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Sample records for resectable locally advanced

  1. Extended resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer

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    WANG Jian-ping; SONG Xin-ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ Colorectal cancer is a common cause of cancer-related mortality.1 In China, it is one of eight cancers in the cancer control blueprint, which are suggested to have comprehensive treatment.Some patients with colorectal cancer presented no symptoms when they were diagnosed, yet the tumor had already penetrated the intestinal wall and involved adjacent organs. If the tumor is localized at time of diagnosis without distant metastases, it is termed locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACC)regardless of whether there is lymph node metastasis. LACC commonly encountered in clinical practice accounts for 5%-10% of all colorectal cancers.2

  2. Locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Chemoradiotherapy, reevaluation and secondary resection; Adenocarcinomes pancreatiques localement evolues. Chimioradiotherapie, reevaluation et resection secondaire?

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    Delpero, J.R.; Turrini, O. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Dept. de chirurgie, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-11-15

    Induction chemoradiotherapy (CRT) may down-stage locally advanced pancreatic tumors but secondary resections are unfrequent. However some responders' patients may benefit of a RO resection. Patients and methods. We report 18 resections among 29 locally advanced pancreatic cancers; 15 patients were treated with neo-adjuvant 5-FU-cisplatin based (13) or taxotere based (2 patients) chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy), and 3 patients without histologically proven adenocarcinoma were resected without any preoperative treatment. Results. The morbidity rate was 28% and the mortality rate was 7%; one patient died after resection (5.5%) and one died after exploration (9%). The RO resection rate was 50%. The median survival for the resected patients was not reached and the actuarial survival at 3 years was 59%. Two specimens showed no residual tumor and the two patients were alive at 15 and 46 months without recurrence; one specimen showed less than 10% viable tumoral cells and the patient was alive at 36 months without recurrence. A mesenteric infarction was the cause of a late death at 3 years in a disease free patient (radiation induced injury of the superior mesenteric artery). The median survival of the 11 non-resected patients was 21 months and the actuarial survival at 2 years was 0%. When the number of the resected patients (18) was reported to the entire cohort of the patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated during the same period in our institution, the secondary resectability rate was 9%. Conclusion. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy identifies poor surgical candidates through observation and may enhance the margin status of patients undergoing secondary resection for locally advanced tumors. However it remains difficult to evaluate the results in the literature because of the variations in the definitions of resectability. The best therapeutic strategy remains to be defined, because the majority of patients ultimately succumb with distant metastatic

  3. Aggressive Multi-Visceral Pancreatic Resections for Locally Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumours. Is It Worth It?

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    Mohammed Abu Hilal

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Traditional surgical principles state that pancreatic resection should not be contemplated when malignancies arise in the pancreas and involve other organs. While this is logic for ductal adenocarcinoma and other tumours with aggressive biological behavior; for even large neuroendocrine tumours, aggressive multivisceral resection may achieve useful palliation and excellent survival. Design Case records were retrospectively analyzed. Patients and interventions Twelve consecutive patients (7 males, 5 females; median age 57 years, range: 37-79 years underwent multi-visceral en bloc resections for neuroendocrine tumour arising in the pancreas between 1994 and 2008. Results Three patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; 9 patients had left sided pancreatic resections for neuroendocrine tumour of median diameter 9.5 cm ( 5-25 cm. They had a median of 3 (range: 1-4 additional organs resected. There were no post-operative deaths or late mortality with median follow up of 24 months. Five patients experienced a complication (major in 3 patients. Median disease free survival was not attained and 3 patients experienced recurrent disease mostly in the liver and may be candidates for further resection. Conclusion Aggressive multi-visceral resection for locally advanced neuroendocrine tumour involving the pancreas is technically feasible and in selected patients can be achieved with low mortality and acceptable morbidity, offering good disease free and overall survival. However this complex surgery should be only performed in specialist centers.

  4. Instant Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Biologic Mesh following Resection of Locally Advanced Colonic Cancer

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    Oskay Kaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of immediate abdominal wall reconstruction with biologic mesh following the resection of locally advanced colonic cancer. The tumor in the right colon did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Surgical enbloc excision, including excision of the invasion in the abdominal wall, was achieved, and the defect was reconstructed with porcine dermal collagen mesh. The patient was discharged with no complication, and adaptation of the mesh was excellent at the six-month followup.

  5. Chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced primary breast cancer.

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    Hille, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Zardo, Patrick; Pertschy, Stefanie; Busch, Kai; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    We sought to evaluate clinical and oncologic outcomes of selected patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) and reconstruction in a multidisciplinary setting. Between 2008 and 2010, five women underwent FTCWR followed by chest wall repair for locally advanced primary breast cancer. In all cases, chest wall repair was performed with a Peri-Guard Repair Patch (Synovis, St. Paul, MN, USA). At follow-up (7-12 months) quality of life, respiratory function and oncologic status were assessed. Successful chest wall resection and repair were achieved in all patients. Plastic reconstruction of post-mastectomy tissue defects was necessary in one case. One patient was treated by breast conserving therapy. Chest ultrasound imaging confirmed absence of adhesions, haematoma or seroma and normal expansion and respiratory movement of the underlying lung in all patients. On follow-up all patients reported good quality of life. Multidisciplinary surgical approaches to chest wall resection and reconstruction in selected patients with locally advanced primary breast cancer are feasible, safe, associated with short operation time and hospital stay and negligible morbidity.

  6. [A case of curative resection after downsizing chemotherapy in initially unresectable locally advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

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    Aoki, Yu; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Takano, Shigetsugu; Okamura, Daiki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakai, Nozomu; Kagawa, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-11-01

    This case report describes an 83-year-old man with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who was referred by a local hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a large tumor in hepatic segments 4, 5, and 8 involving the right hepatic vein and inferior vena cava, which is normally indicative of an unresectable locally advanced tumor. After systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, the observed decrease in the level of tumor marker suggested that the cancer was responding to treatment, while radiological findings showed the main tumor shrunk without the presence of distant metastases. Thus, hepatic left trisectionectomy with bile duct resection was performed after portal vein embolization. Pathological examination revealed negative margins (R0). Eighteen months after surgery, the patient is free of disease and shows no signs of recurrence. An initially unresectable, locally advanced biliary tract cancer may be down sized by chemotherapy, which makes radical resection possible, at least in a proportion of patients. This approach provides longer survival and may have a potential for disease eradication as a new multidisciplinary approach for patients with unresectable locally advanced biliary tract cancer.

  7. Results of chest wall resection for recurrent or locally advanced breast malignancies.

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    Veronesi, Giulia; Scanagatta, Paolo; Goldhirsch, Aron; Rietjens, Mario; Colleoni, Marco; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2007-06-01

    Between 1998 and 2003 we observed 15 women who underwent full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) followed by plastic reconstruction for locally recurrent or primary breast cancer. Preoperative symptoms were: pain (5 patients), malodorous ulceration (3 patients), presence of tumour mass (4 patients) and thoracic deformity (2 patients). One patient was asymptomatic. Surgery was partial sternectomy with rib resection in 9 patients, rib resection alone in 5, and total sternectomy in one. No perioperative mortality or major morbidity occurred; minor complications occurred in 3 patients (20%). Five of the six surviving patients reported a positive overall outcome in a telephonic interview. Median overall and disease-free survival were 23.4 and 17.5 months, respectively. In conclusion, FTCWR is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality that can provide good symptoms palliation in patients with locally advanced breast malignancies, so it should be considered more often by interdisciplinary care providers in those patients who fail to respond to classic multimodality treatment.

  8. Anterior chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer.

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    Wee, Hide Elfrida; Akbar, Fazuludeen Ali; Rajapaksha, Keerthi; Aneez, Dokev Basheer Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    With breast cancer awareness, the incidence of large invasive tumours is rare. We present a video of locally advanced breast cancer invading the anterior chest wall requiring en bloc resection that resulted in a large chest wall defect with exposed pleural and pericardial surface. Skeletal reconstruction and provision of adequate soft tissue coverage in order to avoid respiratory failure was challenging. A 58-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of locally invasive breast carcinoma with contiguous spread to sternum, clavicles, sternoclavicular joints and bilateral second to fifth ribs. She underwent total sternectomy, bilateral second to fifth ribs and chest wall resection resulting in a 21 × 18 cm chest wall defect. Reconstruction of her sternum was with methyl-methacrylate cement prosthesis. Ribs were reconstructed with titanium plates. Soft tissue coverage was achieved with left vertical rectus abdominis pedicle flap, right external oblique transposition flap and a right latissimus dorsi free flap. Flap failure necessitated a right vastus lateralis free flap. She was discharged ambulant without respiratory compromise. Resection and reconstruction of large chest wall defects is possible due to new bioprosthetic materials and is possible with acceptable morbidity and mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term results after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced resectable extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

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    Coco, Claudio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Manno, Alberto; Mattana, Claudio; Verbo, Alessandro; Cellini, Numa; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Covino, Marcello; Mantini, Giovanna; Miccichè, Francesco; Pedretti, Giorgio; Petito, Luigi; Rizzo, Gianluca; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Impiombato, Fabrizio Ambesi; Picciocchi, Aurelio

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate long-term outcome in locally advanced resectable extraperitoneal rectal cancer treated by preoperative radiochemotherapy. Eighty-three consecutive patients who developed locally advanced resectable extraperitoneal rectal cancer underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy followed by surgery, including total mesorectal excision. Median follow-up was 108 (range, 10-169) months. The living patients underwent complete follow-up of, at least, nine years. Fourteen patients developed local recurrence. The time to detection was longer than two years in eight cases and longer than five years in four. Twenty-one patients developed metastases, 19 within the first five years from surgery. At the univariate analysis, clinical stage at presentation, lymph node involvement at clinical restaging after neoadjuvant therapy, and pT and pN stage were found positively correlated to the incidence of metastases. At the multivariate analysis, the only factors which confirmed a positive correlation were pT stage and pN stage. The actuarial overall survival at five, seven, and ten years was 75.5, 67.8, and 60.4 percent, respectively. The same figures for cancer-related survival were 77.9, 70, and 65.8 percent. At the univariate analysis, factors directly correlated with worse survival were: TNM stage at clinical restaging after neoadjuvant therapy (in particular lymph node involvement) pTNM, pT, and pN. At the multivariate analysis the only factors that confirmed a correlation with worse survival were pTNM, pT, and pN. Long- term follow-up allows to individuate 28 percent of all local relapses after the first five years from surgery. Postoperative stage is highly predictive of prognosis.

  10. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced and Borderline Resectable Nonsquamous Sinonasal Tumors (Esthesioneuroblastoma and Sinonasal Tumor with Neuroendocrine Differentiation

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    Vijay M. Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sinonasal tumors are chemotherapy responsive which frequently present in advanced stages making NACT a promising option for improving resection and local control in borderline resectable and locally advanced tumours. Here we reviewed the results of 25 such cases treated with NACT. Materials and Methods. Sinonasal tumor patients treated with NACT were selected for this analysis. These patients received NACT with platinum and etoposide for 2 cycles. Patients who responded and were amenable for gross total resection underwent surgical resection and adjuvant CTRT. Those who responded but were not amenable for resection received radical CTRT. Patients who progressed on NACT received either radical CTRT or palliative radiotherapy. Results. The median age of the cohort was 42 years (IQR 37–47 years. Grades 3-4 toxicity with NACT were seen in 19 patients (76%. The response rate to NACT was 80%. Post-NACT surgery was done in 12 (48% patients and radical chemoradiation in 9 (36% patients. The 2-year progression free survival and overall survival were 75% and 78.5%, respectively. Conclusion. NACT in sinonasal tumours has a response rate of 80%. The protocol of NACT followed by local treatment is associated with improvement in outcomes as compared to our historical cohort.

  11. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

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    Bjerregaard, Jon K., E-mail: jon.bjerregaard@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Mortensen, Michael B. [Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Pfeiffer, Per [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  12. Neoadjuvant therapy and surgical resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

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    Meko, J; Rusch, V W

    2000-10-01

    During the past 15 years, treatment of stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer has evolved considerably because of improvements in patients selection, staging, and combined modality therapy. Results of several clinical trials suggest that induction chemotherapy or chemoradiation and surgical resection is superior to surgery alone. However, the optimal induction regimen has not been defined. An intergroup trial is also underway to determine whether chemoradiation and surgical resection leads to better survival than chemotherapy and radiation alone. Future studies will assess ways to combine radiation and novel chemotherapeutic agents, and will identify molecular abnormalities that predict response to induction therapy.

  13. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients with Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

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    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results...... consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). RESULTS: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model...... for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival...

  14. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on malignant molecule levels in tumor tissue and serum of patients with locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer

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    Bin Huang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on malignant molecule levels in tumor tissue and serum of patients with locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer. Methods:A total of 86 cases of patients with locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer were selected and randomly divided into observation group and control group. Control group of patients received traditional postoperative chemotherapy and observation group of patients received preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy and traditional postoperative chemotherapy. After one cycle, two cycles and three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, serum samples were collected to determine the levels of malignant molecules; after surgical resection, the tumor tissues were collected to determine the expression levels of malignant molecules. Results:After one cycle, two cycles and three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, serum VEGF, Cath-D, MCP-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, sIL-2R and IL-18 levels of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group; after surgical resection, Beclin-1 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression levels in tumor tissue of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, and mTOR, Livin and MTA1 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group.Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can effectively inhibit the malignant degree of locally advanced resectable colorectal cancer and inhibit the expression of malignant molecules, and it is of positive significance in terms of improving overall treatment effect.

  15. Comparison and Prognostic Analysis of Adjuvant Radiotherapy versus Salvage Radiotherapy for Treatment of Radically Resected Locally Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Xin Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical resection for treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Methods. Data from 155 patients with locally advanced ESCC who underwent radical resection and received postoperative radiotherapy from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients received adjuvant radiotherapy and 76 received salvage radiotherapy after locoregional recurrence. Results. The median disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS were significantly higher in the adjuvant radiotherapy group than the salvage radiotherapy group (DFS 25.73 months versus 10.73 months, P 65 years or with PS ≥ 2. Conclusion. Compared to salvage radiotherapy, postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can prolong DFS and OS for patients with radically resected local advanced ESCC but cannot improve survival for patients aged > 65 years or with PS ≥ 2.

  16. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

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    Esnaola, Nestor F. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O' Brien, Paul [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Camp, E. Ramsay [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Thomas, Melanie B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Cole, David J. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Montero, Alberto J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Orwat, Kelly P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  17. Circumferential resection margin positivity after preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on magnetic resonance imaging for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication of boost radiotherapy to the involved mesorectal fascia.

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    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Ho Geun; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-04-01

    To identify patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Between October 2008 and November 2012, 165 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT4 or cT3 with fascia) who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy were analysed. The morphologic patterns on post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging were categorized into five patterns from Pattern A (most-likely negative pathologic circumferential resection margin) to Pattern E (most-likely positive pathologic circumferential resection margin). In addition, the location of mesorectal fascia involvement was classified as lateral, posterior and anterior. The diagnostic accuracy of the morphologic criteria was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was identified in 17 patients (10.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 0.73 using the five-scale magnetic resonance imaging pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement were 76.5, 65.5, 20.3 and 96.0%, respectively, when cut-off was set between Patterns C and D. On multivariate logistic regression, the magnetic resonance imaging patterns D and E (P= 0.005) and posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement (P= 0.017) were independently associated with increased probability of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement. The rate of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 30.0% when the patient had Pattern D or E with posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement. Patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement can be identified using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging although the predictability is moderate. © The

  18. Extended mesometrial resection (EMMR): Surgical approach to the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer based on the theory of ontogenetic cancer fields.

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    Wolf, Benjamin; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Hentschel, Bettina; Horn, Lars-Christian; Höckel, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Based on ontogenetic-anatomic considerations, we have introduced total mesometrial resection (TMMR) and laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER) as surgical treatments for patients with cancer of the uterine cervix FIGO stages I B1 - IV A. For a subset of patients with locally advanced disease we have sought to develop an operative strategy characterized by the resection of additional tissue at risk for tumor infiltration as compared to TMMR, but less than in LEER, preserving the urinary bladder function. We conducted a prospective single center study to evaluate the feasibility of extended mesometrial resection (EMMR) and therapeutic lymph node dissection as a surgical treatment approach for patients with cervical cancer fixed to the urinary bladder and/or its mesenteries as determined by intraoperative evaluation. None of the patients received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. 48 consecutive patients were accrued into the trial. Median tumor size was 5cm, and 85% of all patients were found to have lymph node metastases. Complete tumor resection (R0) was achieved in all cases. Recurrence free survival at 5years was 54.1% (95% CI 38.3-69.9). The overall survival rate was 62.6% (95% CI 45.6-79.6) at 5years. Perioperative morbidity represented by grade II and III complications (determined by the Franco-Italian glossary) occurred in 25% and 15% of patients, respectively. We demonstrate in this study the feasibility of EMMR as a surgical treatment approach for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and regional lymph node invasion without the necessity for postoperative adjuvant radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resection of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Neoplasms after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine following FOLFIRINOX Failure

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    Sarah Hahn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of pancreatic cancer has dramatically increased over the past years, but the prognosis has not improved. Between 30 and 40% of tumors are considered locally advanced, essentially due to vascular involvement. In recent years, new chemotherapy protocols with high response rates have been developed. FOLFIRINOX seems to be an interesting option in this situation, but hematologic toxicity could be an obstacle to its prescription. Nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine offer significant response rates with a reasonable safety profile. We report here a single-center experience of 2 cases with a locally advanced pancreatic cancer initially considered unresectable, progressive after first-line neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy, and then treated with second-line nab-paclitaxel/gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  20. [A case of locally advanced breast cancer successfully treated with wide resection and reconstruction of chest wall with A-O metallic plates].

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    Imamura, H; Tatsuta, M; Masuda, N; Miya, A; Ezumi, K; Shimizu, J; Ikeda, M; Ishida, H; Masutani, S; Kawasaki, T; Furukawa, H; Satomi, T

    2001-10-01

    A 63-year-old female with locally advanced breast cancer was treated with preoperative chemotherapy using docetaxel. The therapeutic regimen was comprised of four cycles at 3-week intervals. One cycle consisted of 80 mg of docetaxel which was administered on day 1. A remarkable response was confirmed. The side effects such as leukopenia, general fatigue and alopecia were moderate and had no influence on the patient's QOL. After preoperative chemotherapy, a full thickness chest wall resection was performed. Chest wall defect was reconstructed with orthopedic A-O metallic plates, Marlex mesh and rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. These metal plates were very useful because it was easy to bend and twist them manually to fit the defect at the time of operation. Moreover, the curved metal plates preserved the cone form of the chest cage. The postoperative course was favourable without frail chest or wound infection.

  1. Epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and capectabine is just as "MAGIC"al as epirubicin, cisplatin, and fluorouracil perioperative chemotherapy for resectable locally advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer

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    Bhawna Sirohi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The perioperative use of epirubicin, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (ECF significantly improves outcomes in patients with gastric and gastro-oesophageal (GO cancers but is cumbersome to administer. Given the equivalence of epirubicin, oxaliplatin, and capectabine (EOX with ECF in advanced setting, we analyzed the compliance, efficacy, and toxicity of perioperative EOX in resectable but locally advanced cancers. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained database of patients treated between January 2012 and September 2013 at Tata Memorial Centre. Patients were planned to receive 3# of neoadjuvant (NA and 3# of adjuvant EOX (intravenous epirubicin 50 mg/m 2 D1, oxaliplatin 130 mg/m 2 , on D1, capecitabiine 1250 mg/m 2 D1-21 every 21 days. On completion of NA therapy, patients were planned to undergo gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Results: A total of 99 patients (76% males, median age 51 years were treated with perioperative EOX. Preoperatively, 93% patients completed EOX. Post-NA chemotherapy, 4 patients progressed, 1 patient died and 94 were taken up for surgery. Of these, 9 were inoperable and 85 patients underwent radical surgery. Of these, 71% (60/85 were able to complete three cycles of adjuvant EOX. The compliance to complete all 6 cycles of perioperative chemotherapy was 64%. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were comparable to the MAGIC dataset apart from higher number of diarrhea in our patients. Conclusions: In patients with resectable GO adenocarcinoma, it is possible to deliver the MAGIC-type perioperative chemotherapy with EOX with better compliance, toxicity, and efficacy rates.

  2. Extended pelvic resections for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent anal canal and colorectal cancer: technical aspects and morbimortality predictors aftet 24 consecutive cases

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    José Wilson Benevides de Mesquita Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the profile of morbidity and mortality and its predictors related to extensive pelvic resections, including pelvic exenteration, to optimize the selection of patients and achieve better surgical results. Methods: we performed 24 major resections for anorectal pelvic malignancy from 2008 to 2015 in the Instituto do Câncer do Ceará. The factors analyzed included age, weight loss, resected organs, total versus posterior exenteration, angiolymphatic and perineural invasion, lymph node metastasis and overall and disease-free survival. Results: the median age was 57 years and the mean follow-up was ten months. Overall morbidity was 45.8%, with five (20.8% serious complications. There were no deaths in the first 30 postoperative days. The median overall survival was 39.5 months, and disease-free survival, 30.7 months. Concomitant resection of the bladder was an isolated prognostic factor for higher risk of complications (87.5% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.009. Angiolymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis did not reach significance with respect to disease-free survival. Conclusion: treatment of advanced anorectal tumors is challenging, often requiring combined resections, such as cystectomy and sacrectomy, and complex reconstructions. The magnitude of the operation still carries a high morbidity rate, but is a procedure considered safe and feasible, with a low mortality and adequate locoregional tumor control when performed in referral centers.

  3. A randomized phase II study of capecitabine-based chemoradiation with or without bevacizumab in resectable locally advanced rectal cancer: clinical and biological features

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Ramon; Capdevila, Jaume; Laquente, Berta; Manzano, Jose Luis; Pericay, Carles; Villacampa, Mercedes Mart?nez; L?pez, Carlos; Losa, Ferran; Safont, Maria Jose; G?mez, Auxiliadora; Alonso, Vicente; Escudero, Pilar; Gallego, Javier; Sastre, Javier; Gr?valos, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperatory chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves local control and survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the addition of bevacizumab (BEV) to preoperative capecitabine (CAP)-based CRT in LARC, and to explore biomarkers for downstaging. Methods Patients (pts) were randomized to receive 5?weeks of radiotherapy 45?Gy/25 fractions with concurrent CAP 825?mg/m2 twice daily 5?days per week and BEV 5?mg/kg once ev...

  4. High-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) with oral UFT/folinic acid and escalating doses of oxaliplatin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber Vestermark, Lene; Jensen, Helle A; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consensus is that patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) should receive long-term chemoradiotherapy (CRT) before surgery. With the intent to offer the patients intensified concomitant chemotherapy (CT) to improve outcome and to assess tolerability and toxicity of oxaliplatin (Ox) a p...

  5. Glioma Surgery: Technological Advances to Achieve a Maximal Safe Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Roberto; Zenga, Francesco; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Cofano, Fabio; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Spena, Giannantonio; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Fornaro, Riccardo; Ducati, Alessandro; Garbossa, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor. Despite the best treatment and advances in therapy, prognosis remains poor. One of the mainstays of therapy in GBM is surgical excision. Several studies have confirmed that the extent of resection (EOR) positively influences overall survival (OS) in patients with high-grade gliomas (HGGs). A literature search was performed using PubMed to assess the useful neurosurgical tools to achieve the best neurosurgical performance. In order to achieve the major extent of resection, preserving neurological function, many tools are now available, especially neuronavigation, intraoperative fluorescence, intraoperative ultrasound, and neuromonitoring. In addition to the maximal excision of tumor, the neurosurgeon can use photodynamic therapy (PTD) and local drug delivery (LDD) to improve the local control and bridge conventional radio and chemotherapy. EOR improves OS in patients with HGGs. There are technological possibilities for achieving a complete resection preserving neurological function, and it is not acceptable to perform only biopsy of these lesions.

  6. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2016-06-24

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  7. A randomized phase II study of capecitabine-based chemoradiation with or without bevacizumab in resectable locally advanced rectal cancer: clinical and biological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ramon; Capdevila, Jaume; Laquente, Berta; Manzano, Jose Luis; Pericay, Carles; Villacampa, Mercedes Martínez; López, Carlos; Losa, Ferran; Safont, Maria Jose; Gómez, Auxiliadora; Alonso, Vicente; Escudero, Pilar; Gallego, Javier; Sastre, Javier; Grávalos, Cristina; Biondo, Sebastiano; Palacios, Amalia; Aranda, Enrique

    2015-02-26

    Perioperatory chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves local control and survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the addition of bevacizumab (BEV) to preoperative capecitabine (CAP)-based CRT in LARC, and to explore biomarkers for downstaging. Patients (pts) were randomized to receive 5 weeks of radiotherapy 45 Gy/25 fractions with concurrent CAP 825 mg/m(2) twice daily 5 days per week and BEV 5 mg/kg once every 2 weeks (3 doses) (arm A), or the same schedule without BEV (arm B). The primary end point was pathologic complete response (ypCR: ypT0N0). Ninety pts were included in arm A (44) or arm B (46). Grade 3-4 treatment-related toxicity rates were 16% and 13%, respectively. All patients but one (arm A) proceeded to surgery. The ypCR rate was 16% in arm A and 11% in arm B (p =0.54). Fifty-nine percent vs 39% of pts achieved T-downstaging (arm A vs arm B; p =0.04). Serial samples for biomarker analyses were obtained for 50 out of 90 randomized pts (arm A/B: 22/28). Plasma angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) levels decreased in arm A and increased in arm B (p <0.05 at all time points). Decrease in Ang-2 levels from baseline to day 57 was significantly associated with tumor downstaging (p =0.02). The addition of BEV to CAP-based preoperative CRT has shown to be feasible in LARC. The association between decreasing Ang-2 levels and tumor downstaging should be further validated in customized studies. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01043484. Trial registration date: 12/30/2009.

  8. Long-term results of a phase II trial of high-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) and UFT/l-leucovorin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestermark, Lene W.; Qvortrup, Camilla; Baatrup, Gunnar; Pfeiffer, Per (Odense Univ. Hospital, Odense (Denmark)); Bisgaard, Claus; Jacobsen, Anders (Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)); Hansen, Flemming; Rasmussen, Peter (Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-03-15

    Background. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is a cornerstone in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve outcome (number of R0 resections and survival) high-dose radiotherapy (RT) was combined with oral UFT/l-leucovorin to allow tumour regression before radical intended surgery. Methods. Pelvic RT was delivered with megavoltage photons using a 5 field technique. RT was CT-based, given 5 days a week through one posterior field and two lateral fields (48.6 Gy/27 fractions) to encompass the primary tumour and the regional lymph nodes. In addition, the tumour bed received a concurrent boost (5.4 Gy/27 fractions) and a final boost (6 Gy/3 fractions); thus GTV received 60 Gy/30 fractions. Concurrent with RT patients received a daily dose of oral UFT 300 mg/m2 plus l-leucovorin 22.5 mg 5/7days (divided in three doses). Results. From September 2000 to November 2004, 52 patients (median age 60 years (32-83); median PS 0 (0-2)) with LARC (36 primary, 16 recurrent) were included in this phase II study. All but three patients received the planned 60 Gy, median duration of RT was 42 days (25-49). Toxicity was very modest; only four patients had a dose reduction of UFT. No hematological toxicity of clinical significance was seen. Non-hematological toxicity grade 1 (GI-toxicity, fatigue and/or dysuria) was frequently observed but only four patients experienced grade 3 toxicity (diarrhoea and/or nausea/vomiting). Forty patients (77%) were operated (30 R0, 5 R1, 5 R2) median 55 days (27-112) after completion of RT. Seven (13%) patients had a pathological complete response (pCR). Thirty-one patients (60%) died after median 25.4 months (1.6-45.2 months). Twenty-one patients (40%) are still alive June 2007. Conclusions. Preoperative high-dose RT and concomitant UFT produces major regression in most patients with non-resectable LARC and thus a good chance of cure

  9. Long-term results of concurrent radiotherapy and UFT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Definition and treatment options for locally advanced non-resectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) vary. Treatment options range from palliative chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Several studies have shown that a number of patients become resectable after complementary treatment prior...

  10. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  11. Ressecção alargada para o adenocarcinoma colorretal localmente invasivo: relato de caso e revisão da literatura Enlarged resection for locally advanced colorectal adenocarcinoma: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Henrique Couto Horta

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available O câncer colorretal localmente invasivo, que acomete por contiguidade estruturas adjacentes e sem metástases à distância, ocorre de 5 a 18% dos casos. São adequadamente tratados com ressecção do tumor e órgãos comprometidos em monobloco e margens livres. É relatado o caso de paciente de 27 anos, masculino, portador de adenocarcinoma de retossigmóide com extensa invasão para bexiga e ceco. Tratado com colectomia total, cistectomia radical em monobloco e ileostomia. O trânsito urinário foi reconstituído com reservatório ileal e anastomose com a uretra prostática. O estudo anátomo-patológico da peça cirúrgica revelou adenocarcinoma moderadamente diferenciado, invasão perineural e invasão da parede da bexiga (T4, N0. Realizou no pós-operatório quimioterapia adjuvante, 6 ciclos, com 5-Fluorouracil e ácido folínico. Após 36 meses de seguimento, o paciente encontra-se livre de doença neoplásica, função urinária preservada, porém com ejaculação retrógrada.The locally advanced colorectal cancer compromises adjacent structures and do not disseminate distant metastasis, occur in 5 to 18% of patients. It is properly treated with tumour resection as well as other compromised organs in an "en bloc" resection with free margins. We report a 27 year old, male patient with colorectal adenocarcinoma invading the urinary bladder and cecum. He was treated with total colectomy associated with radical cistectomy and ileostomy. The urinary transit was established building an ileal reservatory anastomosed to the urethra. The tumour histopathologic study showed adenocarcinoma moderate differentiated, invading urinary bladder (T4N0. Postoperative treatment was 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid chemotherapy. After 36 months of outcome, patient is improving and preserves urinary function but has ejaculatory dysfunction.

  12. Prognostic factors in locally advanced colon cancer treated by extended resection Fatores prognósticos em câncer de cólon localmente avançado tratado com ressecção extendida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René A.C. Vieira

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of clinical, pathologic, and surgical variables on the postoperative morbidity, mortality, and survival of patients undergoing extended resections of colon carcinoma were evaluated. METHODS: The medical records of 95 patients who underwent extended resections for colon carcinoma between 1953 and 1996 were reviewed. In all cases, in addition to colectomy, 1 or more organs and/or structures were resected en bloc due to a macroscopically based suspicion of tumor invasion. The clinical, pathologic, and surgical parameters were analyzed. Overall survival rates were analyzed according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Eighty-six patients were treated by curative surgeries and the remaining by palliative resections. Invasion of the organs and/or adjacent structures and regional lymph nodes was found microscopically in 48 and 31 patients, respectively. The median follow-up without postoperative mortality was 47.7 months. The 5-year overall survival rates was 52.6%. The 5-year overall survival rates for patients undergoing curative and palliative surgeries was 58.3% and 0%, respectively. The mean survival time in the palliative surgery group was 3.1 months. Multivariate analysis showed that Karnofsky performance status was strongly related to the risk of postoperative complications (P = .01, and postoperative deaths were associated with the type of surgery and Karnofsky performance status at the time of admission (P = .001. CONCLUSIONS: Some patients with locally advanced colon adenocarcinomas undergoing extended resections have a 5-year overall survival rates of 58.3%. Patients could benefit from palliative-intent procedures, but these measures should cautiously be indicated and avoided in patients with low Karnofsky performance status due to high rates of postoperative mortality and poor survival.Foi avaliado o impacto de variáveis clínicas, patol

  13. A phase I study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holländer, Cecilie; Jensen, Lene Bæksgaard; Sorensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in patients with non-resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer.......To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in patients with non-resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer....

  14. Recurrent advanced colonic cancer occurring 11 years after initial endoscopic piecemeal resection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishino Takayoshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high frequency of local recurrence occurring after endoscopic piecemeal resection (EPMR for large colorectal tumors is a serious problem. However, almost all of these cases of local recurrence can be detected within 1 year and cured by additional endoscopic resection. We report a rare case of recurrent advanced colonic cancer diagnosed 11 years after initial EPMR treatment. Case presentation A 65-year-old male was diagnosed with a sigmoid colon lesion following a routine health check-up. Total colonoscopy revealed a 12 mm type 0-Is lesion in the sigmoid colon, which was diagnosed as an adenoma or intramucosal cancer and treated by EPMR in 1996. The post-resection defect was closed completely using metallic endoclips to avoid delayed bleeding. In 2007, at the third follow up, colonoscopy revealed a 20 mm submucosal tumor (SMT like recurrence at the site of the previous EPMR. The recurrent lesion was treated by laparoscopic assisted sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection. Conclusion When it is difficult to evaluate the depth and margins of resected tumors following EPMR, it is important that the defect is not closed in order to avoid tumor implantation, missing residual lesions and to enable earlier detection of recurrence. It is crucial that the optimal follow-up protocol for EPMR cases is clarified, particularly how often and for how long they should be followed.

  15. Extended surgical resections of advanced thymoma Masaoka stages III and IVa facilitate outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Michael; Potzger, Tobias; Sziklavari, Zsolt; Diez, Claudius; Neu, Reiner; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Extended thymoma resections including adjacent structures and pleurectomy/decortication (P/D) with hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy (HITHOC) perfusion were performed in a multidisciplinary treatment regime. Between July 2000 and February 2012, 22 patients with Masaoka stage III (n = 9; 41%) and Masaoka stage IVa (n = 13; 59%) thymic tumors were included. Mean age was 55 years (25-84 years) and 50% (11 out of 22) of patients were female. World Health Organization histological classification was as follows: B2 (n = 15), A (n = 1), B1 (n = 1), B3 (n = 2), and thymic carcinoma (C; n = 3). Radical thymectomy and partial resection of the mediastinal pleura and pericardium were performed. Of the 13, 9 patients with pleural involvement (stage IVa) received radical P/D followed by HITHOC (cisplatin). Macroscopic complete resection (R0/R1) was achieved in 19 (86%) patients. All patients received multimodality treatment depending on tumor stage, histology, and completeness of resection. Thirty-day mortality was 0% and three (13.6%) patients needed operative revision. Recurrence of thymoma was documented in five (22.7%) patients (stage III, n = 1; stage IVa, n = 4). Mean disease-free interval of patients with complete resection (n = 14 out of 22) was 30.2 months. After a mean follow-up of 29 months, 18 out of the 22 (82%) patients are alive. After P/D and HITHOC, 89% (8 out of 9 patients) are alive (current median survival is 25 months) without recurrence. Extended surgical resection of advanced thymic tumors infiltrating adjacent structures (stage III) or with pleural metastases (stage IVa) is safe and feasible. It provides a low recurrence rate and an acceptable survival. Additional HITHOC in patients with pleural thymoma spread seems to offer a better local tumor control. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. An Effective Technique for Endoscopic Resection of Advanced Stage Angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mohammadi Ardehali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, the surgical management of angiofibroma has been greatly influenced by the use of endoscopic techniques. However, large tumors that extend into difficult anatomic sites present major challenges for management by either endoscopy or an open-surgery approach which needs new technique for the complete en block resection.   Materials and Methods: In a prospective observational study we developed an endoscopic transnasal technique for the resection of angiofibroma via pushing and pulling the mass with 1/100000 soaked adrenalin tampons. Thirty two patients were treated using this endoscopic technique over 7 years. The mean follow-up period was 36 months. The main outcomes measured were tumor staging, average blood loss, complications, length of hospitalization, and residual and/or recurrence rate of the tumor.   Results: According to the Radkowski staging, 23,5, and 4 patients were at stage IIC, IIIA, and IIIB, respectively. Twenty five patients were operated on exclusively via transnasal endoscopy while 7 patients were managed using endoscopy-assisted open-surgery techniques. Mean blood loss in patients was 1261± 893 cc. The recurrence rate was 21.88% (7 cases at two years following surgery. Mean hospitalization time was 3.56 ± 0.6 days.   Conclusion:  Using this effective technique, endoscopic removal of more highly advanced angiofibroma is possible. Better visualization, less intraoperative blood loss, lower rates of complication and recurrence, and shorter hospitalization time are some of the advantages.

  17. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  18. EORTC 24051 : Unexpected side effects in a phase I study of TPF induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation with lapatinib, a dual EGFR/ErbB2 inhibitor, in patients with locally advanced resectable larynx and hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalami, Yassine; Specenier, Pol M.; Awada, Ahmad; Lacombe, Denis; Liberatoscioli, Cecilia; Fortpied, Catherine; El-Hariry, Iman; Bogaerts, Jan; Andry, Guy; Langendijk, J. A.; Vermorken, Jan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In this phase I/II study, the addition of lapatinib (LAP) was investigated in combination with the sequential use of both approaches TPF induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by chemoradiation (CRT) in locally advanced larynx or hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma. Patients and methods:

  19. [Laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with anal fistula 50 years previously. He complained of mucous and bloody stools. He was diagnosed with a carcinoma associated with anal fistula after biopsy. Image examination showed that the tumor was filled with mucinous substances and that it had invaded the levator ani muscle, with left external iliac and left inguinal lymph node metastases. Therefore, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cancer was administered. After chemoradiotherapy, the tumor and metastatic lymph nodes reduced in size. We performed laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed as a mucinous adenocarcinoma, but no cancer cells were present on the surgical margin. This case suggested that preoperative chemoradiotherapy could be effective for locally advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula.

  20. Multimodality approach for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khaldoun Almhanna; Jonathan R Strosberg

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoma of the esophagus is an aggressive and lethal malignancy with an increasing incidence world-wide.Incidence rates vary internationally,with the highest rates found in Southern and Eastern Africa and Eastern Asia,and the lowest in Western and Middle Africa and Central America.Patients with locally advanced disease face a poor prognosis,with 5-year survival rates ranging from 15%-34%.Recent clinical trials have evaluated different strategies for management of locoregional cancer; however,because of stage migration and changes in disease epidemiology,applying these trials to clinical practice has become a daunting task.We searched Medline and conference abstracts for randomized studies published in the last 3 decades.We restricted our search to articles published in English.Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection is an accepted standard of care in the United States.Esophagectomy remains an essential component of treatment and can lead to improved overall survival,especially when performed at high volume institutions.The role of adjuvant chemotherapy following curative resection is still unclear.External beam radiation therapy alone is considered palliative and is typically reserved for patients with a poor performance status.

  1. Treatment of locally advanced prostatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušić Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A locally advanced prostate cancer is defined as a malignant process spreading beyond the prostate capsule or in seminal vesicles but without distant metastasis or regional lymph nodes invasion. Clinical classification, prediction and treatment of prostate cancer. An exact staging of clinical T3 stadium is usually difficult because of the frequent over and under staging. The risk prognostic stratification is performed through nomograms and ANN (artificial neural networks. The options for treatment are: radical prostatectomy, external radiotherapy and interstitial implantation of radioisotopes, hormonal therapy by androgen blockade. Radical prostatectomy is considered in patients with T3 stage but extensive dissection of lymph nodes, dissection of neurovascular bundle (on tumor side, total removal of seminal vesicle and sometimes resection of bladder neck are obligatory. Postoperative radiotherapy is performed in patients with invasion of seminal vesicles and capsular penetration or with prostate specific antigen value over 0.1 ng/ml, one month after the surgical treatment. Definitive radiotherapy could be used as the best treatment option considering clinical stage, Gleason score, age, starting prostate specific antigen (PSA value, concomitant diseases, life expectancy, quality of life, through multidisciplinary approach (combined with androgen deprivation. Hormonal therapy in intended for patients who are not eligible for surgical treatment or radiotherapy. Conclusion. Management of locally advanced prostate cancer is still controversial and studies for better diagnosis and new treatment modalities are ongoing.

  2. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-10-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

  3. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  4. Computed Tomography Guided Hook-wire Precise Localization and Minimally Invasive Resection of Pulmonary Nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Localization of pulmonary ground glass nodule is the technical difficulty of minimally invasive operation resection. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of computed tomography (CT-guided Hook-wire precise localization in resection of pulmonary nodules by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS as well as to discuss the necessity and feasibility of surgical resection of GGOs through a minimally invasive approach. Methods CT-guided Hook-wire precise localization and wedge resection was done on 25 cases with 26 pulmonary nodules by VATS from May 2013 to June 2015. The efficacy of localization was evaluated in terms of procedure time, VATS success rate, and associated complications of localization. Results All the 26 pulmonary nodules (6 solid nodules and 20 GGOs of 25 patients (10 males and 15 females were preoperatively detected and localized with Hook-wire under CT guidance. Nodule diameters ranged from 5 mm-20 mm (mean: 8 mm. The distance of lung lesions from the nearest pleural surfaces ranged within 5 mm-30 mm (mean: 14 mm. All resections of lesions guided by the Hook-wire were successfully performed by VATS (success rate: 100%. The mean procedure time for the CT-guided Hook-wire localization was 10 min (range: 5 min-10 min. The mean procedure time for VATS wedge resection was 20 min (range: 15 min-40 min. The mean hospital time was 4 d (range: 3 d-6 d. The major complication of CT-guided Hook-wire localization was mild pneumothorax in 4 patients, but no one needed chest tube drainage. Wedge resection was performed successfully in all cases. The dislocation of Hook-wire was found in only one patient during the operation, but the lesion was still successfully resected under VATS. Results of pathological examination of 16 mGGOs revealed 8 primary lung cancers and 8 nonspecific chronic inflammations. Results of pathological examination of 4 pGGOs revealed 1 primary lung cancers, 1 atypical adenomatous

  5. Technological advances in transurethral resection of the prostate: bipolar versus monopolar TURP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Muta M

    2008-08-01

    One of the most significant recent advancements in transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is the incorporation of bipolar technology. Bipolar circuitry allows TURP to be performed in a normal saline environment, which addresses a fundamental concern of conventional monopolar TURP (i.e., the use of hypo-osmolar irrigation). As a result, the risks of dilutional hyponatremia and transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome are eliminated, allowing for longer and safer resection. This review discusses the principles and applications of electrosurgery in conventional monopolar as well as new bipolar saline-based TURP systems. This review also addresses the positive impact on patient safety and resident training.

  6. Successful Re-resection for Locally Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma at Four Years After Ex Vivo Tumor Resection and Autotransplantation of the Liver: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Miura, K; Ishikawa, H; Soma, D; Zhang, Z; Yuza, K; Hirose, Y; Takizawa, K; Nagahashi, M; Sakata, J; Kameyama, H; Kosugi, S; Wakai, T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical resection should be considered for isolated locally recurrent retroperitoneal liposarcomas. We experienced a case of successful re-resection for locally recurrent retroperitoneal liposarcomas 4 years after ex vivo tumor resection and autotransplantation of the liver. A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital. His diagnosis was local recurrence of liposarcomas. He had previously undergone ex vivo tumor resection and autologous orthotopic liver transplantation for a retroperitoneal tumor 4 years earlier. The resected tumor size was 23.5 × 15.5 × 12.5 cm. The tumor was revealed by means of histopathologic study to be a myxoid liposarcoma. Follow-up computerized tomography showed 2 recurrent tumors in the retropancreatic and para-aortic lesions. Although adhesion was severe within the operative field, we successfully performed complete en bloc re-resection of each recurrent tumor. The operative time was 250 minutes, and blood loss was 300 mL. The resected tumor sizes were 3.9 × 3.2 × 1.5 cm and 4.5 × 3.3 × 3.0 cm. The tumors were revealed by means of histopathologic study to be dedifferentiated liposarcomas. Postoperative complications included intestinal obstruction and colocutaneous fistula formation, both of which were treated surgically. The patient was discharged in an ambulatory state at 80 days after re-resection of the recurrent tumors. At the time of writing, he was alive with no evidence of recurrence, 14 months after re-resection and 62 months after primary ex vivo tumor resection. This is the first case of successful surgical re-resection for locally recurrent liposarcoma after ex vivo tumor resection and autotransplantation of the liver.

  7. Treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, RA; Nieuwenhuijzen, GAP; Martijn, H; Rutten, HJT; Hospers, GAP; Wiggers, T

    2004-01-01

    Historically, locally advanced rectal cancer is known for its dismal prognosis. The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is subject to continuous change due to development of new and better diagnostic tools, radiotherapeutic techniques, chemotherapeutic agents and understanding of the

  8. Localized gastric amyloidosis differentiated histologically from scirrhous gastric cancer using endoscopic mucosal resection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamata Tsugumasa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Amyloidosis most often manifests as a systemic involvement of multiple tissues and organs, and an amyloidal deposit confined to the stomach is extremely rare. It is sometimes difficult to provide a definitive diagnosis of localized gastric amyloidosis by biopsy specimen and diagnosis of amyloidosis in some cases has been finalized only after surgical resection of the stomach. Case presentation A 76-year-old Japanese woman with epigastric discomfort underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedure. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed gastric wall thickening, suggesting scirrhous gastric carcinoma, at the greater curvature from the upper to the lower part of the gastric corpus. A biopsy specimen revealed amyloid deposits in the submucosal layer with no malignant findings. We resected a representative portion of the lesion by endoscopic mucosal resection using the strip biopsy method to obtain sufficient tissue specimens, and then conducted a detailed histological evaluation of the samples. The resected specimens revealed deposition of amyloidal materials in the gastric mucosa and submucosa without any malignant findings. Congo red staining results were positive for amyloidal protein and exhibited green birefringence under polarized light. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL amyloid protein type. Based on these results, gastric malignancy, systemic amyloidosis and amyloid deposits induced by inflammatory disease were excluded and this lesion was consequently diagnosed as localized gastric amyloidosis. Our patient was an older woman and there were no findings relative to an increase in gastrointestinal symptoms or anemia, so no further treatment was performed. She continued to be in good condition without any finding of disease progression six years after verification of our diagnosis. Conclusions We report an unusual case of primary amyloidosis of the stomach

  9. Prognostic Role of Functional Neuroimaging after Multilobar Resection in Patients with Localization-Related Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Bin Cho

    Full Text Available To investigate the usage of functional neuroimaging as a prognostic tool for seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes in patients with multilobar resection, we recruited 90 patients who received multilobar resections between 1995 and 2013 with at least 1-year follow-up (mean 8.0 years. All patients were monitored using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG after pre-surgical evaluation. Clinical data (demographics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging were reviewed retrospectively. Surgical outcomes were evaluated at 1, 2, 5 years after surgery, and at the end of the study. After 1 year, 56 patients (62.2% became Engel class I and at the last follow-up, 47 patients (52.2% remained seizure-free. Furthermore, non-localized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET, identifying hypometabolic areas not concordant with ictal onset zones, significantly correlated with seizure recurrence after 1 year. Non-lesional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and left-sided resection correlated with poor outcomes. In the last follow-up, non-localized PET and left-sided resection significantly correlated with seizure recurrence. Both localized PET and ictal-interictal SPECT subtraction co-registered to MR (SISCOM predicted good surgical outcomes in the last follow-up (69.2%, Engel I. This study suggests that PET and SISCOM may predict postoperative outcomes for patients after multilobar epilepsy and shows comparable long-term surgical outcomes after multilobar resection.

  10. Neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri Ramakrishnan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To study the role of neoadjuvant imatinib mesylate in downsizing tumors in patients with locally advanced nonmetastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, thus improving the possibility of complete resection. Materials and Methods : We used neoadjuvant imatinib in six patients with locally advanced GISTs, at a dose of 400 mg daily, given orally in all patients for a median period of 3.5 months (range 1-20 months. All patients had a computerized tomography scan (CT scan once before starting the treatment and a repeat CT scan 1 month after starting imatinib. Some patients had another CT scan done at 3 months. The tumor volume was calculated using the formula V=4/3 πr 3 . Results : Following imatinib therapy, the median reduction in the tumor volume was 40% (range 20-50%. Four of the six patients underwent successful complete resection of the tumor following neoadjuvant imatinib for a median period of 2 months, and are disease free after a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range 3-20 months. Two patients in whom the tumors were deemed to be operable after downsizing refused surgery and are continuing imatinib. Imatinib did not produce serious toxicity in any patient. Conclusion : Neoadjuvant imatinib can be used successfully in patients with locally advanced nonmetastatic GISTs to improve the rates of complete resection and reduce the chance of tumor spill. The optimal duration of neoadjuvant treatment needs to be tailored based on response assessment at frequent intervals to identify the ideal window period for surgery.

  11. Management of Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma with Invasion of the Duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Schlussel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is rare but aggressive, with greater than 20% of patients presenting with stage III or IV, disease. Surgical resection of the primary tumor regardless of stage is the treatment of choice, and en bloc resection of involved organs provides the only potential chance for cure. This case report describes a patient with metastatic right-sided RCC with invasion of the inferior vena cava and duodenum managed by en block resection and pancreaticoduodenectomy. This report will review the workup and treatment of locally advanced RCC, as well as the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the setting of metastatic disease.

  12. Local involvement of the lower urinary tract in primary colorectal cancer - outcome after en-bloc resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig, Morten Frederik Schlaikjær; Bulut, Orhan; Thind, Peter;

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Invasion of urinary organs due to advanced colorectal cancer can comprise a surgical challenge in achieving negative resection margins. The aim of the study was to asses the outcome of patients with colorectal cancer invading the lower urinary organs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a c......-year survival rate in the radical resection group was 74%. CONCLUSIONS: En-bloc resection of colorectal cancer with adjacent urological organs has a high morbidity rate. However it is still possible to achieve negative resection margins in most cases....

  13. Advances in local anesthesia in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E; Mahjoubi, Ghazal

    2011-07-01

    Local pain management is the most critical aspect of patient care in dentistry. The improvements in agents and techniques for local anesthesia are probably the most significant advances that have occurred in dental science. This article provides an update on the most recently introduced local anesthetic agents along with new technologies used to deliver local anesthetics. Safety devices are also discussed, along with an innovative method for reducing the annoying numbness of the lip and tongue following local anesthesia.

  14. Neoadjuvant Imatinib in Locally Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST): The EORTC STBSG Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutkowski, P.; Gronchi, A.; Hohenberger, P.; Bonvalot, S.; Schoffski, P.; Bauer, S.; Fumagalli, E.; Nyckowski, P.; Nguyen, B.P.; Kerst, J.M.; Fiore, M.; Bylina, E.; Hoiczyk, M.; Cats, A.; Casali, P.G.; Cesne, A. le; Treckmann, J.; Stoeckle, E.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Sleijfer, S.; Tielen, R.; Graaf, W.T. van der; Verhoef, C.; Coevorden, F. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative imatinib therapy of locally advanced GIST may facilitate resection and decrease morbidity of the procedure. METHODS: We have pooled databases from 10 EORTC STBSG sarcoma centers and analyzed disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in 161 patients with

  15. Neoadjuvant Imatinib in Locally Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST): The EORTC STBSG Experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutkowski, P.; Gronchi, A.; Hohenberger, P.; Bonvalot, S.; Schoffski, P.; Bauer, S.; Fumagalli, E.; Nyckowski, P.; Nguyen, B.P.; Kerst, J.M.; Fiore, M.; Bylina, E.; Hoiczyk, M.; Cats, A.; Casali, P.G.; Cesne, A. le; Treckmann, J.; Stoeckle, E.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Sleijfer, S.; Tielen, R.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Verhoef, C.; Coevorden, F. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative imatinib therapy of locally advanced GIST may facilitate resection and decrease morbidity of the procedure. METHODS: We have pooled databases from 10 EORTC STBSG sarcoma centers and analyzed disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in 161 patients with

  16. Repair of a penetrating ascending aortic ulcer with localized resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig R; Stamou, Sotiris C; Boeve, Theodore J; Hooker, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Penetrating ascending aortic ulcers are rarely encountered, yet they present significant risk of hemorrhage and aortic dissection. Expedient recognition and repair is of vital importance. The current management of penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta includes replacement of the ascending aorta with a prosthetic graft. We describe our technique of repairing a penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta with localized ulcer resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

  17. [Systemic therapy and hyperthermia for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, L H; Angele, M; Dürr, H R; Rauch, J; Bruns, C

    2014-05-01

    Patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcomas (FNCLCC grades 2-3, > 5 cm and deep lying) are at a high risk of local recurrence or distant metastases despite optimal surgical tumor resection. Therefore, multimodal treatment should be considered for this difficult to treat patient group. Besides surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, hyperthermia has become a valid, complementary treatment option within multimodal treatment concepts. Hyperthermia in this context means the selective heating of the tumor region to temperatures of 40-43 °C for 60 min by microwave radiation in addition to simultaneous chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A randomized phase III study demonstrated that the addition of hyperthermia to neoadjuvant chemotherapy improved tumor response and was associated with a minimal risk of early disease progression as compared to chemotherapy alone. The addition of hyperthermia to a multimodal treatment regimen for high-risk soft tissue sarcoma consisting of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, either in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant setting after incomplete or marginal tumor resection, significantly improved local progression-free and disease-free survival. Based on these results and due to the generally good tolerability of hyperthermia, this treatment method in combination with chemotherapy should be considered as a standard treatment option within multimodal treatment approaches for locally advanced high-risk soft tissue sarcoma.

