were satisfactorily granulated and cleared of bacterial infection at the end of VAC therapy. VAC therapy was useful in the treatment of diabetic foot infection and ulcers, which after debridement, may present with exposed tendon, fascia and/or bone. These included ray amputation wounds, wounds post-debridement for necrotising fasciitis, wounds post-drainage for abscess, a heel ulcer and a sole ulcer. It was able to prepare ulcers well for closure via split-skin grafting or secondary closure in good time. This reduced cost of VAC therapy, as therapy was not prolonged to attain greater reduction in wound area. VAC therapy also provides a sterile, more controlled resting environment to large, exudating wound surfaces. Large diabetic foot ulcers were thus made more manageable.

  16. Comparison of demographic and clinical characteristics influencing health-related quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and those without foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yekta Z

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Zahra Yekta1, Reza Pourali2, Mohammad Ghasemi-rad31Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, 2Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 3Student Research Committee, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Islamic Republic of IranBackground: A number of studies have demonstrated that health-related quality of life (HRQoL is negatively affected by diabetic foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to compare HRQoL in diabetic patients with and without foot ulcers and to determine demographic and clinical factors influencing HRQoL.Methods: There were no variables affecting HRQoL except for gender in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded and HRQoL was evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36 survey for all participants. The summary physical component score (PCS and mental component score (MCS and eight domains of HRQoL were compared in the two groups. Linear regression analysis was also used to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as predictors of quality of life as measured by SF-36.Results: The overall score, PCS, and MCS, were significantly higher in patients without diabetic foot ulcers. Except for gender, none of the variables affected HRQoL in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Male gender had a higher score in all domains of quality of life than female gender in diabetic patients without foot ulcers. Living alone, a low educational level, and having at least one complication were all associated with a lower HRQoL score in patients with foot ulcers. High-grade ulcers determined by Wagner’s classification and poor glycemic control as measured by HbA1C predicted HRQoL impairment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers.Conclusion: Because Wagner’s grade was one of the strongest variables associated with HRQoL, this scale is recommended for monitoring of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in order to prevent continuing

  17. High osteoprotegerin is associated with development of foot ulcer in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Emilie H; von Scholten, Bernt J; Lajer, Maria; Jorsal, Anders; Tarnow, Lise; Rasmussen, Lars M; Holstein, Per; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hansen, T W; Rossing, P

    The bone-related peptide osteoprotegerin has been linked to vascular calcification and peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the association between osteoprotegerin and development of foot complications in persons with type 1 diabetes. Prospective observational study of 573 persons with type 1 diabetes, 225 women; age [mean±SD] 42.3±10.3years. Plasma osteoprotegerin was measured by ELISA. Median (IQR) osteoprotegerin was 2.80(2.35-3.63)μg/L and follow-up time (median (range)) was 12.7(0.1-15.6)years. Endpoints included: new foot ulceration (n=153), Charcot foot (n=14), vascular surgery/amputation (n=53), loss of foot pulse (n=57), and peripheral neuropathy (n=99). In unadjusted analyses, higher osteoprotegerin was associated with development of all endpoints (p≤0.026). Higher osteoprotegerin remained associated with development of foot ulcer, and the combination of vascular surgery/amputation, loss of foot pulse and neuropathy (p≤0.001) in a sex and age adjusted model. After further adjustment (nephropathy status, smoking, HbA 1c , systolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, eGFR, and presence of neuropathy and/or claudication and/or foot ulcer at baseline), higher osteoprotegerin remained associated with development of foot ulcer (HR (95% CI) per doubling: 1.75 (1.04-2.97); p=0.037). Higher osteoprotegerin levels were associated with development of foot ulcer, even after comprehensive adjustment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal A.T. Gayle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90% reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. In conclusion, approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82% or leather shoes (64%, fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%, and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. Approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  19. Vascular surgery, microsurgery and supramicrosurgery for treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers to prevent amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Steffen; Ritter, Ralf-Gerhard; Fansa, Hisham

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers occur in approximately 2,5% of patients suffering from diabetes and may lead to major infections and amputation. Such ulcers are responsible for a prolonged period of hospitalization and co- morbidities caused by infected diabetic foot ulcers. Small, superficial ulcers can be treated by special conservative means. However, exposed bones or tendons require surgical intervention in order to prevent osteomyelitis. In many cases reconstructive surgery is necessary, sometimes in combination with revascularization of the foot. There are studies on non surgical treatment of the diabetic foot ulcer. Most of them include patients, classified Wagner 1-2 without infection. Patients presenting Wagner 3D and 4D however are at a higher risk of amputation. The evolution of microsurgery has extended the possibilities of limb salvage. Perforator based flaps can minimize the donorsite morbidity. 41 patients were treated with free tissue transfer for diabetic foot syndrome and chronic defects. 44 microvascular flaps were needed. The average age of patients was 64.3 years. 18 patients needed revascularization. 3 patients needed 2 microvascular flaps. In 6 cases supramicrosurgical technique was used. There were 2 flap losses leading to amputation. 4 other patients required amputation within 6 months postoperatively due to severe infection or bypass failure. Another 4 patients died within one year after reconstruction. The remaining patients were ambulated. Large defects of the foot can be treated by free microvascular myocutaneous or fasciocutaneous tissue transfer. If however, small defects, exposing bones or tendons, are not eligible for local flaps, small free microvascular flaps can be applied. These flaps cause a very low donor site morbidity. Arterialized venous flaps are another option for defect closure. Amputation means reduction of quality of life and can lead to an increased mortality postoperatively.

  20. Availability and efficacy of revascularization in outpatients with neuroischemic diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Udovichenko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze treatment results in patients with neuroischemic diabetic foot referred to vascular clinics for revascularization.Methods: Follow-up data of 88 consecutive outpatients with neuroischemic diabetic foot ulcers or postsurgery wounds were analyzed. Initially the patients received treatment in one outpatient diabetic foot clinic form 1st March to 30th June 2010. As conservative ulcer / wound treatment during 3–4 weeks was not effective, all they were referred to vascular surgeon / endovascular specialist consultation in several Moscow hospitals. Data were collected on follow-up visits to the foot clinic or by phone. Median follow-up time was 16 months (3 mo – 2.5 yrs.Results: Of 88 referred, revascularization procedures were performed in 38 patients (21 – endovascular, 17 – bypass surgery. 18 patients were considered as inoperable and 24 refused of vascular specialist consultation or treatment. Ulcer treatment results were satisfactory (primary healing or healing after minor amputation in59% of revascularized patients, in 33% of inoperable ones and in 32% of those who refused of revascularization. Patients’ refusal rate of vascular intervention was higher in a period of time when treatment appeared to be less successful due to several reasons. Later treatment results were improved and refusal rate decreased. Conclusions: (1 nowadays revascularization is relatively available for diabetic foot patients in Moscow; (2 more than 2/3 of non-revascularized patients have unsuccessful results of ulcer treatment, vascular intervention improves results significantly; (3 revascularization does not increase mortality in elderly patients with neuroischemic diabetic foot; (4 following is necessary for improvement of revascularization efficacy: active combination of bypass surgery and endovascular interventions, considering of pulsatile blood flow in all vascular bed segments as an aim of intervention and close interdisciplinary

  1. Illness invalidation from spouse and family is associated with depression in diabetic patients with first superficial diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlo, Mohammad G; Alzahrani, Owiss H; Alzahrani, Hasan A

    (1) To assess the prevalence of depressive disorders in a sample of diabetic patients with their first superficial diabetic foot ulcer. (2) To evaluate the association between illness invalidation from spouse, family, and depressive disorders in those patients. Depressive disorders and severity were diagnosed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis Ι disorders, clinical version, and the spouse and family scales of the Illness Invalidation Inventory, respectively (3*I). Physical functioning was also assessed using the Physical Component of The Short Form 36 item health-related quality of life questionnaire. The prevalence of depressive disorders was 27.50% (22/80). There was a significant decrease in physical health component summary mean score and a significant increase in ulcer size, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, spouse discounting, spouse lack of understanding, and family discounting mean scores in the depressed group compared to the non-depressed group. Higher levels of spouse discounting, spouse understanding, and family discounting were significant predictors of diagnosis of depressive disorders and were strongly associated with increased severity of depressive symptoms in diabetic patients with first superficial diabetic foot ulcers. Poor physical functioning was associated with increased depressive symptom severity. This study demonstrated that illness invalidation from spouse and family is associated with diagnosis of depressive disorders and increased severity of depressive symptoms in diabetic patients with first superficial diabetic foot ulcers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. The role of qualitative research in understanding diabetic foot ulcers and amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnke, Janet L; Bailey, Patricia Hill; Woodbury, M Gail; Burrows, Mona

    2014-04-01

    To enhance the learner's competence with knowledge about using qualitative methodologies to understand diabetic foot ulcers and amputations. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Analyze qualitative research methodologies.2. Summarize how conclusions from qualitative research relate to diabetes mellitus and its complications. Persons living with diabetes are at high risk for foot complications, lower extremity trauma, injury, ulceration, infection, and potential amputation. Qualitative health research helps to explore and understand more fully the complexities of diabetes. Qualitative health research seeks to understand what is happening and going on for the individual and his/her support persons. In addition, qualitative health research enables clinicians to appreciate how different qualitative research approaches can explore illness from the perspective of the individual living with the disease.

  3. The management of diabetic foot ulcers in Danish hospitals is not optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Jansen, Rasmus Bo

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The diabetic foot is a complicated health issue which ideally involves several different specialists to ensure the most effective treatment. The Danish Health and Medicines Authority recently published a national guideline to address the implementation of multidisciplinary teams...... and the participant answering the questionnaire was identified as knowledgeable about the department's procedures on treatment of diabetic feet. Only one questionnaire per department was allowed. RESULTS: A total of 62 questionnaires were sent out. We achieved a response rate of ~37% (n = 23). Respondents (n = 13......) were mostly orthopaedic surgeons. A classification system of the diabetic foot was rarely or never used, and eight respondents (42%) reported having a multidisciplinary team in accordance with the national guidelines. 73% of the respondents performed some form of surgical intervention on diabetic feet...

  4. Advance gellam gum-based hydrogels for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcerations

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Lucília Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento - Programa Doutoral em Engenharia de Tecidos, Medicina Regenerativa e Células Estaminais The incidence of Diabetic Foot Ulcerations (DFUs) is increasing with the emergent worldwide prevalence of Diabetes. DFUs pathophysiologies such as delayed and immature re-epithelialization, persistent inflammation, ischemia and neuropathy, hinder the healing of wounds which rapidly develop into DFUs. The main problematic of this chronic and overwhelming condition is the ti...

  5. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic-An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almdal, T; Nielsen, A Anker; Nielsen, K E; Jørgensen, M E; Rasmussen, A; Hangaard, S; Siersma, V; Holstein, P E

    2015-12-01

    To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot. During the period the chiropodist staffing in the foot clinic was doubled; new offloading material and orthopedic foot corrections for recalcitrant ulcers were introduced. Healing was investigated in toe ulcers in Cox regression models. 2634 patients developed foot ulcers, of which 1461 developed toe ulcers; in 790 patients these were neuropathic, in 551 they were neuro-ischemic and in 120 they were critically ischemic. One-year healing rates increased in the period 2001-2011 from 75% to 91% for neuropathic toe ulcers and from 72% to 80% for neuro-ischemic toe ulcers, while no changes was observed for ischemic toe ulcers. Adjusted for changes in the patient population, the overall rate of healing for neuropathic and neuro-ischemic toe ulcers almost doubled (HR=1.95 [95% CI: 1.36-2.80]). The results show that the healing of toe ulcers improved. This outcome could not be explained by changes in the patient characteristics, but coincided with a number of improvements in organization and therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic Foot and Exercise Therapy: Step by Step The Role of Rigid Posture and Biomechanics Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient’s lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity. PMID:24807636

  7. Cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy and self-reported foot-care behaviour of people at high risk of diabetes-related foot complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrin, B. M.; Swerissen, H.; Payne, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy and self-reported foot-care behaviour in an Australian sample of people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Methods: This cross-sectional study was undertaken with 121 participants with diabetes...... was generally realistic about the nature of their condition and the final cluster was uncertain about their condition. The cluster with high misperceptions of their condition undertook more potentially damaging foot-care behaviours than the other clusters (F = 4.98; P diabetes...

  8. A CLINICAL STUDY ON EFFICACY OF NANOCRYSTALLINE SILVER DRESSING IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanaiah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetes is the highest risk factors associated with limb threatening ischemia. Foot ulceration and infection are the major causes of hospi talization in people with diabetes. Signs of infections in these lesions are likely to be masked as people with diabetes may not show typical inflammatory response to infection. Despite this inherent difficulty, diagnosis of infection is essentially clinic al. In addition infection of diabetic foot often involves superficial and deep tissues, including bone. Dressings have a part to play in the management of wounds. They traditionally provide a moist wound environment, handle excessive exudate, aid in debrid ement, and promote disorganised, stalled healing. The control of infection remains a major challenge. Nano - technology makes it possible to expand the surface area of Silver particles markedly to Nano scale. They markedly expand the surface area of silver p articles, increasing their contact with bacteria or fungi, and vastly improving its bactericidal and fungicidal effectiveness. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To study the efficacy of Nano crystalline silver in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. 2. To compare time required for healing of diabetic foot ulcer with Nano crystalline silver against conventional dressing. 3. Numbe r of Nano crystalline silver dressin g required in comparison with conventional dressing. STUDY DESIGN : Prospective and observational study. SAMPLE SIZE: 100 cases were studied prospectively. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients aged more than 20years with diabetic foot ulcer, Ulcers of size less than 10×10 cm. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Clinical signs of infection, cellulites; X - ray showing Osteomyelitis. Doppler showing atherosclerosis and varicosities. U ncontrolled diabetes, significant medical diseases. Patients on steroids, immunosuppressive agents, radiation, or chemotherapy. STUDY SETTING: S. V. R. R. G. G. Hospital, Tirupati. STUDY PERIOD : From Jan 2013 till November

  9. Foot reflexology in feet impairment of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Chantal Magalhães da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to evaluate the effect of foot reflexology on feet impairment of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Method: this is a randomized, controlled and blind clinical trial. The sample was comprised by people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who, after being randomized into Treated group (n = 21 and Control group (n = 24, received guidelines on foot self-care. To the Treated Group it was also provided 12 sessions of foot reflexology. The scores of impairment indicators related to skin and hair, blood circulation, tissue sensitivity and temperature were measured by means of the instrument for assessing tissue integrity of the feet of people with diabetes mellitus. Chi-square test, Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney test and regression analyzes were applied to the data, considering a significance level of 5% (P value <0.05.Results: participants who received the therapy showed better scores in some impairment indicators related to skin and hair (hair growth, elasticity/turgor, hydration, perspiration, texture and integrity of the skin/ skin peeling.Conclusion: the foot reflexology had a beneficial effect on feet impairment of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which makes it a viable therapy, deserving investment. This study was registered in the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials - RBR-8zk8sz.

  10. The Role of Pressure Offloading on Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing and Prevention of Recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2016-01-01

    An increased plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of plantar foot ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus, and ulcers are a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, the evidence is reviewed that relieving areas of increased plantar pressure (ie, offloading) can

  11. The management of neuropathic ulcers of the foot in diabetes by shock wave therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascone Michele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is becoming one of the most common chronic diseases, and ulcers are its most serious complication. Beginning with neuropathy, the subsequent foot wounds frequently lead to lower extremity amputation, even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In recent years, some researchers have studied external shock wave therapy (ESWT as a new approach to soft tissue wound healing. The rationale of this study was to evaluate if ESWT is effective in the management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. Methods We designed a randomized, prospective, controlled study in which we recruited 30 patients affected by neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers and then divided them into two groups based on different management strategies. One group was treated with standard care and shock wave therapy. The other group was treated with only standard care. The healing of the ulcers was evaluated over 20 weeks by the rate of re-epithelization. Results After 20 weeks of treatment, 53.33% of the ESWT-treated patients had complete wound closure compared with 33.33% of the control patients, and the healing times were 60.8 and 82.2 days, respectively (p 2/die in the ESWT-group and 1.30 mm2/die in the control group (p Conclusion Therefore, ESWT may be a useful adjunct in the management of diabetic foot ulceration. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN21800909

  12. Knowledge of foot-care in people with diabetes in a tertiary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate levels of foot care knowledge among patients attending the diabetes clinic at Pretoria Academic Hospital by comparing the knowledge of patients with 'at risk' feet (ARF) to those with 'normal/not at risk' feet (NARF) and so assess whether the education effort by the ...

  13. SIM2PeD– Intelligent monitoring system for prevention of diabetic foot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the pictogram model. The data captured show that slight displacements in frequency caused large variations of answers delivered to the application. The various experiments conducted made the system performed to be specified, and suitable for the remote monitoring of self-care activities in patients with diabetic foot.

  14. Advanced glycation end products assessed by skin autofluorescence: a new marker of diabetic foot ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouillarmet, Julien; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Michon, Paul; Thivolet, Charles

    2013-07-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may contribute to diabetic foot ulceration (DFU). Our goal was to determine whether AGEs measurement by skin autofluorescence (SAF) would be an additional marker for DFU management. We performed SAF analysis in 66 patients with a history of DFU prospectively included and compared the results with those of 84 control patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy without DFU. We then assessed the prognostic value of SAF levels on the healing rate in the DFU group. Mean SAF value was significantly higher in the DFU group in comparison with the control group, even after adjustment for other diabetes complications (3.2±0.6 arbitrary units vs. 2.9±0.6 arbitrary units; P=0.001). In the DFU group, 58 (88%) patients had an active wound at inclusion. The mean DFU duration was 14±13 weeks. The healing rate was 47% after 2 months of appropriate foot care. A trend for a correlation between SAF levels and healing time in DFU subjects was observed but was not statistically significant (P=0.06). Increased SAF levels are associated with neuropathic foot complications in diabetes. Use of SAF measurement to assess foot vulnerability and to predict DFU events in high-risk patients appears to be promising.

  15. Effectiveness of bridge V.A.C. dressings in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This is a prospective study of the clinical efficacy of the V.A.C. Granufoam Bridge Dressing for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Materials and methods: Five consecutive patients with diabetic foot ulcers were treated with V.A.C. Granufoam Bridge Dressings and studied over a period of 22–48 days. The indications for treatment included diabetic patients with open ray amputation wounds and wounds post-drainage for abscess with exposed deep structures. Clinical outcome was measured in terms of reduction in wound dimensions, presence of wound granulation, microbial clearance, and development of wound complications. Results: Our results showed that with V.A.C. therapy, wound healing occurred in all patients. The number of dressings required ranged from 8 to 10. The baseline average wound size was 23.1 cm2. Wound areas shrunk by 18.4–41.7%. All subjects achieved 100% wound bed granulation with an average length of treatment of 33 days. Microbial clearance was achieved in all cases. All wounds healed by secondary intention in one case and four cases required split-thickness skin grafting. Conclusion: The V.A.C. Granufoam Bridge Dressing is effective in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. It promotes reduction of wound area, wound bed granulation, and microbial clearance. By allowing placement of the suction pad outside the foot, it allowed patients to wear protective shoes and to walk non-weight bearing with crutches during V.A.C. therapy.