  18. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improves Local Control After Surgical Resection in Patients With Localized Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Else, Tobias [Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Center for Cancer Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Williams, Andrew [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Miller, Barbra S. [Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of General Surgery, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Worden, Francis [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Hammer, Gary D. [Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States); Jolly, Shruti, E-mail: shrutij@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Mchigan (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy known for high rates of local recurrence, though the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has not been established. In this study of grossly resected ACC, we compare local control of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant RT to a matched cohort treated with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients with localized disease who underwent R0 or R1 resection followed by adjuvant RT. Only patients treated with RT at our institution were included. Matching to surgical controls was on the basis of stage, surgical margin status, tumor grade, and adjuvant mitotane. Results: From 1991 to 2011, 360 ACC patients were evaluated for ACC at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Twenty patients with localized disease received postoperative adjuvant RT. These were matched to 20 controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to stage, margins, grade, or mitotane. Median RT dose was 55 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy). Median follow-up was 34 months. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient treated with RT, compared with 12 patients not treated with RT (P=.0005; hazard ratio [HR] 12.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-97.88). However, recurrence-free survival was no different between the groups (P=.17; HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.67-3.45). Overall survival was also not significantly different (P=.13; HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.57-6.77), with 4 deaths in the RT group compared with 9 in the control group. Conclusions: Postoperative RT significantly improved local control compared with the use of surgery alone in this case-matched cohort analysis of grossly resected ACC patients. Although this retrospective series represents the largest study to date on adjuvant RT for ACC, its findings need to be prospectively confirmed.

  19. Evaluation of 118 Thyroid Cancer Patients Who Underwent a Re-operation after Local Resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Hang; Dong Meng; Liqi Li

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the incidence of residual thyroid cancer and cervical lymph node metastasis following a previous local resection for thyroid cancer, and to discuss methods of a reoperation.METHODS From 1994~2005, 118 patients with thyroid cancer who had previously been treated with a nodule-resection or subtotal Iobectomy in other hospitals underwent a surgical re-operation.RESULTS The incidence of residual cancer at the primary site was 38.1%. The lymph node metastasis rate at the central area was 39.8%.The rate of lymph node metastasis in patients with enlarged lymph nodes in the ipsilateral internal jugular chain was 37.5%. The rate of laryngeal recurrent nerve injury was 15.2% in other hospitals while that of the second operation in our hospital was 1.6%.CONCLUSION Nodule-resection or subtotal Iobectomy alone is not indicated for patients with thyroid cancer because of the high rate of local residual cancer. It is important to be familiar with the anatomy of the laryngeal recurrent nerve for thyroid surgery. Exploration to the central area is necessary for differentiated thyroid cancer.

  20. Combining partial liver resection and local ablation of liver tumours: a preliminary Dutch experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Gulik Thomas M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of partial liver resection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a novel concept in the treatment of unresectable liver malignancies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of this combined strategy in the Netherlands. Methods Thirty-five patients treated with a combination of partial liver resection and RFA were identified from a prospectively registered pooled multicentre database. All patients were operated between June 1999 and November 2003 in 8 medical centres in the Netherlands. Main outcome parameters were morbidity, mortality, local success rate, and survival. Results Thirty-seven operations were performed in 35 patients. The group consisted of 20 male and 15 female patients with a median age of 59 years (range 41–76. Seventy-six lesions were resected and RFA was performed to ablate 82 unresectable liver tumours. Twelve patients developed a total of 24 complications, resulting in an overall perioperative morbidity rate of 32%. In two patients major complications resulted in postoperative death (postoperative mortality rate 5.4%. Local success rate after RFA was 88% and the estimated 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 84%, 70% and 43%, respectively. Conclusion This strategy should only be performed following strict patient selection and within the context of prospective clinical trials.

  1. Local treatment of oligometastatic recurrence in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tokujiro; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Haro, Akira; Fukuyama, Seiichi; Yoshida, Tsukihisa; Kohno, Mikihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported a retrospective study indicating the prognostic impact of the local treatment of oligometastatic recurrence after a complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we prospectively observed postoperative oligometastatic patients and investigated the effects of local treatment on progression-free survival (PFS). Using a prospectively maintained database of patients with completely resected NSCLC treated between October 2007 and December 2011, we identified 52 consecutive patients with postoperative recurrence, excluding second primary lung cancer. Of these patients, 31 suffering from distant metastases alone without primary site recurrence were included in this study. According to the definition of 'oligometastases' as a limited number of distant metastases ranging from one to three, 17 patients had oligometastatic disease. Of those 17 patients, four patients with only brain metastasis were excluded from the analysis. The oligometastatic sites included the lungs in five patients, bone in four patients, the lungs and brain in two patients, the adrenal glands in one patient and soft tissue in one patient. Eleven of the 13 patients first received local treatment. Three patients (lung, adrenal gland, soft tissue) underwent surgical resection, and the remaining eight patients received radiotherapy. The median PFS was 20 months in the oligometastatic patients who received local treatment. There were five patients with a PFS of longer than two years. The metastatic sites in these patients varied, and one patient had three lesions. On the other hand, the two remaining patients first received a systemic chemotherapy of their own selection. The PFS of these two patients was five and 15 months, respectively. Local therapy is a choice for first-line treatment in patients with postoperative oligometastatic recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. En bloc resection of the hepatoduodenal ligament for advanced biliary malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneoka, Yuji; Maeda, Atsuyuki; Isogai, Masatoshi

    2015-04-01

    En bloc resection of the hepatoduodenal ligament (HDL) for advanced biliary malignancy by hepato-ligamento-pancreatoduodenectomy (HLPD) or hepatoligamentectomy (HL) remains challenging, and only short-term outcomes have been reported. We showed our surgical technique of HLPD and HL, and retrospectively investigated surgical outcomes of the patients. Between 2003 and 2014, we performed four HLPD and three HL including major hepatectomy with concomitant caudate lobectomy. Portal vein reconstruction (PVR) was performed with a right external iliac vein graft, and hepatic artery reconstruction (HAR) was accomplished with the heterogeneous artery using the continuous suturing method. Mean operation time and blood loss were 575 ± 111 min and 1539 ± 950 mL, respectively, and patency of the reconstructed vessels was confirmed postoperatively in all cases. Histologically, negative surgical margins (R0) were achieved in 57% of patients, while the resected vascular invasion was confirmed in all patients. Overall morbidity was high at 57%, but we have achieved no postoperative mortality. Overall median survival time of the patients was 36 months, and a patient of HL survived over 5 years. En bloc resection of the HDL based on steady vascular reconstruction can improve the surgical outcome of biliary cancer in selected patients.

  3. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumito Ito

    Full Text Available While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA in a preclinical mouse model.Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma.Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen. Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant treatment for cancer patients with

  4. Using Local Data To Advance Quantitative Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Sweet; Susanne Morgan; Danette Ifert Johnson

    2008-01-01

    In this article we consider the application of local data as a means of advancing quantitative literacy. We illustrate the use of three different sources of local data: institutional data, Census data, and the National College Health Assessment survey. Our learning modules are applied in courses in sociology and communication, but the strategy of using local data can be integrated beyond these disciplinary boundaries. We demonstrate how these data can be used to stimulate student interests in...

  5. Conformal radiotherapy of locally advanced bile duct carcinoma; Radiotherapie conformationnelle des cholangiocarcinomes de la voie biliaire principale localement evolues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouras, N.; Caudry, M.; Bonnel, C.; Trouette, R.; Demeaux, H.; Maire, J.P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Saint-Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Saric, J.; Rullier, E. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Saint-Andre, Service de Chirurgie Viscerale et de Transplantation Hepatique, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2002-02-01

    Purpose. - Retrospective study of 23 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy for a locally advanced bile duct carcinoma. Patients and methods. - Eight cases were irradiated after a radical resection (RO), because they were N+; seven after microscopically incomplete resection (R1) ; seven were not resected (R2). A dose of 45 of 50 Gy was delivered, followed by a boost up to 60 Gy in R1 and R2 groups. Concomitant chemotherapy was given in 15 cases. Results.-Late toxicity included a stenosis of the duodenum, and one of the biliary anastomosis. Two patients died from cholangitis, the mechanism of which remains unclear. Five patients are in complete remission, six had a local relapse, four developed a peritoneal carcinosis, and six distant metastases. Actuarial survival rate is 75%, 28% and 7% at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively (median: 16.5 months). Seven patients are still alive with a 4 to 70 months follow-up. Survival is similar in the 3 small subgroups. The poor local control among RON+ cases might be related to the absence of a boost to the 'tumor bed'. In R1 patients, relapses were mainly distant metastases, where'as local and peritoneal recurrences predominated in R2. Conclusion. - Conformal radio-chemotherapy delivering 60 Gy represents a valuable palliative approach in locally advanced biliary carcinoma. (authors)

  6. Effects of resection margins on local recurrence of osteosarcoma in extremity and pelvis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fangzhou; Zhang, Weibin; Shen, Yuhui; Yu, Pei; Bao, Qiyuan; Wen, Junxiang; Hu, Chuanzhen; Qiu, Shijing

    2016-12-01

    There are conflicting findings about the effect of resection margins on local recurrence in osteosarcoma after surgery. In this meta-analysis, we examined the association between local recurrence and resection margins for osteosarcoma in extremity and pelvis. EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched from January 1980 to July 2016. The quality of included studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of local recurrence were estimated, respectively, for inadequate vs adequate margins and marginal vs wide margins using a random-effect model. Chi-square test was performed to comparing the local recurrence rate between extremity and pelvic osteosarcomas with an identical surgical margin. Thirteen articles involving 1559 patients (175 with and 1384 without local recurrence) were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed that the osteosarcoma resected with inadequate and marginal margins, whether in extremity or in pelvis, were associated with a significantly higher local recurrence rate than the osteosarcoma resected with adequate and wide margins, respectively. Chi-square test showed that, when pelvic and extremity osteosarcomas were removed with an identical resection margin, the local recurrence was significantly more frequent in pelvis osteosarcoma than in extremity osteosarcoma. This study provides level IIa evidence to support that the surgery with adequate or wide resection margin has positive effect on reducing the risk of local recurrence in osteosarcoma. In addition, the factors independent of resection margin are more likely to increase the risk of local recurrence in pelvic osteosarcoma. Level IIa, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Locally advanced colon cancer with cutaneous invasion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Ferreira, Cátia; Silva, Silvia; Marques, Rita; Ribeiro, Artur; Sousa, Paulo Jorge; Luís, Fernando Próspero

    2017-03-01

    Locally advanced colon cancer with direct abdominal wall and skin invasion is an extremely rare finding with most data being derived from case reports, historical autopsy-based or single-center retrospective studies. We present a unique case of a colon cancer with direct cutaneous invasion and colocutaneous fistulization. Eighty-six year old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, referred to Surgical Consultation due to ulcerated skin lesion in the abdomen. She had a long-standing large umbilical hernia but with no previous episodes of incarceration or occlusive symptoms. She denied any digestive or constitutional symptoms. Physical examination showed a large non-reducible umbilical hernia, with an associated painless firm mass within the hernia sac and cutaneous ulcerated growth. Colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer (endoscopic biopsy of the tumor and skin punch biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma of the colon). Computed tomography showed a tumoral mass within the umbilical hernia, with cutaneous infiltration and enlarged regional lymph nodes. Rapid local progression led to colocutaneous fistula with total fecal diversion. We performed an extended right hemicolectomy with en bloc excision of the hernia sac and infiltrating cutaneous mass. In the current era of widespread use of screening colonoscopies, initial diagnosis of locally advanced colon cancer is decreasing. However, this unique case presented an opportunity to recall the advantages of multivisceral resections.

  8. Technical improvements and results of individual cylindrical abdominoperineal resection for locally advanced low rectal cancer%个体化柱状腹会阴联合切除术治疗低位直肠癌的初步探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩加刚; 王振军; 魏广辉; 高志刚; 杨勇; 易秉强; 马华崇; 赵博; 赵宝成

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨个体化柱状腹会阴联合切除术(CAPR)治疗低位进展期直肠癌的安全性和可行性.方法 2011年6月至2012年2月11例低位进展期直肠癌患者接受个体化CAPR手术(个体化手术组),其中男性7例,女性4例,年龄32~74岁,中位年龄64岁;与2008年1月至2012年2月实施的47例经典CAPR(经典手术组)进行对比分析.比较两组患者的临床参数、病理学研究结果和术后并发症发生情况.结果 个体化手术组病例中,保留或部分保留一侧肛提肌6例,保留骶尾骨3例,贴近直肠前壁解剖2例.与经典手术组相比,个体化手术组的标本水平切面总面积[(2197±501) mm2]和固有肌层外面积[(1722 ±414) mm2]较小,但差异无统计学意义(P =0.150、0.167);两组患者的手术时间、术中失血量、标本的环周切缘阳性率、肠管穿孔率差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).个体化手术组术后慢性会阴疼痛(2/11,x2=6.116,P=0.013)和性功能障碍(2/9,x2=4.412,P=0.036)的发生率明显降低.结论 个体化CAPR的手术效果良好,在不影响手术根治性的前提下,可能会降低术后的慢性会阴疼痛和性功能障碍的发生.%Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of individual cylindrical abdominoperineal resection (CAPR) for locally advanced low rectal cancer.Methods From June 2011 to February 2012,11 patients with locally advanced low rectal cancer underwent individual CAPR.There were 7 male and 4 female patients,aged from 32 to 74 years with a median of 64 years.Forty-seven patients underwent classic CAPR from January 2008 to February 2012.Preoperative and postoperative parameters such as clinical information of patients,tissue morphometry and complications were compared.Results In the individual surgical group,6 patients were treated with one side levator ani muscle totally or partially reserved,3 patients with sacrococcyx reserved,and 2 patients with dissection close to the anterior rectal wall

  9. Using Local Data To Advance Quantitative Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Sweet

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the application of local data as a means of advancing quantitative literacy. We illustrate the use of three different sources of local data: institutional data, Census data, and the National College Health Assessment survey. Our learning modules are applied in courses in sociology and communication, but the strategy of using local data can be integrated beyond these disciplinary boundaries. We demonstrate how these data can be used to stimulate student interests in class discussion, advance analytic skills, as well as develop capacities in written and verbal communication. We conclude by considering concerns that may influence the types of local data used and the challenges of integrating these data in a course in which quantitative analysis is not typically part of the curriculum.

  10. Immunostimulatory sutures that treat local disease recurrence following primary tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intra, Janjira; Zhang Xueqing; Salem, Aliasger K [Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Williams, Robin L; Zhu Xiaoyan [Department of Surgery, Roy J and Lucille Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Sandler, Anthony D, E-mail: aliasger-salem@uiowa.edu [Department of Surgery and Center for Cancer and Immunology Research, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Neuroblastoma is a common childhood cancer that often results in progressive minimal residual disease after primary tumor resection. Cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine oligonucleotides (CpG ODN) have been reported to induce potent anti-tumor immune responses. In this communication, we report on the development of a CpG ODN-loaded suture that can close up the wound following tumor excision and provide sustained localized delivery of CpG ODN to treat local disease recurrence. The suture was prepared by melt extruding a mixture of polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA 75:25 0.47 dL g{sup -1}) pellets and CpG ODN 1826. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the sutures were free of defects and cracks. UV spectrophotometry measurements at 260 nm showed that sutures provide sustained release of CpG ODN over 35 days. Syngeneic female A/J mice were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 x 10{sup 6} Neuro-2a murine neuroblastoma wild-type cells and tumors were grown between 5 to 10 mm before the tumors were excised. Wounds from the tumor resection were closed using CpG ODN-loaded sutures and/or polyglycolic acid Vicryl suture. Suppression of neuroblastoma recurrence and mouse survival were significantly higher in mice where wounds were closed using the CpG ODN-loaded sutures relative to all other groups. (communication)

  11. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  12. Management of locally advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Payne

    2009-01-01

    The management of all stages of prostate cancer is an increasingly complex process and involves a variety of available treatments and many disciplines.Despite prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing,the presentation of prostate cancer at a locally advanced stage is common in the UK,accounting for one-third of all new cases.There is no universally accepted definition of locally advanced prostate cancer;the term is loosely used to encompass a spectrum of disease profiles that show high-risk features.Men with high-risk prostate cancer generally have a significant risk of disease progression and cancer-related death if left untreated.High-risk patients,including those with locally advanced disease,present two specific challenges.There is a need for local control as well as a need to treat any microscopic metastases likely to be present but undetectable until disease progression.The optimal treatment approach will therefore often necessitate multiple modalities.The exact combinations,timing and intensity of treatment continue to be strongly debated.Management decisions should be made after all treatments have been discussed by a multidisciplinary team (including urologists,oncologists,radiologists,pathologists and nurse specialists) and after the balance of benefits and side effects of each therapy modality has been considered by the patient with regard to his own individual circumstances.This article reviews the current therapy options.

  13. The Results of Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Kang, Seung Hee; Kim, Sang Won; Jun, Mi Seon; Jo, Seon Mi; Lim, Jun Cheol; Oh, Young Taek; Kang, Seock Yoon [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We retrospectively studied the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or radiotherapy only. Fifty-one patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer (stage IIA{approx}III) who received radiotherapy ({>=}30 Gy) between January 1994 and August 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. The median radiation dose was 39 Gy. Chemotherapy consisted of gemcitabine, cisplatin, or 5-FU alone or in various combinations, and was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in 38 patients. The follow-up period ranged from 2{approx}40 months (median, 8 months). The median survival, and the 1-and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 7 months, 15.7%, and 5.9%, respectively. Based on univariate analysis, the baseline CA19-9, performance status, and chemotherapy regimen were significant prognostic factors. The median survival was 8 months for CCRT, and 6 months for radiotherapy alone. The patients treated with gemcitabine-containing regimens had longer survival (median, 10 months) than the patients treated with radiotherapy alone (p=0.027). Twenty-three patients were available to evaluate the patterns of failure. Distant metastases (DM) occurred in 18 patients and regional recurrences were demonstrated in 4 patients. Local progression developed in 14 patients. We analyzed the association between the time-to-DM and the baseline CA19-9 levels for 18 evaluable patients. The median time-to-DM was 20 months for patients with normal baseline CA19-9 levels and 2 months for patients with baseline CA19-9 levels {>=}200 U/ml. CCRT with gemcitabine-based regimens was effective in improving OS in patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer. We suggest that the baseline CA19-9 level is valuable in determining the treatment strategy for patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  14. Advanced design of local ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulmala, I. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Safety Technology

    1997-12-31

    Local ventilation is widely used in industry for controlling airborne contaminants. However, the present design practices of local ventilation systems are mainly based on empirical equations and do not take quantitatively into account the various factors affecting the performance of these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and limitations of more advanced fluid mechanical methods to the design and development of local ventilation systems. The most important factors affecting the performance of local ventilation systems were determined and their effect was studied in a systematic manner. The numerical calculations were made with the FLUENT computer code and they were verified by laboratory experiments, previous measurements or analytical solutions. The results proved that the numerical calculations can provide a realistic simulation of exhaust openings, effects of ambient air flows and wake regions. The experiences with the low-velocity local supply air showed that these systems can also be modelled fairly well. The results were used to improve the efficiency and thermal comfort of a local ventilation unit and to increase the effective control range of exhaust hoods. In the simulation of the interaction of a hot buoyant source and local exhaust, the predicted capture efficiencies were clearly higher than those observed experimentally. The deviations between measurements and non-isothermal flow calculations may have partly been caused by the inability to achieve grid independent solutions. CFD simulations is an advanced and flexible tool for designing and developing local ventilation. The simulations can provide insight into the time-averaged flow field which may assist us in understanding the observed phenomena and to explain experimental results. However, for successful calculations the applicability and limitations of the models must be known. (orig.) 78 refs.

  15. A phase I study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holländer, Cecilie; Baeksgaard, Lene; Sorensen, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in patients with non-resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Escalating doses of oxaliplatin every second week and daily tegafur......)) with no DLTs. Four out of 9 patients had complete response. CONCLUSION: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab had significant activity. DL1 was established as the MTD....

  16. Successful treatment of primary advanced gastric plasmacytoma using a combination of surgical resection and chemotherapy with bortezomib: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotaro Fukuhara

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This is the first reported case of advanced gastric plasmacytoma using adjuvant chemotherapy involving bortezomib and auto-PBSCT after the resection, and the patient has maintained a good course over a year. This protocol could be a new way to treat these tumors.

  17. A case of a gastric submucosal tumor treated with combined therapy using superselective TAE and endoscopic local resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikamori, Fumio; Kuniyoshi, Nobutoshi; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Kuniyoshi, Kazushige

    2012-10-01

    The case was a 76-year-old female, who was noted to have a gastric submucosal tumor 25 mm in size located at the lesser curvature of the gastric body. Computed tomography revealed that the tumor was located near the coronary loop between the left and right gastric arteries. On the day before endoscopic local resection, abdominal angiography was performed and it revealed that the tumor was supplied by the left and right gastric arteries. Superselective transarterial embolization of the left and right gastric arteries around the tumor was performed to prevent accidental bleeding during the endoscopic procedure. Endoscopic local resection using full-thickness resection and submucosal dissection techniques was performed under general anesthesia. The tumor was completely resected without accidental bleeding. A gastric wall defect was closed using metallic clips and loop snares. Histologic examination revealed that the tumor was a low-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor. We suggest that the combined therapy using superselective transarterial embolization and endoscopic local resection is an optional safe method for the treatment of gastric submucosal tumors.

  18. Surgical resection and vascularized bone reconstruction in advanced stage medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldroney, S; Ghazali, N; Dyalram, D; Lubek, J E

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of all patients with stage 3 medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ), treated by surgical resection and immediate vascularized bone reconstruction at a tertiary care medical center, was performed. Eleven patients were included, seven female and four male; their mean age was 65.8 years (range 56-73 years). Mean follow-up was 25 months. Ten patients had received intravenous bisphosphonates. The most common pathology was breast cancer (4/11). Pain (n=8) and pathological fracture (n=7) were the most common presenting symptoms. Microvascular free flaps consisted of seven fibula osteocutaneous flaps and four scapula osteocutaneous free flaps. All patients reported resolution of symptoms, with complete bone union identified radiographically (100%). Complications occurred in three patients (27%). One patient required removal of hardware at 8 months postoperative. Dental implant rehabilitation was completed in two patients. Ten patients are tolerating an oral diet. Ten patients are alive without evidence of MRONJ at any of the surgical sites. One patient died 28 months after surgery from progression of metastatic disease. Advanced MRONJ can be successfully treated in patients using vascularized tissue transfer, including those patients with significant peripheral vascular disease. Dental rehabilitation is a viable option for advanced MRONJ patients treated by vascularized flap reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Locally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer after complete surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, E G; Brindle, J S; Creagan, E T; Foote, R L; Trastek, V F; Buskirk, S J

    1992-12-01

    Between Jan. 1, 1976, and Dec. 31, 1985, at our institution, 37 patients who had undergone prior complete surgical resection of non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) for locally recurrent disease. Of the 37 recurrences, 33 were in the pulmonary parenchyma or the hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular lymph nodes; the other 4 were in the chest wall. The initial stage of disease was I in 43%, II in 35%, and IIIA in 19%, whereas at the time of local recurrence, the stage was I in 8%, II in 11%, IIIA in 57%, IIIB in 22%, and IV in 3% (this patient had multiple pulmonary nodules encompassible within a single TRT field). The locally recurrent lesions were squamous cell carcinoma in 30%, adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma in 46%, mixed types in 5%, and unknown type in 19%. All patients received megavoltage TRT, most often 4,000 cGy in 10 fractions administered in a split-course schedule. In addition, 15 patients received multiagent chemotherapy, usually a combination of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cisplatin or a regimen that included these drugs. The 2-year and 5-year survivals were 30% and 4%, respectively, and the median duration of survival was 13.7 months. Survival was not improved by the addition of chemotherapy. Approximately half of the patients had radiographic and symptomatic responses after TRT. Of 33 patients assessable for post-TRT patterns of failure, 46% had local failure only, 18% had local plus systemic failure, and 32% had systemic failure only. Two-thirds of the patients died as a direct consequence of progressive chest disease, despite receiving TRT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  1. CT-guided localization of small pulmonary nodules using adjacent microcoil implantation prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Tian-Hao; Jin, Long; He, Wen [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Fan, Yue-Feng [Xiamen University, Department of Interventional Therapy, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xiamen, Fujian (China); Hu, Li-Bao [Peking University People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To describe and assess the localization of small peripheral pulmonary nodules prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) resection using the implantation of microcoils. Ninety-two patients with 101 pulmonary nodules underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided implantation of microcoils proximal to each nodule. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo entire microcoil or leaving-microcoil-end implantations. The complications and efficacy of the two implantation methods were evaluated. VATS resection of lung tissue containing each pulmonary lesion and microcoil were performed in the direction of the microcoil marker. Histopathological analysis was performed for the resected pulmonary lesions. CT-guided microcoil implantation was successful in 99/101 cases, and the placement of microcoils within 1 cm of the nodules was not disruptive. There was no difference in the complications and efficacy associated with the entire implantation method (performed for 51/99 nodules) versus the leaving-microcoil-end implantation method (performed for 48/99 nodules). All nodules were successfully removed using VATS resection. Asymptomatic pneumothorax occurred in 16 patients and mild pulmonary haemorrhage occurred in nine patients. However, none of these patients required further surgical treatment. Preoperative localization of small pulmonary nodules using a refined percutaneous microcoil implantation method was found to be safe and useful prior to VATS resection. (orig.)

  2. Predictive Factors for Local Recurrence and Incomplete Resection of Early Gastric Cancer Treated by Endoscopic Resection: A Western Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Yuji Hondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early gastric cancer (EGC is defined as adenocarcinoma limited to the mucosa or submucosa regardless of lymph node involvement. Local EGC recurrence rates have been described in up to 6% of cases.

  3. Local Application of Gentamicin in the Prophylaxis of Perineal Wound Infection after Abdominoperineal Resection: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.D. Musters (Gijsbert D.); J.W.A. Burger (Jacobus); C.J. Buskens (Christianne); W.A. Bemelman; P.J. Tanis (Pieter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Use of topical antibiotics to improve perineal wound healing after abdominoperineal resection (APR) is controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the impact of local application of gentamicin on perineal wound healing after APR. Methods: The electronic

  4. [Transrectal echography in the assessment of anastomosis and local recurrence after prior resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannicelli, E; Fusaro, P L; Manganaro, L; Conforti, G; Di Nardo, R; Drudi, F M; Passariello, R

    1993-05-01

    The value of rectal endosonography was investigated in the follow-up of the patients submitted to anterior resection for rectal cancer. Rectal endosonography was performed on 42 patients who had been operated on two months to five years before; all patients were monitored according to a carefully planned follow-up schedule including clinical and instrumental examinations and laboratory tests. Sixteen patients had altered clinical and laboratory data; 26 were completely asymptomatic. In the latter group, no signs of local recurrences were found, while in 4 cases the rectal wall appeared homogeneously thickened and hypoechoic: this pattern was due to postoperative or post-irradiation hyperemic-edematous phenomena. In 14 of 16 symptomatic patients, a mass was detected--in 9 of them inhomogeneous and hypoechoic and developing mainly in the perirectal perianastomotic tissue and in 5 limited to the rectal wall, in the anastomotic area. In the last 2 cases, no lesions were found. Both the manual and the stapler anastomoses were always demonstrated, which exhibited different US patterns. US findings were compared with histologic results or were clinically checked in the subsequent follow-up. To conclude, rectal endosonography proved to be useful in the postoperative follow-up of this kind of patients even though it did not allow the differential diagnosis between fibrosis and local recurrence.

  5. Identification of distinct phenotypes of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Teo, Minyuen

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma present as locally advanced disease. Optimal treatment remains controversial. We sought to analyze the clinical course of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) in order to identify potential distinct clinical phenotypes.

  6. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W. [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Herman, Joseph M. [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Regine, William F., E-mail: wregine@umm.edu [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU-based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results: At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2, respectively). Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  7. Treatment of locally advanced/locally recurrent breast cancer and inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masao [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    This paper summarizes the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and locally recurrent breast cancer. A multidisciplinary approach considering subclinical distant metastases is needed to treat these types of breast cancer. Subclinical distant metastasis is observed in about 80% of case of locally advanced cancer, and treatment of subclinical distant metastases, e.g., by endocrinotherapy and chemotherapy, is therefore essential to improving the prognosis. The standard therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer consists of induction chemotherapy with anthracyclines and local treatment with mastectomy or irradiation. Previous reports have stated that induction chemotherapy was effective in 60-80% of the primary lesions or lymph node metastasis, and the CR rates were in the 10-20% range. Combination therapy with induction chemotherapy clearly improved the outcome over local treatment alone. The usual irradiation dose is 50 to 60 Gy/5 to 7 weeks to the whole breast or the thoracic wall. Boost irradiation at a dose of 10 to 25 Gy is performed in unresectable cases. The boost irradiation dose to the lymph node area is usually 45 to 50 Gy/5 to 6 weeks in cases without gross lesions and 10 to 15 Gy in cases with gross lesions. Combination therapy consisting of conservative pectoral mastectomy and postoperative adjuvant chemo- endocrino-therapy (i.e., adjuvant therapy) has become the standard regimen for treating resectable locally advanced breast cancer, because it significantly improves the recurrence rate and survival rate compared to local treatment alone. Some clinical have studies indicated that neoadjuvant therapy (i.e., induction chemotherapy + surgery/radiation therapy) is comparable or superior to adjuvant therapy in terms of improving the prognosis. However, the efficacy and most appropriate method of breast-conserving therapy after induction chemotherapy are still unclear. More clinical trials are needed. It has been

  8. Combination of the transurethral resection and prostate HIFU ablation at treatment of the localized cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2014-09-01

    26 patients were included into HIFU and 74 group in group of the combined treatment (TURP+HIFU. Selection criteria for HIFU ablation were the localized cancer of a prostate concerning which earlier it wasn't carried out treatments, and level of a PSA at the time of statement of the diagnosis 15 ng/ml. All patients corresponding to these by criteria, were considered as candidates for treatment and inclusion in the analysis. The nadir and stability of PSA, the histologic conclusion, IPSS, quality of life and complication were estimated at time of postoperative supervision. Results: Statistically significant influence of a combination TURP+HIFU for the term of transurethral drainage of a bladder (a median of 40 days against 7 days, incontience frequency (15.4% against 6.9%, infections of urinary ways (47.9% against 11.4% and IPSS change during the postoperative period (on the average 8.91 against 3.37 is noted. During the short period of supervision it wasn't observed considerable changes in relation to efficiency: in HIFU group the frequency of repeated sessions made 25%, in TUR/HIFU group 4%. Conclusion: HIFU therapy is modern, minimum invasive method of a cancer therapy of a prostate. The combination of a transurethral resection and HIFU ablation significantly reduces the frequency of the complications connected with treatment. Maintaining the patient after combined TURP and HIFU ablation is comparable with maintaining the patient after usual TURP.

  9. Comparison of Sedation With Local Anesthesia and Regional Anesthesia in Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamohammadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP is usually performed under regional or general anesthesia. An alternative to conventional anesthesia is performing of TURP under local anesthetic infiltration with sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication of sedoanalgesia in TURP. Material & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial from September 2006 to December 2007, 60 patients (30 in each group with prostate hypertrophy, candidate for TURP, were randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group, standard spinal anesthesia was done. In the second group, five minutes before the operation, 25 mgs of diazepam plus 25-50 mgs of pethedine was intravenously administered followed by injection of 10 ml lidocaine 2% gel in the urethra and the skin in the suprapubic area was anesthetized with 2 ml of 1% lidocaine. Using a 22 gauge nephrostomy needle, the suprapubic skin was punctured and the needle was directed toward prostate apex and 10-20ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at the serosal aspect of the rectal wall. For dorsal nerve block, 5-10ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at penopubic junction, and then a standard TURP was performed. Patients were switched to another anesthetic technique if the selected technique failed. Severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results: The average prostate size was 25 grs (range10-50grs in the local anesthetic group (group 1 and 27.5 grs (range 10-50 grs in the spinal group (group2. In the local anesthetic group, 82.3% had no or mild pain while moderate to severe pain was reported in 16, 7% of the patients. In the group with spinal anesthesia, these were 93.1% and 6.9% respectively. Intolerable pain was observed in 23.3% and 13.8% of groups 1 and 2 respectively (p>0.05. Two patients in spinal group and 5 in local anesthetic group (3 due to severe pain and 2 for unsatisfaction required conversion to general anesthesia or receiving

  10. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Andersen, Fahimeh; Fischer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has proven valuable in several tumors, but it has not been elucidated in colon cancer. The present phase II trial addressed the issue in high-risk patients selected by computed tomography (CT) scan. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with resectable colon cancer...

  11. Cerebral revascularization and carotid artery resection at the skull base for treatment of advanced head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Kalb, Samuel; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Lettieri, Salvatore C; Spetzler, Robert F; Porter, Randall W; Feiz-Erfan, Iman

    2013-03-01

    Resection of cancer and the involved artery in the neck has been applied with some success, but the indications for such an aggressive approach at the skull base are less well defined. The authors therefore evaluated the outcomes of advanced skull base malignancies in patients who were treated with bypass and resection of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients with advanced head and neck cancers who underwent ICA sacrifice with revascularization in which an extracranial-intracranial bypass was used between 1995 and 2010 at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Eighteen patients (11 male and 7 female patients; mean age 46 years, range 7-69 years) were identified. There were 4 sarcomas and 14 carcinomas that involved the ICA at the skull base. All patients underwent ICA sacrifice with revascularization. One patient died of a stroke after revascularization. A second patient died of the effects of a fistula between the oral and cranial cavities (surgery-related mortality rate 11.1%). Eight months after the operation, 1 patient developed occlusion of the bypass and died. Complications associated with the bypass surgery included 1 case of subdural hematoma (SDH) with blindness, 1 case of status epilepticus, and 1 case of asymptomatic bypass occlusion (bypass-related morbidity 16.7%). Complications associated with tumor resection included 3 cases of CSF leakage requiring repair and shunting, 1 case of hydrocephalus requiring shunting, 1 case of SDH, and 1 case of contralateral ICA injury requiring a bypass (tumor resection morbidity rate 33.3%). In 1 patient treated with adjuvant therapy before surgery, the authors identified only a radiation effect and no tumor on resection. In a second patient the bypass was occluded, and her tumor was not resected. The other 16 patients underwent gross-total resection of their tumor. Excluding the surgery-related deaths, the mean and median lengths of survival in this series were

  12. Chronic unlimited recording electrocorticography-guided resective epilepsy surgery: technology-enabled enhanced fidelity in seizure focus localization with improved surgical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLorenzo, Daniel J; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Rossi, Marvin A; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy surgery is at the cusp of a transformation due to the convergence of advancements in multiple technologies. Emerging neuromodulatory therapies offer the promise of functionally correcting neural instability and obviating the need for resective or ablative surgery in select cases. Chronic implanted neurological monitoring technology, delivered as part of a neuromodulatory therapeutic device or as a stand-alone monitoring system, offers the potential to monitor patients chronically in their normal ambulatory setting with outpatient medication regimens. This overcomes significant temporal limitations, pharmacological perturbations, and infection risks inherent in the present technology comprising subacute percutaneous inpatient monitoring of presurgical candidates in an epilepsy monitoring unit. As part of the pivotal study for the NeuroPace Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS) System, the authors assessed the efficacy of the RNS System to control seizures in a group of patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Prior to RNS System implantation, these patients were not candidates for further resective surgery because they had temporal lobe epilepsy with bilateral temporal sources, frontal lobe reflex epilepsy with involvement of primary motor cortex, and occipital lobe epilepsy with substantial involvement of eloquent visual cortex. Without interfering with and beyond the scope of the therapeutic aspect of the RNS System study, the authors were able to monitor seizure and epileptiform activity from chronically implanted subdural and depth electrodes in these patients, and, in doing so, they were able to more accurately localize the seizure source. In 5 of these study patients, in whom the RNS System was not effective, the notion of resective surgery was revisited and considered in light of the additional information gleaned from the chronic intracranial recordings obtained from various permutations of electrodes monitoring sources in the frontal, temporal

  13. The role of radiotherapy for locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma

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    Shin, Hyun Soo [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jin Sil [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    A retrospective review of 72 patients with locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma, between January 1900 and December 1996, was performed. Survival results and prognostic factors are analyzed for the patients treated with a various modalities. The patients were classified by treatment modality: group 1 included to 27 patients treated with palliative surgery alone, and group 2 for 11 patient treated with palliative surgery and radiotherapy; group 3 for 18 patients not treated by any treatment modality, and group 4 for 16 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Age distribution ranged from 35 to 80 years with a mean of 63 years. The stage was classified by TNM and Nevin's staging system; all patients had an advanced stage more than III. Palliative surgery was done in 3B patients and adjuvant radiation therapy (Rl1 was followed in 11. For 34 patients, in whom no resection was tried, definitive RT was done in 16. Radiation delivered to tumor site and draining nodes up to 45-612 Gy using 10 MY linear accelerator. Chemotherapy was given to 25 patients with 5-FU based regimens. Median survival time was 10.3 months and 3-year survival rates (3-YSR) were 13.0% in all patients. Survival rates according to the treatment modalities were as followed; in palliative surgery alone, 3-YSR was 2.5%; in palliative surgery and adjuvant RT, 3-YSR was 45.5%; in no treatment group, 3YSR were 8.3%; and definitive RT was 13.1%. It was better survival in additional RT after palliative surgery group than palliative surgery alone (p=0.0009). It was better survival in definitive RT group than no treatment group (p=0.022). Significant prognostic factors by multivariate analysis were treatment modalities, the type of tumor and TNM stage. Significant prognostic factors by multivariate analysis were treatment modalities, the type of tumor and the presence of jaundice. It is suggested that RT could be potentially effective as adjuvant treatment modalities after palliative surgery or primary

  14. Liver resection for advanced or aggressive colorectal cancer metastases in the era of effective chemotherapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru

    2011-10-01

    Liver surgery has been known to cure metastatic colorectal cancer in a small proportion of patients. However, advances in procedural technique and chemotherapy now allow more patients to have safe, potentially curative surgery. Here we review surgery for unresectable colorectal liver metastases using an expert multidisciplinary approach. With multidisciplinary management of patients with effective chemotherapy that can downstage metastases, more patients with previously inoperable disease can benefit from surgery. Portal vein embolization results in hypertrophy of the future liver remnant; on occasions, combining embolization with staged liver resection permits potentially curative surgery for patients previously unable to survive resection. However, increasing use of chemotherapy has raised awareness of potential hepatotoxicity and other deleterious effects of cytotoxic agents. Prolonged prehepatectomy chemotherapy therefore can reduce resectability even using a 2-stage procedure. Suitable timing of surgery for unresectable liver metastases during chemotherapy is critical. Because of advances in chemotherapy, colorectal cancer, like ovarian cancer, can now show survival benefit from maximum surgical debulking. Benefit from such maximum hepatic debulking surgery for metastatic colorectal disease is uncertain, but likely. Surgery in isolation may be approaching technical limits, but is now likely to help more patients because of the success of complementary strategies, particularly newer chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Expert individualized multidisciplinary treatment planning and problem-solving is essential.

  15. Secondary hepatic resection as a therapeutic goal in advanced colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2009-01-01

    Surgery is the only curative option for patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer, but few patients present with resectable hepatic lesions. Chemotherapy is increasingly used to downstage initially unresectable disease and allow for potentially curative surgery.Standard chemotherapy regimens convert 10%-20% of cases to resectable disease in unselected populations and 30%-40% of those with disease confined to the liver. One strategy to further increase the number of candidates eligible for surgery is the addition of active targeted agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy. Data from a phase Ⅲ trial indicate that cetuximab increases the number of patients eligible for secondary hepatic resection, as well as the rate of complete resection when combined with first-line treatment with the FOLFIRI regimen. The safety profiles of preoperative cetuximab or bevacizumab have not been thoroughly assessed, but preliminary evidence indicates that these agents do not increase surgical mortality or exacerbate chemotherapyrelated hepatotoxicity, such as steatosis (5-fluorouracil),steatohepatitis (irinotecan), and sinusoidal obstruction (oxaliplatin). Secondary resection is a valid treatment goal for certain patients with initially unresectable liver metastases and an important end point for future clinical trials.

  16. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-08-01

    Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival.This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months.Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival.TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT.

  17. Intra-operative perforation is an important predictor of local recurrence and impaired survival after abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Christensen, I J; Iversen, L H

    2011-01-01

    on the Danish National Colorectal Cancer Database and included patients treated with abdominoperineal resection between 1 May 2001 and 31 December 2006. Follow up in the departments was supplemented with vital status in the Civil Registration System. The analysis included actuarial local and distant recurrence...... was reported in 108 (10%) patients. The cumulative 5-year local recurrence rate was 11% [95% confidence interval (CI), 7-13)], overall survival was 56% (95% CI, 53-60) and cancer-specific survival was 68% (95% CI, 65-71). Multivariate analysis showed that perforation, tumour stage and nonradical surgery were...

  18. Pancreatic Resections for Advanced M1-Pancreatic Carcinoma: The Value of Synchronous Metastasectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Seelig

    2010-01-01

    Materials and Methods. From January 1, 2004 to December, 2007 a total of 20 patients with pancreatic malignancies were retrospectively evaluated who underwent pancreatic surgery with synchronous resection of hepatic, adjacent organ, or peritoneal metastases for proven UICC stage IV periampullary cancer of the pancreas. Perioperative as well as clinicopathological parameters were evaluated. Results. There were 20 patients (9 men, 11 women; mean age 58 years identified. The primary tumor was located in the pancreatic head (n=9, 45%, in pancreatic tail (n=9, 45%, and in the papilla Vateri (n=2, 10%. Metastases were located in the liver (n=14, 70%, peritoneum (n=5, 25%, and omentum majus (n=2, 10%. Lymphnode metastases were present in 16 patients (80%. All patients received resection of their tumors together with metastasectomy. Pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy was performed in 8 patients, distal pancreatectomy in 8, duodenopancreatectomy in 2, and total pancreatectomy in 2. Morbidity was 45% and there was no perioperative mortality. Median postoperative survival was 10.7 months (2.6–37.7 months which was not significantly different from a matched-pair group of patients who underwent pancreatic resection for UICC adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (median survival 15.6 months; P=.1. Conclusion. Pancreatic resection for M1 periampullary cancer of the pancreas can be performed safely in well-selected patients. However, indication for surgery has to be made on an individual basis.

  19. Role of blood tumor markers in predicting metastasis and local recurrence after curative resection of colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yifan; Zhai, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongmin; Wang, Lin; Gu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA199, CA724 and CA242 in peripheral blood and local draining venous blood in colon cancer patients after curative resection. Methods: 92 colon cancer patients who received curative resection were retrospectively analyzed. The CEA, CA199, CA724 and CA242 were detected in peripheral blood and local draining venous blood. Results: Metastasis or local recurrence was found in 29 (29/92, 31.5%) patients during follow-up period. 92 patients were divided into two groups: metastasis/local recurrence group (n = 29) and non-metastasis/local recurrence group (n = 63). Peripheral venous CEA, CA199, CA724 and CA242 (p-CEA, p-CA199, p-CA724 and p-CA242) were comparable between two groups (P > 0.05). The median draining venous CEA (d-CEA) in metastases/local recurrence group (23.7 ± 6.9 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in non-metastases/local recurrence group (18.1 ± 6.3 ng/ml; P 0.05). The optimal cut-off value of d-CEA was 2.76 ng/ml, with the sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 40% in the prediction of metastasis or local recurrence, respectively. d-CEA correlated with tumor differentiation, T stage, TNM stage, metastasis and local recurrence. Subgroup analysis showed that, of 41 patients with stage II colon cancer, the optimal cut-off value of d-CEA was 8.78 ng/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 87.5% and 69.7% in the prediction of metastasis or local recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: d-CEA may be a prognostic factor for stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:25785084

  20. [Post-recurrence survival after surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer with local recurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokouchi, Hideoki; Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Tsuji, Fumio; Ebisui, Chikara; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of 192 consecutive patients with local recurrence after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer NSCLC). The initial local recurrent site was the resection stump in 5 patients the chest wall in 3 patients, mediastinum in 1 patient, and diaphragm in 1 patient), and the hilar and/or mediastinal lymph node (HMLN) in 17 patients. The sites of distant metastasis were the lungs in 10 patients, pleura in 4 patients, brain in 7 patients, liver in 5 patients, bone in 4 patients, and other sites in 4 patients. Treatments after initial recurrence included surgery in 2 patients, radiotherapy in 5 patients, chemotherapy in 9 patients, and chemo-radiotherapy in 5 patients. Only 1 patient received supportive care. The response to radiotherapy was a complete response (R) in 1 patient, partial response (PR) in 5 patients, stable disease (SD )in 3 patients, and progressive disease (PD )in 1 patient. The best response of all lines of chemotherapy was CR in 3 patients, PR in 4 patients, SD in 3 patients, and PD in 4 patients. The median post-recurrence survival (PRS) time with local recurrence was better than that with distant metastasis (23 vs 14 months); however, the best PRS was obtained in patients with recurrence in the lungs (29 months). A CR for more than 2 years was obtained in 1 patient after surgery, in 1 patient after radiotherapy, and in 2 patients after chemotherapy. Although local recurrence of resected NSCLC can be potentially controlled by using local treatments - such as surgery and radiotherapy - or systemic chemotherapy, curative aggressive treatment should be considered when required.

  1. Pre-adjuvant chemotherapy leukocyte count may predict the outcome for advanced gastric cancer after radical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Dong; Zhu, Fang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Qian, Jing; He, Shaohua; Qian, Yingying; Shen, Hua; Liu, Yiqian; Xu, Jiali; Shu, Yongqian

    2014-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has a high morbidity worldwide each year especially in China and advanced GC is well known with poor prognosis, for which surgical resection combine adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal choice for therapy. Leukocyte is an important index during the treatment for its influence on drugs' dosage and tolerance. Therefore, peripheral blood leukocyte and its subsets during adjuvant chemotherapy may have great clinical value for predicting prognostic. In this retrospective study, we showed the distribution of white blood cell and its subsets in the baseline period before adjuvant chemotherapy in 399 patients who underwent radical resection for advanced GC from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2012. We investigated the relationship between leukocyte count and overall survival (OS) as well as disease-free survival (DFS). In these patients, females were more likely to have less white blood cells after operation (P=0.016). Patients with pre-chemotherapy leukocyte count less than 4×10(9)/L got worse DFS (P=0.028) and OS (P=0.016). In multivariate analysis, tumor size ≥ 6cm (P=0.033), TNM stage IV (P=0.024), vascular or nerval invasion (P=0.005) and leukocyte count less than 4.0×10(9)/L (P=0.019) was associated with poor DFS. TNM stage IV (P=0.008), vascular or nerval invasion (P=0.001) and lower leukocyte count (P=0.045) were independent risk factors for poor OS. Taken together, our findings suggest that pre-adjuvant chemotherapy peripheral blood leukocyte count correlates with clinical outcome of patients with advanced GC after radical resection.

  2. Extended surgical resection for xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking advanced gallbladder carcinoma: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonino Spinelli; Sven Jonas; Jan M Langrehr; Peter Neuhaus; Guido Schumacher; Andreas Pascher; Enrique Lopez-Hanninen; Hussain Al-Abadi; Christoph Benckert; Igor M Sauer; Johann Pratschke; Ulf P Neumann

    2006-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a destructive inflammatory disease of the gallbladder, rarely involving adjacent organs and mimicking an advanced gallbladder carcinoma. The diagnosis is usually possible only after pathological examination. A 46 year-old woman was referred to our center for suspected gallbladder cancer involving the liver hilum, right liver lobe, right colonic flexure, and duodenum. Brushing cytology obtained by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) showed high-grade dysplasia. The patient underwent an en-bloc resection of the mass, consisting of right lobectomy,right hemicolectomy, and a partial duodenal resection.Pathological examination unexpectedly revealed an XGC.Only six cases of extended surgical resections for XGC with direct involvement of adjacent organs have been reported so far. In these cases, given the possible coexistence of XGC with carcinoma, malignancy cannot be excluded, even after cytology and intraoperative frozen section investigation. In conclusion, due to the poor prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma on one side and possible complications deriving from highly aggressive inflammatory invasion of surrounding organs on the other side, it seems these cases should be treated as malignant tumors until proven otherwise. Clinicians should include XGC among the possible differential diagnoses of masses in liver hilum.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. A Single Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, G; Petranyi, A; Szűcs, A; Nehéz, L; Harsanyi, L; Hegyi, P; Bodoky, G

    2017-01-06

    The management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is a major challenge. Although new drugs are available for the treatment of metastatic disease, the optimal treatment of non-metastatic cases remains controversial. The role of neoadjuvant therapy is still a question of debate in this setting. The aim of the study was to prospectively collect and analyse data on efficacy and safety of a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen in LAPC patients treated in a single institution. Another major objective was to assess the capability of FOLFIRINOX to render primary non-resectable cancer to resectable. No bolus fluorouracil was given and a 20% dose reduction of oxaliplatin and irinotecan was applied. Primary G-CSF prophylaxis was applied to prevent febrile neutropenia. Thirty-two patients (mean age 60.2 years, range: 40-77 years) have been enrolled into the study. All patients had ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. Best response to therapy was stable disease (SD) or partial regression (PR) in 18 (56.2%) and 6 (18.8%) cases. Two patients (6.3%) underwent surgical resection (100% R0). The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were nausea (18.8%), fatigue (12.5%) and diarrhea (12.5%). The incidence of severe neutropenia was 28.1%, with only one documented case of febrile neutropenia. The probability of disease progression was 25% and 50% after 75 and 160 days with 88.4% of possibility of disease progression after 500 days. OS probability was 92.1, 71.5% and 49.5% at 180-, 365 and 540 days. Our data does not support the capability of FOLFIRINOX to render primary non-resectable cancer to resectable. However, due to the high disease control rate observed, FOLFRINOX might be recommended as first line option for the palliative treatment of LAPC. Despite reduced chemotherapy doses significant toxicity has been seen.

  4. One Advanced Indoor Localization Algorithm for Improving Localization Accuracy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Chao

    2013-01-01

    The indoor localization technology has very important practical value for real-time monitoring and management of indoor materials.In order to achieve localization for indoor substances,a model of indoor localization algorithm based on distances is established,meanwhile,DFP algorithm is introduced to further refine the positioning coordinates and improve the localization accuracy.The main idea is using the least squares estimation method and cubic spline interpolation to

  5. [A case report of pathologically complete response of locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with XELOX and bevacizumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Tomonori; Ebe, Kazuyu; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Koide, Norihiko; Honma, Kenji; Ikarashi, Toshihiko

    2012-06-01

    A 70-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for constipation. A clinical examination showed locally advanced rectal cancer with possible invasion to the prostate gland and pelvic wall. After performing colostomy, he underwent neoadjuvant radiation therapy (40 Gy) and six courses of a XELOX and bevacizumab regimen. A subsequent examination demonstrated significant reduction of the tumor, so we performed super low anterior resection and colo-anal anastomosis. Pathological examination revealed no residual cancer cells and showed pathological CR. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with XELOX and bevacizumab were useful for down staging and function-preserving surgery in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

  6. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery resection of small ground-glass opacities (GGOs) localized with CT-guided placement of microcoils and palpation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhe; Jiang, Sen; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Although uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is becoming more popular, it’s still very challenging to conduct a wedge resection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacities (GGOs), especially deeply situated subpleural GGOs, via uniportal VATS. We successfully performed thirteen uniportal VATS wedge resections through an approach that combines radiologically guided microcoil localization with palpation, and we encountered no complications related to the new approach. Based on our experience, a combination of CT-guided microcoil localization with palpation in uniportal VATS for deeply situated subpleural GGOs is a safe and effective procedure for accurate diag¬nosis and resection of indeterminate GGOs. PMID:27499978

  7. Late-onset peritoneal recurrence of advanced gastric cancer 20 years after primary resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohri Yasuhiko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Late onset of peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer more than 10 years after surgery is extremely rare, and only three cases have been reported. We present the case of a 61-year-old man who was diagnosed finally with peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer 20 years after primary curative resection. As a result of small-bowel obstruction caused by peritoneal recurrence, diverting ileostomy with partial ileal resection was performed. The resected specimen revealed tubular adenocarcinoma that resembled the primary gastric cancer. The clinical course after the second operation was unfavorable and systemic chemotherapy had no effect. He died at 62 years of age, 21 years and 7 months after initial gastrectomy. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, Ki-67, and p53 was performed to investigate the phenotype of primary and recurrence cancer. Protein expression of proliferation markers such as PCNA and Ki-67 was down-regulated, but p53 was overexpressed at the site of recurrence. These data suggest that late peritoneal recurrence has a low proliferation rate and is resistant to chemoradiotherapy. In conclusion, we present late onset of peritoneal recurrence of gastric cancer more than 20 years after primary surgery, and speculate on the mechanism of late-onset recurrence in our case.

  8. Outcomes ofpreoperative chemoradiotherapy followed bysurgery inpatients withunresectable locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BoQiu; ReneOlivier Mirimanoff; ZhiZhongPan; RuiHuaXu; YuanHongGao; PeiRongDing; LingCai; WeiWeiXiao; ZhiFanZeng; GongChen; ZhenHaiLu; LiRenLi; XiaoJunWu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Complete resection of locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer (LASCC) is sometimes diffcult. Patients with LASCC have a dismal prognosis and poor quality of life, which has encouraged the evaluation of alternative multimodality treatments. This prospective study aimed to assess the feasibility and effcacy of neoadjuvant chemora‑diotherapy (neoCRT) followed by surgery as treatment of selected patients with unresectable LASCC. Methods:We studied the patients with unresectable LASCC who received neoCRT followed by surgery between October 2010 and December 2012. The neoadjuvant regimen consisted of external‑beam radiotherapy to 50Gy and capecitabine‑based chemotherapy every 3weeks. Surgery was scheduled 6–8weeks after radiotherapy. Results:Twenty‑one patients were included in this study. The median follow‑up was 42months (range, 17–57months). All patients completed neoCRT and surgery. Resection with microscopically negative margins (R0 resection) was achieved in 20 patients (95.2%). Pathologic complete response was observed in 8 patients (38.1%). Multivisceral resection was necessary in only 7 patients (33.3%). Two patients (9.5%) experienced grade 2 postopera‑tive complications. No patients died within 30days after surgery. For 18 patients with pathologic M0 (ypM0) disease, the cumulative probability of 3‑year local recurrence‑free survival, disease‑free survival and overall survival was 100.0%, 88.9% and 100.0%, respectively. For all 21 patients, the cumulative probability of 3‑year overall survival was 95.2% and bladder function was well preserved. Conclusion:For patients with unresectable LASCC, preoperative chemoradiotherapy and surgery can be performed safely and may result in an increased survival rate.

  9. Clinical Study of Intra-operative Computed Tomography Guided Localization with A Hook-wire System for Small Ground Glass Opacities in Minimally Invasive Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang CHU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Localization of pulmonary ground glass small nodule is the technical difficulty of minimally invasive operation resection. The aim of this study is to evaluate the value of intraoperative computed tomography (CT-guided localization using a hook-wire system for small ground glass opacity (GGO in minimally invasive resection, as well as to discuss the necessity and feasibility of surgical resection of small GGOs (<10 mm through a minimally invasive approach. Methods The records of 32 patients with 41 small GGOs who underwent intraoperative CT-guided double-thorn hook wire localization prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic wedge resection from October 2009 to October 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS within 10 min after wire localization. The efficacy of intraoperative localization was evaluated in terms of procedure time, VATS success rate, and associated complications of localization. Results A total of 32 patients (15 males and 17 females underwent 41 VATS resections, with 2 simultaneous nodule resections performed in 3 patients, 3 lesion resections in 1 patient, and 5 lesions in a patient. Nodule diameters ranged from 2 mm-10 mm (mean: 5 mm. The distance of lung lesions from the nearest pleural surfaces ranged within 5 mm-24 mm (mean: 12.5 mm. All resections of lesions guided by the inserted hook wires were successfully performed by VATS (100% success rate. The mean procedure time for the CT-guided hook wire localization was 8.4 min (range: 4 min-18 min. The mean procedure time for VATS was 32 min (range: 14 min-98 min. The median hospital time was 8 d (range: 5 d-14 d. Results of pathological examination revealed 28 primary lung cancers, 9 atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and 4 nonspecific chronic inflammations. No major complication related to the intraoperative hook wire localization and VATS was noted. Conclusion Intraoperative CT-guided hook wire

  10. Novel strategies in glioblastoma surgery aim at safe, supra-maximum resection in conjunction with local therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John G. Wolbers

    2014-01-01

    The biggest challenge in neuro-oncology is the treatment of glioblastoma, which exhibits poor prognosis and is increasing in incidence in an increasing aging population. Diverse treatment strategies aim at maximum cytoreduction and ensuring good quality of life. We discuss multimodal neuronavigation, supra-maximum tumor resection, and the postoperative treatment gap. Multimodal neuronavigation al ows the integration of preoperative anatomic and functional data with intraoperative information. This approach includes functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging in preplanning and ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), MRI and direct (sub)cortical stimulation during surgery. The practice of awake craniotomy decreases postoperative neurologic deficits, and an extensive supra-maximum resection appears to be feasible, even in eloquent areas of the brain. Intraoperative MRI- and fluorescence-guided surgery assist in achieving this goal of supra-maximum resection and have been the subject of an increasing number of reports. Photodynamic therapy and local chemotherapy are properly positioned to bridge the gap between surgery and chemoradiotherapy. The photosensitizer used in fluorescence-guided surgery persists in the remaining peripheral tumor extensions. Additionally, blinded randomized clinical trials showed firm evidence of extra cytoreduction by local chemotherapy in the tumor cavity. The cutting-edge promise is gene therapy although both the delivery and efficacy of the numerous transgenes remain under investigation. Issues such as the choice of (cell) vector, the choice of therapeutic transgene, the optimal route of administration, and biosafety need to be addressed in a systematic way. In this selective review, we present various evidence and promises to improve survival of glioblastoma patients by supra-maximum cytoreduction via local procedures while minimizing the risk of new neurologic deficit.

  11. Clinicodemographic aspect of resectable pancreatic cancer and prognostic factors for resectable cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Kun-Chun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCA is one of the most lethal human malignancies, and radical surgery remains the cornerstone of treatment. After resection, the overall 5-year survival rate is only 10% to 29%. At the time of presentation, however, about 40% of patients generally have distant metastases and another 40% are usually diagnosed with locally advanced cancers. The remaining 20% of patients are indicated for surgery on the basis of the results of preoperative imaging studies; however, about half of these patients are found to be unsuitable for resection during surgical exploration. In the current study, we aimed to determine the clinicopathological characteristics that predict the resectability of PCA and to conduct a prognostic analysis of PCA after resection to identify favorable survival factors. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 688 patients (422 men and 266 women who had undergone surgery for histopathologically proven PCA in the Department of Surgery at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan from 1981 to 2006. We compared the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent resection and patients who did not undergo resection in order to identify the predictive factors for successful resectability of PCA, and we conducted prognostic analysis for PCA after resection. Results A carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9 level of 37 U/ml or greater and a tumor size of 3 cm or more independently predicted resectability of PCA. In terms of survival after resection, PCA patients with better nutritional status (measured as having an albumin level greater than 3.5 g/dl, radical resection, early tumor stage and better-differentiated tumors were associated with favorable survival. Conclusions Besides traditional imaging studies, preoperative CA 19–9 levels and tumor size can also be used to determine the resectability of PCA. Better nutritional status, curative resection, early tumor stage and well

  12. Insurance Status and Hospital Payer Mix Are Linked With Variation in Metastatic Site Resection in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Mark A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Krell, Robert W; Regenbogen, Scott E; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A

    2016-11-01

    Despite substantially improved survival with metastatic site resection in colorectal cancers, uptake of aggressive surgical approaches remains low among certain patients. It is unknown whether financial determinants of care, such as insurance status, play a role in this treatment gap. We sought to evaluate the effect of insurance status on metastasectomy in patients with advanced colorectal cancers. This was a retrospective cohort study. Using the National Cancer Data Base Participant User File, incident cases of colorectal cancer metastatic to the lung and/or liver with diagnosis from 2010 to 2013 were identified. We identified 42,300 patients in our cohort with a mean age 64 years. Controlling for patient, tumor, and hospital characteristics, hierarchical regression was used to examine associations between hospital payer mix and metastatic site resection. Metastatic site resection occurred in 12.3% of all patients. Adjusting for patient and hospital fixed effects, we found that patients who were uninsured or on Medicaid were 38% less likely to undergo metastasectomy (OR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56-0.66)). Patients in hospitals with staff treating a high percentage of uninsured patients or patients with Medicaid were less likely to undergo metastasectomy, even after controlling for individual patient insurance status. The study was limited by its retrospective design and the granularity and accuracy of the National Cancer Data Base. Differences in insurance status and hospital payer mix are associated with differences in rates of metastatic site resection in patients with colorectal cancer that is metastatic to the lung and/or liver. There is a need for improved access to metastatic site resection for individual patients who are uninsured or who have Medicaid insurance, as well as for all patients who seek care at hospitals treating a large proportion of patients who are uninsured or on Medicaid. Remedies for individual patients could include improved access to private

  13. Chemoradioimmunotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic and biliary tree adenocarcinoma: a multicenter phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Francesco; Sica, Gigliola; Candeloro, Giampiero; Bisegna, Roberta; Bratta, Massimo; Bonfili, Pierluigi; Necozione, Stefano; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Rea, Silvio

    2009-08-01

    The antitumor activity and toxicity of a multi-step treatment were evaluated in patients with locally advanced, inoperable, or incompletely resected pancreatic (Pa) and biliary tree (Bt) adenocarcinomas (ADKs). Fifty-four patients, 63% with Pa and 37% with Bt ADK, received 3 courses of cisplatin-gemcitabine induction chemotherapy. Progression-free (PF) patients were given consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. PF patients had, as maintenance immunotherapy (MI), interleukin 2 (1.8x10 IU) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (0.5 mg/kg) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]. Thirty-eight patients, 27 with Pa and 11 with Bt ADKs, PF after cisplatin/gemcitabine, were treated with consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. Fourteen PF patients, 7 with Pa and 7 with Bt ADK, received MI. Median PF and overall survivals (OS) for all 54 patients were 6.8 and 12.1 months, respectively. Patients treated with MI had a median PF survival of 16.2 months, whereas median OS had not been reached yet, after a median follow-up of 27.5 months. Grades 3 and 4 hematological and gastrointestinal in 30% and 37% of patients, respectively; grades 1 and 2 autoimmune reactions in 28% of patients. These results support the efficacy and safety of a multi-step sequential treatment in patients with locally advanced, inoperable or incompletely resected Pa and Bt ADKs.

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing-Lung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788. The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2 and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3 were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential.

  15. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

    report the heart toxicities in locally-regionally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC) patients (pts) treated with RT in our centre.   Methods and material: From 01.01.1995-30.11.2007, 287 pts with LA-NSCLC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with RT at our centre with planned dose 60-66 Gy. All RT was applied as 3D RT......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity...

  16. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore-with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of 'on target' effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments or

  17. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Edelman, Martin J. [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Krasna, Mark [Cancer Center at St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland (United States); Burrows, Whitney [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gore, Elizabeth [Dept of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Dept of Radiation Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Choy, Hak [Dept of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  18. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node (rectal cancer SI [bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size (rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma (tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer.

  19. Recent Advances in Wireless Indoor Localization Techniques and System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Farid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in localization based technologies and the increasing importance of ubiquitous computing and context-dependent information have led to a growing business interest in location-based applications and services. Today, most application requirements are locating or real-time tracking of physical belongings inside buildings accurately; thus, the demand for indoor localization services has become a key prerequisite in some markets. Moreover, indoor localization technologies address the inadequacy of global positioning system inside a closed environment, like buildings. Based on this, though, this paper aims to provide the reader with a review of the recent advances in wireless indoor localization techniques and system to deliver a better understanding of state-of-the-art technologies and motivate new research efforts in this promising field. For this purpose, existing wireless localization position system and location estimation schemes are reviewed, as we also compare the related techniques and systems along with a conclusion and future trends.

  20. Locally advanced breast cancer in the elderly: curettage mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solej, Mario; Ferronato, Marco; Nano, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Locally advanced breast tumor represents 5-20% of new cases diagnosed every year. The purpose of this study was to report our experience and to compare it with the literature. From 1998 to 2003 at the Molinette Hospital in the Turin University Third Division of General Surgery, there were 34 cases of breast cancer in older women (between 70 and 94 years of age), 14 of which (41.18%) were locally advanced breast tumor. We evaluated the type of surgical intervention and anesthesia used, muscular invasion, the presence of receptors positive to estrogens and progesterone, the operative mortality, the percentage of local-regional recurrence, and relapses after a period of time. Among the patients with locally advanced breast tumor, 21.43% (3/14) were at stage IIIA and 78.57% (11/14) at stage IIIB. In 14.29% (2/14) of the cases, Patey's radical mastectomy was performed, in 57.14% (8/14) Halsted's radical mastectomy, and in 28.57% (4/14) a simple mastectomy with the removal of the fascia of the major pectoral muscle. Three (21.43%) patients underwent a second intervention for local-regional disease. None of the patients had distant metastasis in the first 2 years after the operation. Mortality after 2 years was 23.1% (3/13). None of the patients who underwent surgery had adjuvant therapy, usually because it was refused by the patients themselves or their families. All the negative and positive hormone receptor patients received tamoxifen. Locally advanced breast tumors are frequent in elderly women. In the past, there has been a tendency to surgical under-treatment. As regards locally advanced breast tumor, curettage operations represent the only possibility to improve the quality of life of the elderly. These should be performed after carefully evaluating a series of variables in the general and local condition of the patient, the aggressiveness of the intervention and the life expectancy.

  1. Combined radical prostatectomy and abdominoperineal resection for locally invasive rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fernández-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: En bloc radical prostatectomy and proctosigmoidectomy is feasible in selected patients with rectal cancer and invasion limited to the prostate or seminal vesicles because it provides good local tumor control and significantly improves the patient's quality of life in comparison to total pelvic exenteration.

  2. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  3. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sarraf, M D; El Hariry, I

    2008-07-01

    Induction CT have evolved since its introduction in the mid of 1970s for patients with previously untreated locally advanced HNC. We went from single agent cisplatin to cisplatin bleomycin combinations, to PF and now to the three drugs combination of TPF or its safer modification. We started with single cycle of induction CT, to two courses and now the best to give is the three cycles of CT. We not only improved on the effectiveness of the induction CT, but also reduced the possible side effects and improved the quality of life for those receiving such treatment. Induction CT followed by RT alone is superior to RT only in patients with previously untreated unresectable/inoperable HNC. Although, the "standard" of care of these patients today is concurrent CT+RT. Induction TPF followed by the best local treatment(s) usually concurrent CT+RT was superior to PF followed by the best local therapy in these patients. Will this mean that in patients with locally advanced unresectable/inoperable HNC induction TPF followed by concurrent CT+RT is the treatment of choice, in our opinion is yes, but this is not acceptable by the majority of investigators. This is why we do have more than four prospective randomized phase III trials trying to answer such an important question. In our opinion and strong believe that all patients with locally advanced HNC including patients with NPC not on active protocol(s) may be offered induction three drugs combination followed by concurrent CT+RT as their primary planned treatment. In those patients who are resectable/operable before any such therapy and did not respond (CR or PR) to such induction CT may offer surgical resection followed by post-operative concurrent CT + RT. Table 5 summarize the rational of the continue use of the total treatment of induction CT followed by concurrent CT+RT in patients with previously untreated and locally advanced HNC.

  5. Local recurrence rates after radiofrequency ablation or resection of colorectal liver metastases. Analysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer #40004 and #40983

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, E.; Nordlinger, B.; Mauer, M.; Sorbye, H.; van Coevorden, F.; Gruenberger, T.M.; Schlag, P.M.; Punt, C.J.A.; Ledermann, J.; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to describe local tumour control after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and surgical resection (RES) of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) in two independent European Organisations for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) studies. Background Only 10–20% of patients with

  6. Local recurrence rates after radiofrequency ablation or resection of colorectal liver metastases. Analysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer #40004 and #40983

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, E.; Nordlinger, B.; Mauer, M.; Sorbye, H.; Coevorden, van F.; Gruenberger, T.M.; Schlag, P.M.; Punt, C.J.A.; Ledermann, J.; Ruers, T.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to describe local tumour control after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and surgical resection (RES) of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) in two independent European Organisations for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) studies. Background Only 10–20% of patients with

  7. Combined modality therapy for locally advanced penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, T J; Wheeler, W; Riemenschneider, H

    1993-12-01

    We report here a patient who presented with locally advanced Jackson Stage IV penile squamous cell carcinoma who was managed with preoperative 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C chemotherapy, and concurrent radiation therapy. He experienced an excellent partial response which allowed more limited surgery than would otherwise be indicated. He is still alive and well 5 years after completion of his treatment without side effects, local recurrence, or distant metastatic disease.

  8. Preoperative treatment with radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastroesophageal junction cancer and unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratosa Ivica

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. To purpose of the study was to analyze the results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable gastric or locoregionally advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ cancer treated at a single institution.

  9. Concurrent radiochemotherapy of locally recurrent or advanced sarcomas of the uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, B.; Klautke, G.; Fietkau, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany); Reimer, T.; Gerber, B. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Univ. of Rostock, Suedstadt Hospital (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Background: uterine sarcomas are rare tumors. Until now, no data on the treatment of recurrent or advanced uterine sarcomas using concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) has been available. Patients and methods: from 01/1997 to 03/2004, seven patients with locally recurrent (n = 6) or locally advanced uterine sarcomas (n = 1) received concurrent RCT after tumor surgery (R1/2 resection in 3/7 patients). A total radiation dose of 45 Gy was applied in single doses of 1.8 Gy using an external-beam technique; in addition, three to four intracavitary doses of 5 Gy were applied. Concurrent chemotherapy was generally administered as follows: 1.2 g/m{sup 2} ifosfamide on days 1-5 and 29-33 in combination with 50 or 40 mg/m{sup 2} adriamycin on days 2 and 30. 3/7 patients received further cycles of chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 35 months. Results: all recurrences (before RCT) were localized either in the vagina or in or directly proximal to the vaginal stump. The main side effects of RCT were hemotoxicity (grade 3: n = 3/7; grade 4: n = 4/7; neutropenic fever n = 1/7) and diarrhea (grade 3: n = 5/7). At the median follow-up (35 months), 4/7 patients had recurrences (one local recurrence; one lymph node recurrence outside the irradiated field, two distant metastases). Local control in the irradiated field was 80% {+-} 18% after 3 years. Disease-free survival calculated according to Kaplan-Meier was 57% {+-} 19% after 3 years. Presently, 5/7 patients are still alive, corresponding to a 3-year survival rate of 83% {+-} 15%. Conclusion: concurrent RCT shows good local effectiveness with a good long-term survival. Further evaluation in phase II studies is recommended. (orig.)

  10. Effect of laparoscope and open radical resection on immunological and stress levels in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia-Fei Sun; Zi-Rui He

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of laparoscope and open radical resection of gastric cancer on the immunological and stress levels in patients with advanced gastric cancer.Methods:A total of 80 patients with advanced gastric cancer who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into the laparoscope group and open group according to different treatment protocols. The morning fasting venous blood 1 d before operation, and 1 d, 3 d, and 5 d after operation in the two groups was collected, and centrifuged for the serum. The scatter turbidimetry was used to detect CRP. ELISA was used to detect IL-6. FCM was used to detect CD4+ and CD8+. CD4+/CD8+ were calculated.Results:The comparison of CRP and IL-6 levels before operation between the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). CRP and IL-6 levels 1 d after operation were significantly elevated, and were gradually reduced 3 d and 5 d after operation. CRP and IL-6 levels 3 d and 5d after operation in the laparoscope group were significantly lower than those in the open group (P0.05). CD4+ 1 d after operation reached the peak, while CD8+ and CD4+/CD8+ were reduced to the lowest. CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+/CD8+ 3 d and 5 d after operation were gradually recovered, and the recovered degree of the above indicators in the laparoscope group were significantly superior to that in the open group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Due to the significant advantage of small effect on the stress reaction and immunosuppression, the laparoscopic radical gastrectomy should be preferred.

  11. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable an

  12. Management of locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. de Wilt (Johannes); M. Vermaas (Maarten); F.T.J. Ferenschild (Floris); C. Verhoef (Kees)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTreatment for patients with locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer differs significantly from patients with rectal cancer restricted to the mesorectum. Adequate preoperative imaging of the pelvis is therefore important to identify those patients who are candidates for multimodality

  13. LOCAL RECURRENCE OF TUBULOCYSTIC CARCINOMA 4 YEARS AFTER RENAL RESECTION (A CLINICAL OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Peters

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of a local recurrence of tubulocystic carcinoma (TCC in a 46-year-old man, a relatively good course (the relapse occurred after 4 years, who has been successfully operated on and is being followed up. This disease is a rare renal malignancy and, until recently, it has been referred to as collecting tubular carcinoma. However, this disease has come to be regarded as an independent nosological entity, by taking into account its certain morphological, immunohistohemical, and cytogenetic characteristics, as well as the nature of its course. About 80 TCC cases have been described to date. Further study of this disease and other rare renal malignancies will allow the more accurate elaboration of management tactics for such patients in terms of certain prognostic factors, which calls for a larger number of cases of this disease.

  14. Initial single-port thoracoscopy to reduce surgical trauma during open en bloc chest wall and pulmonary resection for locally invasive cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayarri, Clara I.; de Guevara, Antonio Cueto Ladron; Martin-Ucar, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES En bloc pulmonary and chest wall resection is the preferred method of treatment for locally invasive lung carcinoma. However, it carries major trauma to the chest wall, especially in cases with chest wall involvement distant to the potential location of ‘traditional’ thoracotomies. We describe an alternative method of estimating the boundaries of chest wall resection employing video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and hypodermic needles. METHODS VATS delineation of boundaries of chest wall involvement by lung cancer has been performed in six patients who gave written consent. In one case the single–port thoracoscopic examination revealed unexpected distant pleural metastases thus preventing from resection. The other 5 patients, three males and two females [median age of 60.5 (range 39 to 75) years] underwent en bloc anatomical lung resection in addition to chest wall excision and reconstruction for T3N0 lung cancer. RESULTS In these five cases the chest wall opening was restricted to the extent of the rib excision, and the pulmonary resection was performed via the existing chest wall opening without requiring extension of the thoracotomy or any rib spreading. DISCUSSION Minimally invasive techniques aid to delineate the boundaries of chest wall involvement of lung cancer and intraoperative staging. This helped tailoring the surgical approach and location of the thoracotomy, and prevented rib-spreading or additional thoracotomies in our cases. PMID:23592724

  15. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conde-Muíño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile’s ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  16. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  17. Life expectancy with perioperative chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadighi S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Although postoperative chemoradiotherapy should be considered for all patients at high risk for recurrence of adenocarcinoma of the stomach, curative surgery occurs in less than 50% of nonmetastatic gastric cancers. A regimen of docetaxel, cisplatin and infusional fluorouracil improves survival of patients with incurable locally-advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. So we assessed the perioperative regimen of docetaxel, cisplatin and infusions 5FU (TCF and postoperative chemoradiotherapy to improve outcomes in patients with potentially resectable gastric adenocarcinoma. "nMethods: Between March 2005 and March 2008, we 100 enrolled patients with stage II to IV (M0 adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had not been treated previously. Treatment consisted of three preoperative and one postoperative cycles of TCF followed by chemoradiotherapy. The primary end point was overall survival. The secondary end points were progression-free survival and toxicity of treatment. "nResults: A total of 100 patients participated, 83 of whom received neoadjuvant and 17 received adjuvant chemotherapy. Seventy-five patients underwent at least D0 gastrectomy. After chemotherapy, tumor stages were significantly lower than before beginning the protocol. Out of 100 patients, 44 had stage IV before chemotherapy versus 15 after the treatment. Three patients showed complete pathologic response. The median survival time was 25 months. "nConclusion: Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5FU combination chemotherapy is an active preoperative treatment in locally advanced gastric cancer. Perioperative chemoradio-therapy should be considered as an option to lengthen patient survival.

  18. Relationship of Clinical and Pathologic Nodal Staging in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Current Controversies in Daily Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Bulzonetti, Nadia; Raffetto, Nicola; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Systemic neo-adjuvant therapy plays a primary role in the management of locally advanced breast cancer. Without having any negative effect in overall survival, induction chemotherapy potentially assures a surgery approach in unresectable disease or a conservative treatment in technically resectable disease and acts on a well-vascularized tumor bed, without the modifications induced by surgery. A specific issue has a central function in the neo-adjuvant setting: lymph nodes status. It still represents one of the strongest predictors of long-term prognosis in breast cancer. The discussion of regional radiation therapy should be a matter of debate, especially in a pathological complete response. Currently, the indication for radiotherapy is based on the clinical stage before the surgery, even for the irradiation of the loco-regional lymph nodes. Regardless of pathological down-staging, radiation therapy is accepted as standard adjuvant treatment in locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:25247013

  19. Efficacy of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Pehr A.; Bystroem, Per (Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (SE)); Isaksson, Bengt; Almstroem, Markus; Permert, Johan (Div. of Surgery, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst. at Karolinska Univ. Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm (SE)); Johnsson, Anders (Dept. of Oncology, Lund Univ. Hospital, Lund (SE)); Albiin, Nils (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (SE))

    2008-03-15

    Background. The optimal care for patients with unresectable, non-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is debated. We treated 17 consecutive cases with preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) as a means for downstaging their tumours and compared outcome with 35 patients undergoing direct surgery for primarily resectable PAC during the same time period. Methods. The patients had biopsy proven, unresectable, non-metastatic PAC which engaged >= 50% of the circumference of a patent mesenteric/portal vein for a distance >= 2 cm and/or < 50% of the circumference of a central artery for < 2 cm. The preop therapy included two courses of Xelox (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 d1; capecitabine 2 000 mg/m2 d1-14 q 3 w) followed by 3-D conformal radiotherapy (50.4 Gy; 1.8 Gy fractions) with reduced Xelox (d1-5 q 1 w X 6). Results. No incident of RCT-related CTC Grade 3-4 haematologic and six cases of non-haematologic side-effects were diagnosed. Sixteen patients completed the RCT and were rescanned with CT and reevaluated for surgery 4 weeks post-RCT. Five cases were diagnosed with new metastases to the liver. Eleven patients were accepted for surgery whereof eight underwent a curative R{sub 0}-resection. The median overall survival for the latter group was 29 months, which compared favourably with our control group of patients undergoing direct curative surgery for primarily resectable PAC (median OS: 16 months; RO-rate: 75%). Perioperative morbidity was similar in the two cohorts but the duration of surgery was longer (576 vs. 477 min) and the op blood loss was greater (3288 vs. 1460 ml) in the RCT-cohort (p < 0.05). The 30-day mortality was zero in both groups. Conclusion. Preoperative RCT in patients with locally advanced PAC resulted in a high rate of curative resections and promising median survival in our treatment series. This trimodality approach merits further exploration in new studies, which are currently underway at our Dept.

  20. Association between irrigation fluids, washout volumes and risk of local recurrence of anterior resection for rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of 427 cases and 492 controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rectal washout can prevent local recurrence after anterior resection of rectal cancer. Few studies have focused particularly on the association between irrigation fluids volume or agents and the risk of local recurrence after anterior resection of rectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between irrigation fluids types, volumes of rectal washout and risk of local recurrence after anterior resection for cancer. DATA SOURCES: Relevant studies were identified by a search of Medline, Embase, Wiley Online Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Cochrane Oral Health Group Specialized Register, Wanfang databases and Google Website from their inception until October 18,2013. STUDY SELECTION: Studies reporting the association between rectal washout types and volumes and risk of local recurrence after anterior resection for cancer were included. INTERVENTIONS: Eligible studies used rectal washout. Control groups were defined as no washout. STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: Random-effects model were used to obtain summary estimates of RR and 95% CI, with Stata version 11 and RevMan 5.2.5 softwares used. The quality of report was appraised in reference to the MINORS item. RESULTS: Of the 919 rectal cancer patients in 8 included studies, a total of 61(6.64% cases of local recurrence were reported, with a pooled RR 0.51 (95%CI = 0.28-0.92, P = 0.03. The RRs 0.37 and 0.39 in normal saline and washout volume (≥ 1500 ml normal saline subgroup, respectively, indicated that rectal washout with normal saline, or ≥ 1500 ml in volume could significantly reduce local recurrence (LR rate (95% CI = 0.17-0.79, P = 0.01; 95% CI = 0.18-0.87, P = 0.02 after anterior resection for cancer. LIMITATION: The included studies were non-randomized observational studies, with diversity of study designs. CONCLUSION: Rectal washout with normal saline alone can reduce the risk of local recurrence in patients with resectable rectal cancer, and

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer reduces surgical risks and lymph-vascular space involvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Wang; Guang Wang; Li-Hui Wei; Ling-Hui Huang; Jian-Liu Wang; Shi-Jun Wang; Xiao-Ping Li

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT),which can reduce the size and therefore increase the resectability of tumors,has recently evolved as a treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer.NACT has been reported to decrease the risk of pathologic factors related to prognosis of cervical cancer.To further assess the effects of NACT on surgery and the pathologic characteristics of cervicat cancer,we reviewed 110 cases of locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radical hysterectomy with or without NACT at the People's Hospital of Peking University between January 2006 and December 2010.Of 110 patients,68 underwent platinum-based NACT prior to surgery (NACT group) and 42 underwent pdmary surgery treatment (PST group).Our results showed 48 of 68 (70.6%) patients achieved a complete response or partial response to NACT.Estimated blood loss,operation time,and number of removed lymph nodes during surgery,as well as complication rates during and after surgery were not significantly different between the NACT group and the PST group.The rates of deep stromal invasion,positive parametria,positive surgical vaginal margins,and lymph node metastasis were not significantly different between the two groups.However,the rate of lymph-vascular space involvement (LVSI) was significantly lower in the NACT group than in the PST group (P = 0.021).In addition,the response rate of NACT was significantly higher in the patients with chemotherapeutic drugs administrated via artery than via vein.Our results suggest that NACT is a safe and effective treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer and significantly decreases the rate of LVSI.

  2. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  3. Giant cell tumor locally advanced around the knee: treatment and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigollino, Ana Valeria; Fernando, Thiago Santos; Tanaka, Marcos Hajime; Souza, Marcello Martins

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign bone tumor with aggressive characteristics. They are more prevalent in the third decade of life and demonstrate a preference for locating in the epiphyseal region of long bones. They have a high local recurrence rate, which depends on the type of treatment and initial tumor presentation. The risk of lung metastases is around 3%. Between October 2010 and August 2014, nine patients diagnosed with locally advanced GCT or with pathological fracture to the knee level underwent surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the treatment, particularly with regard to relapse, and to conduct a literature review. There was a predominance of males (77.7%). The most common location was the distal femur. Four patients (44%) developed local recurrence in the first year after surgery, three in distal femur and one in proximal tibia. Of the two patients with pathologic fracture at diagnosis, one of them presented recurrence after five months. The treatment of GCT is still a challenge. The authors believe that the best treatment method is wide resection and reconstruction of bone defects with non-conventional endoprostheses. Patients should be aware and well informed about the possible complications and functional losses that may occur as a result of the surgical treatment chosen and the need for further surgery in the medium and long term.

  4. Multi-visceral resection of locally advanced extra-pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darren R Cullinan; Stephen W Behrman

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multi-visceral resection for extra-pancreatic carcinoma is an uncommon procedure that may offer palliation and potential cure but must be balanced against the risk for morbidity and mortality. METHODS: A  retrospective  analysis  was  made  of  patients who had undergone multi-visceral resection of non-pancreatic carcinoma. Factors inlfuencing this procedure included histology, pathologic conifrmation of pancreaticoduodenal invasion, tumor clearance, peri-operative morbidity and outcome. RESULTS: Sixteen patients had en bloc resection including a Whipple procedure (6 patients) and a distal resection (10). Primary pathology mostly originated from the stomach and adenocarcinoma  was  predominately  histological.  An  R0 resection was made in 13 patients, and actual cancer invasion or abutment into the pancreas or duodenum was conifrmed pathologically in 11 patients. Twelve patients suffered from at least one complication. Ten patients required therapeutic intervention for complications. There were 2 in-hospital deaths. The median survival of deceased patients was 7.5 months. Six patients are alive at a median of 21 months, and 4 patients have no evidence of disease to the present. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-visceral resections for extra-pancreatic carcinoma  are  associated  with  substantial  morbidity  that requires therapeutic intervention. Clinical determination of pancreaticoduodenal  abutment  and  achievement  of  tumor clearance is excellent. Survival with and without recurrent disease is often limited, supporting that it is necessary to cautiously perform the aggressive procedures in consideration of neoadjuvant therapy.

  5. Novelen-bloc resection of locally advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma:the Rex recess approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Rela; Rajesh Rajalingam; Vivekanandan Shanmugam; Adrian O' Sullivan; Mettu S Reddy and Nigel Heaton

    2014-01-01

     Loco-regional recurrence after potentially curative resection  remains  a  problem  in  hilar  cholangiocarcinoma. Hilar dissection risks local spillage of tumor cells leading to suboptimal disease free survival. We have developed a new technique of radical resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma based on the distinctive anatomy of the Rex recess of the liver, which has been assessed in two patients with locally advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma. This technique included a right hepatectomy  with  en-bloc  resection  of  the  hepatoduodenal ligament and portal venous reconstruction to the left portal vein at the Rex recess. Both patients had R0 resection and have been disease-free for 26 and 38 months, respectively.

  6. Locally advanced stage high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary gland in a 9-year-old girl: the controversy of adjuvant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Micol Martínez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Malignant salivary gland tumors are rare in children, mostly represented by low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas. For these patients, long-term survival rates above 95% are reported after surgical resection. Here we report a case of a 9-year-old girl with a high grade locally advanced mucoepidermoid carcinoma undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy after surgery. We emphasize the controversy and lack of evidence-based indication for these highly toxic adjuvant therapy modalities in children.

  7. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study of induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (DCF) followed by chemoradiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced esophageal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Satake, Hironaga; Tahara, Makoto; Mochizuki, Satoshi; KATO, Ken; Hara, Hiroki; Yokota, Tomoya; Kiyota, Naomi; Kii, Takayuki; Chin, Keisho; Zenda, Sadamoto; Kojima, Takashi; Bando, Hideaki; YAMAZAKI, Tomoko; Iwasa, Satoru; Honma, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Standard care for unresectable locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is concurrent chemoradiotherapy, but survival remains limited. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (DCF) has demonstrated promising activity, with a pathological complete response (CR) of 17 % for resectable stage II/III ESCC. Here, we conducted a multicenter study to assess the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy with DCF followed by CRT in patients with...

  8. Controversy in mitral valve repair, resection or chordal replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, Masaru; Tomari, Shiro; Zaikokuji, Kenta; Imaeda, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    Mitral valve plasty has superseded valve replacement as the standard technique for treating degenerative mitral valve prolapse. Quadrangular resection is considered the gold standard for posterior leaflet prolapse. Chordal replacement was first developed to treat the anterior leaflet and subsequently became widely used for the posterior leaflet, after which a new version of posterior leaflet resection was developed that did not involve local annular plication. In the era of the mini-thoracotomy, the premeasured loop technique is simple to adopt and is as durable as quadrangular resection. However, there is controversy surrounding whether resection or chordal replacement is the optimal technique. The resection technique is curative because it removes the main pathologic lesion. The disadvantage of the resection is that it can be complicated and often requires advanced surgical skills. In contrast, chordal replacement is not pathologically curative because it leaves behind a redundant leaflet. However, the long-term results appear to be equivalent in many reports. Functionally, chordal replacement retains greater posterior leaflet motion with a lower trans-mitral pressure gradient than quadrangular resection. Moreover, chordal replacement is simple and yields uniform results. The optimal technique depends on whether the anterior leaflet or posterior leaflet is involved, the Barlow or non-Barlow disease state, and whether a mini-thoracotomy or standard sternotomy approach is used. For mitral valve repair, the most superior and reliable technique for the posterior leaflet is resection using the newer resection technique with a sternotomy approach, which requires a skilled surgeon.

  9. Delivery of local therapeutics to the brain: working toward advancing treatment for malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Pinheiro, Leon; Brem, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytomas, are characterized by their propensity to invade surrounding brain parenchyma, making curative resection difficult. These tumors typically recur within two centimeters of the resection cavity even after gross total removal. As a result, there has been an emphasis on developing therapeutics aimed at achieving local disease control. In this review, we will summarize the current developments in the delivery of local therapeutics, namely direct injection, convection-enhanced delivery and implantation of drug-loaded polymers, as well as the application of these therapeutics in future methods including microchip drug delivery and local gene therapy.

  10. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, B Mark; Thomson, Iain

    2013-11-01

    In patients with operable esophageal cancer, there is evidence supporting the use of preoperative chemotherapy or preoperative chemoradiation. The addition of radiotherapy to chemotherapy seems more relevant for the more locally advanced cancers. There is a need to examine in trials more modern chemotherapy combinations with and without concurrent radiation and for research into assessing methods for predicting outcomes from neoadjuvant therapy as part of the paradigm of therapy for this disease.

  12. INTRA-ARTERIAL PREOPERATIVE CHEMOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Zikiryakhodzhaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The article is devoted to studying the prospects of the use of selective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer IIIA, B, C stages. A review of literature on the methods of targent intra-arterial infusion of cytostatics and tumor embolization is performed, also it shows the results of treatment with different chemotherapeutic agents — epirubicin, doxorubicin, taxotere, cisplatin, 5‑fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide.

  13. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  14. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  15. Intensified Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel plus Gemcitabine Followed by FOLFIRINOX in a Patient with Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kunzmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer can be improved if secondary complete (R0 resection is possible. In patients initially staged as unresectable this may be achieved with neoadjuvant treatment which is usually chemoradiotherapy based. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with an unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (pT4 Nx cM0 G2 who was treated with a sequential neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen consisting of 2 cycles of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine followed by 4 cycles of FOLFIRINOX. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy resulted in secondary resectability (R0 resection. After 2 cycles of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine, the patient already had a complete metabolic remission as measured by integrated fludeoxyglucose (18F positron emission tomography and computerized tomography. After a follow-up of 18 months the patient is alive without progression of disease. We propose to assess the clinical benefit of sequencing the combinations nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine and FOLFIRINOX as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with locally advanced and initially unresectable pancreatic cancer in a controlled clinical trial.

  16. Intensified Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel plus Gemcitabine Followed by FOLFIRINOX in a Patient with Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Volker; Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Kapp, Markus; Hartlapp, Ingo; Steger, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer can be improved if secondary complete (R0) resection is possible. In patients initially staged as unresectable this may be achieved with neoadjuvant treatment which is usually chemoradiotherapy based. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with an unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (pT4 Nx cM0 G2) who was treated with a sequential neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen consisting of 2 cycles of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine followed by 4 cycles of FOLFIRINOX. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy resulted in secondary resectability (R0 resection). After 2 cycles of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine, the patient already had a complete metabolic remission as measured by integrated fludeoxyglucose (18F) positron emission tomography and computerized tomography. After a follow-up of 18 months the patient is alive without progression of disease. We propose to assess the clinical benefit of sequencing the combinations nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine and FOLFIRINOX as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with locally advanced and initially unresectable pancreatic cancer in a controlled clinical trial. PMID:25408659

  17. [Clinical evaluations of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with DN and FP regimens for patients with middle or lower thoracic locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongxia; Yao, Juan; Wen, Hong; Yu, Lan; Liu, Wu; Liang, Hua; Han, Shuhong

    2015-05-19

    To explore the efficacies and side effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with DN (docetaxel plus cisplatin) and FP (nedaplatin plus cisplatin) regimens for patients with upper or middle thoracic locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. From January 2008 to January 2012, a total of 124 patients with upper or middle thoracic locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were randomized into DN group (n = 64) and FP group (n = 60). Both groups received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The treatment schedule was recycled every 3 weeks. After 2 cycles, those with potential surgical resection underwent surgery. The 2-year overall, locoregional relapse-free and distant metastasis-free survival rates in DN and FP groups were 71.1% and 66.7%, 65.0% and 63.0%, 78.3% and 74.3% respectively (P > 0.05). The incidence of leucopenia was higher in DN group than that in FP group (P DN group. No perioperative mortality occurred with a low incidence of postoperative complications. The rates of overall response, resection, postoperative complications and pathological complete rates response were similar in two groups. And the rates of downstage and R0 resection were significantly higher in DN group than those in FP group (P < 0.05). For patients with middle or lower thoracic locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, neoadjuvant chemotherapies of docetaxel and nedaplatin may achieve excellent outcomes in clinical response and 2-year survival rate. And the side effects are clinically acceptable.

  18. Efficacy of intraarterial chemoinfusion therapy for locally advanced breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis of 28 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhang,1,* Rong Liu,1,* Yingying Wang,1 Sheng Qian,1 Jianhua Wang,1 Zhiping Yan,1 Hongwei Zhang21Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of image-guided delivery of intraarterially infused chemotherapeutic drugs for patients with locally advanced breast cancer.Methods: Twenty-eight patients with pathologically proven, locally advanced breast cancer received intraarterial chemoinfusion therapy (chemoinfusion with docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and epirubicin 50 mg/m2. Digital subtraction angiography was performed to determine tumor arterial blood supply and to guide chemotherapy infusion. Patients were evaluated for complete remission (CR and partial remission (PR.Results: Twenty-eight patients received a total of 64 intraarterial chemoinfusions, 20 patients (71.4% received two infusions, and eight patients (28.6% received three infusions. One patient (3.6% had CR and 23 (82.1% had PR. The total effectiveness rate (CR and PR was 85.7% (24/28. All stage 3 patients underwent Phase II surgical resection after chemoinfusion, and the surgical resection participation rate was 100% (26/26. The mean time from the first chemoinfusion to surgery was 2 ± 1.2 months. Two patients with stage 4 cancer died of distant metastasis and cachexia, and the remaining 26 patients were still alive.Conclusion: Intraarterial chemoinfusion is a safe and effective therapy, achieving down-staging in a relatively short period for locally advanced breast cancer.Keywords: advanced breast cancer, intraarterial infusion, chemotherapy, therapeutic effect

  19. Using Local Flaps in a Chest Wall Reconstruction after Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

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    Joo Seok Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical ablation for locally advanced breast cancer results in large chest wall defects, which can then be managed with local flaps or skin grafts. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the outcomes of three types of local skin flaps.MethodsAmong 25 local flaps in 24 patients, 6 were bilateral advancement (BA flaps, 9 were thoracoabdominal (TA flaps, and 10 were thoracoepigastric (TE flaps. Clinical outcomes were compared including complications, the need for a secondary surgical intervention, and the timing of adjuvant therapy.ResultsThe mean defect size was 436.2 cm2. Two patients with TA flaps and 6 patients with TE flaps developed distal flap necrosis, and skin grafts were needed to treat 2 patients with TE flaps. Radiation was administered to the BA, TA, and TE patients after average postoperative durations of 28, 30, or 41 days, respectively. The incidence of flap necrosis tended to be higher in TE patients, which lead to significant delays in adjuvant radiation therapy (P=0.02.ConclusionsThree types of local skin flaps can be used to treat large chest wall defects after the excision of locally advanced breast cancer. Each flap has its own merits and demerits, and selecting flaps should be based on strict indications based on the dimensions and locations of the defects.

  20. Preoperative chemoradiation and IOERT for unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Adyr A.; Rule, William G.; Callister, Matthew G.; Reddy, K. Sudhakar; Mulligan, David C.; Collins, Joseph M.; De Petris, Giovanni; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Borad, Mitesh

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Pre-operative chemoradiation (preop CRT) plus intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) has been used in the multidisciplinary treatment for patients with locally advanced unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer. This review was performed to evaluate survival, relapse patterns and prognostic factors in patients treated with curative intent. Methods Between January 2002 and December 2010, 48 patients with locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma received preop CRT prior to an attempt at resection and IOERT. 31/48 (65%) patients proceeded to curative-intent surgical resection. Resection status prior to preop CRT was locally unresectable (20 patients) and borderline resectable (11 patients). Preop CRT (45-50.4 Gy/25-28 Fx in 27/31) was delivered with concurrent 5FU or gemcitabine-based regimens. Subsequent gross total resection was achieved in 16 patients (R0, 11; R1, 5). IOERT was delivered in 28 patients (dose, 10-20 Gy). 16 patients also received adjuvant post-operative systemic chemotherapy. Outcomes evaluated include survival, local failure in the EBRT field (LF), central failure in the IOERT field (CF), and distant metastases. Results Resection status was predictive for survival and for patterns of relapse. For patients with at least a gross total resection after preop CRT (R0/R1; n=16) vs. no resection (n=15), both median and overall survival were improved (median 23 vs. 10 months; 2-year, 40% vs. 17%; 3-year, 40% vs. 0%; P=0.002). Liver or peritoneal relapse was documented in 22/31 patients (71%); LF/CF in 5/26 (16%). Conclusions Long term survival and disease control are achievable in select patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreas cancer when gross total surgical resection is achieved after preop CRT. Continued evaluation of curative-intent combined modality therapy is warranted in this high risk population, but additional strategies are needed to improve resectability and disease

  1. Complete Response after Treatment with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation with Prolonged Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

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    Tiffany A. Pompa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the only chance for cure in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN suggests chemotherapy and consideration for radiation in cases of unresectable LAPC. Here we present a rare case of unresectable LAPC with a complete histopathological response after chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. A 54-year-old female presented to our clinic in December 2013 with complaints of abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. An MRI demonstrated a mass in the pancreatic body measuring 6.2×3.2 cm; biopsy revealed proven ductal adenocarcinoma. Due to splenic vein/artery and contiguous celiac artery encasement, she was deemed surgically unresectable. She was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy (three cycles, intensity modulated radiation to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions concurrent with capecitabine, followed by FOLFIRI, and finally XELIRI. After 8 cycles of ongoing XELIRI completed in March 2015, restaging showed a remarkable decrease in tumor size, along with PET-CT revealing no FDG-avid uptake. She was reevaluated by surgery and taken for definitive resection. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated a complete R0 resection and no residual tumor. Based on this patient and literature review, this strategy demonstrates potential efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with prolonged chemotherapy, followed by surgery, which may improve outcomes in patients deemed previously unresectable.

  2. Evaluation and proposal of novel resectability criteria for pancreatic cancer established by the Japan Pancreas Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Suguru; Fujii, Tsutomu; Takami, Hideki; Hayashi, Masamichi; Iwata, Naoki; Kanda, Mitsuro; Tanaka, Chie; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Goro; Koike, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The guidelines for the classification of the resectability of pancreatic cancer established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network can be difficult to utilize in clinical practice. We evaluated novel criteria proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society. We analyzed 382 patients with pancreatic cancer between 2001 and 2015 for survival differences among subgroups classified according to the Japan Pancreas Society classification. Overall survival and disease-free survival were expressed as median values and compared with data based on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network classification, and differences in initial patterns of recurrence were analyzed. Overall survival times according to the Japan Pancreas Society criteria were 34.2, 29.7, 17.3, 14.3, and 15.8 months for the groups defined as resectable, resectable with portal vein invasion, borderline resectable with portal vein invasion, borderline resectable with arterial invasion, and unresectable by locally advanced disease respectively. The overall survival of the resectable group was better than those of the borderline resectable with portal vein invasion or borderline resectable with arterial invasion groups (P Japan Pancreas Society criteria, which are simpler, predicted survival differences between the resectable group and the other subgroups. Our data suggest that cancer patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (borderline resectable with portal vein invasion and borderline resectable with arterial invasion) can be managed as a single subset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nal-IRI With 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Leucovorin or Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin in Advanced Biliary-tract Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-03

    Adenocarcinoma Metastatic; Biliary Tract Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Biliary Tract; Adenocarinoma Locally Advanced; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  4. Adjuvant therapy for locally advanced renal cell cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis

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    Lima Carmen SP

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adjuvant trials have been undertaken in an attempt to reduce the risk of recurrence among patients who undergo surgical resection for locally advanced renal cancer. However, no clear benefit has been identified to date. This systematic review was conducted to examine the exact role of adjuvant therapy in renal cancer setting. Methods Randomized controlled trials were searched comparing adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, vaccine, immunotherapy, biochemotherapy versus no active treatment after surgery among renal cell cancer patients. Outcomes were overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, and severe toxicities. Risk ratios (RR, hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was measured by I2. Different strategies of adjuvant treatment were evaluated separately. Results Ten studies (2,609 patients were included. Adjuvant therapy provided no benefits in terms of OS (HR 1.07; 95%CI 0.89 to 1.28; P = 0.48 I2 = 0% or DFS (HR 1.03; 95%CI 0.87 to 1.21; P = 0.77 I2 = 15% when compared to no treatment. No subgroup analysis (immunotherapy, vaccines, biochemotherapy and hormone therapy had relevant results. Toxicity evaluation depicted a significantly higher frequency of serious adverse events in the adjuvant group. Conclusions This analysis provided no support for the hypothesis that the agents studied provide any clinical benefit for renal cancer patients although they increase the risk of toxic effects. Randomized trials are underway to test targeted therapies, which might open a new therapeutic frontier. Until these trials yield results, no adjuvant therapy can be recommended for patients who undergo surgical resection for renal cell cancer.

  5. Clinical evaluation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in advanced lung cancer (T3 and T4) with surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akinori; Shirakusa, Takayuki; Maekawa, Takafumi; Enatsu, Sotarou; Maekawa, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is well known to occur in patients who have suffered organ damage or trauma, or undergone surgery. SIRS provides useful information in patients with morbidity after surgery. To date, there has been no report of SIRS after surgery in patients with lung cancer. Therefore, based on this new concept of the syndrome, we review here a series of T3 and T4 NSCLC patients who underwent extended resection at our hospital, and attempt to identify the value and correlation of SIRS in predicting the morbidity of such patients. We retrospectively reviewed the patients with NSCLC treated at our hospital between January 1994 and August 2003. Among these 720 patients, a curative approach was attempted in 144 with advanced stage (T3, 100; T4, 44) cancer. The patients were consequently divided into three groups (G1, negative or less than 3 days in SIRS following surgery; G2, less than 7 days; G3, continued over 7 days). Pre- or peri-operative factors were evaluated, and the 5-year survival rates were analyzed. Post-operative morbidity was also compared between the three groups in association with SIRS. Pre-operative counts of WBC were 8848.28+/-3879.21/microl in G3 compared with 7383.33+/-3132.98/microl in G2 and 6778.31+/-3184.89/microl in G1. Values in G3 were significantly higher than those in the other groups (PSIRS after lung surgery was associated with high levels in WBC and low %FEV1. Post-operative morbidity such as bronchial fistula or ARDS were more frequent in the G3 and G2 groups than in G1. The 1-year survival was as follows; G1, 75.4%; G2, 47.9%; G3, 38.1%. Overall 5-year survival rate for NSCLC with T3 and T4 was 32.2%, and the difference between G3 and the other groups in terms of survival was statistically significant (PSIRS have been associated with post-operative complications and survival in NSCLC. Surgical candidates should be carefully according to the predicting factor of SIRS.