  16. Intrinsic muscle atrophy and toe deformity in the diabetic neuropathic foot: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Yang, Qing X.; Wang, Jinghua H.; Smith, Michael B.; Wunderlich, Roshna; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to compare intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy and nondiabetic control subjects and to examine the association between intrinsic muscle CSA and clawing/hammering of the toes in neuropathic feet.

  17. The efficacy of topical Royal Jelly on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Siavash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foot ulcers and infections are the major sources of morbidity in individuals with diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of topical Royal Jelly (a worker honey bee product on healing diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Diabetic patients with foot ulcers that were referred to our clinic at Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran; were evaluated three times a week and treated according to standard treatments consisted of offloading, infection control, vascular improvement and debridement if required. In addition, all ulcers were measured and then topical sterile 5% Royal Jelly was applied on the total surface area of the wounds. Eventually, they were covered with sterile dressings. Each patient was followed for a period of three months or until the complete healing. Results: A total of eight patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, two had two ulcers and, therefore, ten ulcers were evaluated. Two ulcers were excluded. Seven of the remained eight ulcers healed. Mean duration of complete healing was 41 days. One ulcer did not completely heal but improved to 40% smaller in length, 32% in width and 28% in depth. The mean length, width and depth reduction rates were 0.35 mm/day, 0.28 mm/day and 0.11 mm/day, respectively. Conclusions: Royal Jelly dressing may be an effective method for treating diabetic foot ulcers besides standard treatments.

  18. Increased Mortality in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients: The Significance of Ulcer Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chammas, N. K.; Hill, R. L. R.; Edmonds, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients have a greater than twofold increase in mortality compared with nonulcerated diabetic patients. We investigated (a) cause of death in DFU patients, (b) age at death, and (c) relationship between cause of death and ulcer type. This was an eleven-year retrospective study on DFU patients who attended King's College Hospital Foot Clinic and subsequently died. A control group of nonulcerated diabetic patients was matched for age and type of diabetes mellitus. The cause of death was identified from death certificates (DC) and postmortem (PM) examinations. There were 243 DFU patient deaths during this period. Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) was the major cause of death in 62.5% on PM compared to 45.7% on DC. Mean age at death from IHD on PM was 5 years lower in DFU patients compared to controls (68.2 ± 8.7 years versus 73.1 ± 8.0 years, P = 0.015). IHD as a cause of death at PM was significantly linked to neuropathic foot ulcers (OR 3.064, 95% CI 1.003–9.366, and P = 0.049). Conclusions. IHD is the major cause of premature mortality in DFU patients with the neuropathic foot ulcer patients being at a greater risk. PMID:27213157

  19. The Effectiveness of Hypochlorous Acid Solution on Healing of Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Islam I.; Kamal, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Wound cleansing remains a corner stone in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. Hydrogen Peroxide (H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]) and Povidone Iodine are topical antimicrobial agents but known to be toxic to cells involved in the wound healing cascade. The biggest challenge for the physicians and nurses is searching for a safe, noncytotoxic and…

  20. Effect of Infrared Radiation on the Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Ashrafalsadat; Sadeghi Moghadam, Ali; Shariati, Abdalali; Karimi, Hamid; Haghighizadeh, Mohamad Hossien

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a worldwide health care concern affecting tens of thousands of patients. If these ulcers left untreated, they can create severe complications. This study was designed to examine the effect of infrared radiation on the healing of diabetic foot ulcer. This clinical trial was performed on 50 patients referred to Dr. Ganjavian hospital in Dezful city, Iran, with diabetic foot ulcer degree 1 and 2 (based on Wegener Scale). Sample size was determined based on relevant studies of the recent decade. Patients were classified into the intervention and control groups (n = 25 in each group) in terms of age, gender, degree of ulcer, ulcer site and body mass index. In this study, work progress was evaluated according to the checklist of diabetic foot ulcer healing evaluation. The results of the current study showed that there was a statistically significant difference in healing ulcers (P < 0.05) and mean healing time (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Using the infrared plus routine dressing is more effective than using merely routine dressing.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, R. M.; Santema, T. B.; Legemate, D. A.; Ubbink, D. T.; van den Brink, A.; Koelemay, M. J. W.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to assess the additional value of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in promoting the healing of diabetic foot ulcers and preventing amputations was performed. MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify RCTs in patients

  2. Unresolved issues in the management of ulcers of the foot in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffcoate, W. J.; Lipsky, B. A.; Berendt, A. R.; Cavanagh, P. R.; Bus, S. A.; Peters, E. J. G.; van Houtum, W. H.; Valk, G. D.; Bakker, K.

    2008-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers presents a major clinical challenge. The response to treatment is often poor and the outcome disappointing, while the costs are high for both healthcare providers and the patient. In such circumstances, it is essential that management should be based on firm

  3. Cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot: a Markov analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Ortegon (Monica); W.K. Redekop (Ken); L.W. Niessen (Louis Wilhelmus)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate the lifetime health and economic effects of optimal prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot according to international standards and to determine the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in the Netherlands. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

  4. The Diabetic Foot - A Review | Ekere | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High risk patients should be advised to wash and inspect their feet daily, use creams and lotions to prevent dry skin and callus formation, use adequate foot wear, avoid barefoot gait and thermal injury, and seek early medical attention in the event of injury, however trivial. Pedicure must be done by another person

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus foot syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... followeAnkle–brachial pressure index d by calluses (42.6%). Conclusion: The prevalence of DMFS amongst persons with Type 2 DM appears to be high which (are)is in keeping with global trends of DM. Routine foot examination aimed at early identification of and modification of risk factors of DMFS is thus recommended ...

  6. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia after acute foot trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wienemann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy. Design and methods: A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture. Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®. Results: In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group; CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion: Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking.

  7. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). A case-control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II(®)). In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15-25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15-20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to 'pull away' from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking.

  8. Angiosome-targeted infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Maria; Albäck, Anders; Biancari, Fausto; Lappalainen, Kimmo; Lepäntalo, Mauri; Venermo, Maarit

    2013-02-01

    Because of the prolonged healing time of diabetic foot ulcers, methods for identifying ways to expedite the ulcer healing process are needed. The angiosome concept delineates the body into three-dimensional blocks of tissue fed by specific source arteries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization guided by an angiosome model of perfusion in the healing process of diabetic foot ulcers. A total of 250 consecutive legs with diabetic foot ulcers in 226 patients who had undergone infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization in a single center were evaluated. Patient records and periprocedural leg angiograms were reviewed. The legs were divided into two groups depending on whether direct arterial flow to the site of the foot ulcer based on the angiosome concept was achieved (direct group) or not achieved (indirect group). Ulcer healing time was compared between the two groups. A propensity score was used for adjustment of differences in pretreatment covariables in multivariate analysis and for 1:1 matching. Direct flow to the angiosome feeding the ulcer area was achieved in 121 legs (48%) compared with indirect revascularization in 129 legs. Foot ulcers treated with angiosome-targeted infrapopliteal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty healed better. The ulcer healing rate was mean (standard deviation) 72% (5%) at 12 months for the direct group compared with 45% (6%) for the indirect group (P ulcer healing rate than the indirect group (hazard ratio, 1.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.90; P = .001). Attaining a direct arterial flow based on the angiosome model of perfusion to the foot ulcer appears to be important for ulcer healing in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors for plantar foot ulcer recurrence in neuropathic diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaijman, Roelof; de Haart, Mirjam; Arts, Mark L J; Wever, Daniel; Verlouw, Anke J W E; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A

    2014-06-01

    Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention. As part of a footwear trial, 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer and custom-made footwear were followed for 18 months or until ulceration. Demographic data, disease-related parameters, presence of minor lesions, barefoot and in-shoe plantar peak pressures, footwear adherence, and daily stride count were entered in a multivariate multilevel logistic regression model of plantar foot ulcer recurrence. A total of 71 patients had a recurrent ulcer. Significant independent predictors were presence of minor lesions (odds ratio 9.06 [95% CI 2.98-27.57]), day-to-day variation in stride count (0.93 [0.89-0.99]), and cumulative duration of past foot ulcers (1.03 [1.00-1.06]). Significant independent predictors for those 41 recurrences suggested to be the result of unrecognized repetitive trauma were presence of minor lesions (10.95 [5.01-23.96]), in-shoe peak pressure 80% (0.43 [0.20-0.94]), barefoot peak pressure (1.11 [1.00-1.22]), and day-to-day variation in stride count (0.91 [0.86-0.96]). The presence of a minor lesion was clearly the strongest predictor, while recommended use of adequately offloading footwear was a strong protector against ulcer recurrence from unrecognized repetitive trauma. These outcomes define clear targets for diabetic foot screening and ulcer prevention. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Risk factors of foot ulceration in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bañuelos-Barrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identify the risk factors for foot ulceration in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2 who attended a primary care center in the city of Colima (Mexico. Methodology. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted during 2012 with the participation of 87 patients with DM2 from both sexes and older than 30 years of age. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical variables were measured. The study inquired about prior evaluation of the feet and prior education on diabetes by the healthcare team. Results. The mean age was 59 years and 70% were women. The average number of years since diagnosis was nine years; only 35% had good glycemia control; 66% engage in exercise; 51% wear open shoes; none had temperature differences in the feet; 82% had some type of dermatological abnormality; 50% had deformities in their feet. A total of 24% had been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy and another 11% had peripheral vascular disease. Sixty percent of all the patients had risk of foot ulceration. Only 23% of the participants had had previous foot exams. One of every three diabetic patients had received education about the disease. Conclusion. An important proportion of the patients had risk of foot ulceration, contrary to the insufficient percentage of individuals with previous inspection and education about foot care. For nursing, it is an area of opportunity in this level of care to improve the inspection and education on diabetes, specifically on foot care, mainly in those patients with a prolonged evolution of the disease, deficient glycemia control, and risk of ulceration.

  11. FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagna, Olga; Keidar, Zohar; Srour, Saher; Militianu, Daniela; Melamed, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Osteomyelitis, the most serious complication of the diabetic foot, occurs in about 20 % of patients. Early diagnosis is crucial. Appropriate treatment will avoid or decrease the likelihood of amputation. The objective of this study was to assess the value of FDG PET/CT in diabetic patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis. Enrolled in this prospective study were 39 consecutive diabetic patients (29 men and 10 women, mean age 57 years, range 28-71 years) with 46 suspected sites of foot infection. Of these 39 patients, 38 had type 2 and 1 type 1 diabetes for 4-25 years, and 28 were receiving treatment with insulin. FDG PET/CT was interpreted for the presence, intensity (SUVmax) and localization of increased FDG foci. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology and bacteriology of surgical samples, or clinical and imaging follow-up. Osteomyelitis was correctly diagnosed in 18 and excluded in 21 sites. Of 20 lesions with focal bone FDG uptake, 2 were false-positive with no further evidence of osteomyelitis. Five sites of diffuse FDG uptake involving more than one bone on CT were correctly diagnosed as diabetic osteoarthropathy. FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100 %, 92 % and 95 % in a patient-based analysis and 100 %, 93 % and 96 % in a lesion-based analysis, respectively, for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. FDG PET/CT was found to have high performance indices for evaluation of the diabetic foot. The PET component identified FDG-avid foci in sites of acute infection which were precisely localized on fused PET/CT images allowing correct differentiation between osteomyelitis and soft-tissue infection. (orig.)

  12. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN HYDROFIBER DRESSING & POVIDONE DRESSING IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

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    Rithin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU is the most common complication of Diabetes Mellitus (DM. It occurs in 15% of all patients with DM. Major increase in mortality among diabetic patients, observed over the past 20 years is considered to be due to the development of macro and micro vascular complications, including failure of the wound healing process. Non-healing chronic diabetic ulcers are often treated with extracellular matrix replacement therapy.so far, it is a common trend in diabetic foot care domain to use advanced moist wound therapy. At present, there are various categories of moist dressings available such as povidone dressings, adhesive backing film, silicone coated foam, hydrogels, hydrocolloids etc. AIMS & OBJECTIVES 1 To study efficacy of hydrofiber dressings and wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers. 2 To compare the safety, final outcome and patient compliance in hydrofiber and povidone dressing. MATERIALS & METHODS This prospective, observational study is carried in our department from September 2014 to September 2015. All the patients with age of 30 years and above were admitted in AJIMS satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were taken into the study. The patients were followed until the ulcer is treated. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Data are presented as Mean and Standard Deviation (SD. Fischer’s exact test and Chi-Square Test were used as appropriate. GraphPad Prism Version 6.0h was used to analyze data and to prepare graphs. A ‘P’ value below the level of 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS Among the patients who were studied, hydrofiber dressings helped in the better & faster healing of DFU. CONCLUSION In comparison with povidone gauze dressings to hydrofiber dressings in diabetic foot ulcers, the latter is more efficacious in controlling the infection, minimal usage of antibiotics, faster healing rate and patient compliance during dressings.

  13. FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

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    Kagna, Olga; Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, POB 9602, Haifa (Israel); Srour, Saher; Militianu, Daniela [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Melamed, Eyal [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Orthopedics, Haifa (Israel)

    2012-10-15

    Osteomyelitis, the most serious complication of the diabetic foot, occurs in about 20 % of patients. Early diagnosis is crucial. Appropriate treatment will avoid or decrease the likelihood of amputation. The objective of this study was to assess the value of FDG PET/CT in diabetic patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis. Enrolled in this prospective study were 39 consecutive diabetic patients (29 men and 10 women, mean age 57 years, range 28-71 years) with 46 suspected sites of foot infection. Of these 39 patients, 38 had type 2 and 1 type 1 diabetes for 4-25 years, and 28 were receiving treatment with insulin. FDG PET/CT was interpreted for the presence, intensity (SUVmax) and localization of increased FDG foci. Final diagnosis was based on histopathology and bacteriology of surgical samples, or clinical and imaging follow-up. Osteomyelitis was correctly diagnosed in 18 and excluded in 21 sites. Of 20 lesions with focal bone FDG uptake, 2 were false-positive with no further evidence of osteomyelitis. Five sites of diffuse FDG uptake involving more than one bone on CT were correctly diagnosed as diabetic osteoarthropathy. FDG PET/CT had a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100 %, 92 % and 95 % in a patient-based analysis and 100 %, 93 % and 96 % in a lesion-based analysis, respectively, for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot. FDG PET/CT was found to have high performance indices for evaluation of the diabetic foot. The PET component identified FDG-avid foci in sites of acute infection which were precisely localized on fused PET/CT images allowing correct differentiation between osteomyelitis and soft-tissue infection. (orig.)

  14. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  15. Reducing major lower extremity amputations after the introduction of a multidisciplinary team for the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, José Antonio; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Jiménez, Sara; Guadalix, Gregorio; Albarracín, Agustín; Salido, Carmen; Sanz-Moreno, José; Ruiz-Grande, Fernando; Gil-Fournier, Nuria; Álvarez, Julia

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence of lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in the 3rd Health Care Area of Madrid before and after the March 2008 introduction of a multidisciplinary team for managing diabetic foot disease. We compared the amputation rates in people with and without diabetes during 2 periods: before (2001-2007) and after (2008-2011) the introduction of a Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Unit (MDFU). We also analyzed the trend of the amputation rates by joinpoint regression analysis and measured the annual percentage change (APC). During the study period, 514 nontraumatic LEAs were performed, 374 (73%) in people with diabetes and 140 (27%) in people without the disease. The incidence of LEAs showed a significant reduction in major amputations in people with diabetes, from 6.1 per 100 000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9 to 7.2), in the 2001 to 2007 period, to 4.0 per 100 000 per year (95% CI = 2.6 to 5.5) in the 2008 to 2011 period (P = .020). There were no changes in incidence of minor or total amputations in the diabetic population or in amputations in the nondiabetic population during the study period. Joinpoint regression analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence of major LEAs in diabetic population with an APC of -6.6% (95% CI = -10.2 to -2.8; P = .003), but there were no other significant changes. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a multidisciplinary team, coordinated by an endocrinologist and a podiatrist, for managing diabetic foot disease is associated with a reduction in the incidence of major amputations in patients with diabetes.

  16. Knowledge and Practice of Diabetic Foot Care in an InPatient Setting at a Tertiary Medical Center

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    AR Muhammad-Lutfi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Good knowledge and practice regarding diabetic foot care will reduce the risk of diabetic foot complications and ultimately amputation. This study is conducted to assess patients’ knowledge and compliance of diabetic foot care. A cross sectional study performed on patients who were admitted to HSNZ from the 1st September 2013 to 30th April 2014 for diabetic foot infections. They were interviewed with a questionnaire of 15 ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions on foot care knowledge and practice. Score of 1 was given for each ‘yes’ answer. The level of knowledge and practice, whether good or poor, was determined based on the median score of each category. The result was tested using a chi-square test in SPSS version 17. A total of 157 patients were included in this study with a mean age of 56.33 years (31-77. There were 72 male (45.9% and 85 female (54.1% patients with the majority of them being Malays (154 patients, 98.1%. Majority of the patients (58% had poor foot care knowledge while 97 patients (61.8% had poor diabetic foot care practice as compared to the median score. Based on the chi square test of relatedness, there was no significant association between knowledge and practice with any of the variables. In conclusion, the majority of patients admitted for diabetic foot infections had poor knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care. Education regarding foot care strategies should be emphasized and empowered within the diabetic population

  17. Plantar pressure distribution patterns during gait in diabetic neuropathy patients with a history of foot ulcers

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    Tatiana Almeida Bacarin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare the influence of a previous history of foot ulcers on plantar pressure variables during gait of patients with diabetic neuropathy. INTRODUCTION: Foot ulcers may be an indicator of worsening diabetic neuropathy. However, the behavior of plantar pressure patterns over time and during the progression of neuropathy, especially in patients who have a clinical history of foot ulcers, is still unclear. METHODS: Subjects were divided into the following groups: control group, 20 subjects; diabetic neuropathy patients without foot ulcers, 17 subjects; and diabetic neuropathy patients with at least one healed foot ulcer within the last year, 10 subjects. Plantar pressure distribution was recorded during barefoot gait using the Pedar-X system. RESULTS: Neuropathic subjects from both the diabetic neuropathy and DNU groups showed higher plantar pressure than control subjects. At midfoot, the peak pressure was significantly different among all groups: control group (139.4±76.4 kPa, diabetic neuropathy (205.3±118.6 kPa and DNU (290.7±151.5 kPa (p=0.008. The pressure-time integral was significantly higher in the ulcerated neuropathic groups at midfoot (CG: 37.3±11.4 kPa.s; DN: 43.3±9.1 kPa.s; DNU: 68.7±36.5 kPa.s; p=0.002 and rearfoot (CG: 83.3±21.2 kPa.s; DN: 94.9±29.4 kPa.s; DNU: 102.5±37.9 kPa.s; p=0.048. CONCLUSION: A history of foot ulcers in the clinical history of diabetic neuropathy subjects influenced plantar pressure distribution, resulting in an increased load under the midfoot and rearfoot and an increase in the variability of plantar pressure during barefoot gait. The progression of diabetic neuropathy was not found to influence plantar pressure distribution.