  6. Planned preoperative cisplatin and radiation therapy for locally advanced bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, H W; Yagoda, A; Batata, M; Sogani, P C; Whitmore, W F

    1983-12-15

    Cisplatin (DDP) is an active agent in the treatment of disseminated bladder cancer. In addition to its direct tumor cytotoxicity, recent animal and clinical data suggest synergism with radiation therapy (RT). Since improved survival with preoperative RT is largely restricted to bladder cancer patients in whom radiation-induced downstaging (P less than T) may be recognized, the authors administered DDP + RT preoperatively to patients with locally advanced (T3, T4) bladder tumors selected for cystectomy. The aim was to evaluate the feasibility of such a combination in relation to surgical and hematologic complications, the immediate effect on tumor downstaging, disease progression, and survival. Two thousand rad (400 rad X 5 days) was delivered to the whole pelvis, followed by cystectomy in 2 days. DDP (70 mg/m2) was given intravenously on day 2 of the RT. Twenty-four patients received preoperative DDP + RT and underwent attempted cystectomy; however, six patients were nonresectable owing to extensive pelvic disease, and an additional five patients had resectable pelvic lymph node metastases. Pelvic complications developed in 3 of 24 (12%) patients, but none required reoperation. No patient had a wound dehiscence. Transient myelosuppression was similar to that induced by 2000 rad preoperative RT alone. Tumor downstaging (P less than T) was seen in 9 of 24 (38%) patients, and in 5 (21%) patients, no tumor was found in the surgical specimen (P0). Distant metastases alone have been detected in 4 of 18 (22%) patients who had a cystectomy (all 4 had nodal metastases). Disease-free survival at a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 12-34 months) is 60% (14/24) for all patients (89% for P less than T and 40% for P greater than or equal to T patients) and 78% (14/18) for the resected patients. Combined preoperative DDP + RT proved to be a safe and feasible regimen which resulted in a possibly greater recognition of radioresponsive bladder tumors, and after cystectomy, an

  7. Clinical and prognostic significance of pathological and inflammatory markers in the surgical treatment of locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, M; Angelov, K; Vasileva, M; Atanasova, MP; Vlahova, A; Todorov, G

    2015-01-01

    Background Locally advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) may vary in its clinical and pathological appearance. It is now accepted that progression of disease in patients with locally advanced CRC is determined not only by local tumor characteristics but also by the immune system and inflammatory response in the body. Methods We investigated patients with confirmed CRC who were treated in the surgical clinic at the University Hospital Alexandrovska over a 10-year period and retrospectively evaluated the histological features of the preoperative biopsies and operative specimens removed during radical multivisceral resections. We also collected prospective data for serum C-reactive protein levels and Jass-Klintrup score, Petersen Index score, and Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients with locally advanced CRC. Results Of 1,105 patients with CRC, 327 (29.6%) were diagnosed with locally advanced disease. In total, 108 combined multivisceral resections (79 for primary tumors and 29 for recurrent tumors) were performed. Overall survival was 34 months for pR0 cases and 12 months for pR1 cases (P<0.05). Our data confirmed that C-reactive protein is a prognostic marker of overall survival. Data for 48 patients with histologically confirmed locally advanced tumors showed significantly increased survival with a higher Jass-Klintrup score (P=0.037). In patients with node-negative disease, 5-year survival was 49%. However, where there were high-risk pathological characteristics according to the Petersen Index, survival was similar to that for node-positive disease (P=0.702). Our data also showed a significant difference in survival between groups divided according to whether they had a modified Glasgow Prognostic Score of 1 or 2 (P=0.031). Conclusion In order to maintain a reasonable balance between an aggressive approach and so-called meaningless “surgical exorbitance”, we should focus on certain histopathological and inflammatory markers that can be identified as additional

  8. Does chronomodulated radiotherapy improve pathological response in locally advanced rectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Tim; Buchanan, Grant; Rangiah, David; Davis, Ian; Yip, Desmond; Chua, Yu Jo; Rich, Tyvin; Elsaleh, Hany

    2017-01-01

    tumour distance from the anal verge. Females were less likely to exhibit several of the above responses. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer performed later in the day coupled with a longer time period to surgical resection may improve pathological tumour response rates and nodal downstaging. A prospective study in chronomodulated radiotherapy in this disease is warranted.

  9. Pre-operative sequential chemo- and radiochemotherapy in locally advanced carcinomas of the lower oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction

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    Wilke, H.; Mueller, C. [Department of Internal Medicine (Cancer Research), Essen University Medical School, D-45 122 Essen (Germany); Walz, M.K. [Department of General Surgery, Essen University Medical School, D-45 122 Essen (Germany); Stuschke, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Essen University Medical School, D-45 122 Essen (Germany); Vanhoefer, U.; Stahl, M. [Department of Internal Medicine (Cancer Research), Essen University Medical School, D-45 122 Essen (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this trial was to examine the feasibility of intensive, sequential chemo- and radiochemotherapy followed by surgery in patients with locally advanced carcinomas of the lower oesophagus and the gastro-oesophageal junction (GO junction). The chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 6 weekly administrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (2.0 g/m{sup 2}, 24 h infusion) and folinic acid (FA) (500 mg/m{sup 2}, 2 h infusion) combined with twice weekly cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}, 1 h infusion). Irradiation of 30 Gy was given concurrently with one course of cisplatin and etoposide. 25 patients with locally advanced (T3-T4 NX M0) squamous cell or adenocarcinoma of the lower oesophagus and GO junction were included and evaluated. Toxicity was usually mild to moderate (WHO grade 1 and 2) with mucositis as the most important side-effect of the pre-operative treatment. Of the patients, 94 and 88% completed the chemo- and radiochemotherapy according to the protocol, respectively. A major response (=partial remission with subjective improvement) to chemotherapy was achieved in 6/10 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 10/15 with adenocarcinoma. 19 patients had subsequent surgery and complete resection was achieved in 16 (3 patients had intra-abdominal metastases observed at laparotomy). The operative mortality rate was 16% (3/19). 10 of the 16 patients with tumour resection had a pathological complete response. 15 patients (43%) remain alive at a median follow-up of 20 months and the median survival exceeds 16+ months. Our data suggest that this intensive pre-operative chemoradiotherapy programme is feasible and remarkably effective in patients with locally advanced carcinomas of the lower oesophagus or GO junction. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Radio(chemotherapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

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    Markus Glatzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to improve outcome and minimise radiation-induced toxicity. An insight into the rationale of radiotherapy planning for stage III NSCLC is also provided.

  11. Effects on functional outcome after IORT-containing multimodality treatment for locally advanced primary and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannaerts, GHH; Rutten, HJT; Martijn, H; Hanssens, PEJ; Wiggers, T

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In the treatment of patients with locally advanced primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer, much attention is focused on. the oncologic outcome. Little is known about the functional outcome. In this study, the functional outcome after a multimodality treatment for locally advanced primar

  12. Hypofractionated radiotherapy as local hemostatic agent in advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Tumor bleeding continues to remain a challenge in an oncological setting, and radiotherapy has been studied as a local hemostatic agent. We studied the role of local radiotherapy in controlling bleeding at our center. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 25 treated cases (cancer urinary bladder: 12, lung cancer: 5, cervical cancer: 4, uterine cancer: 1, rectal cancer: 2, schwanoma: 1 at our center from March 2008 to December 2010. All patients had either an advanced or recurrent disease. Radiotherapy schedule was either 20 Gray in 5 fractions or 15 Gray in 5 fractions and was delivered with Cobalt 60. Results and Conclusion : Of 25 patients, 22 (88% responded, and there was complete cessation of bleeding. Both 15 Gray and 20 Gray dose schedule had equal efficacy. Treatment was well tolerated without any intermission. Radiotherapy is a safe and effective option in controlling tumor bleeding.

  13. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  14. Conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angio-fibroma

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    Supriya Mallick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the efficacy of radiation in the treatment of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA. Materials and Methods: Data were retrieved for JNA treated with radiotherapy from 1987-2012. The demographics, treatment and outcome data were recorded in predesigned proforma. Results: Data of 32 patients were retrieved. Median age was 17 years (range: 12-33 years. All patients received radiation because of refractory, residual or unresectable locally advanced disease. All patients were planned with a three-dimensional conformal technique (3DCRT. The median radiation dose was 30 Gray (range: 30-45 Gray. Median follow-up was 129 months (range: 1-276 months. At the last follow-up, 13 patients were found to have a radiological complete response. Two patients progressed 38 and 43 months after completion of treatment and opted for alternative treatment. One patient developed squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal ale 15 years after radiation. Conclusion: Conformal radiotherapy shows promise as an alternative treatment approach for locally advanced JNA and confers long-term disease control with minimal toxicity.

  15. Vismodegib induces significant clinical response in locally advanced trichoblastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesant, P; Crinquette, M; Alkeraye, S; Mirabel, X; Dziwniel, V; Cribier, B; Mortier, L

    2015-10-01

    Patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma due to local extension or metastatic disease were previously at a therapeutic impasse. Targeted inhibition of the sonic hedgehog pathway by vismodegib represents a new therapeutic strategy. Adnexal carcinomas are rare malignant skin tumours derived from epithelial annexes. Conventional treatment of adnexal tumours is based on surgical excision. Although the radiosensitivity of adnexal carcinomas has not been established, radiotherapy could be offered alone or in combination in locally advanced or inoperable disease. Chemotherapy represents a therapeutic option in the treatment of metastatic adnexal tumours. Currently there is no effective treatment for these tumours when they become metastatic or unresectable, and treatment is palliative. Sunitinib represents a new therapeutic strategy, with efficiency described in the literature for a small number of patients. However, its efficacy is partial, and its tolerance is not always good. We report a patient with trichoblastic carcinoma, initially diagnosed as basal cell carcinoma, treated effectively with vismodegib. The remarkable response we have observed in this patient suggests an encouraging therapeutic role of vismodegib in trichoblastic carcinoma that should be evaluated in a carefully designed trial.

  16. Treatment results of incomplete chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Gao,1,* Fei Gao,2,* Zi Liu,1 Li-ping Song1 1Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 2Second Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Regimens that combine chemotherapy and radiotherapy increase toxicity and compromise a patient’s ability to adhere to the treatment plan. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a partially completed chemoradiation regimen prescribed for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix. Methods: Medical records of 156 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer stage IIB–IVA who received chemoradiation with cisplatin (40 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 from October 2006 to October 2008 were collected. The treatment protocol called for two cycles of chemotherapy. External beam radiation therapy was administered using a 10-MeV electron beam. Local control, disease free survival, overall survival, and toxicities were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, 89 patients (57% completed the planned protocol. Sixty seven patients (43% completed fewer than two cycles. The 3-year local control rate was significantly better in the patient group that completed the prescribed plan (92.1% compared to 80.6%; P = 0.033. No statistical significance was observed between the groups that completed or did not complete the two cycle protocol with regard to disease free survival (80.9% and 73.2%, respectively; P = 0.250, overall survival (84.3% and 79.1%; P = 0.405, and progression survival (3.4% and 3.0%; P = 0.892. Differences in acute hematologic toxicity and subcutaneous toxicity were observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Completion of two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with radiotherapy was effective, safe, and responsible for better local control

  17. Assessment of intraoperative tube thoracostomy after diaphragmatic resection as part of debulking surgery for primary advanced-stage Müllerian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuyoshi; Tate, Shinichi; Nishikimi, Kyoko; Shozu, Makio

    2013-10-01

    The present study assessed the use of an intraoperative tube thoracostomy for patients with primary advanced-stage ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer who underwent a diaphragmatic resection as part of debulking surgery and to define which patients are more likely to benefit from an intraoperative tube thoracostomy. All consecutive patients with stage IIIC-IV Müllerian cancer who underwent diaphragmatic resection at our institution between April 2008 and March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. When a full-thickness resection of the diaphragm was performed and the thoracic cavity was opened, a chest tube was routinely placed during surgery. Patient-, disease-, and surgery-related data were collected from the patients' medical records. The data were evaluated with particular attention directed at pleural effusion after diaphragmatic resection. A total of 37 patients were included in this study. No complications associated with the intraoperative tube thoracostomy procedures occurred. An infection of the thoracic cavity occurred in one patient, following the presence of intra-abdominal abscess. The total volume of pleural drainage ranged from 88 to 2826 mL (median, 965 mL). The estimated blood loss, intraoperative blood transfusion, and area of the diaphragmatic opening were significantly associated with the total volume of pleural drainage in univariate analyses. In a multivariate analysis, the estimated blood loss was the only factor to be significantly associated with the total volume of pleural drainage. A prophylactic tube thoracostomy might be considered if the volume of the estimated blood loss is higher than usual. © 2013.

  18. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

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    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: a cooperative surgical approach to a complex surgical procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-01-01

    Single stage en bloc abdominoperineal resection and sacrectomy, with a myocutaneous flap closure is a relatively uncommon procedure. Our case study of a 77 year old man with a locally invasive rectal adenocarcinoma highlights the complex intraoperative management of such a patient.

  20. Advances in spike localization with EEG dipole modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Sandra; Ebersole, John S

    2009-10-01

    EEG interpretation by visual inspection of waveforms, using the assumption that activity at a given electrode is a representation of only the activity of the cortex immediately beneath it, has been the traditional form of EEG analysis since its inception. The relatively recent advent of digital EEG has allowed more advanced analysis of EEG data and has shown that the simple visual inspection described above is a simplistic form of analysis. This is especially true when one is attempting to localize an epileptogenic focus using EEG spikes or seizure onset data. Spatiotemporal analysis of scalp voltage fields has allowed for improved localization of likely cerebral origins of such waveforms. Equivalent dipole source modeling is one such technique and, although not perfect, provides improved characterization of spike and seizure sources as compared to previous methods when properly interpreted. The use of other modern techniques, such as 3D MRI reconstructions and realistic head models, can further improve accuracy of dipole localization and allow for the synthesis of EEG and imaging data, which may be invaluable, especially in cases of pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation.

  1. High-dose Helical Tomotherapy With Concurrent Full-dose Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Michael L.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Koom, Woong Sub; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Yoonsun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil, E-mail: jsseong@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To improve poor therapeutic outcome of current practice of chemoradiotherapy (CRT), high-dose helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy has been performed on patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), and the results were analyzed. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with LAPC treated with radiotherapy using HT (median, 58.4 Gy; range, 50.8-59.9 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy between 2006 and 2009. Radiotherapy was directed to the primary tumor with a 0.5-cm margin without prophylactic nodal coverage. Twenty-nine patients (79%) received full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) gemcitabine-based chemotherapy during HT. After completion of CRT, maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 37 patients (95%). Results: The median follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 3.4-43.9) for the entire cohort, and 22.5 months (range, 12.0-43.9) for the surviving patients. The 1- and 2-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.1% and 77.3%, respectively. Eight patients (21%) were converted to resectable status, including 1 with a pathological complete response. The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 21.2 and 14.0 months, respectively. Acute toxicities were acceptable with no gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity higher than Grade 3. Severe late GI toxicity ({>=}Grade 3) occurred in 10 patients (26%); 1 treatment-related death from GI bleeding was observed. Conclusion: High-dose helical tomotherapy with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy resulted in improved local control and long-term survival in patients with LAPC. Future studies are needed to widen the therapeutic window by minimizing late GI toxicity.

  2. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Squamous Carcinoma of Oral Cavity: a Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanambar Sadighi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of adding neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery and radiation therapy for locally advanced resectable oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, 24 patients with T3 or T4a oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were randomly assigned to surgery alone or Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF induction chemotherapy followed by surgery. All patients were planned to receive chemoradiotherapy after surgery. The primary end-points were organ preservation and progression-free-survival. SPSS version 17 was used for data analysis. Median follow-up was 16 months. The median age of the patients was 62 years old (23-75 years. Man/woman ratio was 1.13. The primary site of the tumor was the tongue in most patients (48%. No significant difference was observed between pathologic characteristics of the two groups. Chemotherapy group showed 16% complete pathologic response to TPF. No significant difference in organ preservation surgery or overall survival was detected. However, the patients in the chemotherapy group had longer progression-free-survival (P=0.014. Surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy with or without TPF induction results in similar survival time. However, progression-free-survival improves with the TPF induction chemotherapy. Studies with more patents and new strategies are recommended to evaluate organ preservation improvement and long-term outcomes.

  3. Thoracic wall reconstruction after tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran eHarati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft tissue reconstruction of the thoracic wall improves life quality and mitigates functional impairment after extensive resection. The aim of this article is to illustrate the various plastic surgery treatment options in the multimodal therapy of patients with malignant thoracic wall tumors.Material und methods: This article is based on a review of the current literature and the evaluation of a patient database.Results: Several plastic surgical treatment options can be implemented in the curative and palliative therapy of patients with malignant solid tumors of the chest wall. Large soft tissue defects after tumor resection can be covered by local, pedicled or free flaps. In cases of large full-thickness defects, flaps can be combined with polypropylene mesh to improve chest wall stability and to maintain pulmonary function. The success of modern medicine has resulted in an increasing number of patients with prolonged survival suffering from locally advanced tumors that can be painful, malodorous or prone to bleeding. Resection of these tumors followed by thoracic wall reconstruction with viable tissue can substantially enhance the life quality of these patients. Discussion: In curative treatment regimens, chest wall reconstruction enables complete resection of locally advanced tumors and subsequent adjuvant radiotherapy. In palliative disease treatment, stadium plastic surgical techniques of thoracic wall reconstruction provide palliation of tumor-associated morbidity and can therefore improve

  4. Partial response to sorafenib treatment associated with transient grade 3 thrombocytopenia in a patient with locally advanced thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitoia Fabian; Abelleira, Erika; Jerkovich, Fernando; Urciuoli, Carolina; Cross, Graciela, E-mail: fpitoia@intramed.net [Division de Endocrinologia, Hospital de Clinicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    Advanced radioactive refractory and progressive or symptomatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is a rare condition. Sorafenib was recently approved for the treatment of these patients. We present the case of a 67 year old woman diagnosed with DTC who underwent a total thyroidectomy with central, lateral-compartment neck dissection and shaving of the trachea and esophagus due to tumor infiltration. A local recurrence was detected 14 months later requiring, additionally, two tracheal rings resection. The patient received a cumulative {sup 131}I dose of 650 mCi and developed dysphagia and dyspnea 63 months after initial surgery. A {sup 18}FGD-PET/CT showed progression of the local mass associated to hypermetabolic pulmonary nodules. Sorafenib 800 mg/day was then prescribed. A dose reduction to 400 mg/day was necessary due to grade 3 thrombocytopenia that appeared four months after drug prescription. Platelet count went to normal after this dose reduction. Five months after initiation of sorafenib, a partial response of the local mass with significant intra-tumoral necrosis was observed. We conclude that sorafenib is a valid option for locally advanced DTC and that the platelet count should be evaluated regularly because it seems that thrombocytopenia might be more frequently observed in DTC than in other types of tumors. (author)

  5. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Bae Kwon; Kang, Ki Mun; Chai, Gyu Young [Gyeongsang Institute of Health Sciences, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyeong Won; Kang, Jung Hoon; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Won Seob [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    The effect of concurrent chemoradiotherapy was analyzed in elderly patients when used in the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. The retrospective analysis included 28 elderly patients aged 65 or older, with histopathologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy from January 2001 to July 2007. The squamous cell carcinoma disease stages included 8 patients (28.8%) in stage IIa, 10 patients (35.7%) in stage IIb, and 10 patients (35.7%) in stage III. Fractionated radiotherapy was performed with a 6 MV or 10 MV X-ray for 45{approx}63 Gy (median: 59.4 Gy). Chemotherapy was applied concurrently with the initiation of radiotherapy. A 75 mg/m2 dose of Cisplatin was intravenously administered on day 1. Further, 5-FU 1,000 mg/m2 was continuously administered intravenously from days 1 to 4. This regimen was performed twice at 3-week intervals during radiotherapy. Two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy was performed after radiotherapy. The follow-up period was 3{approx}72 months (median: 19 months). The treatment responses after concurrent chemoradiotherapy included a complete response in 11 patients (39.3%), a partial response in 14 patients (50.0%), and no response in 3 patients (10.7%). The overall response rate was 89.3% (25 patients). The overall 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 55.9%, 34.6% and 24.2%, respectively. The median survival time was 15 months. Two-year survival rates of patients with a complete response, partial response, and no response were 46.2%, 33.0%, and 0%, respectively. The stage and tumor response after concurrent chemoradiotherapy were statistically significant prognostic factors related with survival. No treatment-related deaths occurred in this study. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a relatively effective treatment without serious complications in elderly patients with locally-advanced esophageal cancer.

  6. Varying recurrence rates and risk factors associated with different definitions of local recurrence in patients with surgically resected, stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlotto, John M; Recht, Abram; Flickinger, John C; Medford-Davis, Laura N; Dyer, Anne-Marie; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of different definitions of local recurrence on the reported patterns of failure and associated risk factors in patients who undergo potentially curative resection for stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 306 consecutive patients who were treated from 2000 to 2005 without radiotherapy. Local recurrence was defined either as 'radiation' (r-LR) (according to previously defined postoperative radiotherapy fields), including the bronchial stump, staple line, ipsilateral hilum, and ipsilateral mediastinum; or as 'comprehensive' (c-LR), including the same sites plus the ipsilateral lung and contralateral mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. All recurrences that were not classified as "local" were considered to be distal. The median follow-up was 33 months. The proportions of c-LR and r-LR at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 14%, 21%, and 29%, respectively, and 7%, 12%, and 16%, respectively. Significant risk factors for c-LR on multivariate analysis were diabetes, lymphatic vascular invasion, and tumor size; and significant factors for r-LR were resection of less than a lobe and lymphatic vascular invasion. The proportions of distant (non-local) recurrence using these definitions at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 10%, 12%, and 18%, respectively, and 14%, 19%, and 29%, respectively. Significant risk factors for distant failure were histology when using the c-LR definition and tumor size when using the r-LR definition. Local recurrence increased nearly 2-fold when a broad definition was used instead of a narrow definition. The definition also affected which factors were associated significantly with both local and distant failure on multivariate analysis. Comparable definitions must be used when analyzing different series. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  7. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    CERN Document Server

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Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gehrels, N; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; 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Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2013-01-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals...

  8. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy with Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer. A Phase I–II Multicenter Study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Tesselaar, Margot E.; Cats, Annemieke; Havenga, Klaas; Leer, Jan W. H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.; Jansen, Edwin P.; Van Krieken, Han H. J. M.; Wiggers, Theo; Van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of oxaliplatin added to capecitabine and radiotherapy (Capox-RT) as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Methods T3-4 rectal cancer patients received escalating doses of oxaliplatin (day 1 and 29) with a fixed dose of capecitabine of 1000 mg/m2 twice daily (days 1–14, 25–38) added to RT with 50.4 Gy and surgery after 6–8 weeks. The MTD, determined during phase I, was used in the subsequent phase II, in which R0 resection rate (a negative circumferential resection margin) was the primary end point. Results Twenty-one patients were evaluable. In the phase I part, oxaliplatin at 85 mg/m2 was established as MTD. In phase II, the main toxicity was grade III diarrhea (18%). All patients underwent surgery, and 20 patients had a resectable tumor. An R0 was achieved in 17/21 patients, downstaging to T0-2 in 7/21 and a pCR in 2/21. Conclusion Combination of Capox-RT has an acceptable acute toxicity profile and a high R0 resection rate of 81% in locally advanced rectal cancer. However the pCR rate was low. PMID:17653805

  9. Salvage Total Pelvic Exenteration with Bilateral V-Y Advancement Flap Reconstruction for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Tashiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Total pelvic exenteration for locally recurrent rectal cancer typically requires extensive excision of the pelvic floor with perineal skin. Due to the extensiveness of the procedure and its non-curative nature, it is controversial as purely palliative therapy. A 66-year-old male patient who had undergone abdominoperineal resection at another hospital 8 years prior was admitted to our hospital. During radiation and chemotherapy for 2 years, he complained of perineal pain, discharge, cacosmia and bleeding from a recurrent tumor. The 10 × 8 cm recurrent tumor was exposed on the perineum and the patient suffered from serious discomfort in his daily life during walking or sitting. We performed total pelvic exenteration with partial sacrectomy, after which the large perineal defect was reconstructed with a bilateral V-Y gluteus maximus advancement flap in approximately 120 min. The patient's postoperative course was satisfactory and his quality of life markedly improved.

  10. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm3), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%; p < 0.001). Left

  11. Oncological safety of immediate rectus abdominis myocutaneous breast reconstruction in patients with locally advanced disease (stage IIb and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Mir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of locally advanced (Stage IIb and III breast cancer is challenging. It often includes multimodal treatment with systemic therapy and/or radiation therapy and surgery. Immediate breast reconstruction has not traditionally been performed in these patients. We review the results of immediate rectus abdominis musculo-cutaneous (TRAM/VRAM flap in 60 patients treated for Stage IIb and III breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Data were collected prospectively on 60 patients diagnosed with Stage IIb (32 patients and Stage III (28 patients breast cancer between May 2008 and May 2012. All patients had mastectomy and immediate rectus abdominis myocutaneous reconstruction (TRAM in 40 patients and VRAM in 20 patients. All patients received primary systemic therapy, and all patients received postoperative radiotherapy to the operative site. Results: Mean age was 40.13 (range 28-53 years, mean hospital stay was 8.86 days and mean follow-up for the group was 28 months. Neither of them developed local disease recurrence in the operative site till the last follow-up. Eight (13.3% patients had some delay in chemo-radiation therapy due to flap-related complications. Flap-related complications were present in eight patients (partial flap failure in four and superficial skin necrosis in four. There was no adverse effect of chemo-radiation therapy on reconstructed breast. Conclusion: Immediate TRAM/VRAM breast reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer is not associated with a significant delay in adjuvant therapy or an increased risk of local relapse. Radiation therapy can be delivered to the reconstructed breast when indicated without difficulty. Breast reconstruction facilitates surgical resection of locally advanced breast cancer with primary closure and should be considered if the patient desires immediate breast reconstruction.

  12. [Postoperative local thermo-chemotherapy in control of residual pleural diseases after resection of primary lung carcinoma--regulation of dissemination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Doi, O; Tatsuta, M; Kurokawa, E; Terasawa, T

    1987-12-01

    Pleural dissemination was proved by intraoperative histodiagnosis in 11 of 121 patients who underwent pulmonary resection for non-small cell carcinoma of the lung between April, 1985 and December, 1986. To control such intrathoracic residual diseases, we devised a means of local thermo-chemotherapy. Ten of 11 patients were treated with intrapleurally administrated cisplatin (50-100mg, bolus) combined with simultaneous radiofrequency hyperthermia (13.56 MHz) for 2 to 3 weeks after surgery. Courses were repeated at 5-to 7-day intervals. Eight patients had N2-disease, one N1 and the other NX. Eight were adenocarcinomas. Thermal burn of the chest wall with hyperkalemia was observed in only one patient who received thermotherapy at the over a magnetrode power of 450 watts for 50 minutes. In the other 9, side effects were minimal under the thermotherapy to obtain a peripleural temperature beyond 42 degrees C. Of the 10 patients, three lived more than 12 months after treatment. Although distant metastases were recognized in 6 cases, none had local recurrence for the median follow-up period of 6 months. One patient had metastasis to the contralateral supraclavicular lymph nodes. Because there was no evidence of intrathoracic recurrences in this patient, radical neck dissection were performed 15 months after the initial operation. This experience warrants further investigation of thermo-chemotherapy as a treatment for controlling pleural dissemination after resection of primary tumor.

  13. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calais Gilles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. Methods This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/2/day, LV (75 mg/day, and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR rate. Results Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21% and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%. Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T. Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p Conclusion Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using UFT with LV plus radiotherapy was well tolerated and effective and represents a convenient alternative to 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy for the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. Pretreatment detection of DPD deficiency should

  14. Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 deg2 to 20 deg2 will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ˜ 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  15. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6% underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4% did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2–16 for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR was 3.3 years (range 0.7–12.4. The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51–16.52; P=0.035, extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37–3.46; P=0.009, and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36–0.90; P=0.003. Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P=0.015. Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy.

  16. Resection of the sidewall of superior vena cava using video-assisted thoracic surgery mechanical suture technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Qiu, Yuan; Pan, Hui; Mo, Lili; Chen, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer invading the superior vena cava (SVC) is a locally advanced condition, for which poor prognosis is expected with conservative treatment alone. Surgical resection of the lesion can rapidly relieve the symptoms and significantly improve survival for some patients. Replacement, repair and partial resection of SVC via thoracotomy were generally accepted and used in the past. As the rapid development of minimally invasive techniques and devices, partial resection and repair of SVC are feasible via video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). However, few studies have reported the VATS surgical techniques. In this study, we reported the crucial techniques of partial resection of SVC via VATS. PMID:27076960

  17. Management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer--chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, H F

    1980-08-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most responsive of the common solid tumors when systemic therapy is indicated in the treatment of locally advanced or disseminated cancer. Many single agents have been useful in inducing remission in mammary carcinoma, but in recent years various drug combinations have been developed that appear more effective than individual drugs and in some instances with reduced toxicity levels. Adriamycin is the most interesting of the newer drugs and is the most effective single agent. Polychemotherapy of breast cancer was tried years ago, but remained for Cooper to arouse professional interest in multiple-drug therapy. Many modifications of this original five-drug regimens have been tried. One of the most widely used combinations is the CMF program, which includes cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil. The program that we have come to regard as our standard program in controlled clinical trials (CFP) employs cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and prednisone. Toxicity with this program has been clinically acceptable, and in multiple comparative trials we have found no combination with greater therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  19. [Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer - a definition and effective treatment strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Ebata, Tomoki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Sugawara, Gen; Takahashi, Yuh; Kokuryo, Toshio; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Fukaya, Masahide; Uehara, Keisuke; Itatsu, Keita; Yoshioka, Yuichiro; Nagino, Masato

    2012-03-01

    The survival benefit of extended surgery for advanced pancreatic cancer has been denied by four randomized controlled trials. However, there still is confusion and conflict over the definition and effective treatment strategy for so-called locally advanced or borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. Although there are a number of reports that showed outcomes of preoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for this disease, the definitions and treatment regimens described in these studies vary. Moreover, all of the studies were Phase I / II trials or retrospective analysis, and there is no Phase III trial currently focused on this issue. It is urgently necessary to establish an international consensus on the definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. The usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment for this disease should also be elucidated in future clinical trials. In this review article, we discuss the current understanding and definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, and the value of neoadjuvant treatment strategy for treating it.

  20. Local glutathione redox status does not regulate ileal mucosal growth after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) concentration affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal and other cell lines in vitro. However, in vivo data on gut mucosal GSH redox status and cell turnover are limited. We investigated the effect of altered GSH redox status on the ileal mucosa in a rat model of short bowel syndrome following massive small bowel resection (SBR). Rats underwent 80% mid-jejunoileal resection (RX) or small bowel transection (TX; as operative controls), with administration of either saline or D, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of cellular GSH synthesis. Ileal mucosal redox, morphology, and indices of cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined at different days after surgery. Ileal GSH redox status was assessed by GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) concentrations and the redox potential of GSH/GSSG (Eh). Ileal lipid peroxidation [free malondialdehyde (MDA)] was measured as an index of lipid peroxidation. BSO markedly decreased ileal mucosal GSH, oxidized GSH/GSSG Eh, and increased MDA content without inducing morphological damage as assessed by light or electron microscopy. As expected, SBR stimulated adaptive growth of ileal villus height and total mucosal height at 7 d after surgery, but this response was unaffected by BSO treatment despite a modest increase in crypt cell apoptosis. Ileal cell proliferation (crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine incorporation) increased at 2 d after SBR but was unaffected by BSO. Collectively, our in vivo data show that marked depletion of ileal GSH and oxidation of the GSH redox pool does not alter indices of ileal epithelial proliferation or SBR-induced ileal mucosal adaptive growth.

  1. Comparison between better and poorly differentiated locally advanced gastric cancer in preoperative chemotherapy: a retrospective, comparative study at a single tertiary care institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Bo; Zhao, Guo-Jie; Ding, Da-Yong; Song, Bin; Hou, Rui-Zhi; Li, Yong-Chao

    2014-09-08

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in China, and the long-term survival for locally advanced gastric cancer is very poor. Simple surgery cannot yield an ideal result because of the high recurrence rate after tumor resection. Preoperative chemotherapy could help to reduce tumor volume, improve the R0 resection rate (no residual tumor after surgery), and decrease the risk of local tumor recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pathological differentiation in the effect of preoperative chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (n = 32) received preoperative chemotherapy under the XELOX (capecitabine plus oxaliplatin) regimen. According to pathological examination, patients' tumors were classified into better (well and moderate) and poorly differentiated (lower differentiated and undifferentiated) groups, and the clinical response rate, type of gastrectomy, and negative tumor residual rate were compared between the two groups of patients. Morphological changes and toxic reactions were monitored after chemotherapy. The results showed that the clinical response rate in the better differentiated group was significantly higher than that in the poorly differentiated group (100% versus 25%, P = 0.000). The partial gastrectomy rate in the better differentiated group was significantly higher than that in the poorly differentiated group (87.5% versus 25% P = 0.000). A significant shrinking of tumor and necrosis of tumor tissues caused by chemotherapy could be observed. In conclusion, the better differentiated group with locally advanced gastric cancer is suitable for preoperative chemotherapy under the XELOX regimen, and as a result of effective preoperative chemotherapy, much more gastric tissue can be preserved for the better differentiated group.

  2. A Phase II Study of a Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiation Regimen With Selective Surgical Salvage for Resectable Locoregionally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Initial Reporting of RTOG 0246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, Stephen G., E-mail: sswisher@mdanderson.org [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Headquarters, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wu, Tsung T. [Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% ({alpha} = 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results: Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was {>=}T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions: In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%-82%).

  3. Risk factors for brain metastases after definitive chemoradiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Marina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. As therapy for locally advanced nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC improves, brain metastases (BM still remain a great problem. The aim of the study was to analyze risk factors for BM in patients with locally advanced NSCLC after chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Records for 150 patients with non-resectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC treated with combined chemoradiation therapy were analyzed. All of them had negative brain metastases imaging result before the treatment. Incidence of BM was examined in relation to age, sex, histological type, stage, performance status scale of wellbeing of cancer patients, weight loss, chemotherapy regimen and chemotherapy timing. Results. One- and 2-year incidence rates of BM were 19 and 31%, respectively. Among pretreatment parameters, stage IIIB was associated with a higher risk of BM (p < 0.004 vs stage IIIA. Histologically, the patients with nonsquamous tumors had an exceptionally high 2-year BM risk rate of 32% (p < 0.02. Examining treatment-related parameters, 1-year and 2-year actuarial risk of BM were 27 and 39%, respectively, in the patients receiving chemotherapy before radiotherapy and 15 and 20%, respectively, when radiotherapy was not delayed (p < 0.03. On multivariate analysis, timing of chemotherapy (p < 0.05 and stage IIIA vs IIIB (p < 0.01 remained statistically significant. Conclusion. Patients with IIIB stage, nonsquamous NSCLC, particularly those receiving sequential chemotherapy, had significantly high BM rates.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor response to preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirak, I.; Petera, J.; Vosmik, M.; Melichar, B.; Dvorak, J.; Zoul, Z. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Univ. Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hatlova, J.; Tycova, V. [Dept. of Pathology, Charles Univ. Medical School and Univ. Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Lesko, M. [Dept. of Surgery, Charles Univ. Medical School and Univ. Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hajduch, M. [Lab. of Molecular Pathology, Inst. of Pathology, Palacky Univ., Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: the purpose of our study was a retrospective evaluation whether the intensity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression predicts tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric carcinoma. Patients and methods: thirty-six patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (cT2-4 or N+) were studied. Preoperative treatment consisted of 30-45 Gy of gastric irradiation with continuous 5-fluorouracil and weekly cisplatin. Surgical resection was performed 4-6 weeks later. EGFR expression in pretreatment tumor biopsies was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Level of EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor response was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level and/or finding of intense tumor regression in histopathologic examination. Results: seventeen patients responded to preoperative chemoradiation - 8 patients (22%) had pathologic complete response, 9 patients (25%) were downstaged. Positive EGFR expression was found in 8 tumors (22%), and represented a significant predictive marker of poor tumor response in multivariate logistic regression analysis (p = 0.015). Response to chemoradiotherapy was found in 60% (16/28) of EGFR negative patients and in 13% (1/8) of EGFR positive patients (p = 0.044). None of the eight EGFR positive patients achieved pathologic complete response in comparison with 8/28 (29%) of patients with EGFR negative staining (p = 0.16). Conclusion: EGFR may represent a molecular marker predictive for poor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric carcinoma. (orig.)

  5. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Chernyaev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To reveal prognostic factors of PSA-failure following radical prostatectomy in patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer.Materials and methods. Medical data of 386 consecutive patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2011 were analyzed. Median age was 61.0 years. Median PSA before surgery – 10.3 ng/ml. Plasma levels of VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1, CD105, IL-6 were measured using Enzyme Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA before radical prostatectomy in 77 patients. Postoperatively the tumours were categorized as pT2 in 288 (59.1 %, pT3 – in 144 (37.3 %, pT4 – in 14 (3.6; pN+ – in 34 (8.8 % cases. Gleason score < 7 was present in 254 (65.8 %,  7 – in 132 (34.2 % specimens. Perineural invasion was identified in 188 (48.7 %, angiolymphatic invasion – in 126 (32.6 cases.Results. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 64 (16.6 % out of 386 patients at a median follow-up of 30.5 (12−164 months. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were PSA (HR 0.161 (95% CI:0.058−0.449; р = 0.001, Gleason sum in surgical specimens (HR 0.496 (95 % CI:0.268−0.917; p = 0.025, pN (HR 0.415 (95 % CI:0.181−0.955; p = 0.039. The patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: good (0 factor, intermediate (1 factor, poor (2 factors and very poor (3 factors (AUC – 0.720 (95% CI: 0.656−0.784. High preoperative levels VEGF ( 67 pg/ml (р = 0.005, VEGFR2 ( 3149 pg/ml (р = 0.036, VEGFR3 ( 2268 pg/ml (р = 0.001, TGF-β1 ( 14473 pg/ml (р = 0.052 were identified as unfavorable prognostic factors for survival without PSA-failure. Conclusion. Independent prognostic factors of biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy were PSA, Gleason sum and pN. Joint effect of the factors allows to predict PSA-relapse with accuracy 0.720. Preoperative serum levels VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1 potentially are perspective markers for PSA-failure after

  6. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS OF BIOCHEMICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Chernyaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To reveal prognostic factors of PSA-failure following radical prostatectomy in patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer.Materials and methods. Medical data of 386 consecutive patients with localized and locally-advanced prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2011 were analyzed. Median age was 61.0 years. Median PSA before surgery – 10.3 ng/ml. Plasma levels of VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1, CD105, IL-6 were measured using Enzyme Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA before radical prostatectomy in 77 patients. Postoperatively the tumours were categorized as pT2 in 288 (59.1 %, pT3 – in 144 (37.3 %, pT4 – in 14 (3.6; pN+ – in 34 (8.8 % cases. Gleason score < 7 was present in 254 (65.8 %,  7 – in 132 (34.2 % specimens. Perineural invasion was identified in 188 (48.7 %, angiolymphatic invasion – in 126 (32.6 cases.Results. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 64 (16.6 % out of 386 patients at a median follow-up of 30.5 (12−164 months. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were PSA (HR 0.161 (95% CI:0.058−0.449; р = 0.001, Gleason sum in surgical specimens (HR 0.496 (95 % CI:0.268−0.917; p = 0.025, pN (HR 0.415 (95 % CI:0.181−0.955; p = 0.039. The patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: good (0 factor, intermediate (1 factor, poor (2 factors and very poor (3 factors (AUC – 0.720 (95% CI: 0.656−0.784. High preoperative levels VEGF ( 67 pg/ml (р = 0.005, VEGFR2 ( 3149 pg/ml (р = 0.036, VEGFR3 ( 2268 pg/ml (р = 0.001, TGF-β1 ( 14473 pg/ml (р = 0.052 were identified as unfavorable prognostic factors for survival without PSA-failure. Conclusion. Independent prognostic factors of biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy were PSA, Gleason sum and pN. Joint effect of the factors allows to predict PSA-relapse with accuracy 0.720. Preoperative serum levels VEGF, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, TGF-β1 potentially are perspective markers for PSA-failure after

  7. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  8. [A Case of Advanced Transverse Colon Cancer with Nephrotic Syndrome Treated with Curative Resection and Complete Adjuvant Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nobutaka; Fuyuno, Seiya; Hatada, Teppei; Furuhashi, Takashi; Abe, Toshihiko

    2017-05-01

    A 74-year-old woman was diagnosed as having transverse colon cancer after diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome caused by membranous nephropathy. Although she had hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia, we judged that she had no major nutritional problem. In previous, similar case reports, the use of human serum albumin and fresh-frozen plasma was suggested to be important to avoid complications in the perioperative period. Thus, we used the same in our patient in the perioperative period. In addition, we paid special attention to perioperative nutrition management and used total parenteral nutrition in perioperative period. We performed laparoscopic assisted right hemicolectomy. On the 15th day after the surgical resection, the patient was discharged without any problems. We considered that postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with XELOX (CapeOX)should be performed because the TNM pathological stage was pStage III b. Regarding adjuvant chemotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer with nephrotic syndrome, no previous reports detailed the indications for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Upon introduction of adjuvant chemotherapy, we determined adaptation in accordance with the general adaptation criteria. While observing the patient's progress with a nephrologist, we safely completed the scheduled 8 courses adjuvant chemotherapy.

  9. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arthur; Schmidt; Markus; Bauder; Bettina; Riecken; Karel; Caca

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors(SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound(EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods.

  10. Salvage stereotactic body radiotherapy for locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beant Singh Gill

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Locally-recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (LR-NSCLC remains challenging treat, particularly in patients having received prior radiotherapy. Heterogeneous populations and varied treatment intent in existing literature result in significant limitations in evaluating efficacy of lung re-irradiation. In order to better establish the impact of re-irradiation in patients with LR-NSCLC following high-dose radiotherapy, we report outcomes for patients treated with prior sublobar resection and brachytherapy that subsequently underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT.Methods: A retrospective review of patients initially treated with sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy, who later developed LR-NSCLC along the suture line, was performed. Patients received salvage SBRT with curative intent. Dose and fractionation was based on tumor location and size, with a median prescription dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (range 20-60 Gy in 1-4 fractions.Results: Thirteen consecutive patients were identified with median follow-up of 2.1 years (range 0.7-5.6 years. Two in-field local failures occurred at 7.5 and 11.1 months, resulting in 2-year local control of 83.9% (95% CI 63.5-100.0%. Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates were 38.5% (95% CI 0.0-65.0% and 65.8% (95% CI, 38.2-93.4%. Four patients (31% remained disease-free at last follow-up. All but one patient who experienced disease recurrence developed isolated or synchronous distant metastases. Only one patient (7.7% developed grade ≥3 toxicity, consisting of grade 3 esophageal stricture following a centrally located recurrence previously treated with radiofrequency ablation.Conclusion: Despite high local radiation doses delivered to lung parenchyma previously with I125 brachytherapy, re-irradiation with SBRT for LR-NSCLC results in excellent local control with limited morbidity, allowing for potential disease cure in a subset of patients.

  11. Improved femoral component rotation in advanced genu valgum deformity using computer-assisted measured resection total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Jie; Lee, Chien-Ying; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Huang, Tsan-Wen; Lee, Mel S; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei; Shen, Wun-Jer

    2015-09-02

    Accurate femoral rotational alignment is of vital importance for successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The value of computer-assisted surgery TKA (CAS-TKA) in increasing the accuracy of femoral rotational alignment remains controversial. We hypothesize that outcomes are related to the severity of preoperative varus and valgus deformity and that CAS-TKA may be beneficial under certain circumstances. Between January 2007 and December 2013, patients with osteoarthritis and varus angulation in the mechanical axis (MA) ≥ 15° and valgus angulation in the MA ≥ 10° (based on hip-to-ankle standing radiography) who underwent TKA were divided into four groups. CAS-TKA and conventional TKA outcomes were compared in patients who had preoperative advanced genu varum and advanced genu valgum deformities. The accuracy of component alignment and postoperative limb alignment was determined using radiographic parameters and computed tomography (CT). One hundred and eight patients (144 knees) were included in the analysis. For patients with preoperative advanced genu varum deformity, a significant difference was detected in the sagittal femoral angle (p genu valgum deformity, a significant difference was found in the sagittal femoral angle (p = 0.034). The femoral rotational angle was significantly closer to the proper position in the CAS-TKA group (p genu valgum deformity (p = 0.011). Our data demonstrate that CAS-TKA is beneficial in obtaining proper femoral rotational alignment in patients with advanced genu valgum deformity (preoperative MA ≥ 10° valgus). In patients with advanced genu varum deformity (preoperative MA ≥ 15° varus), CAS-TKA did not improve the femoral rotational alignment.

  12. The "liver-first approach" for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, C.; Pool, A.E. van der; Nuyttens, J.J.; Planting, A.S.; Eggermont, A.M.M.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the outcome of "the liver-first" approach in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases. METHODS: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases were primarily treated for their liver me

  13. Usefulness of increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake for detecting local recurrence in patients with extremity osteosarcoma treated with surgical resection and endoprosthetic replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kyoung Jin; Lim, Ilhan; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Nowon Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Chang-Bae; Cho, Wan Hyeong; Jeon, Dae-Geun; Lee, Soo-Yong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Orthopedic Surgery, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Nowon Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-29

    To investigate the changes of increased F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake around the prosthesis and its ability to differentiate local recurrence from postsurgical change after endoprosthetic replacement in extremity osteosarcoma. A total of 355 positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans in 109 extremity osteosarcoma patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were followed up with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for more than 3 years after tumor resection. For semiquantitative assessment, we drew a volume of interest around the entire prosthesis of the extremity and measured the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Independent samples t test was used to compare SUVmax at each follow-up time. SUVmax at 3 months (SUV1) and SUVmax at the time of local recurrence in patients with recurrence or at the last follow-up in others (SUV2) were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. Diagnostic performances of PET parameters were assessed using ROC curve analyses. Nine patients (8 %) showed a local recurrence. Mean SUVmax at 3, 12, 24, and 36 months was 3.1 ± 1.5, 3.8 ± 1.9, 3.6 ± 1.9, and 3.7 ± 1.5 respectively. In ROC curve analysis, the combination of SUV2 >4.6 and ΔSUV >75.0 was a more useful parameter for predicting local recurrence than SUV2 or ΔSUV alone. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying local recurrence were 89, 76, 77 % for SUV2; 78, 81, 81 % for ΔSUV; and 78, 94, 93 % for the combined criterion respectively. The combination of SUV2 and ΔSUV was more useful than the SUV2 or ΔSUV used alone for the prediction of local recurrence. (orig.)

  14. Vandetanib in locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboulleux, Sophie; Bastholt, Lars; Krause, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    No effective standard treatment exists for patients with radioiodine-refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of vandetanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of RET, VEGFR and EGFR signalling, in this setting....

  15. Combined surgical resective and regenerative therapy for advanced peri-implantitis with concomitant soft tissue volume augmentation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Frank; John, Gordon; Sahm, Narja; Becker, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents a 3-year follow-up of the clinical outcomes of a combined surgical therapy for advanced peri-implantitis with concomitant soft tissue volume augmentation using a collagen matrix. One patient suffering from advanced peri-implantitis and a thin mucosal biotype underwent access flap surgery, implantoplasty at buccally and supracrestally exposed implant parts, and augmentation of the intrabony components using a natural bone mineral and a native collagen membrane after surface decontamination. A collagen matrix was applied to the wound area to increase soft tissue volume and support transmucosal healing. The following clinical parameters were recorded over a period of 3 years: bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), mucosal recession (MR), clinical attachment level (CAL), and width of keratinized mucosa (KM). At 36 months, the combined surgical procedure was associated with a clinically important reduction in mean BOP (100%), PD (4.3 ± 0.5 mm), and CAL (4.4 ± 0.4 mm). Site-level analysis of the buccal aspects pointed to an increase in MR (-1.0 ± 0.4 mm) and a decrease in KM (-1.3 ± 0.5 mm) values at 12 months. However, a regain in mucosal height and KM was noted at 24 months, even reaching respective baseline values after 36 months of healing. The presented combined surgical procedure was effective in controlling an advanced peri-implantitis lesion without compromising the overall esthetic outcome in the long term.

  16. Clinical report of the treatment of locally advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Z; Mietlowski, W; Ohanian, M; Cox, J

    1977-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of the treatment of 345 patients entered in the Veterans Administration Lung Group Protocol 13L. The study was activated March 1972, and closed for the patient accesion March 1975. All patients had a histological diagnosis of primary lung cancer considered clinically non-resectable or inoperable. Patients were equally randomized into two groups, radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy with chemotherapy. The analysis of the data included: treatment regimen, radiation dose, initial performance status, performance status change, cell type, duration of survival, quality of survival and age. The strongest influence on median survival was the level of radiation dose. The small cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy showed significant improvement in the median survival (38.2 weeks) over the patients treated with radiotherapy alone (20.6 weeks). The patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy also showed improvement in performance status more frequently than the patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Other parameters of the analysis will be presented.

  17. Effect of preoperative S-1 combined with regional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization on malignant degree of locally advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Juan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of preoperative S-1 combined with regional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization on malignant degree of locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods:A total of 134 patients who were diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer in our hospital from May 2012 to December 2014 were selected for study, received surgical resection after chemotherapy, and were divided into intravenous chemotherapy group and combined treatment group according to different chemotherapy regimens. After chemotherapy and before operation, serum tumor marker levels were detected;after operation, recurrence and metastasis-related molecule levels in tumor tissue were detected. Results:After chemotherapy and before operation, serum CEA, CA199, CA72-4, TSGF, ESM-1 and DKK-1 levels of combined treatment group were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group;TET1, TET2, LATS1 and RUNX3 levels in tumor tissue of combined treatment group were higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while Sipa1, GOLPH3, AEP, MT2-MMP, OPN, Galectin-1, Galectin-3 and Galectin-9 levels were lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group. Conclusions:Compared with systemic intravenous chemotherapy, preoperative S-1 combined with regional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization can more effectively kill gastric cancer cells and prevent tumor recurrence and metastasis at molecular level.

  18. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  19. Preoperative Induction Therapy for Locally Advanced Thymic Tumors: A Retrospective Analysis Using the ChART Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng WEI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective To evaluate the role of preoperative induction therapy on prognosis of locally advanced thymic malignancies. Methods Between 1994 and 2012, patients received preoperative induction therapies (IT group in the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART database, were compared with those having surgery directly after preoperative evaluation (DS group. All tumors receiving induction therapies were locally advanced (clinically stage III-IV before treatment and those turned out to be in pathological stage I and II were considered downstaged by induction. Clinical pathological characteristics were retrospectively analyzed. To more accurately study the effect of induction therapies, stage IV patients were then excluded. Only stage I-III tumors in the IT group and stage III cases in the DS group were selected for further comparison in a subgroup analysis. Results Only 68 (4% out of 1,713 patients had induction therapies, with a R0 resection of 67.6%, 5-year recurrence of 44.9%, and 5- and 10-year overall survivals (OS of 49.7% and 19.9%. Seventeen patients (25% were downstaged after induction. Significantly more thymomas were downstaged than thymic carcinomas (38.7% vs 13.9%, P=0.02. Tumors downstaged after induction had significantly higher 5-year OS than those not downstaged (93.8% vs 35.6%, P=0.013. For the subgroup analysis when stage IV patients were excluded, 5-year OS was 85.2% in the DS group and 68.1% in the IT group (P<0.001, although R0 resection were similar (76.4% vs 73.3%, P=0.63. However, 5-year OS in tumors downstaged after induction (93.8% was similar to those in the DS group (85.2%, P=0.438, both significantly higher than those not downstaged after induction (35.6%, P<0.001. Conclusion Only 68 (4% out of 1,713 patients had induction therapies, with a R0 resection of 67.6%, 5-year recurrence of 44.9%, and 5- and 10-year overall survivals (OS of 49.7% and 19.9%. Seventeen patients (25% were downstaged after

  20. Long-term results of preoperative 5-fluorouracil-oxaliplatin chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Elisa; Pucci, Francesca; Camisa, Roberta; Bui, Simona; Galdy, Salvatore; Leonardi, Francesco; Negri, Francesca Virginia; Anselmi, Elisa; Losardo, Pier Luigi; Roncoroni, Luigi; Dell'abate, Paolo; Crafa, Pellegrino; Cascinu, Stefano; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the activity, safety and long-term survival of patients after preoperative oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Patients with resectable, T3-4 and/or nodal involvement rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with oxaliplatin 60 mg/m(2) weekly and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m(2)/d infused continuously for five days, over a period of five weeks, and radiotherapy (45 Gy/25 fractions). The primary end-point was pathological complete response (ypCR). Safety, overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) were secondary end-points. Sixty-six patients were treated. Grade 1-2 diarrhea was the most common adverse event. The ypCR rate was 16.7% (95% confidence interval=7.7-25.7%). After a median follow-up of 73.5 months, 23 patients (34.8%) had experienced relapse. Five-year actuarial RFS and OS rates were 64% and 73%, respectively. Five-year actuarial RFS was 91.7% in the ypCR group versus 57.8% in non-ypCR cases. Long-term local control and survival after this very well-tolerated regimen appear encouraging.

  1. Differentiation of early gastric cancer with ulceration and resectable advanced gastric cancer using multiphasic dynamic multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Miyasaka, Mitsutoshi; Nishimuta, Yusuke; Asayama, Yoshiki; Nishie, Akihiro; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi [Kyushu University, Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Oki, Eiji [Kyushu University, Department of Surgery and Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirahashi, Minako [Kyushu University, Department of Anatomic Pathology and Pathological Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Early gastric cancer with ulceration (EGC-U) mimics advanced gastric cancer (AGC), as EGC-Us and ACGs often have similar endoscopic appearance to ulceration. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine whether multiphasic dynamic multidetector CT (MDCT) can help differentiate EGC-Us from AGCs. Patients with EGC-Us with ulcer stages Ul-III or IV and AGCs with tumour stages T2 to T4a were enrolled. MDCT images were obtained 40 s (arterial phase), 70 s (portal phase) and 240 s (delayed phase) after injection of non-ionic contrast material. Two readers independently measured the attenuation values of the lesions by placing regions of interest. We compared the EGC-Us and AGCs using the mean attenuation values in each phase and peak enhancement phase. We analysed the diagnostic performance of CT for differentiating EGC-Us from AGCs. Forty cases (16 EGC-Us and 24 AGCs) were analysed. The mean attenuation values of the EGC-Us were significantly lower than those of the AGCs in both the arterial and portal phases (all p < 0.0001 for each reader). The peak enhancement was significantly different between the EGC-Us and AGCs for both readers (Reader 1, p = 0.0131; Reader 2, p = 0.0006). Multiphasic dynamic contrast-enhanced MDCT can help differentiate EGC-Us from AGCs. (orig.)

  2. Immunohistochemical Examination of a Resected Advanced Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma Arising in a 29-Year-Old Male without Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketoshi Suehiro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old man with advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma was successfully treated with an extended right lobectomy. The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9 level was elevated to 939 IU/l, and the pathological findings revealed moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma which involved almost the entire thickness of the hepatic duct and the adjacent liver tissue (T3 and which was associated with lymph node metastasis (N1. It was a stage IIB (T3N1M0 tubular adenocarcinoma according to UICC pathological staging. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that Ki-67, cyclin D1, and MMP-7 were positive, and 14-3-3σ and p27 were negative. The pathological and immunohistochemical findings indicated high malignant potential indicating poor prognosis. We administrated the postoperative adjunct gemcitabine combined with S-1 chemotherapy. The patient is alive without recurrence and doing well two years after surgery. We also review other reports of cholangiocarcinoma patients aged less than 30 years.

  3. Advances in the management of localized radiation injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kerstin; Meineke, Viktor

    2010-06-01

    Localized radiation injuries account for the vast majority of accidental radiation exposures and mainly occur due to direct handling of highly intense radioactive sources. Their clinical course and severity mainly depend on the type of radiation, radiation source, dose and dose rate, duration of exposure, dose distribution, and location and size of the area exposed. Local injuries appear as skin injuries; however, they may involve radiation damage to other organs and tissues. Local injuries evolve slowly over time and clinical signs and symptoms usually take days to weeks to manifest. Although in most cases not life threatening, their delayed effects may result in serious impairments. Standardized therapeutic protocols and evidence-based approaches for the management of local injuries do not exist yet. Local injuries should therefore be treated symptomatically. The two main approaches comprise conservative and surgical treatment. Conservative methods focus on pain control, reduction of inflammation, prevention of infection and of further vasculature insult, improvement of circulation, healing acceleration, wound cleaning, and minimizing fibrosis. Surgical treatment and plastic remodeling of anatomic structures may be required. During recent years, significant progress has been made in the management of local injuries. There is increasing evidence that injections of human mesenchymal stem cells may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of cutaneous radiation reactions. A consistent follow-up of radiation patients keeping in mind the possible onset of late radiation effects will contribute to the comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of the radiation reaction which is crucial to establish evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  4. Advanced techniques and armamentarium for dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taylor M; Yagiela, John A

    2010-10-01

    Computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD) devices and systems for intraosseous (IO) injection are important additions to the dental anesthesia armamentarium. C-CLAD using slow infusion rates can significantly reduce the discomfort of local anesthetic infusion, especially in palatal tissues, and facilitate palatal approaches to pulpal nerve block that find special use in cosmetic dentistry, periodontal therapy, and pediatric dentistry. Anesthesia of single teeth can be obtained using either C-CLAD intraligamentary injections or IO injections. Supplementary IO anesthesia is particularly suited for providing effective pain control of teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis.

  5. [Laparoscopic liver resection: lessons learned after 132 resections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Campos, Ricardo; Marín Hernández, Caridad; Lopez-Conesa, Asunción; Olivares Ripoll, Vicente; Paredes Quiles, Miriam; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2013-10-01

    After 20 years of experience in laparoscopic liver surgery there is still no clear definition of the best approach (totally laparoscopic [TLS] or hand-assisted [HAS]), the indications for surgery, position, instrumentation, immediate and long-term postoperative results, etc. To report our experience in laparoscopic liver resections (LLRs). Over a period of 10 years we performed 132 LLRs in 129 patients: 112 malignant tumours (90 hepatic metastases; 22 primary malignant tumours) and 20 benign lesions (18 benign tumours; 2 hydatid cysts). Twenty-eight cases received TLS and 104 had HAS. 6 right hepatectomies (2 as the second stage of a two-stage liver resection); 6 left hepatectomies; 9 resections of 3 segments; 42 resections of 2 segments; 64 resections of one segment; and 5 cases of local resections. There was no perioperative mortality, and morbidity was 3%. With TLS the resection was completed in 23/28 cases, whereas with HAS it was completed in all 104 cases. Transfusion: 4,5%; operating time: 150min; and mean length of stay: 3,5 days. The 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for the primary malignant tumours were 100, 86 and 62%, and for colorectal metastases 92, 82 and 52%, respectively. LLR via both TLS and HAS in selected cases are similar to the results of open surgery (similar 5-year morbidity, mortality and survival rates) but with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Five versus ten fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjis Viranna Tallari

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: After induction chemotherapy, HFRT seems to be more efficacious than CFRT in locally advanced HNSCC, by increasing significantly the probability of progression-free survival and locoregional control.

  7. Combination of retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and Seldinger method in locally advanced oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsurgical strategies for locally advanced oral cancer are desirable. Superselective intra-arterial infusion with radiotherapy was utilized for this purpose, and there are two types of superselective intra-arterial infusion methods: The Seldinger method and the retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (HFT method. In one case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced tongue cancer, and the Seldinger method was used for additional administration of cisplatin (CDDP to compensate for a lack of drug flow in the HFT method. In another case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced lower gingival cancer. The Seldinger method was applied to metastatic lymph nodes. In both cases, additional administration of CDDP using the Seldinger method resulted in a complete response. The combination of the HFT and Seldinger methods was useful to eradicate locally advanced oral cancer because each method compensated for the defects of the other.

  8. Combination of retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and Seldinger method in locally advanced oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Masataka; Ohya, Ryouichi; Kodama, Masaaki; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Asahina, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The nonsurgical strategies for locally advanced oral cancer are desirable. Superselective intra-arterial infusion with radiotherapy was utilized for this purpose, and there are two types of superselective intra-arterial infusion methods: The Seldinger method and the retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (HFT method). In one case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced tongue cancer, and the Seldinger method was used for additional administration of cisplatin (CDDP) to compensate for a lack of drug flow in the HFT method. In another case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced lower gingival cancer. The Seldinger method was applied to metastatic lymph nodes. In both cases, additional administration of CDDP using the Seldinger method resulted in a complete response. The combination of the HFT and Seldinger methods was useful to eradicate locally advanced oral cancer because each method compensated for the defects of the other.

  9. Vismodegib: a guide to its use in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the USA, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. In an ongoing, noncomparative, phase II trial, oral vismodegib was effective in and had an acceptable tolerability profile in the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  10. The value of high-resolution MRI technique in patients with rectal carcinoma: pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumferential resection margin and local staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery.

  11. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengeløv, Lisa;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated...

  12. Bicalutamide monotherapy compared with castration in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V

    2000-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiandrogen monotherapy may be a treatment option for some patients with advanced prostate cancer. We report a survival and safety update from an analysis of 2 studies in which patients with nonmetastatic (M0) locally advanced disease were treated with either 150 mg. bicalutamide mo...

  13. Laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER)--principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höckel, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Exenteration has been used for the last 6 decades, mainly to treat cancers of the lower and middle female genital tract in the irradiated pelvis. New ablative techniques based on developmentally derived surgical anatomy termed laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER) aim to increase the curative resection rate, even of tumors extending to and fixed to the pelvic side wall. LEER is performed as a combination of at least two of the following procedures: total mesorectal excision, total mesometrial resection, and total mesovesical resection. In cases of lateral tumor fixation, the inclusion of pelvic side wall and floor muscles, such as the obturator internus muscle and pubococcygeus, iliococcygeus and coccygeus muscles, and eventually of the internal iliac vessel system assures the completeness of the multicompartmental resection. One hundred patients with locally advanced (n=25) and recurrent (n=75) gynecologic tumors have been treated with these new procedures. In 76 patients, the tumors were fixed to the pelvic side wall. Two patients with advanced age and extensive comorbidity died during the early postoperative period. Moderate and severe treatment-related morbidity was 70%, mainly due to compromised healing of irradiated tissue and the performance of complex reconstructions. At a median follow-up period of 30 months (range, 1-136 months), 5-year recurrence-free and disease-specific overall survival probabilities are 62% (95% CI, 52-72%) and 55% (95% CI, 43-67%), respectively. LEER has significant potential to salvage selected patients with locally advanced and recurrent gynecologic malignancies, including those with pelvic side wall disease, traditionally not considered for surgical therapy.

  14. Cylindrical abdominoperineal resection for advanced low rectal cancer: a report of 15 cases%柱状经腹会阴切除术治疗直肠癌15例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜金波; 曲辉; 李雪梅; 戴勇; 姜旭生; 靳祖涛

    2010-01-01

    目的 介绍直肠癌柱状经腹会阴切除术(cylindrical abdominoperineal resection,CAPR)的应用体会.方法 2009-2010年采用柱状经腹会阴直肠癌切除术治疗低位直肠癌15例.采用Holm等描述的手术方法.按TME技术要求游离直肠系膜,向下游离至肛提肌的起点处,结肠造口,关闭腹部切口.将患者置于俯卧位,实施扩大的会阴部切除,沿外括约肌、耻骨直肠肌、肛提肌外表面游离至肛提肌的盆壁起始处,即腹部向下游离的终点下方,后方自尾骨骶骨连接处切开,进入骶前,由背侧至腹侧,将肛提肌自起始处离断.结果 柱状经腹会阴切除术切除更多远端直肠周围组织,15例均无直肠穿孔,会阴切口均Ⅰ期愈合,1例发生会阴血肿,1例发生盆底腹膜疝,1例发生下肢深静脉血栓形成;术后平均随访6个月,1例发生盆腔腹膜后淋巴结转移,1例发生肝肺转移.结论 柱状经腹会阴切除术可以切除更多的低位直肠癌周组织,有利于减少术中穿孔发生率和环周切缘阳性率,进一步降低术后局部复发率.%Objective To decrease tumor local recurrence after abdominoperineal resection (APR)for low rectal cancer using cylindrical abdominoperineal resection. Methods From February 2009 to February 2010 cylindrical APR was performed in 15 patients of advanced ultralow rectal cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, according to the standard protocol as described by Holm. The procedure involves careful mobilization of the mesorectum as far down as the origins of the levator muscle. Ater stoma formation, the abdomen is closed, the patient is rotated into the prone position, and an extended perineal dissection is performed. This includes the sphincter complex and the inferior surface of the levators to a point laterally where they originate on the pelvic sidewall. This point should be just inferior to the level where the abdominal procedure was

  15. A clinical study to assess the pathological involvement of occult supraclavicular lymphnode metastasis in case of locally advanced operable breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, S J; Patni, S; Shah, R

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node (SCLN) recurrence after early breast cancer appears to be worse than for other locoregional recurrences, but better than for distant metastases. Prophylactic radiotherapy (RT) to supraclavicular region decreases risk of ipsilateral SCLN recurrence. Currently, all patients with locally advanced breast cancer are considered high-risk for SCLN metastasis and treated with prophylactic RT. This study is carried out to identify risk factors associated with occult SCLN metastases in locally advanced breast cancer. Total 48 female patients of all ages presenting with locally advanced carcinoma of breast who were operable by protocol criteria were included in the study. All the patients underwent modified radical mastectomy with supraclavicular lymphnode dissection. The resected specimen was processed for the histopathological analysis. Occult SCLN metastases are found in 25% (12/48) of the patients in this study. Eleven factors were identified and analyzed to know whether or not they are associated with SCLN metastasis. Of those only pathological N stage (7% for supraclavicular lymphnode metastasis. Other factors such as age, menopausal status, T stage, pathologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, hormone receptor, and Her2 neu receptor status are not associated with risk for SCLN metastasis. Our study has shown that only high axillary disease burden in terms of more than 10 node positivity or more than 75% positive node out of total dissected nodes is associated with occult supraclavicular lymphnode metastasis breast cancer.

  16. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging assessment of circumferential resection margin predicts disease-free survival and local recurrence: 5-year follow-up results of the MERCURY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan J; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian R; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic relevance of preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement is unknown. This follow-up study of 374 patients with rectal cancer reports the relationship between preoperative MRI assessment of CRM staging, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM stage, and clinical variables with overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and time to local recurrence (LR). Patients underwent protocol high-resolution pelvic MRI. Tumor distance to the mesorectal fascia of ≤ 1 mm was recorded as an MRI-involved CRM. A Cox proportional hazards model was used in multivariate analysis to determine the relationship of MRI assessment of CRM to survivorship after adjusting for preoperative covariates. Surviving patients were followed for a median of 62 months. The 5-year OS was 62.2% in patients with MRI-clear CRM compared with 42.2% in patients with MRI-involved CRM with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.97 (95% CI, 1.27 to 3.04; P < .01). The 5-year DFS was 67.2% (95% CI, 61.4% to 73%) for MRI-clear CRM compared with 47.3% (95% CI, 33.7% to 60.9%) for MRI-involved CRM with an HR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.69; P < .05). Local recurrence HR for MRI-involved CRM was 3.50 (95% CI, 1.53 to 8.00; P < .05). MRI-involved CRM was the only preoperative staging parameter that remained significant for OS, DFS, and LR on multivariate analysis. High-resolution MRI preoperative assessment of CRM status is superior to AJCC TNM-based criteria for assessing risk of LR, DFS, and OS. Furthermore, MRI CRM involvement is significantly associated with distant metastatic disease; therefore, colorectal cancer teams could intensify treatment and follow-up accordingly to improve survival outcomes.

  17. Multidetector CT of Locally Invasive Advanced Gastric Cancer: Value of Oblique Coronal Reconstructed Images for the Assessment of Local Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Hee; Kim, Ah Yong; Kim, Hye Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Yu, Eun Sil; Jang, Yoon Jin; Park, Seong Ho; Shin, Yong Moon; Ha, Hyun Kwon [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of oblique coronal reconstructed CT images to determine the local invasion of advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Thirty-four consecutive patients, who were suspected to have locally invasive advanced gastric cancer (more than T3 stage) on a preoperative MDCT scan and underwent a diagnostic or curative laparotomy, were enrolled in this study. Two reviewers performed an independent blind review of three series of MDCT images in random order; axial (AXI), conventional coronal (CCI), and oblique coronal (OCI) (parallel to long axis of gastric body and pancreas) images. In assessing the local invasion, the reader's confidence for the local invasion of AGC was graded using a five point scale (1 = definitely negative, 5 = definitely positive: T4). With surgical findings and histopathological proofs as reference standards, the diagnostic performance of the three different plans of CT images was employed for the verification of local invasion of AGC on a preoperative CT scan using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. Agreements between the two reviewers were analyzed using weighted kappa statistics. Results: In 19 out of 34 patients, local invasion was confirmed surgically or histopathologically (13 pancreas invasion, 6 liver invasion, 4 major vascular invasion, 3 colon and mesocolon invasion, and 2 spleen invasion). The diagnostic performance of OCI was superior to AXI or CCI in the local invasion of AGC. The differences in the area under the curve of AXI (0.770 {+-} 0.087, 0.700 {+-} 0.094), CCI (0.884 {+-} 0.058, 0.958 {+-} 0.038), and OCI (0.954 {+-} 0.050, 0.956 {+-} 0.049), were statistically significant for both reviewers. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for OCI ({kappa}= .973), which was greater than CCI (({kappa}= .839), and AXI (({kappa}= .763). On a CT scan, OCI might be a useful imaging technique in evaluating locally invasive advanced gastric cancer.

  18. Rectal laterally spreading tumors successfully treated in two steps by endoscopic submucosal dissection and endoscopic mucosal resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Giovanni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy alternative to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms >2 cm. ESD allows for the direct dissection of the submucosa and large lesions can be resected en bloc. ESD is not limited by resection size, increases histologically complete resection rates and may reduce the local recurrence. Nevertheless, the technique is time-consuming, technically demanding and associated with a high complication rate. To reduce the risk of complications, different devices and technical advances have been proposed with conflicting results and, still, ESD en bloc resections of huge lesions are associated with increased complications. Case Presentation We successfully used a combined ESD/EMR technique for huge rectal laterally spreading tumors (LSTs. ESD was used for circumferential resection of 2/3 of the lesion followed by piecemeal resection (2-3 pieces of the central part of the tumour. In all three patients we obtained the complete dissection of the polyp and the complete histological evaluation in absence of complications and recurrence at 6 months' follow up. Conclusions In the treatment of rectal LSTs, the combined treatment - ESD/EMR resection may be considered a suitable therapeutic option, indicated in selected cases as an alternative to surgery, in which the two techniques are neither reliable nor safe separately. However, to confirm our results, larger trials with longer follow up are required together with improvement of the technique and of the technical devices.

  19. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); White, Rebekah R. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tyler, Douglas S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papavassiliou, Paulie [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papalezova, Katia T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Guy, Cynthia D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Czito, Brian G., E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  20. Modelling combined chemotherapy and particle therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eDurante

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumour hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival. We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1-year overall survival significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease.

  1. A review of recent advances in numerical modelling of local scour problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances in numerical modelling of local scour problems. The review is organized in five sections: Highlights of numerical modelling of local scour; Influence of turbulence on scour; Backfilling of scour holes; Scour around complex structures; and Scour protection ...

  2. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locall...

  3. A Dose Escalation and Pharmacodynamic Study of Triapine and Radiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ludmila Katherine [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Grecula, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Jia, Guang [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Wei Lai [Center for Biostatistics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Yang Xiangyu [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Otterson, Gregory A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Wu Xin; Harper, Erica; Kefauver, Cheryl [Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Zhou Bingsen; Yen Yun [City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Bloomston, Mark [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Knopp, Michael [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Ivy, S. Percy [Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Grever, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios, E-mail: Tanios.Saab@osumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Triapine, a novel inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR), is a potent radiosensitizer. This phase 1 study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, assessed the safety and tolerability of triapine in combination with radiation (RT) in patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPCA). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 3 dosage levels of triapine (24 mg/m{sup 2}, 48 mg/m{sup 2}, 72 mg/m{sup 2}) administered with 50.4 Gy of RT in 28 fractions. Patients with LAPCA received triapine thrice weekly, every other week during the course of RT. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was assessed during RT and for 4 weeks after its completion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and serum RR levels were evaluated as potential predictors for early response. Results: Twelve patients were treated. Four patients (1 nonevaluable) were enrolled at dosage level 1 (DL1), 3 patients at DL2, and 5 patients (2 nonevaluable) at DL3. No DLTs were observed, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Two patients (17%) achieved partial response, and 6 patients (50%) had stable disease. One patient underwent R0 resection after therapy. Ninety-two percent of patients (100% at DL3) experienced freedom from local tumor progression. In 75% of patients who eventually experienced progression, metastases developed without local progression. RR levels did not seem to predict outcome. In 4 patients with available data, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may predict early response or resistance to therapy. Conclusion: The combination of triapine at 72 mg/m{sup 2} 3 times weekly every other week and standard RT is tolerable with interesting activity in patients with LAPCA.

  4. Neoadjuvant treatment intensification or adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma rectum: The optimum treatment approach remains unresolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Haresh, K P; Rath, G K

    2015-12-01

    Rectal carcinoma [RC] is often managed with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME). Efforts are being made to improve outcome by intensifying the preoperative treatment. However, the optimum therapy remains unclear. There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimum radiation dose, chemotherapy regimen and schedule. In addition there exists growing disagreement regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant radiation or chemoradiation. We reviewed the recent land mark trials to find a road map in the management of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Preoperative short course radiotherapy has long been proven to improve local disease control. The initial trials with long course chemoradiotherapy, comparing short course radiotherapy have shown to increase local control and pathological complete response rates. Since then treatment intensification of this neoadjuvant schedule has been tried by many researchers. But initial results of these treatment intensification trials, show no significant benefit and are associated with increased toxicity. There is an unmet need to stratify patients depending on risk to assign them to long course chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherapy. Current evidence does not support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who were treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. Preoperative radiotherapy appears to improve disease control with favorable toxicity profile and there is very little to choose between long course chemoradiotherapy and short course radiotherapy. However, long course chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for patients with high risk features like positive circumferential resection margin [CRM] and extramural spread of >5mm. There is no role for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who were treated preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fibromatosis in vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap imitating tumor recurrence after surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Hole, Knut Håkon; Tønne, Elin; Ryder, Truls; Grøholt, Krystyna Kotanska; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2016-03-03

    Abdominoperineal excision is performed in patients with locally advanced, low rectal carcinoma. Reconstruction of the dorsal vagina and perineum using the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap following extensive surgery results in favorable surgical outcome and quality of life. However, the rectus abdominis muscle, as part of the anterior abdominal wall, may develop fibrous lesions also as a transplant. A 39-year-old female patient with low rectal cancer and extensive colorectal polyposis was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by colectomy and abdominoperineal excision with resection of the dorsal vaginal wall and subsequent reconstruction of the perineum using the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. At the 6-month follow-up, a suspected 2 × 2 cm tumor recurrence was detected in the transposed tissue and was subsequently surgically removed. Histologic examination concluded with fibromatosis. Genetic testing revealed a known disease-causing mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene, confirming the diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis. Fibromatosis may affect the anterior abdominal wall, that is the rectus abdominis muscle, at the primary site or may develop in the muscle after its transposition into the perineum at pelvic reconstruction. Fibromatosis in the muscle flap after pelvic reconstruction may present a difficult diagnostic challenge for the multidisciplinary team.

  6. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) resection during pancreatectomy for malignant disease of the pancreas: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheeswaran, Santhalingam; Baltatzis, Minas; Jamdar, Saurabh; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2017-06-01

    Resection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during pancreatectomy is performed infrequently and is undertaken with the aim of removing non-metastatic locally advanced pancreatic tumours. SMA resection reports also encompass resection of other visceral vessels. The consequences of resection of these different arteries are not necessarily equivalent. This is a focused systematic review of the outcome of SMA resection during pancreatectomy for cancer. A computerized search of the English language literature was undertaken for the period 1st January 2000 through 30th April 2016. The keywords "Pancreatic surgery" and "Vascular resections" were used. Thirteen studies reported 70 patients undergoing pancreatectomy with SMA resection from 10,726 undergoing pancreatectomy. Individual patient-level outcome data were available for 25. Median (range) accrual period was 132 (48-372) months. Reported peri-operative morbidity ranged from 39% to 91%. There were 5 peri-operative deaths in the 25 patients with individual-outcome data. Median survival was 11 months (95% Confidence interval 9.5-12.5 months; standard error 0.8 months). SMA resection during pancreatectomy is undertaken infrequently incurring high peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Median survival is 11 (95% CI 9.5-12.5) months. In contemporary practice there is no evidence to support SMA resection during pancreatectomy. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selection Criteria for the Radical Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansel Leigh Davies

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are over 14,000 newly diagnosed rectal cancers per year in the United Kingdom of which between 50 and 64 percent are locally advanced (T3/T4 at presentation. Pelvic exenterative surgery was first described by Brunschwig in 1948 for advanced cervical cancer, but early series reported high morbidity and mortality. This approach was later applied to advanced primary rectal carcinomas with contemporary series reporting 5-year survival rates between 32 and 66 percent and to recurrent rectal carcinoma with survival rates of 22–42%. The Swansea Pelvic Oncology Group was established in 1999 and is involved in the assessment and management of advanced pelvic malignancies referred both regionally and UK wide. This paper will set out the selection, assessment, preparation, surgery, and outcomes from pelvic exenterative surgery for locally advanced primary rectal carcinomas.

  8. Optimal localized observations for advancing beyond the ENSO predictability barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kramer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The existing 20-member ensemble of 50 yr ECHAM5/MPI-OM simulations provides a reasonably realistic Monte Carlo sample of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO. Localized observations of sea surface temperature (SST, zonal wind speed and thermocline depth are assimilated in the ensemble using sequential importance sampling to adjust the weight of ensemble members. We determine optimal observation locations, for which assimilation yields the minimal ensemble spread. Efficient observation locations for SST lie in the ENSO pattern, with the optimum located in the eastern and western Pacific for minimizing uncertainty in the NINO3 and NINO4 index, respectively. After the assimilation of the observations, we investigate how the weighted ensemble performs as a nine-month probabilistic forecast of the ENSO. Here, we focus on the spring predictability barrier with observation in the January–March (March–May period and assess the remaining predictive power in June (August for NINO3 (NINO4. For the ECHAM5/MPI-OM ensemble, this yields that SST observations around 110° W and 140° W provide the best predictive skill for the NINO3 and NINO4 index, respectively. Forecasts can be improved by additionally measuring the thermocline depth at 150° W.

  9. [Hypofractionation in locally advanced breast cancer: "flash" scheme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Marisa; Gonçalves, Sara; Fardilha, Carlos; Melo, Gilberto; Miranda, Cristina; Alves, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: O carcinoma da mama é uma das principais causas de morte no nosso país. No Serviço de Radioterapia do Instituto Português de Oncologia de Coimbra de Coimbra utilizamos, desde há mais de 30 anos, um esquema de hipofraccionamento de radioterapia, denominado “Flash”, como opção terapêutica em doentes idosos ou com baixo Performance Status, portadores de carcinoma da mama localmente avançado ou com estádios IIb ou IV, com intenção neoadjuvante ou paliativa. Objectivos: Avaliar a resposta ao tratamento, nomeadamente sobrevivência global aos três anos, resposta local e toxicidades aguda e crónica, no grupo de doentes seleccionados submetidos a esquema de hipofraccionamento, em estudo retrospectivo. Metodologia: Entre Janeiro de 2006 e Dezembro de 2008, um total de 83 doentes com diagnóstico de Carcinoma da Mama Localmente Avançado ou com estádios IIb ou IV, foi submetido a “Flash” mamário. A dose de radioterapia prescrita foi de 13Gy / 2Fr / 3 dias (em 23 doentes - 27,7%) e 26Gy / 4Fr / 2,5 semanas (em 60 doentes - 72,3%), com fotões de 4 MV, sobre a mama afectada. Foi avaliada sobrevivência global segundo o método de Kaplan-Meier. A análise estatística foi efectuada através da aplicação SPSS, versão 17.0 e os testes estatísticos foram avaliados ao nível de significância de 5%. Resultados: 80 doentes (96,4%) que efectuaram “Flash” mamário eram do género feminino, com idades compreendidas entre os 59 e os 93 anos (idade média 80,72 + 5,87 anos) e Performance Status (Karnosfsky: 0 - 100) entre 90 e 50%. Em 72 doentes (86,7%) o diagnóstico histológico foi Carcinoma Ductal Invasivo. A cirurgia após a realização do “Flash” Mamário foi realizada em 44 doentes (53%) após evidência de resposta local à radioterapia, sendo a Mastectomia Radical Modificada a técnica cirúrgica mais frequente. Efectuou-se o diagnóstico de metastização óssea em 10 doentes (12%), sendo que a taxa de sobrevivência global foi

  10. Endoscopic mucosal resection in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anis Ahmadi; Peter Draganov

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is a technique used to locally excise lesions confined to the mucosa. Its main role is the treatment of advanced dysplasia and early gastrointestinal cancers. EMR was originally described as a therapy for early gastric cancer. Recently its use has expanded as a therapeutic option for ampullary masses, colorectal cancer, and large colorectal polyps. In the Western world, the predominant indication for EMR in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the staging and treatment of advance dysplasia and early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. This review will describe the basis, indications, techniques, and complications of EMR, and its role in the management of Barrett's esophagus.

  11. MicroRNA expression profile associated with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svoboda Marek

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rectal cancer accounts for approximately one third of all colorectal cancers (CRC, which belong among leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/4 and/or cN+ includes neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil followed by radical surgical resection. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of tumors do not respond enough to the neoadjuvant treatment and these patients are at risk of relapse. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs playing significant roles in the pathogenesis of many cancers including rectal cancer. MiRNAs could present the new predictive biomarkers for rectal cancer patients. Methods We selected 20 patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer and whose tumors were classified as most sensitive or resistant to the treatment. These two groups were compared using large-scale miRNA expression profiling. Results Expression levels of 8 miRNAs significantly differed between two groups. MiR-215, miR-190b and miR-29b-2* have been overexpressed in non-responders, and let-7e, miR-196b, miR-450a, miR-450b-5p and miR-99a* have shown higher expression levels in responders. Using these miRNAs 9 of 10 responders and 9 of 10 non-responders (p Conclusions Our pilot study suggests that miRNAs are part of the mechanisms that are involved in response of rectal cancer to the chemoradiotherapy and that miRNAs may be promising predictive biomarkers for such patients. In most miRNAs we identified (miR-215, miR-99a*, miR-196b, miR-450b-5p and let-7e, the connection between their expression and radioresistance or chemoresistance to inhibitors of thymidylate synthetase was already established.

  12. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy for the locally advanced rectum cancer; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante dans le cancer du rectum localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoui, M.; Aksil, N.; Boualga, K.; Moussaoui, D.; Ladj, O. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre anti-cancer, Blida (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study which aimed at assessing the use of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, its tolerance and its feasibility in the case of a locally advanced rectum cancer. Based on data obtained among 62 patients presenting a rectum cancer, they analyse the results in terms of tolerance (cases of leukopenia, anemia, diarrhea, radiodermatitis), of relapses, and survival. Toxicity is acceptable and the concomitant treatment renders the tumour operable in many cases. Short communication

  13. Randomized Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Pazopanib Versus Placebo After Nephrectomy in Patients With Localized or Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motzer, Robert J; Haas, Naomi B; Donskov, Frede; Gross-Goupil, Marine; Varlamov, Sergei; Kopyltsov, Evgeny; Lee, Jae Lyun; Melichar, Bohuslav; Rini, Brian I; Choueiri, Toni K; Zemanova, Milada; Wood, Lori A; Reaume, M Neil; Stenzl, Arnulf; Chowdhury, Simon; Lim, Ho Yeong; McDermott, Ray; Michael, Agnieszka; Bao, Weichao; Carrasco-Alfonso, Marlene J; Aimone, Paola; Voi, Maurizio; Doehn, Christian; Russo, Paul; Sternberg, Cora N

    2017-09-13

    Purpose This phase III trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of pazopanib versus placebo in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at high risk for relapse after nephrectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 1,538 patients with resected pT2 (high grade) or ≥ pT3, including N1, clear cell RCC were randomly assigned to pazopanib or placebo for 1 year; 403 patients received a starting dose of 800 mg or placebo. To address toxicity attrition, the 800-mg starting dose was lowered to 600 mg, and the primary end point analysis was changed to disease-free survival (DFS) for pazopanib 600 mg versus placebo (n = 1,135). Primary analysis was performed after 350 DFS events in the intent-to-treat (ITT) pazopanib 600 mg group (ITT600mg), and DFS follow-up analysis was performed 12 months later. Secondary end point analyses included DFS with ITT pazopanib 800 mg (ITT800mg) and safety. Results The primary analysis results of DFS ITT600mg favored pazopanib but did not show a significant improvement over placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.06; P = .165). The secondary analysis of DFS in ITT800mg (n = 403) yielded an HR of 0.69 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.94). Follow-up analysis in ITT600mg yielded an HR of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.14). Increased ALT and AST were common adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation in the pazopanib 600 mg (ALT, 16%; AST, 5%) and 800 mg (ALT, 18%; AST, 7%) groups. Conclusion The results of the primary DFS analysis of pazopanib 600 mg showed no benefit over placebo in the adjuvant setting.

  14. Preoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Vulvar Carcinoma: Analysis of Pattern of Relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Shukla, Gaurav; Shinde, Ashwin; Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Richards, Scott; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Krivak, Thomas C. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To examine clinical outcomes and relapse patterns in locally advanced vulvar carcinoma treated using preoperative chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with stage I-IV{sub A} (stage I, n=3; stage II, n=13; stage III, n=23; stage IV{sub A}, n=3) vulvar cancer were treated with chemotherapy and IMRT via a modified Gynecological Oncology Group schema using 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with twice-daily IMRT during the first and last weeks of treatment or weekly cisplatin with daily radiation therapy. Median dose of radiation was 46.4 Gy. Results: Thirty-three patients (78.6%) had surgery for resection of vulva; 13 of these patients also had inguinal lymph node dissection. Complete pathologic response was seen in 48.5% (n=16) of these patients. Of these, 15 had no recurrence at a median time of 26.5 months. Of the 17 patients with partial pathological response, 8 (47.1%) developed recurrence in the vulvar surgical site within a median of 8 (range, 5-34) months. No patient had grade ≥3 chronic gastrointestinal/genitourinary toxicity. Of those having surgery, 8 (24.2%) developed wound infections requiring debridement. Conclusions: Preoperative chemotherapy/IMRT was well tolerated, with good pathologic response and clinical outcome. The most common pattern of recurrence was local in patients with partial response, and strategies to increase pathologic response rate with increasing dose or adding different chemotherapy need to be explored to help further improve outcomes.

  15. Comparison of preoperative short-course radiotherapy and long-course radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Saur, G.; Wehner, D.; Sweeney, R.A.; Flentje, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Thalheimer, A.; Germer, C.T. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik I

    2012-07-15

    Background: The purpose of this work was to perform a single institution comparison between preoperative short-course radiotherapy (SC-RT) and long-course radiochemotherapy (LC-RCHT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 225 patients with clinical stage UICC II-III rectal cancer were treated with SC-RT (29 Gy in 10 twice daily fractions followed by immediate surgery; n = 108) or LC-RCHT (54 Gy in 28 fractions with simultaneous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) {+-} oxaliplatin chemotherapy followed by delayed surgery; n = 117). All patients in the LC-RCHT cohort and patients in the SC-RT with pathological UICC stage {>=} II received adjuvant chemotherapy. Before 2004, the standard of care was SC-RT with LC-RCHT reserved for patients where downstaging was considered as required for sphincter preservation or curative resection. In the later period, SC-RT was practiced only for patients unfit for radiochemotherapy. Results: Patients in the LC-RCHT cohort had a significantly higher proportion of cT4 tumors, clinical node positivity, and lower tumor location. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 91% and 66% without differences between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT groups. Acute toxicity was increased during LC-RCHT (grade {>=} II 1% vs. 33%) and there were no differences in postoperative complications. Severe late toxicity grade {>=} III was increased after SC-RT (12% vs. 3%). Of patients aged > 80 years, 7 of 7 patients and 4 of 9 patients received curative surgery after SC-RT and LC-RCHT, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the fact that patients with worse prognostic factors were treated with LC-RCHT, there were no significant differences in LC and OS between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT group. Age > 80 years was identified as a significant risk factor for LC-RCHT and these patients could be treated preferably with SC-RT. (orig.)

  16. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the context of a developing country. We conclude that sequential chemoradiotherapy is better tolerated than concurrent chemoradiation in Indian patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. Patients with stage IIIa, normal weight or overweight, and adequate baseline pulmonary function should be offered concurrent chemoradiation.

  17. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....

  18. Preoperative radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced T4-primary rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, C.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schick, C.; Hohenberger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik mit Poliklinik; Papadopoulos, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Pathologie

    2000-04-01

    Herein we report on the curative resectability rate, acute toxicities, surgical complications, local control and 5-year survival rates achieved with a more aggressive multimodality regimen, including preoperative radiochemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1/1990 and 12/1998, a total of 31 patients with cT4-rectal cancer were treated at our institution. All patients presented with tumor contiguous or adherent to adjacent pelvic organs. Eight patients had synchronous distant metastases. A total radiation dose of 50.4 Gy with a small-volume boost of 5.4 to 9 Gy was delivered (single dose: 1.8 Gy). 5-FU was scheduled as a continuous infusion of 1000 mg/m{sup 2} per 24 hours on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 33. Six weeks after completion of radiochemotherapy, patients were reassessed for resectability. Results: After preoperative radiochemotherapy, 29/31 patients (94%) underwent surgery with curative intent. Resection of the pelvic tumor with negative margins was achieved in 26/31 patients (84%), 3 patients had microscopic residual pelvic disease. In 3/8 patients with distant spread at presentation a complete resection of metastases was finally accomplished. Toxicity of radiochemotherapy occurred mainly as diarrhea (NCI-CTC Grade 3: 23%), dermatitis (Grade 3: 16%) and leucopenia (Grade 3: 10%). Surgical complications appeared as anastomotic leakage in 3, wound infection in 2, fistula, abscess and hemorrhage in 1 patient, respectively. With a median follow-up of 33 months, local failure after curative resection was observed in 4 patients (19%), 3 patients (14%) developed distant metastases. The 5-year overall survival rate for the entire group of 31 patients was 51%, following curative surgery 68%. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die Rate an kurativen (R0) Resektionen nach praeoperativer Radiochemotherapie, die Toxizitaet der Radiochemotherapie, die chirurgische Morbiditaet sowie die lokale Kontrolle und das Fuenf-Jahres-Gesamtueberleben nach multimodaler Therapie

  19. Do all locally advanced rectal cancers require radiation? A review of literature in the modern era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, David T; Hazard, Lisa J

    2010-09-01

    Potentially curable rectal cancer is primarily treated with surgical resection. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiotherapy is often utilized for patients deemed to be at unacceptable risk for local recurrence. The purpose of this article is to review the pertinent literature and elucidate the role of radiotherapy in patients with an intermediate risk of local recurrence. The addition of chemoradiotherapy is recommended in the majority of patients with transmural or node positive rectal cancer. However, some patients with favorable characteristics may have only a small incremental benefit from the addition of radiotherapy. The decision to treat or not to treat should take into consideration the patient and physician tolerance of risk of recurrence and risk of treatment related toxicity. The primary factors identified for determining low risk patients are circumferential radial margin (CRM), location within the rectum, and nodal status. Patients at lowest risk have widely negative CRM (>2mm), proximal lesions (>10cm from the anal verge), and no nodal disease. Patients with all three low risk factors have an absolute reduction in local recurrence that is <5% and may be eligible to forego radiotherapy. Additional factors identified which may impact local recurrence risk are elevated serum CEA level, lymphovascular space invasion, pathologic grade, and extramural space invasion.

  20. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser-Sierra Juan; Bargallo-Rocha Enrique; Morales-Barrera Rafael; Saavedra-Perez David; Gamboa-Vignolle Carlos; Arrieta Oscar; Alvarado-Miranda Alberto; Perez-Sanchez Victor; Ramirez-Ugalde Teresa; Lara-Medina Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamid...

  1. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced or recurrent penile squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ye Liu; Yong-Hong Li; Zhuo-Wei Liu; Zhi-Ling Zhang; Yun-Lin Ye; Kai Yao; Hui Han; Zi-Ke Qin; Fang-Jian Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis after conventional treatment is dismal. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin on local y advanced or recurrent SCC of the penis. Between April 1999 and May 2011, we treated 5 patients with locally advanced penile SCC and 7 patients with recurrent disease with intraarterial chemotherapy. The response rate and toxicity data were analyzed, and survival rates were calculated. After 2 to 6 cycles of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, 1 patients with locoregional y advanced disease achieved a complete response, and 4 achieved partial response. Of the 7 patients with recurrent disease, 2 achieved complete response, 3 achieved partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 developed progressive disease. An objective tumor response was therefore achieved in 10 of the 12 patients. The median overal survival for the patients was 24 months (range, 10-50 months). Three out of 10 patients who responded were long-term survivors after intraarterial chemotherapy. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin may be effective and potential y curative in locoregional y advanced or recurrent penile SCC. The contribution of this therapy in the primary management of advanced or recurrent penile SCC should be prospectively investigated.

  2. High pathologic complete remission rate from induction docetaxel, platinum and fluorouracil (DCF) combination chemotherapy for locally advanced esophageal and junctional cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Jandyal, Sunny; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Prabhash, Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Adding docetaxel to the cisplatin/5-fluorouracil induction regimen for locally advanced esophageal and GEJ cancer may increase the pathologic complete remission (pCR) rate, leading to an improved outcome. Institutional ethics committee approved the protocol of retrospective analysis of patients with locally advanced esophageal and GEJ carcinoma, who received 2-3 cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF) induction chemotherapy with primary growth factors and prophylactic antibiotics. Following chemotherapy, a restaging scan was performed. If disease was deemed resectable, surgery was performed. Between February 2010 and October 2013, 31 patients received induction DCF. Ninety-four percent patients had squamous histology. Response rate was 81 %: complete remission (CR)-23 % and partial remission-58 %. Eighty-seven percent patients underwent surgery; R0 resection rate was 67 %. pCR occurred in 26 %. Common grade 3/4 toxicities included anemia-23 %, neutropenia-42 %, febrile neutropenia-39 %, diarrhea-39 %, hyponatremia-55 % and hypokalemia-39 %. There were no toxic deaths. At a median follow-up of 34 months (95 % CI 31.3-36.6), estimated median progression-free survival (PFS) was 27 months (95 % CI 11-39) and the overall survival (OS) at 1 year, 2 years and 3 years was 80, 68 and 55 %, respectively. Patients who attained pCR had a significant longer PFS and OS; median PFS and OS were not reached in patients with pCR and were 15 months (95 %CI 8.4-21.5 months), P = 0.012 and 25 months (95 %CI 10.3-39.7), P = 0.023, respectively, in patients who did not attain a pCR. DCF induction chemotherapy leads to pCR of 26 %, which rivals that obtained from chemoradiotherapy. Toxicity is substantial but manageable with adequate supportive care.

  3. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION OF PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shaplygin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of retrospective analysis of treatment of 311 patients in Samara Oncology Center in 2008–2011 with locally advanced prostate cancer are presented. According to the received treatment patients were divided into 3 groups: 103 underwent HIFU, 101 patients had a course of EBRT, 107 patients received only hormone therapy (HT. Overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after HIFU therapy was 86.2 %, after EBRT and HT – 66.3% and 18.1 %, respectively. These data indicate a high clinical efficacy of ultrasound ablation. 

  4. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, C; Dahele, M; Paul, M A; van de Ven, P M; de Langen, A J; Senan, S; Smit, E F; Hartemink, K J

    2016-04-01

    Curative intent treatment options for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. In selected patients, surgery can be technically feasible, although it is widely believed to be hazardous. As data regarding the outcome of this approach is sparse, we evaluated our institutional experience with salvage surgery. Patients with a pulmonary resection for in-field locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy (≥60 Gy) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, were identified and retrospectively analyzed. A total of 15 patients treated between January 2007 and August 2015 were eligible for evaluation. In 13 patients (87%), the indication for surgery was a locoregional recurrence, while 2 patients had persistent tumor. The prior median radiotherapy dose was 66 Gy (range 60-70). All patients underwent an anatomical resection, with 8 patients having a pneumonectomy, and all pathological specimens revealed the presence of viable tumor. The in-hospital morbidity rate was 40% (6 patients), and the 90-day mortality rate was 6.7% (1 patient). Median follow-up was 12.1 months. The estimated median overall and event-free survivals were 46 months and 43.6 months, respectively. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy, resulted in acceptable morbidity, mortality and promising outcome. It should be considered as a treatment option for selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pathologic complete remission in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing-Hua; An, Xin; Lin, Xi; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Liu, Guo-Chen; Kong, Ling-Heng; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-10-20

    Patients with pathological complete remission (pCR) after treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) have better long-term outcome and may receive conservative treatments in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The study aimed to evaluate the value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pCR in LARC treated with nCRT. In total, 120 patients entered this study. Sixty-one consecutive patients received preoperative forceps biopsy during endoscopic examination. Ex vivo core needle biopsy was performed in resected specimens of another 43 consecutive patients. The accuracy for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly higher than forceps biopsy (76.7% vs. 36.1%; p core needle biopsy was significantly lower in good responder (TRG 3) than poor responder (TRG ≤ 2) (52.9% vs. 94.1%; p = 0.017). In vivo core needle biopsy was further performed in 16 patients with good response. Eleven patients had residual cancer cells in final resected specimens, among whom 4 (36.4%) patients were biopsy positive. In conclusion, routine forceps biopsy was of limited value in identifying pCR after nCRT. Although core needle biopsy might further identify a subset of patients with residual cancer cells, the accuracy was not substantially increased in good responders.

  6. Benefits of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy during curative surgery in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-bin; YU Jian-chun; MA Zhi-qiang; KANG Wei-ming; ZHOU Li; YE Xin

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little information on the impact of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy on gastric cancer.The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer and undergoing curative resection,with a focus on evaluating survival benefits and tolerance of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy.Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathological data for 264 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for gastric cancer at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2002 to January 2007.Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests.Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox proportional hazard model.Results Patients who received intra-operative systemic chemotherapy had higher 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P=0.019 and 0.010,respectively) than patients who did not receive intra-operative systemic chemotherapy.In the subgroup analysis,systemic intra-operative chemotherapy benefited the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates for patients with cancer of stage pTNM ⅠB-ⅢB,but not stage pTNM ⅢC.Patients who received intra-operative systemic chemotherapy in combination with post-operative chemotherapy had higher 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P=0.046 and 0.021,respectively) than patients who only received postoperative chemotherapy.However,the difference in these rates between patients who received only intra-operative systemic chemotherapy and patients who only received curative surgery was not statistically significant (P=0.150 and 0.170,respectively).Multivariate analyses showed that intra-operative systemic chemotherapy was a favorable prognostic factor for the overall survival and disease-free survival rates (P =0.048 and 0.023,respectively).No grade 4 toxicities related to intra-operative systemic chemotherapy were recorded within the

  7. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B.; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R.; Latz, J.; Schneider, M.

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusi...

  8. Induction chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin followed by chemoradiotherapy before total mesorectal excision in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, J.V.; Larsen, F O; Rasch, L

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer has no impact on overall survival (OS) and distant recurrences. The aim of the study was to evaluate local downstaging, toxicity and long-term outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after induction therapy...

  9. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonanno L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Bonanno,1 Giulia Zago,1 Giuseppe Marulli,2 Paola Del Bianco,3 Marco Schiavon,2 Giulia Pasello,1 Valentina Polo,1,4 Fabio Canova,1 Fabrizio Tonetto,5 Lucio Loreggian,5 Federico Rea,2 PierFranco Conte,1,4 Adolfo Favaretto1 1Medical Oncology Unit 2, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 2Thoracic Surgery Department, University of Padova, 3Clinical Trials and Biostatistics Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 4Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 5Radiotherapy Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy Objectives: If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1, paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1, and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8 for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results: In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system. A total of 36 (62% patients achieved partial response (PR, and six (10% progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62% cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64% patients underwent surgery

  10. The preliminary result of a prospective study of bladder conserving treatment using transurethral resection, transarterial chemotherapy and local involved field radiotherapy in invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Hisato; Nagata, Maki; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Nagashima, Toshiyuki; Tanohata, Kazunori [Yokohama Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Radical cystectomy has been a standard treatment for invasive urinary bladder cancer, however preservation therapy is being considered in many facilities as a clinical examination. After transurethral resection of the bladder (TUR-Bt), three-time transarterial infusion (TAI) of cisplatin (CDDP) 45 mg/m{sup 2}, methotrexate (MTX) 30 mg/m{sup 2} and local five-port external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of 60 Gy/30 fx/ 6 wks were delivered concurrently. Because such reports of organ sparing treatment using TAI are few, a mono-arm prospective study was designed to evaluate the rate of complete response (CR) (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumor (RECIST) standard) and the incidence of acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute (NCI) standard) compared with previous reports in which intravenous chemotherapy was used in a tri-modality treatment protocol. Twenty-three patients with T{sub 2-4}N{sub 0}M{sub 0} or High risk T{sub 1}N{sub 0}M{sub 0} were registered (T{sub 1}; 7, T{sub 2}; 7, T{sub 3}; 8, T{sub 4}; 1). They were all in good performance status (PS) (0-1). CR rate after intravesical therapy with bacilli Calmette-Guerin (BCG) was eighty-seven percent (confidence interval (CI) 66-97%). There was a significant difference (p=0.03) between this value and that (CR rate=62%, n=299) calculated from two reports in which transvenous chemotherapy was used as one of the treatment modalities. Grade three white blood cell decrease was seen in twenty-six percent of patients. This was significantly higher than the value estimated from reports using cisplatin only as the single chemotherapy agent. An acute reaction of the urinary bladder and rectum was negligible. After fifteen-month follow-up, four patients relapsed and two showed metastatic lesions. According to the protocol, three of the former four had already received cystectomy, but one had undergone an intra-vesicle BCG injection because it showed non-invasive papillary histology, and reached CR again. M

  11. Radiotherapy for patients with isolated local recurrence of primary resected pancreatic cancer. Prolonged disease-free interval associated with favorable prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira; Itasaka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Michio; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto University, Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Takaori, Kyoichi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Uemoto, Shinji [Kyoto University, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of radiotherapy and prognostic factors for recurrent pancreatic cancer. The study comprised 30 patients who developed a locoregional recurrence of primarily resected pancreatic cancer and received radiotherapy between 2000 and 2013 with a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 39-60 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy included gemcitabine for 18 patients and S-1 for seven patients. The treatment outcomes and prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed. The median follow-up after radiotherapy was 14.6 months. The 1-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 69 %, 67 %, and 32 %, respectively. The median overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 15.9 and 6.9 months, respectively. Tumor marker reduction and ≥ 50 % reduction were observed in 18 and two patients, respectively. Of the seven patients who exhibited pain symptoms, four and two patients were partly and completely relieved, respectively. Late grade 3 ileus and gastroduodenal bleeding were observed in one patient each. Among the clinicopathological factors evaluated, only a disease-free interval of greater than 18.9 months exhibited a significant association with improved overall survival (p = 0.017). Radiotherapy for isolated locally recurrent pancreatic cancer resulted in encouraging local control, overall survival, and palliative effects with mild toxicity, particularly in patients with a prolonged disease-free interval. This treatment strategy should be prospectively evaluated. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung strahlentherapeutischer Behandlungsergebnisse und prognostischer Faktoren bei rezidivierendem Pankreaskrebs. In dieser Studie wurden 30 Patienten aufgenommen, bei denen es nach primaer reseziertem Pankreaskrebs zu lokoregionaeren Rezidiven kam und die zwischen 2000 und 2013 strahlentherapeutisch mit einer mittleren Dosis von 54 Gy (Bereich 39-60 Gy) behandelt wurden. Im Rahmen der gleichzeitig durchgefuehrten Chemotherapie wurde

  12. EFFECT OF EXTENT OF ANTERIOR RESECTION AND SEX ON DISEASE-FREE SURVIVAL AND LOCAL RECURRENCE IN PATIENTS WITH RECTAL-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUHRE, LMD; MULDER, NH; DERUITER, AJ; VANLOON, AJ; VERSCHUEREN, RCJ

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented following 119 curative resections for rectal cancer performed on 47 women and 72 men. Throughout the study it was policy to remove part of the female genital tract when the rectal tumour impinged on the uterus and/or the posterior vaginal wall. After a median follow-up of 7.5 y

  13. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia for treatment of primary locally advanced cervix cancer: results in 378 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franckena, M.; Lutgens, L.C.; Koper, P.C.; Kleynen, C.E.; Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Jobsen, J.J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Creutzberg, C.L.; Dielwart, M.F.; Norden, Y. Van; Canters, R.A.; Rhoon, G.C. van; Zee, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report response rate, pelvic tumor control, survival, and late toxicity after treatment with combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia (RHT) for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and compare the results with other published series. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1996 to

  14. Parenteral Nutrition for Patients Treated for Locally Advanced Inoperable Tumors of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage IV; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage IV; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm

  15. A COX-2 inhibitor combined with chemoradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Mortensen, John Pløen; Bisgaard, Claus;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effect of a COX-2 inhibitor in addition to chemoradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 35 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. All patients had a tumor localised....