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for intestinal resection in patients with superior mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkrief, Laure; Corcos, Olivier; Bruno, Onorina; Larroque, Beatrice; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zekrini, Kamal; Bretagnol, Frédéric; Joly, Francisca; Francoz, Claire; Bondjemah, Vanessa; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Boudaoud, Larbi; De Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Panis, Yves; Goria, Odile; Hillaire, Sophie; Valla, Dominique; Plessier, Aurélie

    2014-10-01

    The most serious complication of acute mesenteric vein thrombosis (MVT) is acute intestinal ischaemia requiring intestinal resection or causing death. Risk factors for this complication are unknown. To identify risk factors for severe intestinal ischaemia leading to intestinal resection in patients with acute MVT. We retrospectively analysed consecutive patients seen between 2002 and 2012 with acute MVT in 2 specialized units. Patients with cirrhosis were excluded. We compared patients who required intestinal resection to patients who did not. Among 57 patients, a local risk factor was identified in 14 (24%) patients, oral contraceptive use in 16 (29%), and at least one or more other systemic prothrombotic condition in 25 (44%). Five (9%) patients had diabetes mellitus (DM), 33 (58%) had overweight or obesity, 9 (18%) had hypertriglyceridemia and 10 (19%) had arterial hypertension. Eleven patients (19%) underwent intestinal resection. DM was significantly associated with intestinal resection (P = 0.02) while local factors or prothrombotic conditions were not. Computed tomography (CT) scans performed at diagnosis found that occlusion of second order radicles of the superior mesenteric vein was more frequently observed in patients who underwent intestinal resection (P = 0.009). In acute MVT, patients with underlying DM have an increased risk of requiring intestinal resection. Neither local factors nor systemic prothrombotic conditions are associated with intestinal resection. When CT scan shows the preservation of second order radicles of the superior mesenteric vein, the risk of severe resection is low. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The foot-health of people with diabetes in a regional Australian population: a prospective clinical audit

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    Perrin Byron M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited understanding of the foot-health of people with diabetes in Australian regional areas. The aim of this study was to document the foot-health of people with diabetes who attend publically funded podiatric services in a regional Australian population. Methods A three month prospective clinical audit was undertaken by the publically-funded podiatric services of a large regional area of Victoria, Australia. The primary variables of interest were the University of Texas (UT diabetic foot risk classification of each patient and the incidence of new foot ulceration during the study period. Age, gender, diabetes type, duration of diabetes and the podiatric service the patients attended were the other variables of interest. Results Five hundred and seventy six patients were seen during the three month period. Over 49% had a UT risk classification at a level at least peripheral neuropathy or more serious diabetes-related foot morbidity. Higher risk at baseline was associated with longer duration of diabetes (F = 31.7, p χ2 = 40.3, p 0.001 and type 1 diabetes (χ2 = 37.3, p 0.001. A prior history of foot pathology was the overwhelming predictor for incident ulceration during the time period (OR 8.1 (95% CI 3.6 to 18.2, p Conclusions The publically funded podiatric services of this large regional area of Australia deal with a disproportionally large number of people with diabetes at high risk of future diabetes-related foot complications. These findings may be useful in ensuring appropriate allocation of resources for future public health services involved in diabetic foot health service delivery in regional areas.

  20. The relationship of Interleukin-6 -174 G>C gene polymorphism in type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcers in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Solmaz, Soner; Berdeli, Afig

    2017-03-01

    We aims investigate Turkish type 2 diabetic patients with/without diabetic foot ulcers and healthy group and examined the contribution of Interleukin (IL)-6 -174 G>C gene polymorphism to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. The Interleukin (IL)-6 -174 G>C genotypes were determined prospectively in 50 patients with diabetic foot ulcers and 35 without diabetic foot ulcers and a control group of 119 healthy individuals. Genotyping of the Interleukin (IL)-6 -174 G>C gene polymorphisms for all individuals was performed by PCR-RFLP method. The genotype IL6 distribution did differ between the control group (CC 13.3%, GC 66.7%, GG 20%) and type 2 diabetic patients (CC 2.4%, GC 47.1%, GG 50.6%) (Pdiabetic patients group (CC 0%, GC 45.7%, GG 54.3%) and diabetic foot ulcers (CC 4%, GC 48%, 48%) (P>0.05). The frequency of the polymorphic G allele in between the control group and type 2 diabetic patients was no similar for the groups (58.4% and 74.1%, respectively) (pdiabetic patients and diabetic foot ulcers was similar for the groups (77.1% and 72%, respectively) (p>0.05). The gene polymorphism of Interleukin-6 -174 G>C and G allele are an risk factor for diabetes, but gene polymorphism of Interleukin-6 -174 G>C is not an independent risk factor for diabetic foot. Genetic factors in the pathogenesis of diabetic foot may also show any changes in different populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The management of diabetic foot ulcers in Danish hospitals is not optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Jansen, Rasmus Bo

    2015-01-01

    ) were mostly orthopaedic surgeons. A classification system of the diabetic foot was rarely or never used, and eight respondents (42%) reported having a multidisciplinary team in accordance with the national guidelines. 73% of the respondents performed some form of surgical intervention on diabetic feet...... in the treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the treatment practices at the time the guidelines were launched. METHODS: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among Danish hospital departments working with diabetic feet. All public departments were invited by e-mail to participate...

  2. Rare Case of Aspergillus ochraceus Osteomyelitis of Calcaneus Bone in a Patient with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

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    Farhang Babamahmoodi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in humans. One of the major complications of the disease is foot ulcer that is prone to infection. The most common causes of infection which have been reported in these patients are bacteria and fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus species. We report one such rare case with calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by Aspergillus ochraceus in a patient with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The case was a 68-year-old male with a history of type II diabetes for 2 years. The patient had two ulcers on the right heel bones for the past 6 months with no significant improvement. One of the most important predisposing factors to infectious diseases, especially opportunistic fungal infection, is diabetes mellitus. Aspergillus species can involve bony tissue through vascular system, direct infection, and trauma. Proper and early diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infection can reduce or prevent complications, such as osteomyelitis and amputation. The annual examination of feet for skin and nail lesion, sensation, anatomical changes, and vascular circulation can be useful for prevention and control of infection.

  3. Platelet rich plasma for treatment of nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrannia, Masoud; Vaezi, Mitra; Yousefshahi, Fardin; Rouhipour, Nahid

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most important causes of lower limb amputations worldwide. The conventional treatments of diabetic foot ulcers are costly and often require patients to be hospitalized for long periods of time, thus representing a huge burden on any health care system. The use of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which is rich in multiple growth factors, may bear some similarities to the natural wound healing process. Nonetheless, few studies on human subjects have so far addressed the efficacy of PRP as a novel and minimally invasive treatment. Today, there is only 1 approved and available system to separate PRP from a patient's own blood in order to be used in diabetic ulcers. This system incorporates bovine thrombin for activation of PRP gel and may be applied by many healthcare providers without the need for extensive special training. In this report, a patient with extensive diabetic foot ulcers, non-responsive to other treatment modalities, was successfully treated by PRP. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Associated With Ulcer Healing and Quality of Life in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Karathanos, Christos; Bargiota, Alexandra; Chan, Philip; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2017-03-01

    A prospective nonrandomized cohort study on consecutive diabetic patients with foot ulcer was undertaken to assess the factors associated with the healing process or limb salvage and evaluate the impact of their treatment on their quality of life. Quality of life was evaluated using Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale-Short Form (DFS-SF) questionnaire before and after treatment. A total of 103 diabetic patients with ulcer (mean age 69.7 ± 9.6 years, 77% male) were treated and followed up for 12 months. Ulcer healing, minor amputation, and major amputation rates were 41%, 41%, and 18%, respectively, while the mortality rate was 18%. Ulcer healing was associated with University of Texas wound grade 1 and the Study of Infections in Diabetic feet comparing Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Ertapenem versus Piperacillin/Tazobactam trial's diabetic foot infection wound score. Limb loss was associated with nonpalpable popliteal artery, longer in-hospital stay, and delay until referral. Quality of life was improved in all domains of DFS-SF ( P < .0001) throughout the cohort of our patients regardless of their outcome, and no outcome (healing, minor amputation, or major amputation) was superior to other. Significant improvement was observed in all domains of hygiene self-management after consultation during the follow-up period.

  5. Clinical and microbiological profile of diabetic foot ulcer patients in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateel, Ramya; Augustine, Alfred J; Prabhu, Shivananda; Ullal, Sheetal; Pai, Manohar; Adhikari, Prabha

    To evaluate the clinical and microbiological profile of diabetic foot ulcer patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. This study recruited 120 diabetic foot ulcer patients of all grade. Their medical records were evaluated retrospectively. We found that median age of patient was 60(52, 67.75) years. 68.3% of patients were males. Median duration of diabetes mellitus was 15(10, 20) years. Mean HbA1C and fasting glucose was 10.3±2.3 and 167.6±52.42 respectively. Neuropathy (35%) and peripheral vascular disease (23.3%) was major micro vascular and macro vascular complication associated. Different locations of ulcers were toe (23.3%), sole (20%), dorsum (18.3%), shin (16.6%), heel (13.3%), and ankle (8.3%). Bacterial infection was seen in 81.66% patients out of which 23.3% had poly microbial infection. Diabetic foot ulcer patient had poor blood glucose control with elevated HbA1C and fasting blood glucose level. Neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease, hypertension were major complications. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were common infecting bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular typing, virulence traits and antimicrobial resistance of diabetic foot staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Carla; Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Mendes, João J; Melo-Cristino, José; Tavares, Luís; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-03-08

    Diabetes mellitus is a major chronic disease that continues to increase significantly. One of the most important and costly complications of diabetes are foot infections that may be colonized by pathogenic and antimicrobial resistant bacteria, harboring several virulence factors, that could impair its successful treatment. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent isolate in diabetic foot infections, together with aerobes and anaerobes. In this study, conducted in the Lisbon area, staphylococci isolated (n = 53) from diabetic foot ulcers were identified, genotyped and screened for virulence and antimicrobial resistance traits. Genetic relationship amongst isolates was evaluated by pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis with further multilocus sequence typing of the identified pulsotypes. PCR was applied for detection of 12 virulence genes and e-test technique was performed to determine minimal inhibitory concentration of ten antibiotics. Among the 53 isolates included in this study, 41 Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Staphylococcal isolates were positive for intercellular adhesins icaA and icaD, negative for biofilm associated protein bap and pantone-valentine leucocidin pvl. S. aureus quorum sensing genes agrI and agrII were identified and only one isolate was positive for toxic shock syndrome toxin tst. 36 % of staphylococci tested were multiresistant and higher rates of resistance were obtained for ciprofloxacin and erythromycin. Clonality analysis revealed high genomic diversity and numerous S. aureus sequence types, both community- and hospital-acquired, belonging mostly to clonal complexes CC5 and C22, widely diffused in Portugal nowadays. This study shows that diabetic foot ulcer staphylococci are genomically diverse, present resistance to medically important antibiotics and harbour virulence determinants. These properties suggest staphylococci can contribute to persistence and severity of these infections, leading to treatment failure and to

  7. Prevalence and contributing factors of methicillin-resistant staph. aureus and microbiological profile in diabetic foot infection

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    Mahboubeh Haji Abdolbaghi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: In this study, MRSA prevalence was similar to other Asian studies and different from west countries study. There wasn't significant difference between gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms that look out to change of microbiological profile in diabetic foot infections and creation multi-drug resistant bacteria. MRSA infections and other multi drug resistant organisms is a serious problem and increasing problem in diabetic foot infections. Further studies are required to assess the need for antibiotics in treating foot ulcers in diabetes and to assess the optimal therapeutic management.

  8. Clinical decision support software for diabetic foot risk stratification: development and formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Deborah E; Glance, David G; Thompson, Sandra C

    2015-01-01

    Identifying people at risk of developing diabetic foot complications is a vital step in prevention programs in primary healthcare settings. Diabetic foot risk stratification systems predict foot ulceration. The aim of this study was to explore the views and experiences of potential end users during development and formative evaluations of an electronic diabetic foot risk stratification tool based on evidence-based guidelines and determine the accuracy of the tool. Formative evaluation of the risk tool occurred in five stages over an eight-month period and employed a mixed methods research design consisting of semi-structured interviews, focus group and participant observation, online survey, expert review, comparison to the Australian Guidelines and clinical testing. A total of 43 healthcare practitioners trialled the computerised clinical decision support system during development, with multiple software changes made as a result of feedback. Individual and focus group participants exposed critical design flaws. Live testing revealed risk stratification errors and functional limitations providing the basis for practical improvements. In the final product, all risk calculations and recommendations made by the clinical decision support system reflect current Australian Guidelines. Development of the computerised clinical decision support system using evidence-based guidelines can be optimised by a multidisciplinary iterative process of feedback, testing and software adaptation by experts in modern development technologies.

  9. Clinical Evaluation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation After Angioplasty for Diabetic Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H L; Zhu, X H; Zhang, B; Zhou, L; Wang, W Y

    2016-09-01

    Aims: The multilineage differentiation potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUCMSCs) holds therapeutic promise for non-healing ulcers and tissue regeneration. The present study evaluated the effects of HUCMSC transplantation after angioplasty for treatment of diabetic foot. Methods: Included in the study were 53 patients (72 limbs) with severe symptoms of Fontaine II-IV diabetic foot accompanied by varying degrees of lower extremity arterial disease. The patients were randomly apportioned to a control group (25 patients; 38 limbs) or an experimental group (28 patients; 34 limbs). Patients of both groups received interventional treatment with angioplasty; those in the experimental group also received HUCMSCs by endovascular infusion and injection around the foot ulcer. Results: Within the 3-month follow-up, relative to patients in the control group, those in the experimental group experienced significantly greater and more stable improvements in skin temperature, ankle-brachial pressure index, transcutaneous oxygen tension, and claudication distance. Notably, 3 months after treatment a significant increase in neovessels, accompanied by complete or gradual ulcer healing, was shown in the experimental group. In addition, no serious complications or adverse reactions were associated with the treatment. Conclusion: Therefore, our results indicate that HUCMSC transplantation after angioplasty is a safe and effective clinical therapy for severe diabetic foot. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. A STUDY OF SILVER NITRATE SOLUTION IN DRESSING OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

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    Bipin Kishore Bara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic foot ulcer is very common now a days. It ranges from 15% to 25%. Various methods and dressing agents have been tried for dressing. In this study, silver nitrate in solution form as a dressing agent has been tried. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was conducted at MKCG Medical College, Berhampur, Odisha. Here, a total of 100 number of patients having diabetic foot ulcer were studied and consent for various procedures were obtained from them. Data regarding granulation tissue formation, pus culture and sensitivity report, skin graft acceptance and hospital stay were analysed in tabular manner. RESULTS Among 100 study subjects, 50 were taken as control group and 50 as study group. The granulation tissue formation on 14th day was 95% in study group and 82% in control group. Successful skin graft uptake was 94% in study group and 80% in control group. Hospital stay in study group was 25.6 ± 3.4 days and 35.3 ± 7.2 days. Pus culture sensitivity test on day 14 was positive in 6 cases in study group and 12 cases in control group. CONCLUSION Foot ulcer is a common problem worldwide, among which diabetic foot ulcer is the commonest one. Various modalities of dressing methods and materials are available, but in my study silver nitrate in the form of solution form is a better option as compared to others.

  11. The Efficacy of Jing Wan Hong Ointment for Nerve Injury Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Its Mechanisms

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    Shumei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wan Hong ointment contains 30 kinds of Chinese herbs, with functions of activating blood circulation to disperse blood stasis, clearing heat, eliminating dampness, and reducing swelling by detoxification. Therefore, Jing Wan Hong ointment may facilitate the healing of ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of Jing Wan Hong ointment for healing diabetic foot ulceration in Wistar rats induced by streptozotocin and sciatic nerve damage. The results showed that Jing Wan Hong ointment had a marked effect on foot ulcers in diabetic rats induced by initial nerve injury. These effects were manifested by reducing the foot ulcer size and Wagner grade after seven days of treatment. The diabetic rats with foot ulcers were almost healed after 21 days of treatment. Moreover, the mechanisms of this effect seem to be dependent on increased expression of PDGF mRNA, but there was no influence on the expression of TGF-β, VEGF, and FLT-1 mRNA.

  12. Footwear used by individuals with diabetes and a history of foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Gayle E; Smith, Douglas G; Wallace, Carolyn M; Vath, Christy A; Sullivan, Katrina; Hayes, Shane; Yu, Onchee; Martin, Don; Maciejewski, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    To describe footwear preferences of people with diabetes and a history of foot ulcer from two large western Washington State healthcare organizations. As part of a clinical trial of footwear, self-reported information on footwear preferences, use, and cost were obtained from persons with diabetes and a prior healed foot ulcer for the year before their study enrollment. All participants' shoes were allocated into optimal, adequate, and dangerous categories based on design, structural and safety features, and materials. The 309 males and 91 females in this study averaged 62 years of age. At baseline, men owned an average of 6 (+3) pairs of shoes, with an average purchase price of $56, while women owned an average of 8 (+5) pairs, with an average purchase price of $42. Women spent an average of 51% of their time in shoes in dangerous shoes compared to men who spent 27% of their time. Men and women spent nearly 30% of their time while out of bed in slippers, stockings, and barefoot. People with a history of diabetes and foot ulcers needed several styles of safe and attractive shoes for regular activities. Healthcare professionals can provide patients with information on good footwear choices to help them select adequate shoes while avoiding dangerous shoes. This approach is more realistic than trying to move all people with prior foot risk factors or ulcers into uniformly optimal footwear, since recent evidence does not support this practice.

  13. Decreasing incidence of foot ulcer among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the period 2001-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A.; Almdal, T.; Nielsen, A. Anker

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a serious complication to diabetes. The aim was to study the incidence of first DFU among patients with type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), stratified according to etiology: neuropathic, neuro-ischemic or ischemic, over a period of 14 years (2001–2014). Met...

  14. Factors Associated With Quality of Life in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers

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    Nasiriziba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU is a serious and costly complication in diabetes which affects approximately 15% of patients with diabetes and affects their quality of life (QOL. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors associated with QOL in patients with DFU. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 60 patients (32 males and 28 females hospitalized for DFU, performed through convenience sampling. Data related factors and the QOL questionnaire for patients with DFU were abridged. This questionnaire has 29 questions in six dimensions of enjoying life, physical health, daily activities dependence, negative emotions, concern about wound, and wound caring, which evaluate the QOL in patients with DFU. The scoring method for this tool is five optional Likert. Descriptive and analytic statistical methods were used to analyze the data. Results Of the 60 patients with DFU, 53% were male and 47% female with an average age of 58.08 ± 11.95 years and average QOL of 41.1 ± 9.15. Statistical analysis showed that age (P = 0.002, employment (P ≤ 0001, socioeconomic status (P = 0.016, leg ulcer (P ≤ 0001, and the number of foot ulcer (P = 0.017 had a statistically significant relationship with QOL and its dimensions. Other variables did not have a significant relationship with QOL, but some of them such as smoking during negative emotions (P = 0.046 and marital status affecting the foot care difficulties (P = 0.03 had significant statistical relationships with QOL. Conclusions Diabetic foot ulcer affects different aspects of life and can reduce patient’s QOL. To improve the care behaviors and have a better control of foot ulcers and improve the QOL for these patients, taking into account factors such as age, occupation, marital status, number of wounds, and economic status is essential to plan for care and health needs in these patients.