  16. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Lænsø Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary–interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented...

  17. Systematic Review of Adrenalectomy and Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekema, Hendrika J.; MacLennan, Steven; Imamura, Mari; Lam, Thomas B. L.; Stewart, Fiona; Scott, Neil; MacLennan, Graeme; McClinton, Sam; Griffiths, T. R. Leyshon; Skolarikos, Andreas; MacLennan, Sara J.; Sylvester, Richard; Ljungberg, Borje; N'Dow, James

    2013-01-01

    Context: Controversy remains over whether adrenalectomy and lymph node dissection (LND) should be performed concomitantly with radical nephrectomy (RN) for locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cT3-T4N0M0. Objective: To systematically review all relevant literature comparing oncologic, periope

  18. Women with inoperable or locally advanced breast cancer -- what characterizes them?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Charnoubi, Waseem Asim Ghulam; Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Tange, Ulla Brix;

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Danish women. Locally advanced breast cancer occurs in a relatively large proportion of all new primary breast cancer diagnoses and for unexplained reasons 20-30% of women with breast cancer wait more than eight weeks from the initial breast cancer...

  19. Advanced Methods for Passive Acoustic Detection, Classification, and Localization of Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Classification, and Localization of Marine Mammals Jonathan Klay NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) 2115 SE OSU Dr. Newport, OR...classify marine mammal vocalizations and ultimately, in some cases, provide data for estimating the population density of the species present. In...types of marine mammal sounds. OBJECTIVES We are developing advanced real-time passive acoustic marine mammal detection, classification, and

  20. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution.

  1. Liquid fiducial marker performance during radiotherapy of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhög, Jonas Scherman; Mortensen, Steen Riisgaard; Larsen, Klaus Richter

    2016-01-01

    We analysed the positional and structural stability of a long-term biodegradable liquid fiducial marker (BioXmark) for radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Markers were injected via endoscopic- or endobronchial ultrasound in lymph nodes and reachable primary tumours. Marker...

  2. Systematic Review of Adrenalectomy and Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekema, Hendrika J.; MacLennan, Steven; Imamura, Mari; Lam, Thomas B. L.; Stewart, Fiona; Scott, Neil; MacLennan, Graeme; McClinton, Sam; Griffiths, T. R. Leyshon; Skolarikos, Andreas; MacLennan, Sara J.; Sylvester, Richard; Ljungberg, Borje; N'Dow, James

    2013-01-01

    Context: Controversy remains over whether adrenalectomy and lymph node dissection (LND) should be performed concomitantly with radical nephrectomy (RN) for locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cT3-T4N0M0. Objective: To systematically review all relevant literature comparing oncologic,

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene and chemoradiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Ploen, John

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive impact of polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene on the response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This study included two cohorts of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving long-course CRT. The HIF-1α C1772T (rs11549465...

  4. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Té

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation...

  5. Hybrid resection of duodenal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultsides, George A; Pappou, Emmanouil P; Bloom, George Peter; Orlando, Rocco

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review our experience with the hand-assisted laparoscopic management of duodenal tumors with no or low malignant potential and to compare this approach with published case reports of purely laparoscopic local duodenal resection. Eight cases of hand-assisted laparoscopic local duodenal resection performed from 2000 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Hand-assistance was utilized for complete duodenal mobilization, and local duodenal resection was accomplished extracorporeally through the hand-access incision. Patient and tumor characteristics, operative time, length of stay, and complications were compared with 18 cases of totally laparoscopic local excision of duodenal tumors published since 1997. Patients with ampullary tumors were excluded. Compared with the purely laparoscopic approach, the hand-assisted technique was associated with shorter operative time (179 versus 131 minutes, P=.03) and was more commonly used for lesions located in the third portion of the duodenum (0% versus 37.5%, P=.02). Tumor size (2.9 cm versus 3.2 cm, P=.61) and length of hospital stay (5.9 versus 5.9 days, P=.96) were similar between the two groups. The rate of complications was also comparable (0% versus 12.5%, P=.31); 1 of 8 patients in the hand-assisted group developed an incisional hernia at the hand-access site. Hand-assisted laparoscopic local duodenal resection is a feasible, safe, and effective alternative to the totally laparoscopic approach. In addition to being associated with comparable length of hospital stay, hand-assistance can shorten operative time by facilitating duodenal mobilization as well as extracorporeal duodenal resection and closure.

  6. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  7. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on locally advanced cervical cancer by internal iliac arterial infusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen; Aiping; Ding; Zhaoxia; Xu; Bing; Zhao; Shuping; Dai; Shuzhen

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of preoperative chemotherapy on locally advanced cervical cancer by internal iliac arterial infusion.Methods:Sixty two patients with bulky or locally advanced cervical cancer from 1999 to 2004 were underwent internal iliac arterial infusion chemotherapy by using Seldinger technique.Combined regimens were applied including cisplatin as the major drug.Two weeks later,all patients received radical hysterectomy.Results:The local tumor regression rate was 93.55%.Postoperative pathologic examination showed that no cervical tumor residue in stumps were found in 61 of 62 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy.Large quantity of necrotic tissue appeared on primary tumor.In 16 patients with positive lymph nodes,15 demonstrated necrotic lymph nodes.Conclusion:Internal iliac arterial infusion chemotherapy could effectively reduce tumor volume,increase surgical success rate and decrease lymph nodes and subclinical metastasis rates.

  8. De novo sequencing of circulating miRNAs identifies novel markers predicting clinical outcome of locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiwei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been recently detected in the circulation of cancer patients, where they are associated with clinical parameters. Discovery profiling of circulating small RNAs has not been reported in breast cancer (BC, and was carried out in this study to identify blood-based small RNA markers of BC clinical outcome. Methods The pre-treatment sera of 42 stage II-III locally advanced and inflammatory BC patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT followed by surgical tumor resection were analyzed for marker identification by deep sequencing all circulating small RNAs. An independent validation cohort of 26 stage II-III BC patients was used to assess the power of identified miRNA markers. Results More than 800 miRNA species were detected in the circulation, and observed patterns showed association with histopathological profiles of BC. Groups of circulating miRNAs differentially associated with ER/PR/HER2 status and inflammatory BC were identified. The relative levels of selected miRNAs measured by PCR showed consistency with their abundance determined by deep sequencing. Two circulating miRNAs, miR-375 and miR-122, exhibited strong correlations with clinical outcomes, including NCT response and relapse with metastatic disease. In the validation cohort, higher levels of circulating miR-122 specifically predicted metastatic recurrence in stage II-III BC patients. Conclusions Our study indicates that certain miRNAs can serve as potential blood-based biomarkers for NCT response, and that miR-122 prevalence in the circulation predicts BC metastasis in early-stage patients. These results may allow optimized chemotherapy treatments and preventive anti-metastasis interventions in future clinical applications.

  9. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy first, followed by chemoradiation and then surgery, in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercek, Andrea; Goodman, Karyn A; Hajj, Carla; Weisberger, Emily; Segal, Neil H; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L; Stadler, Zsofia K; Wu, Abraham J; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Saltz, Leonard B

    2014-04-01

    Standard therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) the authors began offering FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) as initial treatment for patients with high-risk LARC to target micrometastases while treating the primary tumor. The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of initial FOLFOX given before chemoradiotherapy on tumor downsizing and pathologic complete response (pathCR) in LARC. The records of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer treated at MSKCC between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Of approximately 300 patients with LARC treated at MSKCC, 61 received FOLFOX as initial therapy. Of these 61 patients, 57 received induction FOLFOX (median 7 cycles) followed by chemoradiation, and 4 experienced an excellent response, declined chemoradiation, and underwent total mesorectal excision (TME). Twelve of the 61 patients did not undergo TME: 9 had a complete clinical response (CCR), 1 declined despite persistent tumor, 1 declined because of comorbidities, and 1 developed metastatic disease. Among the 61 patients receiving initial FOLFOX, 22 (36%) had either a pathCR (n=13) or a CCR (n=9). Of the 49 patients who underwent TME, all had R0 resections and 23 (47%) had tumor response greater than 90%, including 13 (27%) who experienced a pathCR. Of the 28 patients who received all 8 cycles of FOLFOX, 8 experienced a pathCR (29%) and 3 a CCR (11%). No serious adverse events occurred that required a delay in treatment during FOLFOX or chemoradiation. FOLFOX and chemoradiation before planned TME results in tumor regression, a high rate of delivery of planned therapy, and a substantial rate of pathCRs, and offers a good platform for nonoperative management in select patients.

  10. Minimally invasive (robotic assisted thoracic surgery and video-assisted thoracic surgery) lobectomy for the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao-Xian; Woo, Kaitlin M.; Sima, Camelia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Insufficient data exist on the results of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) traditionally approached by thoracotomy. The use of telerobotic surgical systems may allow for greater utilization of MIS approaches to locally advanced disease. We will review the existing literature on MIS for locally advanced disease and briefly report on the results of a recent study conducted at our institution. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a prospective single institution database to identify patients with clinical stage II and IIIA NSCLC who underwent lobectomy following induction chemotherapy. The patients were classified into two groups (MIS and thoracotomy) and were compared for differences in outcomes and survival. Results From January 2002 to December 2013, 428 patients {397 thoracotomy, 31 MIS [17 robotic and 14 video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS)]} underwent induction chemotherapy followed by lobectomy. The conversion rate in the MIS group was 26% (8/31) The R0 resection rate was similar between the groups (97% for MIS vs. 94% for thoracotomy; P=0.71), as was postoperative morbidity (32% for MIS vs. 33% for thoracotomy; P=0.99). The median length of hospital stay was shorter in the MIS group (4 vs. 5 days; P<0.001). The 3-year overall survival (OS) was 48.3% in the MIS group and 56.6% in the thoracotomy group (P=0.84); the corresponding 3-year DFS were 49.0% and 42.1% (P=0.19). Conclusions In appropriately selected patients with NSCLC, MIS approaches to lobectomy following induction therapy are feasible and associated with similar disease-free and OS to those following thoracotomy. PMID:27195138

  11. Immediate locally advanced breast cancer and chest wall reconstruction: surgical planning and reconstruction strategies with extended V-Y latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo; Okada, Alberto; Brasil, José Augusto; Gemperli, Rolf; Filassi, José Roberto; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-06-01

    Surgical resection in locally advanced breast cancer produces large defects that may not be suitable for primary closure. Immediate reconstruction is controversial and presents a complicated scenario for breast surgeons and plastic surgeons. In this study, a different design was planned for the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap with primary closure in V-Y for the correction of major lesions in the anterior chest wall. Twenty-five patients underwent immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction with a V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. This flap was raised from adjacent tissue located on the lateral and posterior thoracic region and presented a triangular shape whose base was the lateral aspect of the mastectomy wound. The technique was indicated in patients with large thoracic wounds. Mean follow-up time was 16 months. Closure was obtained in the donor and recipient sites without the use of skin grafts or other more major procedures. Complications occurred in nine patients (36 percent), including dorsal wound dehiscence in five patients and seroma in three. All cases except one were treated by a conservative approach with a good result. No total flap loss was reported. All patients achieved a satisfactory thoracic reconstruction and adequate wound care. The V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is a reliable technique for immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction. The technique is advantageous because the V-Y design allows primary closure of the chest wound and donor defect. Success depends on patient selection, coordinated planning with the breast cancer surgeon, and careful intraoperative management.

  12. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Cathholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0{+-}8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV{sup peak)} and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV{sup peak,} MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV{sup peakw}as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm{sup 3(}range, 0.1-131.0cm{sup 3)}. The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV{sup peak6}.2 and MTV 20.7cm{sup 3w}ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  13. Overall survival and local recurrence of 406 completely resected stage IIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients: questionnaire survey of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group to plan for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Y; Kato, H; Koike, T; Tsuchiya, R; Fujisawa, T; Shimizu, N; Watanabe, Y; Mitsudomi, T; Yoshimura, M

    2001-10-01

    the group of completely resected stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) is considered to be heterogeneous in various aspects including survival and the recurrent pattern. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the factors which separate these patients into high and low risk groups based on the survival and local recurrence. a questionnaire survey on the survival and local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer patients with pathological stage IIIA-N2 disease who underwent a complete resection from January 1992 to December 1993 was performed by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group as of July 1999. The information on the survival of 406 patients and that of local recurrence in 332 of them was available. the 5-year survival of the 406 patients was 31.0%. In a univariate analysis, the age, clinical and pathological T status, number of N2 stations, pathological N1 disease, operative modality and postoperative radiotherapy were all found to be important prognostic factors. Clinical N2 disease marginally influenced the survival (P=0.07). In a multivariate analysis of these variables including clinical N2 disease, the survival was significantly worse in the case of multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=1.741), the presence of pathological N1 disease (1.403), pathological T2 or 3 disease (1.399) and an age older than 65 (1.327). The rate of freedom from any local recurrence at the bronchial stump, or in the hilar, mediastinal or supraclavicular lymph nodes at 5 years was 64%. In a univariate analysis of the freedom from local recurrence, the clinical N status, pathological T status, pathological N1 disease and number of N2 stations were all found to be important prognostic factors. A multivariate analysis revealed the freedom from local recurrence to be adversely influenced by multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=2.05), and the presence of either clinical N1 or 2 (1.733) disease. The 5-year survival and the rate of freedom from local recurrence at 5

  14. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Ahn, Ki Jung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Han [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m{sup 2}) in local control was evaluated. The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m{sup 2} as a cutoff value. Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted.

  15. HDAC inhibitor-loaded bone cement for advanced local treatment of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonak, Marcus; Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Eckhard, Lukas; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Wehler, Thomas C; Proschek, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma, especially wide resection, is challenging. An additional local drug therapy after resection using anti-neoplastic bone cement (Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)) could help improve the outcome of therapy. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PMMA loaded with valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the cell activity of a SaOs-2 cell culture, as well as the elution rate of the drugs out of the bone cement. In our experiments, we used the SaOs-2 osteosarcoma and the SW1353 chondrosarcoma cell line. Bone cement clots (5 g) were prepared and loaded with different drug concentrations of VPA (25 mg and 50 mg) and SAHA (1 mg, 2.5 mg and 5 mg). Two control groups were established, one with a native cement clot, the other with human mesenchymal stem cells, in order to evaluate toxicity on non tumor-cells. Cell activity was measured using an Alamar Blue assay on days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7. The cement clots were additionally examined in a material testing unit for biomechanical and structural changes. Tumor cells showed a significant and complete reduction of activity under therapy with VPA and SAHA. Drug release of VPA was extensive between days 0 and 3 and decreased progressively to day 7. Cumulative drug concentration in the medium continuously increased. Biomechanical testing of the cement clots showed no differences in stability and architecture compared to the control group. SaOs-2 and SW1353 cells with medium from native cement clots without drug therapy presented a cell activity of 100% in all groups and during all measurements. Human mesenchymal stem cells were not significantly affected during therapy with VPA and low concentrations of SAHA. In contrast, cell activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was significantly reduced under therapy with higher concentrations of SAHA, with an approximately linear decrease between days 0-3 and a rapidly decreasing activity between days 4-7. A local cytotoxic therapy in the

  16. Local conjugacy theorem, rank theorems in advanced calculus and a generalized principle for constructing Banach manifolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Applications of locally fine property for operators are further developed. Let E and F be Banach spaces and f: be C1 nonlinear map, where U (x0) is an open set containing point x0∈E. With the locally fine property for Frechet derivatives f′(x) and generalized rank theorem for f′(x), a local conjugacy theorem, i.e. a characteristic condition for f being conjugate to f′(x0) near x0,is proved. This theorem gives a complete answer to the local conjugacy problem. Consequently, several rank theorems in advanced calculus are established, including a theorem for C1 Fredholm map which has been so far unknown. Also with this property the concept of regular value is extended, which gives rise to a generalized principle for constructing Banach submanifolds.

  17. Local conjugacy theorem, rank theorems in advanced calculus and a generalized principle for constructing Banach manifolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马吉溥

    2000-01-01

    Applications of locally fine property for operators are further developed. Let E and F be Banach spaces and f: U( x0) E—→F be C1 nonlinear map, where U (x0) is an open set containing point x0∈ E. With the locally fine property for Frechet derivatives f’ (x) and generalized rank theorem for f ’( x), a local conjugacy theorem, i. e. a characteristic condition for f being conjugate to f (x0) near x0,is proved. This theorem gives a complete answer to the local conjugacy problem. Consequently, several rank theorems in advanced calculus are established, including a theorem for C1 Fredholm map which has been so far unknown. Also with this property the concept of regular value is extended, which gives rise to a generalized principle for constructing Banach submanifolds.

  18. Radical resection of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Koliopanos; C Avgerinos; Athanasios Farfaras; C Manes; Christos Dervenis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) is a disease with dismal prognosis, and the only possibility of cure, albeit small, is based on the combination of complete resection with negative histopathological margins (R0 resection) with adjuvant treatment. Therefore, a lot of effort has been made during the last decade to assess the role of extensive surgery in both local recurrence and survival of patients with PCa. DATA SOURCES:Medline search and manual cross-referencing were utilized to identify published evidence-based data for PCa surgery between 1973 and 2006, with emphasis to feasibility, efifcacy, long-term survival, disease free survival, recurrence rates, pain relief and quality of life. RESULTS: Extended surgery is safe and feasible in high volume surgical centers with comparable short-term results. Organ preserving surgery is a main goal because of quality of life reasons and is performed whenever possible from the tumor extent. Concerning long-term survival major vein resection does not adversely affect outcome. To date, there are no changes in long-term survival attributed to the extended lymph node dissection. However, there is a beneift in locoregional control with fewer local recurrences and extended lymphadenectomy allows better staging for the disease. CONCLUSIONS:Extended PCa surgery is safe and feasible despite the inconclusive results in patient's survival beneift. In the future, appropriately powered randomized trials of standard vs. extended resections may show improved outcomes for PCa patients.

  19. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Creates Surgery Opportunities For Inoperable Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghao; Hou, Lingmi; Chen, Maoshan; Zhou, Yan; Liang, Yueyang; Wang, Shushu; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the systematic chemotherapy given to patients with locally advanced and inoperable breast caner, has been proven to be of great clinical values. Many scientific reports confirmed NAC could effectively eliminate sub-clinical disseminated lesions of tumor, and improve long-term and disease-free survival rate of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC); however, up to now, LABC is still a serious clinical issue given improved screening and early diagnosis. This study, with main focus on inoperable LABC, investigated the values of NAC in converting inoperable LABC into operable status and assessed the prognosis. Sixty-one patients with inoperable LABC were initially treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy; their local conditions were improved to operable status. Radical surgery was exerted on 49 patients. Original chemotherapy was performed after surgery, followed by local radiotherapy. And endocrine therapy was optional according to the hormone receptor status. The quality of life for most patients with skin diabrosis was obviously improved because their local conditions were under control. For all recruited cases, the survival duration and life quality were significantly improved in patients who finished both NAC and surgery compared to those who did not. Further more, this study demonstrates improved prognostic consequences.

  20. Local Institutional Development and Organizational Change for Advancing Sustainable Urban Water Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rebekah R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the local institutional and organizational development insights from a five-year ongoing interdisciplinary research project focused on advancing the implementation of sustainable urban water management. While it is broadly acknowledged that the inertia associated with administrative systems is possibly the most significant obstacle to advancing sustainable urban water management, contemporary research still largely prioritizes investigations at the technological level. This research is explicitly concerned with critically informing the design of methodologies for mobilizing and overcoming the administrative inertia of traditional urban water management practice. The results of fourteen in-depth case studies of local government organizations across Metropolitan Sydney primarily reveal that (i) the political institutionalization of environmental concern and (ii) the commitment to local leadership and organizational learning are key corporate attributes for enabling sustainable management. A typology of five organizational development phases has been proposed as both a heuristic and capacity benchmarking tool for urban water strategists, policy makers, and decision makers that are focused on improving the level of local implementation of sustainable urban water management activity. While this investigation has focused on local government, these findings do provide guideposts for assessing the development needs of future capacity building programs across a range of different institutional contexts.

  1. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  2. Locally advanced leiomyosarcoma of the spleen. A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recchia Franco

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leiomyosarcomas are rare tumours, predominantly localized in the stomach, small intestine and retroperitoneum. Only one case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the spleen is described in human beings in literature. Case presentation We report a case of locally advanced primary leiomyosarcoma of the spleen in a 54 year-old woman, diagnosed only after splenectomy, performed with the suspicion of splenic haematoma. Conclusion Due to the lack of cases, no specific chemotherapy regimen has been tested to provide a longer survival.

  3. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Kojima, Nahoko; Himei, Kengo; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Ishii, Tetsuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Twenty-nine patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDFR) for a total dose of 72 Gy to 82 Gy combined with Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) of CDDP+5FU and concurrent chemotherapy of low dose CBDCA between 1994 and 1997. Twenty-one cases (72%) had complete response and sixteen cases recurred. The relapse-free rate at 2 years was 23.4% and the actual 2-year survival rate was 42.0%. No severe toxicity has been observed. Based on this investigation, it was concluded that TDFR with chemotherapy is a promising modality for locally advanced head and neck cancer and toxicity is acceptable. (author)

  4. Comprehensive clinical study of concurrent chemotherapy breathing IMRT middle part of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Moon, Seong Kwon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University , Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Songho College, Hoengseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The standard treatment of locally advanced type of mid-esophageal cancer is concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). We evaluated the feasibility of chemotherapy with adding docetaxel to the classical basic regimens of cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy up to 70.2 Gy using dose escalations for esophageal cancer. It was possible to escalate radiation treatment dose up to 70.2 Gy by the respiratory-gated intensity- modulated radiotherapy (gated-IMRT) based on the 4DCT-simulation, with improving target coverage and normal tissue (ex., lung, heart, and spinal cord) sparing. This study suggested that the definitive chemo-radiotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (i.e., DCF-R) and gating IMRT is tolerable and active in patients with locally advanced mid-esophageal cancer (AEC)

  5. Locally-advanced prostate cancer in the elderly: should we revisit our treatment paradigms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lughezzani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa represents the most common malignancy in adult males with an estimated number of 280 000 newly diagnosed cases only in the United States in 2015. [1] Due to the introduction of PSA in clinical practice, the majority of the patients are currently diagnosed with organ-confined and sometimes indolent disease. However, a nonnegligible proportion of individuals are still diagnosed with locally-advanced tumors. In their recently published article, Bekelman et al. [2] focused on elderly patients with locally-advanced PCa in the attempt to determine the best treatment approach in this patient category, and concluded that, even in these individuals, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT plus radiotherapy (RT may confer a survival benefit relative to ADT alone. The importance of the current article resides in the fact that it focuses on a patient population that has not been, or has been only scarcely, included in previous studies on the same topic.

  6. Localization of generic gravitational-wave transients with the early advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Essick, Reed; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo, advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a maximum likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurati...

  7. Identifying locally advanced basal cell carcinoma eligible for treatment with vismodegib: an expert panel consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, Ketty; Licitra, Lisa; Ascierto, Paolo A; Corvò, Renzo; Simonacci, Marco; Picciotto, Franco; Gualdi, Giulio; Pellacani, Giovanni; Santoro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer worldwide. Most occur on the head and neck, where cosmetic and functional outcomes are critical. BCC can be locally destructive if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. Surgery is the treatment of choice for the majority of high-risk lesions. Aggressive, recurrent or unresectable tumors can be difficult to manage. Until recently, no approved systemic therapy was available for locally advanced or metastatic BCC inappropriate for surgery or radiotherapy. Vismodegib provides a systemic treatment option. However, a consensus definition of advanced BCC is lacking. A multidisciplinary panel with expertise in oncology, dermatology, dermatologic surgery and radiation oncology proposes a consensus definition based on published evidence and clinical experience.

  8. Neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with standard radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Mature results of a phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Rudat, V. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Wulf, J. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany); Budach, W. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Hoelscher, T. [Technical Univ., Dresden (Germany); Reese, T. [Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Mose, S.; Roedel, C. [Univ. of Frankfurt (Germany); Zuehlke, H. [Paul Gerhard Hospital, Wittenberg (Germany); Hinke, A. [WiSP GmbH, Langenfeld (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose: the objective of this expanded phase II trial was to confirm the safety results of the preceding phase I study and establish the efficacy of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy with capecitabine in rectal cancer in a multicenter setting. Patients and methods: 96 patients (63% male, age 34-81 years) with advanced rectal cancer (cT3-4 or cN+) from seven university centers in Germany were recruited. All were to receive a total irradiation dose of 50.4-55.8 Gy with conventional fractions. Capecitabine was given at an oral dosage of 825 mg/m{sup 2} bid on each day of the radiotherapy period with the first daily dose applied 2 h before irradiation, followed by surgery 6 weeks later. Results: most of the patients suffered from an advanced primary tumor (cT3: 57%, cT4: 40%) with lymph node involvement in 60%. After neoadjuvant treatment, with a mean of 99% of the scheduled radiation dose actually delivered, a clinical response rate of 68% (95% confidence interval: 57-78%) was observed. Out of 87 evaluable patients undergoing surgery, a sphincter-preserving procedure could be performed in 51% and RO resection in 94%. A pathologically complete response was achieved in six patients (7%, 95% confidence interval: 3-14%). The comparison of initial diagnosis and pathologic findings showed a downstaging in 61%. Acute toxicity with > 5% incidence of NCI (National Cancer Institute) grade {>=} 3 included lymphopenia (12%), leukopenia (6%), and diarrhea (7%). Mild to moderate hand-foot syndrome occurred in 12% only. After a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year overall survival and tumor control data were, with regard to patient selection, in the expected range with an overall survival of 65%, a relapse-free survival of 47%, and a local recurrence rate after 5 years of 17%. Conclusion: the data clearly confirm that capecitabine is an adequate substitute for 5-fluorouracil in preoperative chemoradiation of rectal cancer with a favorable safety profile. (orig.)

  9. Significance of postoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, Kiyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Tatsuzaki, Hideo and others

    1989-02-01

    The effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) was retrospectively studied in 71 cases of pT3-4 and/or n2-3 NSCLC. We scheduled 50 Gy RT with a portal including the hilum and the upper madiastinum, although some modifications were made in specific cases. RT was performed in 39 cases including 27 curative resection cases, among which a dose of more than 39 Gy was delivered in 30 cases. A total of 37.9% of 34 curative resection cases in stage IIIA and 11.8% of 17 curative cases in stage IIIB survived for three years after the operation, while none (0%) of 13 patients with macroscopic residual tumors survived for three years. Seven cases of intrapulmonary metastasis were excluded from analysis. Analysis of pT4 and/or n2-3 cases which achieved survival for more than 6 months after the curative resection revealed that the 3-year survival rates in 19 RT cases (greater than or equal to39 Gy) and 15 non-RT cases were 45.6% and 9.8%. The local recurrence rates were 21.1% and 60.0%, while the distant metastasis rates were 36.8% and 53.3%. Local recurrence in the RT group was observed at the supraclavicular fossae which was out of the radiation portal, and metastatic mediastinal lymph nodes were found at two or more sites. The desired dose could not be delivered in the majority of the cases with macroscopic residual tumors. In some cases RT was not undertaken due to the poor post-operative condition of the patients. In conclusion, RT was effective in eradicating local subclinical disease and also in improving the survival rate. Our findings on local recurrence demonstrated that the supraclavicular fossae should also be included in the radiation portal in the cases with two or more metastasized mediastinal lymph node sites for better local control.

  10. Variation in apparent diffusion coefficient measurements among women with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwish, Adam P; Han, Kathy; Foltz, Warren D

    2015-12-01

    ADC variability from mixed data sets acquired from women with locally advanced cervical cancer appears to be predominantly of biologic origin. Intra-histology ADC variance was similar when pooled across technical factors. Inter-histology pooling increased ADC variance. Normalization to urine ADC improved intra-histology variance and receiver-operator curve test performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab combined with chemoradiotherapy in Chinese patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Fa; Tang, Wu-Bin; Pan, Xin-Xi; Wu, Chu-Rong; Cao, Yang; Yang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. Women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stage IIB, III, or IVA) who experienced relapse after first-line chemoradiotherapy and one or more lines of palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. All patients received nimotuzumab weekly at 200 mg/m(2) as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 cycles (21-day per cycle) of gemcitabine (800 mg/m(2)) or cisplatin (50 mg/m(2)) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Overall response rate (ORR) was assessed after 4 weeks of induction therapy and then every 3 months according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors version 1.1 (primary end point). Secondary end points include progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and drug toxicity. Descriptive statistics was used for ORR, and Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for OS and PFS. A total of 80 women with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled and evaluated for safety and efficacy. Our results demonstrated that none of the patients had a complete response (0%), 11 patients had a partial response (14%), and 10 patients had progressive disease (13%), giving a tumor response rate of 14%. A total of 59 patients had stable disease (74%), giving a disease control rate of 88% (70/80). Median PFS was 8.21 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.09-12.45). Median OS was 11.96 months (95% CI: 8.11-23.95). The most common adverse events were mucositis, myelosuppression, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Our study results suggested that nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is well tolerated, and could be a better treatment alternative in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  12. Relationship of Th17/Treg Cells and Radiation Pneumonia in Locally Advanced Esophageal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Gang; Wang, Jie; Li, Xin-Hua; Sun, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xia; Wu, Chao-Yang

    2017-08-01

    Radiation pneumonia is a main side-effect that has limited the clinical usage of radiotherapy in locally advanced esophageal carcinoma. T helper cells 17 (Th 17) and T regulatory cells (Tregs) play an important role in inflammatory diseases. The balance between Treg and Th17 cells is a key factor in the progression of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Whether Tregs and Th17 cells are predictive factors of radiation pneumonia has not yet been reported. In this study, we investigated the relationships of Treg/Th17 cells and radiation pneumonia in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who received radiotherapy. One hundred and forty-eight patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who received radical and palliative radiotherapy were enrolled. The levels of Th17 and Treg cells in the blood of patients were detected using flow cytometry at the time point of pre-radiotherapy, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th week from the start of radiation and 4 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Radiation pneumonia was evaluated according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group's acute radiation pneumonia standards, with the endpoint being grade 2 or above radiation pneumonia. There were 24 cases of radiation pneumonia in 148 cases of locally advanced esophageal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy. Th17 cells increased and, in contrast, Treg cells decreased in the radiation pneumonia group. The change in the ratio of Th17/Treg was more pronounced and the difference was statistically significant from the 5th week after irradiation compared to patients with no radiation pneumonia (pcells may be an effective predictive factor of radiation pneumonia. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Neoadjuvant irinotecan, cisplatin, and concurrent radiation therapy with celecoxib for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, James M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Bueno, Raphael; Choi, Noah; Donahue, Dean M.; Fidias, Panos M.; Gaissert, Henning A.; Jaklitsch, Michael T.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Lynch, Thomas P.; Mentzer, Steven J.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Swanson, Richard S.; Wain, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who are treated with trimodality therapy have a high recurrence rate. Preclinical evidence suggests that inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) increases the effectiveness of chemoradiation, and observational studies in humans suggest that COX-2 inhibition may reduce esophageal cancer risk. This trial tested the safety and efficacy of combining a COX2 inhibitor, celecoxib, with neoadjuvant irinotecan/cisplatin chemoradiation. Methods...

  14. RESULTS OF PREOPERATIVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. N. Shavladze

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The values of the diagnostic efficiency and consistency of preoperative evaluations of locally advanced prostate cancer (PC by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with a matrix coil were estimated in 37 patients with PC who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The accuracy of differentiation of T3 and T2 stages in prospective and retrospective assessments was 59 and 73 %; the sensitivity was 7 and 40 %, and the specificity was 96 and 9 %, respectively; with the moderate consistency of evaluations.

  15. RESULTS OF PREOPERATIVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. N. Shavladze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The values of the diagnostic efficiency and consistency of preoperative evaluations of locally advanced prostate cancer (PC by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with a matrix coil were estimated in 37 patients with PC who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The accuracy of differentiation of T3 and T2 stages in prospective and retrospective assessments was 59 and 73 %; the sensitivity was 7 and 40 %, and the specificity was 96 and 9 %, respectively; with the moderate consistency of evaluations.

  16. Neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: early outcome and technical impact on toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chia-Chun; Liang, Jin-Tung; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lin, Yu-Lin; Shun, Chia-Tung; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate early clinical and pathological results for treating locally advanced rectal cancer with bevacizumab and neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy using the technique of prone-position volumetric modulated arc therapy and to compare the toxicity of volumetric modulated arc therapy with that of supine-position four-field box radiotherapy. Methods Twelve patients with stage IIA to IVA rectal adenocarcinoma, treated with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45...

  17. [Efficacy of whole body gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Ping; Nie, Qing; Kang, Jing-Bo; Wang, Bin; Cai, Chang-Lan; Li, Jian-Guo; Qi, Wen-Jie

    2008-11-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are major therapies for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This study was to evaluate the efficacy of three-dimensional conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer. From December 2001 to January 2006, 75 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were divided into radiotherapy group (37 patients) and combination group (38 patients). All patients received gamma-knife radiotherapy using Stereotactic Radiotherapy Gamma Rays System, with iso-dose curves of 50%-60%, tumor encircling dose of 3.0-4.5 Gy per fraction, 8-11 fractions. The patients in combination group received simultaneous thermotherapy at 41.5-43.5 celsius (1 h/fraction, twice a week for 6 times), and chemotherapy with venous administration of tegafur (0.5-1.0 g) and calcium folinate (CF, 0.2 g) for 4-6 times, or venous administration of gemcitabine (0.6-1.0 g/m2) on Days 1 and 8 and cisplatin (DDP) (20-30 mg/m2) on Days 1-3, repeated every 28 days for 3-6 cycles. At 3 months after treatment, the total response (complete remission and partial remission) rate was 70.7% (53/75); the response rate was 73.7% in combination group and 67.5% in radiotherapy group. The 1-year survival rate was 48.3%, and the 2-year survival rate was 22.1%. The 1-and 2-year survival rates were 51.2% and 26.5% in combination group, and 45.2% and 17.6% in radiotherapy group. No serious complications, such as perforation, bleeding and high fever, were seen during treatment and follow-up. 3-D conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy is well tolerated and is relatively effective for most patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  18. High-grade ureteroscopic biopsy is associated with advanced pathology of upper-tract urothelial carcinoma tumors at definitive surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Thomas; Messer, Jamie C; Terrell, John D; Herman, Michael P; Ng, Casey K; Scherr, Douglas S; Scoll, Benjamin; Boorjian, Stephen A; Uzzo, Robert G; Wille, Mark; Eggener, Scott E; Lucas, Steven M; Lotan, Yair; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Raman, Jay D

    2012-04-01

    Accurate assessment of upper-tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) pathology may guide use of endoscopic vs extirpative therapy. We present a multi-institutional cohort of patients with UTUC who underwent surgical resection to characterize the association of ureteroscopic (URS) biopsy features with final pathology results. URS biopsy data were available in 238 patients who underwent surgical resection of UTUC. Biopsies were performed using a brush biopsy kit, mechanical biopsy device, or basket. Stage was classified as a positive brush, nonmuscle-invasive (biopsy, 88/238 (37%) patients had a positive brush, 140 (59%) had a diagnosis of non-MI, and 10 (4%) had MI disease. Biopsy results showed low-grade cancer in 140 (59%) and high-grade cancer in 98 (41%). Pathologic evaluation at surgical resection demonstrated non-MI tumors in 140 (59%) patients, MI in 98 (41%), and high-grade disease in 150 (63%). On univariate analysis, high URS biopsy grade was associated with high-grade (positive predictive value [PPV] 92%, Pbiopsy stage, however, was associated with surgical pathology grade (P=0.005), but not MI (P=0.16) disease. On multivariate analysis, high URS grade, but not biopsy stage, was associated with high final pathology grade (hazard ratio [HR] 16.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0-39.5, Pbiopsy grade, but not stage, is associated with adverse tumor pathology. This information may play a valuable role for risk stratification and in the appropriate selection of endoscopic management vs surgical extirpation for UTUC.

  19. Resection of Residual Disease Following Isolated Limb Infusion (ILI) is Equivalent to a Complete Response Following ILI Alone in Advanced Extremity Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J; Chen, YA; Fisher, KJ; Beasley, GM; Tyler, DS; Zager, JS

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated limb infusion (ILI) is a limb-preserving treatment for in-transit extremity melanoma. The benefit of resecting residual disease following ILI is unclear. Methods A multi-institutional experience was analyzed comparing patients who underwent ILI plus resection of residual disease (ILI+RES) versus ILI-alone. Results 176 patients were included: 154 ILI-alone and 22 ILI+RES. There were no differences between the groups with respect to gender, age, extremity affected, or time from diagnosis to ILI. All surgical resections were performed as an outpatient procedure, separate from the ILI. Within the ILI+RES group, fifteen (68%) had a partial response (PR), two (9%) stable disease (SD), and 5 (23%) progressive disease (PD). The ILI-alone group had 52 (34%) CR, 30 (19%) PR, 15 (10%) SD, and 46 (30%) PD. Eleven (7%) ILI-alone patients did not have 3-month response available for review. Evaluating overall survival (OS) from date of ILI, the ILI-alone group had a median OS of 30.9 months, whereas the ILI+RES group had not reached median OS, p=0.304. Although the ILI+RES group had a slightly longer disease free survival (DFS) compared to those with a CR after ILI-alone (12.4 vs. 9.6), this was not statistically significant, p=0.978. Within the ILI+RES group, those with an initial PR following ILI had improved DFS vs. those with SD or PD following ILI, pILI offers a DFS and OS similar to those who have a CR after ILI-alone, and may offer a treatment strategy that benefits more patients undergoing ILI. PMID:24162840

  20. Sorafenib in radioactive iodine-refractory, locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brose, Marcia S; Nutting, Christopher M; Jarzab, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with radioactive iodine ((131)I)-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer have a poor prognosis because of the absence of effective treatment options. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of orally administered sorafenib in the tre......BACKGROUND: Patients with radioactive iodine ((131)I)-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer have a poor prognosis because of the absence of effective treatment options. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of orally administered sorafenib...... in the treatment of patients with this type of cancer. METHODS: In this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial (DECISION), we investigated sorafenib (400 mg orally twice daily) in patients with radioactive iodine-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid...... in the sorafenib group were hand-foot skin reaction (76·3%), diarrhoea (68·6%), alopecia (67·1%), and rash or desquamation (50·2%). INTERPRETATION: Sorafenib significantly improved progression-free survival compared with placebo in patients with progressive radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid...

  1. [Application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Yingtai; Sun, Yuemin; Wang, Chengfeng

    2015-04-14

    To explore the application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. During April 2007 to April 2014, retrospective analysis was conducted for 36 patients of locally advanced pancreatic cancer to summarize the clinical data of core needle biopsy technique. And the relevant data included clinical features, pathological findings and puncture-related complications. Regular postoperative follow-ups were conducted. All received pathological examination of core needle biopsy. And the pathological diagnoses were pancreatic cancer (n=29), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=2) and chronic pancreatitis (n=5). During the follow-ups, liver metastasis was pathologically confirmed postoperatively at Months 4 and 6 months among 5 chronic pancreatitis patients. The remainder was followed up for over 12 months. There was neither change in size nor metastasis. One case was diagnosed at Peking Union Hospital as autoimmune pancreatitis while another 2 cases had a clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. The accuracy of core needle puncture was 94.4%. There were 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula in class A. Bleeding complication was absent. The application of core needle biopsy technique is both safe and effective in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. The clinical observation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer with DX regimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Zhang; Jianing Qiu; Shuxian Qu; Yaling Han; Zhaozhe Liu; Xiaodong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The recent clinical curative ef ect and adverse events of docetaxel and capecitabine (DX) of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with local y advanced breast cancer was discussed. Methods:The data of 72 cases of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (DX) in local y advanced breast cancer after 4 cycles were retrospectively analyzed. Docetaxel 75 mg/m2 by infusion 1 h on d1, capecitabine 2000 mg/m2 by oral for twice daily on d1–14, 21 days was a cycle. Results:Al 72 patients were assessed for ef icacy and adverse events. The total ef ective rate was 80.5%(58/72), including pathological complete response (pCR) was 7 (9.7%), clinical complete remission (cCR) was 15(20.8%), clinical partial response (PR) was 43 (59.7%), stable disease (SD) was 8 (11.1%) and progressive disease (PD) was 6 (8.3%). The main adverse events were gastrointestinal reactions and bone marrow suppression. The 3 to 4 degrees of adverse reactions including granulocytopenia in 7 patients (20.6%), hand-foot syndrome in 6 patients (15.2%). Conclusion:The DX regimen provide a favorable ef icacy and safety profile in patients with local y advanced breast cancer for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Locally advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Barriers related to effective treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Lakshmaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral cavity cancer is a significant health problem in India. Majority of patients present with locally advanced disease requiring multimodality treatment. Compliance to recommended treatment is an important factor affecting outcome. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients with regards to treatment adherence and to assess reasons of noncompliance. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. We included patients referred to Department of Medical Oncology for induction chemotherapy in view of locally advanced oral cavity cancer. Results: Only 15 (26% patients completed planned treatment schedule. Their 1 year overall survival was 93%. The remaining 43 patients who received inadequate treatment had a dismal 21% 1 year overall survival. Illiteracy, poverty, long waiting list for surgery, prolonged delay for health scheme treatment plan approval and dissatisfaction with attitude of hospital staffs are major barriers related to effective treatment of these patients. Conclusions: A detailed discussion with patient and their relatives regarding recommended treatment, proper implementation of health schemes, increasing trained manpower to avoid long waiting list for surgery, provision of additional financial support for family member accompanying the patient and a sympathetic approach toward patients are needed to help these patients overcome the battle.

  4. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  5. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikaya, V. V., E-mail: viktoria.v.v@inbox.ru; Startseva, Zh. A., E-mail: zhanna.alex@rambler.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Musabaeva, L. I., E-mail: musabaevaLI@oncology.tomsk.ru; Lisin, V. A., E-mail: Lisin@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  6. Could lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy provide oncological providence for local resectional techniques for colon cancer? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy Joel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic resectional techniques for colon cancer are undermined by their inability to determine lymph node status. This limits their application to only those lesions at the most minimal risk of lymphatic dissemination whereas their technical capacity could allow intraluminal or even transluminal address of larger lesions. Sentinel node biopsy may theoretically address this breach although the variability of its reported results for this disease is worrisome. Methods Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were interrogated back to 1999 to identify all publications concerning lymphatic mapping for colon cancer with reference cross-checking for completeness. All reports were examined from the perspective of in vivo technique accuracy selectively in early stage disease (i.e. lesions potentially within the technical capacity of endoscopic resection. Results Fifty-two studies detailing the experiences of 3390 patients were identified. Considerable variation in patient characteristics as well as in surgical and histological quality assurances were however evident among the studies identified. In addition, considerable contamination of the studies by inclusion of rectal cancer without subgroup separation was frequent. Indeed such is the heterogeneity of the publications to date, formal meta-analysis to pool patient cohorts in order to definitively ascertain technique accuracy in those with T1 and/or T2 cancer is not possible. Although lymphatic mapping in early stage neoplasia alone has rarely been specifically studied, those studies that included examination of false negative rates identified high T3/4 patient proportions and larger tumor size as being important confounders. Under selected circumstances however the technique seems to perform sufficiently reliably to allow it prompt consideration of its use to tailor operative extent. Conclusion The specific question of whether sentinel node biopsy can augment the oncological

  7. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oertel Katrin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0 and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1, plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50% showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  8. [Balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery for evaluating resectability of blood vessel infiltrating cervical metastasis of advanced head and neck cancers--Heidelberg experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A; von Kummer, R; Adams, H P; Kneip, M; Galito, P; Maier, H

    1993-11-01

    During the last two years 17 patients of the ENT-Department of the University of Heidelberg suffering from squamous-cell carcinomas of the head and neck underwent a balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The investigation was performed because of tumorous infiltration of the large cervical vessels. The balloon occlusion of the ICA was accomplished at the Department of Neuroradiology of the University of Heidelberg. While stopping bloodflow in the ICA of one side for 15-20 min, clinical, electrophysiological and Doppler sonographic monitoring was performed, to detect severe cerebral complications. The specific electrophysiological monitoring contained the detection of MSSEP's (median nerve stimulated somatosensorial evoked potentials) and TCMEP's (transcortical motor evoked potentials) during test occlusion. Balloon occlusion was not possible in three patients because of severe arteriosclerosis. Test occlusion had to be discontinued in three patients because of clinical complications (temporary amaurosis, orthostatic complications). Finally, seven patients showed contraindications during test occlusion for permanent occlusion of the ICA. Four patients had a permanent occlusion of the ICA after tumour resection. In two patients the ICA was removed without problems in test occlusion. The third patient underwent a permanent carotid occlusion because of bleeding complications (in spite of poor clinical tolerance of the test occlusion). In the fourth patient, only intraoperative neuromonitoring with MSSEP's was conducted before permanent carotid occlusion. All four patients did not show any neurological deficits after resection of the ICA. Neurophysiological monitoring played an important role in predicting cerebral complications after permanent occlusion of the ICA.

  9. Computed Tomography Guided Hook-wire Precise Localization and Minimally Invasive Resection of Pulmonary Nodules%CT引导下Hook-w ire精确定位并微创切除肺结节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王通; 马少华; 闫天生; 宋金涛; 王可毅; 贺未; 白洁

    2015-01-01

    ,积极微创手术治疗是非常必要的。%Background and objective Localization of pulmonary ground glass nodule is the technical diffculty of minimally invasive operation resection. hTe aim of this study is to evaluate the value of computed tomography (CT)-guided Hook-wire precise localization in resection of pulmonary nodules by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) as well as to discuss the necessity and feasibility of surgical resection of GGOs through a minimally invasive approach.Methods CT-guided Hook-wire precise localization and wedge resection was done on 25 cases with 26 pulmonary nodules by VATS from May 2013 to June 2015. hTe effcacy of localization was evaluated in terms of procedure time, VATS success rate, and associated complications of localization.Results All the 26 pulmonary nodules (6 solid nodules and 20 GGOs ) of 25 patients (10 males and 15 females) were preoperatively detected and localized with Hook-wire under CT guidance. Nodule diameters ranged from 5 mm-20 mm (mean: 8 mm). hTe distance of lung lesions from the nearest pleural surfaces ranged within 5 mm-30 mm (mean: 14 mm). All resections of lesions guided by the Hook-wire were successfully performed by VATS (success rate: 100%). hTe mean procedure time for the CT-guided Hook-wire localization was 10 min (range: 5 min-10 min). hTe mean procedure time for VATS wedge resection was 20 min (range: 15 min-40 min). hTe mean hospital time was 4 d (range: 3 d-6 d). hTe major complication of CT-guided Hook-wire localization was mild pneumothorax in 4 patients, but no one needed chest tube drain-age. Wedge resection was performed successfully in all cases. hTe dislocation of Hook-wire was found in only one patient dur-ing the operation, but the lesion was still successfully resected under VATS. Results of pathological examination of 16 mGGOs revealed 8 primary lung cancers and 8 nonspeciifc chronic inlfammations. Results of pathological examination of 4 pGGOs re-vealed 1 primary lung cancers, 1 atypical

  10. Preoperative Concurrent Radiochemotherapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Treatment Outcome and Prognostic Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Young; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Kwan Min; Kim, Jhing Ook; Shim, Young Mog; Im, Young Hyuck [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: This study reports the results of the use of preoperative concurrent radiochemotherapy (CRCT) for the treatment of locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: From 1998 through 2005, 61 patients with intrathoracic esophageal cancer at stages II-IVB (without distant organ metastasis and presumed to be respectable) received preoperative CRCT. CRCT consisted of radiotherapy (45 Gy /25 fractions /5 weeks) and FP chemotherapy (5-FU 1 g/m2/day, days 1-4 and 29-32, Cisplatin 60 mg/m2/day, days 1 and 29). An esophagectomy was planned in 4 {approx} 6 weeks after the completion of CRCT. Results: There were two treatment-related deaths. Among the 61 patients, 53 patients underwent surgery and 17 patients achieved a pathological complete response (pCR). The overall survival (OS) rates of all 61 patients at 2 and 5 years were 59.0% and 38.0%, respectively. The rates of OS and disease-free survival (DFS) of the surgically resected patients at 2 and 5 years were 61.6%, 40.1% and 53.3%, 41.8%, respectively. By univariate analysis, achievement of pCR and a clinically uninvolved distant lymph node (cM0) were favorable prognostic factors for OS and DFS. There were 27 patients that experienced a relapse-a locoregional relapse occurred in 5 patients, a distant metastasis occurred in 12 patients and combined failure occurred in 10 patients. Conclusion: The results of the current study are favorable. pCR and an uninvolved distant lymph node were found to be favorable prognostic factors.

  11. A randomized comparative study between neoadjuvant 5-fluorouracil and leukovorin versus 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin along with concurrent radiation in locally advanced carcinoma rectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanjit Kumar Kayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT with cisplatin-5-fluorouracil (CDDP-5FU in rectal cancer is based on the concept of biochemical modulation. Aims: The study was designed to evaluate whether CCRT with CDDP and 5-FU is noninferior to CCRT with leukovorin (LV and 5FU in downstaging locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma and to compare the toxicities between the two arms. Settings and Design : Single institutional, noninferiority, prospective, randomized study. Subjects and Methods : In control arm (N = 24 patients received chemotherapy. With bolus 5FU 350 mg/m 2 /day and LV 20 mg/m 2 /day for days 1-5 and 29-33. In study arm (N = 25, patients received chemotherapy with bolus 5 FU 350 mg/m 2 /day for days 1-5 and 29-33 and CDDP 100 mg/m 2 /day at days 1 and 29. Patients in both the arm received concurrent radiation (50.4 Gy in 28#, in conventional fractionation of 1.8 Gy per fraction. Six to eight weeks after concurrent chemoradiation patients underwent assessment and surgery. Postoperatively, adjuvant chemotherapy with m-FOLFO × 6 of 4 months was given to all patients. Statistical Analysis : The Chi-square test was used to compare categorical variables between the groups. Results: Response rate as assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST criteria was comparable between the two treatment arms (P = 0.9541. Pathological complete response rate of study arm was comparable to control arm (20 vs 20.83%, P = 0.7778 was not significant. Surgery with R0 resection was possible in 72% cases of study arm compared to 62.5% cases of control arm; P = 0.6861, not significant. Grade III toxicities were quite comparable between two treatment arms. Conclusions : In terms of pathologic complete response (pCR, R0 resection and toxicity profile of both the arms were comparable.

  12. RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR PATIENTS WITH CLINICALLY LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER: THE REMOTE RESULTS OF TREATEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grygorenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was to improve the treatment results among patients with clinically local and locally advanced prostate cancer while using neo-and/or adjuvant hormone- and radiotherapy.Materials and methods. Radical prostatectomy results estimation was conducted among 170 patients. An average survey period continued 35,99 ± 1,88 (1–102 months. An average age was 61,66 ± 0,45 (40–75 years. Moreover, after operation 125 (73,5 % patients proved to have clinically local forms of prostate cancer (рТ1а,b,c,2aN0М0 – 99, рТ2b,cN0М0 – 26, 25 (14,7 % patients – locally advanced forms (рТ3a,bN0М0 and 19 (11,2 % – generalized forms of prostate cancer (рТ4N0М0, рТ2а,bN1М0,. Metastases in pelvic lymph nodes developed among 10 (5,9 % patients. 43 (25,3 % patients with ІІ–III stages received neoadjuvant hormone therapy treatment due to maximum androgen blockade scheme. An average neoadjuvant hormone therapy duration: 10,14 ± 1,98 (1–60 months. The typical characteristic of modified radical prostatectomy is accurate ejection of urinary bladder neck and proximal area of prostatic urethra part from prostate gland. Already formed urethra-urethral anastomosis is additionally fixed to lateral part of endopelvic fascia.Results. An average 3-year survival made up 95,5 ± 3,5 %, 5-year – 84,1 ± 4,7 %, 7-year – 71,7 ± 6,8 % respectively. 3- and 5-year relapse-free survival comprised 87,05 ± 3,20 %, 79.64 ± 3,03 % 67,11 ± 3,93 % respectively. 5-year survival among patients with localized prostate cancer made up 97,18 ± 3,27 %. 48 (28,2 % patients proved to have biochemical relapse so that they were prescribed adjuvant hormone- and/or radiotherapy treatment. Gleason index ≥ and initial PSA level ≥ 20 ng/ml, and their combination are considered as significant factors that foresee Т > Т2 category and biochemical relapse. For рN+ category initial PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml level is principle. Frequency of disease relapse

  13. RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR PATIENTS WITH CLINICALLY LOCALIZED AND LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER: THE REMOTE RESULTS OF TREATEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grygorenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was to improve the treatment results among patients with clinically local and locally advanced prostate cancer while using neo-and/or adjuvant hormone- and radiotherapy.Materials and methods. Radical prostatectomy results estimation was conducted among 170 patients. An average survey period continued 35,99 ± 1,88 (1–102 months. An average age was 61,66 ± 0,45 (40–75 years. Moreover, after operation 125 (73,5 % patients proved to have clinically local forms of prostate cancer (рТ1а,b,c,2aN0М0 – 99, рТ2b,cN0М0 – 26, 25 (14,7 % patients – locally advanced forms (рТ3a,bN0М0 and 19 (11,2 % – generalized forms of prostate cancer (рТ4N0М0, рТ2а,bN1М0,. Metastases in pelvic lymph nodes developed among 10 (5,9 % patients. 43 (25,3 % patients with ІІ–III stages received neoadjuvant hormone therapy treatment due to maximum androgen blockade scheme. An average neoadjuvant hormone therapy duration: 10,14 ± 1,98 (1–60 months. The typical characteristic of modified radical prostatectomy is accurate ejection of urinary bladder neck and proximal area of prostatic urethra part from prostate gland. Already formed urethra-urethral anastomosis is additionally fixed to lateral part of endopelvic fascia.Results. An average 3-year survival made up 95,5 ± 3,5 %, 5-year – 84,1 ± 4,7 %, 7-year – 71,7 ± 6,8 % respectively. 3- and 5-year relapse-free survival comprised 87,05 ± 3,20 %, 79.64 ± 3,03 % 67,11 ± 3,93 % respectively. 5-year survival among patients with localized prostate cancer made up 97,18 ± 3,27 %. 48 (28,2 % patients proved to have biochemical relapse so that they were prescribed adjuvant hormone- and/or radiotherapy treatment. Gleason index ≥ and initial PSA level ≥ 20 ng/ml, and their combination are considered as significant factors that foresee Т > Т2 category and biochemical relapse. For рN+ category initial PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml level is principle. Frequency of disease relapse

  14. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer in Which Combined Prostate Removal and ISR Using the da Vinci Surgical System with Preoperative Chemotherapy Allowed Curative Resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Hideaki; Katsumata, Kenji; Kasahara, Kenta; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Matsudo, Takaaki; Enomoto, Masanobu; Ishizaki, Tetsuo; Hisada, Masayuki; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2016-11-01

    A 53-year-old male presented with a chief complaint of dyschezia.Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy confirmed the presence of a type II tumor in the lower part of the rectum, and a biopsy detected a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma.As invasion of the prostate and levator muscle of the anus was suspected on diagnostic imaging, surgery was performed after preoperative chemotherapy.With no clear postoperative complications, the patient was discharged 26 days after surgery. After 24 months, the number of urination ranged from 1 to 6, with a Wexner score of 6 and a mild desire to urinate in the absence of incontinence.At present, the patient is alive without recurrence.When combined with chemotherapy, robotassisted surgery allows the curative resection of extensive rectal cancer involving the suspected invasion of other organs.In this respect, it is likely to be a useful method to conserve anal and bladder function.

  15. [A case of advanced ascending colon cancer, curatively resected after complete response in left supraclavicular and paraaortic lymph nodes and liver metastases to FOLFOX4 therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Katsuyoshi; Kojima, Hidenobu; Takaya, Haruo; Okuno, Masayuki; Fuji, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Rei; Mori, Tomohiko; Ito, Daisuke; Kogire, Masafumi

    2010-02-01

    We report a resected case of ascending colon cancer with left supraclavicular and paraaortic lymph nodes and liver metastases which completely responded in terms of metastases but not the primary tumor to FOLFOX4 therapy. A 62-year-old woman with epigastric discomfort was initially diagnosed as malignant lymphoma by FDG-PET with abnormal accumulation at left supraclavicular and paraaortic lesions. Pathological examination of the supraclavicular lymph nodes showed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma, and ascending colon cancer was detected by colonoscopy which was a mixture of various types of differentiation. FOLFOX4 therapy was effective for metastatic lesions but colon tumor did not regress and was accompanied by abdominal pain. Macroscopically, a curative right hemicolectomy was performed, and microscopic examination revealed that the tumor had become a mass of undifferentiated cancer cells. Thus, the present case demonstrates the dedifferentiation of colon cancer during chemotherapy.

  16. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Anand, E-mail: amahadev@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miksad, Rebecca; Goldstein, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth [Department of Medical Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep [Department of Interventional Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kent, Tara; Vollmer, Charles; Callery, Mark [Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24-36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6-36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  17. A case report of locally advanced triple negative breast cancer showing pathological complete response to weekly paclitaxel with bevacizumab treatment following disease progression during anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Hideo; Ozaki, Shinji; Yasui, Daisuke; Hirata, Taizo

    2017-09-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is the standard of care for locally advanced triple negative breast cancer, however, approximately 5% of cases show disease progression during NAC. Although downstaging is essential to create an opportunity for curative surgery and to improve the local control outcome in such a case, no additional line of chemotherapy has been established. A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for an axillary mass presenting three weeks ago and was diagnosed as having right locally advanced (T2N2M0, stage IIIA) triple negative breast cancer. After two courses of epirubicine and cyclophosphamide as NAC, disease progression was recognized and curative resection was considered impossible due to enlarged axillary lymph nodes showing invasion to surrounding tissue. As second-line chemotherapy, weekly paclitaxel with bevacizumab treatment was initiated and significant shrinkage was immediately obtained. A clinically complete response was diagnosed after four courses of weekly paclitaxel with bevacizumab and she underwent a right breast mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection without major complications. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens showed no residual invasive or noninvasive disease and she was diagnosed as having a pathological complete response. Although the addition of bevacizumab to standard adjuvant chemotherapy is not recommended in unselected triple negative breast cancer, the potent effect on tumor shrinkage should be considered in the treatment of locally advanced triple negative breast cancer showing disease progression during standard NAC. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Neoadjuvant vs adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer:Which is superior?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah Popek; Vassiliki Liana Tsikitis

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer including timing and dosage of radiotherapy,degree of sphincter preservation with neoadjuvant radiotherapy,and short and long term effects of radiotherapy are controversial topics.The MEDLINE,Cochrane Library databases,and meeting proceedings from the American Society of Clinical Oncology,were searched for reports of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses comparing neoadjuvant and adjuvant radiotherapy with surgery to surgery alone for rectal cancer.Neoadjuvant radiotherapy shows superior results in terms of local control compared to adjuvant radiotherapy.Neither adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiotherapy impacts overall survival.Short course versus long course neoadjuvant radiotherapy remains controversial.There is insufficient data to conclude that neoadjuvant therapy improves rates of sphincter preserving surgery.Radiation significantly impacts anorectal and sexual function and includes both acute and long term toxicity.Data demonstrate that neoadjuvant radiation causes less toxicity compared to adjuvant radiotherapy,and specifically short course neoadjuvant radiation results in less toxicity than long course neoadjuvant radiation.Neoadjuvant radiotherapy is the preferred modality for administering radiation in locally advanced rectal cancer.There are significant side effects from radiation,including anorectal and sexual dysfunction,which may be less with short course neoadjuvant radiation.

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced melanoma: new strategies with targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Greca, Michele; Grasso, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Giovanna; Russo, Alessia Erika; Bartolotta, Salvatore; D'Angelo, Alessandro; Vitale, Felice Vito; Ferraù, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been successfully tested in several bulky solid tumors, but it has not been utilized in advanced cutaneous melanoma, primarily because effective medical treatments for this disease have been lacking. However, with the development of new immunotherapies (monoclonal antibodies specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 [anti-CTLA-4] and programmed death protein-1 [anti-PD1]) and small molecules interfering with intracellular pathways (anti-BRAF and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [anti- MEK]) the use of this approach is becoming a viable treatment strategy for locally advanced melanoma. The neoadjuvant setting provides a double opportunity for a better knowledge of these drugs: a short-term evaluation of their intrinsic activity, and a deeper analysis of their action and resistance-induction mechanisms. BRAF inhibitors seem to be ideal candidates for the neoadjuvant setting, because of their prompt, repeatedly confirmed response in V600E BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. In this report we summarize studies focused on the neoadjuvant use of traditional medical treatments in advanced melanoma and anecdotal cases of this approach with the use of biologic therapies. Moreover, we discuss our experience with neoadjuvant targeted therapy as a priming for radical surgery in a patient with BRAF V600E mutation-positive advanced melanoma.

  20. The importance of combined radiation and endocrine therapy in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip J Gray; William U Shipley

    2012-01-01

    The management of all stages of prostate cancer has become an increasingly complex task as new treatment paradigms are tested and the results of large randomized studies become available.Despite these advances,prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of eancer death and the seventh overall cause of death in men in the United States.1 The advent of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in the 1980s resulted in a significant downward stage migration such that many men now present with the earliest and most curable form of the disease.2,3 Despite this fact,high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer remains a common and complex problem facing clinicians across the world.

  1. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

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    Scheffer, Hester J., E-mail: hj.scheffer@vumc.nl; Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M., E-mail: m.melenhorst@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Vogel, Jantien A., E-mail: j.a.vogel@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van, E-mail: a.vantilborg@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Nielsen, Karin, E-mail: k.nielsen@vumc.nl; Kazemier, Geert, E-mail: g.kazemier@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Meijerink, Martijn R., E-mail: mr.meijerink@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  2. Chemoradiotherapy with twice-weekly administration of low-dose gemcitabine for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hisato Igarashi; Tetsuhide Ito; Ken Kawabe; Terumasa Hisano; Yoshiyuki Arita; Toyoma Kaku; Ryoichi Takayanagi

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer utilizing low dose gemcitabine as a radiation sensitizer administered twice weekly.METHODS:We performed a retrospective analysis of chemoradiotherapy utilizing gemcitabine administered twice weekly at a dose of 40 mg/m2.After that,maintenance systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine,at a dose of 1000 mg/m2,was administered weekly for 3 wk with 1-wk rest until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity developed.RESULTS:Eighteen patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer were enrolled.Three of those patients could not continue with the therapy;one patient had interstitial pneumonia during radiation therapy and two other patients showed liver metastasis or peritoneal metastasis during an early stage of the therapy.The median survival was 15.0 mo and the overall 1-year survival rate was 60%,while the median progression-free survival was 8.0 too.The subgroup which showed the reduction of tumor development,more than 50% showed a tendency for a better prognosis;however,other parameters including age,gender and performance status did not correlate with survival.The median survival of the groups that died of liver metastasis and peritoneal metastasis were 13.0 mo and 27.7 mo,respectively.CONCLUSION:Chemoradiotherapy with low-dose gemcitabine administered twice weekly could be effective to patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer;however,patients developing liver metastases had a worse prognosis.Another chemoradiotherapy strategy might be needed for those patients,such as administrating one or two cycles of chemotherapy initially,followed by chemoradiotherapy for the cases with no distant metastases.

  3. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION OF TUMOR CELLS IN LOCALLY ADVANCED CERVICAL CANCER AFTER NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL CHEMOTHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 惠京; 张颖; 王德华

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Through observing the clinical response to neoadjuvant intraarterial chemotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer and investigating the changes of p53 protein expression, proliferation and apoptosis of tumor cells after chemotherapy, to study the relationship between biological markers and chemotherapeutic response. Methods: 20 women with locally advanced squamous cervical cancer received consecutive infusion chemotherapy of five days of cisplatin and adriamycin via the superselective uterine artery. The response to chemotherapy was evaluated by gynecologic examination and ultrasonography 3 weeks after chemotherapy. The changes of apoptotic index (AI), proliferation index (PI) and p53 expression of tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemical technique. Results: The clinical response rate of locally advanced squamous cervical cancer to uterine artery infusion chemotherapy was 70%. No change of PI was found 3 weeks after treatment, but AI significantly increased from 2.79±0.76 to 4.29±1.13 (P<0.01), and AI/PI from 5.68±1.21 to 9.00±1.95 (P<0.05). On the contrary, the expression of p53 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed higher PI before chemotherapy and significantly increased AI and AI/PI after chemotherapy than non-responders (P<0.05). Conclusion: Higher PI was an indication for neoadjuvant intraarterial chemotherapy. One more cycle of chemotherapy should be given to those who have significantly increased AI or AI/PI after chemotherapy, while definite treatment such as surgery or/and radiotherapy should be immediately given to those patients without increased AI or AI/PI.

  4. Phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Carla Rameri Alexandre Silva; Thuler, Luiz Cláudio Santos; de Mello, Maria Júlia Gonçalves; de Oliveira Lima, Jurema Telles; da Fonte, Ana Luiza Fassizoli; Fontão, Diógenes Fernando Santos; Carneiro, Vandré Cabral Gomes; Chang, Tien Man Cabral; Ferreira, Carlos Gil

    2017-09-01

    Cervical cancer is a global public health challenge. Since 1999, platin based chemoradiation (CRT) is the standard treatment for those patients with locally advanced disease. However, this population still has a dismal prognosis and, alternatives approaches such as adjuvant chemotherapy are controversial, especially because of increased toxicity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) could be an option for more intensive treatment with manageable toxicity. A phase II, prospective, non-randomized trial was conducted at a reference center in Recife, Brazil. Locally advanced cervical cancer patients (Ib2-IVa) were treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin 35mg/m(2) and gemcitabine 1000mg/m(2) D1 and D8, for 2cycles. Then, they received CRT (50.4Gy) with weekly cisplatin 40mg/m(2) followed by brachytherapy. Response rate (RR) and toxicity were the primary endpoints. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were secondary endpoints. Between Sep/2013 and Oct/2015, 50 patients were initiated on NACT and CRT. RR was 81% at the end of treatment. Hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity were most common. Grade 3/4 toxicity was 20% during NACT and 44% during CRT. Late adverse events were present in 20% of patients. PFS at 1 and 3-years were 73.4% (IC 58.7-83.6) and 53.9% (IC 36.9-68.3), respectively; and, OS at 1 and 3-years were 93.9% (IC 82.4-98.0) and 71.3% (IC 53.3-83.3), respectively. In our hands NACT in locally advanced cervical cancer patients did not show a meaningful improvement in ORR. Nevertheless, we believe it should be further explored in prospective trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A single centre experience with sequential and concomitant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced stage IV tonsillar cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle Catherine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo-radiotherapy offers an alternative to primary surgery and adjuvant therapy for the management of locally advanced stage IV squamous cell carcinomas of the tonsil. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of the outcomes of 41 patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated non-surgically at the Yorkshire Cancer Centre between January 2004 and December 2005. Due to long radiotherapy waiting times, patients received induction chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by either cisplatin concurrent chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. Results Median age was 55 years (range 34-76 years and 28 (68% patients were male. 35/41 patients (85% received 2 or more cycles of induction chemotherapy. Following induction chemotherapy, 32/41 patients (78% had a clinical response. Concomitant chemotherapy was given to 30/41 (73%. All patients received the planned radiotherapy dose with no delays. There were no treatment related deaths. Six (15% patients had gastrostomy tubes placed before treatment, and 22 (54% required nasogastric tube placement during or after treatment for nutritional support. 17 patients required unplanned admissions during treatment for supportive care. At 4 months post treatment assessment 35 out of 41 (85% patients achieved complete clinical and radiographic response. Median follow-up is 38 months (8-61 months. Local and regional control rate in complete responders at 3 years was 91%. Distant metastases have been found in 4 (9.8% patients. Three year progression-free survival rate in all patients is 75%. The 3-year cause specific survival and overall survival are 75% and 66% respectively. Conclusion Cisplatin-based induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy provides excellent tumour control with acceptable toxicity for patients with locally advanced tonsillar cancer.

  6. Long-Term Results of a Randomized Trial in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: No Benefit From Adding a Brachytherapy Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelt, Ane L., E-mail: ane.lindegaard.appelt@rsyd.dk [Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Pløen, John; Rafaelsen, Søren R.; Lindebjerg, Jan; Havelund, Birgitte M. [Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Jakobsen, Anders [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Danish Colorectal Cancer Group South, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Mature data on tumor control and survival are presented from a randomized trial of the addition of a brachytherapy boost to long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and November 2008, 248 patients with T3-4N0-2M0 rectal cancer were prospectively randomized to either long-course preoperative CRT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, per oral tegafur-uracil and L-leucovorin) alone or the same CRT schedule plus a brachytherapy boost (10 Gy in 2 fractions). The primary trial endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) at the time of surgery; secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and freedom from locoregional failure. Results: Results for the primary endpoint have previously been reported. This analysis presents survival data for the 224 patients in the Danish part of the trial. In all, 221 patients (111 control arm, 110 brachytherapy boost arm) had data available for analysis, with a median follow-up time of 5.4 years. Despite a significant increase in tumor response at the time of surgery, no differences in 5-year OS (70.6% vs 63.6%, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, P=.34) and PFS (63.9% vs 52.0%, HR=1.22, P=.32) were observed. Freedom from locoregional failure at 5 years were 93.9% and 85.7% (HR=2.60, P=.06) in the standard and in the brachytherapy arms, respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of stoma. Explorative analysis based on stratification for tumor regression grade and resection margin status indicated the presence of response migration. Conclusions: Despite increased pathologic tumor regression at the time of surgery, we observed no benefit on late outcome. Improved tumor regression does not necessarily lead to a relevant clinical benefit when the neoadjuvant treatment is followed by high-quality surgery.

  7. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  8. What is appropriate neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation for high-risk/locally advanced prostate cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Hiroyuki Konaka

    2011-01-01

    @@ The majority of low-risk patients with clinically localized prostate cancer have a high likelihood of disease-free survival,regardless of the treatment option chosen.1 In contrast, patients with high-risk prostate cancer with high Gleason score, elevated prostate-specific antigen level and advanced clinical stage have a high probability of treatment failure after initial management by single-treatment modalities, such as radical pro-statectomy (RP), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy.2,3 Therefore, it is extremely important to establish the most effective treatment strategy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  9. Comparing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy to Chemotherapy Alone for Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Gwak, Hee Keun [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, the introduction of gemcitabine and the recognition of a benefit in patients with advanced disease stimulated the design of trials that compare chemotherapy alone to concurrent chemoradiation. Therefore, we evaluated role of CCRT for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. We carried out a retrospective analysis of treatment results for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer between January 2000 and January 2008. The radiation was delivered to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes with a 1{approx}2 cm margin at a total dose of 36.0{approx}59.4 Gy (median: 54 Gy). The chemotherapeutic agent delivered with the radiation was 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}). The patients who underwent chemotherapy alone received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) alone or gemcitabine with 5-FU. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 38 months. The survival and prognostic factors were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, respectively. Thirty-four patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy, whereas 21 patients received chemotherapy alone. The median survival time was 12 months for CCRT patients, compared to 11 months for chemotherapy alone patients (p=0.453). The median progression-free survival was 8 months for CCRT patients, compared to 5 months for chemotherapy alone patients (p=0.242). The overall response included 9 partial responses for CCRT and 1 partial response for chemotherapy alone. In total, 26% of patients from the CCRT group experienced grade 3{approx}4 bowel toxicity. In contract, no grade 3{approx}4 bowel toxicity was observed in the chemotherapy alone group. The significant prognostic factors of overall survival were lymph node status, high CA19-9, and tumor location. The response rate and progression-free survival were more favorable in the CCRT group, when compared with the chemotherapy alone group

  10. Comorbidity, Use of Common Medications, and Risk of Early Death in Patients with Localized or Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Nieder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze predictive factors for early death from comorbidity (defined as death within 3 years from diagnosis and unrelated to prostate cancer in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer. Such information may guide individually tailored treatment or observation strategies, and help to avoid overtreatment. We retrospectively analyzed baseline parameters including information on comorbidity and medication use among 177 patients (median age at diagnosis 70 years. Actuarial survival analyses were performed. During the first 3 years, two patients (1.1% died from progressive prostate cancer after they had developed distant metastases. The risk of dying from other causes (3.4% was numerically higher, although not to a statistically significant degree. Six patients who died from other causes had age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (CCI scores ≥5 (CCI is a sum score where each comorbid condition is assigned with a score depending on the risk of dying associated with this condition. The main comorbidity was cardiovascular disease. The two statistically significant predictive factors were medication use and age-adjusted CCI score ≥5 (univariate analysis. However, medication use was not an independent factor as all patients with age-adjusted CCI score ≥5 also used at least one class of medication. Median survival was 30 months in patients with age-adjusted CCI score ≥5. Prediction of non-prostate cancer death may be important to prevent overtreatment in patients who are more threatened by comorbidity. Our data suggest that simple parameters such as use of medications vs. none, or presence of serious cardiac disease vs. none, are not sufficient, and that age-adjusted CCI scores outperform the other factors included in our analysis.

  11. Intraoperative laparoscope augmentation for port placement and resection planning in minimally invasive liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Marco; Mussack, Thomas; Heining, Sandro M; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of liver tumor indications were treated by minimally invasive laparoscopic resection. Besides the restricted view, two major intraoperative issues in laparoscopic liver resection are the optimal planning of ports as well as the enhanced visualization of (hidden) vessels, which supply the tumorous liver segment and thus need to be divided (e.g., clipped) prior to the resection. We propose an intuitive and precise method to plan the placement of ports. Preoperatively, self-adhesive fiducials are affixed to the patient's skin and a computed tomography (CT) data set is acquired while contrasting the liver vessels. Immediately prior to the intervention, the laparoscope is moved around these fiducials, which are automatically reconstructed to register the patient to its preoperative imaging data set. This enables the simulation of a camera flight through the patient's interior along the laparoscope's or instruments' axes to easily validate potential ports. Intraoperatively, surgeons need to update their surgical planning based on actual patient data after organ deformations mainly caused by application of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum. Therefore, preoperative imaging data can hardly be used. Instead, we propose to use an optically tracked mobile C-arm providing cone-beam CT imaging capability intraoperatively. After patient positioning, port placement, and carbon dioxide insufflation, the liver vessels are contrasted and a 3-D volume is reconstructed during patient exhalation. Without any further need for patient registration, the reconstructed volume can be directly augmented on the live laparoscope video, since prior calibration enables both the volume and the laparoscope to be positioned and oriented in the tracking coordinate frame. The augmentation provides the surgeon with advanced visual aid for the localization of veins, arteries, and bile ducts to be divided or sealed.

  12. "Vascular lock" causing splenic perfusion defects during irreversible electroporation of a locally advanced pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Duka, Ejona; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-11-28

    There is little reported experience of irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic tumors (LAP). In literature, few data reported complications. In particular vascular vasoconstriction miming splenic infarcts in humans has never been found. This report describes the onset of asymptomatic multiple little splenic perfusion defects after the treatment of a LAP localized in the boby-tail portion of the pancreas with the application of five percutaneous probes for IRE, in a 79 year-old man. Splenic artery was regularly patent but entirely trapped in the tumor. To the best of our knowledge, until now, no experience concerning percutaneous IRE of pancreatic cancer described that phenomenon. The cause could not be established with certainty and "vascular lock" may be a valid hypothesis. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate its frequency and its exact pathophysiological cause in humans.

  13. Neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced melanoma: new strategies with targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Greca M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Michele La Greca,1 Giuseppe Grasso,2 Giovanna Antonelli,1 Alessia Erika Russo,1 Salvatore Bartolotta,3 Alessandro D’Angelo,1 Felice Vito Vitale,1 Francesco Ferraù1 1Medical Oncology Department, San Vincenzo Hospital, Taormina, Messina, Italy; 2Pathology Department, San Vincenzo Hospital, Taormina, Messina, Italy; 3Surgical Unit, Casa di Cura Gretter-Lucina, Catania, Catania, Italy Abstract: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been successfully tested in several bulky solid tumors, but it has not been utilized in advanced cutaneous melanoma, primarily because effective medical treatments for this disease have been lacking. However, with the development of new immunotherapies (monoclonal antibodies specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 [anti-CTLA-4] and programmed death protein-1 [anti-PD1] and small molecules interfering with intracellular pathways (anti-BRAF and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [anti- MEK] the use of this approach is becoming a viable treatment strategy for locally advanced melanoma. The neoadjuvant setting provides a double opportunity for a better knowledge of these drugs: a short-term evaluation of their intrinsic activity, and a deeper analysis of their action and resistance-induction mechanisms. BRAF inhibitors seem to be ideal candidates for the neoadjuvant setting, because of their prompt, repeatedly confirmed response in V600E BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. In this report we summarize studies focused on the neoadjuvant use of traditional medical treatments in advanced melanoma and anecdotal cases of this approach with the use of biologic therapies. Moreover, we discuss our experience with neoadjuvant targeted therapy as a priming for radical surgery in a patient with BRAF V600E mutation-positive advanced melanoma. Keywords: neoadjuvant setting, biologic, targeted therapy, vemurafenib, advanced melanoma

  14. Resection for secondary malignancy of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Hsia; Wang, Shin-E; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chen, Tien-Hua; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2012-01-01

    This study tried to clarify the role of pancreatic resection in the treatment of secondary malignancy with metastasis or local invasion to the pancreas in terms of surgical risk and survival benefit. Data of secondary malignancy of the pancreas from our 19 patients and cases reported in the English literature were pooled together for analysis. There were 329 cases of resected secondary malignancy of the pancreas, including 241 cases of metastasis and 88 cases of local invasion. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the pancreas and amenable to resection was renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (73.9%). More than half (52.3%) of the primary cancers with local invasion to the pancreas were colon cancer, and nearly half (40.9%) were stomach cancer. The median metastatic interval was 84 months (7 years) for overall primary tumors and 108 months (9 years) for RCC. The 5-year survival for secondary malignancy of the pancreas after resection was 61.1% for metastasis and 58.9% for local invasion, with 72.8% for RCC metastasis, 69.0% for colon cancer, and 43.8% for stomach cancer with local invasion to the pancreas. Pancreatic resection should not be precluded for secondary malignancy of the pancreas because long-term survival could be achieved with acceptable surgical risk in selected patients.

  15. A meta-analysis of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation in the treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun He

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation can decrease the risk of recurrence and metastasis but not improve the 5 years overall survival and 5 years disease free survival compared to radiotherapy alone in the patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  16. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P;

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  17. Neck Management with Total Laryngectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Larynx Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, William R; Amdur, Robert J; Boyce, Brian J; Dziegielewski, Peter; Morris, Christopher G; Mendenhall, William M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with clinically node-negative (cN0) locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the larynx who receive total laryngectomy (TL) benefit from elective neck dissection (END) before adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy (RT). A retrospective review of 36 patients who received TL and adjuvant postoperative RT for laryngeal SCC between 1988 and 2013 was carried out. Patients had either T3 (n = 7; 19%) or T4a (n = 29; 81%) primaries, and all had clinically node-negative disease. All patients underwent TL and adjuvant RT. Patients underwent either a planned unilateral END, a bilateral END, or no END. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 0.3-18.4 years). Occult nodal metastases were found in 9 (32%) of 28 patients receiving END. 5-year control and survival rates for all patients were: local-regional control, 92% (END 91% vs. no END 100%; p = 0.4922); cause-specific survival, 80%; distant metastasis-free survival, 88%; and overall survival, 52%. Local-regional control and survival were not influenced by END. 5 (14%) patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities. In this patient population, those not receiving END at the time of TL had equivalent rates of local-regional control and survival as those receiving END, although our sample size not receiving END was relatively small. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  18. Endolaryngeal laser resection of larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mudunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal cancer takes the leading position among malignant tumors of head and neck. Currently, endolaryngeal laser resection is the leading treatment option for localized processes (T1-T2. In the period from December 2014 to January 2016 such surgeries were performed in 76 patients in our clinic. Carcinoma in situ was detected in 19 (25 %, T1a in 27 (35 %, T1b in 24 (31 %, T2 in 6 (8 % patients. As result of the planned histological examination, in all cases surgical procedures had microscopically radical character. Endolaryngeal CO2 -laser resections allow to perform enough large radical surgical interventions with satisfactory functional and cosmetic results, without compromising long-term outcomes. 

  19. Induction chemotherapy before chemoradiotherapy and surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer. Is it time for a randomized phase III trial?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, Claus [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie; Arnold, Dirk [Halle Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin IV; Becker, Heinz; Ghadimi, Michael; Liersch, Torsten [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Allgemein- und Visceralchirurgie; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [Erlangen Univ. (Germany). Strahlenklinik; Graeven, Ullrich [Kliniken Maria Hilf GmbH, Moenchengladbach (Germany). Klinik fuer Haematologie, Onkologie und Gastroenterologie; Hess, Clemens [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Hofheinz, Ralf [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). III. Medizinische Klinik Haematologie und Internistische Onkologie; Hohenberger, Werner [Erlangen Univ. (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik; Post, Stefan [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik; Raab, Rudolf [Klinikum Oldenburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Allgemein- und Visceralchirurgie; Wenz, Frederick [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2010-12-15

    Background: In the era of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal excision (TME), the development of distant metastases is the predominant mode of failure in rectal cancer patients today. Integrating more effective systemic therapy into combined modality programs is the challenge. The question that needs to be addressed is how and when to apply systemic treatment with adequate dose and intensity. Material and Methods: This review article focuses on phase II-III trials designed to improve 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based combined modality treatment for rectal cancer patients through the inclusion of concurrent, adjuvant or, most recently, induction combination chemotherapy. Computerized bibliographic searches of PubMed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO/ASTRO/ESTRO meetings. Results: After preoperative CRT and surgical resection, approximately one third of patients do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy, mainly due to surgical complications, patients' refusal, or investigator's discretion. In order to be able to apply chemotherapy with sufficient dose and intensity, an innovative approach is to deliver systemic therapy prior to preoperative CRT rather than adjuvant chemotherapy. Emerging evidence from several phase II trials and, recently, randomized phase II trials indicate that induction chemotherapy is feasible, does not compromise CRT or surgical resection, and enables the delivery of chemotherapy in adequate dose and intensity. Although this approach did not increase local efficacy in recent trials (e.g., pathological complete response rates, tumor regression, R0 resection rates, local control), it may help to improve control of distant disease. Conclusion: Whether this improvement in applicability and dose density of chemotherapy will ultimately translate into improved disease-free survival will have to be tested in a larger phase III trial. (orig.)

  20. Tumor phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling and development of metastatic disease in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hansen Ree

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recognizing EGFR as key orchestrator of the metastatic process in colorectal cancer, but also the substantial heterogeneity of responses to anti-EGFR therapy, we examined the pattern of composite tumor kinase activities governed by EGFR-mediated signaling that might be implicated in development of metastatic disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Point mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA and ERBB2 amplification were determined in primary tumors from 63 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer scheduled for radical treatment. Using peptide arrays with tyrosine kinase substrates, ex vivo phosphopeptide profiles were generated from the same baseline tumor samples and correlated to metastasis-free survival. RESULTS: Unsupervised clustering analysis of the resulting phosphorylation of 102 array substrates defined two tumor classes, both consisting of cases with and without KRAS/BRAF mutations. The smaller cluster group of patients, with tumors generating high ex vivo phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-related substrates, had a particularly aggressive disease course, with almost a half of patients developing metastatic disease within one year of follow-up. CONCLUSION: High phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-mediated signaling activity of the primary tumor, rather than KRAS/BRAF mutation status, was identified as a hallmark of poor metastasis-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing radical treatment of the pelvic cavity.

  1. Results of total laryngectomy as treatment for locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cabo Herrero, Patricia; Fernández-Vañes, Laura; López Álvarez, Fernando; Álvarez Marcos, César; Llorente, José Luis; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-19

    Total laryngectomy (TL), with eventual postoperative radiotherapy, has proven to be effective in treating cases of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. The aim of this study was to analyse the oncological outcomes of this procedure in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer classified T3 and T4. We studied 59 patients (33 T3 and 26 T4a) with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx treated with TL from 1998 to 2012. Mean age was 61 years with a male predominance (96.6%). All the patients were smokers and 96% consumed alcohol. Unilateral selective neck dissection (ND) was performed in 12 patients, unilateral radical ND in 11 patients, bilateral selective ND in 20 patients and radical ND plus selective ND in 14 patients. 66% of the patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Lymph node metastases occurred in 81% of the patients and extranodal invasion in 56% of them. 29% of the patients had loco-regional recurrence, 17% developed distant metastases, and 25% a second primary tumour. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 46%. TL extended to pharynx (with eventual postoperative radiotherapy) offers good oncological results in terms of loco-regional control and survival in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer, so organ preservation protocols should achieve similar oncological results to those shown by TL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  2. THORACO - ABDOMINAL FLAP FOR RESURFACING LARGE POST MASTECTOMY DEFECTS IN LOCALLY ADVANCED CA. BREAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Covering of large wounds after mastectomy in locally advanced Ca breast with skin that can withstand radiotherapy is a challenge to the surgeon. Here this study we used a local advancement flap from the adjacent area called Thoraco - A bdominal F la p (TA flap for such giant defects. This is based on superficial and lumbar arteries and is thick to with stand consequent RT . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Of the total 107 cases of LABC 32 had post mastectomy defects of larger than 12 cm and could not be closed by simple approximation. Among the 32 cases 17 cases are covered by split thickness skin grafting. 15 cases are covered by TA flap. These cases are assessed for mean operating time, mean blood loss, post - operative stay, flap necrosis and viability of the f lap after radiotherapy. RESULTS: There is minimal extra time or blood loss in these cases . All the flaps healed well except for small edge necrosis in 4 cases. In all the patients we could start radiotherapy in the fourth week of surgery and all the flaps withstood RT well. After further evaluation probably this can be recommended as procedure for giant post mastectomy defects particularly for those who require RT early

  3. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgical Options for Locally-advanced Breast Cancer: A Single Institution Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abo Elmagd Salem

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can downstage the size of the tumor, thus allowing some patients with advanced disease with the option of conservative breast surgery. Our study aims to investigate the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Methods: Fifty-six patients had locally advanced breast cancer. Ten patients (18% were stage IIB, 32 (57% were stage IIIA, 9 (16% were stage IIIB, and 5 (9% were stage IIIC. Patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy comprised of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and fluorouracil followed by surgery (15 patients with breast conservative surgery,11 with skin sparing mastectomy and latesmus dorsi reconstruction, and 30 patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy and then followed by radiotherapy, 50 Gy with conventional fractionation. Results: Clinical down staging was obtained in 49 (87.5% patients: 5 (9% had complete clinical response, 44 (78.5% had partial response, 6 (10.7% had stable disease, and 1 (1.8% had progressive disease. The primary tumor could not be palpated after chemotherapy in 7 (12.5% of 56 patients who presented with a palpable mass. Median follow-up was 47.5 months. The factors that correlated positively with locoregional recurrence on univariate analysis included hormonal receptor status and surgical margin status. On multivariate analysis, surgical margin status was the only independent significant factor for locoregional recurrence-free survival. In univariate analysis for distant relapse free survival, factors that correlated positively included disease stage and hormonal receptor status. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor stage and hormonal receptor status were independent significant factors that correlated with distant relapse-free survival. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was effective in clinical down staging and should be considered for patients with advanced breast cancer. It improved operability and enhanced

  4. Retrospective analysis of role of interstitial brachytherapy using template (MUPIT in locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandwani Pooja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this retrospective study was to assess treatment outcomes for patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies being treated with interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT and to study the acute and late sequelae and survival after treatment by this technique. Materials and Methods : Ninety seven patients untreated with histopathological confirmation of carcinoma of cervix (37 vault (40 and vagina (20 were treated by combination of external beam RT (EBRT using megavoltage irradiation to pelvis to dose of 4000-5000 cGy followed by interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT between September 2001 to March 2005. Median age was 46 years. Only those patients who were found unsuitable for conventional brachytherapy or in whom intracavitatory radiotherapy was found to be unlikely to encompass a proper dose distribution were treated by interstitial template brachytherapy using MUPIT application and were enrolled in this study. The dose of MUPIT was 1600-2400 cGy in 4-6# with 400 cGy /# and two fractions a day with minimum gap of six hours in between two fractions on micro-HDR. Criteria for inclusion of patients were as follows: Hb minimum 10 gm/dl, performance status - 70% or more (Karnofsy scale, histopathological confirmation FIGO stage IIB-IIIB (excluding frozen pelvis. Results : Among the 97 patients studied, 12 patients lost to follow-up and hence they were excluded from the study. Follow-up of rest of the patients was then done up to September 2006. The duration of follow-up was in the range of 20-60 months. Parameters studied were local control rate, complication rate, mortality rate and number of patients developing systemic metastasis. Local control was achieved in 56/85 (64.7% and complication rate was 15/85 (17.6%. Local control was better for nonbulky tumors compared bulky tumors irrespective of stage of disease. Local control was better in patients with good regression of

  5. Intensity modulated radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Results of feasibility study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Rui Bai; Guo-Hua Wu; Wei-Jian Guo; Xu-Dong Wu; Yuan Yao; Yin Chen; Ren-Hua Zhou; Dong-Qin Lu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in combination with chemotherapy could increase radiation dose to gross tumor volume without severe acute radiation related toxicity by decreasing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Twenty-one patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were evaluated in this clinical trial,Patients would receive the dose of IMRT from 21Gy to 30Gy in 7 to 10 fractions within two weeks after conventional radiotherapy of 30Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. The total escalation tumor dose would be 51, 54,57, 60Gy, respectively. 5-fluororacil (5-FU) or gemcitabine was given concurrently with radiotherapy during the treatment course.RESULTS: Sixteen patients who had completed the radiotherapy plan with doses of 51Gy (3 cases), 54Gy (3 cases), 57Gy (3 cases) and 60Gy (7 cases) were included for evaluation. The median levels of CA19-9 prior to and after radiotherapy were 716 U/ml and 255 U/ml respectively (P<0.001) in 13 patients who demonstrated high levels of CA19-9 before radiotherapy. Fourteen patients who suffered from pain could reduce at least 1/3-1/2 amount of analgesic intake and 5 among these patients got complete relief of pain. Ten patients improved in Kamofsky performance status (KPS). The median follow-up period was 8 months and one-year survival rate was 35 %. No patient suffered more than grade Ⅲ acute toxicities induced by radiotherapy.CONCLUSION: Sixty Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks with late course IMRT technique combined with concurrent 5-FU chemotherapy can provide a definitely palliative benefit with tolerable acute radiation related toxicity for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  6. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF CHEMOIRRADIATION IN LOCALLY ADVANCED URINARY BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehru

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection is the standard method used to treat patients with locally advanced carcinoma of urinary bladder. Furthermore, a significant proportion of patients are deemed unsuitable for surgery due to inoperability, advanced age, and/or comorbid conditions. B ecause of disappointing results with radical cystectomy in terms of survival, as well as the morbidity and decreased quality of life associated with the surgery, bladder - conserving therapies like trimodality (TURBT, concurrent chemoradiation therapy have been gained popularity as the survival rates are nearly equal with radical cystectomy along with functioning bladder. AIM OF STUDY : To study retrospectively the effectiveness of chemoradition therapy in bladder preservation approach in the management of p atients with locally advanced ( I nvasive bladder cancer in medically unfit and unwilling patients for radical cystectomy and those who cannot tolerate combination chemotherapy drugs. METHOD S AND MATERIAL : The data was collected from the patient’s records between 2004 - 2010 who were treated in our Regional cancer hospital. All were biopsy/CT scan proven muscle invasive urinary bladder tumors with T2 – 3, N0, M0 lesions. Post TURBT status. Medi cally unfit and Unwillingness for surgery and underwent concurrent Radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin therapy. And men and / women with age between 45 - 70 years were included in the study. RESULTS : Out of 28 patients 4 (14.29% patients who had good TURP procedure showed complete response , 20(71.43% patients had partial response and 4(14.29% patients showed stable disease. 71.43% patient showed symptomatic response to treatment . CONCLUSION : Being a single agent chemotherapy with radiation and it is feasible without major toxicity and offers a potentially usefulness in locoregional control and symptomatic relief in unfavorable population with invasive bladder cancer. Moreover it

  7. A practical alternative to conventional five-field irradiation postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, R A; Thomadsen, B R; Hansen, H; Phromratanapongse, P; Paliwal, B R

    1994-01-01

    A combination of electron and photon beams has been used as an alternative for the conventional five-field method to irradiate patients postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer. Anterior and posterior opposed photon beams treat in continuity the lateral chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular lymph nodes. An adjacent anterior electron beam is used at an energy matched to the depth of the internal mammary nodes. It includes the anterior chest wall, but bolus is used in the lateral aspect to spare underlying lung. This electron beam eliminates the diverging junction between the internal mammary and medial tangential fields used in the conventional five-field technique. Overlaps along the junction between the photon and electron beams are minimized by placing the center of the photon field along its medial border. Measurements with an Alderson-Rando phantom show dose-distribution advantages for this technique over the conventional five-field approach. There is less chance of underdosing tumor cells or of overdosing normal tissue along beam junctions. Clinical studies on 29 patients treated by this technique between July 1985 and December 1989 show increased rates of acute skin reactions, but otherwise similar side effects compared with 57 breast cancer patients treated with the five-field technique over the same time period. Local recurrence rates and patient survival rates were similar for the two groups. Given the dose-distribution advantages of this technique and its simple adaptation to accommodate unusual surgical scars or cancer recurrences, its use should be considered for postmastectomy patients with locally advanced breast cancer in well-equipped cancer treatment centers.

  8. A STUDY OF COX-2 INHIBITOR CELECOXIB AND CHEMORADIATION IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppa Prakash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To evaluate efficacy of concurrent oral Cox-2 Inhibitor (celecoxib and chemoradiation in locoregional control, distant control, disease free survival and/or overall survival in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. To determine treatment related toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, intravenous cisplatin and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was done for a period of 2 years in a tertiary care cancer hospital which caters to the cancer patients. Advanced squamous, adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, Patients with age <70 years, ECOG performance status 0-2, Normal haematological investigations, Normal renal function test, Normal liver function test, No disease outside of pelvis. RESULTS This prospective study consisted 30 patients, 15 patients on either arm. Overall pooled mean age for both study and comparison group was 50.3 years with a probability value P=0.91 for age. 14 patients (93.33% in both the arms had a performance status of ECOG 0 or 1 and 1 patient in both arms had ECOG PS-2. Stage distribution of the patients in study arm was 3 in IB2, 2 in IIA, 5 in IIB, 4 in III and 1 in stage IVA. In control arm, out of the 15 patients 2 are in IB2, 2 in IIA, 5 in IIB, 5 in III and 1 in stage IVA. The mean probability value was P=0.65 for stage distribution. 15 patients in arm-A (study arm received pelvic RT 50Gy 2Gy/Fr 5#/week followed by HDR –ICR 3 Fr. 700 cGy/Fr after pelvic RT on an average of 1 week along with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (50 mg (D1, D8, D15, D22 and Cox-2 inhibitor oral celecoxib 400 mg twice daily (800 mg/d starting from day 1 to throughout the duration of the chemoradiation. 15 patients in arm-B (Control arm received pelvic RT 50Gy 2Gy/Fr 5#/week followed by HDR –ICR 3 Fr. 700 cGy/Fr on an average of 1 week after pelvic RT along with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (50 mg (D1, D8, D15, D22

  9. What is the correct staging and treatment strategy for locally advanced prostate cancer extending to the bladder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Haki Yüksel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In locally advanced prostate cancer with bladder invasion, frequently encountered problems such as bleeding, urinary retention, hydronephrosis, and pain create distress for the patients. Therefore patients’ quality of life is disrupted and duration of hospitalization is prolonged. Relevant literature about accurate staging and treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with bladder invasion was investigated. Locally advanced prostate cancer can present as a large-volume aggressive tumor extending beyond boundaries of prostate gland, and involving neighboring structures which can be involved as recurrence(s following initial local therapy. Survival times of these patients can range between 5 and 8 years. Their common characteristics are adverse and severe local symptoms unfavorably affecting quality of life Control of local symptoms and their effective palliation are independent clinical targets influencing survival outcomes of these patients. The treatment outcomes of locally advanced prostate cancer into the bladder are currently debatable. Although in the current TNM classification, it is defined in T4a, we think that this may be categorized as a subgroup of T3 and thus encourage surgeons for the indication of radical surgeries (radical prostatectomy, radical cystoprostatectomy in selected patient populations after discussing issues concerning consequences of the treatment alternatives, and expectations with the patients. Cystoprostatectomy followed by immediate androgen deprivation therapy may be a feasible option for selected patients with previously untreated prostate cancer involving the bladder neck because of excellent local control and long term survival.

  10. Two Cases of Mastectomy after Paclitaxel + Bevacizumab Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Shinoda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC deteriorates the quality of life (QOL of the affected patients. Combination chemotherapy or extended chemotherapy is considered to help to shrink local lesions. Case 1: A 71-year-old female with a history of tympanitis and cystitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA visited our hospital. There was a tumor of 7 cm in diameter in her right breast with skin ulceration. Paclitaxel + bevacizumab therapy was started, and after five cycles of therapy, a mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Chemotherapy with anthracycline was avoided for fear of activating the MRSA. After the operation, the patient's wound opened. However, it naturally epithelialized. Case 2: A 41-year-old female visited our hospital due to a tumor of 8 cm in diameter in her right breast with skin ulceration. Four cycles of paclitaxel + bevacizumab therapy were started, and her tumor almost disappeared during the first cycle. Then, doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide therapy was performed for four cycles, and a mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Her postoperative course was good. Discussion: Chemotherapy with bevacizumab or extended chemotherapy is generally not considered to contribute to a survival improvement. However, such therapy contributes in increasing the response to chemotherapy, and should be considered for patients with LABC to shrink the local lesions and improve the QOL.

  11. Reconstruction in extensive axillary Hidradenitis suppurativa with local fasciocutaneous V-Y advancement flaps

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    Sharma Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our experience with the use of local fasciocutaneous V-Y advancement flaps in the reconstruction of 10 axillae in 6 patients for large defects following wide excision of long-standing Hidradenitis suppurativa of the axilla. The defects were closed with local V-Y subcutaneous island flaps. A single flap from the chest wall was sufficient for moderate defects. However, for larger defects, an additional flap was taken from the medial side of the ipsilateral arm. The donor defects could be closed primarily in all the patients. The local areas of the lateral chest wall and the medial side of the arm have a plentiful supply of cutaneous perforators and the flaps can be designed in a V-Y fashion without resorting to preoperative marking of the perforator. The flaps were freed sufficiently to allow adequate movement for closure of the defects. Although no attempt was made to identify the perforators specifically, many perforators were seen entering the flap. Some perforators can be safely divided to increase reach of the flap. All the flaps survived completely. A follow up of 2.5 years is presented.

  12. Multidisciplinary team approach for the management of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Searching the evidence to guide the decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, In Jae; Ahn, Sung Ja [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) is composed of heterogeneous subgroups that require a multidisciplinary team approach in order to ensure optimal therapy for each patient. Since 2010, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network has recommended chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for bulky mediastinal disease and surgical combination for those patients with single-station N2 involvement who respond to neoadjuvant therapy. According to lung cancer tumor boards, thoracic surgeons make a decision on the resectability of the tumor, if it is determined to be unresectable, concurrent CRT (CCRT) is considered the next choice. However, the survival benefit of CCRT over sequential CRT or radiotherapy alone carries the risk of additional toxicity. Considering severe adverse events that may lead to death, fit patients who are able to tolerate CCRT must be identified by multidisciplinary tumor board. Decelerated approaches, such as sequential CRT or high-dose radiation alone may be a valuable alternative for patients who are not eligible for CCRT. As a new treatment strategy, investigators are interested in the application of the innovative radiation techniques, trimodality therapy combining surgery after high-dose definitive CCRT, and the combination of radiation with targeted or immunotherapy agents. The updated results and on-going studies are thoroughly reviewed in this article.

  13. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G;

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  14. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Currently, there is no consensus on dose prescription in image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in locally advanced cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to provide evidence based recommendations for tumor dose prescription based on results from a multi......-center patient series (retroEMBRACE). Materials and methods This study analyzed 488 locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy combined with IGABT. Brachytherapy contouring and reporting was according to ICRU/GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The Cox Proportional...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...

  15. Restaging of locally advanced carcinoma of the rectum with MR imaging after preoperative radio-chemotherapy plus regional hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, K.T.; Wust, P.; Stroszczynski, C.; Felix, R. [Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charite (Germany); Rau, B.; Huenerbein, M. [Div. of Surgery and Surgical Oncology, Robert-Roessle Hospital and Tumor Inst., Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany); Schneider, U. [Inst. of Pathology, Campus Buch, Charite, Robert-Roessle Hospital and Tumor Inst., Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: The restaging accuracy of MR imaging in advanced primary rectal carcinoma after preoperative radiochemotherapy and regional hyperthermia was evaluated and compared with the histopathologically verified degree of tumor remission after a course of radio-chemo-thermotherapy. Patients and Methods: 35 patients with primary rectal carcinoma (uT3/uT4) underwent MRI using a surface coil 4-6 weeks after radiochemotherapy (n=35), regional hyperthermia (n=23), and before curative surgery. We defined as gold standard for the remission status the comparison of pretherapeutic endosonography with the histopathology of the resected specimen. Results: T category was correctly restaged after preoperative treatment in only 19 (54%) of 35 patients. Nine of 20 responders were overstaged and seven of 15 non-responders were understaged. Concurrently, the N category was correctly restaged in 19 (54%) of 35 patients (twelve responders and seven non-responders). Overstaging occurred in four responders and two non-responders, understaging occurred in four responders and six non-responders. Conclusions: MRI proved independent of the response status as not suitable to restage locally advanced rectal carcinoma after preoperative radiochemotherapy despite optimized imaging technique and spatial resolution. Basically, imaging the morphology of a tumor cannot clearly differentiate between vital and devitalized tissue after a treatment. Functional imaging such as PET (positron emission tomography) appears more feasible for restaging after radio-chemo-thermotherapy. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Genauigkeit der Stadienbestimmung mittels MR-Bildgebung wurde bei primaer fortgeschrittenen Rektumkarzinomen nach praeoperativer Radiochemotherapie und regionaler Hyperthermie gepueft und mit der histopathologisch ermittelten Tumorremission nach praeoperativer Behandlung verglichen. Patienten und Methode: 35 Patienten mit primaeren Rektumkarzinomen (uT3/uT4) wurden MR-tomographisch mittels

  16. The Clinical Significance of Cathepsin D and p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Lee, Sheng-Jin; Kim, Jin-Man; Cho, Moon-June [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Cathepsin D (CD) is a lysosomal acid proteinase that is related to malignant progression, invasion, and a poor prognosis in several tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic clinical significance of CD and p53 expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Eighty-nine patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were included in this study. Preoperative chemoradiation consisted of a dose of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation and two concurrent cycles of administration of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Surgery was performed six weeks after chemoradiation. CD and p53 expression in pretreatment formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens were assessed by immunohistochemical staining using a CD and p53 monoclonal antibodies. The threshold value for a positive stain in tumor tissue and stromal cells was 1+ intensity in 10% of the tumors or stromal cells, respectively. Positive CD expression was found in 57 (64%) of the tumors and 32 (35%) of the stromal cell specimens. There was no association with CD expression of the tumor or stromal cells and patient characteristics. There was a correlation between tumor CD expression with stromal cell CD expression (p=0.01). Overexpression of p53 was not a significant prognostic factor. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were not different between tumor CD-negative and positive patient biopsy samples (69% vs. 65%, 60% vs. 61%, respectively). The 5-year OS rates in the tumor-negative/stromal cell-negative, tumor-negative/stromal cell-positive, tumor-positive/stromal cell-negative and tumor-positive/ stromal cell-positive biopsy samples were 75%, 28%, 62%, and 73%, respectively. Stromal cell staining only without positive tumor staining demonstrated the worst overall survival prognosis for patients (p=0.013). Overexpression of p53 in rectal biopsy tissue was not

  17. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bailleux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods: From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age was 56.4 years (27-79. Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%, T3a = 1 pt (3%, T3b = 6 pts (18.2%, and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%. Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27. Median CTVCT (16 pts and HR-CTV MRI (17 pts were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3, 31.9 cc (17.1-58, respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5, 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4, respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9, 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4, and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1, respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51. Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pt, G3 infection = 2 pts, and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts, respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion; no bleeding was

  18. Observation and nursing care of Locally advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with intratumoral bruceajavanica oil injection%鸦胆子油乳瘤内注射治疗LANSCLC疗效观察与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华; 刘敏

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨鸦胆子油乳瘤内注射治疗不可手术切除局部晚期非小细胞肺癌的疗效及护理.方法:对284例不可手术切除局部晚期非小细胞肺癌患者采用瘤内注射鸦胆子油乳,并配合有效护理,观察疗效及不良反应.结果:完全缓解(CR)20例,部分缓解(PR)126例,好转(MR)76例,稳定(SD)46例,进展(PD)16例,有效率51.4%.无进展生存期(PFS)11.31月.结论:加强鸦胆子油乳瘤内注射治疗不可手术切除局部晚期非小细胞肺癌注射前后的健康指导和护理,可显著提高疗效.%Objective:To investigate the intratumoral injection of Brucea javanica oil in the treatment of no operation resection for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer and nursing care. Methods:284 cases of no operation resection of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer with intratumoral injection of Brucea javanica oil, combined with effective nursing, observation curative effect and adverse reaction. Results:The complete response ( CR ) in 20 cases, partial remission ( PR ) in 126 cases,76 cases improved ( MR ), stability ( SD ) in 46 cases, progress (PD) in 16 cases, with an efficiency of 51.4%. Progression free survival ( PFS ) in 11.31months. Conclusion:Strengthening of Brucea Javanica Oil intratumor injection for treatment of no operation resection of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer before and after injection of health guidance and care, can significantly improve the efficacy.