  15. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic—An observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas Peter; Nielsen, A.A.; Nielsen, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. METHODS: The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus...... no changes was observed for ischemic toe ulcers. Adjusted for changes in the patient population, the overall rate of healing for neuropathic and neuro-ischemic toe ulcers almost doubled (HR=1.95 [95% CI: 1.36-2.80]). CONCLUSION: The results show that the healing of toe ulcers improved. This outcome could...

  16. Effectiveness of a Patient Education Module on Diabetic Foot Care in Outpatient Setting: An Open-label Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Hammadur Sk; Jyotsna, Viveka P; Sreenivas, V; Krishnan, Anand; Tandon, Nikhil

    2018-01-01

    A large number of patients with diabetes mellitus are unaware of foot care and are at risk of developing foot ulcer and amputation. This increases healthcare burden due to preventable complication of diabetes. We conducted this study to assess the effectiveness of a foot care education module for diabetes developed by us. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with diabetes mellitus attending our outpatient were randomized into intervention ( n = 63) and control groups ( n = 64). At first visit, 1 and 3 months later, both groups filled a questionnaire regarding foot care knowledge and practice. The intervention group was administered foot care education module and the control group received routine care at baseline and 1 month. Patient education module consisted of an audio-visual display and a pamphlet on diabetes foot care. Change in score at 3 months was assessed by Student's t -test. Knowledge scores in the intervention group at first, second, and third visits were 9.8 ± 1.8, 10.2 ± 1.6, and 11.0 ± 1.7, respectively. The knowledge scores in the control group at first, second, and third visits were 9.9 ± 1.7, 9.8 ± 1.6, and 10.0 ± 1.8, respectively. The change in knowledge score was statistically significant ( P education module in outpatient setting is an effective means to improve foot care knowledge and practice in patients with diabetes.

  17. What has finite element analysis taught us about diabetic foot disease and its management? A systematic review.

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    Scott Telfer

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades finite element (FE analysis has become a popular tool for researchers seeking to simulate the biomechanics of the healthy and diabetic foot. The primary aims of these simulations have been to improve our understanding of the foot's complicated mechanical loading in health and disease and to inform interventions designed to prevent plantar ulceration, a major complication of diabetes. This article provides a systematic review and summary of the findings from FE analysis-based computational simulations of the diabetic foot.A systematic literature search was carried out and 31 relevant articles were identified covering three primary themes: methodological aspects relevant to modelling the diabetic foot; investigations of the pathomechanics of the diabetic foot; and simulation-based design of interventions to reduce ulceration risk.Methodological studies illustrated appropriate use of FE analysis for simulation of foot mechanics, incorporating nonlinear tissue mechanics, contact and rigid body movements. FE studies of pathomechanics have provided estimates of internal soft tissue stresses, and suggest that such stresses may often be considerably larger than those measured at the plantar surface and are proportionally greater in the diabetic foot compared to controls. FE analysis allowed evaluation of insole performance and development of new insole designs, footwear and corrective surgery to effectively provide intervention strategies. The technique also presents the opportunity to simulate the effect of changes associated with the diabetic foot on non-mechanical factors such as blood supply to local tissues.While significant advancement in diabetic foot research has been made possible by the use of FE analysis, translational utility of this powerful tool for routine clinical care at the patient level requires adoption of cost-effective (both in terms of labour and computation and reliable approaches with clear clinical

  18. Improving foot self-care knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors in patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulceration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lifeng; Sidani, Souraya; Cooper-Brathwaite, Angela; Metcalfe, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    The pilot study aimed to explore the effects of an educational intervention on patients' foot self-care knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors in adult patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulceration. The intervention consisted of three sessions and was given over a 3-week period. A total of 70 eligible consenting participants were recruited for this pilot study. Fifty-six participants completed the study. The outcomes were assessed at pretest, following the first two sessions, and 3-month follow-up. The findings indicated that the foot self-care educational intervention was effective in improving foot self-care knowledge, self-efficacy and behaviors in adult patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulceration. The findings support the effects of the intervention. Future research should evaluate its efficacy using a randomized clinical trial design, and a large sample of patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulcerations. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Health locus of control and self-care behaviors in diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abredari, Hamid; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Rassouli, Maryam; Nasiri, Navideh; Taher, Mohammad; Abedi, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot affects more than 25% of diabetic patients and finally up to 20% of cases result in amputation. The most important factor resulting in severe complications or even death is lack of self-care. Health locus of control has been introduced as one of health factors and predicting factors of self-care. This research was performed for analyzing the correlation between self-care behaviors and health locus of control in diabetic foot patients. In this descriptive study, 120 patients with diabetic foot were chosen using convenience sampling from endocrine clinic and wards of endocrine and vascular surgery of Teleqani Hospital of Shahid Beheshti Medical University. The data were gathered by demographic, self-care behavior, and health locus of control questionnaires. The t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and spearman coefficient were used to analyze the data. RESULTS of this research showed that there is a direct and significant relation between selfcare behaviors and internal health locus of control (plocus of control (plocus of control improve and strengthen patients' self-care behaviors and their involvement in treatment.

  20. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia

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    Pradana Soewondo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: a cohort study (February – October 2010 was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG, marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery, and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG. Results: median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM, previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. Conclusion: in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  1. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in severe diabetic foot ischemia: outcomes and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueminet, S; Hartemann-Heurtier, A; Izzillo, R; Cluzel, P; Golmard, J L; Ha Van, G; Koskas, F; Grimaldi, A

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of severe ischemic diabetic foot ulcers for which percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was considered as the first-line vascular procedure. Factors associated with successful PTA were sought. In 32 consecutive diabetic patients with foot ulcers and severe limb ischemia, PTA was performed if feasible; if not, primary bypass grafting was done when feasible. All patients were followed until healing or for at least one year. Patients with worsening ulcers after PTA underwent bypass grafting. Clinical and angiographic factors influencing outcomes after PTA were sought by univariate and multivariate analysis. PTA was done in 25 of the 32 (78%) patients, and considered clinically successful in 13 (52%). After 1 year, the healing rate was 70% and the limb salvage rate 90%. Successful PTA was significantly associated with a higher post-PTA transcutaneous oxygen pressure (P = 0.03) and presence of at least one patent pedal vessel (P = 0.03) in the univariate analysis; only a patent pedal vessel was significant in the multivariate analysis. Primary PTA in diabetic patients with severe ischemic foot ulcers provides similar outcomes to usual results obtained in severe ischemia in absence of diabetes. The presence of one patent pedal vessel on arteriography before PTA is the best prognostic factor.

  2. Plantar pressures are higher in cases with diabetic foot ulcers compared to controls despite a longer stance phase duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu E; Crowther, Robert G; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sangla, Kunwarjit S; Wearing, Scott; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-09-15

    Current international guidelines advocate achieving at least a 30 % reduction in maximum plantar pressure to reduce the risk of foot ulcers in people with diabetes. However, whether plantar pressures differ in cases with foot ulcers to controls without ulcers is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess if plantar pressures were higher in patients with active plantar diabetic foot ulcers (cases) compared to patients with diabetes without a foot ulcer history (diabetes controls) and people without diabetes or a foot ulcer history (healthy controls). Twenty-one cases with diabetic foot ulcers, 69 diabetes controls and 56 healthy controls were recruited for this case-control study. Plantar pressures at ten sites on both feet and stance phase duration were measured using a pre-established protocol. Primary outcomes were mean peak plantar pressure, pressure-time integral and stance phase duration. Non-parametric analyses were used with Holm's correction to correct for multiple testing. Binary logistic regression models were used to adjust outcomes for age, sex and body mass index. Median differences with 95 % confidence intervals and Cohen's d values (standardised mean difference) were reported for all significant outcomes. The majority of ulcers were located on the plantar surface of the hallux and toes. When adjusted for age, sex and body mass index, the mean peak plantar pressure and pressure-time integral of toes and the mid-foot were significantly higher in cases compared to diabetes and healthy controls (p diabetic foot ulcers despite having a longer stance phase duration which would be expected to lower plantar pressure. Whether plantar pressure changes can predict ulcer healing should be the focus of future research. These results highlight the importance of offloading feet during active ulceration in addition to before ulceration.

  3. Low Level Laser Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Critical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin H. Beckmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers as one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus are defined as nonhealing or long-lasting chronic skin ulcers in diabetic patients. Multidisciplinary care for the diabetic foot is common, but treatment results are often unsatisfactory. Low level laser therapy (LLLT on wound areas as well as on acupuncture points, as a noninvasive, pain-free method with minor side effects, has been considered as a possible treatment option for the diabetic foot syndrome. A systematic literature review identified 1764 articles on this topic. Finally, we adopted 22 eligible references; 8 of them were cell studies, 6 were animal studies, and 8 were clinical trials. Cell studies and animal studies gave evidence of cellular migration, viability, and proliferation of fibroblast cells, quicker reepithelization and reformed connective tissue, enhancement of microcirculation, and anti-inflammatory effects by inhibition of prostaglandine, interleukin, and cytokine as well as direct antibacterial effects by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The transferral of these data into clinical medicine is under debate. The majority of clinical studies show a potential benefit of LLLT in wound healing of diabetic ulcers. But there are a lot of aspects in these studies limiting final evidence about the actual output of this kind of treatment method. In summary, all studies give enough evidence to continue research on laser therapy for diabetic ulcers, but clinical trials using human models do not provide sufficient evidence to establish the usefulness of LLLT as an effective tool in wound care regimes at present. Further well designed research trials are required to determine the true value of LLLT in routine wound care.

  4. Increased Number of Langerhans Cells in the Epidermis of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Correlates with Healing Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie; Lehmann, Janin; Pastar, Irena; Kirsner, Robert S.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells. They represent one of the first cells of immunological barrier and play an important role during the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the immunopathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated co-morbidities such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), considerable gaps in our knowledge exist. In this study, we utilized the human ex vivo wound model and confirmed the increased epidermal LCs at wound edges during early phases of wound healing. Next, we aimed to determine differences in quantity of LCs between normal human and diabetic foot skin and to learn if the presence of LCs correlates with the healing outcome in DFUs. We utilized immunofluorescence to detect CD207+ LCs in specimens from normal and diabetic foot skin and DFU wound edges. Specimens from DFUs were collected at the initial visit and 4 weeks at the time when the healing outcome was determined. DFUs that decreased in size by >50% were considered to be healing, while DFUs with a size reduction of healing. Quantitative assessment of LCs showed a higher number of LCs in healing when compared to non–healing DFU’s. Our findings provide evidence that LCs are present in higher number in diabetic feet than normal foot skin. Healing DFUs show a higher number of LCs compared to non-healing DFUs. These findings indicate that the epidermal immune barrier plays an important role in the DFU healing outcome and may offer new therapeutic avenues targeting LC in non-healing DFUs. PMID:24277309

  5. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer Using Matriderm In Comparison with a Skin Graft

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    Hyojin Jeon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor patients with neuropathy, vasculopathy, and impairment of wound healing, treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer poses many challenges. A large number of dermal analogues have been invented in an effort to overcome these challenges. Matriderm, a dermal analogue, is made from bovine collagen and elastin. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the effectiveness of Matriderm for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, in comparison with skin grafting.MethodsSixty patients with diabetic foot ulcer were included in this prospective study. The average age of the patients, who had type II diabetes mellitus, was 58 years old. The patients were allocated to an experimental or control group with their consents. The patients were selected with their consent for inclusion in an experimental group and a control group. Patients in the experimental group received a Matriderm appliance and a split-thickness skin graft, while those in the control group received only a split-thickness skin graft.ResultsA shorter hospitalization period (7.52 weeks was observed in the experimental group than in the control group (9.22 weeks, and a shorter period of time (8.61 weeks was required for complete healing, compared with the control group (12.94 weeks, with statistical significance (P<0.05. A higher elasticity ratio of the affected side to the non-affected side was observed in the experimental group, compared with the control group (P<0.01.ConclusionsMatriderm enables effective healing and improves elasticity in treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcer.

  6. Assessment of prevalence and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot ulcer

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    Thulasikumar G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcer(DFU is very common yet challenging complication of diabetes worldwide. These ulcers are biologically compromised majorly by ischemia and neuropathy. Ischemia has gained recognition as a significant cause of DFU. The association of peripheral arterial disease(PAD largely impacts the treatment outcomes of DFU in terms of ulcer healing, lower limb amputations and mortality. The burden of PAD in DFU in South Indian population has not been assessed adequately in the recent years. A multidisciplinary approach to DFU and prompt diagnosis of ischemia will decrease the loss of limb and life. The objective of the study was to assess the peripheral arterial disease and associated risk factors in patients with diabetic foot ulcer. A total of 100 patients were evaluated in this study. The patients were subjected to detailed history and clinical examination which included distal pulse assessment, ankle-brachial index(ABI and duplex scan to evaluate PAD. The data was subjected to statistical analysis to find out association between parameters of interest. The prevalence of PAD in DFU was found to be 36%. It was more prevalent in males and in age>40 years and higher with increasing age. PAD was associated almost equally with plantar and dorsal ulcers, more often whole of foot was involved. There is significant association of PAD with longer diabetic duration(p<0.0001 with mean disease duration of 10 years. Previous studies aimed to study prevalence of PAD in diabetes irrespective of foot ulcer. The present study analyzed various factors coexisting with DFU and PAD. The results conclude that peripheral arterial disease is a potential risk factor for major limb amputations.

  7. Prognosis of the infected diabetic foot ulcer: a 12-month prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndosi, M; Wright-Hughes, A; Brown, S; Backhouse, M; Lipsky, B A; Bhogal, M; Reynolds, C; Vowden, P; Jude, E B; Nixon, J; Nelson, E A

    2018-01-01

    To determine clinical outcomes and explore prognostic factors related to ulcer healing in people with a clinically infected diabetic foot ulcer. This multicentre, prospective, observational study reviewed participants' data at 12 months after culture of a diabetic foot ulcer requiring antibiotic therapy. From participants' notes, we obtained information on the incidence of wound healing, ulcer recurrence, lower extremity amputation, lower extremity revascularization and death. We estimated the cumulative incidence of healing at 6 and 12 months, adjusted for lower extremity amputation and death using a competing risk analysis, and explored the relationship between baseline factors and healing incidence. In the first year after culture of the index ulcer, 45/299 participants (15.1%) had died. The ulcer had healed in 136 participants (45.5%), but recurred in 13 (9.6%). An ipsilateral lower extremity amputation was recorded in 52 (17.4%) and revascularization surgery in 18 participants (6.0%). Participants with an ulcer present for ~2 months or more had a lower incidence of healing (hazard ratio 0.55, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.77), as did those with a PEDIS (perfusion, extent, depth, infection, sensation) perfusion grade of ≥2 (hazard ratio 0.37, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.55). Participants with a single ulcer on their index foot had a higher incidence of healing than those with multiple ulcers (hazard ratio 1.90, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.06). Clinical outcomes at 12 months for people with an infected diabetic foot ulcer are generally poor. Our data confirm the adverse prognostic effect of limb ischaemia, longer ulcer duration and the presence of multiple ulcers. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  8. Is surgical debridement necessary in the diabetic foot treated with photodynamic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivo, João Paulo; Serrano, Rodrigo; Zimmermann, Lívia Maria; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Baptista, Mauricio S; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Atallah, Álvaro N

    2017-01-01

    Background : Diabetic patients are susceptible to developing foot ulcers with serious complications such as osteomyelitis and amputations. Treatment approaches are still empirical and the benefit of usual procedures such as surgical debridement has not been properly evaluated. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive and highly efficient method for the treatment of the diabetic foot, being able to eradicate the infection and to stimulate healing, decreasing considerably the amputation risk. In the day-to-day practice of our service, we have been faced with the question whether debridement is necessary before PDT. In here, we designed a study to answer that question. Methods : Patients were divided in two groups: In one of the groups (n = 17), debridement was performed before PDT and in the other (n = 40) only PDT treatment was performed. PDT sessions were performed once a week in all patients until healing was achieved, as indicated by visual inspection as well as by radiographic and laboratory exams. At the start of the study, the two groups had no statistical differences concerning their clinical features: average age, gender, insulin use, diabetes mellitus onset time and previous amputations. Results : PDT was effective in the treatment of 100% of the patients showing no relapses after one year of follow up. The group submitted to PDT without previous debridement had a statistically significant (p = 0.036, Mann-Whitney) shorter cure time (29 days, ~27%). Conclusion : Our data indicates that debridement is not necessary in the treatment of diabetic foot in patients that have enough peripheral arterial perfusion. In addition, we reproduced previous studies confirming that PDT is an efficient, safe, simple and affordable treatment method for the diabetic foot.

  9. The Important Role of Specialist Nurse in the Improvement of Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer: Letter to the Editor

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    Amirmohseni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU is considered as one of the main causes of hospitalization in diabetic patients, which can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if the necessary care is not provided. Based on the recent investigations, one of the most effective tactics to manage diabetic foot ulcer is to form a multidisciplinary team including a general practitioner, a nurse, an educator, podiatrists, and some consultants. Although all team members play their own important roles in reduction of DFU and amputation incidence, the role of nurses seems to be more essential. In the developed countries, the diabetes nursing is divided into several categories which one of them is diabetic foot specialist nurse. Totally, these specialists play an effective role in prevention, care, and rehabilitation of the patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Today, the specialist nurses provide effective foot ulcer management and treatment in many countries; however, these specialists, in some developing countries such as Iran, highlight a lack of specialist training as an obstacle to effective healthcare provision. Therefore, the current study aimed to emphasize on the important role of specialist nurses in the improvement of patients with diabetic foot ulcer to encourage the authorities in order to take appropriate strategies.

  10. Diabetic complications do not hamper improvement of health-related quality of life over the course of treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, Volkert; Thorsen, Hanne; Holstein, Per E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic complications, and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), are associated with low health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated whether the presence of diabetic complications also influenced the improvement of HRQoL during DFU treatment. Methods: 1088 patients presenting...

  11. Outcomes after foot surgery in people with a diabetic foot ulcer and a 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenselink, E; Holloway, S; Eefting, D

    2017-05-02

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively measure the outcomes of foot-sparing surgery at one year follow-up for patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). We assessed wound healing and the need for further surgery in relation to the variables that influence healing. Data were retrospectively collected by reviewing the electronic files of patients attending the Wound Expert Clinic (WEC). Outcomes of surgical debridement, toe, ray and transmetatarsal amputations were assessed. A total of 129 cases in 121 patients were identified for inclusion. The results demonstrated that complete wound healing was reached in 52% (61/117) of the patients within 12 months. The need for additional surgery or for major amputation was 56% (n=72/129) and 30% (n=39/129) respectively. The need for an additional procedure was particularly high after surgical debridement (75%, 33/44) and transmetatarsal amputation (64%, 7/11). Risk factors for non-healing or for a major amputation were: infection (p=0.01), ischaemia (p=0.01), a history of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (p<0.01) and smoking (p=0.01). Additional findings were that not all patients underwent vascular assessment and in half of the patients there was a delay in undergoing revascularisation. The results of the study reveal some areas for improvement including timely revascularisation and performance of multiple debridement procedures if needed in order to save a limb.

  12. RISK FACTORS ASSESSMENT OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER USING THE SIXTY SECONDS SCREENING TOOL: A HOSPITAL BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY AT TIKUR ANBESSA SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Tesfatsion; Yifter, Helen; Lemessa, Teklu

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. Annual foot exam in diabetic patients and education on foot care is a cost effective way of preventing foot ulcers and amputations. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Diabetes Center on 200 participants using the 60 seconds diabetic foot ulcer screening tool from April to August 2014. A total of 200 patients were included in the study. The male to female ratio was 1 to 2.64 (55 to 145). The median age was 50 years (IQR, 39-59 years) and median duration of diabetes mellitus was 11 years (IQR, 6-11 years). Among the 200 patients, 169 (84.5%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas; 31(15.5%) had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Among the participants, only 9 (4.5%) had foot examination in the last 5 years. Thirty one (15.5%) participants had history of previous ulcer, 1 (0.5%) had history of amputation, 11 (5.5%) had deformity of shape and structure of the foot. Among the participants, 71 (35.5%) had at least one risk factor for the development of diabetic foot ulcer. Diabetic foot problems are common among the diabetic patients examined at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Diabetic Center. Screening for diabetic foot ulcer is a very easy practice which will take maximum of 60 seconds per patient. Despite this fact it is barely practiced for outpatients visiting the diabetic clinics. We stress the need for a clinical diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcers using the 60 seconds screening tool.

  13. Surgical management of Diabetic foot ulcers: A Tanzanian university teaching hospital experience

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    Kataraihya Johannes B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs pose a therapeutic challenge to surgeons, especially in developing countries where health care resources are limited and the vast majority of patients present to health facilities late with advanced foot ulcers. A prospective descriptive study was done at Bugando Medical Centre from February 2008 to January 2010 to describe our experience in the surgical management of DFUs in our local environment and compare with what is known in the literature. Findings Of the total 4238 diabetic patients seen at BMC during the period under study, 136 (3.2% patients had DFUs. Males outnumbered females by the ratio of 1.2:1. Their mean age was 54.32 years (ranged 21-72years. Thirty-eight (27.9% patients were newly diagnosed diabetic patients. The majority of patients (95.5% had type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean duration of diabetes was 8.2 years while the duration of DFUs was 18.34 weeks. Fourteen (10.3% patients had previous history of foot ulcers and six (4.4% patients had previous amputations. The forefoot was commonly affected in 60.3% of cases. Neuropathic ulcers were the most common type of DFUs in 57.4% of cases. Wagner's stage 4 and 5 ulcers were the most prevalent at 29.4% and 23.5% respectively. The majority of patients (72.1% were treated surgically. Lower limb amputation was the most common surgical procedure performed in 56.7% of cases. The complication rate was (33.5% and surgical site infection was the most common complication (18.8%. Bacterial profile revealed polymicrobial pattern and Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent microorganism isolated. All the microorganisms isolated showed high resistance to commonly used antibiotics except for Meropenem and imipenem, which were 100% sensitive each respectively. The mean hospital stay was 36.24 ± 12.62 days (ranged 18-128 days. Mortality rate was 13.2%. Conclusion Diabetic foot ulceration constitutes a major source of morbidity and mortality

  14. The Interaction between Diabetes, Body Mass Index, Hepatic Steatosis, and Risk of Liver Resection: Insulin Dependent Diabetes Is the Greatest Risk for Major Complications

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    M. G. Wiggans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to assess the relationship between diabetes, obesity, and hepatic steatosis in patients undergoing liver resection and to determine if these factors are independent predictors of major complications. Materials and Methods. Analysis of a prospectively maintained database of patients undergoing liver resection between 2005 and 2012 was undertaken. Background liver was assessed for steatosis and classified as <33% and ≥33%. Major complications were defined as Grade III–V complications using the Dindo-Clavien classification. Results. 504 patients underwent liver resection, of whom 56 had diabetes and 61 had steatosis ≥33%. Median BMI was 26 kg/m2 (16–54 kg/m2. 94 patients developed a major complication (18.7%. BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (P=0.001 and diabetes (P=0.018 were associated with steatosis ≥33%. Only insulin dependent diabetes was a risk factor for major complications (P=0.028. Age, male gender, hypoalbuminaemia, synchronous bowel procedures, extent of resection, and blood transfusion were also independent risk factors. Conclusions. Liver surgery in the presence of steatosis, elevated BMI, and non-insulin dependent diabetes is not associated with major complications. Although diabetes requiring insulin therapy was a significant risk factor, the major risk factors relate to technical aspects of surgery, particularly synchronous bowel procedures.

  15. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; de Haart, Mirjam; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken. RESULTS On the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44–1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15–0.99], P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended. PMID:24130357

  16. Surgical management of diabetic foot and role of UT (University of Texas) classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishwani, A.H.; Kiyani, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of University of Texas Classification in the management of Diabetic foot. Design: Descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Surgical unit II Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi (2003 to 2008) and Department of Surgery Combined Military Hospital Peshawar (July 2008 to Jan 2010). Patients and Method: A total of 300 patients who reported to Surgical Department with a foot ulcer or infection and diagnosed to have Diabetes Mellitus were studied. Patients of both gender and age >12 years were included. Patients of end stage renal disease, compromised immunity or on steroid therapy were excluded. Detailed history and clinical examination were recorded. Routine investigations including complete blood examination, urine routine examination, renal function tests, x-ray foot, chest x-ray, ECG and pus for culture and sensitivity were recorded. Lesions were classified according to University of Texas classification and treated accordingly. Results: Majority of the patients were of 50 to 70 years age group. Male to female ratio was 4:1. Big toe was the commonest site followed by fore foot and heel. Patients were classified according to UT classification. Patients were managed with antibiotics, dressings, incision and drainage, debridement, vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with or without skin grafting and amputations of different types. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest isolate. Conclusion: Our study has shown that UT classification is an effective system of assessing the severity of Diabetic foot at the time of presentation and planning its management. Amputation rates, time of healing and morbidity increases with increasing stage and grade. (author)

  17. Comparision of Vacuum-Asisted Closure and Moist Wound Dressing in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Ravari, Hassan; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi Saeed; Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Johari, Hamed Ghoddusi; Vatanchi, Attieh Mohammadzadeh; Sangaki, Abolghasem; Shahrodi, Mohammad Vahedian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is a new method in wound care which speeds wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates. This study aims to evaluate its efficacy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients with diabetic foot ulcers were enrolled in the moist dressing group, and 10 patients in the VAC group. The site, size and depth of the wound were inspected and recorded before and every three days du...

  18. Resource utilisation and costs associated with the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Prospective data from the Eurodiale Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prompers, L.; Huijberts, M.; Schaper, N.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of the present study was to investigate resource utilisation and associated costs in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and to analyse differences in resource utilisation between individuals with or without peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and/or infection. Methods Data....... In view of the magnitude of the costs associated with in-hospital stay, reducing the number and duration of hospital admissions seems an attractive option to decrease costs in diabetic foot disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  19. Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing

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    F. R. Henshaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Hypothesis. Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Methods. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. Results. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r=0.406; P<0.001. Conclusions/Interpretation. These data collectively increasingly substantiate a functional role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcers.

  20. [Ankle and foot ulcerations in a diabetic patient revealing cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclot, J; Stansal, A; Lazareth, I; Galloula, A; Duchatelle, V; Laurent-Bellue, A; Priollet, P

    2014-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that typically manifests as a typical crusted ulcer called the oriental sore. Its localization on the lower limbs can be mistaken for a leg ulcer. An 81-year-old male, native of Algeria, with type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension and arteriopathy developed a chronic ulceration of the right ankle and foot compatible with the diagnosis of infectious diabetic foot. Non-improvement with antibiotics, local treatment and rest, and the absence of any hemodynamic arteriopathy led to skin biopsies. Polymerase chain reaction performed on biopsy samples for parasitological investigations yielded the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major. Complete healing was obtained with topical care alone, the patient having declined an etiological treatment. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the rare infectious etiologies of chronic leg ulcers. Several therapeutic options, including abstention, can be proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Noninvasive management of the diabetic foot with critical limb ischemia: current options and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Mathias; Slesaczeck, Torsten; Rietzsch, Hannes; Münch, Dirk; Nanning, Thomas; Paetzold, Hartmut; Florek, Hans-Joachim; Barthel, Andreas; Weiss, Norbert; Bornstein, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Foot ulcers are a major complication in patients with diabetes mellitus and involve dramatic restrictions to quality of life and also lead to enormous socio-economical loss due to the high amputation rate. The poor and slow wound healing is often aggravated by the frequent comorbidity of foot ulcers with peripheral arterial disease, making the treatment of this condition even more complicated. While the local treatment of foot ulcers is mainly based on mechanical relief and prevention or treatment of infection, improving perfusion of the impaired tissue remains the major challenge in peripheral arterial disease. While focal arterial stenosis is the domain of interventional angioplasty or vascular surgery, patients with critical limb ischemia and lacking options for revascularization have a much worse prognosis, because current treatment options avoiding amputation are scarce. However, based on recent research efforts, there is rising hope for promising and more-effective therapeutic approaches for these patients. Here, we discuss the current improvements of established therapies aimed at an improvement of limb perfusion, as well as the development of novel cutting-edge therapies based on stem-cell technology. The experiences of a 'high-volume center' for treatment of diabetic foot syndrome with a current major amputation rate of 4% are discussed.

  2. A questionnaire for determining prevalence of diabetes related foot disease (Q-DFD: construction and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Caroline A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community based prevalence for diabetes related foot disease (DRFD has been poorly quantified in Australian populations. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey tool to facilitate collection of community based prevalence data for individuals with DRFD via telephone interview. Methods Agreed components of DRFD were identified through an electronic literature search. Expert feedback and feedback from a population based construction sample were sought on the initial draft. Survey reliability was tested using a cohort recruited through a general practice, a hospital outpatient clinic and an outpatient podiatry clinic. Level of agreement between survey findings and either medical record or clinical assessment was evaluated. Results The Questionnaire for Diabetes Related Foot Disease (Q-DFD comprised 12 questions aimed at determining presence of peripheral sensory neuropathy (PN and peripheral vascular disease (PVD, based on self report of symptoms and/or clinical history, and self report of foot ulceration, amputation and foot deformity. Survey results for 38 from 46 participants demonstrated agreement with either clinical assessment or medical record (kappa 0.65, sensitivity 89.0%, and specificity 77.8%. Correlation for individual survey components was moderate to excellent. Inter and intrarater reliability and test re-test reliability was moderate to high for all survey domains. Conclusion The development of the Q-DFD provides an opportunity for ongoing collection of prevalence estimates for DRFD across Australia.

  3. A questionnaire for determining prevalence of diabetes related foot disease (Q-DFD): construction and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shan M; Brand, Caroline A; Colman, Peter G; Campbell, Donald A

    2009-11-25

    Community based prevalence for diabetes related foot disease (DRFD) has been poorly quantified in Australian populations. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey tool to facilitate collection of community based prevalence data for individuals with DRFD via telephone interview. Agreed components of DRFD were identified through an electronic literature search. Expert feedback and feedback from a population based construction sample were sought on the initial draft. Survey reliability was tested using a cohort recruited through a general practice, a hospital outpatient clinic and an outpatient podiatry clinic. Level of agreement between survey findings and either medical record or clinical assessment was evaluated. The Questionnaire for Diabetes Related Foot Disease (Q-DFD) comprised 12 questions aimed at determining presence of peripheral sensory neuropathy (PN) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD), based on self report of symptoms and/or clinical history, and self report of foot ulceration, amputation and foot deformity. Survey results for 38 from 46 participants demonstrated agreement with either clinical assessment or medical record (kappa 0.65, sensitivity 89.0%, and specificity 77.8%). Correlation for individual survey components was moderate to excellent. Inter and intrarater reliability and test re-test reliability was moderate to high for all survey domains. The development of the Q-DFD provides an opportunity for ongoing collection of prevalence estimates for DRFD across Australia.

  4. Microbiological profile and clinical outcome of severe foot ulcers of diabetic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marivaldo Loyola Aragão(

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the microbiological profile and clinical outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers of inpatients of a tertiary university hospital, at Ceara, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical charts data of all diabetic inpatients of the Endocrine and Diabetes Unit of Walter Cantídio University Hospital (Federal University of Ceará, admitted from January, 2006 to June, 2007 for severe foot ulcers (minimum of grade 2 of Wagner`s classification, which were refractory to ambulatory treatment. Clinical data from each patient were recorded (sex, age, diabetes duration, and comorbidities as well as microbiological characteristics of foot ulcers and surgical (amputations material. Results: We identified 17 diabetic patients, all type 2, aged 58.11 ± 10.8 years and 12.4 ± 8.4 years of disease, 58.8% male. Of ulcers, 41.1% were grade 2; 35.2% grade 3; 11.7% grade 4 and 11.7% grade 5 of Wagner; 64.7% with less than 3 months of evolution. Debridement was performed in 82.3% of patients and amputation in 47%; osteomyelitis was identified in 47% of cases. All patients started empiric antibiotic therapy, where ciprofloxacin/metronidazole was the most used scheme (76.5%. Cultures were negative in 12.5% of the patients. In the positive ones, the most prevalent bacterial pathogens detected in the culture materials were: S. aureus (57.1%; S. viridans (28.7%; P. aeruginosas (28.7%; M. morganii (28.7%. The majority (75% of isolated S. aureus were methicillin-resistant, but were sensitive to vacomicin. Conclusion: We observed the presence of polymicrobial flora with a large number of multiresistant pathogens and high prevalence of osteomyelitis and amputations in diabetic patients with severe ulcers, neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.

  5. Clinical and behavioral factors associated with management outcome in hospitalized patients with diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yekta Z

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zahra Yekta1, Reza Pourali2, Rahim Nezhadrahim3, Leila Ravanyar4, Mohammad Ghasemi-rad5 1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 2Medical Demonstrator, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 3Department of Infectious Disease, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 4Master of Health Education, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 5Student Research Committee, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Islamic Republic of Iran Objectives: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU has been linked to high mortality and morbidity in diabetic patients. In spite of the increasing prevalence of diabetes and its complications, this issue has not been adequately studied in Iran. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study we attempt to describe the prevalence of diabetic foot amputation in patients admitted to our training hospitals in Urmia, Iran, and also to determine the associated demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors. Results: Of 94 patients with DFU, 34 (32% had amputation. Those with amputation were significantly older and were also less educated than those without amputation, had longer duration of diabetes (hence were more likely to suffer from complications, and had high-risk wounds plus a poor glycemic control. On logistic regression analysis two variables were associated with amputation: Wagner classification ≥3 and HbA1c. On a receiver operating characteristics curve, the HbA1c cutoff point of 9.7% significantly discriminated to predict increasing risk of amputation. Conclusion: Both glycemic control and promoting the knowledge of patients and health care professionals in order to diagnose DFU in the early stages and to prevent development of the high-grade wounds would be a significant step in reducing the burden of DFU and its effect on quality of life in Iran. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, foot ulcer, amputation

  6. Characteristics of diabetic foot lesions and its complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Luiza da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases, and the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality, involving some complications, leaving the patient vulnerable. The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence of lower limb amputations due to diabetic ulcers of patients with infection at a Family Health Unit and analyze the physiological changes detected during the assessment of the patients. This is a retrospective approach to quantitative research, conducted from May to October 2010 with a sample of 40 people involved in the activities. As a result it was found out that the patients have some deformity or bony prominence (30.8% and relative insensitivity and the dryness of the feet, 46.2% had such complications. It is concluded that health professionals, especially nurses should perform care for these patients, thus delivering knowledge-focused in the care and prevention, through educational activities aimed at the social well-being.

  7. DESCRIPTION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF CILOSTAZOL AND ASPIRIN AS ADJUVANT OF DIABETIC FOOT WAGNER GRADE II AND III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandji Winata Nurikhwan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Inflammation in patients with diabetic foot will activate platelets and cause aggregation and lead to stasis of blood flow. This inflammation is caused by infection of the diabetic foot. Management of diabetic foot infections in patients is the use of antibiotics. However, the presence of vascularization disorders causing antibiotic delivery to the site of infection to be disrupted so that the process of eradication of infection would be inhibited. One of inflamation markers on patient with diabetic foot is increasing of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESRs.The general objective of this study was to determine the efficacy difference between cilostazol and aspirin as an adjuvant to accelerate tissue healing of diabetic foot care Wagner Grade II – III based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate. This study is a descriptive study using the double-blind and randomized pretest-posttest design. A total of 14 samples is obtained by consecutive sampling. The results showed that four patients given cilostazol showed a 35% reduction in ESR and ten patients were given aspirin showed a 35% reduction in ESR. It can be concluded giving cilostazol and aspirin as adjuvant diabetic foot Wagner II and III showed a decrease in ESR.

  8. A prospective randomized evaluation of negative-pressure wound dressings for diabetic foot wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eginton, Mark T; Brown, Kellie R; Seabrook, Gary R; Towne, Jonathan B; Cambria, Robert A

    2003-11-01

    Optimal treatment for large diabetic foot wounds is ill defined. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of wound healing with the Vacuum Assisted Closure device trade mark (VAC) to conventional moist dressings in the treatment of large diabetic foot wounds. Diabetics with significant soft tissue defects of the foot were considered for enrollment. Patients were randomized to receive either moist gauze dressings or VAC treatments for 2 weeks, after which they were treated with the alternative dressing for an additional 2 weeks. Wounds were photographed weekly and wound dimensions calculated in a blinded fashion with spatial analysis software. Percent change in wound dimensions were calculated and compared for each weekly assessment and over 2 weeks of therapy with each dressing type. Ten patients were enrolled in the trial, but two were lost to follow-up and two were withdrawn. Complete data were available for analysis on seven wounds in six patients. Average length, width, and depth of the wounds at initiation of the trial was 7.7, 3.5, and 3.1 cm, respectively. Only the wound depth was significantly decreased over the weeks of the trial to 1.2 cm ( p VAC dressings decreased the wound volume and depth significantly more than moist gauze dressings (59% vs. 0% and 49% vs. 8%, respectively). VAC dressings were associated with a decrease in all wound dimensions while wound length and width increased with moist dressings. In summary, over the first several weeks of therapy, VAC dressings decreased wound depth and volume more effectively than moist gauze dressings. Negative-pressure wound treatment may accelerate closure of large foot wounds in the diabetic patient.

  9. Histomorphological observation of surgical debridement combined with negative pressure therapy in treatment of diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Yun Dong

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Epidermal cells on the fascia side of the flap could be derived from the stem cells. Negative pressure wound therapy would attract not only cells but also other elements such as growth factors, cytokines, some nutrients and extracellular matrix. With the formation of the appropriate microenvironment after debridement, the migrated cells can grow, differentiate and spread, eventually leading to the epithelization on the fascia side of the flap in diabetic foot.

  10. Clinical significance of the isolation of Staphylococcus epidermidis from bone biopsy in diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aragón-Sánchez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coagulase-negative staphylococci are considered as microorganisms with little virulence and usually as contaminants. In order to establish the role of Staphylococcus epidermidis as a pathogen in diabetic foot osteomyelitis, in addition to the isolation of the sole bacterium from the bone it will be necessary to demonstrate the histopathological changes caused by the infection. Methods: A consecutive series of 222 diabetic patients with foot osteomyelitis treated surgically in the Diabetic Foot Unit at La Paloma Hospital (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain between 1 October 2002 and 31 October 2008. From the entire series including 213 bone cultures with 241 isolated organisms, we have analyzed only the 139 cases where Staphylococci were found. We analyzed several variables between the two groups: Staphylococcus aureus versus Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results: Of the 134 patients included in this study, Staphlylococcus epidermidis was found as the sole bacterium isolated in 11 cases and accompanied by other bacteria in 12 cases. Staphlylococcus aureus was found as the sole bacterium isolated in 72 cases and accompanied by other bacteria in 39 cases. Histopathological changes were found in the cases of osteomyelitis where Staphylococcus epidermidis was the sole bacterium isolated. Acute osteomyelitis was found to a lesser extent when Staphylococcus epidermidis was the sole bacterium isolated but without significant differences with the cases where Staphylococcus aureus was the sole bacterium isolated. Conclusion: Staphylococcus epidermidis should be considered as a real pathogen, not only a contaminant, in diabetic patients with foot osteomyelitis when the bacterium is isolated from the bone. No differences in the outcomes of surgical treatment have been found with cases which Staphlylococcus aureus was isolated.

  11. Development of the Tardivo Algorithm to Predict Amputation Risk of Diabetic Foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Tardivo

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects almost 19% of the elderly population in Brazil and similar percentages around the world. Amputation of lower limbs in diabetic patients who present foot complications is a common occurrence with a significant reduction of life quality, and heavy costs on the health system. Unfortunately, there is no easy protocol to define the conditions that should be considered to proceed to amputation. The main objective of the present study is to create a simple prognostic score to evaluate the diabetic foot, which is called Tardivo Algorithm. Calculation of the score is based on three main factors: Wagner classification, signs of peripheral arterial disease (PAD, which is evaluated by using Peripheral Arterial Disease Classification, and the location of ulcers. The final score is obtained by multiplying the value of the individual factors. Patients with good peripheral vascularization received a value of 1, while clinical signs of ischemia received a value of 2 (PAD 2. Ulcer location was defined as forefoot, midfoot and hind foot. The conservative treatment used in patients with scores below 12 was based on a recently developed Photodynamic Therapy (PDT protocol. 85.5% of these patients presented a good outcome and avoided amputation. The results showed that scores 12 or higher represented a significantly higher probability of amputation (Odds ratio and logistic regression-IC 95%, 12.2-1886.5. The Tardivo algorithm is a simple prognostic score for the diabetic foot, easily accessible by physicians. It helps to determine the amputation risk and the best treatment, whether it is conservative or surgical management.

  12. Diabetic foot infections: Current treatment and delaying the 'post-antibiotic era'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for diabetic foot infections requires properly diagnosing infection, obtaining an appropriate specimen for culture, assessing for any needed surgical procedures and selecting an empiric antibiotic regimen. Therapy will often need to be modified based on results of culture and sensitivity testing. Because of excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics for treating diabetic foot infections, resistance to the usually employed bacteria has been increasing to alarming levels. This article reviews recommendations from evidence-based guidelines, informed by results of systematic reviews, on treating diabetic foot infections. Data from the pre-antibiotic era reported rates of mortality of about 9% and of high-level leg amputations of about 70%. Outcomes have greatly improved with appropriate antibiotic therapy. While there are now many oral and parenteral antibiotic agents that have demonstrated efficacy in treating diabetic foot infections, the rate of infection with multidrug-resistant pathogens is growing. This problem requires a multi-focal approach, including providing education to both clinicians and patients, developing robust antimicrobial stewardship programmes and using new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies. Recently, new methods have been developed to find novel antibiotic agents and to resurrect old treatments, like bacteriophages, for treating these difficult infections. Medical and political leaders have recognized the serious global threat posed by the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. By a multipronged approach that includes exerting administrative pressure on clinicians to do the right thing, investing in new technologies and encouraging the profitable development of new antimicrobials, we may be able to stave off the coming 'post-antibiotic era'. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Development of the Tardivo Algorithm to Predict Amputation Risk of Diabetic Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivo, João Paulo; Baptista, Maurício S; Correa, João Antonio; Adami, Fernando; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects almost 19% of the elderly population in Brazil and similar percentages around the world. Amputation of lower limbs in diabetic patients who present foot complications is a common occurrence with a significant reduction of life quality, and heavy costs on the health system. Unfortunately, there is no easy protocol to define the conditions that should be considered to proceed to amputation. The main objective of the present study is to create a simple prognostic score to evaluate the diabetic foot, which is called Tardivo Algorithm. Calculation of the score is based on three main factors: Wagner classification, signs of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which is evaluated by using Peripheral Arterial Disease Classification, and the location of ulcers. The final score is obtained by multiplying the value of the individual factors. Patients with good peripheral vascularization received a value of 1, while clinical signs of ischemia received a value of 2 (PAD 2). Ulcer location was defined as forefoot, midfoot and hind foot. The conservative treatment used in patients with scores below 12 was based on a recently developed Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) protocol. 85.5% of these patients presented a good outcome and avoided amputation. The results showed that scores 12 or higher represented a significantly higher probability of amputation (Odds ratio and logistic regression-IC 95%, 12.2-1886.5). The Tardivo algorithm is a simple prognostic score for the diabetic foot, easily accessible by physicians. It helps to determine the amputation risk and the best treatment, whether it is conservative or surgical management.

  14. A questionnaire for determining prevalence of diabetes related foot disease (Q-DFD): construction and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Bergin, Shan M; Brand, Caroline A; Colman, Peter G; Campbell, Donald A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Community based prevalence for diabetes related foot disease (DRFD) has been poorly quantified in Australian populations. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a survey tool to facilitate collection of community based prevalence data for individuals with DRFD via telephone interview. Methods Agreed components of DRFD were identified through an electronic literature search. Expert feedback and feedback from a population based construction sample were sought on t...

  15. Clinical and surgical characteristics of infected diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary hospital of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2017-01-01

    Background : The objective of this study was to determine the clinical and surgical characteristics of diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary level hospital in Mexico. Methods : We performed a longitudinal, descriptive study from July, 2012 to August, 2015 on a sample composed of 100 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. We analyzed socio-demographic variables, comorbidities, characteristics of ulcers, and the applied treatment. Results : We found that the most affected areas were the forefoot (48%) and the plantar region (55%) of the foot. Also, most of the patients arrived with advanced stages of diabetic foot ulcers, since 93% of the lesions were of grades III-V according to the Wagner classification. Moreover, lesions usually present with advanced states of infection, since 60% of the lesions were of grades 3-4 in the PEDIS scale. In addition, the great majority of the patients are prone to complications because we found that 43% of the patients suffered from hypertension, 47% of the patients had chronic kidney disease, and 45% reported smoking. In fact, 45% of the patients eventually suffered an amputation. We also found that the situation is more difficult because the great majority of the patients (96%) have a low level of education and very low income and they do not have any health insurance. Nevertheless, we also found that an efficient treatment can help in avoiding amputations, since 53% of grade IV and 25% of grade V lesions according to the Wagner system did not suffer an amputation. Conclusions : Therefore, an effective antibiotic treatment and an education of the patient on the adequate care of their lesions are essential in increasing the welfare of patients, especially when they have a low level of education.

  16. Improving Surgical Techniques of Finger Amputation and Treatment of Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    M.O. Prystupiuk; B.Р. Bezrodnyi

    2015-01-01

    We have performed surgeries in 31 patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic foot syndrome of neuropathic and neuroischemic origin. The study group consisted of 11 men aged 60.50 ± 1.50 years and 20 women aged 70.95 ± 1.45 years on the average. The control group included 30 patients. Groups were representative by the age, gender and comorbidity. All patients underwent amputation of the phalanges using the proposed method. In the treatment of wounds in patients of the study group,...

  17. Reduction of diabetic foot ulcer healing times through use of advanced treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Gerit; Tenenhaus, Mayer; D'Souza, Gehaan F

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic wounds are a major health care problem associated with delayed healing and high amputation rates. This review systematically evaluated newer wound care therapies for the treatment of diabetic wounds. More recent means of approaching diabetic foot ulcers include various dressings, off-loading shoes, and bioengineered skin constructs and growth factors. Electrical stimulation, phototherapy, electromagnetic fields, and shockwave therapy have been further proposed as potential treatments. A brief overview of these treatments is presented using peer-reviewed evidenced-based literature. A review of the literature demonstrated that treatment of diabetic wounds has focused on either prevention of the wounds in the form of off-loading shoes or adequate protective dressings or on direct treatment of wounds with bioengineered skin constructs, growth factors, or medical devices that accelerate wound healing. The authors' conclusion, following extensive literature review, is that although excellent national and international guidelines exist regarding suggested approaches to the treatment of the diabetic foot ulcer, there is no definitive or universal consensus on the choice of specific treatment modalities. The importance of optimizing comorbidities and the disease state, hemodynamics, local and peripheral skin and wound care, and metabolic challenges while reducing biological and bacterial burden and minimizing trauma remain the primary approach, followed by choice of the most appropriate treatment material or product. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Comparison of foot segmental mobility and coupling during gait between patients with diabetes mellitus with and without neuropathy and adults without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, K; Matricali, G A; Roosen, P; Nobels, F; Tits, J; Desloovere, K; Bruyninckx, H; Flour, M; Deleu, P-A; Verhoeven, W; Staes, F

    2013-08-01

    Reduction in foot mobility has been identified as a key factor of altered foot biomechanics in individuals with diabetes mellitus. This study aimed at comparing in vivo segmental foot kinematics and coupling in patients with diabetes with and without neuropathy to control adults. Foot mobility of 13 diabetic patients with neuropathy, 13 diabetic patients without neuropathy and 13 non-diabetic persons was measured using an integrated measurement set-up including a plantar pressure platform and 3D motion analysis system. In this age-, sex- and walking speed matched comparative study; differences in range of motion quantified with the Rizzoli multisegment foot model throughout different phases of the gait cycle were analysed using one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Coupling was assessed with cross-correlation techniques. Both cohorts with diabetes showed significantly lower motion values as compared to the control group. Transverse and sagittal plane motion was predominantly affected with often lower range of motion values found in the group with neuropathy compared to the diabetes group without neuropathy. Most significant changes were observed during propulsion (both diabetic groups) and swing phase (predominantly diabetic neuropathic group). A trend of lower cross-correlations between segments was observed in the cohorts with diabetes. Our findings suggest an alteration in segmental kinematics and coupling during walking in diabetic patients with and without neuropathy. Future studies should integrate other biomechanical measurements as it is believed to provide additional insight into neural and mechanical deficits associated to the foot in diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does obtaining an initial magnetic resonance imaging decrease the reamputation rates in the diabetic foot?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Jbara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM through its over glycosylation of neurovascular structures and resultant peripheral neuropathy continues to be the major risk factor for pedal amputation. Repetitive trauma to the insensate foot results in diabetic foot ulcers, which are at high risk to develop osteomyelitis. Many patients who present with diabetic foot complications will undergo one or more pedal amputations during the course of their disease. The purpose of this study was to determine if obtaining an initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, prior to the first amputation, is associated with a decreased rate of reamputation in the diabetic foot. Our hypothesis was that the rate of reamputation may be associated with underutilization of obtaining an initial MRI, useful in presurgical planning. This study was designed to determine whether there was an association between the reamputation rate in diabetic patients and utilization of MRI in the presurgical planning and prior to initial forefoot amputations. Methods: Following approval by our institutional review board, our study design consisted of a retrospective cohort analysis of 413 patients at Staten Island University Hospital, a 700-bed tertiary referral center between 2008 and 2013 who underwent an initial great toe (hallux amputation. Of the 413 patients with a hallux amputation, there were 368 eligible patients who had a history of DM with documented hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c within 3 months of the initial first ray (hallux and first metatarsal amputation and available radiographic data. Statistical analysis compared the incidence rates of reamputation between patients who underwent initial MRI and those who did not obtain an initial MRI prior to their first amputation. The reamputation rate was compared after adjustment for age, gender, ethnicity, HbA1c, cardiovascular disease, hypoalbuminemia, smoking, body mass index, and prior antibiotic treatment. Results: The results of our statistical

  20. Efficacy of Cellular Therapy for Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

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    Zhang, Ye; Deng, Hong; Tang, Zhouping

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a widely spread chronic disease with growing incidence worldwide, and diabetic foot ulcer is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of diabetic foot ulcer in many preclinical experiments and clinical researches. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cellular therapy in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. We systematically searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to May 2017 for randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of cellular therapy in diabetic foot ulcer, and a meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 6 randomized controlled clinical trials involving 241 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. The results suggested that cellular therapy could help accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer, presented as higher ankle-brachial index (mean difference = 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.23), higher transcutaneous oxygen pressure (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09- to 1.78), higher ulcer healing rate (relative risk [RR] = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.25), higher amputation-free survival (RR = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.40), and lower scale of pain (SMD = -1.69; 95% CI, -2.05 to -1.33). Furthermore, cellular therapy seemed to be safe, with no serious complications and low risk of short-term slight complications. Cellular therapy could accelerate the rate of diabetic foot ulcer healing and may be more efficient than standard therapy for diabetic foot treatment.

  1. Plectranthus amboinicus and Centella asiatica Cream for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

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    Yuan-Sung Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of a topical cream containing P. amboinicus (Lour. Spreng. (Lamiaceae and C. asiatica (L. Urban (Umbelliferae were evaluated and compared to effects of hydrocolloid fiber wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers. A single-center, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted. Twenty-four type 1 or type 2 diabetes patients aged 20 years or older with Wagner grade 3 foot ulcers postsurgical debridement were enrolled between October 2008 and December 2009. Twelve randomly assigned patients were treated with WH-1 cream containing P. amboinicus and C. asiatica twice daily for two weeks. Another 12 patients were treated with hydrocolloid fiber dressings changed at 7 days or when clinically indicated. Wound condition and safety were assessed at days 7 and 14 and results were compared between groups. No statistically significant differences were seen in percent changes in wound size at 7- and 14-day assessments of WH-1 cream and hydrocolloid dressing groups. A slightly higher proportion of patients in the WH-1 cream group (10 of 12; 90.9% showed Wagner grade improvement compared to the hydrocolloid fiber dressing group but without statistical significance. For treating diabetic foot ulcers, P. amboinicus and C. asiatica cream is a safe alternative to hydrocolloid fiber dressing without significant difference in effectiveness.

  2. Plectranthus amboinicus and Centella asiatica Cream for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Lu, William

    2012-01-01

    Effects of a topical cream containing P. amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae) and C. asiatica (L.) Urban (Umbelliferae) were evaluated and compared to effects of hydrocolloid fiber wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers. A single-center, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted. Twenty-four type 1 or type 2 diabetes patients aged 20 years or older with Wagner grade 3 foot ulcers postsurgical debridement were enrolled between October 2008 and December 2009. Twelve randomly assigned patients were treated with WH-1 cream containing P. amboinicus and C. asiatica twice daily for two weeks. Another 12 patients were treated with hydrocolloid fiber dressings changed at 7 days or when clinically indicated. Wound condition and safety were assessed at days 7 and 14 and results were compared between groups. No statistically significant differences were seen in percent changes in wound size at 7- and 14-day assessments of WH-1 cream and hydrocolloid dressing groups. A slightly higher proportion of patients in the WH-1 cream group (10 of 12; 90.9%) showed Wagner grade improvement compared to the hydrocolloid fiber dressing group but without statistical significance. For treating diabetic foot ulcers, P. amboinicus and C. asiatica cream is a safe alternative to hydrocolloid fiber dressing without significant difference in effectiveness.

  3. Bacterial genus is a risk factor for major amputation in patients with diabetic foot

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    NATÁLIA ANÍCIO CARDOSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate whether bacterial genus is a risk factor for major amputation in patients with diabetic foot and infected ulcer. Methods: we conducted a case-control, observational study of 189 patients with infected ulcers in diabetic feet admitted to the Vascular Surgery Service of the Risoleta Tolentino Neves Hospital, from January 2007 to December 2012. The bacteriological evaluation was performed in deep tissue cultures from the lesions and amputation was considered major when performed above the foot'smiddle tarsus. Results: the patients'mean age was 61.9±12.7 years; 122 (64.6% were men. The cultures were positive in 86.8%, being monomicrobial in 72% of the cases. In patients with major amputation, Acinetobacter spp. (24.4%, Morganella spp. (24.4%, Proteus spp. (23.1% and Enterococcus spp. (19.2% were the most frequent types of bacteria. The most commonly isolated species were Acinetobacter baumannii, Morganella morganii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. As predictors of major amputation, we identified the isolation of the generaAcinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp., serum creatinine ≥1.3mg/dl and hemoglobin <11g/dl. Conclusion: the bacterial genera Acinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp. identified in infected ulcers of patients with diabetic foot were associated with a higher incidence of major amputation.

  4. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

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    Marcela Janka-Zires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P=0.025. Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P=0.081. By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P=0.011. By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P=0.050. The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  5. The response of diabetic foot to a new type of dressing

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    Skórkowska-Telichowska Katarzyna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FlaxAid is a newly developed type of dressing enriched in particular flavonoids through genetic engineering of flax plants that exhibit health-promoting activities due to their strong antioxidant properties. The purpose of the current study was to assess the clinical efficacy of the FlaxAid bandage therapy for a patient affected with a diabetic foot ulcer which was unresponsive to previous treatments. The patient was treated with FlaxAid bandages for 12 weeks and the size and properties of the wound were routinely observed and recorded. Due to the the clinical picture of the wound study design was adopted whereby the comparative treatment was cotton gauze wetted with isotonic salt solution. Findings Following therapy, the foot ulcer decreased in size, despite the decompensation of advanced diabetes. It is believed that the beneficial nature of FlaxAid is derived from its high level and broad spectrum of antioxidants. Conclusions The FlaxAid dressing provides a novel and effective method for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This study presents a preliminary pilot investigation and a larger number of subjects need to be included within the study in order to draw firm clinical conclusions. Efforts to this effect are currently under way.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Toxins and Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Role in Pathogenesis and Interest in Diagnosis

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    Catherine Dunyach-Remy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of foot ulcers is a common, often severe and costly complication in diabetes. Diabetic foot infections (DFI are mainly polymicrobial, and Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent pathogen isolated. The numerous virulence factors and toxins produced by S. aureus during an infection are well characterized. However, some particular features could be observed in DFI. The aim of this review is to describe the role of S. aureus in DFI and the implication of its toxins in the establishment of the infection. Studies on this issue have helped to distinguish two S. aureus populations in DFI: toxinogenic S. aureus strains (harboring exfoliatin-, EDIN-, PVL- or TSST-encoding genes and non-toxinogenic strains. Toxinogenic strains are often present in infections with a more severe grade and systemic impact, whereas non-toxinogenic strains seem to remain localized in deep structures and bone involving diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Testing the virulence profile of bacteria seems to be a promising way to predict the behavior of S. aureus in the chronic wounds.

  7. The Visualization of Biofilms in Chronic Diabetic Foot Wounds Using Routine Diagnostic Microscopy Methods

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    Angela Oates

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot wounds are commonly colonised by taxonomically diverse microbial communities and may additionally be infected with specific pathogens. Since biofilms are demonstrably less susceptible to antimicrobial agents than are planktonic bacteria, and may be present in chronic wounds, there is increasing interest in their aetiological role. In the current investigation, the presence of structured microbial assemblages in chronic diabetic foot wounds is demonstrated using several visualization methods. Debridement samples, collected from the foot wounds of diabetic patients, were histologically sectioned and examined using bright-field, fluorescence, and environmental scanning electron microscopy and assessed by quantitative differential viable counting. All samples (n = 26 harboured bioburdens in excess of 5 log10 CFU/g. Microcolonies were identified in 4/4 samples by all three microscopy methods, although bright-field and fluorescence microscopy were more effective at highlighting putative biofilm morphology than ESEM. Results in this pilot study indicate that bacterial microcolonies and putative biofilm matrix can be visualized in chronic wounds using florescence microscopy and ESEM, but also using the simple Gram stain.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Toxins and Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Role in Pathogenesis and Interest in Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Infection of foot ulcers is a common, often severe and costly complication in diabetes. Diabetic foot infections (DFI) are mainly polymicrobial, and Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent pathogen isolated. The numerous virulence factors and toxins produced by S. aureus during an infection are well characterized. However, some particular features could be observed in DFI. The aim of this review is to describe the role of S. aureus in DFI and the implication of its toxins in the establishment of the infection. Studies on this issue have helped to distinguish two S. aureus populations in DFI: toxinogenic S. aureus strains (harboring exfoliatin-, EDIN-, PVL- or TSST-encoding genes) and non-toxinogenic strains. Toxinogenic strains are often present in infections with a more severe grade and systemic impact, whereas non-toxinogenic strains seem to remain localized in deep structures and bone involving diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Testing the virulence profile of bacteria seems to be a promising way to predict the behavior of S. aureus in the chronic wounds. PMID:27399775

  9. Happy@feet application for the management of diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

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    Fiquet, S; Desbiez, F; Tauveron, I; Mrozek, N; Vidal, M; Lesens, O

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to develop and implement an application that could improve the management of patients presenting with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Physicians from the multidisciplinary diabetic foot infection team and a software engineer first assessed the needs required for the infection management and application. An experimental version was then designed and progressively improved. A final version was implemented in clinical practice in 2013 by the multidisciplinary diabetic foot infection team of our university hospital. The application, known as Happy@feet, helps gather and allows access to all required data for patient management, dispenses prescriptions (antibiotics, nursing care, blood tests), and helps follow the evolution of the wound. At the end of the consultation, a customizable letter is generated and may be directly sent to the persons concerned. This application also facilitates clinical and economic research. In 2014, Happy@feet was used to follow 83 patients during 271 consultations, 88 of which were day care hospitalizations. The Happy@feet application is useful to manage these complex patients. Once the learning period is over, the time required for data collection is compensated by the rapid dispense of prescriptions and letters. Happy@feet can be used for research projects and will be used in a remote patient management project. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Medical Imaging in Differentiating the Diabetic Charcot Foot from Osteomyelitis.

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    Short, Daniel J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) poses a great challenge to diagnose in the early stages and when plain radiographs do not depict any initial signs of osseous fragmentation or dislocation in a setting of a high clinical index of suspicion. Medical imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and advanced bone scintigraphy, has its own unique clinical indications when treating the DCN with or without concomitant osteomyelitis. This article reviews different clinical case scenarios for choosing the most accurate medical imaging in differentiating DCN from osteomyelitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vascular calcification in diabetic foot and its association with calcium homeostasis

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    Jayshree Swain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular calcification (VC, long thought to result from passive degeneration, involves a complex process of biomineralization resembling osteogenesis, frequently observed in diabetes and is an indicator of diabetic peripheral vascular disease with variable implications. Aim and Objective : To study the association between vascular calcification and calcium homeostasis in diabetic patients with foot ulcers without stage 4, 5 chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods : A total of 74 patients with diabetic foot ulcer were enrolled, and VC was detected by X-ray and Doppler methods. Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALKP, fasting and post-prandial glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C were recorded. Serum iPTH and 25 (OH vitamin D were estimated by immune radiometric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Data was analyzed by SPSS 16.0. Results: Vascular calcification was present in 42% of patients. Significant difference in the mean (±SD of vitamin D, HbA1C, and eGFR was observed in VC +ve compared to VC -ve. There was no significant association of age, duration, BMI, PTH, Ca, PO4, ALKP with that of VC incidence. Severe vitamin D deficiency was more common in VC +ve (51.6% compared to in VC -ve (18.6%. Sub-group analysis showed that the risk of VC was significantly higher (RR = 2.4, P < 0.05, 95% C.I. = 0.058-2.88 in patients with vitamin D < 10 ng/ml compared to others. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency could be a risk for vascular calcification, which possibly act through receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells or modulates osteoprotegerin/RANKL system like other factors responsible for VC in diabetic foot patients.

  12. Bacteriology of diabetic foot in tertiary care hospital; frequency, antibiotic susceptibility and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, S.S.; Shams, N.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic foot being one of the frequent and disabling complications of diabetes. In view of widespread regional variation in causative organisms and antimicrobial susceptibility, the current study aimed to determine frequency of causative organisms, their antimicrobial susceptibility and associated risk factors. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 6 months' duration at dept. of Medicine; PIMS Hospital Islamabad. Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic foot ulcer were enrolled after informed consent. Patients already receiving antibiotics, having no growth on culture and >3 weeks' duration of ulcer were excluded. Sample from wound was sent for culture and sensitivity. Antibiotic susceptibility testing identified the susceptible and resistant strains of organisms. Results: Among 114 patients (66.67% males and 33.33% females); mean age was 55.11+-11.96 years. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in 46%, E. coli in 28%, Pseudomonas in 6%, Klebsiella in 3.5% and other organisms in 17%. 92% of S. aureus was sensitive to Vancomycin and 67% to Clindamycin. Amongst E. coli, 81% showed sensitivity to Imipenem, 69% to Aminoglycosides and 31% to Quinolones. Glycaemic control was unsatisfactory in 65.8%. Peripheral vascular disease was found in 46% patients and sensory neuropathy in 94%. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent isolate amongst gram positive organisms while E. coli amongst gram-negatives. Vancomycin is suggested to be the drug of choice for gram positive and Imipenem for gram negative organisms. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy according to susceptibility patterns would reduce the morbidity and emergence of multidrug resistant organisms in diabetic foot infections. (author)

  13. Impact of diabetic foot ulcer on health-related quality of life: A cross-sectional study.

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    Sekhar, M Sonal; Thomas, Roy Raymol; Unnikrishnan, M K; Vijayanarayana, K; Rodrigues, Gabriel Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Studies have reported that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is adversely affected by diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). There is a paucity of data on the effects of foot ulcers on HRQoL of diabetes patients in our population. Because South-Asians, especially Indians, have unique features related to diabetes and its complications, generalizing the data about their effect on HRQoL from any other part of the world is not a pragmatic approach. This study evaluated the impact of foot ulcers on HRQoL of diabetes patients. This cross-sectional study, conducted in Kasturba Hospital, Manipal (coastal South India), included 200 DFU patients in a study group (SG) and 200 diabetes patients in a control group (CG). The RAND-36 questionnaire was employed for evaluating HRQoL scores for the patients in both groups. DFU patients also completed the Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale-Short Form questionnaire. Independent t-test was used to test the differences in mean scores. Results found that both CG and SG have "poor" HRQoL (mean score Foot Ulcer Scale-Short Form found that HRQoL is very poor for DFU patients on all six domains. The study concludes that DFU patients have very poor HRQoL compared with diabetic patients. Likewise, the diabetic foot is associated with severely impaired HRQoL in both physical and mental health aspects. This study will help to develop a patient education model for DFU patients by looking at the various HRQoL domains that are adversely affected by the presence of foot ulcer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary infragenicular angioplasty for diabetic neuroischemic foot ulcers following the angiosome distribution: a new paradigm for the vascular interventionist?

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    Alexandrescu, Vlad; Hubermont, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The angiosome principle was first described by Jan Taylor in 1987 in the plastic reconstructive surgery field, providing useful information on the vascular anatomy of the human body. Specifically concerning foot and ankle pathology, it may help the clinician to select better vascular access and specific strategies for revascularization. This knowledge may be particularly beneficial when treating diabetic neuroischemic foot wounds associated with particularly aggressive atherosclerotic disease and a poor collateral circulation. The implementation of angiosome-based strategies in diabetic infragenicular vascular reconstruction may afford encouraging wound healing and limb preservation rates using both bypass and endovascular techniques. The minimal invasiveness of these novel strategies enables us to perform more specific and more distal tibial and/or foot arterial reconstructions, in one or multiple targeted vessels. This paper reviews the available literature on this revascularization strategy and focuses on the potential benefit of angiosome-guided primary angioplasty for diabetic ischemic foot ulcers.

  15. Collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate as an option to treat a neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Almeida, C E

    2016-01-01

    The ischaemic diabetic foot is associated with a faster evolving atherosclerosis affecting preferentially the bellow knee arteries. This distal ischemia associated with a wide distribution of multiple stenosis and occlusions throughout lower limb arteries, makes revascularization very hard or even impossible. This represents a major factor responsible for non-healing diabetic foot ulcer. In these cases all efforts should be made to find treatment alternatives that can promote ulcer healing. Male patient with neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer with exposure tendon, without possibility for endovascular or surgical revascularization, was treated unsuccessfully with prostaglandin and several types of dressings for 7 months. Skin graft failed. Weekly dressings with collagen implant impregnated with gentamicin sulphate were then started and continued in an outpatient setting. Evolution was very positive, with 99% of epithelisation in 9 months. No pain or infection since the beginning of this treatment. Successful treatment of a neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer rests with the possibility of increasing the perfusion to the foot. Whether or not a revascularization procedure is possible will set the tone for the ensuing treatment. Using collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate, collagen is delivered to the wound bed helping in the granulation tissue formation, will increase microcirculation, and topic gentamicin will decrease bacterial load, exudate and proteases production, increasing cicatrisation. In neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer weekly dressings with collagen implant impregnated with gentamicin sulphate can be a good option for ulcer healing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic Significance of Circulating and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Markers in Type 2 Diabetic Foot

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    Maria Sambataro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We studied circulating precursor cells (CPC in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with neuropathic foot lesions with or without critical limb ischemia and relationships between endothelial precursor cells (EPC and peripheral neuropathy. Methods and Subjects. We measured peripheral blood CD34, CD133, and CD45 markers for CPC and KDR, CD31 markers for EPC by citofluorimetry and systemic neural nociceptor CGRP (calcitonin gene related protein by ELISA in 8 healthy controls (C and 62 T2DM patients: 14 with neuropathy (N, 20 with neuropathic foot lesions (N1, and 28 with neuroischemic recent revascularized (N2 foot lesions. Timing of lesions was: acute (until 6 weeks, healed, and not healed. Results. CD34+ and CD133+ were reduced in N, N1, and N2 versus C, and CD34+ were lower in N2 versus N1 (P=0.03. In N2 CD34+KDR+ remain elevated in healed versus chronic lesions and, in N1 CD133+31+ were elevated in acute lesions. CGRP was reduced in N2 and N1 versus C (P<0.04 versus C 26±2 pg/mL. CD34+KDR+ correlated in N2 with oximetry and negatively in N1 with CGRP. Conclusions. CD34+ CPC are reduced in diabetes with advanced complications and diabetic foot. CD34+KDR+ and CD31+133+ EPC differentiation could have a prognostic and therapeutic significance in the healing process of neuropathic and neuroischemic lesions.

  17. A developing world experience with distal foot amputations for diabetic limb salvage

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    Omer Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the functional outcome, morbidity, and viability of foot salvage in diabetic patients. Materials and methods: This prospective case series was conducted from March 2007 to December 2012 at the department of surgery Pakistan Ordnance Factories Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan. 123 males and 26 female patients were included in the study. All the patients were treated after getting admitted in the hospital and wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and debridement of necrotic tissue with adequate antibiotic coverage. Results: In total, 149 patients (mean age: 56±7.52 years with 171 amputations were included in the study. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus (DM was 9±4.43 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were diagnosed with type 2 DM. Wound debridement was performed under general anesthesia in 48 (33.2% patients, whereas local anesthesia was used for the rest of the patients after having good glycemic control and improvement in general health. The most common pathogen isolated from the infected wounds was Staphylococcus aureus in approximately 46% cases. Regarding the types of amputation, partial toe amputation was performed in 21 (12.2% cases, second-toe amputation in 60 (35% cases, hallux amputation in 41 (24% cases, multiple toe amputations in 29 (17% cases, bilateral feet involvement was observed in 16 (9.3% cases, and transmetatarsal amputation was performed in 4 (2.3% cases. The wounds healed well except in 19 cases where amputation had to be revised to a more proximal level. Thirty-nine patients died during the study period: 3 died of wound-related complications and 36 died of systemic complications. Conclusion: With the ever-increasing epidemic of DM, the number of patients with diabetic foot ulcers has also significantly risen. Early surgical management with good glycemic control and foot care with close monitoring can decrease amputations and thus foot salvage can be successfully

  18. Intralesional epidermal growth factor for diabetic foot wounds: the first cases in Turkey

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    Bulent M. Ertugrul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intralesional recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF was produced in the Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB, Cuba, in 1988 and licensed in 2006. Because it may accelerate wound healing, it is a potential new treatment option in patients with a diabetic foot wound (whether infected or not as an adjunct to standard treatment (i.e. debridement, antibiotics. We conducted the initial evaluation of EGF for diabetic foot wounds in Turkey. Methods: We enrolled 17 patients who were hospitalized in various medical centers for a foot ulcer and/or infection and for whom below the knee amputation was suggested to all except one. All patients received 75 μg intralesional EGF three times per week on alternate days. Results: The appearance of new granulation tissue on the wound site (≥75% was observed in 13 patients (76%, and complete wound closure was observed in 3 patients (18%, yielding a ‘complete recovery’ rate of 94%. The most common side effects were tremor (n=10, 59% and nausea (n=6, 35%. In only one case,a serious side effect requiring cessation of EGF treatment was noted. That patient experienced severe hypotension at the 16th application session, and treatment was discontinued. At baseline, a total of 21 causative bacteria were isolated from 15 patients, whereascultures were sterile in two patients. The most frequently isolated species was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Thus, this preliminary study suggests that EGF seems to be a potential adjunctive treatment option in patients with limb-threatening diabetic foot wounds.

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy after partial diabetic foot amputation: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A

    2005-11-12

    Diabetic foot wounds, particularly those secondary to amputation, are very complex and difficult to treat. We investigated whether negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) improves the proportion and rate of wound healing after partial foot amputation in patients with diabetes. We enrolled 162 patients into a 16-week, 18-centre, randomised clinical trial in the USA. Inclusion criteria consisted of partial foot amputation wounds up to the transmetatarsal level and evidence of adequate perfusion. Patients who were randomly assigned to NPWT (n=77) received treatment with dressing changes every 48 h. Control patients (n=85) received standard moist wound care according to consensus guidelines. NPWT was delivered through the Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) Therapy System. Wounds were treated until healing or completion of the 112-day period of active treatment. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study has been registered with , number NCT00224796. More patients healed in the NPWT group than in the control group (43 [56%] vs 33 [39%], p=0.040). The rate of wound healing, based on the time to complete closure, was faster in the NPWT group than in controls (p=0.005). The rate of granulation tissue formation, based on the time to 76-100% formation in the wound bed, was faster in the NPWT group than in controls (p=0.002). The frequency and severity of adverse events (of which the most common was wound infection) were similar in both treatment groups. NPWT delivered by the VAC Therapy System seems to be a safe and effective treatment for complex diabetic foot wounds, and could lead to a higher proportion of healed wounds, faster healing rates, and potentially fewer re-amputations than standard care.

  20. Effects of topical Kiwifruit on healing of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer

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    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kiwifruit (Actindia Deliciosa is demonstrated to have antibacterial and pro-angiogenic effects. It also contains proteolytic enzymes (actinidin and ascorbic acid. In this study, the effects of Kiwifruit on neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer healing in clinical settings were evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial of 37 patients (17 in experimental and 20 in control groups with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer were studied in Isfahan-Iran. Patients of the control group received just the standard treatments. In the experimental group, in addition to the standard treatments, ulcers were dressed with pure extract of kiwifruit twice daily for 21 days. The ulcers were examined and evaluated based on macroscopic, microscopic and microbiological status. Pre- and post-interventions, biopsies were taken from the ulcers to perform microbiological and histological studies. Results: Mean reduction in surface area of foot ulcer in the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (168.11 ± 22.31 vs. 88.80 ± 12.04 mm 2 respectively, P < 0.0001. The amount of collagen and granulation tissues was significantly higher in the experimental groups than the control group (P value < 0.0001. Significantly higher levels of angiogenesis and vascularization were found in the kiwifruit treated patients (P value < 0.0001. No significant antibacterial effect was observed for kiwifruit. Conclusion: Natural compounds in the kiwifruit including protein-dissolving enzymes (Actinidin improved different aspects of the wound healing process. Based on these benefits and safety aspects, we conclude that using kiwifruit is a simple, applicable and effective way for treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer.

  1. Clinical Prospective Study on the Use of Subcutaneous Carboxytherapy in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiat, Lynda; Leibaschoff, Gustavo H

    2018-03-22

    Diabetic footfoot ulcer (DFU) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus, and possibly the major morbidity of the diabetic foot. It is the most common foot injury in diabetic patients and can lead to lower-extremity amputation. Management of DFU requires a systematic knowledge of the major risk factors for amputation, frequent routine evaluation, scrupulous preventive maintenance, and correction of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Carboxytherapy refers to the subcutaneous injection of CO2 to improve the microcirculation and promote wound-healing by stimulating the microcirculation. Since optimal ulcer-healing requires adequate tissue perfusion, it is considered that carboxytherapy could be useful in the treatment of DFU. The present prospective clinical study included 40 patients with different sizes and types of chronic DFU. In addition to cleaning of the wound, antibiotics and debridement as necessary, the treatment protocol included blood sugar control, medication, healthy habits, no weight-bearing, and carboxytherapy. The results showed that this treatment that included carboxytherapy promoted wound-healing and prevented amputation. These positive effects should be confirmed through a complete study that includes different clinical and instrumental parameters.

  2. Non invasive blood flow assessment in diabetic foot ulcer using laser speckle contrast imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthy, A. K.; Sujatha, N.; Reddy, M. Ramasubba; Narayanamoorthy, V. B.

    2014-03-01

    Measuring microcirculatory tissue blood perfusion is of interest for both clinicians and researchers in a wide range of applications and can provide essential information of the progress of treatment of certain diseases which causes either an increased or decreased blood flow. Diabetic ulcer associated with alterations in tissue blood flow is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations. A technique which can detect the onset of ulcer and provide essential information on the progress of the treatment of ulcer would be of great help to the clinicians. A noninvasive, noncontact and whole field laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique has been described in this paper which is used to assess the changes in blood flow in diabetic ulcer affected areas of the foot. The blood flow assessment at the wound site can provide critical information on the efficiency and progress of the treatment given to the diabetic ulcer subjects. The technique may also potentially fulfill a significant need in diabetic foot ulcer screening and management.

  3. Diabetic foot ulcers in conjunction with lower limb lymphedema: pathophysiology and treatment procedures

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    Kanapathy M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Muholan Kanapathy,1 Mark J Portou,1,2 Janice Tsui,1,2 Toby Richards1,21Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs are complex, chronic, and progressive wounds, and have a significant impact on morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. A particular aspect of DFU that has not been reviewed extensively thus far is its management in conjunction with peripheral limb edema. Peripheral limb edema is a feature of diabetes that has been identified as a significant risk factor for amputation in patients with DFU. Three major etiological factors in development of lymphedema with concurrent DFU are diabetic microangiopathy, failure of autonomic regulation, and recurrent infection. This review outlines the pathophysiology of lymphedema formation in patients with DFU and highlights the cellular and immune components of impaired wound healing in lymphedematous DFU. We then discuss the principles of management of DFU in conjunction with lymphedema.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, lymphedema, chronic wound, wound management

  4. Localization of human adipose-derived stem cells and their effect in repair of diabetic foot ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongfeng; Jin, Yinpeng; Cao, Chuanwu; Han, Shilong; Shao, Xiaowen; Meng, Lingyu; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Meiling; Zheng, Jiayi; Xu, Jun; Li, Maoquan

    2016-10-22

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is an intractable diabetic complication. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM) frequently present with infected DFUs. In this study, a wound healing model on diabetic rat foot was established to mimic the pathophysiology of clinical patients who suffer from DFUs. Our study aimed to explore the localization of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) and the role of these cells in the repair of foot ulcerated tissue in diabetic rats, and thus to estimate the possibilities of adipose-derived stem cells for diabetic wound therapy. Sprague-Dawley rats were used to establish diabetic models by streptozotocin injection. A full-thickness foot dorsal skin wound was created by a 5 mm skin biopsy punch and a Westcott scissor. These rats were randomly divided into two groups: the hADSC-treated group and the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. The hADSC or PBS treatment was delivered through the left femoral vein of rats. We evaluated the localization of hADSCs with fluorescence immunohistochemistry and the ulcer area and ulcerative histology were detected dynamically. The hADSCs had a positive effect on the full-thickness foot dorsal skin wound in diabetic rats with a significantly reduced ulcer area at day 15. More granulation tissue formation, angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, and higher levels of growth factors expression were also detected in wound beds. Our data suggest that hADSC transplantation has the potential to promote foot wound healing in diabetic rats, and transplantation of exogenous stem cells may be suitable for clinical application in the treatment of DFU.

  5. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and diabetic foot ulcer: is there any relationship?

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    Zubair, Mohammad; Malik, Abida; Meerza, Dilnasheen; Ahmad, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an effort to understand possible roles of 25(OH)D, including its role in the immune system particularly on T cell medicated immunity, pancreatic insulin secretion and insulin action. 25(OH)D stimulates the cell differentiation and reduces cell proliferation, which is essential for cell growth and wound healing. However, data on the association between low level of plasma 25(OH)D and diabetic foot syndrome are scarce. Circulating plasma levels of 25(OH)D were measured in diabetic patients with ulcer (n=162) and without ulcer (n=162) in a prospective cohort hospital based study. Of these patients, 85.1% had type 2 diabetes. Subjects with diabetic foot ulcer showed lower median plasma level of 25(OH)D [6.3(4.2-11.1) vs 28.0(21.4-37.0)] ng/ml after adjusting the age and BMI. Regardless of the low levels of 25(OH)D in cases and controls, it was associated with neuropathy, sex (female), duration of ulcer healing, and smoking status and independent of confounding factors, including BMI (kg/m²), A1c (%), hypertension, nephropathy, foot ulcer, retinopathy, CAD, PAD, HDL-C (mg/dl) and LDL-C (mg/dl). The factors which predict the risk of developing ulcer independent of 25(OH)D status were A1c (>6.9%) [OR 4.37; RR 1.77], HDL-C (100mg/dl) [OR 1.07; RR 1.03], triglycerides (>200mg/dl) [OR 1.40; RR 1.19], neuropathy [OR 6.88; RR 3.12], retinopathy [OR 3.34; RR 1.91], hypertension [OR 1.64; RR 1.28], nephropathy [OR 3.12; RR 1.87] and smoking [OR 4.53; RR 2.99] using odds and risk ratios. It is not clear whether the suppression of delayed wound healing seen during 25(OH)D deficiency is due to the secondary effect or is a direct action of vitamin D on certain components of the immune system. Long-term randomized trials are needed to see the impact of vitamin D supplementation on the outcome of diabetic foot patients. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients' attitudes and experiences with health services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delea, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness that places a huge burden on the individual, the health system and society. Patients with active foot disease and lower limb amputations due to diabetes have a significant amount of interaction with the health care services. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of foot care services in Ireland among people with diabetes and active foot disease or lower limb amputations.

  7. Extensive use of peripheral angioplasty, particularly infrapopliteal, in the treatment of ischaemic diabetic foot ulcers: clinical results of a multicentric study of 221 consecutive diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faglia, E; Mantero, M; Caminiti, M; Caravaggi, C; De Giglio, R; Pritelli, C; Clerici, G; Fratino, P; De Cata, P; Dalla Paola, L; Mariani, G; Poli, M; Settembrini, P G; Sciangula, L; Morabito, A; Graziani, L

    2002-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, technical effectiveness and limb salvage potential of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), particularly infrapopliteal, in diabetic subjects with ischaemic foot ulcer. Intervention study with PTA in consecutive series. Six Diabetology Foot Centres and one Cardiovascular Catheterization Laboratory in Italy. Two hundred and twenty-one consecutive diabetic subjects hospitalized for ischaemic foot ulcer. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) was investigated by means of foot pulses assessment, ankle-brachial-index (ABI), transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2) and duplex scanning. If non-invasive parameters suggested PAOD, angiography was performed and a PTA was carried out during the same session. PTA feasibility, improvement of ABI and TcPO2, limb salvage rate, clinical recurrence. On angiography, two patients had stenoses which were 50%, even when longer than 10 cm and/or multiple/calcified. In 11 patients (5.8%) PTA was performed in the proximal axis exclusively, in 81 (42.4%) patients in the infrapopliteal axis exclusively and in 99 (51.8%) in both the femoropopliteal and infrapopliteal axis. Both ABI and TcPO2 improved significantly after PTA (P diabetic subjects with ischaemic foot ulcer and is effective for foot revascularization. Clinical recurrence was infrequent and the procedure could successfully be repeated in most cases. In subjects treated successfully with PTA the above-the-ankle amputation rate was low. PTA should be considered as the revascularization treatment of first choice in all diabetic subjects with foot ulcer and PAOD.

  8. IWGDF guidance on the diagnosis, prognosis and management of peripheral artery disease in patients with foot ulcers in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinchliffe, R. J.; Brownrigg, J. R. W.; Apelqvist, J.; Boyko, E. J.; Fitridge, R.; Mills, J. L.; Reekers, J.; Shearman, C. P.; Zierler, R. E.; Schaper, N. C.

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations Examine a patient with diabetes annually for the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD); this should include, at a minimum, taking a history and palpating foot pulses. (GRADE strength of recommendation: strong; quality of evidence: low) Evaluate a patient with diabetes and a

  9. Pressure relief and load redistribution by custom-made insoles in diabetic patients with neuropathy and foot deformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To study the effects of custom-made insoles on plantar pressures and load redistribution in neuropathic diabetic patients with foot deformity. Design. Cross-sectional. Background. Although custom-made insoles are commonly prescribed to diabetic patients, little quantitative data on their

  10. Unsuspected osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers. Diagnosis and monitoring by leukocyte scanning with indium in 111 oxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, L.G.; Waller, J.; Palestro, C.J.; Schwartz, M.; Klein, M.J.; Hermann, G.; Harrington, E.; Harrington, M.; Roman, S.H.; Stagnaro-Green, A.

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers is unknown. Early diagnosis of this infection is critical, as prompt antibiotic treatment decreases the rate of amputation. The authors therefore assessed the prevalence of osteomyelitis in 35 diabetic patients with 41 foot ulcers. They compared results of roentgenograms, leukocyte scans with indium In 111 oxyquinoline, and bone scans with the diagnostic criterion standards of bone histologic and culture findings. Leukocyte scans were repeated at 2- to 3-week intervals during antibiotic treatment. Consecutive samples were obtained from 54 diabetic patients. Thirty-five patients with 41 foot ulcers were included. As determined by bone biopsy and culture, osteomyelitis was found to underlie 28 (68%) of 41 diabetic foot ulcers. Only nine (32%) of the 28 cases were diagnosed clinically by the referring physician. Underscoring the clinically silent nature of osteomyelitis in these ulcers, 19 (68%) of 28 occurred in outpatients, 19 (68%) of 28 occurred in ulcers not exposing bone, and 18 (64%) of 28 had no evidence of inflammation on physical examination. All patients with ulcers that exposed bone had osteomyelitis. Of the imaging tests, the leukocyte scan had the highest sensitivity, 89%. In patients with osteomyelitis, the leukocyte scan image intensity decreased by 16 to 34 days of antibiotic treatment and normalized by 36 to 54 days. The majority of diabetic foot ulcers have an underlying osteomyelitis that is clinically unsuspected. Leukocyte scans are highly sensitive for diagnosing osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers and may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. The recommend that diabetic patients with foot ulcers that expose bone should be treated for osteomyelitis

  11. Unsuspected osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers. Diagnosis and monitoring by leukocyte scanning with indium in 111 oxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, L.G.; Waller, J.; Palestro, C.J.; Schwartz, M.; Klein, M.J.; Hermann, G.; Harrington, E.; Harrington, M.; Roman, S.H.; Stagnaro-Green, A. (Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-09-04

    The prevalence of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers is unknown. Early diagnosis of this infection is critical, as prompt antibiotic treatment decreases the rate of amputation. The authors therefore assessed the prevalence of osteomyelitis in 35 diabetic patients with 41 foot ulcers. They compared results of roentgenograms, leukocyte scans with indium In 111 oxyquinoline, and bone scans with the diagnostic criterion standards of bone histologic and culture findings. Leukocyte scans were repeated at 2- to 3-week intervals during antibiotic treatment. Consecutive samples were obtained from 54 diabetic patients. Thirty-five patients with 41 foot ulcers were included. As determined by bone biopsy and culture, osteomyelitis was found to underlie 28 (68%) of 41 diabetic foot ulcers. Only nine (32%) of the 28 cases were diagnosed clinically by the referring physician. Underscoring the clinically silent nature of osteomyelitis in these ulcers, 19 (68%) of 28 occurred in outpatients, 19 (68%) of 28 occurred in ulcers not exposing bone, and 18 (64%) of 28 had no evidence of inflammation on physical examination. All patients with ulcers that exposed bone had osteomyelitis. Of the imaging tests, the leukocyte scan had the highest sensitivity, 89%. In patients with osteomyelitis, the leukocyte scan image intensity decreased by 16 to 34 days of antibiotic treatment and normalized by 36 to 54 days. The majority of diabetic foot ulcers have an underlying osteomyelitis that is clinically unsuspected. Leukocyte scans are highly sensitive for diagnosing osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers and may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. The recommend that diabetic patients with foot ulcers that expose bone should be treated for osteomyelitis.

  12. A classification of diabetic foot infections using ICD-9-CM codes: application to a large computerized medical database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Donald R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic foot infections are common, serious, and varied. Diagnostic and treatment strategies are correspondingly diverse. It is unclear how patients are managed in actual practice and how outcomes might be improved. Clarification will require study of large numbers of patients, such as are available in medical databases. We have developed and evaluated a system for identifying and classifying diabetic foot infections that can be used for this purpose. Methods We used the (VA Diabetes Epidemiology Cohorts (DEpiC database to conduct a retrospective observational study of patients with diabetic foot infections. DEpiC contains computerized VA and Medicare patient-level data for patients with diabetes since 1998. We determined which ICD-9-CM codes served to identify patients with different types of diabetic foot infections and ranked them in declining order of severity: Gangrene, Osteomyelitis, Ulcer, Foot cellulitis/abscess, Toe cellulitis/abscess, Paronychia. We evaluated our classification by examining its relationship to patient characteristics, diagnostic procedures, treatments given, and medical outcomes. Results There were 61,007 patients with foot infections, of which 42,063 were classifiable into one of our predefined groups. The different types of infection were related to expected patient characteristics, diagnostic procedures, treatments, and outcomes. Our severity ranking showed a monotonic relationship to hospital length of stay, amputation rate, transition to long-term care, and mortality. Conclusions We have developed a classification system for patients with diabetic foot infections that is expressly designed for use with large, computerized, ICD-9-CM coded administrative medical databases. It provides a framework that can be used to conduct observational studies of large numbers of patients in order to examine treatment variation and patient outcomes, including the effect of new management strategies

  13. Feasibility of foot deformations corrective operations performing in patients with diabetes

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    S. D. Shapoval

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To improve methods of early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy and suggest options for surgical prophylaxis possible purulent and necrotic complications in patients with diabetic foot syndrome. Materials and Methods. The study involved 64 patients with complicated diabetic foot syndrome (DFS. The average age of patients - 61,9 ± 3,8 years, duration of diabetes - 11,47 ± 3,2 years. The patients had neuropathic and mixed forms of DFS, fingers or arched foot deformations with the presence of pressor venous trophic ulcers in the forefoot. Patients were randomized into two groups: the main group - 34 and comparison group - 30 patients. There were representative characteristics for all groups: age, sex, comorbidity and did not differ significantly (P> 0,05. There were no statistically significant difference between the groups of these data (χ2 = 0,05; P = 0,8195. Results. After 6 months of complex treatment the ulcers were healed in more than half of patients in both groups - 19 (63,3% of patients in the comparison group and 25 (73,5% of the main group. In 8 (26,7% patients in the comparison and 7 (20,6% of the main group positive dynamics was observed, but over a longer period of treatment . After 12 months, the number of patients whose ulcers were completely healed differed significantly by the main group (P = 0,0007; χ2 = 11,41. Also in the main group was only 1 (3,0% patient with ulcer that was not healed, in contrast to the comparison group - 7 (23,3% patients (P = 0,0373; χ2 = 4,34. Conclusions. Operations aimed at correction of fingers and feet deformations in combination with standard therapy and unloading of the lower limb, allow improving the results of patients with complicated DFS treatment by reducing the number of relapses.

  14. Use of Vacuum Therapy in the Treatment of Wounds in Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome

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    P.O. Herasymchuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute and chronic wound defects of the lower extremities occurs in 15–25 % of patients with diabetes mellitus, serving as the direct cause of frequent amputations of lower extremities in 12 % of patients. One of the current and promising directions of wound healing is vacuum therapy. Objective. To study the effect of vacuum therapy on the course of acute and chronic wound process in patients with diabetic foot syndrome, depending on the pathogenic form of the injury, and on the basis of the findings to improve the outcomes of surgical treatment of the above-mentioned pathology. Materials and methods. The study involved 239 patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome. Monitoring of the wound progress is complemented by clinical, cytological, microbiological and morphological criteria. In the treatment of patients, we have used vacuum therapy device by Agat-Dnepr company. Vacuum therapy of wounds was carried out in the modes of negative pressure within 80–125 mmHg. Results. On the 2nd — 3rd day of vacuum treatment, there was a significant decrease of local manifestations of acute inflammation. At the same time, we have noted a significantly reduction in the amount of wound defects. There were positive changes from the side of wound microbial contamination defects. Application of continuous vacuum therapy in the treatment of wound defects greatly improved the performance of local microcirculation. Conclusions. Use of vacuum therapy in the combination treatment of acute and chronic wounds in patients with diabetic foot syndrome has a local and systemic action that enables to stabilize the course of wound process, to stimulate regenerative processes, to eliminate manifestations of endogenous intoxication and violations of immunological reactivity.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoekenbroek, R M; Santema, T B; Legemate, D A; Ubbink, D T; van den Brink, A; Koelemay, M J W

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to assess the additional value of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in promoting the healing of diabetic foot ulcers and preventing amputations was performed. MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify RCTs in patients with diabetic foot ulcers published up to August 2013. Eligible studies reported the effectiveness of adjunctive HBOT with regard to wound healing, amputations, and additional interventions. Seven of the 669 identified articles met the inclusion criteria, comprising 376 patients. Three trials included 182 patients with ischaemic ulcers, two trials studied 64 patients with non-ischaemic ulcers, and two trials comprising 130 patients did not specify ulcer type. Two trials were of good methodological quality. Pooling of data was deemed inappropriate because of heterogeneity. Two RCTs in patients with ischaemic ulcers found increased rates of complete healing at 1-year follow-up (number needed to treat (NNT) 1.8 (95% CI: 1.1 to 4.6) and 4.1 (95% CI: 2.3 to 19)), but found no difference in amputation rates. A third trial in ischaemic ulcers found significantly lower major amputation rates in patients with HBOT (NNT 4.2, 95% CI: 2.4 to 17), but did not report on wound healing. None of the RCTs in non-ischaemic ulcers reported differences in wound healing or amputation rates. Two trials with unknown ulcer types reported beneficial effects on amputation rates, although the largest trial used a different definition for both outcomes. HBOT did not influence the need for additional interventions. Current evidence shows some evidence of the effectiveness of HBOT in improving the healing of diabetic leg ulcers in patients with concomitant ischaemia. Larger trials of higher quality are needed before implementation of HBOT in routine clinical practice in patients with diabetic foot ulcers can be justified. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of existing methods for identifying diabetic foot ulcers from inpatient and outpatient datasets

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    Budiman-Mak Elly

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the number of persons with diabetes is projected to double in the next 25 years in the US, an accurate method of identifying diabetic foot ulcers in population-based data sources are ever more important for disease surveillance and public health purposes. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the accuracy of existing methods and to propose a new method. Methods Four existing methods were used to identify all patients diagnosed with a foot ulcer in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA hospital from the inpatient and outpatient datasets for 2003. Their electronic medical records were reviewed to verify whether the medical records positively indicate presence of a diabetic foot ulcer in diagnoses, medical assessments, or consults. For each method, five measures of accuracy and agreement were evaluated using data from medical records as the gold standard. Results Our medical record reviews show that all methods had sensitivity > 92% but their specificity varied substantially between 74% and 91%. A method used in Harrington et al. (2004 was the most accurate with 94% sensitivity and 91% specificity and produced an annual prevalence of 3.3% among VA users with diabetes nationwide. A new and simpler method consisting of two codes (707.1× and 707.9 shows an equally good accuracy with 93% sensitivity and 91% specificity and 3.1% prevalence. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Harrington and New methods are highly comparable and accurate. We recommend the Harrington method for its accuracy and the New method for its simplicity and comparable accuracy.

  17. Variation in antibiotic treatment for diabetic patients with serious foot infections: A retrospective observational study

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    Christiansen Cindy L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic foot infections are common, serious, and diverse. There is uncertainty about optimal antibiotic treatment, and probably substantial variation in practice. Our aim was to document whether this is the case: A finding that would raise questions about the comparative cost-effectiveness of different regimens and also open the possibility of examining costs and outcomes to determine which should be preferred. Methods We used the Veterans Health Administration (VA Diabetes Epidemiology Cohorts (DEpiC database to conduct a retrospective observational study of hospitalized patients with diabetic foot infections. DEpiC contains computerized VA and Medicare patient-level data for VA patients with diabetes since 1998, including demographics, ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes, antibiotics prescribed, and VA facility. We identified all patients with ICD-9-CM codes for cellulitis/abscess of the foot and then sub-grouped them according to whether they had cellulitis/abscess plus codes for gangrene, osteomyelitis, skin ulcer, or none of these. For each facility, we determined: 1 The proportion of patients treated with an antibiotic and the initial route of administration; 2 The first a