  19. Quality of life after hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion for locally advanced extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssens, KMJ; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; van Ginkel, RJ; Hoekstra, HJ

    2006-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) were studied in patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the extremities treated with isolated limb perfusion and delayed resection, with or without adjuvant irradiation. Methods: Forty-one patients received a questionnaire

  20. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy followed by mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. An alternative treatment option for locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, Montserrat; Corradini, Stefanie; Schoenecker, Stephan; Scheithauer, Heike; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Dian, Darius [Mednord Munich Clinic, Munich (Germany); Bodungen, Vera von; Ditsch, Nina; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Harbeck, Nadia [LMU Munich, Breast Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The optimal sequence of mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is still under debate. Increased rates of postoperative complications are described following postmastectomy RT. Neoadjuvant RT aims to improve the aesthetic results and simplify the reconstructive pathway. A total of 22 patients diagnosed with LABC and treated with neoadjuvant RT followed by mastectomy and IBR between 04/2012 and 03/2015 were retrospectively analyzed. RT consisted of external beam RT to the breast and the regional lymphatics, if indicated. Both implant-based and autologous tissue-transfer reconstruction techniques were used. At the time of RT, 10 patients had no prior surgery and 12 patients had previously undergone breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with positive resection margins without the possibility to perform a second BCS. Additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 18 patients prior to RT. A complete pathological response was achieved in 55.0% of patients. The 2-year overall survival rate was 89.3%, the 2-year disease-free-survival 79.8% and the local-recurrence-free survival was 95.2%. The cosmetic result was excellent or good in 66% of the patients treated with upfront mastectomy and 37% of the patients who had previously undergone BCS. Among patients who received implant-based IBR, 4 patients developed serious wound-healing problems with implant loss. The most satisfactory results were achieved with autologous tissue reconstruction. A sequential neoadjuvant chemo-/radiotherapy to allow IBR following mastectomy in selected cases of LABC seems feasible and can be safely attempted. Careful patient selection, close monitoring, and continuous patient support is mandatory to ensure compliance in this treatment strategy. (orig.) [German] Die optimale Therapiesequenz von Mastektomie mit sofortiger Brustrekonstruktion (IBR) und Radiotherapie (RT) beim lokal fortgeschrittenen

  1. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect......Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we...... estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...

  2. Liquid fiducial marker applicability in proton therapy of locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Perrin, Rosalind; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    2017-01-01

    .164 for the LFM. Phantom measurements revealed a maximum relative deviation in dose of 4.8% for the LFM in the spread-out Bragg Peak, compared to 12-67% for the solid markers. Using the experimentally determined RSP, the maximum proton range error introduced by the LFM is about 1. mm. If the marker was displaced......Background and purpose: We investigated the clinical applicability of a novel liquid fiducial marker (LFM) for image-guided pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy (PBSPT) of locally advanced lung cancer (LALC). Materials and methods: The relative proton stopping power (RSP) of the LFM...... was calculated and measured. Dose perturbations of the LFM and three solid markers, in a phantom, were measured. PBSPT treatment planning on computer tomography scans of five patients with LALC with the LFM implanted was performed with 1-3 fields. Results: The RSP was experimentally determined to be 1...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for planning intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate Miranda, M; Pinho, D F; Wardak, Z; Albuquerque, K; Pedrosa, I

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological cancer. Its treatment depends on tumor staging at the time of diagnosis, and a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in locally advanced cervical cancers. The combined use of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy increases survival in these patients. Brachytherapy enables a larger dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumor with less toxicity for neighboring tissues with less toxicity for neighboring tissues compared to the use of external beam radiotherapy alone. For years, brachytherapy was planned exclusively using computed tomography (CT). The recent incorporation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides essential information about the tumor and neighboring structures making possible to better define the target volumes. Nevertheless, MRI has limitations, some of which can be compensated for by fusing CT and MRI. Fusing the images from the two techniques ensures optimal planning by combining the advantages of each technique.

  4. A multidisciplinary clinical treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer complicated with rectovesical fistula: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Tiancheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula is a rare and difficult to treat entity. Here, we describe a case of rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula successfully managed by multimodality treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer accompanied by rectovesical fistula. He underwent treatment with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy combined with total pelvic excision and adjuvant chemotherapy, as recommended by a multimodality treatment team. Post-operative pathology confirmed the achievement of pathological complete response. Conclusions This case suggests that a proactive multidisciplinary treatment is needed to achieve complete cure of locally advanced rectal cancer even in the presence of rectovesical fistula.

  5. Age dependent prognosis in concurrent chemo-radiation of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Nielsen, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    , the results might be due to selection bias, thus reports from a cohort of consecutively treated patients are warranted. The current single institution study reports on the influence of age on survival of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy combined with or without concurrent chemotherapy....... Material and methods. Altogether, 478 patients completed radical radiotherapy in doses of 60-66 Gy/30-33 fractions from 1995 to June 2012; 137 of the patients had concurrent chemotherapy. The data was analyzed in age groups ... specific survival the hazard ratio was related to the use of concurrent chemotherapy was 0.49 (95% CI 0.29; 0.82), 0.68 (95% CI 0.48; 0.98) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.67; 1.51) for the age groups

  6. Geometric uncertainties in voluntary deep inspiration breath hold radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Dueck, Jenny;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) increases lung volume and can potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer. We estimated geometric uncertainties in visually guided voluntary DIBH and derived the appropriate treatment margins for different...... image-guidance strategies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventeen patients were included prospectively. An optical marker-based respiratory monitoring with visual guidance enabled comfortable DIBHs, adjusted to each patient's performance. All patients had three consecutive DIBH CTs at each of the treatment...... fractions 2, 16 and 31. DIBH reproducibility was evaluated as inter- and intra-fractional variations in lung volume, tumour position and differential motion between primary tumour and mediastinal lymph nodes. RESULTS: Lung volume increased by median 60% in DIBH. Inter- and intra-fractional lung volume...

  7. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV⩾85Gy EQD2) while reducing the dose to the surface of the vagina to vaginal loading (ovoid/ring) was reduced from 51% to 33% of the total loading with VDD, which significantly reduced the dose to the vaginal dose points (pvaginal point was reduced by a mean of 4±4Gy EQD2 (pvaginal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pharyngolaryngeal Cancers with Stridor: Is It Feasible and Safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Maruti Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The standard initial management of patients with locally advanced pharyngolaryngeal presenting with stridor is tracheostomy. Tracheostomy has been shown to negatively impact cancer-related outcomes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 9 patients, who underwent induction chemotherapy with the aim of prevention of tracheostomy. Presenting features, time to resolution of stridor, and further management are reported. Results. Eight out of 9 patient received chemotherapy within 12 hours of presentation with stridor. There were 4 patients each with primary hypopharynx and larynx. The stage was IVA in 6 patients and IVB in 2 patients. In all patients receiving immediate chemotherapy, clinical stridor resolved within 48 hours. The radiological response rate was 62.5%. The median reduction in size of tumor was 37%. Conclusion. Immediate neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a feasible and safe option for patients presenting with early stridor and helps in resolution of stridor and avoiding tracheostomy.

  9. Image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge because of the head and neck complex anatomy and the tumor invasion to the adjacent organs and/or metastases to the cervical nodes. Postoperative irradiation or concurrent chemoradiation may lead to damage of radiosensitive structures such as the salivary glands, mandible, cochlea, larynx, and pharyngeal muscles. Xerostomia, osteoradionecrosis, deafness, hoarseness of the voice, dysphagia, and aspiration remain serious complications of head and neck irradiation and impair patient quality of life. Intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy by virtue of steep dose gradient and daily imaging may allow for decreased radiation of the organs at risk for complication while preserving loco-regional control.

  10. PELVIC ACTINOMYCOSIS MIMICKING A LOCALLY ADVANCED PELVIC MALIGNANCY--CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velenciuc, Natalia; Velenciuc, I; Makkai Popa, S; Roată, C; Ferariu, D; Luncă, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a former user of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for 10 years, diagnosed with a bulky, fixed pelvic tumor involving the internal genital organs and the recto sigmoid, causing luminal narrowing of the rectum, interpreted as locally advanced pelvic malignancy, probably of genital origin. Intraoperatively, a high index of suspicion made us collect a sample from the fibrous wall of the tumor mass, large Actinomyces colonies were thus identified. Surgery consisted in debridement, removal of a small amount of pus and appendectomy, thus avoiding a mutilating and useless surgery. Specific antibiotic therapy was administered for 3 months, with favorable postoperative and long-term outcomes. Pelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic tumors in women using an IUD. The association of long-term antibiotic treatment is essential to eradicate the infection and prevent relapses.

  11. Local-Oscillator Noise Coupling in Balanced Homodyne Readout for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Steinlechner, Sebastian; Bell, Angus S; Danilishin, Stefan L; Gläfke, Andreas; Gräf, Christian; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Houston, E Alasdair; Huttner, Sabina H; Leavey, Sean S; Pascucci, Daniela; Sorazu, Borja; Spencer, Andrew; Strain, Kenneth A; Wright, Jennifer; Hild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The second generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are quickly approaching their design sensitivity. For the first time these detectors will become limited by quantum back-action noise. Several back-action evasion techniques have been proposed to further increase the detector sensitivity. Since most proposals rely on a flexible readout of the full amplitude- and phase-quadrature space of the output light field, balanced homodyne detection is generally expected to replace the currently used DC readout. Up to now, little investigation has been undertaken into how balanced homodyne detection can be successfully transferred from its ubiquitous application in table-top quantum optics experiments to large-scale interferometers with suspended optics. Here we derive implementation requirements with respect to local oscillator noise couplings and highlight potential issues with the example of the Glasgow Sagnac Speed Meter experiment, as well as for a future upgrade to the Advanced LIGO detectors.

  12. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Narang, Amol K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Reese, Jennifer B. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gearhart, Susan L. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Azad, Nolifer S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chan, June; Olsen, Leah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Efron, Jonathan E. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  13. Different response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for different molecular subtypes in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huafeng Kang; Zhijun Dai; Xiaobin Ma; Xing Bao; Shuai Lin; Hongbing Ma; Xiaoxu Liu; Xijing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different molecular subtypes defined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining on the response rate for patients with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: One hundred and seven breast cancer patients admitted from 2007 to 2011 who received 4 cycles of docetaxel/epirubicin-combined (TE) neoadjuvant chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed, the patients were classified into 4 subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, HER-2 and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) according to different combination patterns of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER-2) expression defined by IHC method. The correlation between response rate and the molecular subtypes were analyzed. Results: The pathological complete response (PCR), clinical complete response (CCR), clinical partial response (CPR), and clinical stable disease (CSD) rate of whole group was 15.89% (17/107), 22.43% (24/107), 63.55% (68/107), 14.02% (15/107), respectively, and the overall response rate (ORR) was 85.98% (92/107). The PCR rate and ORR of luminal A, luminal B, HER-2 and TNBC subtypes was 4.76% and 73.81%; 16.67% and 83.33%;17.65% and 100.00%; 30.00% and 96.67%, respectively. The PCR and ORR rate of HER-2/TNBC subtypes was higher than that of luminal A/B subtypes (P = 0.019, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusion: Different molecular subtypes display different response rate for patients with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant TE chemotherapy, HER-2/TNBC subtypes have a higher PCR and ORR rate than that of luminal A/B subtypes.

  14. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  15. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and radiation therapy for treatment-naive patients with locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Dong Ryul; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Shin, Sung Wook; Cho, Sung Ki; Gwak, Geum Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Paik, Yong Han; Paik, Seung Woon [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) followed by radiotherapy (RT) in treatment-naive patients with locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Eligibility criteria were as follows: newly diagnosed with HCC, the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C, Child-Pugh class A or B, and no prior treatment for HCC. Patients with extrahepatic spread were excluded. A total of 59 patients were retrospectively enrolled. All patients were treated with TACE followed by RT. The time interval between TACE and RT was 2 weeks as per protocol. A median RT dose was 47.25 Gy10 as the biologically effective dose using the α/β = 10 (range, 39 to 65.25 Gy10). At 1 month, complete response was obtained in 3 patients (5%), partial response in 27 patients (46%), stable disease in 13 patients (22%), and progressive disease in 16 patients (27%). The actuarial one- and two-year OS rates were 60.1% and 47.2%, respectively. The median OS was 17 months (95% confidence interval, 5.6 to 28.4 months). The median time to progression was 4 months (range, 1 to 35 months). Grade 3 or greater liver enzyme elevation occurred in only two patients (3%) after RT. Grade 3 gastroduodenal toxicity developed in two patients (3%). The combination treatment of TACE followed by RT with two-week interval was safe and it showed favorable outcomes in treatment-naive patients with locally advanced HCC. A prospective randomized trial is needed to validate these results.

  16. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Florence, E-mail: florence.huguet@tnn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital, APHP, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Val d' Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, Montpellier (France); Racadot, Severine [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  17. [Axillary pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer with axillary involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Román-Santamaría, J M; Pelayo Alarcón, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    2015-01-01

    To compare axillary involvement (N+) at initial staging in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) with axillary lymphadenectomy histologic results after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (NeoChemo). Retrospective study between November 2011 and September 2013 of LABC cases treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on docetaxel (associated with trastuzumab in HER2 positive cases and carboplatin/adriamycin in HER2 negative cases). Those clinically or radiologically suspected cases of axillary involvement were histologically confirmed. When there was no suspicion of axillary involvement, sentinel lymph node radioguided biopsy (SLNRB) was performed using intradermal injection of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid albumin prior to neoadjuvant treatment. Axillary lymphadenectomy after NeoChemo was undertaken in all cases with positive axilla. Final pathologic response was classified as complete (pCR) when there was no evidence of tumoral disease and as non-pathologic complete response (no pCR) in the opposite case. A total of 346 patients treated with docetaxel were reviewed, identifying 105 LABC. Axillary involvement at initial staging was detected in 70 (67%) before starting NeoChemo. From these 70, 73% (n=51) were N+ (fine needle biopsy and/or biopsy) and the remaining 19 (27%) were occult N+ detected by SLNRB. Axillary lymphadenectomy detected pCR in 56% (39/70), increasing up to 84% pCR when initial N+ status was reached using SNLB. On the other hand, when N+ was detected using fine needle biopsy/lymph biopsy, pCR was only 45%. More than 50% of women affected by locally advanced breast cancer with tumoral axillary involvement at initial diagnosis present free metastatic axilla after therapeutic neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. This increases up to almost 90% in case of occult metastatic axilla detected with sentinel node biopsy prior starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. Outcome of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Treated with Concurrent Chemo-radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Kang, Seung Hee; Jo, Sun Mi; Oh, Young Taek; Chun, Mi Son; Choi, Jin Hyuk; Kang, Seok Yun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Gonyang University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    We investigated the outcome and the prognostic factors of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who were treated with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Two hundred forty six patients with esophageal cancer that were treated by radiotherapy between January 1994 and July 2007. Of these, 78 patients who received radiotherapy of {>=}45 Gy with concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We included patients stages IIA, IIB, III, IVA, and IVB with supraclavicular metastasis in the middle/lower esophageal cancer or celiac node metastasis in cervical or upper/middle thoracic esophageal cancer. The median radiation dose was 54 Gy and the combination chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin (FP chemotherapy) was given concurrently with radiotherapy in most patients (88%). The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 117 months (median 14 months). The treatment response of the 54 patients could be evaluated by computerized tomography or endoscopy. A complete response (CR) was observed in 17 patients, whereas a partial response was observed in 18 patients. In patients with a CR, the median recurrence time was 20 months and the first relapse sites constituted a locoregional failure in 3 patients and a distant failure in 7 patients. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 58.9%, 21.7%, and 12.2%, respectively. The median survival period was 14 months. A univariate analysis indicated that the treatment response and cycles of FP chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS. Daily or weekly administration of cisplatin as a radiosensitizer showed a better treatment response than FP chemotherapy. This study has shown that results of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer is comparable to those of other studies. Daily or weekly cisplatin administration may be considered as an alternative treatment in patients that are medically unfit for FP chemotherapy.

  19. Outcome after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and correlation with nutritional status in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, P.; Habermehl, D.; Welzel, T.; Combs, S.E. [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Debus, J. [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Cancer patients commonly suffer from weight loss since rapid tumor growth can cause catabolic metabolism and depletion of energy stores such as abdominal fat. In locally advanced pancreatic cancer this is even more pronounced due to abdominal pain, fatigue, nausea or malnutrition. In the present article, we quantify this frequently observed weight loss and assess its impact on outcome and survival. Methods: Data on demographics, biometrics, toxicity and survival were collected for the last 100 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer at our department (45.0 Gy and boost up to 54.0 Gy plus concurrent and subsequent gemcitabine), and the subcutaneous fat area at the umbilicus level was measured by computer tomography before and after chemoradiation. Results: After chemoradiation, patients showed a highly statistically significant weight loss and reduction of the subcutaneous fat area. We could determine a very strong correlation of subcutaneous fat area to patient BMI. By categorizing patients according to their BMI based on the WHO classification as slender, normal, overweight and obese, we found improved but not statistically significant survival among obese patients. Accordingly, patients who showed less weight loss tended to survive longer. Conclusions: In this study, patients with pancreatic cancer lost weight during chemoradiation and their subcutaneous fat diminished. Changes in subcutaneous fat area were highly correlated with patients' BMI. Moreover, obese patients and patients who lost less weight had an improved outcome after treatment. Although the extent of weight loss was not significantly correlated with survival, the observed trend warrants greater attention to nutritional status in the future. (orig.)

  20. State of the art: Advanced techniques for prostatic urethral lift for the relief of prostate obstruction under local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lance Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects an estimated 60% of men over the age of 50 and 90% of men over the age of 80. The prostatic urethral lift (PUL) is a safe and effective office-based procedure that is used worldwide for the treatment of BPH in men who are dissatisfied with medications due to side effects or lack of efficacy or don't want to have a transurethral resection of the prostate due to the side effects and invasiveness of the procedure. In 2012 Barkin et al, published the standard technique for the delivery of the Urolift implant. The objective of this article is to describe the current state of the art advanced techniques for the delivery of the UroLift implant.

  1. A Younger Dryas re-advance of local glaciers in north Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Funder, Svend; Linge, Henriette; Möller, Per; Schomacker, Anders; Fabel, Derek; Xu, Sheng; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2016-09-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) is a well-constrained cold event from 12,900 to 11,700 years ago but it remains unclear how the cooling and subsequent abrupt warming recorded in ice cores was translated into ice margin fluctuations in Greenland. Here we present 10Be surface exposure ages from three moraines in front of local glaciers on a 50 km stretch along the north coast of Greenland, facing the Arctic Ocean. Ten ages range from 11.6 ± 0.5 to 27.2 ± 0.9 ka with a mean age of 12.5 ± 0.7 ka after exclusion of two outliers. We consider this to be a minimum age for the abandonment of the moraines. The ages of the moraines are furthermore constrained using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of epishelf sediments, which were deposited prior to the ice advance that formed the moraines, yielding a maximum age of 12.4 ± 0.6 ka, and bracketing the formation and subsequent abandonment of the moraines to within the interval 11.8-13.0 ka ago. This is the first time a synchronous YD glacier advance and subsequent retreat has been recorded for several independent glaciers in Greenland. In most other areas, there is no evidence for re-advance and glaciers were retreating during YD. We explain the different behaviour of the glaciers in northernmost Greenland as a function of their remoteness from the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which in other areas has been held responsible for modifying the YD drop in temperatures.

  2. Concurrent Chemoradiation With Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmati E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 80 years, the standard treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer was radiotherapy. However, based on several phase III randomized clinical trials in the past decade, concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of treatment for this disease. Gemcitabine has potent radiosensitizing properties in preclinical and clinical trials, so it can be utilized simultaneously with radiation.Methods: Thirty Women with untreated invasive squamous-cell carcinoma of the cervix of stage IIB to stage IVA were enrolled in the study in Radiation Oncology department of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran from September 2009 to September 2010. Sixty mg/m2 gemcitabine followed by 35 mg/m2 cisplatin were concurrently administered with radiotherapy to the whole pelvic region on day one of each treatment week for five weeks One and three months after treatment, patients underwent a complete physical examination and MRI to determine the response to treatment.Results: The mean age of the participants was 58.13±11.83 (29-78 years. After 3 months of treatment, 73.3% had complete and 26.7% had partial response to treatment. Grade 3 anemia was seen in 10%, grade 3 thrombocytopenia in 3.3% and grade 3 leukopenia in 10% of the patients.Conclusion: According to the positive results of this study in stage IIB, further phase II and III clinical trials are suggested to evaluate the role of chemoradiation by gemcitabine in advanced cervical cancers.

  3. Survival and failure outcomes in locally advanced esthesioneuroblastoma: a single centre experience of 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Khosla, Divya; Bharti, Shreekant; Das, Ashim; Kumar, Narendra; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-05-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) constitutes 3 % of all malignant intranasal tumors. As the tumor is very rare, the number of patients of ENB treated in individual departments is small. We present our institute's experience in combined modality management of 15 successive patients of ENB treated from 2006 to 2010. Clinical characteristics and treatment modality in form of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were noted. Kadish stage C was the most common stage (12 patients) followed by stage B (3 patients). Fourteen patients underwent primary surgery, of which nine had total excision and five had subtotal excision. One patient was treated with combination of chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). Median RT dose delivered was 54 Gy. Twelve patients received CT with cisplatin and etoposide. Overall, eight patients had complete response, five had partial response, while one had static disease and progressive disease each. Two patients had distant metastases. Four-year loco-regional control (LRC) was 25 % and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 45 %. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require adjuvant RT, which helps in significant LRC. Systemic CT benefits in inoperable, advanced and high risk tumors. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  4. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thorough evaluation by a surgeon qualified in laparoscopic colon resection in consultation with your primary ... Olympic Blvd., Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90064 Tel: (310) 437-0544 Fax: (310) 437- ...

  5. Patterns of Local-Regional Failure in Completely Resected Stage IIIA(N2) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cases: Implications for Postoperative Radiation Therapy Clinical Target Volume Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Fu, Xiao-Long, E-mail: xlfu1964@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Cai, Xu-Wei; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang; Fan, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Xiang, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Wei; Chen, Hai-Quan [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of local-regional failure (LRF) for completely resected stage IIIA(N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated in our hospital and to propose a clinical target volume (CTV) for postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2011, consecutive patients with pT1-3N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection in our hospital but who did not receive PORT were identified. The patterns of first LRF were assessed and evaluated as to whether these areas would be encompassed by our proposed PORT CTV. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 173 of 250 patients (69.2%) experienced disease recurrence. Of the 54 patients with LRF as the first event, 48 (89%) had recurrence within the proposed PORT CTV, and 6 (11%) had failures occurring both within and outside the proposed CTV (all of which occurred in patients with right-lung cancer). Ninety-three percent of failure sites (104 of 112) would have been contained within the proposed PORT CTV. For left-sided lung cancer, the most common lymph node station failure site was 4R, followed by 7, 4L, 6, 10L, and 5. For right-sided lung cancer, the most common site was station 2R, followed by 10R, 4R, and 7. Conclusions: LRF following complete surgery was an important and potentially preventable pattern of failure in stage IIIA(N2) patients. Ipsilateral superior mediastinal recurrences dominated for right-sided tumors, whereas left-sided tumors frequently involved the bilateral superior mediastinum. Most of the LRF sites would have been covered by the proposed PORT CTV. A prospective investigation of patterns of failure after PORT (following our proposed CTV delineation guideline) is presently underway and will be reported in a separate analysis.

  6. Transurethral resection of the prostate a 3 year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N O Chukwujama

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Transurethral resection of prostate is a safe and effective treatment modality in the surgical management of men with bladder outlet obstruction secondary to BPH and advanced CAP in our environment.

  7. Unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Smita; Nayar, Pavan; Virmani, Pooja; Bansal, Shipra; Pawar, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological, therapeutic and diagnostic advancements, surgical intervention in pheochromocytoma may result in a life-threatening situation. We report a patient who developed unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor. PMID:26330724

  8. Unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite technological, therapeutic and diagnostic advancements, surgical intervention in pheochromocytoma may result in a life-threatening situation. We report a patient who developed unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor.

  9. Surgical approach for ulcerated locally advanced breast cancer. A single Center experience: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforgia, Rita; Punzo, Clelia; Panebianco, Annunziata; Volpi, Annalisa; Minafra, Marina; Sederino, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our retrospective study is to analyze surgical possibilities for the extended LABC in those cases not suitable for a neoadjuvant chemotherapy step and to consider various reconstruction techniques. Between 2009 and 2015 we enrolled 11 patients, admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting ulcerated LABC that needed palliative surgical demolitive procedures because of bleeding and anemia and in which was necessary to use natural tissues transposition or synthetic substitutes for the reconstruction of the skin flaps. The mean follow up was 12 months. Mortality rate was 82% (9 patients); in 2 cases there was local relapse after 6 months; 9 months was the longest disease free survival. Thanks to multidisciplinary strategies LABC's surgical treatment improved results with a five-year survival rate between 30-40% and better quality of survival. Despite extended demolitive approach, there is still a 50% of death because of metastases. Our results confirm that musculocutaneous flap, skin anterior thigh grafts, bilayer matrix wound dressing are excellent reconstructive strategies in locally advanced ulcerated breast cancer after aggressive extended surgery even if palliative to improve patients' further survival. Our data also showed that those patients presenting medium level of malignancy as "luminal b" subtype (7 patients) if treated earlier with a radical surgical procedure would have better prognosis. Oncoplastic techniques, Ulcerated breast cancer.

  10. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Gui, Benedetta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Clementi, Valeria [Clinical Science Development Group, GE Healthcare, Milan (Italy); Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiology, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi [OU Clinic Radiobiology, I.F.C.A. Florence (Italy); Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiotherapy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma, Milan (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  11. The presence of local and circulating autoreactive B cells in patients with advanced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglundh, Tord; Liljenberg, Birgitta; Tarkowski, Andrej; Lindhe, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the local (gingival) and systemic occurrence of autoreactive B cells (CD5+CD19 positive) in subjects with a high or low susceptibility to periodontitis. 2 groups of subjects (Group A and B) susceptible to periodontitis were included. Group A consisted of 22 adult patients (7 females and 15 males, aged 24-66 years) with advanced and generalized chronic periodontitis and group B comprised 7 children (4 girls and 3 boys aged 9-13 years) with localized aggressive periodontitis. 26 periodontally healthy subjects, Group C (aged 23-80 years, mean 49.6+/-16.3), were also recruited. Assessment of clinical and radiographical characteristics of periodontal disease was performed. Gingival biopsies and peripheral blood samples were obtained and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. Blood samples only were obtained from the periodontally healthy subjects (group C). The proportion of autoreactive B cells (CD5+CD19 positive) of peripheral blood lymphocytes was about 6 times higher in group A and 4 times higher in group B than in the samples from the control subjects (group C). About 40-50% of the B cells in the peripheral blood of the periodontitis susceptible individuals expressed markers for autoreactive features while less than 15% of the circulating B cells in the subjects of group C exhibited such markers. The periodontitis lesion in the adult periodontitis patients contained a substantial number of B cells out of which about 30% demonstrated autoreactive features. It is suggested that both circulating and local B cells in periodontitis susceptible individuals have a higher propensity to autoreactive properties than B cells of patients with a low susceptibility to periodontitis.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of neutron capture therapy for local advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagie, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: yanagie@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Kumada, H. [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakurai, Y. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Nuclear Physics, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan); Furuya, Y. [Department of Surgery, Satukidai Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Sugiyama, H. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ono, K. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Takamoto, S. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Eriguchi, M. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Microbiology, Syowa University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Local recurrence breast cancer is one of the most difficult conditions to cure and there is a need for new therapy. If sufficient boron compound can be targeted to the tumor, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be applied to local recurrent breast cancer. In this study, we performed a preliminary dosimetry with a phantom model of the mammary gland at Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), and a feasibility dosimetry with JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) at JRR4 reactor of Japan Atomic Research Institute. We performed preliminary dosimetry of a phantom model of the mammary gland with thermal neutron irradiation (OO-0011 mode) on LiF collimation at KUR. The thermal neutron flux was 5.16 E+08 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at the surface of phantom. The blood boron concentration is estimated to be 30 ppm; tumor boron concentration is also estimated to be 90 ppm according to tumor/blood ratio 3 and skin/blood ratio 1.2. Tumor RBE dose is estimated to be 47 Gy/h, and skin RBE dose is 12.4 Gy/h. In case of advanced breast cancer, we performed the feasibility estimation of 3D construction of tumor according to the MRI imaging of a patient with epithermal neutron mode at JRR4. The blood boron concentration (ppm) and tumor/normal tissue ratio are estimated to be 24 and 3.5, respectively. Skin RBE dose is restricted to 10 Gy/h, the maximum tumor RBE dose, minimum tumor RBE dose, and mean tumor RBE dose are 42.2, 11.3, and 28.9 Gy-Eq, respectively, in half hour irradiation. In this study, we showed the possibility to apply BNCT to local recurrent breast cancer. We can irradiate tumors selectively and as safely as possible, reducing the effects on neighboring healthy tissues.

  13. [A Case of Sigmoid Colon Cancer with Synchronous Liver Metastasis, Treated with Laparoscopic Liver Resection after SOX plus BV Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuhito; Ando, Katsuhiko; Oda, Kenji; Kubosawa, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    We performed laparoscopic liver resection in a patient with synchronous liver metastasis from advanced sigmoid colon cancer after induction with S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX) plus bevacizumab (BV) chemotherapy. A 61-year-old woman underwent laparoscopy-assisted sigmoidectomy for locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer with synchronous liver metastasis. SOX plus BV chemotherapy was initiated. After 3 courses, the liver tumor was downsized, and metastasectomy was performed laparoscopically with R0 resection. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 11th postoperative day. She has been free from recurrence. Induction with SOX plus BV chemotherapy is considered to be not only effective, but also beneficial for maintaining the quality of life (QOL) in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  14. Comparison of surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization for patients with intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Lin Lin

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Our results indicated that surgical resection provided superior survival benefit than TACE to patients with intermediate-stage HCC. This is in part attributable to advances in liver surgery which make the resection of intermediate-stage HCC possible. Surgical resection should be considered first for patients with preserved liver function.

  15. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy followed by extrafascial hysterectomy for locally advanced endometrial cancer clinically extending to the cervix or parametria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, John A; Boisen, Michelle M; Comerci, John T; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-11-01

    For locally-advanced uterine cancer clinically extending to the cervix, two treatment paradigms exist: surgical staging radical hysterectomy with tailored adjuvant therapy or neoadjuvant therapy followed by a less extensive simple hysterectomy. Currently, insufficient data exists to guide consensus guidelines and practical application of preoperative radiotherapy. Retrospective IRB approved cohort study from 1999 to 2014 of 36 endometrial cancer patients with clinical involvement of cervix±parametria treated with neoadjuvant external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4Gy in 25-28 fractions) and image-based HDR brachytherapy (5-5.5Gy times 3-4 fractions)±chemotherapy followed by extrafascial hysterectomy performed at a median of 6weeks after radiotherapy. All patients had clinical cervical extension, 50% also had parametria extension, and 31% had nodal involvement. At the time of surgery 91% had no clinical cervical involvement, 58% had no pathologic cervical involvement, and all had margin negative resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 24%. Median follow-up from the time of surgery was 20months (range: 0-153). The 3-year local control, regional control, distant control, disease free survival and overall survival rates were 96%, 89%, 84%, 73%, and 100%. The 3-year rate of grade 3 complications was 11%, with no grade 4+ toxicity. Neoadjuvant radiation therapy±chemotherapy followed by extrafascial hysterectomy appears to be a viable option for patients with endometrial cancer clinically extending to the cervix and parametria. The HDR brachytherapy schema of 5-5.5Gy times 3-4 fractions, for a cumulative EQD2 of 60-70Gy, is well tolerated with high rates of clinical and pathological response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbea, Leire, E-mail: larbea@unav.es [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Hernandez, Jose Luis [Department of General Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Sola, Jesus Javier [Department of Pathology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Ramos, Luis Isaac [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Subtil, Jose Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Nunez, Jorge [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  17. Laparoscopic resection of colon cancer and synchronous liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Timothy M; Tebb, Zachary D; Sato, Erika; Miedema, Brent W; Awad, Ziad T

    2006-02-01

    The recommended surgical approach to synchronous colorectal metastasis has not been clarified. Simultaneous open liver and colon resection for synchronous colorectal carcinoma has been shown beneficial when compared to staged resections. A review of the literature has shown the benefits of both laparoscopic colon resection for colorectal cancer and laparoscopic left lateral segmentectomy in liver disease. We present the case of a 60-year-old male with sigmoid colon carcinoma and a synchronous solitary liver metastasis localized to the left lateral segment. Using laparoscopic techniques, we were able to achieve simultaneous resection of the sigmoid colon and left lateral liver segment.

  18. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®  Resectable Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The management of resectable rectal cancer continues to be guided by clinical trials and advances in technique. Although surgical advances including total mesorectal excision continue to decrease rates of local recurrence, the management of locally advanced disease (T3-T4 or N+ benefits from a multimodality approach including neoadjuvant concomitant chemotherapy and radiation. Circumferential resection margin, which can be determined preoperatively via MRI, is prognostic. Toxicity associated with radiation therapy is decreased by placing the patient in the prone position on a belly board, however for patients who cannot tolerate prone positioning, IMRT decreases the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The use of IMRT requires knowledge of the patterns of spreads and anatomy. Clinical trials demonstrate high variability in target delineation without specific guidance demonstrating the need for peer review and the use of a consensus atlas. Concomitant with radiation, fluorouracil based chemotherapy remains the standard, and although toxicity is decreased with continuous infusion fluorouracil, oral capecitabine is non-inferior to the continuous infusion regimen. Additional chemotherapeutic agents, including oxaliplatin, continue to be investigated, however currently should only be utilized on clinical trials as increased toxicity and no definitive benefit has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every two years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to

  19. [Options of hypofractionation of proton boost in locally advanced prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelevskiĭ, E V; Pan'shin, G A; Kancheli, I N; Khoroshkov, V S

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of various fractionation proton boost in the proton-photon radiation therapy of locally advanced prostate cancer. The study included 272 patients with prostate cancer and intermediate-to-high risk of progression. 114 patients received 3-D conformal local irradiation of the prostate by proton beam 220Mev. The focal dose of 28-28,8 SoGy-eq was fed to the prostate for 8, 5 or 3 fractions for 3, 4 or 5.5 Gy-eq, respectively. Given the photon component (44 Gy in 22 fractions to the whole volume of the pelvis), the dose to the prostate was 72.8., 72 and 72SoGr-eq, respectively. In 158 patients in the control group the similar doses to the pelvis were supplemented by local 4-dipole photon irradiation of the prostate to 68-72 Gy in 12-14 fractions of 2 Gy. Acute gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity maximum, 2 St expression, were found significantly less frequently after the proton-photon therapy: in 54.4% of cases, versus 69.2% in the controls (p 0.05). A 5-year survival without biochemical recurrence was in the study and control groups 60,0 +/- 5,4% and 61,9 +/- 4,4%, and a 9-year survival--45,5 +/- 8,5% and 42,8 +/- 7 1%, respectively (p > 0.05). Thus, precise local irradiation by a proton beam with ROD 3-5.5 Gy-eq. and SOD 28-28,8 Gy-eq supplementing photon irradiation of total small pelvis significantly reduces the severity of early and late post-radiation proctitis but does not reduce the risk of damage to the lower urinary tract and does not influence the anti-tumor treatment effectiveness compared to conventional conformal photon radiotherapy. In this case, the proton boost modes: 8 fractions for 3 Gy, 5 fractions for 4 Gy and 3 fractions for 5.5 Gy does not significantly differ in the level of toxicity.

  20. Intravenous 5-fluorouracil versus oral doxifluridine as preoperative concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Prospective randomized trails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam-Kyu; Min, Jin-Sik; Park, Jea-Kun; Yun, Seong-Hyun; Sung, Jin-Sil; Jung, Hyun-Chul; Roh, Jae-Kyung [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    2001-01-01

    recurrence during the follow-up periods were 1/14 (7.1%) in the IV arm and 2/14 (14.3%) in the Oral arm, respectively (p=0.307). One local recurrence was observed in the Oral arm. Even though the results were not entirely reliable owing to the small number of patients enrolled, oral doxifluridine-based chemotherapy as preoperative chemoradiation for advanced rectal cancer did not show any significant advantages over intravenous infusion. (author)

  1. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  2. Prognostic factors and sites of metastasis in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; Speers, Caroline; McGahan, Colleen E; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2015-08-01

    Due to differences in natural history and therapy, clinical trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have recently been subdivided into unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate prognostic factors in LAPC patients who were treated with first-line chemotherapy and describe patterns of disease progression. Patients with LAPC who initiated first-line palliative chemotherapy, 2001-2011 at the BC Cancer Agency were included. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify clinicopathologic variables, treatment, and subsequent sites of metastasis. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression survival analyses were performed. A total of 244 patients were included in this study. For the majority of patients (94.3%), first-line therapy was single-agent gemcitabine. About 144 (59%) patients developed distant metastatic disease and the most frequent metastatic sites included peritoneum/omentum (42.3%), liver (41%), lungs (13.9%), and distant lymph nodes (9%). Median overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 11.7 months (95% CI, 10.6-12.8). Development of distant metastases was associated with significantly inferior survival (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.57-4.93), as was ECOG 2/3 versus 0/1 (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.28-2.23), CA 19.9 > 1000 versus ≤ 1000 (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.19-2.14) and female gender, (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.19-2.08). In this population-based study, 41% of LAPC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy died without evidence of distant metastases. Prognostic factors for LAPC were baseline performance status, elevated CA 19.9, gender, and development of distant metastasis. Results highlight the heterogeneity of LAPC and the importance of locoregional tumor control.

  3. Complete pathological responses in locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative IMRT and integrated-boost chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernando-Requejo, Ovidio [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid (Spain); HM Universitario Sanchinarro, Centro Integral Oncologico Clara Campal, Madrid (Spain); Lopez, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Almudena; Ciervide, Raquel; Valero, Jeannette; Sanchez, Emilio; Garcia-Aranda, Mariola; Potdevin, Guillermo [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Cubillo, Antonio; Rodriguez, Jesus [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Medical Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid (Spain); Rubio, Carmen [Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, Department of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario Sanchinarro, CEU San Pablo University, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    To analyze the efficacy and safety of a new preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and integrated-boost chemoradiation scheme. In all, 74 patients were treated with IMRT and concurrent standard dose capecitabine. The dose of the planning target volume (PTV) encompassing the tumor, mesorectum, and pelvic lymph nodes was 46 Gy in 23 fractions; the boost PTV, at a dose of 57.5 Gy in 23 fractions, included the macroscopic primary tumor and pathological lymph nodes. The patients underwent surgery 6-8 weeks after chemoradiation. The complete treatment data of 72 patients were analyzed. Tumor downstaging was achieved in 55 patients (76.38 %) and node downstaging in 34 (47.2 %). In 22 patients (30.6 %), there was complete pathological response (ypCR). The circumferential resection margin was free of tumor in 70 patients (97.2 %). The 3-year estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 95.4 and 85.9 % respectively, and no local relapse was found; however, ten patients (13.8 %) developed distant metastases. High pathologic tumor (pT) downstaging was shown as a favorable prognostic factor for disease-free survival. No grade 4 acute radiotherapy-related toxicity was found. The IMRT and integrated-boost chemoradiation scheme offered higher rates of ypCR and pT downstaging, without a significant increase in toxicity. The circumferential margins were free of tumors in the majority of patients. Primary tumor regression was associated with better disease-free survival. (orig.) [German] Analyse von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit eines neuen praeoperativen intensitaetsmodulierten Bestrahlungsschemas (IMRT) mit integriertem Boost. Insgesamt 74 Patienten wurden simultan mit IMRT und Capecitabin (Standarddosis) behandelt. Die Dosis des Planungszielvolumens (PTV) umfasste den Tumor, das Mesorektum sowie die Beckenlymphknoten und betrug 46 Gy in 23 Fraktionen. Das Boost-PTV betrug 57,5 Gy in 23 Fraktionen und umfasste den makroskopischen Primaertumor und die

  4. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Miranda, Alberto; Arrieta, Oscar; Gamboa-Vignolle, Carlos; Saavedra-Perez, David; Morales-Barrera, Rafael; Bargallo-Rocha, Enrique; Zinser-Sierra, Juan; Perez-Sanchez, Victor; Ramirez-Ugalde, Teresa; Lara-Medina, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC), or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC) IV in four 21-day courses) followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg), and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR) in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5%) and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5%) if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%). No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04). Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%). The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted. PMID:19591689

  5. Response to chemoradiotherapy and lymph node involvement in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis; J; García-Flórez; Guillermo; Gómez-álvarez; Ana; M; Frunza; Luis; Barneo-Serra; Manuel; F; Fresno-Forcelledo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish the association between lymph node involvement and the response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.METHODS: Data of 130 patients with mid and low locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical surgery over a 5-year period were reviewed. Tumor staging was done by endorectal ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy was determined by T-downstaging and tumor regression grading(TRG). Pathologic complete response(p CR) is defined as the absence of tumor cells in the surgical specimen(yp T0N0). The varying degrees TRG were classified according to Mandard’s scoring system. The evaluation of the response is based on the comparison between previous clinico-radiological staging and the results of pathological evaluation. χ2 and Spearman’s correlation tests were used for the comparison of variables. RESULTS: Pathologic complete response(p CR, yp T0N0, TRG1) was observed in 19 cases(14.6%), and other 18(13.8%) had only very few residual malignant cells in the rectal wall(TRG2). T-downstaging was found in 63(48.5%). Mean lymph node retrieval was 9.4(range0-38). In 37 cases(28.5%) more than 12 nodes were identified in the surgical specimen. Preoperative lymph node involvement was seen in 77 patients(59.2%), 71 N1 and 6 N2. Postoperative lymph node involvement was observed in 41 patients(31.5%), 29 N1 and 12 N2, while the remaining 89 were N0(68.5%). In relation to yp T stage, we found nodal involvement of 9.4% in yp T0-1, 22.2% in yp T2 and 43.7% in yp T3-4. Of the 37 patients considered "responders" to neoadjuvant therapy(TRG1 and 2), there were only 4 N+(10.8%) and the remainder N0(89.2%). In the "non responders" group(TRG 3, 4 and 5), 37 cases were N+(39.8%) and 56(60.2%) were N0(P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: Response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer is associated with lymph node involvement.

  6. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of locally advanced cervix cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Osman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervix cancer has comparable benefits to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT, but with fewer side effects. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the management of locally advanced cervix cancer from stage IB2 (tumor >4.0 cm to IIIB (tumor extending to the pelvic wall and/or hydronephrosis. Our primary objective was to assess benefits in terms of survival. The data source included the USA national library of medicine, Medline search, and the National Cancer Institute PDQ Clinical Protocols. Inclusion criteria for consideration in the current systematic review included studies published between January 1997 and December 2012. In terms of histology, they had to be focused on squamous cell carcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, and/or adenocarcinoma. Patients should be either chemotherapy naïve or cervix cancer chemotherapy naïve, and have a performance status ≤2. The search in the above-mentioned scientific websites led to identify 49 publications, 19 of which were excluded, as they did not meet the inclusion criteria of this systematic review. Therefore only 30 studies were deemed eligible. Data was collected from 1760 patients enrolled in the current systematic review study. The mean age was 45.2 years. The mean tumor size was 4.7 cm. The most commonly used chemotherapies were cisplatin doublets. Paclitaxel was the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in the doublets. The mean chemotherapy cycles were 2.7. After chemotherapy, patients underwent surgery after a mean time of 2.5 weeks. The standard operation was radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Chemotherapy achieved an objective response rate of 84%. The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 61.9% and 72.8% respectively. The treatment protocol was associated

  7. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

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    Zinser-Sierra Juan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC, 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC, or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC IV in four 21-day courses followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg, and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5% and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5% if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%. No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04. Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%. The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted.

  8. Expression profiling of 21 biomolecules in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinomas of Caucasian patients

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    Krikelis Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since scarce data exist on the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Caucasian patients, we attempted to elucidate the responsible molecular pathways in this patient population. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples from 107 patients, diagnosed with locally-advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma and treated with chemotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of the following proteins: E-cadherin, P-cadherin, Fascin-1, Cyclin D1, COX-2, EGFR, VEGF-A, VEGF-C, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, ERCC1, p53, p63, Ki67, MAPT, phospho-p44/42MAPK, PTEN, phospho-AKT, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-GSK-3β. EBER status was assessed by in situ hybridization. The majority of the cases were included in tissue microarray. All stains were performed and assessed centrally by two pathologists. The median follow-up time was 76.8 (42.3 – 99.2 months. Results Biomolecules expressed in >90% of cases were: p53, COX-2, P-cadherin, EBER, phospho-GSK-3β, and Fascin-1. WHO II+III tumors were more frequently EBER & PTEN positive and VEGF-A negative. Advanced age was significantly associated with positive phospho-GSK-3β and ERCC1 expression; male gender with positive phospho-AKT and phospho-p44/42MAPK; and worse performance status (1 or 2 with negative Ki67, ERCC1, PTEN, and phospho-mTOR expression. Earlier disease stage was closely associated with p63, MAPT, PTEN, and Cyclin D1 positivity. Univariate Cox regression analysis highlighted Cyclin D1 as a negative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (p=0.034 and EBER as a positive one for overall survival (p=0.048. In multivariate analysis, advanced age and stage, poor performance status, and positive ERCC1 emerged as predictors of worse disease-free and overall survival, as opposed to positive phospho-mTOR. Clustering analysis defined two protein-expression groups being predictive of better overall survival (p=0.043. Conclusions Our study is the

  9. Radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Long-term outcome

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    Ordu, Arif Deniz; Deymann, Lisa Felicia; Scherer, Vera; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [University of Tromsoe, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodoe (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Geinitz, Hans [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern Linz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Linz (Austria); Kup, Philipp Guenther [Marien Hospital Herne, Universitaetsklinikum der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Fakhrian, Khashayar [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Marien Hospital Herne, Universitaetsklinikum der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sankt Josef Hospital Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-11-18

    The purpose of this work is to report the long-term outcomes of three-dimensional conformal radio(chemo)therapy in the curative management of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A retrospective analysis of patients treated with radio(chemo)therapy between 1988 and 2011 at Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen was performed. In all, 168 patients received radio(chemo)therapy for ESCC in curative intention. The median follow-up time was 91 months (range 1-212 months). There were 128 men and 40 women with a median age of 63 years. Selection criteria for radio(chemo)therapy were unfit for surgery and/or unresectable primary tumor (n = 146, 87 %) or patients' choice (n = 22, 13 %). The majority of the patients received a combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy with 54 Gy in 30 fractions of radiotherapy. The median overall survival (OS) was 20 months (95 % confidence interval 17-23 months). The OS at 2 and 5 years for the whole cohort was 41 ± 4 % and 22 ± 3 %, respectively. Forty patients (24 %) suffered an in-field recurrence. The most common acute nonhematologic toxicity >grade 2 was dysphagia in 35 % of the patients. Acute hematologic toxicity > grade 2 was recorded in 14 % of the patients. There was no grade 5 toxicity observed during the study. Poor ECOG performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3, HR = 1.70, p = 0.002) and weight loss ≥ 10 % before the start of therapy (HR = 1.99, p = 0.001) were among the factors significantly associated with poor OS in multivariate analysis. Three-dimensional conformal definitive radio(chemo)therapy is well tolerated and leads to long-term survival in more than 20 % of patients with advanced disease and/or contraindication to surgery. However, 24 % in-field recurrence remains a major concern. Prospective trials are warranted to assess if a well-tailored conformal radiochemotherapy can improve the local control and obviate the need for surgical resection in patients with good general

  10. [OPERABILITY AND RESECTABILITY OF GASTRIC CANCER:ANALYSIS OF 2280 CASES IN 15 YEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eloy; Berrospi, Francisco; Morante, Carlos; Payet, Eduardo; Celis, Juan; Montalbetti, Juan Antonio

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine which are the operability and resectability tendencies of gastric cancer in Peru.BACKGROUND: In Peru, gastric cancer is the first cause of death in men and the third one in women. Most of the patients with gastric cancer receive treatment al the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas of Lima (INEN).PATIENTS AND METHODS: Every patient with untreated histologically verified gastric adenocarcinoma, who was admitted to the INEN between January 1980, and December 1994, was included.We determined the actual trends of operability and resectability. These rates were calculated and compared with rates of the 1952-1977 period.The 1980-1994 period was divided in lustrums to evaluate a more complete preoperative staging act upon operability and resectability.The causes of inoperability and irresectability were also determined.RESULTS: Between 1980 and 1994 a total of 2280 new gastric cancer patients were admitted to the INEN. The operability and resectability rates of the 1980-1994 period (56,8% and 58,5% respectively) differ significantly from rates of the 1952-1977 period (43,8% and 49,2% respectively). A more complete preoperative staging produces a decrease of operability and an increase of resectability.The main causes of inoperability were poor physical condition associated to a locally advanced tumor 34%, and peritoneal metastases 26%. The main causes of irresectability were peritoneal metastases 50,3%, and invasion to adjacent organs 26,7%.CONCLUSIONS: Even when there is an increase of operability and resectability rates, gastric cancer is still diagnosed al a late stage in Peru. It is vital to stage pathology precisely to avoid unnecessary laparotomies.

  11. Prognostic nomograms for predicting survival and distant metastases in locally advanced rectal cancers.

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    Junjie Peng

    Full Text Available To develop prognostic nomograms for predicting outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal cancers who do not receive preoperative treatment.A total of 883 patients with stage II-III rectal cancers were retrospectively collected from a single institution. Survival analyses were performed to assess each variable for overall survival (OS, local recurrence (LR and distant metastases (DM. Cox models were performed to develop a predictive model for each endpoint. The performance of model prediction was validated by cross validation and on an independent group of patients.The 5-year LR, DM and OS rates were 22.3%, 32.7% and 63.8%, respectively. Two prognostic nomograms were successfully developed to predict 5-year OS and DM-free survival rates, with c-index of 0.70 (95% CI = [0.66, 0.73] and 0.68 (95% CI = [0.64, 0.72] on the original dataset, and 0.76 (95% CI = [0.67, 0.86] and 0.73 (95% CI = [0.63, 0.83] on the validation dataset, respectively. Factors in our models included age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen value, tumor location, T stage, N stage, metastatic lymph nodes ratio, adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Predicted by our nomogram, substantial variability in terms of 5-year OS and DM-free survival was observed within each TNM stage category.The prognostic nomograms integrated demographic and clinicopathological factors to account for tumor and patient heterogeneity, and thereby provided a more individualized outcome prognostication. Our individualized prediction nomograms could help patients with preoperatively under-staged rectal cancer about their postoperative treatment strategies and follow-up protocols.

  12. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Carmen [School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcala, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Cuervo, Miguel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Clínica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurr