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Sample records for resectable colorectal cancer

  1. Outcome of colorectal cancer resection in octogenarians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colorectal cancer is predominantly a disease of the elderly. It is the second most common cancer in the UK and the third most common cause of cancer-related death.[1] Surgical resection, either for cure or palliation, remains the mainstay of treatment.[1,2]. Long-term survival is related to the extent of disease at diagnosis.

  2. Determinants of recurrence after intended curative resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Kring, Thomas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    Despite intended curative resection, colorectal cancer will recur in ∼45% of the patients. Results of meta-analyses conclude that frequent follow-up does not lead to early detection of recurrence, but improves overall survival. The present literature shows that several factors play important roles...... in development of recurrence. It is well established that emergency surgery is a major determinant of recurrence. Moreover, anastomotic leakages, postoperative bacterial infections, and blood transfusions increase the recurrence rates although the exact mechanisms still remain obscure. From pathology studies...

  3. From scratch: developing a hepatic resection service for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Neil; Hider, Phillip; Armstrong, Delwyn; Rajkomar, Kheman; Srinivasa, Sanket; Rodgers, Michael; Brown, Anna; Koea, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    Waitemata District Health Board has New Zealand's largest catchment and busiest colorectal unit. The upper gastrointestinal unit was established in 2005, in part to provide a hepatic resection service for patients with colorectal carcinoma metastatic to the liver. The aim of this investigation was to report on quality indicators for the hepatic resection of colorectal carcinoma in the development of a regional resection service. Prospectively collected data on patients undergoing hepatic resection for colorectal carcinoma between 2005 and 2014 was reviewed and correlated with costing data and national hepatic resection rates. A total of 123 patients underwent 138 hepatic resections for metastatic colorectal cancer with a median hospital stay of 8 days (range 4-37 days), a zero 30-day mortality and a median cost of NZ$21 374 for minor hepatectomy and NZ$43 133 for major hepatectomy. Actuarial 5-year disease-free survival was 44%, with 28 patients alive and disease free at 5 years post-resection. Median overall survival was not reached. Review of national hepatic resection rates indicate that Waitemata District Health Board performs one sixth of all hepatic resections in New Zealand and that this treatment modality may be underutilized in the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A regional hepatic resection centre for colorectal metastases can be established in areas of population need and can provide a high-quality, cost-effective service. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Sequential surgical resection of hepatic and pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Stefan; Oevermann, Elisabeth; Killaitis, Claudia; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin; Bruch, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Resection of isolated hepatic or pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer is widely accepted and associated with a 5-year survival rate of 25?40%. The value of aggressive surgical management in patients with both hepatic and pulmonary metastases still remains a controversial area. Materials and methods A retrospective review of 1,497 patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) was analysed. Of 73 patients identified with resection of CRC and, at some point in time, both liver and l...

  5. Staged or simultaneous resection of synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillingso, J.G.; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to estimate the differences in length of hospital stay, morbidity, mortality and long-term survival between staged and simultaneous resection of synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer to determine the level of evidence for recommen......A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to estimate the differences in length of hospital stay, morbidity, mortality and long-term survival between staged and simultaneous resection of synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer to determine the level of evidence...... with grade C recommendations. Synchronous resections can be undertaken in selected patients, provided that surgeons specialized in colorectal and hepatobiliary surgery are available Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1...

  6. Changes in plasma TIMP-1 levels after resection for primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, C.; Lomholt, A.F.; Davis, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1) are associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC), however postoperative changes in plasma TIMP-1 levels after resections for CRC have not been thoroughly evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plasma samp...

  7. Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic ultrasonography before laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, S B; Fristrup, C W; Hovendal, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraoperative ultrasonography during open surgery for colorectal cancer may be useful for the detection of unrecognized liver metastases. Laparoscopic ultrasonography (LUS) for the detection of unrecognized liver metastasis has not been studied in a randomized trial. This RCT tested...... in the LUS than in the control group (7·8 (95 per cent c.i. 3·8 to 13·8) and 0·8 (0 to 4·2) per cent respectively; P = 0·010), but the suspected M1 disease was benign in half of the patients. CONCLUSION: Routine LUS during resection of colorectal cancer is not recommended. Registration number: NCT02079389...

  8. Referral patterns of patients with liver metastases due to colorectal cancer for resection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Sahaf, O

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Colorectal carcinoma accounts for 10% of cancer deaths in the Western World, with the liver being the most common site of distant metastases. Resection of liver metastases is the treatment of choice, with a 5-year survival rate of 35%. However, only 5-10% of patients are suitable for resection at presentation. AIMS: To examine the referral pattern of patients with liver metastases to a specialist hepatic unit for resection. METHODOLOGY: Retrospective review of patient\\'s charts diagnosed with colorectal liver metastases over a 10-year period. RESULTS: One hundred nine (38 women, 71 men) patients with liver metastases were included, mean age 61 years; 79 and 30 patients had synchronous and metachronus metastases, respectively. Ten criteria for referral were identified; the referral rate was 8.25%, with a resection rate of 0.9%. Forty two percent of the patients had palliative chemotherapy; 42% had symptomatic treatment. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the advanced stage of colorectal cancer at presentation; in light of modern evidence-based, centre-oriented therapy of liver metastasis, we conclude that criteria of referral for resection should be based on the availability of treatment modalities.

  9. Laparoscopic versus open 1-stage resection of synchronous liver metastases and primary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgun, Emre; Yazici, Pinar; Onder, Akin; Benlice, Cigdem; Yigitbas, Hakan; Kahramangil, Bora; Tasci, Yunus; Aksoy, Erol; Aucejo, Federico; Quintini, Cristiano; Miller, Charles; Berber, Eren

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the perioperative and oncologic outcomes of open and laparoscopic approaches for concomitant resection of synchronous colorectal cancer and liver metastases. Between 2006 and 2015, all patients undergoing combined resection of primary colorectal cancer and liver metastases were included in the study (n=43). Laparoscopic and open groups were compared regarding clinical, perioperative and oncologic outcomes. There were 29 patients in the open group and 14 patients in the laparoscopic group. The groups were similar regarding demographics, comorbidities, histopathological characteristics of the primary tumor and liver metastases. Postoperative complication rate (44.8% vs . 7.1%, P=0.016) was higher, and hospital stay (10 vs . 6.4 days, P=0.001) longer in the open compared to the laparoscopic group. Overall survival (OS) was comparable between the groups (P=0.10); whereas, disease-free survival (DFS) was longer in laparoscopic group (P=0.02). According to the results, in patients, whose primary colorectal cancer and metastatic liver disease was amenable to a minimally invasive resection, a concomitant laparoscopic approach resulted in less morbidity without compromising oncologic outcomes. This suggests that a laparoscopic approach may be considered in appropriate patients by surgeons with experience in both advanced laparoscopic liver and colorectal techniques.

  10. Resection of Concomitant Hepatic and Extrahepatic Metastases from Colorectal Cancer - A Worthwhile Operation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Andrei; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Ionel, Zenaida; Zlate, Cristian; Grigorie, Razvan; Brasoveanu, Vladislav; Hrehoret, Doina; Ciurea, Silviu; Botea, Florin; Tomescu, Dana; Droc, Gabriela; Croitoru, Adina; Herlea, Vlad; Boros, Mirela; Grasu, Mugur; Dumitru, Radu; Toma, Mihai; Ionescu, Mihnea; Vasilescu, Catalin; Popescu, Irinel

    2017-01-01

    Background: The benefit of hepatic resection in case of concomitant colorectal hepatic and extrahepatic metastases (CHEHMs) is still debatable. The purpose of this study is to assess the results of resection of hepatic and extrahepatic metastases in patients with CHEHMs in a high-volume center for both hepatobiliary and colorectal surgery and to identify prognostic factors that correlate with longer survival in these patients. It was performed a retrospective analysis of 678 consecutive patients with liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases operated in a single Centre between April 1996 and March 2016. Among these, 73 patients presented CHEHMs. Univariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors for overall survival (OS) in these patients. Results: There were 20 CHMs located at the lymphatic node level, 20 at the peritoneal level, 12 at the ovary and lung level, 12 presenting as local relapses and 9 other sites. 53 curative resections (R0) were performed. The difference in overall survival between the CHEHMs group and the CHMs group is statistically significant for the entire groups (p 0.0001), as well as in patients who underwent R0 resection (p 0.0001). In CHEHMs group, the OS was statistically significant higher in patients who underwent R0 resection vs. those with R1/R2 resection (p=0.004). Three variables were identified as prognostic factors for poor OS following univariate analysis: 4 or more hepatic metastases, major hepatectomy and the performance of operation during first period of the study (1996 - 2004). There was a tendency toward better OS in patients with ovarian or pulmonary location of extrahepatic disease, although the difference was not statistically significant. In patients with concomitant hepatic and extrahepatic metastases, complete resection of metastatic burden significantly prolong survival. The patients with up to 4 liver metastases, resectable by minor hepatectomy benefit the most from this aggressive onco

  11. En bloc urinary bladder resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer: a 17-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jimmy C M; Chong, Charing C N; Ng, Simon S M; Yiu, Raymond Y C; Lee, Janet F Y; Leung, Ka Lau

    2011-09-01

    En bloc bladder resection is often required for treating colorectal cancer with suspected urinary bladder invasion. Our aim was to review our institutional experience in en bloc resection of locally advanced colorectal cancer involving the urinary bladder over a period of 17 years. The hospital records of 72 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer who underwent en bloc urinary bladder resection at our institution between July 1987 and December 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and oncologic outcomes were evaluated. The mean duration of follow-up was 64.3 months. Genuine tumor invasion into the urinary bladder was confirmed in 34 patients (47%) by histopathology. Forty patients (56%) underwent primary closure of the urinary bladder, while 32 patients (44%) required various kinds of urologic reconstructive procedures. Operative mortality occurred in four patients (6%). The overall postoperative morbidity rate was significantly higher in patients undergoing urologic reconstruction (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.002) when compared to that in patients undergoing primary closure. This was mostly attributable to significantly higher rates of urinary anastomotic leak (21.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.002) and urinary tract infection (50% vs. 18%, p = 0.003) in the urologic reconstruction group. For the 57 patients (79%) who underwent curative resection, the 5-year overall survival rate was 59%, and the local recurrence at 5 years was 15%. Both parameters were not significantly affected by the presence of pathologic bladder invasion or the extent of surgical procedures. En bloc bladder resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer involving the urinary bladder can produce reasonable long-term local control and patient survival.

  12. Multivisceral resections in 461 cases operated of colorectal cancer; Resecciones multiviscerales en 461 casos operados de cancer colorrectal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Hormaza; Jose, Antonio

    2007-07-01

    The colorectal cancer is the third more frequent cause of cancer in the U.S.A., a 12% of these tumors extend to neighboring organs. One appears the experience in multivisceral resections of the services of coloproctology of the Clinic San Pedro Claver and the Central Hospital of the Police in colorectal cancer with 62 patients of 461 cases operated from the 2000 to the 2006. The rectum tumors must receive first neoadjuvant therapy. The resection in block is the fundamental pillar of the treatment, although the morbidity and mortality are greater than in the resections standard, survival, local and systemic recurrence tends to behave as the colorectal tumors that do not require surgery extended to other organs.

  13. Colorectal cancer surgery in the very elderly patient: a systematic review of laparoscopic versus open colorectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Laurence; Celentano, Valerio; Cohen, Richard; Khan, Jim; Chand, Manish

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of death from neoplastic disease in men and third in women of all ages. Globally, life expectancy is increasing, and consequently, an increasing number of operations are being performed on more elderly patients with the trend set to continue. Elderly patients are more likely to have cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities that are associated with increased peri-operative risk. They further tend to present with more locally advanced disease, more likely to obstruct or have disseminated disease. The aim of this review was to investigate the feasibility of laparoscopic colorectal resection in very elderly patients, and whether there are benefits over open surgery for colorectal cancer. A systematic literature search was performed on Medline, Pubmed, Embase and Google Scholar. All comparative studies evaluating patients undergoing laparoscopic versus open surgery for colorectal cancer in the patients population over 85 were included. The primary outcomes were 30-day mortality and 30-day overall morbidity. Secondary outcomes were operating time, time to oral diet, number of retrieved lymph nodes, blood loss and 5-year survival. The search provided 1507 citations. Sixty-nine articles were retrieved for full text analysis, and only six retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria. Overall mortality for elective laparoscopic resection was 2.92% and morbidity 23%. No single study showed a significant difference between laparoscopic and open surgery for morbidity or mortality, but pooled data analysis demonstrated reduced morbidity in the laparoscopic group (p = 0.032). Patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery are more likely to have a shorter hospital stay and a shorter time to oral diet. Elective laparoscopic resection for colorectal cancer in the over 85 age group is feasible and safe and offers similar advantages over open surgery to those demonstrated in patients of younger ages.

  14. Primary tumor location as a predictor of the benefit of palliative resection for colorectal cancer with unresectable metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong-Xin; Ma, Wen-Juan; Gu, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Tian-Qi; Huang, Zhi-Mei; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Gu, Yang-Kui

    2017-07-27

    It is still under debate that whether stage IV colorectal cancer patients with unresectable metastasis can benefit from primary tumor resection, especially for asymptomatic colorectal cancer patients. Retrospective studies have shown controversial results concerning the benefit from surgery. This retrospective study aims to evaluate whether the site of primary tumor is a predictor of palliative resection in asymptomatic stage IV colorectal cancer patients. One hundred ninety-four patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer were selected from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center Database in the period between January 2007 and December 2013. All information was carefully reviewed and collected, including the treatment, age, sex, carcinoembryonic antigen, site of tumor, histology, cancer antigen 199, number of liver metastases, and largest diameter of liver metastasis. The univariate and multivariate analyses were used to detect the relationship between primary tumor resection and overall survival of unresectable stage IV colorectal cancer patients. One hundred twenty-five received palliative resection, and 69 received only chemotherapy. Multivariate analysis indicated that primary tumor site was one of the independent factors (RR 0.569, P = 0.007) that influenced overall survival. For left-side colon cancer patients, primary tumor resection prolonged the median overall survival time for 8 months (palliative resection vs. no palliative resection: 22 vs. 14 months, P = 0.009); however, for right-side colon cancer patients, palliative resection showed no benefit (12 vs. 10 months, P = 0.910). This study showed that left-side colon cancer patients might benefit from the primary tumor resection in terms of overall survival. This result should be further explored in a prospective study.

  15. CT detection of hydronephrosis in resected colorectal cancer: a predictor of recurrent disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Drury, A.E.; Cunningham, D.; Husband, J.E.S.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes and significance of hydronephrosis in follow-up of colorectal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Case notes and serial computed tomography (CT) examinations were reviewed of 75 patients (250 CT examinations) after resection for colorectal cancer in whom hydronephrosis developed on follow-up. RESULTS: The most common cause of hydronephrosis was a focal plaque-like mass centred on the peritoneum, demonstrated in 37 cases (49%). Patients with R1 (microscopic residual tumour) or R2 (macroscopic residual tumour) disease developed hydronephrosis at a median time of 13 months (90% CI: 9-18 months) compared with 22 months (90% CI: 17-26 months) for those having (R0) curative resection. Patients with pT4 invasion of peritoneum or adjacent organs developed hydronephrosis at a median of 14 months (90% CI: 6-16 months) compared with a median of 22 months in patients with pT3 tumours (90% CI: 11-27 months). Of 26 patients without an obvious cause of hydronephrosis on initial CT examination, follow-up CT demonstrated a definite mass lesion in 50%. Median survival after the onset of hydronephrosis was 6 months (range 1-34 months) with a 1-year mortality of 62%. CONCLUSIONS: Hydronephrosis is an important early indicator of colorectal cancer recurrence, even in the absence of a mass. Brown, G. etal. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 137-142

  16. CT detection of hydronephrosis in resected colorectal cancer: a predictor of recurrent disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.; Drury, A.E.; Cunningham, D.; Husband, J.E.S

    2003-02-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes and significance of hydronephrosis in follow-up of colorectal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Case notes and serial computed tomography (CT) examinations were reviewed of 75 patients (250 CT examinations) after resection for colorectal cancer in whom hydronephrosis developed on follow-up. RESULTS: The most common cause of hydronephrosis was a focal plaque-like mass centred on the peritoneum, demonstrated in 37 cases (49%). Patients with R1 (microscopic residual tumour) or R2 (macroscopic residual tumour) disease developed hydronephrosis at a median time of 13 months (90% CI: 9-18 months) compared with 22 months (90% CI: 17-26 months) for those having (R0) curative resection. Patients with pT4 invasion of peritoneum or adjacent organs developed hydronephrosis at a median of 14 months (90% CI: 6-16 months) compared with a median of 22 months in patients with pT3 tumours (90% CI: 11-27 months). Of 26 patients without an obvious cause of hydronephrosis on initial CT examination, follow-up CT demonstrated a definite mass lesion in 50%. Median survival after the onset of hydronephrosis was 6 months (range 1-34 months) with a 1-year mortality of 62%. CONCLUSIONS: Hydronephrosis is an important early indicator of colorectal cancer recurrence, even in the absence of a mass. Brown, G. etal. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 137-142.

  17. Safety of laparoscopic resection for colorectal cancer in patients with liver cirrhosis: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Senjun; Zhu, Hepan; Li, Zhenjun; Ying, Xiaojiang; Xu, Miaojun

    2018-05-26

    Patients with liver cirrhosis represent a high risk group for colorectal surgery. The safety and effectiveness of laparoscopy in colorectal surgery for cirrhotic patients is not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of laparoscopic colorectal surgery with those of open procedure for colorectal cancer in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 62 patients with cirrhosis who underwent radical resections for colorectal cancer from 2005 to 2014 were identified retrospectively from a prospective database according to the technique adopted (laparoscopic or open). Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between the two groups. Comparison of laparoscopic group and open group revealed no significant differences at baseline. In the laparoscopic group, the laparoscopic surgery was associated with reduced estimated blood loss (136 vs. 266 ml, p = 0.015), faster first flatus (3 vs. 4 days, p = 0.002) and shorter days to first oral intake (4 vs. 5 days, p = 0.033), but similar operative times (p = 0.856), number of retrieved lymph nodes (p = 0.400) or postoperative hospital stays (p = 0.170). Despite the similar incidence of overall complications between the two groups (50.0% vs. 68.8%, p = 0.133), we observed lower morbidities in laparoscopic group in terms of the rate of Grade II complication (20.0% vs. 50.0%, p = 0.014). Long-term of overall and Disease-free survival rates did not differ between the two groups. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery appears to be a safe and less invasive alternative to open surgery in some elective cirrhotic patients in terms of less blood loss or early recovery and does not result in additional harm in terms of the postoperative complications or long-term oncological outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Patient perceptions regarding the likelihood of cure after surgical resection of lung and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuhree; Winner, Megan; Page, Andrew; Tisnado, Diana M; Martinez, Kathryn A; Buettner, Stefan; Ejaz, Aslam; Spolverato, Gaya; Morss Dy, Sydney E; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the prevalence of the expectation that surgical resection of lung or colorectal cancer might be curative. The authors sought to assess patient-level, tumor-level, and communication-level factors associated with the perception of cure. Between 2003 and 2005, a total of 3954 patients who underwent cancer-directed surgery for lung (30.3%) or colorectal (69.7%) cancer were identified from a population-based and health system-based survey of participants from multiple US regions. Approximately 80.0% of patients with lung cancer and 89.7% of those with colorectal cancer responded that surgery would cure their cancer. Even 57.4% and 79.8% of patients with stage IV lung and colorectal cancer, respectively, believed surgery was likely to be curative. On multivariable analyses, the odds ratio (OR) of the perception of curative intent was found to be higher among patients with colorectal versus lung cancer (OR, 2.27). Patients who were female, with an advanced tumor stage, unmarried, and having a higher number of comorbidities were less likely to believe that surgery would cure their cancer; educational level, physical function, and insurance status were not found to be associated with perception of cure. Patients who reported optimal physician communication scores (reference score, 0-80; score of 80-100 [OR, 1.40] and score of 100 [OR, 1.89]) and a shared role in decision-making with their physician (OR, 1.16) or family (OR, 1.17) had a higher odds of perceiving surgery would be curative, whereas patients who reported physician-controlled (OR, 0.56) or family-controlled (OR, 0.72) decision-making were less likely to believe surgery would provide a cure. Greater focus on patient-physician engagement, communication, and barriers to discussing goals of care with patients who are diagnosed with cancer is needed. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  19. Minilaparoscopic Colorectal Resections: Technical Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colorectal resections have been shown to provide short-term advantages in terms of postoperative pain, general morbidity, recovery, and quality of life. To date, long-term results have been proved to be comparable to open surgery irrefutably only for colon cancer. Recently, new trends keep arising in the direction of minimal invasiveness to reduce surgical trauma after colorectal surgery in order to improve morbidity and cosmetic results. The few reports available in the literature on single-port technique show promising results. Natural orifices endoscopic techniques still have very limited application. We focused our efforts in standardising a minilaparoscopic technique (using 3 to 5 mm instruments for colorectal resections since it can provide excellent cosmetic results without changing the laparoscopic approach significantly. Thus, there is no need for a new learning curve as minilaparoscopy maintains the principle of instrument triangulation. This determines an undoubted advantage in terms of feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure without increasing operative time. Some preliminary experiences confirm that minilaparoscopic colorectal surgery provides acceptable results, comparable to those reported for laparoscopic surgery with regard to operative time, morbidity, and hospital stay. Randomized controlled studies should be conducted to confirm these early encouraging results.

  20. Simultaneous resection for colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases is a safe procedure: Outcomes at a single center in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulundu, Ender; Attaallah, Wafi; Tilki, Metin; Yegen, Cumhur; Coskun, Safak; Coskun, Mumin; Erdim, Aylin; Tanrikulu, Eda; Yardimci, Samet; Gunal, Omer

    2017-05-23

    The optimal surgical strategy for treating colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases is subject to debate. The current study sought to evaluate the outcomes of simultaneous colorectal cancer and liver metastases resection in a single center. Prospectively collected data on all patients with synchronous colorectal liver metastases who underwent simultaneous resection with curative intent were analyzed retrospectively. Patient outcomes were compared depending on the primary tumor location and type of liver resection (major or minor). Between January 2005 and August 2016, 108 patients underwent simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and liver metastases. The tumor was localized to the right side of the colon in 24 patients (22%), to the left side in 40 (37%), and to the rectum in 44 (41%). Perioperative mortality occurred in 3 patients (3%). Postoperative complications were noted in 32 patients (30%), and most of these complications (75%) were grade 1 to 3 according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Neither perioperative mortality nor the rate of postoperative complications after simultaneous resection differed among patients with cancer of the right side of the colon, those with cancer of the left side of the colon, and those with rectal cancer (4%, 2.5%, and 2%, respectively, p = 0.89) and (17%, 33%, and 34%, respectively; p = 0.29)]. The 5-year overall survival of the entire sample was 54% and the 3-year overall survival was 67 %. In conclusion, simultaneous resection for primary colorectal cancer and liver metastases is a safe procedure and can be performed without excess morbidity in carefully selected patients regardless of the location of the primary tumor and type of hepatectomy.

  1. Does hospital readmission following colorectal cancer resection and enhanced recovery after surgery affect long term survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, N J; Noble, E; Salib, E; Hipkiss, R; Meachim, E; Dalton, R; Allison, A; Ockrim, J; Francis, N K

    2017-08-01

    Hospital readmission is undesirable for patients and care providers as this can affect short-term recovery and carries financial consequences. It is unknown if readmission has long-term implications. We aimed to investigate the impact of 30-day readmission on long-term overall survival (OS) following colorectal cancer resection within enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) care and explore the reasons for and the severity and details of readmission episodes. A dedicated, prospectively populated database was reviewed. All patients were managed within an established ERAS programme. Five-year OS was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The number, reason for and severity of 30-day readmissions were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo (CD) system, along with total (initial and readmission) length of stay (LoS). Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors predicting readmission. A total of 1023 consecutive patients underwent colorectal cancer resection between 2002 and 2015. Of these, 166 (16%) were readmitted. Readmission alone did not have a significant impact on 5-year OS (59% vs 70%, P = 0.092), but OS was worse in patients with longer total LoS (20 vs 14 days, P = 0.04). Of the readmissions, 121 (73%) were minor (CD I-II) and 27 (16%) required an intervention of which 16 (10%) were returned to theatre. Gut dysfunction 32 (19%) and wound complications 23 (14%) were the most frequent reasons for readmission. Prolonged initial LoS, rectal cancer and younger age predicted for hospital readmission. Readmission does not have a significant impact on 5-year OS. A broad range of conditions led to readmission, with the majority representing minor complications. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Intraoperative blood loss independently predicts survival and recurrence after resection of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although numerous prognostic factors have been reported for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRLM, few studies have reported intraoperative blood loss (IBL effects on clinical outcome after CRLM resection. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical and histopathological characteristics of 139 patients who underwent liver resection for CRLM. The IBL cutoff volume was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curves. Overall survival (OS and recurrence free survival (RFS were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. RESULTS: All patients underwent curative resection. The median follow up period was 25.0 months (range, 2.1-88.8. Body mass index (BMI and CRLM number and tumor size were associated with increased IBL. BMI (P=0.01; 95% CI = 1.3-8.5 and IBL (P500mL were 71%, 33%, and 0%, respectively (P<0.01. RFS of patients within three IBL volumes at the end of the first year were 67%, 38%, and 18%, respectively (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: IBL during CRLM resection is an independent predictor of long term survival and tumor recurrence, and its prognostic value was confirmed by a dose-response relationship.

  3. Outcome of urinary bladder recurrence after partial cystectomy for en bloc urinary bladder adherent colorectal cancer resection.

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    Luo, Hao Lun; Tsai, Kai Lung; Lin, Shung Eing; Chiang, Po Hui

    2013-05-01

    Around 10 % of colorectal cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis. There are higher incidences for sigmoid and rectal cancer adhered to urinary bladder (UB) rather than other segments of colon cancer. Surgeons often performed partial cystectomy as possible for preservation of patient's life quality. This study investigates prognostic factors in patients who underwent bladder preservation en bloc resection for UB adherent colorectal cancer. From 2000 to 2011, 123 patients with clinically UB involvement colorectal cancer underwent primary colorectal cancer with urinary bladder resection. Seventeen patients were excluded because of the concurrent distant metastasis at diagnosis and another 22 patients were excluded because of total cystectomy with uretero-ileal urinary diversion. Finally, 84 patients with clinical stage IIIC (T4bN0M0, according to AJCC 7th edition) that underwent en bloc colorectal cancer resection with partial cystectomy were enrolled into this study for further analysis. Preoperative colovesical fistula and positive CT result were significantly more in the urinary bladder invasion group (p = 0.043 and 0.010, respectively). Pathological UB invasion is an independent predictor of intravesical recurrence (p = 0.04; HR, 10.71; 95 % CI = 1.12∼102.94) and distant metastasis (p = 0.016; HR, 4.85; 95 % CI = 1.34 ∼ 17.53) in multivariate analysis. For bladder preservation en bloc resection of urinary bladder adherent colorectal cancer, the pathological urinary bladder invasion is significantly associated with more urinary bladder recurrence and distant metastasis. This result helps surgeons make decisions at surgical planning and establish follow-up protocol.

  4. Initial experiences of simultaneous laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer and liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, L. T.; Busch, O. R. C.; Bemelman, W. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; Tanis, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and synchronous liver metastases (SLMs) is subject of debate with respect to morbidity in comparison to staged resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with this approach. Methods. Five patients

  5. Peri-operative chemotherapy in the management of resectable colorectal cancer pulmonary metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Eliza A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery is often advocated in patients with resectable pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC. Our study aims to evaluate peri-operative chemotherapy in patients with metastastic CRC undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. Methods Patients treated for CRC who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy by a single surgeon were identified. Outcome measures included survival, peri-operative complications, radiological and histological evidence of chemotherapy-induced lung toxicities. Results Between 1997 and 2009, 51 eligible patients were identified undergoing a total of 72 pulmonary resections. Thirty-eight patients received peri-operative chemotherapy, of whom 9 received an additional biological agent. Five-year overall survival rate was 72% in the whole cohort - 74% and 68% in those who received peri-operative chemotherapy (CS and those who underwent surgery alone (S respectively. Five-year relapse free survival rate was 31% in the whole cohort - 38% and ≤18% in CS and S groups respectively. Only 8% had disease progression during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. There were no post-operative deaths. Surgical complications occurred in only 4% of patients who received pre-operative chemotherapy. There was neither radiological nor histological evidence of lung toxicity in resected surgical specimens. Conclusions Peri-operative chemotherapy can be safely delivered to CRC patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. Survival in this selected group of patients was favourable.

  6. Differential impact of obesity and diabetes mellitus on survival after liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amptoulach, Sousana; Gross, Gillis; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-12-01

    Data on the potential effect of obesity and diabetes mellitus on survival after liver resection due to colorectal cancer (CRC) metastases are very limited. Patients undergoing liver resection for CRC metastases in a European institution in 2004-2011 were retrospectively enrolled. Relevant data, such as body mass index, extent of resection, chemotherapy, and perioperative outcome, were collected from medical records. The relation of obesity and diabetes mellitus with overall and disease-free survival was assessed using adjusted Cox models. Thirty of 207 patients (14.4%) included in the study were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and 25 (12%) had diabetes mellitus. Major hepatectomy was performed in 46%. Although both obese patients and those with diabetes had higher American Society of Anesthesiologist scores (P diabetes was significantly related to primary tumor characteristics, liver metastasis features, extent or radicality of resection, extrahepatic disease at hepatectomy, preoperative or postoperative oncologic therapy, or perioperative outcome (P > 0.05 for all). Patients were followed up for a median of 39 mo posthepatectomy (interquartile range, 13-56 mo). After adjustment for confounders, obesity was an independent predictor of improved (hazard ratio, 0.305, 95% confidence interval, 0.103-0.902) and diabetes of worse overall survival (hazard ratio, 3.298, 95% confidence interval, 1.306-8.330). Obese patients with diabetes had also worse disease-free survival compared with the rest of the cohort (P diabetes mellitus has a negative impact on prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complications as indicators of quality assurance after 401 consecutive colorectal cancer resections: the importance of surgeon volume in developing colorectal cancer units in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Guruprasad S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low incidence of colorectal cancer in India, coupled with absence of specialized units, contribute to lack of relevant data arising from the subcontinent. We evaluated the data of the senior author to better define the requirements that would enable development of specialized units in a country where colorectal cancer burden is increasing. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data of 401 consecutive colorectal resections from a prospective database of the senior author. In addition to patient demographics and types of resections, perioperative data like intraoperative blood loss, duration of surgery, complications, re-operation rates and hospital stay were recorded and analyzed. Results The median age was 52 years (10-86 years. 279 were males and 122 were females. The average duration of surgery was 220.32 minutes (range 50 - 480 min. The overall complication rate was 12.2% (49/401 with a 1.2% (5/401 mortality rate. The patients having complications had an increase in their median hospital stay (from 10.5 days to 23.4 days and the re-operation rate in them was 51%. The major complications were anastomotic leaks (2.5% and stoma related complications (2.7%. Conclusions This largest ever series from India compares favorably with global standards. In a nation where colorectal cancer is on the rise, it is imperative that high volume centers develop specialized units to train future specialist colorectal surgeons. This would ensure improved quality assurance and delivery of health care even to outreach, low volume centers.

  8. Inadvertent Splenectomy During Resection for Colorectal Cancer Does Not Increase Long-term Mortality in a Propensity Score Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Schefte, David F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that long-term mortality is increased in patients who undergo splenectomy during surgery for colorectal cancer. The reason for this association remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between inadvertent...... splenectomy attributed to iatrogenic lesion to the spleen during colorectal cancer resections and long-term mortality in a national cohort of unselected patients. DESIGN: This was a retrospective, nationwide cohort study. SETTINGS: Data were collected from the database of the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group...... for patients surviving 30 days after surgery. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and risk factors for inadvertent splenectomy. Multivariable and propensity-score matched Cox regression analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding. RESULTS: In total, 23,727 patients were included, of which 277...

  9. Substantial underreporting of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer in the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutegård, Martin; Kverneng Hultberg, Daniel; Angenete, Eva; Lydrup, Marie-Louise

    2017-12-01

    The causes and effects of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection are difficult to study in small samples and have thus been evaluated using large population-based national registries. To assess the accuracy of such research, registries should be validated continuously. Patients who underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer during 2007-2013 in 15 different hospitals in three healthcare regions in Sweden were included in the study. Registry data and information from patient records were retrieved. Registered anastomotic leakage within 30 postoperative days was evaluated, using all available registry data and using only the main variable anastomotic insufficiency. With the consensus definition of anastomotic leakage developed by the International Study Group on Rectal Cancer as reference, validity measures were calculated. Some 1507 patients were included in the study. The negative and positive predictive values for registered anastomotic leakage were 96 and 88%, respectively, while the κ-value amounted to 0.76. The false-negative rate was 29%, whereas the false-positive rate reached 1.3% (the vast majority consisting of actual leaks, but occurring after postoperative day 30). Using the main variable anastomotic insufficiency only, the false-negative rate rose to 41%. There is considerable underreporting of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer in the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. It is probable that this causes an underestimation of the true effects of leakage on patient outcomes, and further quality control is needed.

  10. Lymph node status as a prognostic factor after palliative resection of primary tumor for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingguo; Wang, Changjian; Li, Yaqi; Li, Xinxiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, Guoxiang; Lian, Peng; Cai, Sanjun

    2017-07-18

    Lymph node (LN) status is one of the most important predictors for M0 colorectal cancer patients. However, its clinical impact on stage IV colorectal cancer remains unclear. The study aimed to explore the prognostic value of LN status after palliative resection of primary tumor for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We combined analyses of mCRC patients in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database and Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC).A total of 17,553 patients with mCRC were identified in SEER database. X-tile program was adopted to identify 2 and 10 as optimal cutoff values for negative lymph node (NLN) count to divide patients into 3 subgroups of high, middle and low risk of cancer related death. N stage and NLN count were verified as independent prognostic factors in multivariate analyses of patients in whole cohort and in subgroup analyses of each N stage (Pcolorectal cancer. Advanced N stage and small number of NLN were correlated with high risk of cancer related death after palliative resection of primary tumor.

  11. Nonelective colon cancer resections in elderly patients: results from the dutch surgical colorectal audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, N. E.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Gooiker, G. A.; Eddes, E. H.; Kievit, J.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Marang-van de Mheen, P. J.; Bemelman, W. A.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Dam, R. M.; van der Harst, E.; Jansen-Landheer, M. L. E. A.; Karsten, Th M.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Kuijpers, W. G. T.; Lemmens, V. E.; Manusama, E. R.; Meijerink, W. J. H. J.; Rutten, H. J. T.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Wiggers, T.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess which factors contribute to postoperative mortality, especially in elderly patients who undergo emergency colon cancer resections, using a nationwide population-based database. 6,161 patients (1,172 nonelective) who underwent a colon cancer resection in 2010 in the

  12. Initial Experiences of Simultaneous Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Hoekstra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Simultaneous resection of primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC and synchronous liver metastases (SLMs is subject of debate with respect to morbidity in comparison to staged resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with this approach. Methods. Five patients with primary CRC and a clinical diagnosis of SLM underwent combined laparoscopic colorectal and liver surgery. Patient and tumor characteristics, operative variables, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. Results. The primary tumor was located in the colon in two patients and in the rectum in three patients. The SLM was solitary in four patients and multiple in the remaining patient. Surgical approach was total laparoscopic (2 patients or hand-assisted laparoscopic (3 patients. The midline umbilical or transverse suprapubic incision created for the hand port and/or extraction of the specimen varied between 5 and 10 cm. Median operation time was 303 (range 151–384 minutes with a total blood loss of 700 (range 200–850 mL. Postoperative hospital stay was 5, 5, 9, 14, and 30 days. An R0 resection was achieved in all patients. Conclusions. From this initial single-center experience, simultaneous laparoscopic colorectal and liver resection appears to be feasible in selected patients with CRC and SLM, with satisfying short-term results.

  13. Reduced Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietelink, Lieke; Wouters, Michel W J M; Tanis, Pieter J; Deken, Marion M; Ten Berge, Martijn G; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Krieken, J Han; de Noo, Mirre E

    2015-09-01

    The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival after rectal cancer surgery. Therefore, availability of this parameter is essential. Although the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial raised awareness about CRM in the late 1990s, quality assurance on pathologic reporting was not available until the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) started in 2009. The present study describes the rates of CRM reporting and involvement since the start of the DSCA and analyzes whether improvement of these parameters can be attributed to the audit. Data from the DSCA (2009-2013) were analyzed. Reporting of CRM and CRM involvement was plotted for successive years, and variations of these parameters were analyzed in a funnelplot. Predictors of CRM involvement were determined in univariable analysis and the independent influence of year of registration on CRM involvement was analyzed in multivariable analysis. A total of 12,669 patients were included for analysis. The mean percentage of patients with a reported CRM increased from 52.7% to 94.2% (2009-2013) and interhospital variation decreased. The percentage of patients with CRM involvement decreased from 14.2% to 5.6%. In multivariable analysis, the year of DSCA registration remained a significant predictor of CRM involvement. After the introduction of the DSCA, a dramatic improvement in CRM reporting and a major decrease of CRM involvement after rectal cancer surgery have occurred. This study suggests that a national quality assurance program has been the driving force behind these achievements. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  14. Detection of disseminated tumour cells in blood and bone marrow samples of patients undergoing hepatic resection for metastasis of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlems, F. A.; Diepstra, J. H. S.; Punt, C. J. A.; Ligtenberg, M. J. L.; Cornelissen, I. M. H. A.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Wobbes, T.; van Muijen, G. N. P.; Ruers, T. J. M.

    2003-01-01

    In 50-60 per cent of patients who undergo hepatic resection for metastasis of colorectal cancer the first site of tumour recurrence is extrahepatic, indicating the presence of more extensive disease at the time of resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of disseminated

  15. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  16. Ressecções colorretais laparoscópicas e laparotômicas no câncer colorretal Laparoscopic and open colorectal resections for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dâmia Leal Vendramini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A ressecção cirúrgica é o principal elemento do tratamento do câncer colorretal com intenção curativa. OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados pós-operatórios de ressecções colorretais laparotômicas e videolaparoscópicas por câncer colorretal. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de uma série de 189 pacientes operados. As variáveis descritivas foram idade e gênero, e as de desfecho foram tipo de ressecção, número de linfonodos ressecados, margens, necessidade de ostomia, complicações, tempo operatório e tempo de internação. Elas foram analisadas por meio dos testes do Qui-quadrado, t de student e Mann-Whitney, com nível de significância BACKGROUND: Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for colorectal cancer with curative intent. AIM: To evaluate the postoperative results of laparoscopic and laparotomic colorectal resections for colorectal cancer. METHODS: A retrospective study of a series of 189 patients. The descriptive variables were age and gender, and for outcome were type of resection, number of lymph nodes resected, free margins, the need for colostomy, complications, operative time and hospital stay. They were analyzed using the chi-square, Student t and Mann-Whitney test, with significance level <0.05. RESULTS: Of the 189 operated patients, 110 met the inclusion criteria, 75 (68.2% operated by open surgery and 35 (31.8% by laparoscopic. The sigmoid colon was the most common site presented by neoplasia and rectosigmoidectomy was performed more by open colorectal resection (p = 0.042. The conversion rate was 7.9% (3/38. The patients were operated by open surgery in 81.5% of time less than 180 minutes (p <0.001. In both pathways, the average number of removed lymph nodes was greater than 12, but laparotomy enabled, more frequently, the resection of 12 or more nodes (p = 0.012. No patient had surgical margins involved, but laparotomy allowed a greater number of patients with a margin greater than 5 cm from

  17. Reduced Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, Lieke; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Deken, Marion M.; ten Berge, Martijn G.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; van Krieken, J. Han; de Noo, Mirre E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival after rectal cancer surgery. Therefore, availability of this parameter is essential. Although the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial raised awareness

  18. Reduced Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, L.; Wouters, M.W.; Tanis, P.J.; Deken, M.M.; Berge, M.G. Ten; Tollenaar, R.A.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Noo, M.E. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival after rectal cancer surgery. Therefore, availability of this parameter is essential. Although the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial raised awareness

  19. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  20. Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy After Curative Resection of Lung Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Soon; Jung, Minkyu; Shin, Sang Joon; Heo, Su Jin; Kim, Chang Gon; Lee, Min Goo; Beom, Seung Hoon; Lee, Chang Young; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Ahn, Joong Bae

    2016-03-01

    The survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy after colorectal cancer (CRC) lung metastasectomy is uncertain. We enrolled 221 CRC patients who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy between October 2002 and July 2013, including those with previous liver metastasis that had been curatively resected. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from the day of lung metastasectomy. Among all patients, 176 (79.6%) received adjuvant chemotherapy after lung metastasectomy. Median follow-up was 34.7 months from the time of lung metastasectomy [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 7.4-90.9 months]. Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy had longer DFS compared with surgery alone (median 32.7 vs 11.2 months respectively, P = 0.076). Multivariate analysis revealed previous liver metastasis, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen ≥5 ng/mL, disease-free interval chemotherapy as independent risk factors for recurrence. Low-risk patients who had 0-1 risk factors received a significant survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy [hazard ratio (HR) 0.54; 95% CI 0.32-0.91, P = 0.020]; however, high-risk patients with ≥2 risk factors did not (HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.48-2.14, P = 0.964). Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy showed no OS benefit compared with patients who received surgery alone (median 89.6 vs 86.8 months respectively, P = 0.833). CRC patients received lung metastasectomy could have a DFS benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, especially in low-risk patients. Larger, prospective studies are needed to evaluate the role of adjuvant chemotherapy after CRC lung metastasectomy.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  2. Role of major resection in pulmonary metastasectomy for colorectal cancer in the Spanish prospective multicenter study (GECMP-CCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J; Molins, L; Fibla, J J; Heras, F; Embún, R; Rivas, J J

    2016-05-01

    Patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may benefit from aggressive surgical therapy. The objective of this study was to determine the role of major anatomic resection for pulmonary metastasectomy to improve survival when compared with limited pulmonary resection. Data of 522 patients (64.2% men, mean age 64.5 years) who underwent pulmonary resections with curative intent for CRC metastases over a 2-year period were reviewed. All patients were followed for a minimum of 3 years. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were assessed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors associated with DSS and DFS were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. A total of 394 (75.6%) patients underwent wedge resection, 19 (3.6%) anatomic segmentectomy, 5 (0.9%) lesser resections not described, 100 (19.3%) lobectomy, and 4 (0.8%) pneumonectomy. Accordingly, 104 (19.9%) patients were treated with major anatomic resection and 418 (80.1%) with lesser resection. Operations were carried out with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) in 93 patients. The overall DSS and DFS were 55 and 28.3 months, respectively. Significant differences in DSS and DFS in favor of major resection versus lesser resection (DSS median not reached versus 52.2 months, P = 0.03; DFS median not reached versus 23.9 months, P < 0.001) were found. In the multivariate analysis, major resection appeared to be a protective factor in DSS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.96, P = 0.031] and DFS (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.36-0.75, P < 0.001). The surgical approach (VATS versus open surgical resection) had no effect on outcome. Major anatomic resection with lymphadenectomy for pulmonary metastasectomy can be considered in selected CRC patient with sufficient functional reserve to improve the DSS and DFS. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to confirm the present results. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press

  3. Analysis of prognostic factors after resection of solitary liver metastasis in colorectal cancer: a 22-year bicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciuffi, Sara; Meyer, Frank; Bauschke, Astrid; Settmacher, Utz; Lippert, Hans; Croner, Roland; Altendorf-Hofmann, Annelore

    2018-03-01

    The investigation of the predictors of outcome after hepatic resection for solitary colorectal liver metastasis. We recruited 350 patients with solitary colorectal liver metastasis at the University Hospitals of Jena and Magdeburg, who underwent curative liver resection between 1993 and 2014. All patients had follow-up until death or till summer 2016. The follow-up data concern 96.6% of observed patients. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 47 and 28%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year disease-free survival rates were 30 and 20%, respectively. The analysis of the prognostic factors revealed that the pT category of primary tumour, size and grade of the metastasis and extension of the liver resection had no statistically significant impact on survival and recurrence rates. In multivariate analysis, age, status of lymph node metastasis at the primary tumour, location of primary tumour, time of appearance of the metastasis, the use of preoperative chemotherapy and the presence of extrahepatic tumour proved to be independent statistically significant predictors for the prognosis. Moreover, patients with rectal cancer had a lower intrahepatic recurrence rate, but a higher extrahepatic recurrence rate. The long-term follow-up of patients with R0-resected liver metastasis is multifactorially influenced. Age and comorbidity have a role only in the overall survival. More than three lymph node metastasis reduced both the overall and disease-free survival. Extrahepatic tumour had a negative influence on the extrahepatic recurrence and on the overall survival. Neither overall survival nor recurrence rates was improved using neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. Prognostic impact of the number of resected lymph node on survival in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia M. Ladeira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal Cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of death in Western countries. In Portugal, in the North, emerges as the second most common cancer. The presence of lymph node metastasis is an important predictor of overall and disease-free survival and several studies recommend the evaluation of at least 12–14 regional lymph nodes, as it contributes to improve cancer staging and patient outcomes. Aims: Epidemiological characterization of the studied population and identify a possible relationship between the number of lymph nodes evaluated in the surgical specimen and survival. Methods: We preceded to the study of 1065 CCR patients, submitted to surgical resection between 1 January 2000 and 31 August 2012, in Braga Hospital. Discussion/Conclusion: The results of the epidemiological characterization of this population are coincident with those described in the literature. It was observed a significant correlation between age, tumor size, serosal invasion, differentiation, tumor penetration, venous and lymphatic invasion, metastasis, TNM stage and the number of lymph nodes evaluated. However, we did not observe a statistically significant correlation between patient survival and number of lymph nodes evaluated (p > 0.05. A possible explanation is the practice of oncologists, addressing patients with less than 12 nodes identified in the surgical specimen as “N-positive” and undergoing adjuvant therapy. A better harvest and careful analysis of lymph nodes would lead to more accurate staging, avoiding overtreatment and side effects associated, and allow better economic management of hospital resources, in real N0 patients. Resumo: Introdução: O câncer colorretal (CCR ocupa o terceiro lugar em termos de frequência e, além disso, é a segunda causa principal de morte nos países ocidentais. Em Portugal, no norte, CCR surge como o segundo câncer mais comum. A presença de metástase aos

  5. Nonelective colon cancer resections in elderly patients: results from the dutch surgical colorectal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolfschoten, N E; Wouters, M W J M; Gooiker, G A; Eddes, E H; Kievit, J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Marang-van de Mheen, P J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess which factors contribute to postoperative mortality, especially in elderly patients who undergo emergency colon cancer resections, using a nationwide population-based database. 6,161 patients (1,172 nonelective) who underwent a colon cancer resection in 2010 in the Netherlands were included. Risk factors for postoperative mortality were investigated using a multivariate logistic regression model for different age groups, elective and nonelective patients separately. For both elective and nonelective patients, mortality risk increased with increasing age. For nonelective elderly patients (80+ years), each additional risk factor increased the mortality risk. For a nonelective patient of 80+ years with an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of III+ and a left hemicolectomy or extended resection, postoperative mortality rate was 41% compared with 7% in patients without additional risk factors. For elderly patients with two or more additional risk factors, a nonelective resection should be considered a high-risk procedure with a mortality risk of up to 41%. The results of this study could be used to adequately inform patient and family and should have consequences for composing an operative team. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Exploring gene expression signatures for predicting disease free survival after resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikol Snoeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify and validate gene signatures that can predict disease free survival (DFS in patients undergoing a radical resection for their colorectal liver metastases (CRLM. METHODS: Tumor gene expression profiles were collected from 119 patients undergoing surgery for their CRLM in the Paul Brousse Hospital (France and the University Medical Center Utrecht (The Netherlands. Patients were divided into high and low risk groups. A randomly selected training set was used to find predictive gene signatures. The ability of these gene signatures to predict DFS was tested in an independent validation set comprising the remaining patients. Furthermore, 5 known clinical risk scores were tested in our complete patient cohort. RESULT: No gene signature was found that significantly predicted DFS in the validation set. In contrast, three out of five clinical risk scores were able to predict DFS in our patient cohort. CONCLUSIONS: No gene signature was found that could predict DFS in patients undergoing CRLM resection. Three out of five clinical risk scores were able to predict DFS in our patient cohort. These results emphasize the need for validating risk scores in independent patient groups and suggest improved designs for future studies.

  7. Prognostic value of primary tumour resection in synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer: Individual patient data analysis of first-line randomised trials from the ARCAD database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, K. L.; Shi, Q.; Goey, K. K. H.; Meyers, J.; Heinemann, V.; Diaz-Rubio, E.; Aranda, E.; Falcone, A.; Green, E.; de Gramont, A.; Sargent, D. J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.

    2018-01-01

    Indication for primary tumour resection (PTR) in asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients is unclear. Previous retrospective analyses suggest a survival benefit for patients who underwent PTR. The aim was to evaluate the prognostic value of PTR in patients with synchronous mCRC by

  8. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible. Research will help us better understand whether chemotherapy can benefit elderly colorectal cancer patients. Such patients often do not receive chemotherapy due to concerns about side effects. We will ...

  9. Short term benefits for laparoscopic colorectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, W; Haase, O; Neudecker, J; Müller, J M

    2005-07-20

    Colorectal resections are common surgical procedures all over the world. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is technically feasible in a considerable amount of patients under elective conditions. Several short-term benefits of the laparoscopic approach to colorectal resection (less pain, less morbidity, improved reconvalescence and better quality of life) have been proposed. This review compares laparoscopic and conventional colorectal resection with regards to possible benefits of the laparoscopic method in the short-term postoperative period (up to 3 months post surgery). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CancerLit, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for the years 1991 to 2004. We also handsearched the following journals from 1991 to 2004: British Journal of Surgery, Archives of Surgery, Annals of Surgery, Surgery, World Journal of Surgery, Disease of Colon and Rectum, Surgical Endoscopy, International Journal of Colorectal Disease, Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery, Der Chirurg, Zentralblatt für Chirurgie, Aktuelle Chirurgie/Viszeralchirurgie. Handsearch of abstracts from the following society meetings from 1991 to 2004: American College of Surgeons, American Society of Colorectal Surgeons, Royal Society of Surgeons, British Assocation of Coloproctology, Surgical Association of Endoscopic Surgeons, European Association of Endoscopic Surgeons, Asian Society of Endoscopic Surgeons. All randomised-controlled trial were included regardless of the language of publication. No- or pseudorandomised trials as well as studies that followed patient's preferences towards one of the two interventions were excluded, but listed separately. RCT presented as only an abstract were excluded. Results were extracted from papers by three observers independently on a predefined data sheet. Disagreements were solved by discussion. 'REVMAN 4.2' was used for statistical analysis. Mean differences (95% confidence intervals) were used for analysing continuous variables. If

  10. [Oligometastasized colorectal cancer-modern treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnebösel, M; Lambertz, A; Dejong, K; Neumann, U P

    2018-06-05

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer in UICC stage IV has been improved in the last decades by improvements in interdisciplinary treatment. Treatment strategies for oligometastasized colorectal cancer are developing more and more into an individualized treatment. An overview of the current literature of modern treatment concepts in oligometastasized colorectal cancer UICC stage IV is given. Surgery still has the supreme mandate in resectable colorectal liver metastases, as neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies to not provide any benefits for these patients. In marginal or non-resectable stages systemic treatment is superior in these patients depending on the prognostic parameters. Also in curative settings local treatment options should be considered as a reasonable additive tool. An interesting treatment approach for isolated liver metastases and non-resectable colorectal cancer is liver transplantation. Irrespective of new developments in treatment strategies for metastasized colorectal cancer, resection of colorectal liver metastases remains the gold standard whenever possible.

  11. Inadvertent Splenectomy During Resection for Colorectal Cancer Does Not Increase Long-term Mortality in a Propensity Score Model: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolle, Ida; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Schefte, David F; Bulut, Orhan; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Rosenstock, Steffen J

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that long-term mortality is increased in patients who undergo splenectomy during surgery for colorectal cancer. The reason for this association remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between inadvertent splenectomy attributed to iatrogenic lesion to the spleen during colorectal cancer resections and long-term mortality in a national cohort of unselected patients. This was a retrospective, nationwide cohort study. Data were collected from the database of the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group and merged with data from the National Patient Registry and the National Pathology Databank. Danish patients with colorectal cancer undergoing curatively intended resection between 2001 and 2011 were included in the study. The primary outcome was long-term mortality for patients surviving 30 days after surgery. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and risk factors for inadvertent splenectomy. Multivariable and propensity-score matched Cox regression analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding. In total, 23,727 patients were included, of which 277 (1.2%) underwent inadvertent splenectomy. There was no association between inadvertent splenectomy and long-term mortality (adjusted HR = 1.15 (95% CI, 0.95-1.40); p = 0.16) in the propensity score-matched model, whereas 30-day mortality was significantly increased (adjusted HR = 2.31 (95% CI, 1.71-3.11); p splenectomy was most often seen during left hemicolectomy (left hemicolectomy vs right hemicolectomy: OR = 24.76 (95% CI, 15.30-40.06); p splenectomy during resection for colorectal cancer does not seem to increase long-term mortality. The previously reported reduced overall survival after inadvertent splenectomy may be explained by excess mortality in the immediate postoperative period.

  12. Plasma chitinase 3-like 1 is persistently elevated during first month after minimally invasive colorectal cancer resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HMC Shantha Kumara; David Gaita; Hiromichi Miyagaki; Xiaohong Yan; Sonali AC Hearth; Linda Njoh; Vesna Cekic; Richard L Whelan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess blood chitinase 3-like 1(CHi3L1) levels for 2 mo after minimally invasive colorectal resection(MICR) for colorectal cancer(CRC). METHODS: CRC patients in an Institutional Review Board approved data/plasma bank who underwent elective MICR for whom preoperative(PreO p), early postoperative(PostO p), and 1 or more late PostO p samples [postoperative day(POD) 7-27] available were included. Plasma CHi3L1 levels(ng/m L) were determined in duplicate by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: PreOp and PostOp plasma sample were available for 80 MICR cancer patients for the study. The median PreOp CHi3L1 level was 56.8 CI: 41.9-78.6 ng/mL(n = 80). Significantly elevated(P < 0.001) median plasma levels(ng/mL) over PreOp levels were detected on POD1(667.7 CI: 495.7, 771.7; n = 79), POD 3(132.6 CI: 95.5, 173.7; n = 76), POD7-13(96.4 CI: 67.7, 136.9; n = 62), POD14-20(101.4 CI: 80.7, 287.4; n = 22), and POD 21-27(98.1 CI: 66.8, 137.4; n = 20, P = 0.001). No significant difference in plasma levels were noted on POD27-41. CONCLUSION: Plasma CHi3L1 levels were significantly elevated for one month after MICR. Persistently elevated plasma CHi3L1 may support the growth of residual tumor and metastasis.

  13. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  14. A multi-institutional analysis of 429 patients undergoing major hepatectomy for colorectal cancer liver metastases: The impact of concomitant bile duct resection on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlewait, Lauren M; Squires, Malcolm H; Kooby, David A; Weber, Sharon M; Scoggins, Charles R; Cardona, Kenneth; Cho, Clifford S; Martin, Robert C G; Winslow, Emily R; Maithel, Shishir K

    2015-10-01

    Data are lacking on long-term outcomes of patients undergoing major hepatectomy requiring bile duct resection (BDR) for the treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases. Patients who underwent major hepatectomy (≥3 segments) for metastatic colorectal cancer from 2000-2010 at three US academic institutions were included. The primary outcome was disease-specific survival (DSS). Of 429 patients, nine (2.1%) underwent BDR, which was associated with pre-operative portal vein embolization (25.0% vs. 4.3%; P = 0.049). There were no significant differences in age, ASA class, margin status, number of lesions, tumor size, cirrhosis, perineural invasion, or lymphovascular invasion. BDR was independently associated with increased postoperative major complications (OR: 6.22; 95%CI:1.44-26.97; P = 0.015). There were no differences in length of stay, reoperation, readmission, or 30-day mortality. Patients who underwent BDR had markedly decreased DSS (9.3 vs. 39.9 mo; P = 0.002). When accounting for differences between the two groups, the need for BDR was independently associated with reduced DSS (HR: 3.06; 95%CI:1.12-8.34; P = 0.029). Major hepatectomy with concomitant bile duct resection is seldom performed in patients undergoing resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases and is associated with higher major morbidity and reduced disease-specific survival compared to major hepatectomy alone. Stringent selection criteria should be applied when patients may need bile duct resection during hepatectomy for colorectal cancer liver metastases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes colorectal cancer risk in relation to A-bomb radiation. The RERF Life Span Study has revealed the incidence of colorectal cancer to be significantly high in the group of A-bomb survivors than the control group. With regard to relative risk or excess relative risk, there is no definitive difference among sites in the colon. Risk for colon cancer is found to be linearly increased with increasing radiation doses, and in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Risk associated with one Gy is estimated to be increased by double. There is no definitive variation between sex and between Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Excess relative risk would be increased rapidly with aging in the whole group of A-bomb survivors and with the cancer-prone age in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. (N.K.)

  16. Reporting colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirke, P; Morris, E

    2007-01-01

    The management of colorectal cancer is a team process. High-quality reporting of colorectal cancer is very important as the whole team relies upon the skill of the pathologist. Failure to report key features can lead to undertreatment of this disease. The use of a proforma has been demonstrated to be beneficial and we recommend staying with TNM5 due to scientific and reproducibility issues with TNM6. Important features in stage II/Dukes' B cases are extramural vascular invasion, peritoneal involvement, extent of extramural spread, incomplete resection and perforation. All of these may lead to adjuvant therapy being administered. The surgically created circumferential resection margin (CRM) and the mode of its creation are important features and the CRM retains its value after preoperative therapy. Regression grading should be applied only to fully resected tumours and the dissection and sampling must be standardized to allow comparison of results between trials and centres. When reporting local resections of early-stage cancers we need to look for features that predict spread to local lymph nodes to allow a full resection to be considered.

  17. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  18. Current Innovations in Endoscopic Therapy for the Management of Colorectal Cancer: From Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection to Endoscopic Full-Thickness Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Fujihara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is accepted as a minimally invasive treatment for colorectal cancer. However, due to technical difficulties and an increased rate of complications, ESD is not widely used in the colorectum. In some cases, endoscopic treatment alone is insufficient for disease control, and laparoscopic surgery is required. The combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection represents a new frontier in cancer treatment. Recent developments in advanced polypectomy and minimally invasive surgical techniques will enable surgeons and endoscopists to challenge current practice in colorectal cancer treatment. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR of the colon offers the potential to decrease the postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with segmental colectomy while enhancing the diagnostic yield compared to current endoscopic techniques. However, closure is necessary after EFTR and natural transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES. Innovative methods and new devices for EFTR and suturing are being developed and may potentially change traditional paradigms to achieve minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. The present paper aims to discuss the complementary role of ESD and the future development of EFTR. We focus on the possibility of achieving EFTR using the ESD method and closing devices.

  19. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Gessler, B; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Colorectal anastomotic leakage is a serious complication. Despite extensive research, no consensus on the most important preoperative risk factors exists. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate risk factors for anastomotic leakage in patients operated with colore...

  20. Artificial intelligence may help in predicting the need for additional surgery after endoscopic resection of T1 colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Mori, Yuichi; Misawa, Masashi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Kouyama, Yuta; Baba, Toshiyuki; Hidaka, Eiji; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hayashi, Takemasa; Kudo, Toyoki; Ishigaki, Tomoyuki; Yagawa, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hiroki; Takeda, Kenichi; Haji, Amyn; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Mori, Kensaku; Ishida, Fumio; Miyachi, Hideyuki

    2018-03-01

     Decisions concerning additional surgery after endoscopic resection of T1 colorectal cancer (CRC) are difficult because preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis (LNM) is problematic. We investigated whether artificial intelligence can predict LNM presence, thus minimizing the need for additional surgery.  Data on 690 consecutive patients with T1 CRCs that were surgically resected in 2001 - 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. We divided patients into two groups according to date: data from 590 patients were used for machine learning for the artificial intelligence model, and the remaining 100 patients were included for model validation. The artificial intelligence model analyzed 45 clinicopathological factors and then predicted positivity or negativity for LNM. Operative specimens were used as the gold standard for the presence of LNM. The artificial intelligence model was validated by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for predicting LNM, and comparing these data with those of the American, European, and Japanese guidelines.  Sensitivity was 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 72 % to 100 %) in all models. Specificity of the artificial intelligence model and the American, European, and Japanese guidelines was 66 % (95 %CI 56 % to 76 %), 44 % (95 %CI 34 % to 55 %), 0 % (95 %CI 0 % to 3 %), and 0 % (95 %CI 0 % to 3 %), respectively; and accuracy was 69 % (95 %CI 59 % to 78 %), 49 % (95 %CI 39 % to 59 %), 9 % (95 %CI 4 % to 16 %), and 9 % (95 %CI 4 % - 16 %), respectively. The rates of unnecessary additional surgery attributable to misdiagnosing LNM-negative patients as having LNM were: 77 % (95 %CI 62 % to 89 %) for the artificial intelligence model, and 85 % (95 %CI 73 % to 93 %; P  artificial intelligence significantly reduced unnecessary additional surgery after endoscopic resection of T1 CRC without missing LNM positivity. © Georg

  1. p53 nuclear accumulation and multiploidy are adverse prognostic factors in surgically resected stage II colorectal cancers independent of fluorouracil-based adjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglioni, S; D'Agnano, I; Vasselli, S; Perrone Donnorso, R; D'Angelo, C; Brenna, A; Benevolo, M; Cosimelli, M; Zupi, G; Mottolese, M

    2001-09-01

    To identify the prognostically highest risk patients, DNA content and p53 nuclear or cytoplasmic accumulation, evaluated by monoclonal antibody DO7 and polyclonal antibody CM1, were determined in 94 surgically resected stage II (Dukes B2) colorectal cancers, treated or not with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Sixty-one (65%) of the tumors were aneuploid, 16 (17%) of which had a multiploid DNA content; 50 (53%) displayed DO7 nuclear p53 accumulation, and 44 (47%) showed cytoplasmic CM1 positivity. In multivariate analysis, only multiploidy and p53 nuclear positivity emerged as independent prognostic indicators of a poorer outcome. Positivity for p53 was associated with shorter survival in 5-fluorouracil-treated and untreated patients. Therefore, in patients with Dukes B2 colorectal cancer, a biologic profile based on the combined evaluation of DNA multiploidy and p53 status can provide valuable prognostic information, identifying patients to be enrolled in alternative, more aggressive therapeutic trials.

  2. Primary Tumour Resection Could Improve the Survival of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Bevacizumab-Containing Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of primary tumour resection (PTR among metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients remains controversial. Combination chemotherapy with bevacizumab could improve the clinical outcomes of these patients, which might change the importance of PTR in the multi-disciplinary treatment pattern. Methods: We performed a non-randomized prospective controlled study of mCRC pts whose performance status (PS scored ≤2 and who received bevacizumab combination chemotherapy (FOLFOX/XELOX/FOLFIRI as a first-line therapy. These patients were classified into the PTR group and the IPT (intact primary tumour group according to whether they underwent PTR before receiving the systemic therapy. The progression free survival (PFS time and overall survival (OS time, which were recorded from the start of the primary diagnosis until disease progression and death or last follow-up, were analysed. We also compared severe clinical events (such as emergency surgery, radiation therapy, and stent plantation between the two groups. Results: One hundred and nighty-one mCRC pts (108 male patients and 93 female patients were entered in this prospective observational study. The median age was 57.5 years old. The clinical characteristics (age, gender, performance status, primary tumour site, RAS status, and the number of metastatic organs did not significantly differ between the two groups. The median PFS and OS times of the PTR group were superior than those of the IPT group (10.0 vs 7.8 months, p Conclusions: The mCRC patients who received PTR and bevacizumab combination chemotherapy had better clinical outcomes than patients who did not receive PTR. PTR also decreased the incidence of severe clinical events and improved quality of life.

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  4. Surgical Management of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Centre Experience on Oncological Outcomes of Pulmonary Resection vs Cytoreductive Surgery and HIPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Evelyn Yi Ting; Tan, Grace Hwei Ching; Ng, Deanna Wan Jie; Koh, Tina Puay Theng; Kumar, Mrinal; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2017-12-01

    Metastasectomy is accepted as standard of care for selected patients with colorectal pulmonary metastases (CLM); however, the role of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for colorectal peritoneal metastases (CPM) is not universally accepted. We aim to compare oncological outcomes of patients with CLM and CPM after pulmonary resection and CRS-HIPEC, respectively, by comparing overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A retrospective review of 49 CLM patients who underwent pulmonary resection, and 52 CPM patients who underwent CRS-HIPEC in a single institution from January 2003 to March 2015, was performed. The 5-year OS for CLM patients and CPM patients were 59.6 and 40.5%, respectively (p = 0.100), while the 5-year DFS were 24.0 and 14.2%, respectively (p = 0.173). CPM patients had longer median operative time (8.38 vs. 1.75 h, p CPM patients by multivariate analysis. There were no independent prognostic factors for DFS in CLM patients by multivariate analysis, but peritoneal cancer index score, bladder involvement, and higher nodal stage at presentation of the initial malignancy were independent prognostic factors for DFS in CPM patients. OS and DFS for CPM patients after CRS and HIPEC are comparable to CLM patients after lung resection, although morbidity appears higher. The prognostic factors affecting survival after surgery are different between CPM and CLM patients and must be considered when selecting patients for metastasectomy.

  5. [Surgery for colorectal cancer since the introduction of the Netherlands national screening programmeInvestigations into changes in number of resections and waiting times for surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Neree Tot Babberich, M P M; van der Willik, E M; van Groningen, J T; Ledeboer, M; Wiggers, T; Wouters, M W J M

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of the Netherlands national colorectal cancer screening programme on the number of surgical resections for colorectal carcinoma and on waiting times for surgery. Descriptive study. Data were extracted from the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit. Patients with primary colorectal cancer surgery between 2011-2015 were included. The volume and median waiting times for the years 2011-2015 are described. Waiting times from first tumor positive biopsy until the operation (biopsy-operation) and first preoperative visit to the surgeon until the operation (visit-operation) are analyzed with a univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Separate analysis was done for visit-operation for academic and non-academic hospitals and for screening compared to non-screening patients. In 2014 there was an increase of 1469 (15%) patients compared to 2013. In 2015 this increase consisted of 1168 (11%) patients compared to 2014. In 2014 and 2015, 1359 (12%) and 3111 (26%) patients were referred to the surgeon through screening, respectively. The median waiting time of biopsy-operation significantly decreased (ß: 0.94, 95%BI) over the years 2014-2015 compared to 2011-2013. In non-academic hospitals, the waiting time visit-operation also decreased significantly (ß: 0.89, 95%BI 0.87-0.90) over the years 2014-2015 compared to 2011-2013. No difference was found in waiting times between patients referred to the surgeon through screening compared to non-screening. There is a clear increase in volume since the introduction of the colorectal cancer screening programme without an increase in waiting time until surgery.

  6. Short-term outcomes following laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2011-03-01

    Laparoscopic resection for colon cancer has been proven to have a similar oncological efficacy compared to open resection. Despite this, it is performed by a minority of colorectal surgeons. The aim of our study was to evaluate the short-term clinical, oncological and survival outcomes in all patients undergoing laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

  7. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview What to Expect ... section Overview 2 of 6 sections The Basics: Colorectal Cancer What is colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer is a ...

  8. Determinants of survival after liver resection for metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parau, Angela; Todor, Nicolae; Vlad, Liviu

    2015-01-01

    Prognostic factors for survival after liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer identified up to date are quite inconsistent with a great inter-study variability. In this study we aimed to identify predictors of outcome in our patient population. A series of 70 consecutive patients from the oncological hepatobiliary database, who had undergone curative hepatic surgical resection for hepatic metastases of colorectal origin, operated between 2006 and 2011, were identified. At 44.6 months (range 13.7-73), 30 of 70 patients (42.85%) were alive. Patient demographics, primary tumor and liver tumor factors, operative factors, pathologic findings, recurrence patterns, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were analyzed. Clinicopathologic variables were tested using univariate and multivariate analyses. The 3-year CSS after first hepatic resection was 54%. Median CSS survival after first hepatic resection was 40.2 months. Median CSS after second hepatic resection was 24.2 months. The 3-year DFS after first hepatic resection was 14%. Median disease free survival after first hepatic resection was 18 months. The 3-year DFS after second hepatic resection was 27% and median DFS after second hepatic resection 12 months. The 30-day mortality and morbidity rate after first hepatic resection was 5.71% and 12.78%, respectively. In univariate analysis CSS was significantly reduced for the following factors: age >53 years, advanced T stage of primary tumor, moderately- poorly differentiated tumor, positive and narrow resection margin, preoperative CEA level >30 ng/ml, DFS <18 months. Perioperative chemotherapy related to metastasectomy showed a trend in improving CSS (p=0.07). Perioperative chemotherapy improved DFS in a statistically significant way (p=0.03). Perioperative chemotherapy and achievement of resection margins beyond 1 mm were the major determinants of both CSS and DFS after first liver resection in multivariate

  9. A Modified Spontaneously Closed Defunctioning Tube Ileostomy After Anterior Resection of the Rectum for Rectal Cancer with a Low Colorectal Anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qin-Song; Hua, Han-Ju; Cheng, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei-Bing; Chen, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jia-He; Lin, Jian-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a new technique of modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection of the rectum for rectal cancer with a low colorectal anastomosis. Patients with rectal cancer who underwent anterior resection of rectum with a low colorectal anastomosis and chose a modified defunctioning tube ileostomy between March 2012 and August 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data on the success of the operation procedures, post-operative hospital stay, and post-operative tube ileostomy-related complications were analyzed. One hundred fifty-two patients (87 males and 65 females; 57.1 ± 17.4 years) undergoing the modified defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection for rectal cancer were included. The post-operative hospital stay was 11.9 ± 3.2 days. The tube was removed on days 22.6 ± 4.1 after operation and the ileostomy wound closed spontaneously within 13.1 ± 1.9 days. Twenty-five patients felt tube-associated pain or discomfort, which was relieved after a period of adaptation and appropriate tube adjustment. Nine patients suffered from tube blockage and were treated successfully with saline irrigation. Two patients had intestinal obstruction, which was resolved with conservative treatment. Three patients developed leakage of the distal anastomosis: two were successfully treated with conservative measures and the other completely recovered after reoperation. The modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy appears efficacious and safe. This technique may be used to protect the distal anastomosis and simultaneously decrease the ileostomy complications, and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with stoma takedown.

  10. Single incision laparoscopic colorectal resection: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnusamy Palanivelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A prospective case series of single incision multiport laparoscopic colorectal resections for malignancy using conventional laparoscopic trocars and instruments is described. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients (seven men and four women with colonic or rectal pathology underwent single incision multiport laparoscopic colectomy/rectal resection from July till December 2010. Four trocars were placed in a single transumblical incision. The bowel was mobilized laparoscopically and vessels controlled intracorporeally with either intra or extracorporeal anastomosis. Results: Three patients had carcinoma in the caecum, one in the hepatic flexure, two in the rectosigmoid, one in the descending colon, two in the rectum and two had ulcerative pancolitis (one with high grade dysplasia and another with carcinoma rectum. There was no conversion to standard multiport laparoscopy or open surgery. The median age was 52 years (range 24-78 years. The average operating time was 130 min (range 90-210 min. The average incision length was 3.2 cm (2.5-4.0 cm. There were no postoperative complications. The average length of stay was 4.5 days (range 3-8 days. Histopathology showed adequate proximal and distal resection margins with an average lymph node yield of 25 nodes (range 16-30 nodes. Conclusion: Single incision multiport laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignancy is feasible without extra cost or specialized ports/instrumentation. It does not compromise the oncological radicality of resection. Short-term results are encouraging. Long-term results are awaited.

  11. Significance of diagnosis of liver metastases from colorectal cancer by angio helical CT and intermittent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy after hepatic resection in terms of prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsuse, Kazuo; Aoki, Hideki; Murayama, Michinori

    1997-01-01

    Seventy five cases had undergone hepatic resection for liver metastases from colorectal cancer from 1979 to 1994. Computed tomography during hepatic angiography (angio CT) was tried in 27 cases. At first, we compared detection ratios of angio CT for liver metastase to those of ultrasonography, conventional CT, and operative ultrasonography on these 27 cases. Next, the prognosis of seventy five cases was examined. They were divided into three groups; the HX group 29 cases with only hepatic resection; the HX+AP group of 19 cases with intermittent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy after hepatic resection; the angio CT group of 27 cases selected for hepatic resection by angio CT, followed by the same infusion chemotherapy as that given to the HX+AP group. Fifty metastases were diagnosed histopathologically in twenty seven cases that underwent hepatic resection after angio CT. Detection ratios for small metastases 1.0 cm or smaller in diameter were 8.3% with ultrasonography, 25% with CT, 75% with angio CT, and 50% with operative ultrasonography. Detection ratios of angio CT were superior to those of ultrasonography and CT. Recurrence rates of the remnant liver were significantly low and survival rates were significantly superior in the angio CT group compared to the other two groups (p<0.02). The prognosis with and without intermittent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy after hepatic resection were significantly different (p<0.03). The above data suggest that improvement of detection ratios for liver metastases by angio CT, and probably concomitant intermittent hepatic infusion chemotherapy contribute to decreased remnant liver recurrence and an increased survival rate. (author)

  12. Manual Colostomy Reversals Following Wide Colorectal Resections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of WCRR were: sigmoid colon volvulus (58%); colorectal cancer: (17%); perforated sigmoid diverticulitis (11%), amoebic perforations (18%) and rectal cancer (6%). All 36 patients (100%) got discharged after successful management of the following complications: a faecal fistula in two patients, a surgical abdominal ...

  13. Full Robotic Colorectal Resections for Cancer Combined With Other Major Surgical Procedures: Early Experience With the da Vinci Xi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Luca; Di Franco, Gregorio; Guadagni, Simone; Palmeri, Matteo; Gianardi, Desirée; Bianchini, Matteo; Moglia, Andrea; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Caprili, Giovanni; D'Isidoro, Cristiano; Melfi, Franca; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco

    2017-08-01

    The da Vinci Xi has been developed to overcome some of the limitations of the previous platform, thereby increasing the acceptance of its use in robotic multiorgan surgery. Between January 2015 and October 2015, 10 patients with synchronous tumors of the colorectum and others abdominal organs underwent robotic combined resections with the da Vinci Xi. Trocar positions respected the Universal Port Placement Guidelines provided by Intuitive Surgical for "left lower quadrant," with trocars centered on the umbilical area, or shifted 2 to 3 cm to the right or to the left, depending on the type of combined surgical procedure. All procedures were completed with the full robotic technique. Simultaneous procedures in same quadrant or left quadrant and pelvis, or left/right and upper, were performed with a single docking/single targeting approach; in cases of left/right quadrant or right quadrant/pelvis, we performed a dual-targeting operation. No external collisions or problems related to trocar positions were noted. No patient experienced postoperative surgical complications and the mean hospital stay was 6 days. The high success rate of full robotic colorectal resection combined with other surgical interventions for synchronous tumors, suggest the efficacy of the da Vinci Xi in this setting.

  14. Freqüência de pólipos em doentes operados de câncer colorretal Frequency of adenomatous polyps after surgical resection of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pinho ROCHA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Introdução - Estudos epidemiológicos e gênicos mostram que os pólipos colônicos do tipo adenoma são lesões pré-neoplásicas. O seguimento de um paciente com câncer colorretal visa principalmente o diagnóstico e retirada de pólipos adenomatosos. Objetivo - Estudar a freqüência do aparecimento de pólipos adenomatosos em doentes com câncer colorretal em acompanhamento clínico após ressecção tumoral. Casuística e Métodos - Foi estudada, retrospectivamente, a freqüência de pólipos do tipo adenoma em 68 pacientes com idade média de 59 anos, submetidos a cirurgia curativa para tratamento de câncer colorretal e a colonoscopia de controle. Resultados - A incidência de pólipos adenomatosos foi de 18%, sendo maior acima de 45 anos (20% e no cólon esquerdo (38%. Em relação ao tipo histológico, 61% eram tubulares, 22% vilosos e 17% túbulo-vilosos. Discussão - Assim como em outros relatos da literatura, a incidência de pólipos foi superior em indivíduos com mais de 45 anos, sendo em mais da metade do tipo tubular. A freqüência de pólipos foi maior nos dois primeiros anos de acompanhamento.Introduction - Epidemiologic and molecular biologic studies have already demonstrated that adenomatous colonic polyps are precancerous diseases. The main indication of the colonoscopy in the surveillance of colorectal cancer treated patients is the diagnosis and resection of adenomatous polyps. Aim - To study the frequency of adenomatous polyps after surgically resection of colorectal cancer. Material and Methods - Sixty eight patients, mean age 59 years old, with total resection of colorectal cancer, submitted to various colonoscopies during the follow up were studied retrospectively. The histological type and the characteristics of the polyp were described. Results - The frequency of polyps was 18%, being higher in the patients with more than 45 years (20%. The site of the polyps was in the left colon in 38% of the patients with

  15. Colorectal Cancer: Prognostic Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Manxhuka-Kerliu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available After lung cancer colorectal cancer (Cc is ranked the second, as a cause of cancer-related death. The purpose of this study was to analyze the Cc cases in our material with respect to all prognostic values including histological type and grade, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, and tumor border features. There were investigated 149 cases of resection specimen with colorectal cancer, which were fixed in buffered neutral formalin and embedded in paraffin. Tissue sections (4(µm thick were cut and stained with H&E. Adenocarcinoma was the most frequent histological type found in 85,90% of cases, in 60,94% of males and 39,06% of females; squamous cell carcinoma in 7,38%, in 63,63% of males and 36,36% of females; mucinous carcinoma in 4,68%, in 57,15% of males and 42,85% of females; while adenosquamous carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma and carcinoma in situ in 0,71% of cases each. Dukes' classification was used in order to define the depth of invasion. Dukes B was found in 68,45% of cases, whereas in 31,54% of cases Dukes C was found. As far as histological grading is concerned, Cc was mostly with moderate differentiation (75,16% with neither vascular nor perineural invasion. Resection margins were in all cases free of tumor. Our data indicate that the pathologic features of the resection specimen constitute the most powerful predictors of postoperative outcome in Cc. Dukes' stage and degree of differentiation provide independent prognostic information in Cc. However, differentiation should be assessed by the worst pattern.

  16. A randomized two arm phase III study in patients post radical resection of liver metastases of colorectal cancer to investigate bevacizumab in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX vs CAPOX alone as adjuvant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schouten Sander B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 50% of patients with colorectal cancer are destined to develop hepatic metastases. Radical resection is the most effective treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases offering five year survival rates between 36-60%. Unfortunately only 20% of patients are resectable at time of presentation. Radiofrequency ablation is an alternative treatment option for irresectable colorectal liver metastases with reported 5 year survival rates of 18-30%. Most patients will develop local or distant recurrences after surgery, possibly due to the outgrowth of micrometastases present at the time of liver surgery. This study aims to achieve an improved disease free survival for patients after resection or resection combined with RFA of colorectal liver metastases by adding the angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab to an adjuvant regimen of CAPOX. Methods/design The Hepatica study is a two-arm, multicenter, randomized, comparative efficacy and safety study. Patients are assessed no more than 8 weeks before surgery with CEA measurement and CT scanning of the chest and abdomen. Patients will be randomized after resection or resection combined with RFA to receive CAPOX and Bevacizumab or CAPOX alone. Adjuvant treatment will be initiated between 4 and 8 weeks after metastasectomy or resection in combination with RFA. In both arms patients will be assessed for recurrence/new occurrence of colorectal cancer by chest CT, abdominal CT and CEA measurement. Patients will be assessed after surgery but before randomization, thereafter every three months after surgery in the first two years and every 6 months until 5 years after surgery. In case of a confirmed recurrence/appearance of new colorectal cancer, patients can be treated with surgery or any subsequent line of chemotherapy and will be followed for survival until the end of study follow up period as well. The primary endpoint is disease free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall

  17. Asymptomatic primary tumour in incurable metastatic colorectal cancer: is there a role for surgical resection prior to systematic therapy or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalavicius, Narimantas E; Dulskas, Audrius; Baltruskeviciene, Edita; Smailyte, Giedre; Skuciene, Marija; Mikelenaite, Rasa; Venslovaite, Rasa; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Samalavicius, Almantas; Lunevicius, Raimundas

    2016-01-01

    The role of the resection of asymptomatic primary colorectal cancer in patients with incurable disease is questionable. To evaluate the impact of the resection of asymptomatic primary tumour on overall survival in patients with unresectable distant metastases. Patients treated in the National Cancer Institute, Lithuania, in the period 2008-2012, were selected retrospectively. The main inclusion criteria were: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), endoscopically and histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, without any symptoms for urgent operation, and at least one cycle of palliative chemotherapy administered. Information on patients' age, gender, tumour histology, localization of the tumour, regional lymph node involvement, number of metastatic sites, surgery and systemic treatment was collected prospectively. Eligible patients for the study were divided into two groups according to the initial treatment - surgery (patients who underwent primary tumour resection) and chemotherapy (patients who received chemotherapy without surgery). The impact of initial treatment strategy, tumour size and site, regional lymph nodes, grade of differentiation of adenocarcinoma and application of biotherapy on overall cumulative survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. To compare survival between groups the log-rank test was used. Cox regression analysis was employed to assess the effects of variables on patient survival. The study group consisted of 183 patients: 103 men and 80 women. The median age was 66 years (range: 37-91). There were no notable imbalances with regard to age, gender, number of metastatic sites, metastases (such as pulmonary, peritoneal, liver, metastases into non-regional lymph nodes and other metastases), the number of received cycles of chemotherapy, first line chemotherapy type or biological therapy. Only 27 (14.8%) patients received biological therapy and the majority of them (n = 25, 92.6%) were treated with bevacizumab. For surgically treated

  18. Combining eastern and western practices for safe and effective endoscopic resection of large complex colorectal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Andrew; Gulati, Shraddha; Burt, Margaret; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Haji, Amyn

    2018-05-01

    Endoscopic resection of large colorectal polyps is well established. However, significant differences in technique exist between eastern and western interventional endoscopists. We report the results of endoscopic resection of large complex colorectal lesions from a specialist unit that combines eastern and western techniques for assessment and resection. Endoscopic resections of colorectal lesions of at least 2 cm were included. Lesions were assessed using magnification chromoendoscopy supplemented by colonoscopic ultrasound in selected cases. A lesion-specific approach to resection with endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was used. Surveillance endoscopy was performed at 3 (SC1) and 12 (SC2) months. Four hundred and sixty-six large (≥20 mm) colorectal lesions (mean size 54.8 mm) were resected. Three hundread and fifty-six were resected using endoscopic mucosal resection and 110 by ESD or hybrid ESD. Fifty-one percent of lesions had been subjected to previous failed attempts at resection or heavy manipulation (≥6 biopsies). Nevertheless, endoscopic resection was deemed successful after an initial attempt in 98%. Recurrence occurred in 15% and could be treated with endoscopic resection in most. Only two patients required surgery for perforation. Nine patients had postprocedure bleeding; only two required endoscopic clips. Ninety-six percent of patients without invasive cancer were free from recurrence and had avoided surgery at last follow-up. Combining eastern and western practices for assessment and resection results in safe and effective organ-conserving treatment of complex colorectal lesions. Accurate assessment before and after resection using magnification chromoendoscopy and a lesion-specific approach to resection, incorporating ESD where appropriate, are important factors in achieving these results.

  19. Prognostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by regional lymph nodes on pretreatment PET/CT in patients with resectable colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Byung Hyun; Lim, Ilhan; Kim, Byung Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sun Mi; Shin, Ui Sup [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Surgery, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We evaluated the ability of pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG uptake by regional lymph nodes to predict the survival of patients with resectable colorectal cancer. The records of 78 patients with AJCC stage III colorectal cancer (pathologically confirmed node-positive disease without evidence of distant metastasis) treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The maximum standardized uptake values of the primary tumor (SUVp) and regional lymph nodes (SUVn) were measured by pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The ROC curve analyses and the Cox proportional hazard model were used to analyze whether SUVp, SUVn, and clinicopathologic parameters could predict disease-free survival. Although there were no significant differences between the median SUVp in the event group and that in the non-event group, the median SUVn was significantly higher in the event group (1.7) than in the non-event group (0.8, p = 0.023). Based on the ROC curve analysis, SUVn predicted the event for disease-free survival (AUC = 0.668, p = 0.02) with the optimal criterion, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of > 1.2, 71 %, 63 %, and 65 %, respectively. However, SUVp did not predict disease-free survival (AUC = 0.570, p = 0.349). Univariate analysis revealed that SUVn (p = 0.011) and venous invasion (p = 0.016) were associated with disease-free survival, but pathologic N stage was not (p = 0.09). By multivariate analysis, only SUVn > 1.2 independently shortened the disease-free survival (relative risk, 2.97; 95 % CI, 1.14-7.74, p = 0.026). SUVn before surgery may be a useful prognostic marker in patients with AJCC stage III colorectal cancer. (orig.)

  20. Colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Data have been accumulating to support an increased role for combined radiation therapy and surgery in the initial treatment of many rectal and some colonic carcinomas. These include the following findings: 1. Improvements in surgical survival rates have been minimal in the past 25 to 30 years and are the result of an increase in operability with little change by stage of disease in those patients who have survived a ''curative resection.'' 2. The incidence of local recurrence after potentially curative surgery is high in more advanced stages of disease for both rectal and colon cancer. Although palliation of local recurrence can frequently be obtained, its duration is often limited and the curative potential is low. Therefore, prevention of local recurrence with adjuvant radiation with or without chemotherapy is imperative. 3. When patients present with fixed, unresectable tumors, aggressive treatment combinations appear to improve both local control and survival. Close interaction is required between the surgeon and the radiation oncologist to achieve these results with an acceptable risk of complications

  1. Colorectal cancer complicating Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H J

    2001-04-01

    Some earlier studies have indicated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Moreover, others in tertiary care centres have suggested that patients with Crohn's disease also have a higher risk of colorectal cancer. Canadian data on colorectal cancer in Crohn's disease appear to be limited. For this investigation, a single clinician database of 877 patients with Crohn's disease was used. Altogether, there were six patients with colorectal cancer (ie, overall rate of 0.7%). All of these patients were men with an initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease established at a mean age of approximately 28 years, with either ileocolonic disease or colonic disease alone, but not with ileal disease alone. Although there was a predominance of women in the overall study population (ie, 56.1%), no women developed colorectal cancer. The clinical behaviour of Crohn's disease was classified as nonstricturing in all six patients with colorectal cancer, but in two patients, Crohn's disease was complicated by a perirectal abscess or a fistula. All cancers were located in the rectum and were diagnosed 30 years, 22 years, seven years, 18 years, 20 years and 40 years after Crohn's disease was initially diagnosed. In three patients, the cancer was detected in a residual rectal stump after a partial colon resection at least 10 years earlier. In five patients, localized extension of disease through the serosa, nodal or distant metastases (ie, liver, lung) was found at the time of cancer diagnosis; two patients have since died. The present study confirms that Crohn's disease involving the colon may be a possible risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, at least in younger men, but, in this study, not in women. However, part of this increased risk in men may have been related to the presence of a rectal stump, rather than to Crohn's disease per se.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Complicating Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Some earlier studies have indicated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis, have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Moreover, others in tertiary care centres have suggested that patients with Crohn's disease also have a higher risk of colorectal cancer. Canadian data on colorectal cancer in Crohn's disease appear to be limited. For this investigation, a single clinician database of 877 patients with Crohn's disease was used. Altogether, there were six patients with colorectal cancer (ie, overall rate of 0.7%. All of these patients were men with an initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease established at a mean age of approximately 28 years, with either ileocolonic disease or colonic disease alone, but not with ileal disease alone. Although there was a predominance of women in the overall study population (ie, 56.1%, no women developed colorectal cancer. The clinical behaviour of Crohn's disease was classified as nonstricturing in all six patients with colorectal cancer, but in two patients, Crohn's disease was complicated by a perirectal abscess or a fistula. All cancers were located in the rectum and were diagnosed 30 years, 22 years, seven years, 18 years, 20 years and 40 years after Crohn's disease was initially diagnosed. In three patients, the cancer was detected in a residual rectal stump after a partial colon resection at least 10 years earlier. In five patients, localized extension of disease through the serosa, nodal or distant metastases (ie, liver, lung was found at the time of cancer diagnosis; two patients have since died. The present study confirms that Crohn's disease involving the colon may be a possible risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer, at least in younger men, but, in this study, not in women. However, part of this increased risk in men may have been related to the presence of a rectal stump, rather than to Crohn's disease per se.

  3. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaofang; Du, Hong; Zhou, Chunlian; Zhang, Qingyun; Hao, Chunyi; Wen, Xianzi; Ji, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients. Method Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort), 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model. Results LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts). LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045). Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS) in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively), but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.243–0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638–1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663–1.530, respectively). Conclusion These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might

  5. Relationship between LAPTM4B Gene Polymorphism and Prognosis of Patients following Tumor Resection for Colorectal and Esophageal Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Cheng

    Full Text Available Lysosome-associated transmembrane-4 beta (LAPTM4B is an oncogene that participates tumorgenesis in a variety of human solid tumors, and it has two alleles named as LAPTM4B*1 and *2. The present study aimed to identify the association of LAPTM4B genotype with clinicopathological features and prognosis in colorectal and esophageal cancer patients.Genotypes of LAPTM4B were determined by PCR in 167 colon cancer cases (72 patients in a discovery cohort and 95 patients in a testing cohort, 160 rectal cancer cases and 164 esophageal cancer cases. Association between the LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and clinicopathological variables was calculated by Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Patient survival differences were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined with Log-rank test and Cox regression model.LAPTM4B *1/1 was more frequently detected in colon cancer patients with lymph node metastasis and TNM III+IV stages in total colon cancer (discovery + testing cohorts. LAPTM4B *2/2 decreased in recurrent patients in total colon cancer patients (P = 0.045. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Log-rank test showed that LAPTM4B*1 was correlated with shorter overall survival (OS in discovery and testing cohorts of colon cancer (P = 0.0254 and 0.0292, respectively, but not in rectal and esophageal cancer cases (P = 0.7669 and 0.9356, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that LAPTM4B genotype was an independent prognostic factor for OS in total colon cancer [P = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR = 0.432; 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.243-0.768], but not in rectal and esophageal cancers (P = 0.791, HR = 1.073, 95% CI = 0.638-1.804 and 0.998, HR = 1.000, 95% CI = 0.663-1.530, respectively.These findings suggested that LAPTM4B allele *1 was a risk factor associated with poor prognosis in patients with colon cancer, but not in patients with rectal or esophageal cancers. LAPTM4B genotype status might be a useful prognostic indicator for

  6. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  7. Underwater colorectal EMR: remodeling endoscopic mucosal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Gabriele; Granata, Antonino; Ligresti, Dario; Tarantino, Ilaria; Barresi, Luca; Liotta, Rosa; Traina, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Underwater EMR (UEMR) has been reported as a new technique for the removal of large sessile colorectal polyps without need for submucosal injection. To evaluate (1) outcomes of UEMR, (2) whether UEMR can be easily performed by an endoscopist skilled in traditional EMR without specific dedicated training in UEMR, and (3) whether EUS is required before UEMR. Prospective, observational study. Single, tertiary-care referral center. Underwater EMR. Complete resection and adverse events. A total of 72 consecutive patients underwent UEMR of 81 sessile colorectal polyps. EUS was performed before UEMR in 9 cases (11.1%) with a suspicious mucosal/vascular pattern. The mean polyp size was 18.7 mm (range 10-50 mm); the mean UEMR time was 11.8 minutes. Fifty-five polyps (68%) were removed en bloc, and 26 (32%) were removed with a piecemeal technique. Histopathology consisted of tubular adenomas (25.9%), tubulovillous adenomas (5%), adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (42%), serrated polyps (4.9%), carcinoma in situ (13.6%), and hyperplastic polyps (8.6%). Surveillance colonoscopy was scheduled at 3 months. Complete resection was successful in all patients. No adverse events or recurrence was recorded in any of the patients. Limited follow-up; single-center, uncontrolled study. Interventional endoscopists skilled in conventional EMR performed UEMR without specific dedicated training. EUS may not be required for lesions with no invasive features on high-definition narrow-band imaging. UEMR appears to be an effective and safe alternative to traditional EMR and could eventually improve the way in which we can effectively and safely treat colorectal lesions. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An audit of colorectal cancer histopathology reports in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To audit the completeness of histopathologic reports of Colorectal Cancer for prognostic information in a tertiary care hospital in the light of the minimum reporting standards for colorectal cancer resections recently proposed for use in Nigeria. Material and Methods: Twenty–five histopathology reports of colorectal ...

  9. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table ... Carmen Marc Valvo is an outspoken voice for colorectal cancer screening. Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Designer ...

  10. Endoscopic resection as unique treatment for early colorectal cancer Resección endoscópica de cáncer colorrectal temprano como único tratamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ruiz-Tovar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopic screening in developed countries allows detection and resection of a great number of early colorectal cancers. There is a strong controversy to decide when endoscopic treatment is enough or when surgical resection is necessary. To this contributes the diverse names to define the lesions, the wide number of classifications and the different criteria of each author. We perform an extense literature review, aiming to clarify concepts and unify criteria that can be used as a guide for the treatment of early colorectal cancer. We conclude that in early colorectal cancer arising in pedunculated polyps (0-Ip, mucosal endoscopic resection would be indicated as only treatment in Haggitt levels 1, 2 and 3, tumors smaller than 2 cm, well- or moderately differentiated, without vascular or lymphatic affection, with submucosal infiltration lower than 1 µm from the muscularis mucosae and maximal submucosal width lower than 4 µm, and undergoing en bloc resection. In sessile polyps (0-Is or non-polypoideal elevated (0-IIa or plain (0-IIb lesions, recommendations will be similar, without applicability of Haggitt levels.El screening mediante colonoscopia que se realiza en países occidentales ha permitido la detección y resección de un número elevado de tumores colorrectales en estadio temprano. Existe una gran controversia a la hora de decidir cuándo el tratamiento endoscópico es suficiente y cuándo debe realizarse la resección quirúrgica. A ello contribuye la gran diversidad en la nomenclatura para definir estas lesiones, la amplia variedad de clasificaciones de las mismas y los diferentes criterios que tiene cada autor. Mediante una revisión extensa de la literatura, pretendemos aclarar conceptos, enlazar los datos de las diferentes clasificaciones y unificar unos criterios que sirvan de guía para el tratamiento del cáncer colorrectal temprano. Tras ello, llegamos a la conclusión de que en el cáncer colorrectal temprano que aparece

  11. Prehabilitation with Whey Protein Supplementation on Perioperative Functional Exercise Capacity in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Resection for Cancer: A Pilot Double-Blinded Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Chelsia; Loiselle, Sarah-Eve; Fiore, Julio F; Awasthi, Rashami; Wykes, Linda; Liberman, A Sender; Stein, Barry; Charlebois, Patrick; Carli, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    A previous comprehensive prehabilitation program, providing nutrition counseling with whey protein supplementation, exercise, and psychological care, initiated 4 weeks before colorectal surgery for cancer, improved functional capacity before surgery and accelerated functional recovery. Those receiving standard of care deteriorated. The specific role of nutritional prehabilitation alone on functional recovery is unknown. This study was undertaken to estimate the impact of nutrition counseling with whey protein on preoperative functional walking capacity and recovery in patients undergoing colorectal resection for cancer. We conducted a double-blinded randomized controlled trial at a single university-affiliated tertiary center located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Colon cancer patients (n=48) awaiting elective surgery for nonmetastatic disease were randomized to receive either individualized nutrition counseling with whey protein supplementation to meet protein needs or individualized nutrition counseling with a nonnutritive placebo. Counseling and supplementation began 4 weeks before surgery and continued for 4 weeks after surgery. The primary outcome was change in functional walking capacity as measured with the 6-minute walk test. The distance was recorded at baseline, the day of surgery, and 4 weeks after surgery. A change of 20 m was considered clinically meaningful. The whey group experienced a mean improvement in functional walking capacity before surgery of +20.8 m, with a standard deviation of 42.6 m, and the placebo group improved by +1.2 (65.5) m (P=0.27). Four weeks after surgery, recovery rates were similar between groups (P=0.81). Clinically meaningful improvements in functional walking capacity were achieved before surgery with whey protein supplementation. These pilot results are encouraging and justify larger-scale trials to define the specific role of nutrition prehabilitation on functional recovery after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Academy of

  12. Role of specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for the assessment of tumor stage and residual disease following tumor resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcic, Gregor; Jelenc, Franc; Cerkovnik, Petra; Stegel, Vida; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the detection of tumor-specific KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at all stages and adenomas was used for the estimation of disease stage prior to surgery and for residual disease following surgery. A total of 65 CRC patients were enrolled. The primary tumor tested positive for the specific mutations (KRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, 117 or 146 and BRAF mutations in codon 600) in 35 patients. In all these patients, the specimen of normal bowel resected with the tumor was also tested for the presence of the same mutations in order to exclude the germ-line mutations. Only patients who tested positive for the specific mutation in the primary tumor were included in further analysis for the presence of tumor-specific mutation in the peripheral blood. No statistically significant differences were found between the detection rates of tumor mutations in the blood and different tumor stages (P=0.491). However, statistically significant differences in the proportions of patients with detected tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were found when comparing the groups of patients with R0 and R2 resections (P=0.038). Tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were more frequently detected in the patients with an incomplete surgical clearance of the tumor due to macroscopic residual disease (R2 resections). Therefore, the study concludes that the follow-up of somatic KRAS- and BRAF-mutated DNA in the peripheral blood of CRC patients may be useful in assessing the surgical clearance of the disease. PMID:27900004

  13. Hepatic resection for colorectal metastases - a national perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriot, A. G.; Reynolds, J.; Marks, C. G.; Karanjia, N.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many consultant surgeons are uncertain about peri-operative assessment and postoperative follow-up of patients for colorectal liver metastases, and indications for referral for hepatic resection. The aim of this study was to assess the views the consultant surgeons who manage these patients. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant members of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland and of the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland. The questionnaire assessed current practice for preoperative assessment and follow-up of patients with colorectal malignancy and timing of and criteria for hepatic resection of metastases. Number of referrals/resections were also assessed. RESULTS: The response rate was 47%. Half of the consultants held joint clinics with an oncologist and 89% assessed the liver for secondaries prior to colorectal resection. Ultrasound was used by 75%. Whilst 99% would consider referring a patient with a solitary liver metastasis for resection, only 62% would consider resection for more than 3 unilobar metastases. The majority (83%) thought resections should be performed within the 6 months following colorectal resection. During follow-up, 52% requested blood CEA levels and 72% liver ultrasound. Half would consider chemotherapy prior to liver resection and 76% performed at least one hepatic resection per year with a median number of 2 resections each year. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of patients are assessed for colorectal liver metastases preoperatively and during follow-up though there is spectrum of frequency of assessment and modality for imaging. Virtually all patients with solitary hepatic metastases are considered for liver resection. Patients with more than one metastasis are likely to be not considered for resection. Many surgeons are carrying out less than 3 resections each year. PMID:15527578

  14. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  15. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for locally recurrent colorectal lesions after previous endoscopic mucosal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pinghong; Yao, Liqing; Qin, Xinyu; Xu, Meidong; Zhong, Yunshi; Chen, Weifeng

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for locally recurrent colorectal cancer after previous endoscopic mucosal resection. A total of 16 patients with locally recurrent colorectal lesions were enrolled. A needle knife, an insulated-tip knife and a hook knife were used to resect the lesion along the submucosa. The rate of the curative resection, procedure time, and incidence of complications were evaluated. Of 16 lesions, 15 were completely resected with endoscopic submucosal dissection, yielding an en bloc resection rate of 93.8 percent. Histologic examination confirmed that lateral and basal margins were cancer-free in 14 patients (87.5 percent). The average procedure time was 87.2 +/- 60.7 minutes. None of the patients had immediate or delayed bleeding during or after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Perforation in one patient (6.3 percent) was the only complication and was managed conservatively. The mean follow-up period was 15.5 +/- 6.8 months; none of the patients experienced lesion residue or recurrence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection appears to be effective for locally recurrent colorectal cancer after previous endoscopic mucosal resection, making it possible to resect whole lesions and provide precise histologic information.

  16. CpG island methylator phenotype is an independent predictor of survival after curative resection for colorectal cancer: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2017-08-01

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is found in approximately 30% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. However, the role of CIMP status in predicting oncologic outcomes in curatively resected CRC is still unclear. Between January 2006 and December 2006, we retrospectively reviewed 157 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgery for CRC. Prognostic significance of CIMP status was evaluated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. CIMP-high (H) and CIMP-none/low (N/L) tumors were found in 50 cases (31.8%) and 107 cases (68.2%), respectively. CIMP-H tumors were significantly associated with female sex, colonic location, poorly/mucinous histologic type, higher T category, perineural invasion, and MSI-high status (P = 0.001). During a median of 64.5 months, tumor recurrence developed in 47 (29.9%) patients. The 5-year disease-free survival for CIMP-H and CIMP-N/L was 61.4% and 76.3% (P = 0.018). In addition, multivariate analysis showed that CIMP-H was also a significant prognostic factor (P = 0.042). When analysis was performed according to anatomical location, more marked survival differences were observed in patients with colon cancer (P = 0.026) than in patients with rectal cancer (P = 0.210). Similarly, the role of CIMP status as a prognostic indicator was more prominent in patients with stage I/II (P = 0.006) than in patients with stage III/IV CRC (P = 0.65). DNA methylation status can be considered as a useful predictor of survival after CRC surgery, particularly for patients with stage I/II disease or colon cancer. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  18. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  19. Differential histopathologic parameters in colorectal cancer liver metastases resected after triplets plus bevacizumab or cetuximab: a pooled analysis of five prospective trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremolini, Chiara; Milione, Massimo; Marmorino, Federica; Morano, Federica; Zucchelli, Gemma; Mennitto, Alessia; Prisciandaro, Michele; Lonardi, Sara; Pellegrinelli, Alessio; Rossini, Daniele; Bergamo, Francesca; Aprile, Giuseppe; Urbani, Lucio; Morelli, Luca; Schirripa, Marta; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Fassan, Matteo; Fontanini, Gabriella; de Braud, Filippo; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Falcone, Alfredo; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    Many factors, including histopathologic parameters, seem to influence the prognosis of patients undergoing resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM), although their relative weight is unclear. Histopathologic growth patterns (HGPs) of CRCLM may affect sensitivity to antiangiogenics. We aimed at evaluating differences in histopathologic parameters of response according to the use of bevacizumab or cetuximab as first-line targeted agents, and at exploring the prognostic and predictive role of HGPs. We performed a comprehensive histopathologic characterisation of CRCLM from 159 patients who underwent secondary resection, after receiving triplets FOLFOXIRI (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan) or COI (capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan) plus bevacizumab (N = 103) vs cetuximab (N = 56) in five first-line no-profit clinical trials. Both major histopathologic response (tumour regression grade TRG1-2, 32 vs 14%, p = 0.013) and infarct-like necrosis (80 vs 64%, p = 0.035) were significantly higher in the bevacizumab than in the cetuximab group. Achieving major response positively affected relapse-free survival (RFS) (p = 0.012) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.045), also in multivariable models (RFS, p = 0.008; OS, p = 0.033). In the desmoplastic HGP (N = 28), a higher percentage of major response was reported (57 vs 17% in pushing and 22% in replacement HGP, p < 0.001) and an unsignificant advantage from cetuximab vs bevacizumab was evident in RFS (p = 0.116). In the pushing HGP (N = 66), a significant benefit from bevacizumab vs cetuximab (p = 0.017) was observed. No difference was described in the replacement HGP (N = 65, p = 0.615). The histopathologic response is the only independent determinant of survival in patients resected after triplets plus a biologic. When associated with triplet chemotherapy, bevacizumab induces a higher histopathologic response rate than

  20. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J.; Jakobsen, Karen V.; Christensen, Ib J.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among...... procedures for colorectal cancer. Therefore, results of present research, validating RAE tests, are awaited with interest....

  1. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship........59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...

  2. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  3. Pneumatosis Coli Mimicking Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis coli (PC is a rare condition of the gastrointestinal tract involving extraluminal gas confined within the bowel wall. We report the case of a 40-year-old gentleman presenting clinically and endoscopically with suspected colorectal cancer. In light of the patient’s red flag symptoms, and carpet of polyps seen endoscopically, surgical management by an anterior resection was performed with the patient making a successful recovery. Histological analysis of the resected specimen confirmed pneumatosis coli with no evidence of colonic neoplasia. Although PC can be an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients and considered a benign condition, it can also present as a life-threatening emergency with bowel necrosis and obstruction requiring emergency surgical intervention. Also, when PC mimics malignancy, surgical management is the most appropriate step to ensure that the diagnosis of cancer is not missed.

  4. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  5. Colorectal cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, A. A.; Halligan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden worldwide. There is clear-cut evidence that screening will reduce colorectal cancer mortality and the only contentious issue is which screening tool to use. Most evidence points towards screening with fecal occult blood testing. The immunochemical fecal occult blood tests have a higher sensitivity than the guaiac-based tests. In addition, their automation and haemoglobin quantification allows a threshold for colonoscopy to be selected that can...

  6. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  7. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... at the National Cancer Institute, shared developments in colorectal cancer screening methods with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What ...

  8. [Strategy of liver resection during chemotherapy for otherwise unresectable colorectal metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kuniya; Kumamoto, Takafumi; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Nojiri, Kazunori; Endo, Itaru

    2013-07-01

    With multidisciplinary management of patients with effective chemotherapy that can downstage metastases, more patients with previously inoperable disease can benefit from surgery. Surgery in isolation may be approaching technical limits, but now is likely to help more patients because of success of complementary strategies, particularly newer chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Leaving behind disappearing metastases after chemotherapy, margin-positive resection, staged liver resection, and liver-first reversed management permit potentially curative surgery for patients previously unable to survive resection. Further, survival benefit from maximum debulking surgery, like ovarian cancer, for colorectal liver metastases is uncertain at present, but likely. Individualized multidisciplinary treatment planning using such strategies is essential.

  9. Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection for Colorectal Liver Metastases: The OSLO-COMET Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretland, Åsmund Avdem; Dagenborg, Vegar Johansen; Bjørnelv, Gudrun Maria Waaler; Kazaryan, Airazat M; Kristiansen, Ronny; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Hausken, John; Tønnessen, Tor Inge; Abildgaard, Andreas; Barkhatov, Leonid; Yaqub, Sheraz; Røsok, Bård I; Bjørnbeth, Bjørn Atle; Andersen, Marit Helen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Aas, Eline; Edwin, Bjørn

    2018-02-01

    To perform the first randomized controlled trial to compare laparoscopic and open liver resection. Laparoscopic liver resection is increasingly used for the surgical treatment of liver tumors. However, high-level evidence to conclude that laparoscopic liver resection is superior to open liver resection is lacking. Explanatory, assessor-blinded, single center, randomized superiority trial recruiting patients from Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway from February 2012 to January 2016. A total of 280 patients with resectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to undergo laparoscopic (n = 133) or open (n = 147) parenchyma-sparing liver resection. The primary outcome was postoperative complications within 30 days (Accordion grade 2 or higher). Secondary outcomes included cost-effectiveness, postoperative hospital stay, blood loss, operation time, and resection margins. The postoperative complication rate was 19% in the laparoscopic-surgery group and 31% in the open-surgery group (12 percentage points difference [95% confidence interval 1.67-21.8; P = 0.021]). The postoperative hospital stay was shorter for laparoscopic surgery (53 vs 96 hours, P < 0.001), whereas there were no differences in blood loss, operation time, and resection margins. Mortality at 90 days did not differ significantly from the laparoscopic group (0 patients) to the open group (1 patient). In a 4-month perspective, the costs were equal, whereas patients in the laparoscopic-surgery group gained 0.011 quality-adjusted life years compared to patients in the open-surgery group (P = 0.001). In patients undergoing parenchyma-sparing liver resection for colorectal metastases, laparoscopic surgery was associated with significantly less postoperative complications compared to open surgery. Laparoscopic resection was cost-effective compared to open resection with a 67% probability. The rate of free resection margins was the same in both groups. Our results support the continued

  10. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  11. Colorectal cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    McLoughlin, Monica Ramona

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden and is the most common cause of mortality from cancer in Europe. Over the last two decades robust evidence from randomised clinical trials and case-control series have confirmed that the mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by screening. The challenge over the next decade is how to implement this in clinical practice. This is what we set out to answer with this thesis. Not all individuals are equal when it comes to screening and tho...

  12. Synchronous resection of colorectal liver metastasis- a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case report of a young patient of. Carcinoma sigmoid colon with multiple liver metastases who was managed with synchronous resection of colorectal liver metastasis. The patient had an ulceroproliferative growth in the sigmoid colon 18 cm from the anal verge with multiple bilobar liver metastases. The CEA

  13. [The occurrence and impact on survival of type 2 diabetes mellitus and thrombocytosis in colorectal cancer, before and after the surgical resection of the primary tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Zoltán; Ambrus, Viktória; Herold, Magdolna; Herczeg, György; Igaz, Péter; Harsányi, László; Somogyi, Anikó

    2018-05-01

    The relationship between platelets and metastatic tumor cells is an ongoing research area. Pre- and postoperative thrombocytosis are suggested predictive survival markers. Colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes are characterized by various changes to platelets. The occurrence of colorectal cancer is more frequent in diabetes. Our aim was to determine the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in colorectal cancer patients, who attended the Semmelweis University 2nd Department of Internal Medicine's Oncology Department in the last three years. Further goals included the evaluation of anamnestic, pre- and postoperative laboratory data, and whether diabetes can be a significant survival factor. A retrospective study was conducted with 86 randomly selected colorectal cancer patients' preoperative (86 patients) and paired postoperative (66, who were operable) data. Patients were monitored no later than September 30, 2017 or until their death. Preoperatively, elevated (over 400 Giga/L) platelet counts were present in 22.1% of the patients (323.5 ± 128.63 Giga/L, mean ± SD) which decreased to 10.6% postoperatively (χ 2 : p = 0.0351; 289.2 ± 82.45 Giga/L, p = 0.0232). Negative correlation was found between platelet counts and overall survival (R: -0.35, p = 0.0085). One third of the patients had diabetes. Laboratory results (i.e., blood counts, creatinine) between diabetic and non-diabetic patients were not significant. Diabetes is a significant five-fold postoperative risk factor for shorter overall survival (relative risk: 5.1612, p = 0.0165). Average survival was 30.6 ± 26.78 months. Persistent consequential postoperative thrombocytosis may indicate shorter survival time. Our observations suggest elevated platelet counts and type 2 diabetes as prognostic markers for survival at the recognition of colorectal tumors. Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(19): 756-767.

  14. Factors affecting colonoscope insertion time in patients with or without a colostomy after left-sided colorectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hui Won; Kim, Yoon Nam; Nam, Chung Mo; Lee, Hyun Jung; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2012-12-01

    We examined whether the insertion time for colonoscopies performed after left-sided resection was different in patients with a colostomy from that in patients without a colostomy and identified factors that could impact colonoscopy performance. We included consecutive patients who underwent colonoscopy between July 2005 and March 2011 after left-sided colorectal resection for colorectal cancer. We classified surgical methods according to the presence or absence of a colostomy and evaluated colonoscope insertion time retrospectively. Furthermore, we analyzed factors that might affect insertion time. A total of 1,041 patients underwent colonoscopy after left-sided colorectal resection during the study period. The colonoscopy completion rate was 98.6 %, and the mean insertion time was 6.1 ± 4.6 min (median 4.7 min, range 0.3-35.8 min). A shorter resection length of colon, the presence of a colostomy, and a lower endoscopist case volume were found to be independent factors associated with prolonged insertion time in patients with left-sided colorectal resection. Among experienced colonoscopists, no colonoscopy-associated or clinical factors were found to affect insertion time. However, a shorter resection length of colon, the presence of a colostomy, and poor bowel preparation were associated with prolonged insertion time among inexperienced endoscopists. We identified three factors that affect colonoscope insertion time after left-sided colorectal resection, including the presence of a colostomy. Inexperienced endoscopists were much more affected by the presence of a colostomy after left-sided colorectal resection. These findings have implications for the practice and teaching of colonoscopy after left-sided colorectal resection.

  15. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race ...

  16. Elevated tumor-to-liver uptake ratio (TLR) from 18F-FDG-PET/CT predicts poor prognosis in stage IIA colorectal cancer following curative resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jun; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jiaming; Huang, Pinzhu; Tan, Shuyun; Wang, Jianping; Huang, Meijin; Duan, Yinghua; Zhang, Zhanwen; Hu, Ping; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic value of the tumor-to-liver uptake ratio (TLR) from 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) in the early stage of colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear. Notably, some stage IIA CRC patients experience early recurrence even after curative resection and might benefit from neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. This study aims to evaluate whether elevated TLR from 18 F-FDG-PET/CT can predict poor prognosis in stage IIA CRC patients undergoing curative resection. From April 2010 to December 2013, 504 consecutive CRC patients with different TNM stages (I-IV) underwent 18 F-FDG-PET/CT scans at the 6th Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University. Among the patients, 118 with stage IIA CRC who accepted preoperative 18 F-FDG-PET/CT scanning and were treated with curative surgery alone were reviewed retrospectively. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the primary tumor, TLR, and demographic, clinical, histopathological, and laboratory data were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors associated with patient disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). ROC curve analysis demonstrated that TLR was superior to primary tumor SUVmax in predicting the risk of recurrence in stage IIA CRC. The optimal TLR cutoff was 6.2. Univariate analysis indicated that elevated TLR, tumor size, and lymphovascular/neural invasion correlated with DFS (P = 0.001, P = 0.002, and P = 0.001, respectively) and OS (P = 0.001, P = 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year DFS rates were 98.4%, 96.9%, and 96.9% for stage IIA CRC patients with lower TLR (≤6.2) versus 77.8%, 60.6%, and 60.6% for those with elevated TLR (>6.2), respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates were 100.0%, 100.0%, and 98.3% for the patients with lower TLR versus 98.1%, 83.3%, and 74.3% for those with elevated TLR. Cox

  17. Elevated tumor-to-liver uptake ratio (TLR) from {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT predicts poor prognosis in stage IIA colorectal cancer following curative resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jun; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jiaming; Huang, Pinzhu; Tan, Shuyun; Wang, Jianping; Huang, Meijin [6th Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Colorectal Surgery, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Duan, Yinghua [1st Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Zhanwen; Hu, Ping [6th Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Xiaoyan [1st Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-11-15

    The prognostic value of the tumor-to-liver uptake ratio (TLR) from 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) in the early stage of colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear. Notably, some stage IIA CRC patients experience early recurrence even after curative resection and might benefit from neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. This study aims to evaluate whether elevated TLR from {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT can predict poor prognosis in stage IIA CRC patients undergoing curative resection. From April 2010 to December 2013, 504 consecutive CRC patients with different TNM stages (I-IV) underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT scans at the 6th Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University. Among the patients, 118 with stage IIA CRC who accepted preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT scanning and were treated with curative surgery alone were reviewed retrospectively. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the primary tumor, TLR, and demographic, clinical, histopathological, and laboratory data were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors associated with patient disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). ROC curve analysis demonstrated that TLR was superior to primary tumor SUVmax in predicting the risk of recurrence in stage IIA CRC. The optimal TLR cutoff was 6.2. Univariate analysis indicated that elevated TLR, tumor size, and lymphovascular/neural invasion correlated with DFS (P = 0.001, P = 0.002, and P = 0.001, respectively) and OS (P = 0.001, P = 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year DFS rates were 98.4%, 96.9%, and 96.9% for stage IIA CRC patients with lower TLR (≤6.2) versus 77.8%, 60.6%, and 60.6% for those with elevated TLR (>6.2), respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates were 100.0%, 100.0%, and 98.3% for the patients with lower TLR versus 98.1%, 83.3%, and 74.3% for those with

  18. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with 131 I at a total dose of at least 1.0 μCi. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the 131 I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with 131 I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures

  19. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  1. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Enrique; Saito, Yutaka; Hassan, Cessare; Senore, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should wo...

  2. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... infectious complications (n = 170; HR 0.6 (95 per cent c.i. 0.4 to 0.9), P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis of patients who had a curative resection, including Dukes' stage, age, gender, tumour location, blood transfusion, postoperative infectious complications and treatment, ranitidine still had...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  3. Microbiota, Inflammation and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécily Lucas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, is a multifactorial disease involving genetic, environmental and lifestyle risk factors. In addition, increased evidence has established a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer. Indeed, changes in the intestinal microbiota composition in colorectal cancer patients compared to control subjects have been reported. Several bacterial species have been shown to exhibit the pro-inflammatory and pro-carcinogenic properties, which could consequently have an impact on colorectal carcinogenesis. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the potential links between the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer, with a focus on the pro-carcinogenic properties of bacterial microbiota such as induction of inflammation, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation and the production of toxic metabolites. Finally, we will describe the potential therapeutic strategies based on intestinal microbiota manipulation for colorectal cancer treatment.

  4. Curable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hochster, Howard S.

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer, though already metastatic, may still be curable through multi-modality approaches, which require combined planning between medical and surgical oncologists. Retrospective surgical series have historically shown 5-year survival or “cures” for 30% to 50% of patients with solitary or a few resectable liver metastases. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting has been poorly defined. A recent European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study randomize...

  5. Histopathological report of colorectal carcinoma resections: A 5-year audit in Lagos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmos, Kabir Bolarinwa; Rotimi, Olorunda; Lawal, Abdulrazzaq Oluwagbemiga; Osinowo, Adedapo O; Habeebu, Mohammed Y; Abdulkareem, Fatimah Biade

    2018-01-01

    Complete and accurate pathology reporting of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) resection specimen is critical to clinical management of individual patients. The study aims to audit colorectal cancer histopathology reporting in Lagos between 2011 and 2015 before the adoption of the Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology in Nigeria pro forma in 2016. All resected CRC cases were identified from the Histopathology record of our Department and that of a private Laboratory in Lagos over a 5-year from 2011 to 2015. The dataset as contained in the pro forma was extracted from the reports and analysed using SPSS version 16 software. A total of 92 colorectal resections were received during the 5-year period consisting of 90 colonic and 2 rectal tumours. Data inclusiveness on tumour differentiation, extent of primary tumour, total lymph node and lymph node involvement were 96.7%, 91.3%, 83.7% and 92.4%, respectively. Tumour perforation, level of venous involvement and distant metastasis were reported in 73.9%, 21.7% and 96.7% respectively. The circumferential resection margin (CRM) in the 2 rectal tumours had 100% inclusiveness. Tumour node metastasis staging was complete in 87% of cases while Dukes staging was documented in 8.7% of the reports. None of the data items was 100% complete except the CRM for rectal carcinoma. Free text reporting results in incomplete data resulting in improper staging, especially the lymph node status. This highlights the need for pro forma reporting to ensure and maintain consistent reporting of important parameters required for proper staging and management of patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. Pulmonary nodules and metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) are subjected to a preoperative thoraco-abdominal CT scan to determine the cancer stage. This staging is of relevance with regard to treatment and prognosis. About 20% of the patients have distant metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis, i...... detected in 7.5% of the patients and in 37% of these cases the metastatic spread was confined to the lungs. The prevalence of SPCM increased with the implementation of thoracic CT in CRC staging. SPCM impaired survival significantly and was associated with increasing age and rectal cancer. Resection...

  7. Endoscopic mucosal resection for middle and large colorectal polyps with a double-loop snare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naohisa; Saito, Yutaka; Hirose, Ryohei; Ogiso, Kiyoshi; Inada, Yutaka; Yagi, Nobuaki; Naito, Yuji; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Yanagisawa, Akio; Itoh, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) with a novel uniquely shaped, double-loop snare (Dualoop, Medico's Hirata Inc., Tokyo, Japan) for colorectal polyps. This was a clinical trial conducted in two referral centers, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine and National Cancer Center Hospital in Japan. First, the firmness of various snares including 'Dualoop' was experimentally analyzed with a pressure gauge. Five hundred and eighty nine consecutive polyps that underwent EMR with 'Dualoop' were compared to 339 polyps with the standard round snare. Lesion characteristics, en bloc resection, and complications were analyzed. 'Dualoop' had the most firmness among the various snares. The average tumor size was 9.3 mm (5-30), and en bloc resection was achieved in 95.4%. The rate of en bloc resection for middle polyps 15-19 mm in diameter was significantly higher with the 'Dualoop' than that with the round snare (97.9 vs. 80.0%, p < 0.05). The rate of en bloc resection was 64.7% for large polyps ≥20 mm in diameter using 'Dualoop'. Higher age, larger tumor size, and superficial polyps were associated with the failure of en bloc resection. EMR with 'Dualoop' was effective for resecting both middle and large polyps en-bloc. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Australian contemporary management of synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Phillip; Gibbs, Peter; Shapiro, Jeremy; Sockler, Jim; Bell, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    This article outlines the current Australian multidisciplinary treatment of synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and assesses the factors that influence patient outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of the prospective 'Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer' registry, describing the patient treatment pathway and documenting the extent of disease, resection of the colorectal primary and metastases, chemotherapy and biological therapy use. Cox regression models for progression-free and overall survival were constructed with a comprehensive set of clinical variables. Analysis was intentionn-ton-treat, quantifying the effect of treatment intent decided at the multidisciplinary team meeting (MDT). One thousand one hundred and nine patients presented with synchronous metastatic disease between July 2009 and November 2015. Median follow-up was 15.8 months; 4.4% (group 1) had already curative resections of primary and metastases prior to MDT, 22.2% (group 2) were considered curative but were referred to MDT for opinion and/or medical oncology treatment prior to resection and 70.2% were considered palliative at MDT (group 3). Overall, 83% received chemotherapy, 55% had their primary resected and 23% had their metastases resected; 13% of resections were synchronous, 20% were staged with primary resected first and 62% had only the colorectal primary managed surgically. Performance status, metastasis resection (R0 versus R1 versus R2 versus no resection), resection of the colorectal primary and treatment intent determined at MDT were the most significant factors for progression-free and overall survival. This is the largest Australian series of synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and offers insight into the nature and utility of contemporary practice. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. Individual data meta-analysis for the study of survival after pulmonary metastasectomy in colorectal cancer patients: A history of resected liver metastases worsens the prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaleta, Jon; Iida, Tomohiko; Falcoz, Pierre E; Salah, Samer; Jarabo, José R; Correa, Arlene M; Zampino, Maria G; Matsui, Takashi; Cho, Sukki; Ardissone, Francesco; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Gonzalez, Michel; Gervaz, Pascal; Emparanza, Jose I; Abraira, Víctor

    2018-03-21

    To assess the impact of a history of liver metastases on survival in patients undergoing surgery for lung metastases from colorectal carcinoma. We reviewed recent studies identified by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE using the Ovid interface, with the following search terms: lung metastasectomy, pulmonary metastasectomy, lung metastases and lung metastasis, supplemented by manual searching. Inclusion criteria were that the research concerned patients with lung metastases from colorectal cancer undergoing surgery with curative intent, and had been published between 2007 and 2014. Exclusion criteria were that the paper was a review, concerned surgical techniques themselves (without follow-up), and included patients treated non-surgically. Using Stata 14, we performed aggregate data and individual data meta-analysis using random-effect and Cox multilevel models respectively. We collected data on 3501 patients from 17 studies. The overall median survival was 43 months. In aggregate data meta-analysis, the hazard ratio for patients with previous liver metastases was 1.19 (95% CI 0.90-1.47), with low heterogeneity (I 2 4.3%). In individual data meta-analysis, the hazard ratio for these patients was 1.37 (95% CI 1.14-1.64; p analysis identified the following factors significantly affecting survival: tumour-infiltrated pulmonary lymph nodes (p analysis protocol in PROSPERO (CRD42015017838). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact of surgical resection of the primary tumor on the development of synchronous colorectal liver metastasis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, H; Cosyns, S; Ceelen, Wim P

    2018-05-22

    In recent years different therapeutic strategies for synchronously liver metastasized colorectal cancer were described. Apart from the classical staged surgical approach, simultaneous and liver-first strategies are now commonly used. One theoretical drawback of the classical approach is, however, the stimulatory effect on liver metastases growth that may result from resection of the primary tumour. This systematic review, therefore, aims to investigate the current insights on the stimulatory effects of colorectal surgery on the growth of synchronous colorectal liver metastases in humans. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA statement. A literature search was performed using PubMed and Embase. Articles investigating the effects of colorectal surgery on synchronous colorectal liver metastases were included. Primary endpoints were metastatic tumor volume, metabolic and proliferative activity and tumour vascularization. Four articles meeting the selection criteria were found involving 200 patients. These studies investigate the effects of resection of the primary tumour on synchronous liver metastases using histological and radiological techniques. These papers support a possible stimulatory effect of resection of the primary tumor. Some limited evidence supports the hypothesis that colorectal surgery might stimulate the growth and development of synchronous colorectal liver metastases.

  11. Surgical and clinical impact of extraserosal pelvic fascia removal in segmental colorectal resection for endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Marcos; Belghiti, Jérémie; Zilberman, Sonia; Thomin, Anne; Bonneau, Claire; Bazot, Marc; Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Daraï, Emile

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of patients with colorectal endometriosis and extraserosal pelvic fascia (EPF) involvement and to assess the effect of EPF resection. Prospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University hospital. Two hundred twenty-seven patients who underwent segmental colorectal resection to treat symptomatic deep infiltrating endometriosis between 2001 and 2011, with or without EPF resection. Segmental colorectal resection with or without EPF resection. One hundred twelve patients (49.4%) required EPF resection. In these patients the total American Society for Reproductive Medicine endometriosis scores were higher (p = .004), there were more associated resected lesions of deep infiltrating endometriosis (p EPF infiltration reflects disease severity in patients with colorectal endometriosis. Its removal affects intraoperative morbidity and leads to a higher rate of voiding dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Trends in surgical mortality following colorectal resection between 2002 and 2012: A single-centre, retrospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stephens, I

    2017-06-01

    Surgical mortality is a commonly-used measurement of surgical risk. It is imperative that patients receive accurate, up-to-date information regarding operative risk. To date, studies investigating temporal changes in surgical mortality following colorectal resection in Ireland have been limited. This retrospective study investigates such trends in one of the eight centres for symptomatic and screen-detected colorectal cancers in Ireland, across an 11-year period. A steady decline in surgical mortality was found across this time, showing a significant difference in rates before and after centralisation of rectal cancer care and the advent of colorectal surgery as a surgical specialisation (5.2%, 1.52%). This has important implications for the organisation of colorectal cancer care in Ireland.

  13. Exercise and Low-Dose Ibuprofen for Cognitive Impairment in Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-13

    Cognitive Impairment; Stage 0 Colorectal Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  14. Short-Term Outcomes of Simultaneous Laparoscopic Colectomy and Hepatectomy for Primary Colorectal Cancer With Synchronous Liver Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Akira; Uemura, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Hiraki, Masayuki; Naito, Atsushi; Ogino, Takayuki; Nonaka, Ryoji; Nishimura, Junichi; Wada, Hiroshi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Nagano, Hiroaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases is reported to be safe and effective, the feasibility of a laparoscopic approach remains controversial. This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and short-term outcomes of simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for primary colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases. From September 2008 to December 2013, 10 patients underwent simultaneous laparoscopic resection of primary colorectal cancer an...

  15. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2010-06-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and postmenopausal hormones for women are associated with substantial reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  16. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...... features, and the genetic and epigenetic profiles of the familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) syndrome with the aim to delineate tumor characteristics that may contribute to refined diagnostics and optimized tumor prevention....

  17. Use of an electrothermal bipolar sealing device in ligation of major mesenteric vessels during laparoscopic colorectal resection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, S T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of approaches are available for division of major vascular structures during laparoscopic colorectal resection. Ultrasonic coagulating shears (UCS), vascular staplers, plastic or titanium clips and electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing (EBVS) are currently available. We report our experience with an EBVS device, LigaSure (Covidien AG), used in division of the ileocolic, middle colic and inferior mesenteric arteries during laparoscopic colorectal resection. METHODS: We report the immediate outcome of 802 consecutive unselected patients who underwent elective laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection performed with use of the LigaSure (5 and 10 mm) at our institution over a 5-year period. Operative procedures included right hemicolectomy (n = 180), left hemicolectomy (n = 96), sigmoid colectomy (n = 347) and anterior resection (n = 179). Data were collected from a prospectively maintained cancer database and operative records. The procedures were performed primarily by three consultant surgeons with an interest in laparoscopic colorectal resection. RESULTS: Of 802 cases in which the LigaSure device was employed to divide major vascular structures, immediate effective vessel sealing was achieved in 99.8% (n = 800). Two patients experienced related adverse events both following division of the inferior mesenteric artery with a 5 mm LigaSure. Both patients had immediate uncontrolled haemorrhage that required laparotomy. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the LigaSure device to seal and divide the major mesenteric vessels during laparoscopic colorectal resection is very effective, with a high success rate of 99.8%. Caution should be exercised in elderly atherosclerotic patients, particularly when using the 5-mm LigaSure device.

  18. The RAPID protocol enhances patient recovery after both laparoscopic and open colorectal resections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lloyd, G M

    2010-06-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs can accelerate recovery and shorten the hospital stay after colorectal resections. The RAPID (remove, ambulate, postoperative analgesia, introduce diet) protocol is a simplified ERAS program that consists of a simplified, user-friendly single-page pro forma schedule. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the RAPID protocol on patients undergoing both laparoscopic and open colorectal resections in two specialized colorectal units.

  19. Hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastases. Influence on survival of preoperative factors and surgery for recurrences in 80 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlinger, B; Quilichini, M A; Parc, R; Hannoun, L; Delva, E; Huguet, C

    1987-01-01

    This report analyses an experience with 80 liver resections for metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Primary colorectal cancers had all been resected. Liver metastases were solitary in 44 patients, multiple in 36 patients, unilobar in 76 patients, and bilobar in 4 patients. Tumor size was less than 5 cm in 33 patients, 5-10 cm in 30 patients, and larger than 10 cm in 17 patients. There were 43 synchronous and 37 metachronous liver metastases with a delay of 2-70 months. The surgical procedures included more major liver resections (55 patients) than wedge resections (25 patients). Portal triad occlusion was used in most cases, and complete vascular exclusion of the liver was performed for resection of the larger tumors. In-hospital mortality rate was 5%. Three- and 5-year survival rates were 40.5% and 24.9%, respectively. None of the analysed criteria: size and number of liver metastases, delay after diagnosis of the primary cancer, Duke's stage, could differentiate long survivors from patients who did not benefit much from liver surgery due to early recurrence. Recurrences were observed in 51 patients during the study, two thirds occurring during the first year after liver surgery. Eight patients had resection of "secondary" metastases after a first liver resection: two patients for extrahepatic recurrences and six patients for liver recurrences. Encouraging results raise the question of how far agressive surgery for liver metastases should go. PMID:3827361

  20. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed......, and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal...... diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an increase in short- and long...

  1. Obesity and colorectal cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hano Garcia, Olga Marina; Wood Rodriguez, Lisette; Villa Jimenez, Oscar Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic and multifactor disease characterized by presence of excess body fat harmful for health. Several studies have been conducted to assess the possible risk character of different factors for colorectal cancer including the following modifying factors: a diet rich in saturated fats, a diet low in vegetables, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption and obesity. A case-control study was conducted to include 276 adult patients (93 cases and 184 controls) consecutively seen from May, 2008 to May, 2009 in the Institute of Gastroenterology determining a possible association between obesity as risk factor and colorectal cancer. Variables measures included: sex, age, skin color, body mass index, hip-waist circumference and endoscopic location of cancer. We conclude that the colorectal cancer with predominance in female sex and in white people in both groups. Obesity according to a great relation hip-waist had an strong relation with colorectal cancer, which had predominance towards distal colon in both sexes

  2. A randomized phase II study of immunization with dendritic cells modified with poxvectors encoding CEA and MUC1 compared with the same poxvectors plus GM-CSF for resected metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Marshall, John L; Garrett, Christopher; Chang, David Z; Aklilu, Mebea; Crocenzi, Todd S; Cole, David J; Dessureault, Sophie; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Onaitis, Mark; Clary, Bryan M; Hsu, David; Devi, Gayathri R; Bulusu, Anuradha; Annechiarico, Robert P; Chadaram, Vijaya; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether 1 of 2 vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) and poxvectors encoding CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and MUC1 (PANVAC) would lengthen survival in patients with resected metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recurrences after complete resections of metastatic CRC remain frequent. Immune responses to CRC are associated with fewer recurrences, suggesting a role for cancer vaccines as adjuvant therapy. Both DCs and poxvectors are potent stimulators of immune responses against cancer antigens. Patients, disease-free after CRC metastasectomy and perioperative chemotherapy (n = 74), were randomized to injections of autologous DCs modified with PANVAC (DC/PANVAC) or PANVAC with per injection GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Endpoints were recurrence-free survival overall survival, and rate of CEA-specific immune responses. Clinical outcome was compared with that of an unvaccinated, contemporary group of patients who had undergone CRC metastasectomy, received similar perioperative therapy, and would have otherwise been eligible for the study. Recurrence-free survival at 2 years was similar (47% and 55% for DC/PANVAC and PANVAC/GM-CSF, respectively) (χ P = 0.48). At a median follow-up of 35.7 months, there were 2 of 37 deaths in the DC/PANVAC arm and 5 of 37 deaths in the PANVAC/GM-CSF arm. The rate and magnitude of T-cell responses against CEA was statistically similar between study arms. As a group, vaccinated patients had superior survival compared with the contemporary unvaccinated group. Both DC and poxvector vaccines have similar activity. Survival was longer for vaccinated patients than for a contemporary unvaccinated group, suggesting that a randomized trial of poxvector vaccinations compared with standard follow-up after metastasectomy is warranted. (NCT00103142).

  3. Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer The Importance of Early Detection Past Issues / Summer ... Cancer of the colon or rectum is called colorectal cancer. The colon and the rectum are part of ...

  4. Colorectal Cancer: What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Colorectal Cancer: What You Should Know Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... with—and more than 50,000 died from—colorectal cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. It is ...

  5. Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic (HAL) Multiple Segmental Colorectal Resections: Are They Feasible and Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggarshe, Deepa; Attuwaybi, Bashir O; Matier, Brian; Visco, Jeffrey J; Butler, Bryan N

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term outcomes of synchronous hand-assisted laparoscopic (HAL) segmental colorectal resections. The surgical options for synchronous colonic pathology include extensive colonic resection with single anastomosis, multiple synchronous segmental resections with multiple anastomoses, or staged resections. Traditionally, multiple open, synchronous, segmental resections have been performed. There is a lack of data on HAL multiple segmental colorectal resections. A retrospective chart review was compiled on all patients who underwent HAL synchronous segmental colorectal resections by all the colorectal surgeons from our Group during the period of 1999 to 2014. Demographics, operative details, and short-term outcomes are reported. During the period, 9 patients underwent HAL synchronous multiple segmental colorectal resections. There were 5 women and 4 men, with median age of 54 (24-83) years and median BMI of 24 (19.8-38.7) kg/m(2). Two patients were on long-term corticosteroid therapy. The median operative time was 210 (120-330) minutes and median operative blood loss was 200 (75-300) mLs. The median duration for return of bowel function was 2 days and the median length of stay was 3.5 days. We had 2 minor wound infections. There were no deaths. Synchronous segmental colorectal resections with anastomoses using the hand-assisted laparoscopic technique are safe. Early conversion to open and use of stomas are advisable in challenging cases.

  6. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  7. Local involvement of the lower urinary tract in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig, Morten F.; Bulut, Orhan; Niebuhr, Malene

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Invasion of urinary organs due to advanced colorectal cancer can comprise a surgical challenge in achieving negative resection margins. The aim of the study was to asses the outcome of patients with colorectal cancer invading the lower urinary organs. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  8. Surveillance Patterns After Curative-Intent Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative surveillance following curative-intent resection of colorectal cancer (CRC is variably performed due to existing guideline differences and to the limited data supporting different strategies.

  9. Diagnostic Ultrasound in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARYBackground and purpose Colorectal cancer is a common disease in Denmark with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although survival in recent years has improved, Denmark still has the lowest 5-year survival compared to the other Nordic countries. The treatment of patients depends on local...... the potential to contribute to the staging of colorectal cancer. The purpose of these studies was to determine the usefulness of ultrasound diagnostics in patients with colorectal cancer.The purpose of the TRUS studies was to compare staging of rectal carcinomas using digital rectal exploration...... of 295 patients with primary colorectal cancer we found a sensitivity of preoperative ultrasound, surgical exploration, and intraoperative ultrasound of 70%, 84%, and 97%, respectively, based on a patient-by-patient comparison (p

  10. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF COLORECTAL CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    B. Shafayan M. Keyhani

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to analyze certain epidemiological variations in Iranian patients with colorectal cancer. (CRC): From March 1981 up to March 1993, 103 patients were analyzed retrospectively for age, gender, marital state, job, nutritional habits, presenting symptoms and histopathological features. Most of the patients with colorectal cancer were male, age range 20-75 (mean 56), 25.4 percent were long-term smokers and bleeding was the most common symptom. The rectum was the most com...

  11. Curative resection for locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer using neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX plus panitumumab: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Tomizawa

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a successful curative resection in a patient with initially unresectable, locally advanced colorectal cancer who was treated with FOLFOX4 combined with panitumumab.

  12. Some Aspects Of Adjuvant Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavata, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe and in North America. Cornerstone of the treatment of localized colorectal cancer is surgical resection followed by chemotherapy or radio-chemotherapy in indicated cases. For patients with Stage III colon cancer recent data have shown efficacy through the combining fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with oxaliplatin into adjuvant treatment program. For patients with Stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at high risk for disease recurrence. Current randomized clinical trials in the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer are examining the value of adding agents known to be active in metastatic disease, including those that modify specific molecular targets. (author)

  13. Microsatellite Status of Primary Colorectal Cancer Predicts the Incidence of Postoperative Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Aki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yoko; Hata, Keisuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms stratified by the nature of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we revealed it on the basis of the microsatellite (MS) status of primary CRC. We retrospectively reviewed 338 patients with CRC and calculated the risk of neoplasms during postoperative surveillance colonoscopy in association with the MS status of primary CRC. A propensity score method was applied. We identified a higher incidence of metachronous rectal neoplasms after the resection of MS stable CRC than MS instable CRC (adjusted HR 5.74, p=0.04). We also observed a higher incidence of colorectal tubular adenoma in patients with MSS CRC (adjusted hazard ratio 7.09, pcolorectal cancer influenced the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of low skeletal muscle mass and density on short and long-term outcome after resection of stage I-III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Jeroen L A; Coebergh van den Braak, Robert R J; Lalmahomed, Zarina S; Vrijland, Wietske W; Dekker, Jan W T; Zimmerman, David D E; Vles, Wouter J; Coene, Peter-Paul L O; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2018-06-06

    Preoperative low skeletal muscle mass and density are associated with increased postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing curative colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery. However, the long-term effects of low skeletal muscle mass and density remain uncertain. Patients with stage I-III CRC undergoing surgery, enrolled in a prospective observational cohort study, were included. Skeletal muscle mass and density were measured on CT. Patients with high and low skeletal muscle mass and density were compared regarding postoperative complications, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). In total, 816 patients (53.9% males, median age 70) were included; 50.4% had low skeletal muscle mass and 64.1% low density. The severe postoperative complication rate was significantly higher in patients with low versus high skeletal muscle and density (20.9% versus 13.6%, p = 0.006; 20.0% versus 11.8%, p = 0.003). Low skeletal muscle mass (OR 1.91, p = 0.018) and density (OR 1.87, p = 0.045) were independently associated with severe postoperative complications. Ninety-day mortality was higher in patients with low skeletal muscle mass and density compared with patients with high skeletal muscle mass and density (3.6% versus 1.7%, p = 0.091; 3.4% versus 1.0%, p = 0.038). No differences in DFS were observed. After adjustment for covariates such as age and comorbidity, univariate differences in OS and CSS diminished. Low skeletal muscle mass and density are associated with short-term, but not long-term, outcome in patients undergoing CRC surgery. These findings recommend putting more emphasis on preoperative management of patients at risk for surgical complications, but do not support benefit for long-term outcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  15. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, W. Warren; Blackstock, A. William; Herman, Joseph; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007

  16. Genetic polymorphism in a VEGF-independent angiogenesis gene ANGPT1 and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients after surgical resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyao Dai

    Full Text Available The VEGF-independent angiogenic signaling plays an important role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC. However, its implication in the clinical outcome of CRC has not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the association between genetic variations in several major VEGF-independent signaling pathway genes and the overall survival of CRC patients.Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in four important VEGF-independent angiogenic genes (ANGPT1, AMOT, DLL4 and ENG were genotyped in a Chinese population with 408 CRC patients.One SNP, rs1954727 in ANGPT1, was significantly associated with CRC overall survival. Compared to patients with the homozygous wild-type genotype of rs1954727, those with heterozygous and homozygous variant genotypes exhibited a favorable overall survival with a hazard ratio (HR of 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.43, P = 0.623, and 0.32 (95% CI 0.15-0.71, P = 0.005, respectively (P trend = 0.008. In stratified analysis, this association remained significant in patients receiving chemotherapy (P trend = 0.012, but not in those without chemotherapy. We further evaluated the effects of chemotherapy on CRC survival that was stratified by rs1954727 genotypes. We found that chemotherapy resulted in a significantly better overall survival in the CRC patients (HR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.26-0.75, P = 0.002, which was especially prominent in those patients with the heterozygous genotype of rs1954727 (HR = 0.45, 95%CI 0.22-0.92, P = 0.028.Our data suggest that rs1954727 in ANGPT1 gene might be a prognostic biomarker for the overall survival of CRC patients, especially in those receiving chemotherapy, a finding that warrants validation in larger independent populations.

  17. Undefined familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Theodoropoulos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2009-10-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers of the world, is actually a spectrum of several subtypes, with different molecular profiles, clinico-pathological characteristics and possibly separate pathways of progression. It is estimated that in approximately 25%-35% of cases, a familial component exists, so they are classified as familial CRC (fCRC). However the known hereditary CRC syndromes justify only up to 5%. The rest are attributed to some inherited genetic predisposition passed to offspring through low-penetrance genes, which in the proper environmental setting can bring on tumorigenesis. Furthermore, part of the familial clustering may be attributed to chance. Because of the complexity regarding the etiology of CRC, the clinician is sometimes faced with obscure patient data, and cannot be sure if they are dealing with fCRC or sporadic CRC. The elucidation of what is going on with the as yet "undefined" portion of CRC will aid not only in the diagnosis, classification and treatment of CRC, but more importantly in the proper adjustment of the screening guidelines and in genetic counselling of patients.

  18. Liver resection in metastatic colorectal cancer: a multidisciplinary approach Resección hepática por metástasis de cáncer colorrectal: una visión multidisciplinar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Noguera Aguilar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze qualitative short-time results of a new program for multidisciplinary liver evaluation in complex cases of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer. Patients and methods: 40 clinical consecutive evaluations with liver metastasis assessed for major liver resection by a multidisplinary specialist committee. Complementary explorations performed included CT and ultrasounds, and MRI or PET for doubtful cases. Liver resection was made in a single operation or two-stage hepatectomy, or combined with other techniques. Results: postoperative mortality at 30 days was 4%. Complications occurred in 28%, with surgical wound infection being most frequent (20%; 16.6% of resections were transfused, with a mean volume of 1000 ml. Two patients needed reoperation -one for an intraperitoneal abscess and one for bile-duct stenosis. Percentage of global relapse was 36%, with 26% of relapses out of the liver. Actuarial survival at one year follow-up was 90%, and 82% at two years; 64% of patients remain free of disease two years after the operation. Conclusions: programs for liver resection for colorectal cancer metastasis may be implemented by multidisciplinary teams of recent setup. There is a need to evaluate own results and then compare them with a standard of quality previously reported.Objetivo: valorar los resultados cualitativos a corto y medio plazo de un programa de reciente implantación de evaluación hepática multidisciplinar de casos complejos de metástasis hepáticas de cáncer colorrectal. Pacientes y métodos: cuarenta evaluaciones clínicas consecutivas de pacientes con metástasis hepáticas de cáncer colorrectal valorados para resección hepática mayor, realizadas por un comité multidisciplinar de especialistas. Las exploraciones complementarias practicadas fueron TAC trifásica y ecografía intraoperatoria, junto a RMN y/o PET en casos de dudas. La resección hepática se podía realizar como gesto único o bien en dos tiempos y

  19. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before 50). Dave has Lynch syndrome and had colorectal cancer at 28. Amy found out she has Lynch syndrome when she was diagnosed with colorectal cancer days after turning 47. Why is it Important ...

  20. ALPPS Improves Resectability Compared With Conventional Two-stage Hepatectomy in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Liver Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandström, Per; Røsok, Bård I; Sparrelid, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    resection offers the only chance of a cure for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) and an insufficient future liver remnant (FLR) volume are traditionally treated with chemotherapy with portal vein embolization or ligation followed by hepatectomy (TSH...... of patients completing both stages of the treatment. Secondary outcomes were complications, radicality, and 90-day mortality measured from the final intervention. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics, besides body mass index, did not differ between the groups. The RR was 92% [95% confidence interval (CI) 84...

  1. Colorectal cancer with venous tumor thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kensuke Otani; Soichiro Ishihara; Keisuke Hata; Koji Murono; Kazuhito Sasaki; Koji Yasuda; Takeshi Nishikawa; Toshiaki Tanaka; Tomomichi Kiyomatsu; Kazushige Kawai; Hiroaki Nozawa; Hironori Yamaguchi; Toshiaki Watanabe

    2018-01-01

    Summary: Colorectal cancer is seldom accompanied by venous tumor thrombosis, and little is known about the features of venous tumor thrombosis in colorectal cancer. However, some reports show that colorectal cancer patients can develop venous tumor thrombosis and warn clinicians not to overlook this complication. In this report, we perform a review of 43 previously reported cases and investigate the characteristics of colorectal cancer accompanied by venous tumor thrombosis. The histological ...

  2. [Flow cytometry in datecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Q; Ding, Y; Zhang, J

    2001-01-25

    To study the methodology and significance of flow cytometry in detecting lymph node micrometastasis of colorectal cancer. One hundred sixty-two cellular suspensions were prepared with lymph nodes which were resected radically on 25 patients with colorectal cancer and in which no cancer cells were found by HE staining. Different concentrations of cultured Lovo colorectal cancer cells were added into the celular suspension prepared from lymph node tissue of persons without colorectal cancer in order to prepare a control model. Dual staining with CK/FTTC and PI was made to the sedimetns from those 2 kinds of suspension. Flow cytometry was used to detect cancer cells. An ideal correlation was obtained between the detection value and the theoretical value of cancer cells in the specimen suspensions and control models (r = 0.097 6) with a sensitivity rate of 10/10(5). Cancer cells were detected from 7 out of the 25 patients and 30 of the 162 cellular suspensions. The detection rate was correlated with the size and infiltrating depth of the cancer. Flow cytometry is a reliable, rapid, and quantitative method for detecting lymph node micrometastasis in colorectal cancer.

  3. Subnuclear proteomics in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R

    2010-01-01

    for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we......Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers...... with statistics, we identified proteins that are significantly enriched in the nuclear matrix fraction relative to two earlier fractions (the chromatin-binding and intermediate filament fractions) isolated from six colorectal tissue samples. The total data set contained 2,059 non-redundant proteins. Gene ontology...

  4. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is an important public health problem. Several screening methods have been shown to be effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality. The objective of this review was to assess the cost-effectiveness of the different colorectal cancer screening methods and to

  5. Bone morphogenetic protein signalling in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardwick, James C.; Kodach, Liudmila L.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; van den Brink, Gijs R.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the current understanding of colorectal cancer stems from the study of rare, inherited colorectal cancer syndromes. Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway have been found in juvenile polyposis, an inherited polyposis syndrome that predisposes to colorectal cancer. The

  6. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...

  7. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-06

    An oncologist (cancer doctor) shares her medical and personal advice for people between the ages of 50 and 75 about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/6/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2017.

  9. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with

  10. Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yoshiko; Itabashi, Michio; Hirosawa, Tomoichiro; Ogawa, Shinpei; Noguchi, Eiichiro; Takemoto, Kaori; Shirotani, Noriyasu; Kameoka, Shingo

    2007-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the clinical characteristics of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Five patients with brain metastasis from colorectal cancer treated at our institute between 2001 and 2005 were included in the study. Clinical findings and survival time were determined and an appropriate system for follow-up in such cases was considered. Brain metastasis was found after surgery for colorectal cancer in 4 cases. In addition, colorectal cancer was found after diagnosis of brain metastasis in 1 case. At the time of diagnosis of brain metastasis, all patients had lung metastasis and 3 had liver metastasis. The mean periods between surgery for colorectal cancer and lung and brain metastases were 19.5 and 38.2 months, respectively. In all cases, brain metastasis was diagnosed by imaging after the appearance of neurological symptoms. Brain metastases were multiple in 1 case and focal in 4 cases. We performed gamma knife radiation therapy, and the symptoms disappeared or decreased in all cases. Mean survival time after brain metastasis was 3.0 months. Prognosis after brain metastasis is poor, but gamma knife radiation therapy contributed to patients' quality of life. (author)

  11. Cancer immunology and colorectal cancer recurrence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vannucci, Luca

    -, č. 3 (2011), s. 1421-1431 ISSN 1945-0524 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colorectal cancer * inflammation * tumor Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  12. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer. (author)

  13. Managing Potentially Resectable Metastatic Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, John L.

    2008-01-01

    For patients with metastatic colon cancer, management has evolved from resecting a single liver metastasis and having only one chemotherapy medicine, to resecting multiple metastases including those outside the liver as well as using combination chemotherapy (based on recent supportive trials) to improve outcomes. This success has also raised many questions, including the role of adjuvant chemotherapy to downstage borderline resectable tumors, whether patients who receive preoperative chemoth...

  14. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shafayan M. Keyhani

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to analyze certain epidemiological variations in Iranian patients with colorectal cancer. (CRC: From March 1981 up to March 1993, 103 patients were analyzed retrospectively for age, gender, marital state, job, nutritional habits, presenting symptoms and histopathological features. Most of the patients with colorectal cancer were male, age range 20-75 (mean 56, 25.4 percent were long-term smokers and bleeding was the most common symptom. The rectum was the most common site and moderately differentiated carcinoma was considered as the main common histopathological variety. In conclusion, increasing incidence of colorectal cancer in younger Iranian population, below 30 and late admission and diagnosis were the main findings in the present study necessitating screening programs with annual fecal occult blood tests in high risk families.

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT) for Locally Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Se; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Jae Hwang; Kwan, Koing Bo; Kim, Heung Dae

    1991-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most frequent malignant tumor in the United States and fourth most frequent tumor in Korea. Surgery has been used as a primary treatment modality but reported overall survivals after curative resection were from 20% to 50%. Local recurrence is the most common failure in the treatment of locally advanced colorectal cancer. Once recurrence has developed, surgery has rarely the role and the five year survival of locally advanced rectal cancer is less than 5%, this indicated that significant improvement of local control could be achieved. We performed 6 cases of IORT for locally advanced colorectal cancer which is he first experience in Korea. Patient's eligibility, treatment applicator, electron energy, dose distribution on the surface and depth within the treatment field and detailed skills are discussed. We hope that our IORT protocol can reduce local failure and increase the long term survival significantly

  16. Colorectal Anastomotic Stenosis: Lesson Learned after 1643 Colorectal Resections for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocchi, Elisa; Barugola, Giuliano; Benini, Marco; Bocus, Paolo; Rossini, Roberto; Ceccaroni, Marcello; Ruffo, Giacomo

    2018-04-17

    To evaluate incidence, risk factors, and treatment of colorectal anastomotic stenosis in patients who underwent rectosigmoid resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). A retrospective analysis of prospective database (Canadian Task Force classification III). Public Medical Center PATIENTS: All women who underwent laparoscopic rectosigmoid resections for DIE between January 2002 and December 2016. All patients were evaluated clinically and endoscopically at 1 and 3 months after bowel resection. Stenosis was defined as the lack of passage through the anastomosis of a 12-mm proctoscope. Symptomatic stenosis was defined as the presence of endoscopically confirmed stricture accompanied by at least two of the following symptoms: constipation, need to push, tenesmus, ribbon stools. Only patients with symptomatic stenosis were studied. Demographics, surgical technique, and postoperative complications were prospectively recorded. Treatment and results of anastomotic symptomatic stricture were analyzed. One thousand six hundred and forty-three patients underwent laparoscopic rectosigmoid resections. One hundred and four patients (6.3%) presented with symptomatic anastomotic stenosis. The mean age of patients was 27 years (range, 23-44). Interval between diagnosis and symptomatic stenosis was 57 days (range, 21-64 days). The only statistically significant predictors of anastomotic stenosis were the presence of ileostomy (p = .01) and previous pelvic surgery (p = .002). Treatment of choice was always conservative. Of 104 patients in analysis, 90 patients (86.5%) underwent three endoscopic dilatations. Reoperations were not necessary. The anastomotic stricture is a recognized complication in patients following intestinal resection for DIE, and protective ileostomy represents the only modifiable factor related to anastomotic stenosis. Endoscopic dilatation is a valid option to treat this complication. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. R1 Resection by Necessity for Colorectal Liver Metastases Is It Still a Contraindication to Surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Robbert J.; Wicherts, Dennis A.; Flores, Eduardo; Azoulay, Daniel; Castaing, Denis; Adam, Rene

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare long-term outcome of R0 (negative margins) and R1 (positive margins) liver resections for colorectal liver metastases (CLM) treated by an aggressive approach combining chemotherapy and repeat surgery. Summary Background Data: Complete macroscopic resection with negative margins

  18. Risk Factors Associated With Circumferential Resection Margin Positivity in Rectal Cancer: A Binational Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Satish K; Kong, Joseph Cherng; Guerra, Glen R; Chittleborough, Timothy J; Naik, Arun; Ramsay, Robert G; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2018-04-01

    Rectal cancer outcomes have improved with the adoption of a multidisciplinary model of care. However, there is a spectrum of quality when viewed from a national perspective, as highlighted by the Consortium for Optimizing the Treatment of Rectal Cancer data on rectal cancer care in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess and identify predictors of circumferential resection margin involvement for rectal cancer across Australasia. A retrospective study from a prospectively maintained binational colorectal cancer database was interrogated. This study is based on a binational colorectal cancer audit database. Clinical information on all consecutive resected rectal cancer cases recorded in the registry from 2007 to 2016 was retrieved, collated, and analyzed. The primary outcome measure was positive circumferential resection margin, measured as a resection margin ≤1 mm. A total of 3367 patients were included, with 261 (7.5%) having a positive circumferential resection margin. After adjusting for hospital and surgeon volume, hierarchical logistic regression analysis identified a 6-variable model encompassing the independent predictors, including urgent operation, abdominoperineal resection, open technique, low rectal cancer, T3 to T4, and N1 to N2. The accuracy of the model was 92.3%, with an receiver operating characteristic of 0.783 (p risk associated with circumferential resection margin positivity ranged from risk factors) to 43% (6 risk factors). This study was limited by the lack of recorded long-term outcomes associated with circumferential resection margin positivity. The rate of circumferential resection margin involvement in patients undergoing rectal cancer resection in Australasia is low and is influenced by a number of factors. Risk stratification of outcome is important with the increasing demand for publicly accessible quality data. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A512.

  19. Molecular Classification and Correlates in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ogino, Shuji; Goel, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    Molecular classification of colorectal cancer is evolving. As our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis improves, we are incorporating new knowledge into the classification system. In particular, global genomic status [microsatellite instability (MSI) status and chromosomal instability (CIN) status] and epigenomic status [CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status] play a significant role in determining clinical, pathological and biological characteristics of colorectal cancer. In thi...

  20. [Treatment Strategy for Liver Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer - Including Treatment for Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeo; Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamanashi, Takahiro; Miura, Hirohisa; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Shimazu, Masashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2017-10-01

    The mainstay of treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer is surgery. Therefore, colorectal cancer metastasis is distinctive, compared to other cancer types in which chemotherapy is the main treatment. Initially, Japan experienced medical druglag compared with western countries. However, the use of oxaliplatin for unresectable recurrent metastatic colorectal cancer became available in Japan, as well as in western countries, in 2005. We have since shifted chemotherapeutic regimens from monotherapy to combination therapy with molecular targeted agents. The combination therapy has rapidly become a standard therapy for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer, and prognosis has dramatically increased for patients with this condition. Herein, we describe the treatment of liver metastasis of colorectal cancer, and surgery and adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy options for resectable cancer. Furthermore, we focus on conversion therapy for unresectable cancer.

  1. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  2. Colorectal Cancer Profile in a Tertiary Care Centre, Bangalore, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja Suryadevara, , , ,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancers are a common disease of oncological practice. A raising incidence is seen in Asian population. It is one of the cancers where screening and early diagnosis are possible. Very few articles are there about the cancer scenario in India. A study of the disease profile helps in screening, early diagnosis and management of the disease in developing countries. Aim: To study the cancer presentation in our population which can help in developing strategies for better control of disease. Material and Methods: Medical records of 171 patients registered at Kidwai Hospital from 2010 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data including age at presentation, sex, location of the cancer and stage at presentation were analyzed. Results: The male to female ratio was 1.26:1 in rectal cancer. In colon cancer the ratio was 1:1.3. The mean age at presentation was 47 years in males and 51 years in females in colorectal cancers together. Thirty eight percent of the patients were less than 45 years old. Eighty percent of the cases were rectal cancers. In 71% of rectal cancers the growth was located within 5cm from anal verge (AV. Stage III was the commonest stage of presentation. Abdominoperineal resection (APR was the commonest surgical procedure done. Inoperability was highest with lower rectal cancer. Conclusion: Younger age at presentation, low lying rectal cancers and advanced stage at presentation were observed in our study group which includes predominantly rural population. Rectal cancers are the most common cancers referred among colorectal cancers. Screening for colorectal cancers and early evaluation of symptomatic cases need to be encouraged. Patients should be educated regarding this. Screening strategies, etiopathogenesis and genetic abnormalities in colorectal cancer patients need to be defined in developing countries.

  3. Selective use of adjuvant radiation therapy in resectable colorectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Gunderson, L.L.; Welch, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Colorectal cancer recurs within the operative field in 10-20 per cent of patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. In certain subgroups, the recurrence rate is 20-50 per cent. There are some data to suggest either preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy as an adjuvant to potentially curative surgery can reduce the local operative failure rate. However, since radiation therapy has significant side effects, patient selection to maximize the therapeutic ratio is important. This report defines the criteria at the Massachusetts General Hospital for selection of patients with colorectal cancer for adjuvant radiation therapy, defines radiation therapy-surgery sequencing alternatives used, and describes techniques to reduce radiation side effects. Over a period of three and a half years, 196 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy: 51 patients received either moderate or low dose preoperative radiation therapy to rectal or rectosigmoid cancers, and 161 patients received postoperative radiation therapy to the pelvis or extrapelvic colonic tumor-lymph node beds. Some patients who received low-dose preoperative radiation therapy also received moderate-dose postoperative radiation therapy. We prefer moderate-dose postoperative radiation therapy as the approach most likely to decrease the local recurrence rate with minimal interference with surgical procedures and late small-bowel complications. Patients who received postoperative radiation therapy were those without distant metastases, whose primary tumor pathology revealed macroscopic or extensive microscopic transmural tumor penetration into extraperitoneal tissues. Careful case selection, multiple field techniques, the use of reperitonealization, omental flaps, and retroversion of the uterus into the pelvis were combined with postoperative small-bowel x-rays, bladder distention, and lateral portals to minimize radiation damage to normal structures

  4. Contemporary Management of Localized Resectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, Anuhya; Tella, Sri Harsha; Goyal, Gaurav; Ma, Wen Wee; Mahipal, Amit

    2018-01-20

    Pancreatic cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Surgical resection with negative margins still constitutes the cornerstone of potentially curative therapy, but is possible only in 15-20% of patients at the time of initial diagnosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the neoadjuvant approach may improve R0 resection rate in localized resectable and borderline resectable diseases, and potentially downstage locally advanced disease to achieve surgical resection, though the impact on survival is to be determined. Despite advancements in the last decade in developing effective combinational chemo-radio therapeutic options, preoperative treatment strategies, and better peri-operative care, pancreatic cancer continues to carry a dismal prognosis in the majority. Prodigious efforts are currently being made in optimizing the neoadjuvant therapy with a better toxicity profile, developing novel agents, imaging techniques, and identification of biomarkers for the disease. Advancement in our understanding of the tumor microenvironment and molecular pathology is urgently needed to facilitate the development of novel targeted and immunotherapies for this setting. In this review, we detail the current literature on contemporary management of resectable, borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer with a focus on future directions in the field.

  5. Costs of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    A health economist talks about studies on figuring out the costs of running a colorectal cancer screening program, and how this can lead to better screening.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  6. Syncytin immunoreactivity in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Mou; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    monoclonal syncytin antibody we have assessed syncytin expression in a retrospective series of 140 colorectal cancer patients. Variable degrees of syncytin expression were detected in both colonic and rectal tumors and the prognostic impact of such expression was analysed with the Kaplan-Meier method...... and the Cox proportional hazard model. Interestingly, increased syncytin expression was associated with decreased overall survival in rectal but not in colonic cancer patients. Thus, the prognostic impact of syncytin expression appears to vary with the tumor type....

  7. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  8. Attributable causes of colorectal cancer in China

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Meng-Jia; Huang, Qiu-Chi; Bao, Cheng-Zhen; Li, Ying-Jun; Li, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Ding; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Kun; Wang, Jian-Bing

    2018-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the 4th common cancer in China. Most colorectal cancers are due to modifiable lifestyle factors, but few studies have provided a systematic evidence-based assessment of the burden of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality attributable to the known risk factors in China. Methods We estimated the population attributable faction (PAF) for each selected risk factor in China, based on the prevalence of exposure around 2000 and relative risks from cohort studies a...

  9. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and a...

  10. Pitfalls and Opportunities in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. van Putten (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer in the Western world. Screening has been shown to reduce CRC incidence and mortality. The first evidence that colorectal cancer screening could effectively reduce mortality dates

  11. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  12. Anal metastasis originating from colorectal cancer: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Min; Lim, Joon Seok; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Mi Suk; Kim, Myeong Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Taek; Kim, Ho Guen [Dept. of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Anal metastasis from colorectal cancer rarely occurs, but it severely impairs the patient's quality of life, often requiring wide resection including the anal sphincter with permanent colostomy. This lesion can be misdiagnosed as a perianal fistula or an abscess, and it can be overlooked at the time of surgery because it is not included in the routine surgical extent of low anterior resection. We report two rare cases of anal metastasis from colorectal cancer. In both cases, perianal nodules with an internal solid portion were detected on preoperative rectal magnetic resonance imaging and additional local excisions of the anal lesions were performed during the process of treatment. Anal metastasis was pathologically confirmed by histology and immunohistochemical staining.

  13. Promising results after endoscopic vacuum treatment of anastomotic leakage following resection of rectal cancer with ileostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Johansen, John Lykkegaard; Alkhefagie, Ghalib Ali Abod

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In colorectal surgery, the most feared complication is anastomotic leakage (AL), which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we focus on treatment of perianastomotic abscess following AL after low anterior resection (LAR) of rectal cancer. In the literature...

  14. Promising results after endoscopic vacuum treatment of anastomotic leakage following resection of rectal cancer with ileostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Johansen, John Lykkegaard; Alkhefagie, Ghalib Ali Abod

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In colorectal surgery, the most feared complication is anastomotic leakage (AL), which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we focus on treatment of perianastomotic abscess following AL after low anterior resection (LAR) of rectal cancer. In the literatu...

  15. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an increase in short- and long

  16. Psychological distress in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients following microsatellite instability testing for Lynch syndrome on the pathologist's initiative.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Brunner, H.G.; Duijvendijk, P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Dutch Guideline on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer published in 2008, patients with recently diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) should undergo microsatellite instability (MSI) testing by a pathologist immediately after tumour resection if they are younger than 50 years, or if a second

  17. Prognostic significance of numeric aberrations of genes for thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrofolate reductase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Astrup; Vainer, B.; Witton, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    ) in colorectal cancer, and to evaluate its prognostic significance following adjuvant chemotherapy, since these enzymes are closely related to efficacy of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients (n = 314), who were completely resected for colorectal cancer stages II-IV and adjuvantly...

  18. Association of oncogenic bacteria with colorectal cancer in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youlian; He, Hanchang; Xu, Haoming; Li, Yingfei; Li, Zhiming; Du, Yanlei; He, Jie; Zhou, Yongjian; Wang, Hong; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-12-06

    To quantify Fusobacterium spp., Enterococcus faecalis (E.faecalis), Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and their possible association with CRC clinicopathogical features, we collected the resected tumors and adjacent normal tissues (N) from 97 CRC patients. 48 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) were also recruited. Real-time PCR was used for bacterial quantification. The median abundance ofFusobacterium spp.(p colon tissue in the proximity of the tumor.

  19. Preoperative Aspartate Aminotransferase-to-Platelet Ratio Index Predicts Perioperative Liver-Related Complications Following Liver Resection for Colorectal Cancer Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amptoulach, S.; Gross, G.; Sturesson, C.

    2017-01-01

    -related). In multivariate regression analysis, the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index was independently associated with liver-related complications (odds ratio: 1.149, p = 0.003) and perioperative liver failure (odds ratio: 1.155, p = 0.012). The latter was also true in the subcohort of patients......Background and Aims: There are limited data on the potential role of preoperative non-invasive markers, specifically the aspartate-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio and the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index, in predicting perioperative liver-related complications after hepatectomy...... collected from medical records. The nontumorous liver parenchyma in the surgical specimens of 31 patients was re-evaluated. Results: Overall, 215 patients were included. In total, 40% underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 47% major resection, while 47% had perioperative complications (6% liver...

  20. Local resection of early rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Qvist, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the National Danish screening programme for colorectal cancer will result in the detection of more early rectal cancers (ERC), which may be considered for local excision. For the low risk≤T1 cancer, the oncological outcome at local excision in smaller patient series has shown......, where rescue surgery may be considered. The establishment of a regional or national clinical database is necessary to improve the local treatment of ERC....

  1. Augmented Reality Guidance for the Resection of Missing Colorectal Liver Metastases: An Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Memeo, Ricardo; Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Modern chemotherapy achieves the shrinking of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) to such extent that they may disappear from radiological imaging. Disappearing CRLM rarely represents a complete pathological remission and have an important risk of recurrence. Augmented reality (AR) consists in the fusion of real-time patient images with a computer-generated 3D virtual patient model created from pre-operative medical imaging. The aim of this prospective pilot study is to investigate the potential of AR navigation as a tool to help locate and surgically resect missing CRLM. A 3D virtual anatomical model was created from thoracoabdominal CT-scans using customary software (VR RENDER(®), IRCAD). The virtual model was superimposed to the operative field using an Exoscope (VITOM(®), Karl Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). Virtual and real images were manually registered in real-time using a video mixer, based on external anatomical landmarks with an estimated accuracy of 5 mm. This modality was tested in three patients, with four missing CRLM that had sizes from 12 to 24 mm, undergoing laparotomy after receiving pre-operative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. AR display and fine registration was performed within 6 min. AR helped detect all four missing CRLM, and guided their resection. In all cases the planned security margin of 1 cm was clear and resections were confirmed to be R0 by pathology. There was no postoperative major morbidity or mortality. No local recurrence occurred in the follow-up period of 6-22 months. This initial experience suggests that AR may be a helpful navigation tool for the resection of missing CRLM.

  2. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  3. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  4. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Pedro Lopes; Paula Manuela de Castro Cardoso Pereira; Ana Filipa dos Reis Baltazar Vicente; Alexandra Bernardo; María Fernanda de Mesquita

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery...

  5. Screening vs. non-screening detected colorectal cancer: Differences in pre-therapeutic work up and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraste, D; Martling, A; Nilsson, P J; Blom, J; Törnberg, S; Janson, M

    2017-06-01

    Objectives To compare preoperative staging, multidisciplinary team-assessment, and treatment in patients with screening detected and non-screening detected colorectal cancer. Methods Data on patient and tumour characteristics, staging, multidisciplinary team-assessment and treatment in patients with screening and non-screening detected colorectal cancer from 2008 to 2012 were collected from the Stockholm-Gotland screening register and the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Results The screening group had a higher proportion of stage I disease (41 vs. 15%; p team-assessed than the non-screening group ( p team-assessed than patients with surgically resected cancers ( p team assessed more extensively than patients with non-screening detected cancers. Staging and multidisciplinary team assessment prior to endoscopic resection was less complete compared with surgical resection. Extensive surgical and (neo)adjuvant treatment was given in stage I disease. Participation in screening reduced the risk of emergency surgery for colorectal cancer.

  6. Radiologic evaluation of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Joong; Kang, Hee Tae; Kim, Jong Deok; Rhee, Hak Song

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer of Korea is much lower than that of Western countries, but has shown a tendency to a slight increase recently. Barium enema is the most valuable, noninvasive and inexpensive method available to evaluate the size, shape and site of colorectal cancer. The authors reviewed and radiologically classified barium enema studies of 232 cases of colorectal cancer from Aug. 1967 to July 1982 at Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Confirmed clinically, operatively and pathologically. The results were as follows; 1. The ratio of male and female was 1.3:1, and youngest was 13 year-old and the oldest 86 year-old. 2. The peak incidence occurred from 5th to 7th decades, accounting for 78% of all cases (181/232), and there was a relatively high incidence of the disease in patients below 30 years of age at 7.8% (18/232). 3. Rectum and rectosigmoid region are the most frequently involved regions (127/232:54.8%). 4. The positivity of barium enema examination was 4.0% (232/5807), and its accuracy was 96.5% (224/232). 5. The radiologic findings were classified into 4 groups, and they were annular encircling 62.9% (146/232). polypoid fungating 26.8% (62/232), infiltrating 8.6% (20/232), and primary ulcerating 1.7% (4/232) in order of frequency. 6. The linear length of the cancer ranged from 1.5 Cm to 15 Cm, and the average length was 5.5 Cm. 7. There was no statistical correlation between the length of lesion, the site, and the radiologic findings, and stages of the lesion (P:0.750-0.250). 8. The majority of colorectal cancers was adenocarcinoma (217/232:93.6%)

  7. Systematic Second-look Surgery Plus HIPEC in Patients Without Evidence of Recurrence, at High Risk of Carcinomatosis After Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano Del Moral, Ángel; Pérez Viejo, Estibalitz; Manzanedo Romero, Israel; Rodríguez Caravaca, Gil; Pereira Pérez, Fernando

    2018-02-01

    To analyze the impact of systematic second-look surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) performed 1 year after resection of the primary tumor, in asymptomatic patients at high risk of developing peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). Between 2012-2016, 33 patients without any sign of peritoneal recurrence on imaging studies were prospectively included in the study and underwent second-look surgery aimed at treating limited PC earlier and were prospectively recorded. They were selected based on 5 primary tumor-associated criteria: resected minimal synchronous macroscopic PC (n = 10), synchronous ovarian metastases (n = 2), positive peritoneal cytology (n = 2), pT4 primary tumors (n = 15) and perforation (n = 4). PC was found and treated by cytoreduction plus HIPEC in 10 of the 33 (30.3%) patients, although it was detected in only 2/15 patients of the pT4 subgroup (13.3%). The patients without PC underwent complete abdominal exploration plus HIPEC. Median follow-up was 14.5 months. One patient died postoperatively at day 55. Severe morbidity rate (Clavien-Dindo III-V) was low (15.2%). The 3-year overall survival rate was 93% and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 33%. Peritoneal recurrences occurred in 4 patients (12.1%), 2 of whom had macroscopic PC discovered at the second-look (20%), while the other 2 patients had no macroscopic PC (8.7%) (P = .04). The second look + HIPEC strategy in our series of patients at high risk of developing PC, allows its early detection and its treatment in 30.3% of cases, with a very low rate of peritoneal recurrence. It is important to continue evaluating the results to increase the accuracy of the inclusion criteria, especially the pT4 criterion that in this series has a low predictive power for the occurrence of PC. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimizing Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.S. Meester (Reinier)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractColorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths. Screening for colorectal cancer is implemented in an increasing number of settings, but performance of programs is often suboptimal. In this thesis, advanced modeling, informed by empirical data, was used to identify areas for

  9. Colorectal cancer: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaillant, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Technical advances that has been achieved during the past two decades have not dramatically improved the 35 % five-year rate observed in patients with colorectal cancer. These tumours remain one of the most challenging problems in public health policies in western countries. Screening applies to some subgroups of high-risk individuals and the general population aged over 50. In order to improve their efficacy, such screening programs imply large-scale information campaigns and a strong cooperation with the general physicians. The diagnosis is strongly suggested by any recent modification of bowel habits ad by rectal bleeding. It has to be confirmed by rectal examination and by colonoscopy which allows sampling to the tumour. Loco-regional and distant metastatic tumour spread must be assessed precisely before any therapeutic strategy is decided. Surgery, which resects the tumour en bloc with the corresponding lymphatic territories, is the only treatment that can achieve long term cure. In localized tumours, surgery alone can provide patients with 5-years survival rates close to 95 %. On the other hand, surgery alone is not sufficient to cure patients with advances cancers. In recent years, several adjuvant therapeutic modalities have been shown to improve the results of surgery in these cases (rectal cancer: pre-operative radiotherapy or post-operative radio-chemotherapy, colon cancer with nodal metastases: post-operative chemotherapy). There is a hope that a better use of our diagnostic and therapeutic armementarium would be able to avoid or to cure up to 75 % of the colorectal cancers we are dealing with. (author)

  10. Postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection.......To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection....

  11. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  12. Influence of Transfusions on Perioperative and Long-Term Outcome in Patients Following Hepatic Resection for Colorectal Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooby, David A.; Stockman, Jennifer; Ben-Porat, Leah; Gonen, Mithat; Jarnagin, William R.; Dematteo, Ronald P.; Tuorto, Scott; Wuest, David; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Fong, Yuman

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine if transfusion affected perioperative and long-term outcome in patients undergoing liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer. Summary Background Data Blood transfusion produces host immunosuppression and has been postulated to result in adverse outcome for patients undergoing surgical resection of malignancies. Methods Blood transfusion records and clinical outcomes for 1,351 patients undergoing liver resection at a tertiary cancer referral center were analyzed. Results Blood transfusion was associated with adverse outcome after liver resection. The greatest effect was in the perioperative course, where transfusion was an independent predictor of operative mortality, complications, major complications, and length of hospital stay. This effect was dose-related. Patients receiving one or two units or more than two units had an operative mortality of 2.5% and 11.1%, respectively, compared to 1.2% for patients not requiring transfusions. Transfusion was also associated with adverse long-term survival by univariate analysis, but this factor was not significant on multivariate analysis. Even patients receiving only one or two units had a more adverse outcome. Conclusions Perioperative blood transfusion is a risk factor for poor outcome after liver resection. Blood conservation methods should be used to avoid transfusion, especially in patents currently requiring limited amounts of transfused blood products. PMID:12796583

  13. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tayyem, Reema F.; Bawadi, Hiba A.; Shehadah, Ihab; Agraib, Lana M.; AbuMweis, Suhad S.; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed; Bani-Hani, Kamal E.; Heath, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background & aimsDietary pattern and lifestyle have been reported to be important risk factors in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanism of action of dietary factors in CRC disease is unclear. The aim of this study is the examination of several dietary choices and their potential association with the risk of developing CRC. MethodsDietary data was collected from 220 subjects who were previously diagnosed with CRC, and 281 control subjects (matched by age, g...

  14. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Luís César [UNIFESP; Matos, Delcio [UNIFESP

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a clinical entity of a persistent relevance in clinical practice and its early diagnosis is a determinant factor to obtain better therapeutic results. Tumor markers are helpful means for a better approach to individuals with such neoplasm. In the present review, the authors analyze the phases in which surgical-clinical treatment markers must be used: diagnosis, determination of tumor stage, establishment of prognosis and detection of recurrence. Current and future markers...

  15. Poor prognostic role of the pretreatment platelet counts in colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Zheng-Shui; Cheng, Hua; Shen, Wei; Wang, Xin-Ping

    2018-06-01

    Recently, a wide variety of studies have suggested that elevated platelet counts are associated with survival in patients with colorectal cancer. On one hand several studies suggest a negative connection in colorectal cancer patients with pre-operative thrombocytosis, on the other hand other studies contradicts this. However, it remains unknown whether elevated platelet counts are associated with survival in colorectal cancer patients. We therefore conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic role of platelet counts in colorectal cancer. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception to October 15, 2016 to identify relevant studies that have explored the prognostic role of platelet counts in colorectal cancer. Studies that examined the association between platelet counts and prognoses in colorectal cancer and that provided a hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for overall survival (OS) and/or disease-free survival (DFS) were included. This meta-analysis included 9 retrospective cohort studies involving 3413 patients with colorectal cancer. OS was shorter in patients with elevated platelet counts than in patients with normal counts (HR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.68-2.65). For DFS, an elevated platelet count was also a poor predictor (HR 2.51, 95% CI: 1.84-3.43). In this meta-analysis, we suggest that an elevated platelet count is a negative predictor of survival in both primary colorectal cancer and resectable colorectal liver metastases.

  16. Development of Detachable IORT Table for Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Se; Lee, Joon Ha

    1994-01-01

    In spite of remarkable improvement of surgical skills and anesthesia, local failure still occurred in 36-45% of locally advanced colorectal cancer after curative resection with or without pre-or post-operative irradiation. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is the ideal modality which respectable lesions are removed surgically and the remaining cancer nests are sterilized by irradiation during a surgical procedure. Therefore, the excellent local control without the damage of the adjacent normal tissues can be achieved. In IORT, judicious set up of the treatment cone on the treatment surface of the patient is required for accurate and homogenous dose distribution within treatment field, especially on the slopping surface of sacrum and pelvic sidewall which are the common sites of the local recurrence in rectal cancer. For this purpose, adequate coordination of gantry rotation and table tilting are essential. Adjusting gantry rotation is not difficult but tilting of the table is impossible inconventional treatment couch. Department of Therapeutic Radiology in Yeungnam University Medical Center developed the IORT table for colorectal cancer which is easy to set up and detach on head-down is about 30 degree which is efficient and easy-to-use, not only for IORT but also for colorectal surgery. So far, authors performed IORT with newly developed treatment table in 2 patients with rectal cancer and we found that this newly developed table could contribute in improving the dose distribution of IORT and surgical procedure for colorectal cancer

  17. Intermittent clamping of the hepatic pedicle in simultaneous ultrasonography-guided liver resection and colorectal resection with intestinal anastomosis: is it safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raffele, Emilio; Mirarchi, Mariateresa; Vaccari, Samuele; Cuicchi, Dajana; Lecce, Ferdinando; Dalla Via, Barbara; Cola, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    In patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and synchronous colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) potentially candidates to combined liver (LR) and colorectal resection (CRR), the extent of LR and the need of hepatic pedicle clamping (HPC) in selected cases are considered risk factors for the outcome of the intestinal anastomosis. This study aimed to determine whether intermittent HPC is predictive of anastomotic leakage (AL) and has an adverse effect on the clinical outcome in patients undergoing combined restorative CRR and LR. One hundred six LR have been performed for CRLM in our unit from July 2005. Patients who received CRR with anastomosis and simultaneous intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS)-guided LR/ablation for resectable CRLM were included in this study. CRR was performed first. Intermittent HPC was decided at the discretion of the liver surgeon. The perioperative outcome was evaluated according to occurrence of AL and overall postoperative morbidity and mortality. Thirty-eight patients underwent simultaneous IOUS-guided LR/ablation and CRR with intestinal anastomosis; 19 underwent intermittent HPC (group ICHPY) while 19 did not (group ICHPN); the mean ± SD (range) duration of clamping in group ICHPY was 58.6 ± 32.2 (10.0-125.0) min. Postoperative results were similar between groups. One asymptomatic AL occurred in group ICHPY (5.2 %). Major postoperative complications were none in group ICHPY and one (5.2 %) in group ICHPN, respectively. One patient in group ICHPY died postoperatively (5.2 %). This study suggests that intermittent HPC during LR is not predictive of AL and has no adverse effect on the overall clinical outcome in patients undergoing combined restorative colorectal surgery and hepatectomy for advanced CRC.

  18. Systems Support Mapping in Guiding Self-Management in Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8

  19. Cause and place of death in patients dying with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, O M; John, S K P; Horseman, N; Lawrance, R J; Fozard, J B J

    2007-03-01

    Few studies on colorectal cancer look at the one-third of patients for whom treatment fails and who need a management strategy for death. This paper has examined the mode and place of death in patients with colorectal cancer. This study was a review of 209 deaths, analysed between January 2001 and September 2004 by retrospective review of a prospectively collected database. A total of 118 patients (group 1) had undergone resection of their primary colorectal cancer, 20 (group 2) had had a defunctioning stoma or bypass surgery and the remaining 71 patients (group 3) had either had no surgery, an open and close laparotomy or had a colonic stent. One hundred and fifty-six (75%) patients died of colorectal cancer with the remainder dying of other causes. The number of admissions to hospital and the number of days spent in hospital from diagnosis to death were greatest in group 1. Overall, only 34 patients (22%) dying from colorectal cancer died at home. Forty (26%) died in hospital and 70 (45%) died in a palliative care unit. Patients dying from colorectal cancer who undergo surgical resection of their primary tumour spend more time between diagnosis and death in hospital. They are also more likely to die in hospital than patients treated by surgical palliation or nonsurgically. Patients who are treated palliatively from the outset (group 3) are most likely to die at home. If hospital is accepted as an appropriate place for death from colorectal cancer, then greater provision for this should be made.

  20. Which patients with resectable pancreatic cancer truly benefit from oncological resection: is it destiny or biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis. A technically perfect surgical operation may still not provide a survival advantage for patients with technically resectable pancreatic cancer. Appropriate selection of patients for surgical resections is an imminent issue. Recent studies have provided an important clue on what serum biomarkers may be used to select out the patients who would unlikely benefit from the surgical resection.

  1. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, fo...

  2. Lower or Standard Dose Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-22

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  3. Screening of colorectal early cancer by radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, M.; Usui, Y.; Kobayashi, S.

    1988-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been gradually increasing in Japan, and if the present rate of increase is maintained it has been estimated that it will become the most common of all malignant neoplasms by the year 2000. It has been proved that colorectal cancer can be completely cured, if it is treated in its early phase. Early cancer of the large bowel is defined as a cancer which is limited to the mucosal membrane or submucosal layer, regardless of lymph node and distant metastases. Detection of early cancer improves the overall curability of colorectal cancer. The greatest number of early cancers of the large bowel are polypoid lesions in their macroscopic form, and depressed lesions are rarely encountered. Accordingly, the first step in the detection of early cancer starts with the screening of polypoid lesion by radiology and endoscopy. This paper is concerned with diagnostic accuracy of radiology in the screening of colorectal cancer with endoscopic correlation

  4. Clinicodemographic aspect of resectable pancreatic cancer and prognostic factors for resectable cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Kun-Chun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCA is one of the most lethal human malignancies, and radical surgery remains the cornerstone of treatment. After resection, the overall 5-year survival rate is only 10% to 29%. At the time of presentation, however, about 40% of patients generally have distant metastases and another 40% are usually diagnosed with locally advanced cancers. The remaining 20% of patients are indicated for surgery on the basis of the results of preoperative imaging studies; however, about half of these patients are found to be unsuitable for resection during surgical exploration. In the current study, we aimed to determine the clinicopathological characteristics that predict the resectability of PCA and to conduct a prognostic analysis of PCA after resection to identify favorable survival factors. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 688 patients (422 men and 266 women who had undergone surgery for histopathologically proven PCA in the Department of Surgery at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan from 1981 to 2006. We compared the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent resection and patients who did not undergo resection in order to identify the predictive factors for successful resectability of PCA, and we conducted prognostic analysis for PCA after resection. Results A carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9 level of 37 U/ml or greater and a tumor size of 3 cm or more independently predicted resectability of PCA. In terms of survival after resection, PCA patients with better nutritional status (measured as having an albumin level greater than 3.5 g/dl, radical resection, early tumor stage and better-differentiated tumors were associated with favorable survival. Conclusions Besides traditional imaging studies, preoperative CA 19–9 levels and tumor size can also be used to determine the resectability of PCA. Better nutritional status, curative resection, early tumor stage and well

  5. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment and follow up were included. Patient ... and recurrence and the associated patient and disease ... The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the devel- ... therapy, disease stage and curative intent (table 3). ... through genetic and family analyses (4,6). ... Polite BN, Dignam JJ: A colorectal cancer model of health.

  7. Vitamin D, inflammation, and colorectal cancer progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harten-Gerritsen, van Suzanne; Balvers, Michiel G.J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Kampman, Ellen; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Survival from colorectal cancer is positively associated with vitamin D status. However, whether this association is causal remains unclear. Inflammatory processes may link vitamin D to colorectal cancer survival, and therefore investigating inflammatory markers as potential mediators may be a

  8. Colorectal Cancer Awareness for Women via Facebook: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Kelly; Pennings Kamp, Kendra J; Salaysay, Zachary

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death among U.S. women. Women report being screened for colorectal cancer less often than men, and if colorectal cancer screening guidelines were routinely followed, approximately 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented. Many colorectal cancer screening interventions have not used Facebook, which is the most popular social media site among women. Little is known about engaging women in colorectal cancer screening and risk reduction information using Facebook. The "Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness for Women" Facebook page was created to promote colorectal cancer screening and risk reduction awareness among women. Facebook posts targeted women aged 45-64 years and highlighted colorectal cancer screening methods, guidelines, and colorectal cancer risk reduction strategies. Demographics and data about the women's interactions with the page were collected using Facebook analytics and analyzed. The majority of the 391 users of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Awareness for Women Facebook page were women aged 45-54 years (56.5%). The most "liked" posts were related to colorectal cancer risk reduction behaviors. In an effort to increase routine colorectal cancer screening and colorectal cancer risk reduction behaviors, gastroenterology nurses and practices should consider Facebook as a good method to regularly engage women in colorectal cancer screening and colorectal cancer risk reduction information.

  9. Delayed Coloanal Anastomosis for rectovaginal fistula after colorectal resection for deep endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Gaetano; Luc, Alberto Realis; Tutino, Roberta; Clerico, Giuseppe; Trompetto, Mario

    2016-11-28

    The deep infiltrating endometriosis, defined as a subperitoneal infiltration of endometrial implants of ≥ 5 mm involving not only the colorectal tract but also rectovaginal septum, vagina and bladder often requires a challenging surgery. Endometriosis nodes of the rectovaginal septum, if symptomatic, need a resection of the involved colorectal tract with colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. Unfortunately in these cases is not uncommon the possibility of a postoperative rectovaginal fistula (RVF), caused by the weakness of the septum that must be skeletonized to completely remove the endometriosis nodes. Here we present a case of anastomotic leakage with high RVF after colorectal resection and low colorectal anastomosis for deep endometriosis in which, for a chronic pelvic sepsis and a high risk of failure of a new immediate coloanal anastomosis, a Turnbull-Cutait pull-through with delayed coloanal anastomosis (DCAA) has been performed. A now 34 years old woman was admitted to our Clinic because of a RVF due to recto-sigmoid resection with colorectal anastomosis for endometriosis. An evaluation in anesthesia confirmed the RVF. In this case we avoided an immediate new colorectal anastomosis for the high risk of a recurrent anastomotic leakage and performed a DCAA. The outcome of the two-steps operation has been satisfactory both for the healing of the RVF and for the functional results bringing the young patient to a completely restored social, sexual and working life. In our opinion Turnbull-Cutait pull-through with delayed coloanal anastomosis is a good choice in patients with RVF in which a new colorectal or coloanal anastomosis can bring to a recurrent leakage. Delayed coloanal anastomosis, Deep endometriosis, Rectovaginal fistula.

  10. Self-expandable metal stents in the treatment of benign anastomotic stricture after rectal resection for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamazza, A; Fiori, E; Sterpetti, A V; Schillaci, A; Scoglio, D; Lezoche, E

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the use of self-expandable metallic stents to treat patients with symptomatic benign anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection. Ten patients with a benign symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection were treated with endoscopic placement of a self-expandable metal stent. The stent was placed successfully in all 10 patients without any major morbidity. At a mean follow-up of 18 months the stenosis was resolved successfully in 7 out 10 patients (70%). The remaining three patients were subsequently treated successfully with balloon dilatation. Self-expandable metal stents represent a valid alternative to balloon dilatation to treat patients with benign symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection for cancer. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Colorectal cancer, diabetes and survival : Epidemiological insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanders, M. M. J.; Vissers, P. A. J.; Haak, H. R.; van de Poll-Franse, L.

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with pre-existing diabetes have significantly lower rates of overall survival compared with patients without diabetes. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society in 2010 reviewed the scientific literature concerning diabetes

  12. Short-Term Outcomes of Simultaneous Laparoscopic Colectomy and Hepatectomy for Primary Colorectal Cancer With Synchronous Liver Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Akira; Uemura, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Hiraki, Masayuki; Naito, Atsushi; Ogino, Takayuki; Nonaka, Ryoji; Nishimura, Junichi; Wada, Hiroshi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Nagano, Hiroaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Although simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases is reported to be safe and effective, the feasibility of a laparoscopic approach remains controversial. This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and short-term outcomes of simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for primary colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases. From September 2008 to December 2013, 10 patients underwent simultaneous laparoscopic resection of primary colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases with curative intent at our institute. The median operative time was 452 minutes, and the median estimated blood loss was 245 mL. Median times to discharge from the hospital and adjuvant chemotherapy were 13.5 and 44 postoperative days, respectively. Negative resection margins were achieved in all cases, with no postoperative mortality or major morbidity. Simultaneous laparoscopic colectomy and hepatectomy for primary colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases appears feasible with low morbidity and favorable outcomes. PMID:25058762

  13. Ovarian cancer mimicking recurrence at colorectal anastomosis: report of a case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reardon, C M

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: The aim of this article is to emphasize the increased risk of developing metachronous ovarian tumors after resection of rectal cancer. METHOD AND RESULTS: We report the case of a postmenopausal female patient who, five years after anterior resection, developed a primary ovarian malignancy that invaded a rectal anastomosis and in so doing mimicked a recurrence of a Dukes A rectal cancer. To our knowledge, such an occurrence has not been described previously in the literature. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the possible benefits of routine prophylactic oophorectomy at the time of colorectal cancer resection.

  14. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.

  15. [Significance of CEA in gastric and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, K; Miyamoto, Y; Izuo, M; Shiozaki, H; Aiba, S; Matsumoto, H

    1985-04-01

    The determination of serum CEA (Sandwich method) and CEA staining (PAP method) of excised specimens were performed in patients with gastric or colorectal cancer, and the biological characteristics of each cancer and the factors to increase serum CEA were studied with the following results: As colonic cancer has strong CEA productivity, serum CEA can be useful for the detection of cancer, and especially effective for the postoperative observation. Gastric cancer has weak CEA productivity, and serum CEA is not so useful in the detection of cancer and the judgement of resectability. The CEA positive rate of tissue with CEA staining was 80% in gastric cancer, 100% in colonic cancer, and were nearly equal to the CEA positive rate of serum in the group of terminal stage. In the mode of CEA staining of cancerous cells, IV type was observed most frequently in gastric cancer, and I type in colonic cancer. Among the resected cases showing more than 7ng/ml serum CEA, differentiated type, lymph node metastasis (+), the degree of tissue staining with CEA staining, the mode of cell staining O or I type in gastric cancer and I type in colonic cancer were observed in common.

  16. The use of a proforma improves colorectal cancer pathology reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, K.; Brown, S. R.; Lakin, G.; Balsitis, M.; Hosie, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    The detail and accuracy of pathological reporting for colorectal cancer is becoming increasingly recognised as important in the overall management of the patient. However, there is criticism of the variable standards of reporting. We assessed how the use of a proforma affected the completeness of reporting within one hospital. Data on all colorectal cancer patients attending one teaching hospital has been collected prospectively over a 15 month period from 1997 to 1998. The Royal College of Surgeons/Association of Coloproctology proforma lists all items considered to be essential for a complete pathological report of colorectal cancer. Its introduction in September 1997 allowed us to compare reporting before the proforma to that after. Of 54 patients, 46 (85%) had one or more items missing from their report before introduction of the proforma compared with only 8/44 (18%) patients after the proforma (P < 0.001). Circumferential resection margins and apical node status were the items most often absent, being significantly more frequently reported after the proforma (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). There was no difference in the median number of lymph nodes harvested after proforma introduction. The introduction of the proforma has not only resulted in improvements in reporting, but has increased the dialogue between surgical oncologists and pathologists. These features should result in improved overall management of the colorectal cancer patient. PMID:10655894

  17. HER 2/neu protein expression in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuell, B; Gruenberger, T; Scheithauer, W; Zielinski, Ch; Wrba, F

    2006-01-01

    Conflicting data exist about the prevalence of HER-2/neu overexpression in colorectal cancer ranging from 0 to 83 %. In our study we tried to clarify the extent of expression and its relationship to clinicopathological parameters. This study involved 77 specimens of malignant colorectal cancer lesions of surgically resected patients. HER-2/neu immunohistochemistry was performed using the Hercep-Test Kit. Out of 77 specimens, 56 were Her-2/neu negative (70%), 20 (26%) showed a barely immunostaining (1+), only 1 (1%) was moderately (2+) and 2 (3%) were strongly positive (3+). Her-2/neu staining (moderately and strongly positive) was only detected in primary tumours of patients with confirmed metastases. No relationship was found between membranous HER-2 expression and patients' gender or differentiation. The median survival time of patients with positive HER-2/neu immunostaining was 21 versus 39 months in patients without HER-2/neu expression (p = 0.088). The c-erbB protein expression was observed in colorectal cancer but rarely in the therapeutic range (2+ and 3+). There was no significant association with tumour grade, gender, localization of the primary tumour or survival. These data indicate that c-erbB-2 is unlikely to play a major role in the therapeutic management of colorectal cancer

  18. Robotic Colorectal Resection With and Without the Use of the New Da Vinci Table Motion: A Case-Matched Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, Matteo; Gianardi, Desirée; Guadagni, Simone; Di Franco, Gregorio; Bastiani, Luca; Furbetta, Niccolò; Simoncini, Tommaso; Zirafa, Cristina; Melfi, Franca; Buccianti, Piero; Moglia, Andrea; Cuschieri, Alfred; Mosca, Franco; Morelli, Luca

    2018-06-01

    The da Vinci Table Motion (dVTM) is a new device that enables patients to be repositioned with instruments in place within the abdomen, and without undocking the robot. The present study was designed to compare operative and short-term outcomes of patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery with the da Vinci Xi system, with or without use of the dVTM. Ten patients underwent robotic colorectal resection for cancer with the use of dVTM (Xi-dVTM group) between May 2015 and October 2015 at our center. The intraoperative and short-term clinical outcome were compared, using a case-control methodology (propensity scores approach to create 1:2 matched pairs), with a similar group of patients who underwent robotic colorectal surgery for cancer without the use of the dVTM device (Xi-only group). Overall robotic operative time was shorter in the Xi-dVTM group ( P = .04). Operations were executed fully robotic in all Xi-dVTM cases, while 2 cases of the Xi-only group required conversion to open surgery because of bulky tumors and difficult exposure. Postoperative medical complications were higher in the Xi-only group ( P = .024). In this preliminary experience, the use of the new dVTM with the da Vinci Xi in colorectal surgery, by overcoming the limitations of the fixed positions of the patient, enhanced the workflow and resulted in improved exposure of the operative field. Further studies with a greater number of patients are needed to confirm these benefits of the dVTM-da Vinci Xi robotically assisted colorectal surgery.

  19. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyem, Reema F; Bawadi, Hiba A; Shehadah, Ihab; Agraib, Lana M; AbuMweis, Suhad S; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed; Bani-Hani, Kamal E; Heath, Dennis D

    2017-06-01

    Dietary pattern and lifestyle have been reported to be important risk factors in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanism of action of dietary factors in CRC disease is unclear. The aim of this study is the examination of several dietary choices and their potential association with the risk of developing CRC. Dietary data was collected from 220 subjects who were previously diagnosed with CRC, and 281 control subjects (matched by age, gender, occupation and marital status). The data was collected between January 2010 and December 2012, using interview-based questionnaires. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between dietary choices and risk of developing colorectal cancer. Factor analysis revealed three major dietary patterns. The first pattern we identified as the "Healthy Pattern", the second was identified as "High Sugar/High Tea Pattern" and the third as "Western Pattern". In the Healthy Pattern group we found a 10.54% variation in food intake, while the intake variation was 11.64% in the Western Pattern. After adjusting for confounding factors, the Western Pattern food choice was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of developing CRC (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.12-3.16). The results for the Healthy and High-Sugar/High Tea Patterns showed a decrease, but the statistic was not significant for the risk of CRC development. The Western Pattern of dietary choice was directly associated with CRC. The association between the dietary food choice in the Healthy and High-Sugar/High Tea Patterns and colorectal cancer needs further study in our Jordanian population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Endoscopic management of colorectal adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel; Fischer, Andreas; Schmidt, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal adenomas are well known precursors of invasive adenocarcinoma. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for adenoma detection. Colonoscopy is far more than a diagnostic tool, as it allows effective treatment of colorectal adenomas. Endoscopic resection of colorectal adenomas has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer. Difficult resection techniques are available, such as endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection and endoscopic full-thickness resection. This review aims to provide an overview of the different endoscopic resection techniques and their indications, and summarizes the current recommendations in the recently published guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

  1. Personalizing therapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ashley; Ma, Brigette B Y

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Several important scientific discoveries in the molecular biology of CRC have changed clinical practice in oncology. These included the comprehensive genome-wide profiling of CRC by the Cancer Genome Atlas Network, the discovery of mutations along the RAS-RAF signaling pathway as major determinants of response to antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor, the elucidation of new molecular subsets of CRC or gene signatures that may predict clinical outcome after adjuvant chemotherapy, and the innovative targeting of the family of vascular endothelial growth factor and receptors. These new data have allowed oncologists to individualize drug therapy on the basis of a patient's tumor's unique molecular profile, especially in the management of metastatic CRC. This review article will discuss the progress of personalized medicine in the contemporary management of CRC. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  3. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management.

  4. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  5. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  6. The impact of incisional hernia on mortality after colonic cancer resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Erichsen, Rune; Krarup, Peter Martin

    2016-01-01

    intended colonic resection for cancer with primary anastomosis between 2001 and 2008 were included. The exposure of interest was incisional hernia, as registered in the NPR, and the outcome was long-term overall mortality. Extended cox regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables...... the impact of incisional hernia on mortality after colonic cancer resection. METHOD: This was a nationwide cohort study comprising data from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database, the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR), and the Danish Central Person Registry. Patients who underwent curatively...... with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.35, 95 % confidence interval 1.39-3.98), while incisional hernia repair did not increase mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 0.81, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: Incisional hernia diagnosis or repair subsequent to colonic cancer resection did...

  7. Update on Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Karin M

    2018-05-01

    Our understanding of the genetics of colorectal cancer has changed dramatically over recent years. Colorectal cancer can be classified in multiple different ways. Along with the advent of whole-exome sequencing, we have gained an understanding of the scale of the genetic changes found in sporadic colorectal cancer. We now know that there are multiple pathways that are commonly involved in the evolution of colorectal cancer including Wnt/β-catenin, RAS, EGFR, and PIK3 kinase. Another recent leap in our understanding of colorectal cancer genetics is the recognition that many, if not all tumors, are actually genetically heterogeneous within individual tumors and also between tumors. Recent research has revealed the prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications of various specific mutations, including specific mutations in BRAF and KRAS . There is increasing interest in the use of mutation testing for screening and surveillance through stool and circulating DNA testing. Recent advances in translational research in colorectal cancer genetics are dramatically changing our understanding of colorectal cancer and will likely change therapy and surveillance in the near future.

  8. MRI of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain. Differential diagnosis of colorectal and pulmonary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukusumi, Akio; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Katsutoshi

    1998-01-01

    To clarify the characteristic features of MR imagings of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain and search for differential points between the lesions from colorectal cancer and those of lung cancer, we evaluated retrospectively intraparenchymal metastatic lesions of 13 colorectal origins and 13 pulmonary origins on MR imagings, compared with resected specimens. Metastatic lesions from colorectal cancer showed marked hypointense solid components on T2WI, which correspond to the dense tumor cells and coagulated necrosis pathologically. Metastatic lesions from lung cancers showed mixed intensity and various components on T2WI, which correspond to various histological components, such as solid tumor cell's nests, hemorrhage, necrosis and cystic fluid collection. Pathological specimens suggested that the low signal intensity on T2WI of MRI derived from concentration of tumor cells and coagulated necrosis including macrophages and lymphocytes. This study may contribute to make the differential diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain from colorectal and pulmonary cancers. (author)

  9. Curative resection of transverse colon cancer via minilaparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishiguro, Tohru; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Okada, Norimichi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Haga, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Minilaparotomy has been reported to be a minimally invasive alternative to laparoscopically assisted surgery. We retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of minilaparotomy for the resection of transverse colon cancer, which has generally been considered difficult to resect laparoscopically. Patients for whom curative resection was attempted for transverse colon cancer (n = 21) or sigmoid colon cancer (n = 81) via minilaparotomy (skin incision, transverse colon cancer as well as those with sigmoid colon cancer.

  10. Determining gastric cancer resectability by dynamic MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zilai; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Ding, Bei; Song, Qi; Ling, Huawei; Huang, Baisong; Chen, Kemin [Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Yan, Chao [Jiaotong University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2010-03-15

    Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has been widely used to detect primary lesions and to evaluate TNM staging. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of dynamic MDCT in the preoperative determination of the resectability of gastric cancer. MDCT was used to image 350 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed by biopsy before surgery. MDCT findings regarding TNM staging and resectability were correlated with surgical and pathological findings. The accuracy of MDCT for staging gastric cancer was high, especially for tumour stage T1 (94.3%), lymph node stage N2 (87.3%), and for predicting distant metastases (>96.6%). When resectability was considered to be the outcome, the total accuracy of MDCT was 87.4%, sensitivity was 89.7% and specificity was 76.7%. Results showed high sensitivity for identifying peritoneal seeding (90.0%) and for predicting liver metastasis (80.0%). Dynamic enhanced MDCT is useful for TNM staging of gastric cancers and for predicting tumour respectability preoperatively. (orig.)

  11. Determining gastric cancer resectability by dynamic MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Zilai; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Ding, Bei; Song, Qi; Ling, Huawei; Huang, Baisong; Chen, Kemin; Yan, Chao

    2010-01-01

    Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) has been widely used to detect primary lesions and to evaluate TNM staging. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of dynamic MDCT in the preoperative determination of the resectability of gastric cancer. MDCT was used to image 350 cases of gastric cancer diagnosed by biopsy before surgery. MDCT findings regarding TNM staging and resectability were correlated with surgical and pathological findings. The accuracy of MDCT for staging gastric cancer was high, especially for tumour stage T1 (94.3%), lymph node stage N2 (87.3%), and for predicting distant metastases (>96.6%). When resectability was considered to be the outcome, the total accuracy of MDCT was 87.4%, sensitivity was 89.7% and specificity was 76.7%. Results showed high sensitivity for identifying peritoneal seeding (90.0%) and for predicting liver metastasis (80.0%). Dynamic enhanced MDCT is useful for TNM staging of gastric cancers and for predicting tumour respectability preoperatively. (orig.)

  12. Genetic prognostic markers in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Houlston, R S; Tomlinson, I P

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of molecular genetics to colorectal cancer has been restricted largely to relatively rare inherited tumours and to the detection of germline mutations predisposing to these cancers. However, much is now also known about somatic events leading to colorectal cancer. A number of studies has been undertaken examining possible relations between genetic features and prognostic indices. While many of these studies are small and inconclusive, it is clear that a number of different pa...

  13. The Association Between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0273 TITLE: The Association between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer ... Colorectal Cancer Risk 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0273 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrea Burnett-Hartman 5d... cancer in patients with sessile serrated colorectal polyps (SSPs). The project’s specific aims are as follows: 1) Estimate the risk of colorectal

  14. Perceived religiousness is protective for colorectal cancer: data from the Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Kune, G A; Kune, S; Watson, L F

    1993-01-01

    The perceived or self-reported degree of 'religiousness' was obtained by interview from 715 colorectal cancer patients and 727 age/sex matched community controls, as part of a large, comprehensive population-based study of colorectal cancer incidence, aetiology and survival (The Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study) conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Self-reported or perceived 'religiousness', as defined in the study, was a statistically significant protective factor [relative risk (RR) = 0.70, ...

  15. Endoscopic Stenting for Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learned From a 15-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Enrico; Lamazza, Antonietta; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Schillaci, Alberto

    The aim of our prospective study was to analyze the results of endoscopic stenting to treat obstruction due to colorectal cancer and complications after colorectal resection for cancer. Endoscopic stenting for obstructing colorectal cancer has become a common place in clinical practice. However, there is a 2% to 5% risk of bowel perforation, and a percentage of technical failure of 2% to 10%. In a 15-year period (August, 1999 to December, 2013), 153 patients with colorectal cancer had endoscopic placement of a self-expandable metal stent for treatment of an obstructing colorectal cancer (133 patients) or for treatment of complications after colorectal resection for cancer (20 patients). They were prospectively evaluated in a database and they form the basis of this report. There was no case of mortality or major morbidity. Overall technical success was 94.8%. After introducing the use of a pediatric nasogastroscope to pass the obstruction (71 patients), technical success was 100%. Complications in patients in whom the stent was left in place during the follow-up were frequent, requiring a close observation. We had 20 patients with fecal obstruction, 4 cases of stent dislodgment, and 8 cases of obstruction from ingrowth of the tumor. All patients were treated successfully endoscopically. Placement of self-expandable metal stents represents a valid technique. A proper training is required.

  16. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Meat and colo-rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M J

    1999-05-01

    In early epidemiological studies of diet and cancer the stress was on the search for causal factors. Population (ecological) studies tended to show a strong correlation between meat intake, particularly red meat, and the risk of colo-rectal cancer. They also tended to show meat to be strongly inversely correlated with cancers of the stomach and oesophagus and liver. Early case-control studies tended to support the postulated role for red meat in colo-rectal carcinogenesis, although more recent case-control studies, particularly those from Europe, have tended to show no relationship. The cohort studies in general failed to detect any relationship between meat intake and colo-rectal cancer risk. The available evidence points to the intake of protective factors such as vegetables and whole-grain cereals being the main determinants of colo-rectal cancer risk, with meat intake only coincidentally related.

  18. Colorectal Cancer Safety Net: Is It Catching Patients Appropriately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althans, Alison R; Brady, Justin T; Times, Melissa L; Keller, Deborah S; Harvey, Alexis R; Kelly, Molly E; Patel, Nilam D; Steele, Scott R

    2018-01-01

    Disparities in access to colorectal cancer care are multifactorial and are affected by socioeconomic elements. Uninsured and Medicaid patients present with advanced stage disease and have worse outcomes compared with similar privately insured patients. Safety net hospitals are a major care provider to this vulnerable population. Few studies have evaluated outcomes for safety net hospitals compared with private institutions in colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare demographics, screening rates, presentation stage, and survival rates between a safety net hospital and a tertiary care center. Comparative review of patients at 2 institutions in the same metropolitan area were conducted. The study included colorectal cancer care delivered either at 1 safety net hospital or 1 private tertiary care center in the same city from 2010 to 2016. A total of 350 patients with colorectal cancer from each hospital were evaluated. Overall survival across hospital systems was measured. The safety net hospital had significantly more uninsured and Medicaid patients (46% vs 13%; p presentation, a similar percentage of patients at each hospital presented with stage IV disease (26% vs 20%; p = 0.06). For those undergoing resection, final pathologic stage distribution was similar across groups (p = 0.10). After a comparable median follow-up period (26.6 mo for safety net hospital vs 29.2 mo for tertiary care center), log-rank test for overall survival favored the safety net hospital (p = 0.05); disease-free survival was similar between hospitals (p = 0.40). This was a retrospective review, reporting from medical charts. Our results support the value of safety net hospitals for providing quality colorectal cancer care, with survival and recurrence outcomes equivalent or improved compared with a local tertiary care center. Because safety net hospitals can provide equivalent outcomes despite socioeconomic inequalities and financial constraints, emphasis should be focused

  19. Pathological and Biological Aspects of Colorectal Cancer Treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, M.J.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pathological and biological aspects of colorectal cancer treatment. This thesis describes several pathological and biological aspects of colorectal cancer treatment. Different patient populations were investigated including patients with mobile rectal cancer enrolled in the Dutch TME trial, patients

  20. The use of synthetic mesh in patients undergoing ventral hernia repair during colorectal resection: Risk of infection and recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal H. El-Gazzaz

    2012-10-01

    Conclusions: Use of non-absorbable mesh during colorectal resection should be very selective. Comorbidity, duration of follow-up, emergency operations, size of area covered and infection are independent factors associated with recurrence.

  1. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth and progression of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Ushio, K.; Hirota, T.

    1988-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the natural history of colorectal carcinoma, now that small polypoid lesions of the large intestine can be detected effectively by radiology and endoscopy. The problems of this histo- and morphogenesis of colorectal cancer have, however, remained unsettled because the observation of the sequential change of a lesion with time by follow-up radiology and/or endoscopy is impossible once its malignancy is proved. Clinically the retrospective review of radiographic findings in overlooked cases is the only means to evaluate the natural history of colorectal cancer. This paper attempts to estimate the growth rate of colorectal cancer, based on a retrospective review of radiographic findings of overlooked cases, and analyses of the radiographic features of small polypoid lesions which may develop into advanced cancers

  3. Colorectal cancer presenting as bone metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Suresh Babu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In this study, the patients of colorectal cancer presenting with bone metastasis were of male sex and younger age. The factors that were associated with reduced survival were extraosseous and liver involvement.

  4. [Repeat hepatic resections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, I; Ciurea, S; Braşoveanu, V; Pietrăreanu, D; Tulbure, D; Georgescu, S; Stănescu, D; Herlea, V

    1998-01-01

    Five cases of iterative liver resections are presented, out of a total of 150 hepatectomies performed between 1.01.1995-1.01.1998. The resections were carried out for recurrent adenoma (one case), cholangiocarcinoma (two cases), hepatocellular carcinoma (one case), colo-rectal cancer metastasis (one case). Only cases with at least one major hepatic resection were included. Re-resections were more difficult than the primary resection due, first of all, to the modified vascular anatomy. Intraoperative ultrasound permitted localization of intrahepatic recurrences. Iterative liver resection appears to be the best therapeutical choice for patients with recurrent liver tumors.

  5. FDG-PET improves the staging and selection of patients with recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonneux, Max; Reffad, Abdel-Malek; Pauwels, Stanislas; Detry, Roger; Kartheuser, Alex; Gigot, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Whole-body fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has proved effective in the diagnosis and staging of recurrent colorectal cancer. In this study, we analysed how PET affects the management of patients with recurrent colorectal cancer by permitting more accurate selection of candidates for curative resection. The data of 79 patients with known or suspected recurrent colorectal cancer were analysed. Conventional imaging modalities (CIM) and PET results were compared with regard to their accuracy in determining the extent and the resectability of tumour recurrence. Recurrence was demonstrated in 68 of the 79 patients. The data indicate that PET was superior to CIM for detection of recurrence at all sites except the liver. Based on the CIM+PET staging, surgery with curative intent was proposed in 39 patients and was indeed achieved in 31 of them (80%). PET was more accurate than CIM alone in predicting the resectability or non-resectability of the recurrence (82% vs 68%, P=0.02). It is concluded that whole-body FDG-PET is highly sensitive for both the diagnosis and the staging of patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Its use in conjunction with conventional imaging procedures results in a more accurate selection of patients for surgical treatment with curative intent. (orig.)

  6. Tumor markers in finding recurrent disease iin colorectal cancer: a diagnostic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verberne, Charlotte; de Jong, W.H.; Grossmann, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Aim: In the search for evidence-based follow-up of patients after resection for colorectal cancer, numerous tumor markers have been proposed. This review has evaluated these markers and comments on the diagnostic accuracy in finding recurrent disease in relation to Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA...

  7. Morphometrical differences between resectable and non-resectable pancreatic cancer: a fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, Catalin; Giza, Dana Elena; Petrisor, Petre; Dobrescu, Radu; Popescu, Irinel; Herlea, Vlad

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive cancer with a rising incidence and poor prognosis despite active surgical treatment. Candidates for surgical resection should be carefully selected. In order to avoid unnecessary laparotomy it is useful to identify reliable factors that may predict resectability. Nuclear morphometry and fractal dimension of pancreatic nuclear features could provide important preoperative information in assessing pancreas resectability. Sixty-one patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study between 2003 and 2005. Patients were divided into two groups: one resectable cancer group and one with non-resectable pancreatic cancer. Morphometric parameters measured were: nuclear area, length of minor axis and length of major axis. Nuclear shape and chromatin distribution of the pancreatic tumor cells were both estimated using fractal dimension. Morphometric measurements have shown significant differences between the nuclear area of the resectable group and the non-resectable group (61.9 ± 19.8µm vs. 42.2 ± 15.6µm). Fractal dimension of the nuclear outlines and chromatin distribution was found to have a higher value in the non-resectable group (p<0.05). Objective measurements should be performed to improve risk assessment and therapeutic decisions in pancreatic cancer. Nuclear morphometry of the pancreatic nuclear features can provide important pre-operative information in resectability assessment. The fractal dimension of the nuclear shape and chromatin distribution may be considered a new promising adjunctive tool for conventional pathological analysis.

  8. Laparoscopic mobilization for resection of the transverse colon for cancer: a simple, reproducible method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Olusegun O; Melani, Armando G; Véo, Carlos A; Denadai, Marcos V; de Oliveira, Júnea C

    2012-10-01

    Laparoscopic resection for colorectal cancer by appropriately skilled surgeons is now accepted as safe and oncologically sound. Much of the contemporary debate in this area is regarding appropriate training of surgeons, as there is a steep learning curve. Arguably, the most difficult aspect of laparoscopic colon resection is mobilization of the transverse colon, with division of the middle colic artery. Mobilizing the transverse colon is necessary for many colonic resections, including "introductory" procedures. Our department has a consistent, sequential method for mobilization of the transverse colon with proximal isolation and ligation of the middle colic artery as indicated. This involves using the head, or distal body, of the pancreas as a landmark, for right-sided and left-sided resections, respectively. We believe that this particular methodology is easy to learn and surgically efficient. We also discuss some particular intraoperative problems and scenarios, with suggested solutions.

  9. T cells but not NK cells are associated with a favourable outcome for resected colorectal liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, Siân A; Harrison, Rebecca J; Primrose, John N; Khakoo, Salim I

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive immune response to colorectal cancer is important for survival. Less is understood about the role of innate lymphocytes, such as Natural Killer (NK) cells, which are abundant in human liver. Samples of fresh liver (n = 21) and tumour (n = 11) tissue were obtained from patients undergoing surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases. Flow cytometry was used to analyse the presence and phenotype of NK cells, as compared to T cells, in the tumour and liver tissue. Results were correlated with survival. NK cells were poorly recruited to the tumours (distant liver tissue 38.3%, peritumoural liver 34.2%, tumour 12.9%, p = 0.0068). Intrahepatic and intratumoural NK cells were KIR (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor) lo NKG2A hi whereas circulating NK cells were KIR hi NKG2A lo . By contrast T cells represented 65.7% of the tumour infiltrating lymphocytes. Overall survival was 43% at 5 years, with the 5-year survival for individuals with a T cell rich infiltrate being 60% (95% CI 17-93%) and for those with a low T cell infiltrate being 0% (95% CI 0-48%). Conversely individuals with higher levels of NK cells in the tumour had an inferior outcome, although there were insufficient numbers to reach significance (median survivals: NK Hi 1.63 years vs NK Lo 3.92 years). T cells, but not NK cells, are preferentially recruited to colorectal liver metastases. NK cells within colorectal metastases have an intrahepatic and potentially tolerogenic, rather than a peripheral, phenotype. Similar to primary tumours, the magnitude of the T cell infiltrate in colorectal metastases is positively associated with survival

  10. Tumor deposit is a poor prognostic indicator in patients who underwent simultaneous resection for synchronous colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Q

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Qi Lin,# Ye Wei,# Li Ren,# Yunshi Zhong,# Chunzhi Qin, Peng Zheng, Pingping Xu, Dexiang Zhu, Meiling Ji, Jianmin XuDepartment of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China#These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Tumor deposits are one of the important influencing factors among the different editions of Tumor, Node, Metastasis classification. Incidence and prognosis of tumor deposits in stage I, II, and III colorectal cancer patients has been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of tumor deposits in stage IV colorectal cancer patients who underwent simultaneous resection for synchronous colorectal liver metastases (SCRLM.Methods: Clinicopathological and outcome data of 146 consecutive SCRLM patients who underwent simultaneous R0 resection between July 2003 and July 2013 were collected from our prospectively established SCRLM database. The prognostic value of tumor deposits was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression analysis.Results: Tumor deposits were detected in 41.8% (61/146 of these SCRLM patients. Tumor deposits were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and nerve invasion of the primary tumors (P=0.002, P=0.041; respectively. The Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS of SCRLM patients with tumor deposits were significantly poorer than those with no tumor deposits (P=0.039, P=0.001; respectively. And with multivariate analysis, we found that positive tumor deposits were significantly associated with shorter DFS independent of lymph node status (P=0.002. Subgroup analysis found that of the 57 SCRLM patients with negative lymph node status, the OS and DFS of patients with positive tumor deposits were significantly shorter than those with negative tumor deposits (P=0.002 and P=0.031, respectively. Of the 89 patients with positive lymph node status, the OS of

  11. Role of β1-Integrin in Colorectal Cancer: Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bo-Young; Kim, Kwang Ho; Chung, Soon Sup; Hong, Kyoung Sook

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In the metastatic process, interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and the extracellular matrix or surrounding cells are required. β1-Integrin may mediate these interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether β1-integrin is associated with the detection of CTCs in colorectal cancer. Methods We enrolled 30 patients with colorectal cancer (experimental group) and 30 patients with benign diseases (control group). Blood samples were obtained from each group, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA for CTCs marker and β1-integrin mRNA levels were estimated by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the results were compared between the two groups. In the experimental group, preoperative results were compared with postoperative results for each marker. In addition, we analyzed the correlation between the expressions of β1-integrin and CEA. Results CEA mRNA was detected more frequently in colorectal cancer patients than in control patients (P = 0.008). CEA mRNA was significantly reduced after surgery in the colorectal cancer patients (P = 0.032). β1-Integrin mRNA was detected more in colorectal cancer patients than in the patients with benign diseases (P < 0.001). In colorectal cancer patients, expression of β1-integrin mRNA was detected more for advanced-stage cancer than for early-stage cancer (P = 0.033) and was significantly decreased after surgery (P < 0.001). In addition, expression of β1-integrin mRNA was significantly associated with that of CEA mRNA in colorectal cancer patients (P = 0.001). Conclusion In conclusion, β1-integrin is a potential factor for forming a prognosis following surgical resection in colorectal cancer patients. β1-Integrin may be a candidate for use as a marker for early detection of micrometastatic tumor cells and for monitoring the therapeutic response in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:24851215

  12. Clinical usefulness of 111In transferrin scintigraphy in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Morihisa; Naruki, Yukihiko; Urita, Yosihisa; Nakatani, Naoto; Otsuka, Sachio; Noguchi, Masahiro; Takano, Masaaki; Maruyama, Yuuzou.

    1993-01-01

    As assessment was made regarding the clinical value of 111 In transferrin in scintigraphy on 28 lesions in 26 cases of colorectal cancer. The positive rate of colorectal cancer was high: 21 lesions out of the 28 (75%) were found to be positive. As for the location of cancer, there was a tendency for the positive rate to be high in the ascending and transverse colon. There was no obvious trend regarding Borrmann's classification, histological type, or macroscopic depth of invasion. There was a trend for cases in which the maximum diameter of the tumor was large and depth of invasion was in progress to be positive. Ten cases in which a specimen was resected were all shown to be positive by scintigraphy. Radioactivity in the tumorous regions was 4.41±2.96 times that of the non-tumorous regions. Moreover, tumorous tissue was strongly stained by the immuno-histological staining with anti-Tf-receptor antibody. From the above findings, it was considered that 111 In transferrin is clinically useful in scintigraphy, since it is evident that it accumulates in the tissue of colorectal cancer. (author)

  13. Profile of colorectal cancer in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Snigdha; Mukherjee, Ramanuj; Paira, Susil Kumar; Roy, Bipradas; Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Mukherjee, Saibal Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Although colorectal cancer is a major cause of concern in the western population, recent studies are showing the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer to be rapidly rising in Asia. The present study is an insight into the epidemiological profile of colorectal cancer of a representative Eastern Indian population. Over a period of three years, all histologically proved patients with colorectal cancer were assessed for age, sex, body mass index, dietary habits, socioeconomic status and stage of disease. Of a total of 168 patients male to female ratio was 1.7:1.The mean age of presentation was 47.01 years. Although colorectal cancer has been known as a disease of sedentary obese men, 41.66% of the patients were from a low socioeconomic rural set-up and 40.47% were involved in heavy physical labour with only 15% of being obese; 62% patients were harbouring a locally advanced disease at the time of presentation. The epidemiological pattern of colorectal cancer in India is different from that of the west as regards to earlier age of presentation, prevalence in low socio economic class with low fat diet and scanty meat intake.

  14. Industrial risk factors for colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashner, B.A.; Epstein, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in the United States, and its incidence rates have sharply increased recently, especially in males. Industrial exposures, both occupational and environmental, are important colorectal cancer risk factors that are generally unrecognized by clinicians. Migration studies have documented that colorectal cancer is strongly associated with environmental risk factors. The causal role of occupational exposures is evidenced by a substantial literature associating specific work practices with increased colorectal cancer risks. Industrially related environmental exposures, including polluted drinking water and ionizing radiation, have also been associated with excess risks. Currently, there is a tendency to attribute colorectal cancer, largely or exclusively, to dietary and other lifestyle factors, thus neglecting these industrially related effects. Concerted efforts are needed to recognize the causal role of industrial risk factors and to encourage government and industry to reduce carcinogenic exposures. Furthermore, cost-effective screening programs for high-risk population groups are critically needed to further reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. 143 references

  15. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  16. Colorectal Anastomoses : Surgical outcome and prevention of anastomotic leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Ilsalien

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal surgery is a frequently performed procedure with more than 10.000 annual resections in the Netherlands. The majority of resections are performed for colorectal cancer. The first part of this thesis focused on outcome of colorectal cancer surgery in the Netherlands based on the nationwide

  17. Multimodal treatment for resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection has been traditionally the mainstay of treatment for localized esophageal cancers. However, survival after surgery alone for advanced esophageal cancer is not satisfactory. In Japan, the development of multimodal therapy for esophageal cancers has centered mainly on systemic chemotherapy plus surgery to control distant metastasis. Based on the results of the recent Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 9907 study, preoperative chemotherapy (consisting of 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin) followed by surgery has emerged as the standard treatment. In Western countries, where chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been mainly explored for patients with resectable esophageal cancers, two large controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of preoperative chemotherapy reported conflicting results. However, a recent meta-analysis reported significant survival benefits for preoperative chemotherapy in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. We need to find new effective preoperative chemotherapeutic regimens, including molecular target agents, with response rates higher than that of the conventional chemotherapy of 5-FU and cisplatin. However, we also must compare the survival benefits of preoperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  18. Usefulness of the preoperative administration of tegafur suppositories as alternative adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with resectable stage II or III colorectal cancer: a KODK4 multicenter randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Koji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohishi, Takashi; Hisa, Akio; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and conferred protection against recurrence of preoperatively administered tegafur suppositories following the intravenous and oral administration of fluoropyrimidine in a multicenter randomized control trial. Patients with clinical T3/4 colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to receive the preoperative administration of tegafur suppositories (group A) or no preoperative treatment (group B). The primary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The mean follow-up periods were 80.9 ± 31.0 months in group A and 64.5 ± 28.8 months in group B. The 5-year DFS rates were 89.3% in group A and 70.3% in group B (p = 0.045), whereas the 5-year OS rates were 91.4% in group A and 73.2% in group B (p = 0.051). Furthermore, a significant difference in the cumulative distant metastatic rate was observed (group A, 7.4% vs. group B, 23.4%; p = 0.03). However, no significant difference in the cumulative local recurrence rate was seen (group A, 4.6% vs. group B, 8.2%; p = 0.68). Despite a relatively small sample size, preoperative tegafur suppositories might protect recurrences and improve survival rates, mainly by preventing distant metastasis. These findings suggest the utility of tegafur suppositories as an alternative neoadjuvant treatment in modern chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Unresectable liver metastases in colorectal cancer: review of current strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Benjamin; Pellerin, Olivier; Voron, Thibault; Pointet, Anne L; Taieb, Julien; Pernot, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the treatment of colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases should be clearly defined at the outset. Potentially resectable patients should be distinguished from clearly unresectable patients. In defining resectability, it is important to take into account both anatomic characteristics and patient characteristic (comorbidities, symptoms, age). According to this evaluation, treatment should be tailored to each patient. The most widely accepted standard is doublet cytotoxic regimen plus biotherapy (anti-EGFR or anti-VEGF antibodies according to RAS status, but some patients could benefit from an intensified regimen, as triplet chemotherapy ± bevacizumab, or intraarterial treatments (hepatic arterial infusion, radioembolization or chemoembolization), in order to allow resectability. It is therefore very important to discuss the treatments with a multidisciplinary team, including an experienced surgeon, an interventional radiologist and an oncologist. On the other hand, some patients could benefit in terms of quality of life and decreased toxicity from less intense treatment when resection is not an objective. First-line monotherapy or a maintenance strategy with biotherapy and/or cytotoxics could be discussed with these patients, and treatment holidays should be considered in selected patients. Finally, in patients with secondary resection of liver metastases, specificity should be considered in choosing the best adjuvant treatment, such as response to preoperative treatment and individual risk of relapse, which many in some cases justify intensification with hepatic arterial infusion in an adjuvant setting.

  20. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Elderly Patients: A Propensity Score Match Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Angelis, Nicola; Abdalla, Solafah; Bianchi, Giorgio; Memeo, Riccardo; Charpy, Cecile; Petrucciani, Niccolo; Sobhani, Iradj; Brunetti, Francesco

    2018-05-31

    Minimally invasive surgery in elderly patients with colorectal cancer remains controversial. The study aimed to compare the operative, postoperative, and oncologic outcomes of robotic (robotic colorectal resection surgery [RCRS]) versus laparoscopic colorectal resection surgery (LCRS) in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to compare patients aged 70 years and more undergoing elective RCRS or LCRS for colorectal cancer between 2010 and 2017. Overall, 160 patients underwent elective curative LCRS (n = 102) or RCRS (n = 58) for colorectal cancer. Before PSM, the mean preoperative Charlson score and the tumor size were significantly lower in the robotic group. After matching, 43 RCRSs were compared with 43 LCRSs. The RCRS group showed longer operative times (300.6 versus 214.5 min, P = .03) compared with LCRS, but all other operative variables were comparable between the two groups. No differences were found for postoperative morbidity, mortality, time to flatus, return to regular diet, and length of hospital stay. R0 resection was obtained in 95.3% of procedures. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were similar between RCRS and LCRS patients. The presence of more than one comorbidity before surgery was significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative complications. In patients aged 70 years or more, robotic colorectal surgery showed operative and oncologic outcomes similar to those obtained by laparoscopy, despite longer operative times. Randomized trials are awaited to reliably assess the clinical and oncological noninferiority and the costs/benefits ratio of robotic colorectal surgery in elderly populations.

  1. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayez Sandouk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families.

  2. Epigenetic prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benard, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common diagnosed cancers worldwide, and is the second most important cause of cancer mortality in Europe. The current TNM staging system used at the time of diagnosis is insufficient, as patients with the same tumor stage show wide variations in survival and

  3. The effects of the Kampo medicine (Japanese herbal medicine) "Daikenchuto" on the surgical inflammatory response following laparoscopic colorectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Nishioka, Masanori; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Iwata, Takashi; Morimoto, Shinya; Miyatani, Tomohiko; Komatsu, Masato; Kashihara, Hideya; Mikami, Chie

    2012-07-01

    The inflammatory response after surgery is associated with various postoperative complications. The aim of the present prospective study was to evaluate the effects of Daikenchuto (DKT) (a Japanese herbal medicine) on the inflammatory response in patients following laparoscopic colorectal resection. Thirty patients who underwent laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal carcinoma were divided into two groups: a DKT intake group (D group, n = 15) and a control group (C group, n = 15). The D group took 7.5 g/day of DKT from the day after surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The body temperature, heart rate, WBC count, lymphocyte count, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, β-D: -glucan level and Candida index were compared between the two groups. The patients' mean age in the D group was significantly younger than that in the C group. D3 lymph node dissection was performed more often in the D group. The time until first flatus was significantly shorter in the D group (1.8 ± 0.5 days) than in the C group (2.7 ± 0.5 days). The CRP level was significantly lower in the D group (4.6 ± 0.6 mg/dl) than in the C group (8.3 ± 1.1 mg/dl) on the 3rd postoperative day. Postoperative DKT administration significantly suppressed the CRP level and shortened the time until first flatus. DKT administration also significantly suppressed postoperative inflammation following surgery for colorectal cancer.

  4. [Effect of blood transfusions on the survival of patients with colorectal cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, K; Zhang, X; Menghini, T; Metzger, U; Largiadèr, F

    1989-01-01

    Blood transfusion is reported to cause immunosuppression. An adverse relationship between perioperative blood transfusions and the risk of subsequent recurrence of cancer was reported recently. We reviewed the records of 282 patients and analyzed the interaction between blood tranfusion and the outcome of Dukes stages A, B and C colorectal cancers treated by radical resection during the years 1978-1985. 53 of these patients did not receive any blood transfusions. The actuarial survival analysis (Cutler and Ederer) showed no significant difference for the overall and recurrence-free survival. This study did not support the hypothesis that blood transfusions had an adverse effect on survival of patients with colorectal cancer.

  5. The impact of age on anxiety level and cognitive function in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Stilidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer is highly prevalent in Russia, especially among the elderly patients. We analyzed the influence of age on anxiety level and cognitive function on patients with colorectal cancer.Materials and methods. In the period 2012–2015 we analyzed pre-operatively the level of anxiety (HADS scale and cognitive disfunction (MoCA test in 244 patients who underwent radical colorectal resection.Results. Patients younger than 60 constituted 34 %, 60–74 years – 31 %, 75 years and older – 35 %. We were able to show a correlation between age and anxiety level according to HADS. The same trend was found according to MoCA test.Conclusion. Oncopsychologist shall develop individualized treatment plan according to anxiety and cognitive levels in patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. The effect of a multidisciplinary regional educational programme on the quality of colon cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan-Dare, G E; Marks, K M; Tinkler-Hundal, E; Ingeholm, P; Bertelsen, C A; Quirke, P; West, N P

    2018-02-01

    Mesocolic plane surgery with central vascular ligation produces an oncologically superior specimen following colon cancer resection and appears to be related to optimal outcomes. We aimed to assess whether a regional educational programme in optimal mesocolic surgery led to an improvement in the quality of specimens. Following an educational programme in the Capital and Zealand areas of Denmark, 686 cases of primary colon cancer resected across six hospitals were assessed by grading the plane of surgery and undertaking tissue morphometry. These were compared to 263 specimens resected prior to the educational programme. Across the region, the mesocolic plane rate improved from 58% to 77% (P educational programme and continued to produce a high rate of mesocolic plane specimens (68%) with a greater distance between the tumour and the high tie (median for all fresh cases: 113 vs 82 mm) and lymph node yield (33 vs 18) compared to the other hospitals. Three of the other hospitals showed a significant improvement in the plane of surgical resection. A multidisciplinary regional educational programme in optimal mesocolic surgery improved the oncological quality of colon cancer specimens as assessed by mesocolic planes; however, there was no significant effect on the amount of tissue resected centrally. Surgeons who attempt central vascular ligation continue to produce more radical specimens suggesting that such educational programmes alone are not sufficient to increase the amount of tissue resected around the tumour. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-05

    This podcast is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/5/2011.

  8. Propensity Score-Matched Analysis of Clinical and Financial Outcomes After Robotic and Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazrou, Ahmed M; Baser, Onur; Kiran, Ravi P

    2018-06-01

    The study aims to evaluate the clinical and financial outcomes of the use of robotic when compared to laparoscopic colorectal surgery and any changes in these over time. From the Premier Perspective database, patients who underwent elective laparoscopic and robotic colorectal resections from 2012 to 2014 were included. Laparoscopic colorectal resections were propensity score matched to robotic cases for patient, disease, procedure, surgeon specialty, and hospital type and volume. The two groups were compared for conversion, hospital stay, 30-day post-discharge readmission, mortality, and complications. Direct, cumulative, and total (including 30-day post-discharge) costs were evaluated. Clinical and financial outcomes were also separately assessed for each of the included years. Of 36,701 patients, 32,783 (89.3%) had laparoscopic colorectal resection and 3918 (10.7%) had robotic colorectal resection; 4438 procedures (2219 in each group) were propensity score matched. For the entire period, conversion to open approach (4.7 vs. 3.7%, p = 0.1) and hospital stay (mean days [SD] 6 [5.3] vs. 5 [4.6], p = 0.2) were comparable between robotic and laparoscopic procedures. Surgical and medical complications were also the same for the two groups. However, the robotic approach was associated with lower readmission (6.3 vs. 4.8%, p = 0.04). Wound or abdominal infection (4.7 vs. 2.3%, p = 0.01) and respiratory complications (7.4 vs. 4.7%, p = 0.02) were significantly lower for the robotic group in the final year of inclusion, 2014. Direct, cumulative, and total (including 30-day post-discharge) costs were significantly higher for robotic surgery. The difference in costs between the two approaches reduced over time (direct cost difference: 2012, $2698 vs. 2013, $2235 vs. 2014, $1402). Robotic colorectal surgery can be performed with comparable clinical outcomes to laparoscopy. With greater use of the technology, some further recovery benefits may be evident

  9. Double Colorectal Cancer Only Diagnosed by Computed Tomographic Colonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Nagata

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old woman presented to her physician with rectal bleeding and intermittent diarrhea. Optical colonoscopy revealed a bulky tumor which was diagnosed as rectal cancer. She was referred to our institution for further evaluation and treatment. Slim optical colonoscopy showed an obstructive cancer in the rectosigmoid junction and no information of the proximal side of the obstruction. The patient then underwent computed tomographic (CT colonography for further evaluation of the proximal side. Three-dimensional endoluminal ‘fly-through’ images revealed another protruded lesion in the proximal side of the obstruction. Diagnosis of synchronous double cancer was made by CT colonography. This CT data was not only used to create three-dimensional images but also to decide on a preoperative clinical staging. Laparoscopy-assisted high anterior resection was performed and T3 rectal cancer and T1 sigmoid colon cancer were confirmed in the resected specimen. Follow-up optical colonoscopy revealed no other tumors. CT colonography has recently become a popular preoperative examination tool with significant improvement in quality of image due to a rapid progress in computer technology. CT colonography correctly showed synchronous double cancer in our case and provided crucial information for planning surgery. We recommend that CT colonography should be used for evaluating the proximal side of obstructive colorectal cancer.

  10. Clinical implications of thymidylate synthetase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase activity levels in colorectal carcinoma following radical resection and administration of adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Masashi; Miyauchi, Takayuki; Kashiwagi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated whether the activity levels of enzymes involved in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism are prognostic factors for survival in patients with colorectal carcinoma. Most reports have examined thymidylate synthetase (TS) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) in unresectable or metastatic cases, therefore it is unclear whether the activity of these enzymes is of prognostic value in colorectal cancer patients treated with radical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-FU. This study examined fresh frozen specimens of colorectal carcinoma from 40 patients who had undergone curative operation and were orally administered adjuvant tegafur/uracil (UFT) chemotherapy. TS, DPD and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) activities were assayed in cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue and their association with clinicopathological variables was investigated. In addition, the relationships between TS, DPD and OPRT activities and patient survival were examined to determine whether any of these enzymes could be useful prognostic factors. While there was no clear relationship between pathological findings and TS or DPD activity, OPRT activity was significantly lower in tumors with lymph node metastasis than in tumors lacking lymph node metastasis. Postoperative survival was significantly better in the groups with low TS activity and/or high OPRT activity. TS and OPRT activity levels in tumor tissue may be important prognostic factors for survival in Dukes' B and C colorectal carcinoma with radical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy with UFT

  11. Rectovaginal fistula after low anterior resection for rectal cancer healed by nonoperative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu Emoto

    Full Text Available Background: Rectovaginal fistula (RVF is a serious complication after colorectal anastomosis using a double-stapling technique. RVF following this procedure has been considered to be refractory to conservative treatment. Case presentation: A 75-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection for early rectal cancer developed RVF on the 12th postoperative day. Conservative treatment was chosen and was successful. She was discharged from the hospital after 3 weeks with a normal oral diet. Colonoscopy on the 50th postoperative day showed that the RVF was closed. Conclusion: Conservative treatment may be effective for RVF after colorectal anastomosis using a double-stapling technique when there is no evidence of defecation through the vagina. Keywords: Rectovaginal fistula, Low anterior resection, Double-stapling technique

  12. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  13. Epigenetics and colorectal cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  14. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy

  15. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebin Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Circle of Health for Alaskans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the colon and rectum is often called colorectal cancer. But in this brochure we use the term ... tests can be used to find polyps or colorectal cancer. Each can be used alone. Sometimes they are ...

  17. Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer prevention strategies can include avoiding known risk factors, having a healthy lifestyle, taking aspirin, and removing polyps. Learn more about preventing colorectal cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  18. Elevated C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminemia measured before resection of colorectal liver metastases predict postoperative survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Teruya, Masanori; Kishiki, Tomokazu; Endo, Daisuke; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Miki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Morita, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have investigated whether the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score measured before resection of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM), can predict postoperative survival. Sixty-three consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for CRLM were investigated. GPS was calculated on the basis of admission data as follows: patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminemia (l) were allocated a GPS score of 2. Patients in whom only one of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a GPS score of 1, and patients with a normal C-reactive protein and albumin were allocated a score of 0. Significant factors concerning survival were the number of liver metastases (p = 0.0044), carcinoembryonic antigen level (p = 0.0191), GPS (p = 0.0029), grade of liver metastasis (p = 0.0033), and the number of lymph node metastases around the primary cancer (p = 0.0087). Multivariate analysis showed the two independent prognostic variables: liver metastases > or =3 (relative risk 2.83) and GPS1/2 (relative risk 3.07). GPS measured before operation and the number of liver metastases may be used as novel predictors of postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent curative resection for CRLM. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Preoperative plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and serum C-reactive protein levels in patients with colorectal cancer. The RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sørensen, Steen

    2000-01-01

    study we analyzed the association between plasma PAI-1 and serum CRP in patients scheduled for elective resection of colorectal cancer. In addition, the prognostic value of PAI-1 and CRP was studied in this patient cohort. METHODS: PAI-1 and CRP were analyzed in citrated plasma and serum, respectively......, excluding patients with Dukes' D disease showed serum CRP to be an independent prognostic variable (P study did not show a strong correlation between plasma PAI-1 and serum CRP in patients with colorectal cancer. Serum CRP was found to be a Dukes......BACKGROUND: Preoperative plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a prognostic variable in patients with colorectal cancer. It has been suggested, however, that plasma PAI-1 is a nonspecific prognostic parameter similar to the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP). In the present...

  20. High Variability in Nosocomial Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Across Hospitals After Colorectal Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquina, Christopher T; Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Hensley, Bradley J; Iannuzzi, James C; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection is associated with adverse patient outcomes and high medical costs. The incidence and severity of C. difficile has been rising in both medical and surgical patients. Our aim was to assess risk factors and variation associated with the development of nosocomial C. difficile colitis among patients undergoing colorectal resection. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study included segmental colectomy and proctectomy cases in New York State from 2005 to 2013. The study cohort included 150,878 colorectal resections. Patients with a documented previous history of C. difficile infection or residence outside of New York State were excluded. A diagnosis of C. difficile colitis either during the index hospital stay or on readmission within 30 days was the main measure. C. difficile colitis occurred in 3323 patients (2.2%). Unadjusted C. difficile colitis rates ranged from 0% to 11.3% among surgeons and 0% to 6.8% among hospitals. After controlling for patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics using mixed-effects multivariable analysis, significant unexplained variation in C. difficile rates remained present across hospitals but not surgeons. Patient factors explained only 24% of the total hospital-level variation, and known surgeon and hospital-level characteristics explained an additional 8% of the total hospital-level variation. Therefore, ≈70% of the hospital variation in C. difficile infection rates remained unexplained by captured patient, surgeon, and hospital factors. Furthermore, there was an ≈5-fold difference in adjusted C. difficile rates across hospitals. A limited set of hospital and surgeon characteristics was available. Colorectal surgery patients appear to be at high risk for C. difficile infection, and alarming variation in nosocomial C. difficile infection rates currently exists among hospitals after colorectal resection. Given the high morbidity and cost associated with C. difficile colitis

  1. Definition and scope of the surgical treatment in patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Ahmedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in lungs is a relatively new trend of modern oncology. In this connection, still there are no clearly formulated criteria for patient selection for this type of intervention, approaches to repeated resections and scope of the surgical operation in case of multiple lesions. Established key prognostic factors include lesion of intrathoracic lymph nodes, timing of the development of metastatic disease, baseline level of carcinoembryonic antigen, number of foci and the volume of metastatic lesion, stage of the disease. Options for surgical access include lateral thoracotomy, sternotomy, thoracoscopy and thoracoscopy combined with additional minithoracotomy.If a patient has a single peripheral metastatic lesions, physician should prefer thoracoscopic operations. One of their advantages include minimum development of adhesions and possibility of subsequent re-thoracoscopy. Resection of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (R0 resection rate allows to achieve persistent healing of the tumor process in a significant number of patients.

  2. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth facto...

  3. [Two Cases of Curative Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Noboru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Satoshi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Kato, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Reports of conversion in cases of locally advanced colorectal cancer have been increasing. Here, we present 2 cases in which curative resection of locally advanced rectal cancer accompanied by intestinal obstruction was achieved after establishing a stoma and administering chemotherapy. The first case was of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with upper rectal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Because of a high level of retroperitoneal invasion, after establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 13 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Around 6 months after the initial surgery, low anterior resection for rectal cancer and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Fourteen days after curative resection, the patient was discharged from the hospital. The second case was of a 66-year-old male patient with a circumferential tumor extending from Rs to R, accompanied by right ureter infiltration and sub-intestinal obstruction. After establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 11 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Five months after the initial surgery, anterior resection of the rectum and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Twenty days after curative resection, the patient was released from the hospital. No recurrences have been detected in either case.

  4. Cytogenetic findings in metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardi, G; Parada, L A; Bomme, L

    1997-01-01

    Eighteen tumor samples from 11 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were cytogenetically analyzed after short-term culturing. Of the 13 metastases examined, 11 were from lymph nodes, 1 from the peritoneum and 1 from the lung. In 5 of the 11 patients, matched samples from the primary tumor...... colorectal carcinomas, and del(10)(q22) and add(16)(p13), which so far have not been associated with primary tumors and which may play a particular pathogenetic role in the metastatic process....

  5. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  6. Determinants of morbidity and survival after elective non-curative resection of stage IV colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Axel; Füessl, Kathrin E; Seeliger, Hendrik; Eichhorn, Martin E; Müller, Mario H; Rentsch, Markus; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Angele, Martin K; Kreis, Martin E; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2009-09-01

    The benefit of elective primary tumor resection for non-curable stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) remains largely undefined. We wanted to identify risk factors for postoperative complications and short survival. Using a prospective database, we analyzed potential risk factors in 233 patients, who were electively operated for non-curable stage IV CRC between 1996 and 2002. Patients with recurrent tumors, resectable metastases, emergency operations, and non-resective surgery were excluded. Risk factors for increased postoperative morbidity and limited postoperative survival were identified by multivariate analyses. Patients with colon cancer (CC = 156) and rectal cancer (RC = 77) were comparable with regard to age, sex, comorbidity, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, hepatic spread, tumor grade, resection margins, 30-day mortality (CC 5.1%, RC 3.9%) and postoperative chemotherapy. pT4 tumors, carcinomatosis, and non-anatomical resections were more common in colon cancer patients, whereas enterostomies (CC 1.3%, RC 67.5%, p 50%, and comorbidity >1 organ. Prognostic factors for limited postoperative survival were hepatic tumor load >50%, pT4 tumors, lymphatic spread, R1-2 resection, and lack of chemotherapy. Palliative resection is associated with a particularly unfavorable outcome in rectal cancer patients presenting with a locally advanced tumor (pT4, expected R2 resection) or an extensive comorbidity, and in all CRC patients who show a hepatic tumor load >50%. For such patients, surgery might be contraindicated unless the tumor is immediately life-threatening.

  7. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  8. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  9. Predictors of advanced colorectal neoplasia for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Lam, Thomas Y T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Chan, Victor C W; Hirai, Hoyee W; Ching, Jessica Y L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2014-05-01

    The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score based on age, gender, family history, and smoking is useful to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in asymptomatic Asian subjects. To evaluate the factors in addition to those of APCS associated with ACN colonoscopic findings. Data from 5,220 asymptomatic subjects aged between 50 and 70 years who underwent screening colonoscopy in a community center between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed. One binary logistic regression analysis was conducted in 2013 with the presence of ACN or cancer as the outcome, controlling for APCS score, alcohol consumption, BMI, hypertension, and other chronic diseases as independent variables. The average participant age was 57.7 years (SD=4.9) and 47.5% were men. Advanced neoplasms or cancers were identified at colonoscopy in 5.6% of all screening participants. From multivariate regression analysis, APCS score≥4 (adjusted OR [AOR]=1.74, 95% CI=1.34, 2.25, pstatistic of APCS score alone was 0.560 (95% CI=0.524, 0.595, p=0.001) and that of APCS score plus BMI, hypertension, and alcohol consumption was 0.613 (95% CI=0.578, 0.648, p<0.001). Alcohol consumption, hypertension, and BMI are independent predictors of ACN, which could be incorporated into the APCS for prioritizing Asian asymptomatic subjects for colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated

  11. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Akimasa [Department of Surgery II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2010-11-24

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated.

  12. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidel, S; Hu, G; Jousilahti, P; Antikainen, R; Pukkala, E; Hakulinen, T; Tuomilehto, J

    2010-09-01

    The possible association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer has been extensively studied in the many populations. The aim of this study is to examine this relationship among Finns, who are the heaviest coffee consumers in the world. A total of 60 041 Finnish men and women who were 26-74 years of age and without history of any cancer at baseline were included in the present analyses. Their coffee consumption and other study characteristics were determined at baseline, and they were prospectively followed up for onset of colon and rectal cancer, emigration, death or until 30 June 2006. During a mean follow-up period of 18 years, 538 cases of colorectal cancer (304 cases of colon cancer and 234 cases of rectal cancer) were diagnosed. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of colorectal cancer incidence for > or =10 cups of coffee per day compared with non-drinkers was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.47-2.03) for men (P for trend=0.86), 1.24 (95% CI, 0.49-3.14) for women (p for trend=0.83) and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.58-1.83) for men and women combined (P for trend=0.61). In this study, we found no association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal, colon and rectal cancer.

  13. App Improves Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer screening reduces deaths from the disease, yet about one-third of Americans aren’t up to date with screening. In this Cancer Currents blog post, learn what happened when people waiting for routine checkups could order their own screening test using a computer app.

  14. Pulmonary nodules and metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) are subjected to a preoperative thoraco-abdominal CT scan to determine the cancer stage. This staging is of relevance with regard to treatment and prognosis. About 20% of the patients have distant metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis, i...

  15. Colorectal cancer screening | Schneider | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world, with an estimated incidence of 148 810 cases in the USA in 2008, and about 50 000 deaths from this disease. If detected early, patients with disease localised to the colonic wall have a 5-year survival of 90%. The 5-year survival for patients ...

  16. Colorectal cancer screening: World Gastroenterology Organisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colorectal cancer screening: World Gastroenterology Organisation/International Digestive Cancer Alliance Practice Guidelines. S Winawer, M Classen, R Lambert, M Fried, P Dite, K L Goh, F Guarner, D Lieberman, R Eliakim, B Levin, R Saenz, A G Khan, I Khalif, A Lanas, G Lindberg, M J O'Brien, G Young, J Krabshuis ...

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Guide to the Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas K Rex

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most recent guidelines for colorectal cancer screening are those of the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research, and the American Cancer Society. The guidelines are similar in many regards and reflect current literature, consensus opinion and compromise between members of multidisciplinary panels. The emphasis of both guidelines is to increase the options available for colorectal cancer screening. Increasing choice should expand the attractiveness of colorectal cancer screening to more patients and physicians, and the development of guidelines should help compel payers to provide reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening. These guidelines are summarized and evaluated as they pertain to colorectal cancer screening.

  18. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a tool for real-time tissue assessment during colorectal cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltussen, Elisabeth J. M.; Snaebjornsson, Petur; de Koning, Susan G. Brouwer; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Aalbers, Arend G. J.; Kok, Niels; Beets, Geerard L.; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Kuhlmann, Koert F. D.; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal surgery is the standard treatment for patients with colorectal cancer. To overcome two of the main challenges, the circumferential resection margin and postoperative complications, real-time tissue assessment could be of great benefit during surgery. In this ex vivo study, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) was used to differentiate tumor tissue from healthy surrounding tissues in patients with colorectal neoplasia. DRS spectra were obtained from tumor tissue, healthy colon, or rectal wall and fat tissue, for every patient. Data were randomly divided into training (80%) and test (20%) sets. After spectral band selection, the spectra were classified using a quadratic classifier and a linear support vector machine. Of the 38 included patients, 36 had colorectal cancer and 2 had an adenoma. When the classifiers were applied to the test set, colorectal cancer could be discriminated from healthy tissue with an overall accuracy of 0.95 (±0.03). This study demonstrates the possibility to separate colorectal cancer from healthy surrounding tissue by applying DRS. High classification accuracies were obtained both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous tissues. This is a fundamental step toward the development of a tool for real-time in vivo tissue assessment during colorectal surgery.

  19. Screening for colorectal cancer in defunctioned colons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Fayyaz; Quyn, Aaron; Steele, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Population-based colorectal (bowel) cancer screening using faecal occult blood tests leads to a reduction in cause-specific mortality. However, in people where the colon is defunctioned, the use of standard faecal occult blood test is not appropriate. The aim of this study was to examine the current trends of clinical practice for colorectal cancer screening in people with defunctioned colons. Methods An online survey was performed using SurveyMonkey. All members of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland were invited by email to participate. Reminders were sent to non-responders and partial responders till six weeks. All responses were included in our analysis. Results Of the 206 (34.59%) questionnaires completed, all questions were answered in 110 (55.8%). Among responders, 94 (85.4%) were colorectal consultant surgeons, 72% had worked in their current capacity for more than five years, and 105 (50.9%) had encountered colorectal cancer in defunctioned colons during their career. Some 72.2% of responders stated that a screening test for colorectal cancer in patients with defunctioned colons was currently not offered, or that they did not know whether or not it was offered in their area. Conclusions Bowel screening in the United Kingdom is currently not offered to 72.2% of the age appropriate population with defunctioned colons. Among responding colorectal surgeons, 50% had encountered colorectal cancer in such patients. There is considerable variability in clinical practice regarding the optimal age for onset of screening, time interval, and the optimal modality to offer for screening in such cases.

  20. Increased platelet-lymphocyte ratio closely relates to inferior clinical features and worse long-term survival in both resected and metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of 24 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Li, Wanling; Huang, Kexin; Yang, Wenhao; Huang, Lin; Cong, Tianxin; Li, Qingfang; Qiu, Meng

    2017-05-09

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. However, the prognostic and clinical value of platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in colorectal cancer was still unclear, which attracted more and more researchers' considerable attention. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between PLR and survival as well as clinical features of CRC update to September 2016. The hazard ratio (HR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to access the association. We included 24 eligible studies with a total of 13719 patients. Elevated PLR predicted shorter overall survival (OS) (HR=1.47; 95%CI, 1.28-1.68; p<0.001), poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (HR=1.51; 95% CI, 1.2-1.91; p=0.001), and worse recurrence-free survival (RFS) (HR=1.39; 95% CI, 1.03-1.86; p=0.03), but had nothing to do with Cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR=1.14; 95% CI, 0.92-1.42; p=0.223). After trim and fill method, the connection between PLR and DFS disappeared (HR=1.143; 95%CI, 0.903-1.447; p=0.267). By subgroup analyze, we found that increased PLR predicated a worse OS and DFS in patients who underwent surgery, and this prognostic role also shown both in metastatic and nonmetastatic patients. In addition, elevated PLR was associated with poorly differentiated tumor (OR=1.51; 95% CI, 1.26-1.81; p<0.001), higher tumor stage (OR=1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.49; p=0.012), lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (OR=1.25; 95% CI, 1.09-1.43; p=0.001), and the recurrence of CRC (OR=2.78; 95% CI, 1.36-5.68; p=0.005). We indicated that pretreatment PLR was a good prognostic marker for CRC patients. High PLR was related to worse OS, RFS and poor clinical characteristics.

  1. Prokineticin 1 protein expression is a useful new prognostic factor for human sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Goi, Takanori; Hirono, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Hematogenous metastasis, regarded as closely related to angiogenic growth factors, is associated with colorectal cancer prognosis. The angiogenic growth factor prokineticin 1 (PROK1) has been cloned from endocrine cells. However, its protein expression in human malignant tumors has not been studied. The current study established the anti-PROK1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and examined the relationship between the expression of PROK1 protein and human colorectal cancer. The expression of PROK1 protein was assessed in 620 resected sporadic colorectal cancer tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining with in-house-developed human PROK1 mAb to investigate the relationship of PROK1 expression to clinicopathologic factors, recurrence, and survival rate and to evaluate its prognostic significance. The expression of PROK1 protein was detected in 36 % (223/620) of human primary colorectal cancer lesions but no in the healthy mucosa adjacent to the colorectal cancer lesions. According to the clinicopathologic examinations, the frequency of positive PROK1 expression was significantly higher in cases with serosal invasion, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, hematogenous metastasis, and higher stage disease. The recurrence rate and prognosis for patients with PROK1 expression-positive lesions were significantly worse. In the Cox proportional hazard model, PROK1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The expression of PROK1 protein was identified for the first time as a new prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

  2. The Influence of Hospital Volume on Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietelink, Lieke; Henneman, Daniel; van Leersum, Nicoline J; de Noo, Mirre; Manusama, Eric; Tanis, Pieter J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Wouters, Michel W J M

    2016-04-01

    This population-based study evaluates the association between hospital volume and CRM (circumferential resection margin) involvement, adjusted for other confounders, in rectal cancer surgery. A low hospital volume (risk of CRM involvement (odds ratio=1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.11). To evaluate the association between hospital volume and CRM (circumferential resection margin) involvement in rectal cancer surgery. To guarantee the quality of surgical treatment of rectal cancer, the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands has stated a minimal annual volume standard of 20 procedures per hospital. The influence of hospital volume has been examined for different outcome variables in rectal cancer surgery. Its influence on the pathological outcome (CRM) however remains unclear. As long-term outcomes are best predicted by the CRM status, this parameter is of essential importance in the debate on the justification of minimal volume standards in rectal cancer surgery. Data from the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (2011-2012) were used. Hospital volume was divided into 3 groups, and baseline characteristics were described. The influence of hospital volume on CRM involvement was analyzed, in a multivariate model, between low- and high-volume hospitals, according to the minimal volume standards. This study included 5161 patients. CRM was recorded in 86% of patients. CRM involvement was 11% in low-volume group versus 7.7% and 7.9% in the medium- and high-volume group (P≤0.001). After adjustment for relevant confounders, the influence of hospital volume on CRM involvement was still significant odds ratio (OR) = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.11). The outcomes of this pooled analysis support minimal volume standards in rectal cancer surgery. Low hospital volume was independently associated with a higher risk of CRM involvement (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.11).

  3. Toward standardizing and reporting colorectal cancer screening indicators on an international level: The International Colorectal Cancer Screening Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, Victoria S.; Atkin, Wendy S.; Green, Jane; Nadel, Marion R.; Patnick, Julietta; Smith, Robert A.; Villain, Patricia; Patnick, J.; Atkin, W. S.; Altenhofen, L.; Ancelle-Park, R.; Benson, V. S.; Green, J.; Levin, T. R.; Moss, S. M.; Nadel, M.; Ransohoff, D.; Segnan, N.; Smith, R. A.; Villain, P.; Weller, D.; Koukari, A.; Young, G.; López-Kostner, F.; Antoljak, N.; Suchánek, S.; Zavoral, M.; Holten, I.; Malila, N.; Salines, E.; Brenner, G.; Herszényi, L.; Tulassay, Z.; Rennert, G.; Senore, C.; Zappa, M.; Zorzi, M.; Saito, H.; Leja, M.; Dekker, E.; Jansen, J.; Hol, L.; Kuipers, E.; Kaminski, M. F.; Regula, J.; Sfarti, C.; Trifan, A.; Tang, C.-L.; Hrcka, R.; Binefa, G.; Espinàs, J. A.; Peris, M.; Chen, T. H.; Steele, R.; Pou, G.; Bisges, D.; Dwyer, D.; Groves, C.; Courteau, S.; Kramer, R.; Siegenthaler, K.; Lane, D.; Herrera, C.; Rogers, J.; Rojewski, M.; Wolf, Holly; Sung, J. J.; Ling, K.; Bryant, H.; Rabeneck, L.; Dale, J.; Sware, L.; Yang, H.; Viguier, J.; Von Karsa, L.; Kupcinskas, L.; Deutekom, M.; Törnberg, S.; Austoker, J.; Beral, V.; Monk, C.; Valori, R.; Watson, J.; Kobrin, S.; Pignone, M.; Taplin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The International Colorectal Cancer Screening Network was established in 2003 to promote best practice in the delivery of organized colorectal cancer screening programs. To facilitate evaluation of such programs, we defined a set of universally applicable colorectal cancer screening measures and

  4. Radiological and clinical evaluation of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, O. J.; Chin, S. Y.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred thirty two cases of the pathologically proven colorectal cancer at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Hospital in the period from January 1973 to June 1980 were analyzed radiologically and clinically. The results were as follows: 1. The colorectal cancer was prevalent in rectosigmoid area and in the fourth to seventh decade of life. 2. The clinical pictures were classified into two groups. The one was rectosigmoid cancer with bowel habit changes. The other was one with no specific symptoms or signs. The clinical pictures of the right colon cancer were rather indirected, chronic and systemic than those of the left one. 3. The roentgenological findings were classified into two groups. The one was rectum and left colon cancer with symmetrical annular narrowing and the other showed trumpet-like proximal dilatation. 4. The most frequent complication was intestinal obstruction. 5. The majority of colorectal cancer was adenocarcinoma. The squamous cell carcinoma and atypical cell carcinoma were most prevalent in rectum, but malignantly lymphoma often occurred in right colon. The rarest colorectal cancer was atypical cell carcinoma in rectum

  5. Colorectal cancer stages transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyao Huo

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression differences in different stages of CRC. Gene expression data on 433 CRC patient samples were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Gene expression differences were evaluated across CRC stages using linear regression. Genes with p≤0.001 in expression differences were evaluated further in principal component analysis and genes with p≤0.0001 were evaluated further in gene set enrichment analysis. A total of 377 patients with gene expression data in 20,532 genes were included in the final analysis. The numbers of patients in stage I through IV were 59, 147, 116 and 55, respectively. NEK4 gene, which encodes for NIMA related kinase 4, was differentially expressed across the four stages of CRC. The stage I patients had the highest expression of NEK4 genes, while the stage IV patients had the lowest expressions (p = 9*10-6. Ten other genes (RNF34, HIST3H2BB, NUDT6, LRCh4, GLB1L, HIST2H4A, TMEM79, AMIGO2, C20orf135 and SPSB3 had p value of 0.0001 in the differential expression analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that the patients from the 4 clinical stages do not appear to have distinct gene expression pattern. Network-based and pathway-based gene set enrichment analyses showed that these 11 genes map to multiple pathways such as meiotic synapsis and packaging of telomere ends, etc. Ten of these 11 genes were linked to Gene Ontology terms such as nucleosome, DNA packaging complex and protein-DNA interactions. The protein complex-based gene set analysis showed that four genes were involved in H2AX complex II. This study identified a small number of genes that might be associated with clinical stages of CRC. Our analysis was not able to find a molecular basis for the current clinical staging for CRC based on the gene expression patterns.

  6. Impact of elective resection on plasma TIMP-1 levels in patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J. H.; Basse, L.; Svedsen, M. N.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pre- and post-operative plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) levels have a prognostic impact on patients with colorectal cancer. However, the surgical trauma may play an essential role in regulation of plasma TIMP-1 levels, which in turn may influence subsequent TIMP......-1 measurements. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutively, 48 patients with colon cancer (CC) and 12 patients with nonmalignant colonic disease were randomised to undergo elective laparoscopically assisted or open resection followed by fast track recovery. Plasma samples were collected just before and 1...

  7. Impact of elective resection on plasma TIMP-1 levels in patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J. H.; Basse, L.; Svedsen, M. N.

    2006-01-01

    -1 measurements. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutively, 48 patients with colon cancer (CC) and 12 patients with nonmalignant colonic disease were randomised to undergo elective laparoscopically assisted or open resection followed by fast track recovery. Plasma samples were collected just before and 1......OBJECTIVE: Pre- and post-operative plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) levels have a prognostic impact on patients with colorectal cancer. However, the surgical trauma may play an essential role in regulation of plasma TIMP-1 levels, which in turn may influence subsequent TIMP...

  8. Sugars, sucrose and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjie; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2014-05-01

    A diet high in sugars may promote colorectal carcinogenesis, but it remains uncertain whether high intake of sugars or sucrose confers increased risk of colorectal cancer. The authors investigated the associations of sugars and sucrose intake with colorectal cancer risk in a community-based case-control study in Japan. The study subjects comprised 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Consumption frequencies and portion sizes of 148 food and beverage items were ascertained by a computer-assisted interview. The authors used the consumption of 29 food items to estimate sugars and sucrose intake. The odds ratios of colorectal cancer risk according to intake categories were obtained using a logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Overall, intakes of sugars and sucrose were not related to colorectal cancer risk either in men or women. The association between sugars intake and colorectal cancer risk differed by smoking status and alcohol use in men, but not in women. In men, sugars intake tended to be associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely among never-smokers and positively among male ever-smokers (interaction p=0.01). Sugars intake was associated with an increased risk among men with no alcohol consumption, but was unrelated to the risk among male alcohol drinkers (interaction p=0.02). Body mass index did not modify the association with sugars intake in either men or women. Sugars intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer among smokers and non-alcohol drinkers in men selectively.

  9. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  10. Is Diversion with Ileostomy Non-inferior to Hartmann Resection for Left-sided Colorectal Anastomotic Leak?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Caitlin; Francone, Todd D; Marcello, Peter W; Roberts, Patricia L; Ricciardi, Rocco

    2018-03-01

    Treatment of left-sided colorectal anastomotic leaks often requires fecal stream diversion for prevention of further septic complications. To manage anastomotic leak, it is unclear if diverting ileostomy provides similar outcomes to Hartmann resection with colostomy. We identified all patients who developed anastomotic leak following left-sided colorectal resections from 1/2012 through 12/2014 using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Then, we examined the risk of mortality and abdominal reoperation in patients treated with diverting ileostomy as compared to Hartmann resection. There were 1745 patients who experienced an anastomotic leak in a cohort of 63,748 patients (3.7%). Two hundred thirty-five patients had a reoperation for anastomotic leak involving the formation of a diverting ileostomy (n = 77) or Hartmann resection (n = 158). There was no difference in mortality or abdominal reoperation in patients treated with diverting ileostomy (3.9, 7.8%) versus Hartmann resection (3.8, 6.3%) (p = 0.8). There was no difference in the outcomes of mortality or need for second abdominal reoperation in patients treated with diverting ileostomy as compared to Hartmann resection for left-sided colorectal anastomotic leak. Thus, select patients with left-sided colorectal anastomotic leaks may be safely managed with diverting ileostomy.

  11. Involvement of hyaluronidases in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouga, Helen; Tsouros, Isidoros; Bounias, Dimitrios; Kyriakopoulou, Dora; Stavropoulos, Michael S; Papageorgakopoulou, Nikoletta; Theocharis, Dimitrios A; Vynios, Demitrios H

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronidases belong to a class of enzymes that degrade, predominantly, hyaluronan. These enzymes are known to be involved in physiological and pathological processes, such as tumor growth, infiltration and angiogenesis, but their exact role in tumor promotion or suppression is not clear yet. Advanced colorectal cancer is associated with elevated amounts of hyaluronan of varying size. The aim of the present study was therefore to illuminate the importance of hyaluronidases in colon carcinoma progression. The patients' samples (macroscopically normal and cancerous) were subjected to sequential extraction with PBS, 4 M GdnHCl and 4 M GdnHCl - 1% Triton X-100. The presence of the various hyaluronidases in the extracts was examined by zymography and western blotting. Their expression was also examined by RT-PCR. Among hyaluronidases examined, Hyal-1, -2, -3 and PH-20 were detected. Their activity was higher in cancerous samples. Hyal-1 and Hyal-2 were overexpressed in cancerous samples, especially in advanced stages of cancer. Both isoforms were mainly extracted with PBS. Hyal-3 was observed only in the third extract of advanced stages of cancer. PH-20 was abundant in all three extracts of all stages of cancer. The expression of only Hyal-1 and PH-20 was verified by RT-PCR. A high association of hyaluronidases in colorectal cancer was observed. Each hyaluronidase presented different tissue distribution, which indicated the implication of certain isoforms in certain cancer stages. The results provided new evidence on the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer

  12. Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection: A population-based study of risk factors and hospital variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolian, Vahagn C; Kamdar, Neil S; Regenbogen, Scott E; Morris, Arden M; Byrn, John C; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A; Campbell, Darrell A; Hendren, Samantha

    2017-06-01

    Anastomotic leak is a major source of morbidity in colorectal operations and has become an area of interest in performance metrics. It is unclear whether anastomotic leak is associated primarily with surgeons' technical performance or explained better by patient characteristics and institutional factors. We sought to establish if anastomotic leak could serve as a valid quality metric in colorectal operations by evaluating provider variation after adjusting for patient factors. We performed a retrospective cohort study of colorectal resection patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative. Clinically relevant patient and operative factors were tested for association with anastomotic leak. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to derive risk-adjusted rates of anastomotic leak. Of 9,192 colorectal resections, 244 (2.7%) had a documented anastomotic leak. The incidence of anastomotic leak was 3.0% for patients with pelvic anastomoses and 2.5% for those with intra-abdominal anastomoses. Multivariable analysis showed that a greater operative duration, male sex, body mass index >30 kg/m 2 , tobacco use, chronic immunosuppressive medications, thrombocytosis (platelet count >400 × 10 9 /L), and urgent/emergency operations were independently associated with anastomotic leak (C-statistic = 0.75). After accounting for patient and procedural risk factors, 5 hospitals had a significantly greater incidence of postoperative anastomotic leak. This population-based study shows that risk factors for anastomotic leak include male sex, obesity, tobacco use, immunosuppression, thrombocytosis, greater operative duration, and urgent/emergency operation; models including these factors predict most of the variation in anastomotic leak rates. This study suggests that anastomotic leak can serve as a valid metric that can identify opportunities for quality improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Histopathological growth pattern, proteolysis and angiogenesis in chemonaive patients resected for multiple colorectal liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eefsen, Rikke Løvendahl; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterise growth patterns, proteolysis, and angiogenesis in colorectal liver metastases from chemonaive patients with multiple liver metastases. Twenty-four patients were included in the study, resected for a median of 2.6 metastases. The growth pattern......-type plasminogen activator receptor (P = 0.0008). Angiogenesis was most pronounced in metastases with a pushing growth pattern in comparison to those with desmoplastic (P = 0.0007) and replacement growth pattern (P = 0.021). Although a minor fraction of the patients harboured metastases with different growth...

  14. A protocol is not enough to implement an enhanced recovery programme for colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maessen, J; Dejong, C.H.C.; Hausel, J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-centre studies have suggested that enhanced recovery can be achieved with multimodal perioperative care protocols. This international observational study evaluated the implementation of an enhanced recovery programme in five European centres and examined the determinants...... with a shorter hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Functional recovery in 3 days after colorectal resection could be achieved in daily practice. A protocol is not enough to enable discharge of patients on the day of functional recovery; more experience and better organization of care may be required. Copyright (c) 2006...

  15. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bo In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong Eun

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the second most common cancer among Korean males and the fourth most common among females. Since the majority of colorectal cancer case present following the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are vital methods in its prevention. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The proposed guidelines have been developed by the Korean Multi-Society Task Force using evidence-based methods. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been used to form the statements contained in the guidelines. This paper discusses the epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea as well as optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations.

  16. Endoscopic treatment of early colorectal cancer – just a competition with surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebigbo Alanna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic treatment of cancerous and precancerous lesions in the gastrointestinal (GI tract has experienced major breakthroughs in the past years. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR is a simple and efficient method for the treatment of most benign lesions in the GI tract. However, with the introduction of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD and endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR, the scope of lesions eligible for endoscopic treatment has been widened significantly even in the colon. These methods are now being used routinely not just for the treatment of benign lesions but also in the curative en bloc resection of early colorectal cancers. The quick, efficient, and noninvasive character of these endoscopic procedures make them not just an alternative to surgery but, in many cases, the methods of choice for the treatment of most early colon cancers and some rectal cancers.

  17. Linking Gut Microbiota to Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raskov, Hans; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical data produce mounting evidence that the microbiota is strongly associated with colorectal carcinogenesis. Dysbiosis may change the course of carcinogenesis as microbial actions seem to impact genetic and epigenetic alterations leading to dysplasia, clonal expansion...... and malignant transformation. Initiation and promotion of colorectal cancer may result from direct bacterial actions, bacterial metabolites and inflammatory pathways. Newer aspects of microbiota and colorectal cancer include quorum sensing, biofilm formation, sidedness and effects/countereffects of microbiota...... and probiotics on chemotherapy. In the future, targeting the microbiota will probably be a powerful weapon in the battle against CRC as gut microbiology, genomics and metabolomics promise to uncover important linkages between microbiota and intestinal health....

  18. Colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, H.; Ezaki, H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on autopsied and surgical cases of colorectal cancer in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have not shown a relationship to radiation. In a recent epidemiologic study made on a fixed population at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), the risk of colon cancer was found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and also in both males and females. The dose effect for the cities and sexes combined was especially pronounced for cancer of the sigmoid colon. The effect of radiation was found to vary by age at the time of the bomb (ATB) and the effect was remarkable among those under age 20 ATB. The risk of rectal cancer was not found to increase significantly with radiation and the distribution of histological types for cancer of either the colon or rectum was unrelated to radiation dose. The effect of A-bomb exposure on the postoperative survival rate for colorectal cancer patients was studied. No difference by radiation dose could be demonstrated. In Japan, the incidence of colorectal cancer, and of colon cancer in particular, has been increasing. Therefore, close attention should be paid to changes occuring in A-bomb survivors

  19. Colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Hirofumi; Ezaki, Haruo.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on autopsied and surgical cases of colorectal cancer in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have not shown a relationship to radiation. In a recent epidemiologic study made on a fixed population at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), the risk of colon cancer was found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and also in both males and females. The dose effect for the cities and sexes combined was especially pronounced for cancer of the sigmoid colon. The effect of radiation was found to vary by age at the time of the bomb (ATB) and the effect was remarkable among those under age 20 ATB. The risk of rectal cancer was not found to increase significantly with radiation and the distribution of histological types for cancer of either the colon or rectum was unrelated to radiation dose. The effect of A-bomb exposure on the postoperative survival rate for colorectal cancer patients was studied. No difference by radiation dose could be demonstrated. In Japan, the incidence of colorectal cancer, and of colon cancer in particular, has been increasing. Therefore, close attention should be paid to changes occurring in A-bomb survivors. (author)

  20. Clinical significance of macroscopic completeness of mesorectal resection in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, J S; Martins, S C; Oliveira, J; Cunha, M F; Castro-Sousa, F

    2011-04-01

    Local recurrence after resection of rectal cancer is usually regarded as being due to a 'failure' of surgery. The completeness of resection of the mesorectum has been proposed as an indicator of the 'quality' of the resection. We determined the prognostic value of macroscopic evaluation of rectal cancer resection specimens and the circumferential resection margin (CRM) after curative surgery. From 1999 to 2006, the macroscopic quality of the mesorectum and the CRM were prospectively assessed in 127 patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with curative intent (R0+R1). Chemoradiotherapy was administered for 61 tumours staged as locally advanced tumours (T3, T4 and N+). Univariate analysis of time to local recurrence and cancer-free survival were tested (Kaplan-Meier) and multivariate analysis calculated with a Cox regression model. The mesorectum was incomplete in 34 (26.8%) patients. At a median follow up of 34 months (range, 9-96 months), in the group with an adequate mesorectal excision, the cumulative risk of local recurrence at 5 years was 10%. This was 25% if the mesorectum was incomplete (P CRM and the mesorectal score as independent factors for local recurrence, and T and N status and the mesorectal score as independent factors for disease-free survival. The outcome of surgical treatment of rectal cancer is related to the completeness of mesorectal excision. It is a more discriminative prognostic factor than the classic tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) system. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Family history of prostate and colorectal cancer and risk of colorectal cancer in the Women's health initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L; Yee, Cecilia; Paskett, Electra; Schwartz, Ann G; Lane, Dorothy; Palmer, Nynikka R A; Bock, Cathryn H; Nassir, Rami; Simon, Michael S

    2017-12-13

    Evidence suggests that risk of colorectal and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease, particularly among first-degree relatives. However, the aggregation of colorectal and prostate cancer within families has not been well investigated. Analyses were conducted among participants of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) observational cohort, free of cancer at the baseline examination. Subjects were followed for colorectal cancer through August 31st, 2009. A Cox-proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate risk of colorectal cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and both cancers among first-degree relatives of all participants and stratified by race (African American vs. White). Of 75,999 eligible participants, there were 1122 colorectal cancer cases diagnosed over the study period. A family history of prostate cancer alone was not associated with an increase in colorectal cancer risk after adjustment for confounders (aHR =0.94; 95% CI =0.76, 1.15). Separate analysis examining the joint impact, a family history of both colorectal and prostate cancer was associated with an almost 50% increase in colorectal cancer risk (aHR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.04, 2.10), but similar to those with a family history of colorectal cancer only (95% CI = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.11, 1.54). Our findings suggest risk of colorectal cancer is increased similarly among women with colorectal cancer only and among those with both colorectal and prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contribution of genes and shared environment to the risk of both cancers.

  2. Influence of body composition profile on outcomes following colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malietzis, G; Currie, A C; Athanasiou, T; Johns, N; Anyamene, N; Glynne-Jones, R; Kennedy, R H; Fearon, K C H; Jenkins, J T

    2016-04-01

    Muscle depletion is characterized by reduced muscle mass (myopenia), and increased infiltration by intermuscular and intramuscular fat (myosteatosis). This study examined the role of particular body composition profiles as prognostic markers for patients with colorectal cancer undergoing curative resection. Patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective surgical resection between 2006 and 2011 were included. Lumbar skeletal muscle index (LSMI), visceral adipose tissue (VAT) surface area and mean muscle attenuation (MA) were calculated by analysis of CT images. Reduced LSMI (myopenia), increased VAT (visceral obesity) and low MA (myosteatosis) were identified using predefined sex-specific skeletal muscle index values. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models were used to determine the role of different body composition profiles on outcomes. Some 805 patients were identified, with a median follow-up of 47 (i.q.r. 24·9-65·6) months. Multivariable analysis identified myopenia as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (hazard ratio (HR) 1·53, 95 per cent c.i. 1·06 to 2·39; P = 0·041) and overall survival (HR 1·70, 1·25 to 2·31; P cancer survival for patients with colorectal cancer. Muscle depletion may represent a modifiable risk factor in patients with colorectal cancer and needs to be targeted as a relevant endpoint of health recommendations. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer in a Japanese population: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Kayo; Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Joshi, Amit Man; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2010-12-01

    Few studies have addressed the relation between dietary patterns and colorectal cancer in Japan. We investigated dietary patterns in relation to colorectal cancer risk in a community-based case-control study. The association with dietary patterns was also examined for different sites of colorectal cancer. Data were derived from the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, including 800 cases and 775 controls interviewed from September 2000 to December 2003. The cases were admitted to one of the participating hospitals for the first surgical treatment during this period. We identified dietary patterns using principal component analysis of intakes of twenty-nine items of food groups and specific foods. Quartile categories of each dietary pattern were used, and non-dietary lifestyle factors and total energy intake were adjusted for in the analysis. We identified three dietary patterns: prudent, high-fat and light-meal patterns. The prudent dietary pattern characterised by high intakes of vegetables, fruits, seafoods and soya foods showed a nearly significant protective association with the overall risk of colorectal cancer (trend P = 0.054), and it was statistically significantly related to a decreased risk of distal colon cancer (trend P = 0.002), but not to that of either proximal colon or rectal cancer. The high-fat and light-meal dietary patterns were not materially related to the overall or site-specific risk of colorectal cancer. In summary, a prudent dietary pattern was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, especially with that of distal colon cancer, in a fairly large case-control study in Japan.

  4. Impact of long-term antihypertensive and antidiabetic medications on the prognosis of post-surgical colorectal cancer: the Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Feng; Hu, Dan; Lin, Xiandong; Liang, Binying; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hejun; Xia, Yan; Lin, Jinxiu; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2018-05-24

    Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are common comorbidities of colorectal cancer. We designed a prospective cohort study aiming to investigate the impact of long-term antihypertensive and antidiabetic medications on colorectal cancer-specific survival and recurrence among 713 post-surgical patients. All participants received radical resection for colorectal cancer during 2000-08, and they were followed up until July 2017. Colorectal cancer patients without hypertension had better survival than those with hypertension (median survival time [MST]: 190.3 months versus 99.0 months, p colorectal cancer survival was statistically significant, that is, patients receiving antidiabetic medications had longer survival time than untreated diabetic patients (MST: 135.8 months versus 80.2 months, p : 0.007), whereas the prognosis was greatly improved in colorectal cancer patients without diabetes mellitus ( p colorectal cancer relative to those without medications, respectively. Our data indicate that long-term antidiabetic medications can significantly prolong the survival and improve the prognosis of post-surgical colorectal cancer.

  5. Storage time of transfused blood and disease recurrence after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    of the transfused blood. Therefore, we studied the relationship between blood storage time and the development of disease recurrence and long-term survival after colorectal cancer surgery. METHODS: Preoperative and postoperative data were prospectively recorded in 740 patients undergoing elective resection...... for primary colorectal cancer. None of the patients received preoperative or postoperative chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Endpoints were overall survival and disease recurrence in the subgroup of patients operated on with curative intention who also survived the first 30 days after operation. Storage......BACKGROUND: Perioperative blood transfusion and subsequent development of postoperative infectious complications may lead to poor prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. It has been suggested that the development of postoperative infectious complications may be related to the storage time...

  6. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  7. Parameters of biological activity in colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Š.; Topolčan, O.; Holubec jr., L.; Levý, M.; Pecen, Ladislav; Svačina, Š.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2011), s. 373-378 ISSN 0250-7005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : colorectal cancer * biological activity * prognosis * tumor markers * angiogenetic factors * metalloproteinases * adhesion molecules Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2011

  8. Serum YKL-40 and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cintin, C; Johansen, J S; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    1999-01-01

    related to short survival. In the present study we analysed YKL-40 in preoperative sera from patients with colorectal cancer and evaluated its relation to survival. Serum YKL-40 was determined by RIA in 603 patients. Survival after operation was registered, and median follow-up time was 61 months. Three...

  9. Systemic therapy for patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Recent modalities and strategies have increased the complexity of treatment choice in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and therefore all cases should be assessed at a multidisciplinary conference. Adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months increases the chance of cure by absolutely 5 % in stage II...

  10. Diagnostic interval and mortality in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise; Frydenberg, Morten; Hamilton, William

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the theory of a U-shaped association between time from the first presentation of symptoms in primary care to the diagnosis (the diagnostic interval) and mortality after diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Study Design and Setting Three population-based studies in Denmark...

  11. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  12. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...

  13. Why I Got Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-29

    CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why she got tested for colorectal cancer when she turned 50 years old. .  Created: 2/29/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/29/2016.

  14. Cetuximab: clinical results in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiello, E; Giuliani, F; Gebbia, V; Piano, A; Agueli, R; Colucci, G

    2007-06-01

    In recent years, the introduction of targeted therapies into clinical practice seems to offer incremental benefits in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), mainly when they are employed in combination with optimal chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. In this paper, we focus on Cetuximab and its role in the treatment of mCRC.

  15. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt, M.F.P. van der; Wobbes, T.; Strobbe, L.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  17. Status of colorectal cancer devices: present scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandel, Shammy; Akhtar, Reyhan; Sarotra, Pooja; Medhi, Bikash

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was the colonoscopic detection and removal of neoplasia from the colorectum to prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Various online medical databases were searched such as PubMed, ACS, NCI, NIH, WHO, etc. for relevant publications and clinical trials for new developments in colonoscopic devices that are intended for diagnostic visualization and therapeutic interventions of the digestive tract. HD colon and I-Scan both has shown to increase the detection of sporadic adenomas with high quality. Third Eye Retroscope confers the backward view of colon, but aeroscope screens the entire colon in 30-60 min. Narrow-band imaging enhances mucosal and vascular details through the color differentiation of precancerous or cancerous polyp, compared to white light colonoscopy. The PillCam Colon Capsule is another new technique which is easily inserted and painless. In case of chemotherapy, Therasphere with Yttrium-90 has good results in the treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma metastasis. Radiofrequency ablation is a good technique for tumors ablation and Staple Line Reinforcement prevents the leak during and post-surgery of colon. FOBT is much more sensitive and cheaper test for colorectal cancer screening. Registered clinical trials have shown promising results for neoplasia detection by I-Scan, TER, and NBI imaging techniques will change current colonoscopic practice in colorectal cancer screening. However, more studies and inventions are required for improving the patient safety and efficacy.

  18. [Multiple primary colorectal cancer: Clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatkina, N V; Kit, O I; Gevorkyan, Yu A; Milakin, A G

    to define some clinical characteristics of synchronous and metachronous colorectal cancer (CRC). The investigation was concerned with the data of 150 patients with T1-4N0-2M0-1 multiple primary CRC. The clinical, biological, and morphological characteristics of synchronous and metachronous tumors were analyzed. Multiple primary tumors were 6.01% of all the cases of CRC. There was a preponderance of synchronous CRC (63.75%) with the tumor localized in the sigmoid colon and rectum. In women, synchronous colorectal tumors were more often concurrent with breast tumors; metachronous ones were detected after treatment for genital tumors. In men, synchronous colorectal tumors were more frequently concurrent with kidney cancer; metachronous ones were identified after treatment for gastric cancer. The found characteristics of multiple primary colorectal tumors may be taken in account in programs for both primary diagnosis and follow-up after treatment for malignant tumors, which will be able to improve the early detection of cancer patients and their treatment results.

  19. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  20. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  1. Fear of cancer recurrence in colorectal cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.A.E.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Janssen, S.H.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Prins, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors generally report a good quality of life, fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) remains an important issue. This study investigated whether the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) can detect high FCR, the prevalence, and characteristics of FCR in CRC

  2. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which

  3. Radioimmunoguided surgery using iodine 125 B72.3 in patients with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Martin, E.W. Jr.; Lavery, I.; Daly, J.; Sardi, A.; Aitken, D.; Bland, K.; Mojzisik, C.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary data using B72.3 murine monoclonal antibody labeled with iodine 125 suggested that both clinically apparent as well as occult sites of colorectal cancer could be identified intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma detecting probe. We report the preliminary data of a multicenter trial of this approach in patients with primary or recurrent colorectal cancer. One hundred four patients with primary, suspected, or known recurrent colorectal cancer received an intravenous infusion of 1 mg of B72.3 monoclonal antibody radiolabeled with 7.4 x 10 Bq of iodine 125. Twenty-six patients with primary colorectal cancer and 72 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer were examined. Using the gamma detecting probe, 78% of the patients had localization of the antibody in their tumor; this included 75% of primary tumor sites and 63% of all recurrent tumor sites; 9.2% of all tumor sites identified represented occult sites detected only with the gamma detecting probe. The overall sensitivity was 77% and a predictive value of a positive detection was 78%. A total of 30 occult sites in 26 patients were identified. In patients with recurrent cancer, the antibody study provided unique data that precluded resection in 10 patients, and in another eight patients it extended the potentially curative procedure

  4. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkasap, N.; Ozkurt, M. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Erkasap, S.; Yasar, F. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uzuner, K. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ihtiyar, E. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uslu, S.; Kara, M. [Department of Biochemistry, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Bolluk, O. [Department of Biostatistics, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-03-19

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  5. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkasap, N.; Ozkurt, M.; Erkasap, S.; Yasar, F.; Uzuner, K.; Ihtiyar, E.; Uslu, S.; Kara, M.; Bolluk, O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis

  6. Leptin receptor (Ob-R mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Erkasap

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases and metastatic colon (13 cases cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  7. Resection of pancreatic cancer in Europe and USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lei; Jansen, Lina; Balavarca, Yesilda

    2018-01-01

    European population-based cancer registries and the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database during 2003-2016 were analysed. Age-standardised resection rates for overall and stage I-II PaCs were computed. Associations between resection and demographic and clinical parameters were...

  8. Pancreatoduodenectomy with colon resection for cancer: A nationwide retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, E. Madelief; de Rooij, Thijs; van Eijck, Casper H.; Boerma, Djamila; Bonsing, Bert A.; van Dam, Ronald M.; van Dieren, Susan; Erdmann, Joris I.; Gerhards, Michael F.; de Hingh, Ignace H.; Kazemier, Geert; Klaase, Joost; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Patijn, Gijs A.; Scheepers, Joris J.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Busch, Olivier R.; Besselink, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically radical (R0) resection of pancreatic, periampullary, or colon cancer may occasionally require a pancreatoduodenectomy with colon resection (PD-colon), but the benefits of this procedure have been disputed, and multicenter studies on morbidity and oncologic outcomes after PD-colon are

  9. Preliminary results of robotic colorectal surgery at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, A.S.; Mahmoud, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The available literature on minimally invasive colorectal cancer demonstrates that laparoscopic approach is feasible and associated with better short term outcomes than open surgery while maintaining equivalent oncologic safety. Reports have shown that robotic surgery may overcome some of the pitfalls of laparoscopic intervention. Objective of the work: To evaluate early results of robotic colorectal surgery, in a cohort of Egyptian patients, regarding operative time, operative and early post-operative complications, hospital stay and pathological results. Patients and methods: A case series study which was carried out in surgical department at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Ten Egyptian cases of colorectal cancer (age ranged from 30 to 67, 5 males and 5 females) were recruited from the period of April 2013 to April 2014. Robotic surgery was performed to all cases. Results: Three patients had low anterior resection, three anterior resection, one total proctectomy, one abdominoperineal resection, one left hemicolectomy and one colostomy. The study reported no mortalities and two morbidities. The mean operative time was 333 min. The conversion to open was done in only one patient. A total mesorectal excision with negative circumferential margin was accomplished in all patients, distal margin was positive in one patient. Mean lymph nodes removed was 10.7. Mean hospital stay was 7.4 days. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the outcomes of robotic colorectal cancer intervention in Egyptian patients. Our preliminary results suggest that robotic- assisted surgery for colorectal cancer can be carried out safely and according to oncological principles

  10. Genomics of Colorectal Cancer in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Brim, Hassan; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide studies are increasingly becoming a must, especially for complex diseases such as cancer where multiple genes and diverse molecular mechanisms are known to be involved in genes’ function alteration. In this review, we report our latest genomic and epigenomic findings in African-American colorectal cancer patients. This population suffers a higher burden of the disease and most investigators in this field are looking for the underlying genetic and epigenetic targets that might be r...

  11. Determinants of long-term outcome in patients undergoing simultaneous resection of synchronous colorectal liver metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It remains unclear which patients can benefit from simultaneous resection of synchronous colorectal liver metastases (SCRLMs. This study aimed to examine the prognostic value of patient- and tumor-related factors in predicting long-term outcomes of patients undergoing simultaneous resection of SCRLMs and to help patients select a suitable therapeutic regimen and proper surveillance. METHODS: Clinicopathological and outcome data of 154 consecutive SCRLM patients who underwent simultaneous resection between July 2003 and July 2013 were collected from our prospectively established SCRLM data and analyzed with univariate and multivariate methods, and the prognostic index (PI was formulated based on the regression coefficients (β of the Cox model. The patients were classified into high- and low-risk groups according to the PI value; the cut-off point was the third quartile. RESULTS: The 5-year overall survival rate was 46%, and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 35%. Five factors were found to be independent predictors of poor overall survival (OS by multivariate analysis: positive lymph node status, vascular invasion, BRAF mutation, the distribution of bilobar liver metastases (LMs and non-R0 resection of LMs. Compared to low PI (≤5.978, high PI (>5.978 was highly predictive of shorter OS. Three factors were found to be independent predictors of poor disease-free survival (DFS by multivariate analysis: tumor deposits, BRAF mutation and bilobar LM distribution. We also determined the PI for DFS. Compared to low PI (≤2.945, high PI (>2.945 was highly predictive of shorter DFS. CONCLUSIONS: Simultaneous resection of SCRLM may lead to various long-term outcomes. Patients with low PI have longer OS and DFS, while those with high PI have shorter OS and DFS. Thus, patients with high PI may receive more aggressive treatment and intensive surveillance, This model needs further validation.

  12. Quality of life and its determinants among colorectal cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Ali Nikbakht; Nayyereh Amini Sani; Mohamad Asghari Jafarabadi; Seyed Reza Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer has a significant impact on physical, mental and social discomfort of patients. The aim of this study was to assess different aspects of health-related quality of life and its association with demographic characteristics and some clinical features in colorectal cancer survivors in the city of Babol. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 120 colorectal cancer survivors identified in the cancer registry from 2007 to 2012. A questionnair...

  13. Laparoscopic resection of transverse colon cancer: long-term oncologic outcomes in 58 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Koo-Yong; Baek, Se-Jin; Joh, Yong-Geul; Kim, Seon-Hahn

    2012-01-01

    Although the advantages of laparoscopic colectomy have been demonstrated, there are few data available on laparoscopic resection of transverse colon cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess operative outcomes, long-term survival, and disease recurrence after laparoscopic resection of transverse colon cancer. Prospective data were collected from 58 patients with transverse colon cancer among 1141 colorectal cancer cases undergoing laparoscopic resection between February 2001 and July 2009. Cancers located in both flexures were excluded. The surgical procedures included 39 extended right hemicolectomies, 11 extended left hemicolectomies, 5 transverse colectomies, and 3 total abdominal colectomies. The mean operating time was 216 minutes, and the mean operative blood loss was 111 mL. The average harvested lymph nodes were 35.8. The proximal and distal resection margins were 20.27 cm and 15.23 cm, respectively. Eight patients developed minor complications postoperatively, but these cases were controlled conservatively without interventions. One patient was converted to an open procedure because of severe adhesions. There were no surgery-related deaths. The mean follow-up period was 40.5 months. There were no local recurrences during the follow-up period. Systemic recurrence developed in four patients: two in the liver and two with peritoneal seeding. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 84.6% and 89.3%, respectively. Compared with previously published multicenter studies such as the COST, COLOR, and CLASICC trials, the long-term outcomes of this study demonstrate that transverse colon cancer can safely be resected using the laparoscopic technique in experienced hands.

  14. [The necessary perseverance of surgery for the treatment of locally advanced colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin

    2018-03-25

    Colorectal cancer, a malignant tumor arising from the colon or rectum, is a common cancer in China, with most patients diagnosed at the advanced stage or locally advanced stage. Large tumor size results in the invasion of adjacent organs and the multiple organ involvement, which poses certain challenges for clinical treatment. When facing advanced stage colorectal cancer, some surgeons do not consider surgery, a reasonable option. However, in fact, multi-disciplinary treatment can achieve relatively good treatment outcomes in patients with advanced stage or locally advanced stage colorectal cancer. Therefore, reasonable surgery should not be hastily abandoned. For patients with large tumors without distant metastases but with multiple organ involvement, directly surgical resection is difficult, therefore, preoperative adjuvant therapy can be considered. The basic principle of surgical treatment is to accomplish maximum protection of organ functions and to perform reasonable regional lymph node dissection on the basis of achieving R0 resection. Common surgical procedures for locally advanced colorectal cancer are as follows: (1)Right-sided colon cancer with duodenal invasion: first, the colon must be freed from three directions, namely the right posterior surface of the colon, the left side of the tumor, and the upper side of the tumor inferior to the pylorus, so as to expose and assess the spatial relationship between the tumor and the duodenum; the actual tumor invasion depth in the duodenum may be shallow. (2) Splenic flexure colon cancer with invasion of the cauda pancreatis and hilum lienis: multivisceral resection must be performed without separating the attachment between the tumor and spleen. The tumor border can be found more easily through manipulations starting from the descending colon. (3) Giant sigmoid colorectal cancer with bladder invasion: invasion usually occurs at the bladder fundus. Therefore, during surgery, the attachment between the rectum and

  15. Colorectal liver metastases: factors affecting outcome after surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, N.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death in Europe. The overall survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer is greatly affected by the presence of liver metastases, which occurs in about 50% of patients. Radical resection of colorectal liver metastases means a

  16. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective study of blood metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Yu, Danxia; Li, Hong-Lan; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Ma, Xiao; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Jia, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2018-02-26

    Few prospective studies, and none in Asians, have systematically evaluated the relationship between blood metabolites and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to search for risk-associated metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer in an Asian population using blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess associations of metabolites with cancer risk. In this study, we included 250 incident cases with colorectal cancer and individually matched controls nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. We found 35 metabolites associated with risk of colorectal cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Among them, 12 metabolites were glycerophospholipids including nine associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and three with increased risk [odds ratios per standard deviation increase of transformed metabolites: 0.31-1.98; p values: 0.002-1.25 × 10 -10 ]. The other 23 metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk included nine lipids other than glycerophospholipid, seven aromatic compounds, five organic acids and four other organic compounds. After mutual adjustment, nine metabolites remained statistically significant for colorectal cancer. Together, these independently associated metabolites can separate cancer cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.76 for colorectal cancer. We have identified that dysregulation of glycerophospholipids may contribute to risk of colorectal cancer. © 2018 UICC.

  18. Storage time of transfused blood and disease recurrence after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    of the transfused blood. Therefore, we studied the relationship between blood storage time and the development of disease recurrence and long-term survival after colorectal cancer surgery. METHODS: Preoperative and postoperative data were prospectively recorded in 740 patients undergoing elective resection......BACKGROUND: Perioperative blood transfusion and subsequent development of postoperative infectious complications may lead to poor prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. It has been suggested that the development of postoperative infectious complications may be related to the storage time...... transfused patients (P = 0.004). The survival of patients receiving blood exclusively stored blood stored > or = 21 days, survival was 3.7 years (P = 0.12). Among patients with curative resection (n = 532), the hazard ratio of disease recurrence was 1.5 (95...

  19. A Single Centre Retrospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic Rectal Resection with TME for Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Cancer-Specific Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Quarati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colon resection has established its role as a minimally invasive approach to colorectal diseases. Better long-term survival rate is suggested to be achievable with this approach in colon cancer patients, whereas some doubts were raised about its safety in rectal cancer. Here we report on our single centre experience of rectal laparoscopic resections for cancer focusing on short- and long-term oncological outcomes. In the last 13 years, 248 patients underwent minimally invasive approach for rectal cancer at our centre. We focused on 99 stage I, II, and III patients with a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. Of them 43 had a middle and 56 lower rectal tumor. Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection was performed in 71 patients whereas laparoscopic abdomino-perineal resection in 28. The overall mortality rate was 1%; the overall morbidity rate was 29%. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 69.7%, The 5-year overall survival rate was 78.8%.

  20. A transcriptome anatomy of human colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü, Bingjian; Xu, Jing; Lai, Maode; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Jian

    2006-01-01

    Accumulating databases in human genome research have enabled integrated genome-wide study on complicated diseases such as cancers. A practical approach is to mine a global transcriptome profile of disease from public database. New concepts of these diseases might emerge by landscaping this profile. In this study, we clustered human colorectal normal mucosa (N), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), adenoma (A) and cancer (T) related expression sequence tags (EST) into UniGenes via an in-house GetUni software package and analyzed the transcriptome overview of these libraries by GOTree Machine (GOTM). Additionally, we downloaded UniGene based cDNA libraries of colon and analyzed them by Xprofiler to cross validate the efficiency of GetUni. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the expression of β-catenin and. 7 novel genes in colorectal cancers. The efficiency of GetUni was successfully validated by Xprofiler and RT-PCR. Genes in library N, IBD and A were all found in library T. A total of 14,879 genes were identified with 2,355 of them having at least 2 transcripts. Differences in gene enrichment among these libraries were statistically significant in 50 signal transduction pathways and Pfam protein domains by GOTM analysis P < 0.01 Hypergeometric Test). Genes in two metabolic pathways, ribosome and glycolysis, were more enriched in the expression profiles of A and IBD than in N and T. Seven transmembrane receptor superfamily genes were typically abundant in cancers. Colorectal cancers are genetically heterogeneous. Transcription variants are common in them. Aberrations of ribosome and glycolysis pathway might be early indicators of precursor lesions in colon cancers. The electronic gene expression profile could be used to highlight the integral molecular events in colorectal cancers

  1. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  2. Prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal cancer in Iran: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Esmaeilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and hereditary factors and family history are responsible for the incidence and development of the disease in 20 to 30% of cases. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, is the most common hereditary form of CRC that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This study consisted of a systematic literature review of research articles that described the prevalence of HNPCC in Iranian patients with CRC. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Scopus, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases to identify relevant articles that describe HNPCC or Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC in Iran. For this purpose, a keyword search of the following terms was employed: (((Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer OR HNPCC OR Lynch syndrome AND (colorectal cancer OR familial colorectal cancer OR colon cancer OR rectal cancer OR bowel cancer AND IRAN. All eligible documents were collected, and the desired data were qualitatively analyzed.Result: Of the 67 articles that were found via the initial database search, only 12 were deemed to be of relevance to the current study. These articles included a total population of 3237 and this sample was selected and qualitatively analyzed. The findings of the review revealed that the frequency of mutation in MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6 genes varied between 23.1% and 62.5% among the studied families. This indicated that HNPCC is linked with up to 5.5% of the total cases of colorectal cancers in Iran.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the hereditary form of HNPCC or Lynch syndrome is significantly high among patients with CRC in Iran

  3. Laparoscopic resection for low rectal cancer: evaluation of oncological efficacy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Diarmaid C

    2011-09-01

    Laparoscopic resection of low rectal cancer poses significant technical difficulties for the surgeon. There is a lack of published follow-up data in relation to the surgical, oncological and survival outcomes in these patients.

  4. Expression and lymphatic microvessel density in primary tumors of node-neagtive colorectal cancer patients predict disease recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doekhie, F.S.; Morreau, H.; de Bock, G.H.; Speetjens, F.M.; Dekker-Ensink, N.G.; Putter, H.; vand e Velde, C.J.H.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Kuppen, P.J.K.; Sialyl lewis, X.

    2008-01-01

    Up to 30% of curatively resected colorectal cancer patients with tumor-negative lymph nodes, show disease recurrence. We assessed whether these high-risk patients can be identified by examining primary tumors for the following blood and lymphatic vasculature markers: A) sialyl Lewis X (sLeX),

  5. Role of radiation therapy in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher; Czito, Brian

    2011-07-01

    The 5-year overall survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is approximately 5%, with potentially resectable disease representing the curable minority. Although surgical resection remains the cornerstone of treatment, local and distant failure rates are high after complete resection, and debate continues as to the appropriate adjuvant therapy. Many oncologists advocate for adjuvant chemotherapy alone, given that high rates of systemic metastases are the primary cause of patient mortality. Others, however, view locoregional failure as a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, thereby justifying the use of adjuvant chemoradiation. As in other gastrointestinal malignancies, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy offers potential advantages in resectable patients, and clinical investigation of this approach has shown promising results; however, phase III data are lacking. Further therapeutic advances and prospective trials are needed to better define the optimal role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  6. Inflammatory Response After Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastases Data From the Oslo-CoMet Trial: Erratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In the article ''Inflammatory Response After Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastases Data From the Oslo-CoMet Trial'', which appeared in Volume 94, Issue 42 of Medicine, the University of Oslo was not credited as the affiliation for several authors. The article has since been corrected online.

  7. Comparison between local ablative therapy and chemotherapy for non-resectable colorectal liver metastases: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, Theo J. M.; Joosten, Joris J.; Wiering, Bastiaan; Langenhoff, Barbara S.; Dekker, Heleen M.; Wobbes, Theo; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest for the use of local ablative techniques in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases. Evidence on the efficacy over systemic chemotherapy is, however, extremely weak. In this prospective study we aim to assess the additional benefits of local tumour

  8. Comparison between local ablative therapy and chemotherapy for non-resectable colorectal liver metastases: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, T.J.M.; Joosten, J.J.; Wiering, B.; Langenhoff, B.S.; Dekker, H.M.; Wobbes, Th.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest for the use of local ablative techniques in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases. Evidence on the efficacy over systemic chemotherapy is, however, extremely weak. In this prospective study we aim to assess the additional benefits of local

  9. Role of stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastasis from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-04-21

    Systemic chemotherapy has enabled prolongation of survival in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. This has subsequently increased the relative significance of local therapy for patients with oligometastases because they can be cured by removal of oligometastatic lesions. One of the most frequently reported tumor histologies for oligometastases is colorectal cancer. Resection is the standard therapy in most settings of oligometastases. Recently, studies have shown that stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may become a treatment option that provides high local control with minimal morbidity. Two-year local control rates following SBRT for hepatic and pulmonary oligometastases are almost over 80% and are even higher for patients treated with high-dose regimens. The indications of SBRT for other metastatic sites or conditions include isolated lymph nodes, spinal and adrenal metastasis, and post-surgical pelvic recurrence. Many retrospective studies have indicated that SBRT for various lesions results in good outcomes with low morbidity, both in the curative and palliative setting. However, few reports with a high level of evidence have indicated the efficacy of SBRT compared to standard therapy. Hereafter, the optimal indication of SBRT needs to be prospectively investigated to obtain convincing evidence.

  10. Two cases of colorectal cancer developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Mituaki; Aoki, Youzou; Uesaka, Kazunobu; Enomoto, Katuhiko; Shimamoto, Tetuya; Hirabayashi, Naoki [Hashimoto Municipal Hospital, Wakayama (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We experienced two cases of advanced colorectal cancer developed after radiation therapy. One case was a 66-year old female who had received irradiation for her uterine cancer 35 years before. She was treated for a radiation colitis and a radiation dermatitis 6 years ago. Sigmoid colon cancer was pointed out by barium enema and colonoscopy, and Hartmann's operation was performed. The other case was a 68-year old man who had received irradiation for left malignant orchionous 30 years before. He had the radiation dermatitis in both inguinal region, and had received skin graft for the left inguinal dermatitis. He complained of anal bleeding, and rectal cancer was found out by the colonoscopy. Low anterior resection was performed. Their pathological findings showed mucinous adenocarcinoma. In a review of the Japanese literature, colorectal cancers developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy have been reported in only 8 cases including these two cases. (author)

  11. Two cases of colorectal cancer developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Mituaki; Aoki, Youzou; Uesaka, Kazunobu; Enomoto, Katuhiko; Shimamoto, Tetuya; Hirabayashi, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    We experienced two cases of advanced colorectal cancer developed after radiation therapy. One case was a 66-year old female who had received irradiation for her uterine cancer 35 years before. She was treated for a radiation colitis and a radiation dermatitis 6 years ago. Sigmoid colon cancer was pointed out by barium enema and colonoscopy, and Hartmann's operation was performed. The other case was a 68-year old man who had received irradiation for left malignant orchionous 30 years before. He had the radiation dermatitis in both inguinal region, and had received skin graft for the left inguinal dermatitis. He complained of anal bleeding, and rectal cancer was found out by the colonoscopy. Low anterior resection was performed. Their pathological findings showed mucinous adenocarcinoma. In a review of the Japanese literature, colorectal cancers developed more than 30 years after pelvic radiation therapy have been reported in only 8 cases including these two cases. (author)

  12. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  13. Clinical application and research of tumor markers in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yumei

    2005-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. There are many tumor markers for detecting colorectal cancer, some of which have been widely used in clinical area. However, still lack an ideal tumor marker of colorectal cancer. In this review, we simply characterized some common tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA50, CA242 etc and their dignostic value. And here we discussed some combined detecting procedures which improve diagnostic accuracy of colorectal cancer. In addition, with the development of the biomoleculer technique, some newly discovered tumor markers and genetic marekers have gained great progress in the research of colorectal cancer, and will become a promissing technique in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. (authors)

  14. Colorectal cancer in younger population: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, A.Q.; Samo, K.A.; Memon, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To promote awareness regarding increased occurrence of colorectal cancer in younger population and its clinicopathological features compared to older patients. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2010 to January 2011 on patients with diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma admitted through emergency or outpatient departments to Surgical Unit 5, Civil Hospital, Karachi. Data regarding age, gender, presentation, site of tumour, surgery performed and Dukes staging was collected and analysed. Results: A total of 23 patients were operated during the study period: 13 (56.52%) males and 10 (43.47%) females. Of them 12 (52.17%) were below the age of 40 years, while 3 (13.04%) patients were in the 11-20 age group. In 7 (30.4%) patients, tumour was irresectable at the time of presentation so a palliative procedure (diversion colostomy or ileostomy) was performed. There was a higher proportion of younger patients with metastatic disease at the time of presentation (n=9; 75%) while 10 out of 12 patients in the younger age group (83.3%) had a tumour of left colon, particularly rectum. Conclusion: Although colorectal cancer is usually a disease of older patients, it is increasingly becoming more common in younger population. Data suggests a leftward distribution for colorectal carcinoma and that younger patients present with more advanced disease and poorer prognosis. (author)

  15. Dendritic Cell-Based Adjuvant Vaccination Targeting Wilms’ Tumor 1 in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetaka Shimodaira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant recent advances in the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors, the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer involving metastasis to distant organs remains challenging. We conducted a phase I study to investigate the safety and immunogenicity of Wilms’ tumor (WT1 class I/II peptides-pulsed dendritic cell DC vaccination for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Standard treatment comprising surgical resection and chemotherapy was followed by one course of seven biweekly administrations of 1–2 × 107 DCs with 1–2 KE of OK-432 (streptococcal preparation in three patients. Clinical efficacy was confirmed based on WT1 expression using immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissues and immune monitoring using tetramer analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT assays. WT1 expression with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-class I molecules was detected in surgical resected tissues. Adverse reactions to DC vaccinations were tolerable under an adjuvant setting. WT1-specific cytotoxic T cells were detected by both modified WT1-peptide/HLA-A*24:02 tetramer analysis and/or interferon-γ-producing cells through the use of ELISPOT assays after the first DC vaccination. Immunity acquired from DC vaccination persisted for two years with prolonged disease-free and overall survival. The present study indicated that DC vaccination targeting WT1 demonstrated the safety and immunogenicity as an adjuvant therapy in patients with resectable advanced colorectal cancer.

  16. The current role of radiotherapy in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    During the last two decades, radiotherapy has become an integral part of the multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Currently, radiotherapy is seen mainly as an adjuvant therapy, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy, in a pre- or post-operative setting. Adjuvant radiotherapy alone leads to a significant reduction of local recurrence rates, but an impact on survival is seen only in subset analyses. Combined modality treatment can reduce local recurrence rates even further, and can also reduce the rate of distant relapses and increase survival. The acute toxicity of combined modality is considerably higher. Local radiation can also be used as a component of organ conserving local treatment for selected early lesions. Radiotherapy has been an important palliative treatment modality, diminishing symptoms in cases of inoperable primary rectal cancers or pelvic recurrences. The timing of radiation, surgery and chemotherapy has been under evaluation for years. For patients with locally advanced primary or recurrent malignancies (unresectable due to fixation), the preferred sequence is pre-operative irradiation with or without chemotherapy, followed by surgical resection. For mobile resectable lesions, sequencing issues are being tested in phase III randomised trials. (author)

  17. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Colorectal (Colon) Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Risk Assessment Tool (National Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  18. Lifestyle Changes and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a public health challenge in developed countries and ... of this cancer in sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East, South Asia and the Caribbean. ... populations from low risk regions to countries in North America, Europe and ... risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in their newly found environment as a result of ...

  19. Colorectal Cancer: Late Presentation and Outcome of Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colorectal cancer remains a major health problem especially in developed countries where it ranks as the third most common cause of cancer in both men and women. Though incidence of colorectal cancer is low in Nigeria and other developing countries, outcome of treatment remains poor due largely to late ...

  20. Presentation of colorectal cancers in Benin-City, Nigeria | Eze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, and the prevalence in Nigeria appears to be increasing due to a shift to western diets. We undertook a retrospective analysis of colorectal cancers seen at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City from January 1983 to December 2002.

  1. Clinical and biological aspects of mucinous colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugen, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands approximately 5% of all people will develop colorectal cancer during his or her life. The rapid development of individualized therapy for cancer patients has led to an increased interest in tumor subtypes. Currently, colorectal cancer patients are treated in the same way

  2. Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in Asia: A systematic review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the top five cancers afflicting both men and women globally. Once predominantly a Western disease, it has begun to rise in Asian countries as well. This systematic review aims to compile and analyze the various barriers towards colorectal cancer screening in Asia, and to ...

  3. Environmental Factors and Colorectal Tumor Risk in Individuals With Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Braam, H.; Vasen, H.F.; Nagengast, F.M.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims: Individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at increased risk for colorectal cancer. Environmental factors might play a role in HNPCC-associated carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the effects of environmental factors on

  4. Peritumoral eosinophils predict recurrence in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Kornprat, Peter; Lindtner, Richard A; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Langner, Cord

    2015-03-01

    In colorectal cancer, the presence and extent of eosinophil granulocyte infiltration may render important prognostic information. However, it remains unclear whether an increasing number of eosinophils might simply be linked to the overall inflammatory cell reaction or represent a self-contained, antitumoral mechanism that needs to be documented and promoted therapeutically. Peri- and intratumoral eosinophil counts were retrospectively assessed in 381 primary colorectal cancers from randomly selected patients. Tumors were diagnosed in American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage I in 21%, stage II in 32%, stage III in 33%, and stage IV in 14%. Presence and extent of eosinophils was related to various histopathological parameters as well as patients' outcome. Overall, peri- and intratumoral eosinophils were observed in 86 and 75% cancer specimens. The peritumoral eosinophil count correlated strongly with the intratumoral eosinophil count (R=0.69; Peosinophil counts were significantly associated with lower T and N classification, better tumor differentiation, absence of vascular invasion, as well as improved progression-free and cancer-specific survival. However, only peritumoral eosinophils, but not intratumoral, were an independent prognosticator of favorable progression-free (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.98; P=0.04) and cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.7; 95% confidence interval 0.52-0.93; P=0.01)-independent of the intensity of overall inflammatory cell reaction. This was also found for patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease, wherein the presence of peritumoral eosinophils was significantly associated with favorable outcome. In conclusion, the number of peritumoral eosinophils had a significant favorable impact on prognosis of colorectal cancer patients independent of the overall tumor-associated inflammatory response. Evaluation of peritumoral eosinophils represents a promising

  5. [Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. In 2012 one million thirty six thousand cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed all over the world, two hundred fifty three thousand cases were diagnosed in China (accounted for 18.6%). China has the largest number of new cases of colorectal cancer in the world. Colorectal cancer has becoming a serious threat of Chinese residents' health. In 2010, the National Ministry of Health organized colorectal cancer expertise of the Chinese Medical Association to write the "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2010edition), and publish it publicly. In recent years, the National Health and Family Planning Commission has organized experts to revised the protocol 2 times: the first time in 2015, the second time in 2017. The revised part of "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2017 edition) involves new progress in the field of imaging examination, pathological evaluation, surgery, chemotherpy and radiotherapy. The 2017 edition of the protocol not only referred to the contents of the international guidelines, but also combined with the specific national conditions and clinical practice in China, and also included many evidence-based clinical data in China recently. The 2017 edition of the protocol would further promote the standardization of diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer in China, improve the survival and prognosis of patients, and benefit millions of patients with colorectal cancer and their families.

  6. Benchmarking circumferential resection margin (R1) resection rate for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, W; Collins, G; Warren, B; Cunningham, C; Mortensen, N; Lindsey, I

    2010-09-01

    Circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement (R1) is used to audit rectal cancer surgical quality. However, when downsizing chemoradiation (dCRT) is used, CRM audits both dCRT and surgery, its use reflecting a high casemix of locally advanced tumours. We aimed to evaluate predictors of R1 and benchmark R1 rates in the dCRT era, and to assess the influence of failure of steps in the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process to CRM involvement. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected rectal cancer data was undertaken. Patients were classified according to CRM status. Uni- and multivariate analysis was undertaken of risk factors for R1 resection. The contribution of the steps of the MDT process to CRM involvement was assessed. Two hundred and ten rectal cancers were evaluated (68% T3 or T4 on preoperative staging). R1 (microscopic) and R2 (macroscopic) resections occurred in 20 (10%) and 6 patients (3%), respectively. Of several factors associated with R1 resections on univariate analysis, only total mesorectal excision (TME) specimen defects and threatened/involved CRM on preoperative imaging remained as independent predictors of R1 resections on multivariate analysis. Causes of R1 failure by MDT step classification found that less than half were associated with and only 15% solely attributable to a suboptimal TME specimen. Total mesorectal excision specimen defects and staging-predicted threatened or involved CRM are independent strong predictors of R1 resections. In most R1 resections, the TME specimen was intact. It is important to remember the contribution of both the local staging casemix and dCRT failure when using R1 rates to assess purely surgical competence.

  7. Radiolabeled antibody imaging in the management of colorectal cancer. Results of a multicenter clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, R.J.; Abdel-Nabi, H.; Krag, D.; Mitchell, E.

    1991-01-01

    Presurgical colorectal cancer patients (n = 116) received single intravenous infusions of 1 mg of CYT-103 (OncoScint CR103), an immunoconjugate of monoclonal antibody B72.3, radiolabeled with 111In. Following gamma camera imaging, 103 patients underwent an operative procedure: 92 had primary or recurrent colorectal carcinoma, 1 patient evaluated for recurrence of colorectal cancer had a second primary malignancy (small cell lung), and 10 patients had no demonstrable evidence of malignancy. 111In-CYT-103 immunoscintigraphic findings were consistent with the pathologic diagnoses for 70% of patients with colorectal cancer and 90% of disease-free patients. Antibody imaging contributed to surgical decision making through the detection of occult disease (12% of patients) and the confirmation of localized, potentially resectable disease without regional or metastatic spread. Seven patients (6%) experienced adverse effects, primarily fevers and itching, and 33% of patients developed antibodies to murine immunoglobulin after administration of 111In-CYT-103. The results of this study suggest that 111In-CYT-103 is a useful diagnostic tool for the presurgical evaluation of colorectal cancer patients

  8. Liver resection over the last decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, A.; Larsen, P.N.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma in our institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The patients who underwent their primary liver resection from 1.1.1995-31.12.2004 in our institution were included. The surgical outcome was reviewed retrospectively and the five-year survival...... after resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma was estimated. RESULTS: 141 patients (71M/70F), median age 58 years (1-78), underwent a liver resection in the ten-year period. The number of resections increased from two in 1995 to 32 in 2004. Median hospital...

  9. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules in Colorectal-Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPN) at staging computed tomography (CT) for colorectal cancer (CRC), and the optimal diagnostic approach, are debated. This study aimed to analyse variability in radiologists' detection of IPN at staging CT for CRC. METHODS......: All patients with CRC referred to our center between 2006 and 2011 were included. Primary staging CT scans were re-evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist whose findings were entered into a dedicated database and merged with data from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database, the National...... investigated radiological characteristics or clinicopathological factors were significantly associated with malignancy of IPN. CONCLUSION: The characterization of pulmonary findings on staging CT for CRC varied greatly between the radiologists, and double-reading of scans with IPN is recommended prior...

  10. Potential targets for colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temraz, Sally; Mukherji, Deborah; Shamseddine, Ali

    2013-08-22

    The step-wise development of colorectal neoplasia from adenoma to carcinoma suggests that specific interventions could delay or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Several key factors involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis have already been identified including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), survivin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Clinical trials of COX-2 inhibitors have provided the "proof of principle" that inhibition of this enzyme can prevent the formation of colonic adenomas and potentially carcinomas, however concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these drugs have limited their use as a chemopreventative strategy. Curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin are chemopreventive agents that are able to suppress multiple signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis and hence are attractive candidates for further research.

  11. Potential Targets for Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamseddine

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The step-wise development of colorectal neoplasia from adenoma to carcinoma suggests that specific interventions could delay or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Several key factors involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis have already been identified including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, survivin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I. Clinical trials of COX-2 inhibitors have provided the “proof of principle” that inhibition of this enzyme can prevent the formation of colonic adenomas and potentially carcinomas, however concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these drugs have limited their use as a chemopreventative strategy. Curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin are chemopreventive agents that are able to suppress multiple signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis and hence are attractive candidates for further research.

  12. Genetics, Cytogenetics, and Epigenetics of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Migliore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the colorectal cancer (CRC cases are sporadic, only 25% of the patients have a family history of the disease, and major genes causing syndromes predisposing to CRC only account for 5-6% of the total cases. The following subtypes can be recognized: MIN (microsatellite instability, CIN (chromosomal instability, and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype. CIN occurs in 80–85% of CRC. Chromosomal instability proceeds through two major mechanisms, missegregation that results in aneuploidy through the gain or loss of whole chromosomes, and unbalanced structural rearrangements that lead to the loss and/or gain of chromosomal regions. The loss of heterozygosity that occur in the first phases of the CRC cancerogenesis (in particular for the genes on 18q as well as the alteration of methylation pattern of multiple key genes can drive the development of colorectal cancer by facilitating the acquisition of multiple tumor-associated mutations and the instability phenotype.

  13. Bile acids in experimental colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Rainey, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Cogent epidemiological and experimental data implicate bile acids as endogenous co-carcinogens in colorectal cancer. A series of experiments was designed to test the ability of sodium deoxycholate (SDC) to promote intestinal hyperplasia and neoplasia in rats (n = 265). The intermediary role of faecal anaerobes was explored in animals receiving oral metronidazole. Intrarectal instillation of SDC trebled tumour yield in functioning large bowel and increased both crypt depth and crypt cell produ...

  14. Cetuximab in the management of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2007-01-01

    Cetuximab, a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets the ligand-binding domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is active in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). As an IgG1 antibody, cetuximab may exert its antitumor efficacy through both EGFR antagonism and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Clinical trials established the role of cetuximab, particularly with irinotecan, in irinotecan-refractory/heavily pretreated patients. More recent studies show promising...

  15. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%–5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%; inherited (5% and familial (25%. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN, microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53, and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined

  16. Effects of the combination of blood transfusion and postoperative infectious complications on prognosis after surgery for colorectal cancer. Danish RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2000-01-01

    affects the prognosis. METHODS: Patient risk variables, variables related to operation technique, blood transfusion and the development of infectious complications were recorded prospectively in 740 patients undergoing elective resection for primary colorectal cancer. Endpoints were overall survival (n......BACKGROUND: The frequency of postoperative infectious complications is significantly increased in patients with colorectal cancer receiving perioperative blood transfusion. It is still debated, however, whether perioperative blood transfusion alters the incidence of disease recurrence or otherwise...... = 740) and time to diagnosis of recurrent disease in the subgroup of patients operated on with curative intention (n = 532). The patients were analysed in four groups divided with respect to administration or not of perioperative blood transfusion and development or non-development of postoperative...

  17. Effects of the combination of blood transfusion and postoperative infectious complications on prognosis after surgery for colorectal cancer. Danish RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of postoperative infectious complications is significantly increased in patients with colorectal cancer receiving perioperative blood transfusion. It is still debated, however, whether perioperative blood transfusion alters the incidence of disease recurrence or otherwise...... affects the prognosis. METHODS: Patient risk variables, variables related to operation technique, blood transfusion and the development of infectious complications were recorded prospectively in 740 patients undergoing elective resection for primary colorectal cancer. Endpoints were overall survival (n...... = 740) and time to diagnosis of recurrent disease in the subgroup of patients operated on with curative intention (n = 532). The patients were analysed in four groups divided with respect to administration or not of perioperative blood transfusion and development or non-development of postoperative...

  18. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, Guillermo; Murillo, Oihana; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Dubrot, Juan; Tirapu, Iñigo; Rizzo, Miguel; Arina, Ainhoa; Alfaro, Carlos; Azpilicueta, Arantza; Berasain, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, José L; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNγ in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17990348

  19. Comparison of colorectal and gastric cancer: Survival and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghimi-Dehkordi, Bijan; Safaee, Azadeh; Zali, Mohammad R

    2009-01-01

    Gastric and colorectal cancers are the most common gastrointestinal malignancies in Iran. We aim to compare the survival rates and prognostic factors between these two cancers. We studied 1873 patients with either gastric or colorectal cancer who were registered in one referral cancer registry center in Tehran, Iran. All patients were followed from their time of diagnosis until December 2006 (as failure time). Survival curves were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier Method and compared by the Log-rank test. Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was carried out using the Cox proportional hazard model. Of 1873 patients, there were 746 with gastric cancer and 1138 with colorectal cancer. According to the Kaplan-Meier method 1, 3, 5, and 7-year survival rates were 71.2, 37.8, 25.3, and 19.5%, respectively, in gastric cancer patients and 91.1, 73.1, 61, and 54.9%, respectively, in patients with colorectal cancer. Also, univariate analysis showed that age at diagnosis, sex, grade of tumor, and distant metastasis were of prognostic significance in both cancers ( P < 0.0001). However, in multivariate analysis, only distant metastasis in colorectal cancer and age at diagnosis, grade of tumor, and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer were identified as independent prognostic factors influencing survival. According to our findings, survival is significantly related to histological differentiation of tumor and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer patients and only to distant metastasis in gastric cancer patients. (author)

  20. Analysis of metastasis associated signal regulatory network in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2018-06-18

    Metastasis is a key factor that affects the survival and prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. To elucidate molecular mechanism associated with the metastasis of colorectal cancer, genes related to the metastasis time of colorectal cancer were screened. Then, a network was constructed with this genes. Data was obtained from colorectal cancer expression profile. Molecular mechanism elucidated the time of tumor metastasis and the expression of genes related to colorectal cancer. We found that metastasis-promoting and metastasis-inhibiting networks included protein hubs of high connectivity. These protein hubs were components of organelles. Some ribosomal proteins promoted the metastasis of colorectal cancer. In some components of organelles, such as proteasomes, mitochondrial ribosome, ATP synthase, and splicing factors, the metastasis of colorectal cancer was inhibited by some sections of these organelles. After performing survival analysis of proteins in organelles, joint survival curve of proteins was constructed in ribosomal network. This joint survival curve showed metastasis was promoted in patients with colorectal cancer (P = 0.0022939). Joint survival curve of proteins was plotted against proteasomes (P = 7 e-07), mitochondrial ribosome (P = 0.0001157), ATP synthase (P = 0.0001936), and splicing factors (P = 1.35e-05). These curves indicate that metastasis of colorectal cancer can be inhibited. After analyzing proteins that bind with organelle components, we also found that some proteins were associated with the time of colorectal cancer metastasis. Hence, different cellular components play different roles in the metastasis of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcome of Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection for Transverse Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Gen; Liu, Meng-Jia; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang; Hou, Hui-Rong; Liang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xing-Mao; Hu, Jun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic resection for transverse colon cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate the short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for transverse colon cancer. A total of 278 patients with transverse colon cancer from a single institution were included. All patients underwent curative surgery, 156 patients underwent laparoscopic resection (LR), and 122 patients underwent open resection (OR). The short- and long-term results were compared between two groups. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were comparable between two groups. Conversions were required in eight (5.1 %) patients. LR group was associated with significantly longer median operating time (180 vs. 140 min; P colon cancer is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes.

  2. Emergency surgery for complicated colorectal cancer in central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Caetano dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to report clinical and pathological features of patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed during emergency abdominal surgery. Methods: records of 107 patients operated between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed. Results: there were 58 women and 49 men with mean age of 59.8 years. The most frequent symptoms were: abdominal pain (97.2%, no bowel movements (81.3%, vomiting (76.6%, and anorexia (40.2%. Patients were divided into five groups: obstructive acute abdomen (n = 68, obstructive acute perforation (n = 21, obstructive acute inflammation (n = 13, abdominal sepsis (n = 3, and severe gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 2. Tumors were located in the rectosigmoid (51.4%, transverse colon (19.6%, ascendent colon (12.1%, descendent colon (11.2%, and 5.6% of the cases presented association of two colon tumors (synchronic tumors. The surgical treatment was: tumor resection with colostomy (85%, tumor resection with primary anastomosis (10.3%, and colostomy without tumor resection (4.7%. Immediate mortality occurred in 33.4% of the patients. Bivariate analysis of sex, tumor location and stage showed no relation to death (p > 0.05%. Conclusions: colorectal cancer may be the cause of colon obstruction or perfuration in patients with nonspecific colonic complaints. Despite the high mortality rate, resection of tumor is feasible in most patients. Resumo: Objetivo: analisar os aspectos clinicos e patológicos de pacientes operados de cancer colorretal diagnosticados durante operações abdominais de urgencia. Métodos: foram estudados os prontuários de 107 pacientes operados entre 2006 e 2010. Resultados: Foram incluidos 58 mulheres e 49 homens com idade media de 59,8 anos. Os sintomas mais frequentes foram: dor abdominal (97,2%, parade de eliminação de gases e fezes (81,3%, vomitos (76,6% e anorexia (40,2%. Os pacientes foram divididos em cinco grupos: abdomen agudo obstrutivo (68, abdomen agudo perfurativo (21, abdomen agudo inflamatorio (13

  3. Serum YKL-40 and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cintin, C; Johansen, J S; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    1999-01-01

    related to short survival. In the present study we analysed YKL-40 in preoperative sera from patients with colorectal cancer and evaluated its relation to survival. Serum YKL-40 was determined by RIA in 603 patients. Survival after operation was registered, and median follow-up time was 61 months. Three......YKL-40 is a mammalian member of the chitinase protein family. Although the function of YKL-40 is unknown, the pattern of its expression suggests a function in remodelling or degradation of extracellular matrix. High serum YKL-40 has been found in patients with recurrent breast cancer and has been...

  4. Does tumor size have its prognostic role in colorectal cancer? Re-evaluating its value in colorectal adenocarcinoma with different macroscopic growth pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weixing; Li, Yaqi; Meng, Xianke; Cai, Sanjun; Li, Qingguo; Cai, Guoxiang

    2017-09-01

    Few previous studies have taken the growth pattern into consideration when analyzing the prognostic value of tumor size in colorectal cancer (CRC). We sought to reveal the prognostic role of tumor size in different macroscopic growth patterns of CRC. Using Cancer Center datasets, we identified 4057 cases with colorectal adenocarcinoma treated with curative resection. Macroscopic growth patterns of tumors were classified into three types: infiltrative, ulcerative and expansive types based on tumor gross appearance. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). In whole cohort, tumor size was an independent factor for OS (HR 1.10, 95%CI 1.04-1.16, p colorectal adenocarcinoma of infiltrative type, while only for OS in patients of ulcerative type. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Thoracoscopic resection for esophageal cancer: A review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheepers Joris

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal resection remains the only curative option in high grade dysplasia of the Barrett esophagus and non metastasized esophageal cancer. In addition, it may also be an adequate treatment in selected cases of benign disease. A wide variety of minimally invasive procedures have become available in esophageal surgery. Aim of the present review article is to evaluate minimally invasive procedures for esophageal resection, especially the approach performed through right thoracoscopy.

  6. The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0198 TITLE: The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jatin Roper...CONTRACT NUMBER The Role of Akt Isoforms in Colorectal Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0198 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...substantially reduces colorectal tumorigenesis in our genetically engineered mouse model. We also successfully ablated novel downstream targets of Akt in our

  7. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal cancer: comparison of stapled and manual coloanal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, J C; Chen, C S; Ma, M X; Xia, Z X; Liu, D S; Zhang, F Y

    2014-05-01

    The study aim was to analyse the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic intersphincteric resection with stapled coloanal anastomosis for low rectal cancer. Between March 2009 and August 2010, 22 patients underwent laparoscopic intersphincteric resection with a stapled coloanal anastomosis without a diverting ileostomy. The results were compared retrospectively with hand-sewn coloanal anastomoses performed between January 2001 and May 2009, which included 55 open and 38 laparoscopic intersphincteric resections. The morbidity comparison only included data relevant to the anastomosis. Function was compared using the Saito function questionnaire and the Wexner score and only involved data relevant to the laparoscopy. The anastomotic complication rates were similar for fistula, bleeding and neorectal mucosal prolapse (P = 0.526, P = 0.653 and P = 0.411, respectively). Anastomotic leakage and stricture formation of the stapled coloanal anastomosis were significantly lower than those of the hand-sewn coloanal anastomosis (P = 0.037 and P = 0.028, respectively). There were no significant differences in the Saito function questionnaire and the Wexner score between the stapled and hand-sewn coloanal anastomotic groups (all P > 0.05). Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection with a stapled coloanal anastomosis is technically feasible and is less likely to result in anastomotic leakage and stricture formation than a hand-sewn anastomosis. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Comparative Analysis between Simultaneous Resection and Staged Resection for Synchronous Colorectal Liver Metastases - A Single Center Experience on 300 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Sorin; Diaconescu, Andrei; Ionel, Zenaida; Zlate, Cristian; Grigorie, Răzvan; Hrehoreţ, Doina; Braşoveanu, Vladislav; Dima, Simona; Botea, Florin; Ionescu, Mihnea; Tomescu, Dana; Droc, Gabriela; Fota, Ruxandra; Croitoru, Adina; Gramaticu, Iulia; Buica, Florina; Iacob, Razvan; Gheorghe, Cristian; Herlea, Vlad; Grasu, Mugur; Dumitru, Radu; Boroş, Mirela; Popescu, Irinel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In synchronous colorectal liver metastases (SCLMs), simultaneous resection (SR) of the primary tumor and liver metastases has not gained wide acceptance. Most authors prefer staged resections (SgR), especially in patients presenting rectal cancer or requiring major hepatectomy. Methods: Morbidity, mortality, survival rates and length of hospital stay were compared between the two groups of patients (SR vs. SgR). A subgroup analysis was performed for patients with similar characteristics (e.g. rectal tumor, major hepatectomy, bilobar metastases, metastatic lymph nodes, preoperative chemotherapy). Results: Between 1995 and 2016, SR was performed in 234 patients, while 66 patients underwent SgR. Comparative morbidity (41% vs. 31.8%, respectively, p = 0.1997), mortality (3.8% vs. 3%, respectively, p = 1) and overall survival rates (85.8%, 51.3% and 30% vs. 87%, 49.6% and 22.5%, at 1-, 3- and 5-years, respectively, p = 0.386) were similar between the SR and SgR group. Mean hospital stay was significantly shorter in patients undergoing SR than SgR (15.11 ‚+- 8.60 vs. 19.42 ‚+- 7.36 days, respectively, p 0.0001). The characteristics of SR and SgR groups were similar, except the following parameters: rectal tumor (34.1% vs. 19.7%, respectively, p = 0.0245), metastatic lymph nodes (68.1% vs. 86.3%, respectively, p = 0.0383), bilobar liver metastases (22.6% vs. 37.8%, respectively, p = 0.0169), major hepatectomies (13.2% vs. 30.3%, respectively, p= 0.0025) and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (13.2% vs. 77.2%, respectively, p 0.0001). A comparative analysis of morbidity, mortality and survival rates between SR and SgR was performed for subgroups of patients presenting these parameters. In each of these subgroups, SR was associated with similar morbidity, mortality and survival rates compared with SgR (p value 0.05). In patients with SCLMs, SR provides similar short-term and long-term outcomes as SgR, with a shorter hospital stay. Therefore, in most patients with

  9. Early colorectal Cancer: focuses and handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Oscar A; Martinez, Carlos E; Escobar, Jaime; Sanchez, William; Serrano, Juan M

    2001-01-01

    Currently, early colorectal cancer (ECC) constitutes only 10% of the total of diagnosed colorectal malignancy. This proportion is expected to show an important increase with the different screening protocols that are on the way, together with recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy. We compare the histopathologic spectrum of ECC from the western and Japanese viewpoint, defining the anatomopathologic characteristics of this lesions, together with the natural history and new classification and staging systems; variables which are all oriented to establish the grade of local invasion and risk of nodal spread. The knowledge and integral analysis of the different biologic, clinical, histological and endoscopic characteristics of ECC, will determine the most rational individual therapeutic pathway from the prognostic point of view

  10. Mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer patients in a low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-06

    Feb 6, 2013 ... This is 10% of the rate reported in First-World countries. In high-incidence areas, the rate of abnormal mismatch repair gene expression in colorectal cancers is 2 - 7%. Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hMLH1- and hMSH2-deficient colorectal cancer in the. Northern Cape.

  11. Colorectal cancer screening awareness among physicians in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzimichalis Georgios

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data comparison between SEER and EUROCARE database provided evidence that colorectal cancer survival in USA is higher than in European countries. Since adjustment for stage at diagnosis markedly reduces the survival differences, a screening bias was hypothesized. Considering the important role of primary care in screening activities, the purpose of the study was to investigate the colorectal cancer screening awareness among Hellenic physicians. Methods 211 primary care physicians were surveyed by mean of a self-reported prescription-habits questionnaire. Both physicians' colorectal cancer screening behaviors and colorectal cancer screening recommendations during usual check-up visits were analyzed. Results Only 50% of physicians were found to recommend screening for colorectal cancer during usual check-up visits, and only 25% prescribed cost-effective procedures. The percentage of physicians recommending stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy was 24% and 4% respectively. Only 48% and 23% of physicians recognized a cancer screening value for stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy. Colorectal screening recommendations were statistically lower among physicians aged 30 or less (p = 0.012. No differences were found when gender, level and type of specialization were analyzed, even though specialists in general practice showed a trend for better prescription (p = 0.054. Conclusion Contemporary recommendations for colorectal cancer screening are not followed by implementation in primary care setting. Education on presymptomatic control and screening practice monitoring are required if primary care is to make a major impact on colorectal cancer mortality.

  12. Patterns and presentations of colorectal cancer at Komfo-Anokye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally and its incidence is increasing in developing countries. This study determined the incidence, clinical features and the histopathological patterns of colorectal cancer at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi, Ghana. Methods: A ...

  13. Workload and surgeon's specialty for outcome after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archampong, David; Borowski, David; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    A large body of research has focused on investigating the effects of healthcare provider volume and specialization on patient outcomes including outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery. However there is conflicting evidence about the role of such healthcare provider characteristics in the management...... of colorectal cancer....

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer in Kenya | Saidi | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The incidence of colorectal cancer in Africa is increasing. True data on clinical outcomes of the disease is hampered by follow up challenges. Method Follow up data of 233 patients treated for colorectal cancer between 2005 and 2010 at various Nairobi hospitals were evaluated. The primary outcome was ...

  15. Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer (CRC) cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced CRC, 14 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity, tolerability, immune and clinical responses to the vaccine. No severe toxicity ...

  16. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  17. Complex Liver Resections for Colorectal Metastases: Are They Safe in the Low-Volume, Resource-Poor Caribbean Setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamir O. Cawich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although many authorities suggest that major liver resections should only be carried out in high-volume specialized centres, many patients in the Caribbean do not have access to these health care systems. Presentation of a Case. A 50-year-old woman with a solitary colorectal metastasis invading the inferior vena cava underwent an extended left hepatectomy with caval resection and reconstruction. Several technical maneuvers were utilized that were suited to the resource-poor environment. Conclusion. We suggest that good outcomes can still be attained in the resource-poor, low-volume centres once dedicated and appropriately trained teams are available.

  18. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer; Epidemiologie kolorektaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Colorectal tumors are among the most frequently encountered forms of cancer worldwide. With approximately 57,000 new cases every year, they represent the most frequent type of cancer in Germany, ranking before breast cancer (approximately 46,000) and lung cancer (approximately 37,000). Although global incidence is on the rise, in Germany it is only increasing among men, but not among women. The mortality rate (approximately 26,500 deaths annually) in Germany has declined among men for about the past 10 years and among women for about the past 20 years.The most important risk factors are familial history of colorectal and other tumors as well as lifestyle factors such as nutrition, obesity, inactivity,and smoking.Lifestyle-related risks offer a broad area for implementing primary preventive measures, which have not yet been adequately exhausted. Several proven (fecal occult blood test) and probably effective (endoscopic) methods are available for secondary prevention. Consistent encouragement of these possibilities for prevention could reduce incidence and mortality substantially and render colorectal tumors less frequent. (orig.) [German] Kolorektale Tumoren gehoeren weltweit zu den haeufigsten Krebsarten und sind mit jaehrlich ca.57000 Neuerkrankungsfaellen vor Brustkrebs (ca. 46000) und Lungenkrebs (ca. 37000) die haeufigste Krebsart in Deutschland.Waehrend die Inzidenz weltweit steigt, nimmt sie in Deutschland nur bei Maennern,nicht aber bei Frauen zu.Die Mortalitaet (jaehrlich ca.26500 Todesfaelle) geht hierzulande bei Maennern seit ca.10 Jahren, bei Frauen seit ca.20 Jahren zurueck. Die bedeutendsten Risikofaktoren sind familiaere Vorgeschichte an kolorektalen und anderen Tumoren sowie Lebensstilfaktoren wie Ernaehrung, Uebergewicht,Bewegungsmangel und Rauchen.Die lebensstilbedingten Risiken bieten breiten Raum fuer primaere Praevention, der bisher nur unzureichend ausgeschoepft ist.Auch fuer sekundaere Praevention stehen mehrere nachgewiesenermassen (Test auf

  19. Prognostic and predictive factors in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolocan, A; Ion, D; Ciocan, D N; Paduraru, D N

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important public health problem; it is a leading cause of cancer mortality in the industrialized world, second to lung cancer: each year there are nearly one million new cases of CRC diagnosed worldwide and half a million deaths (1). This review aims to summarise the most important currently available markers for CRC that provide prognostic or predictive information. Amongst others, it covers serum markers such as CEA and CA19-9, markers expressed by tumour tissues, such as thymidylate synthase, and also the expression/loss of expression of certain oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes such as K-ras and p53. The prognostic value of genomic instability, angiogenesis and proliferative indices, such as the apoptotic index, are discussed. The advent of new therapies created the pathway for a personalized approach of the patient. This will take into consideration the complex genetic mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis, besides the classical clinical and pathological stagings. The growing number of therapeutic agents and known molecular targets in oncology lead to a compulsory study of the clinical use of biomarkers with role in improving response and survival, as well as in reducing toxicity and establishing economic stability. The potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers which have arisen from the study of the genetic basis of colorectal cancer and their therapeutical significance are discussed. RevistaChirurgia.

  20. Pattern & presentation of colorectal cancer in central Sudan, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    logical types of colorectal cancer cases presented to Ibn Sina specialized hospital. ... Abdominal pain. Tenesmus. Weight loss. Abdominal distension. Anal pain ... Male sex. 23. 18. 31. 21. Family history 8. 1. 6. 5. Rectal cancer. 26. 9. 29. 26.

  1. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins...

  2. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  3. LICC: L-BLP25 in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection of hepatic metastases--a randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational, double-blinded phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimanski Carl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 15-20% of all patients initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer develop metastatic disease and surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment available. Current 5-year survival following R0-resection of liver metastases is 28-39%, but recurrence eventually occurs in up to 70%. To date, adjuvant chemotherapy has not improved clinical outcomes significantly. The primary objective of the ongoing LICC trial (L-BLP25 In Colorectal Cancer is to determine whether L-BLP25, an active cancer immunotherapy, extends recurrence-free survival (RFS time over placebo in colorectal cancer patients following R0/R1 resection of hepatic metastases. L-BLP25 targets MUC1 glycoprotein, which is highly expressed in hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. In a phase IIB trial, L-BLP25 has shown acceptable tolerability and a trend towards longer survival in patients with stage IIIB locoregional NSCLC. Methods/Design This is a multinational, phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a sample size of 159 patients from 20 centers in 3 countries. Patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma limited to liver metastases are included. Following curative-intent complete resection of the primary tumor and of all synchronous/metachronous metastases, eligible patients are randomized 2:1 to receive either L-BLP25 or placebo. Those allocated to L-BLP25 receive a single dose of 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide (CP 3 days before first L-BLP25 dose, then primary treatment with s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg once weekly for 8 weeks, followed by s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg maintenance doses at 6-week (years 1&2 and 12-week (year 3 intervals unless recurrence occurs. In the control arm, CP is replaced by saline solution and L-BLP25 by placebo. Primary endpoint is the comparison of recurrence-free survival (RFS time between groups. Secondary endpoints are overall survival (OS time, safety, tolerability, RFS/OS in MUC-1 positive

  4. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.

  5. Preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiation therapy for resectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Goto, Kunihito; Marubashi, Shigeru; Yano, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    During the period from 2002 to 2011, a total of 240 consecutive patients with resectable pancreatic cancer received preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Among 240 patients, 201 patients underwent the subsequent pancreatectomy (resection rate: 84%). The 5-year overall survival of resected cases was 56% and the median survival of 39 unresected cases was 11 months. The 5-year locoregional recurrence rate of resected cases was 15%. The 5-year overall survival of the entire cohort (n=240) was 47%. The preoperative CRT and subsequent pancreatectomy provided a favorable surgical result, which was contributed by several characteristics of preoperative CRT: the prominent locoregional treatment effect with lower incidence of locoregional recurrence, and the discrimination between patients who are likely to benefit from subsequent surgery and those who are not. (author)

  6. Biology and potential clinical implications of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in colorectal cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nanna Møller; Sørensen, irene Vejgaard; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the industrialized world. About half of "curatively" resected patients develop recurrent disease within the next 3-5 years despite the lack of clinical, histological and biochemical evidence of remaining overt disease...... after resection of the primary tumour. Availability of validated biological markers for early detection, selection for adjuvant therapy, prediction of treatment efficacy and monitoring of treatment efficacy would most probably increase survival. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) may...... patients, suggesting that TIMP-1 could have a tumour-promoting function. Furthermore, measurement of plasma TIMP-1 has been shown to be useful for disease detection, with a high sensitivity and high specificity for early-stage colon cancer. This review describes some basic information on the current...

  7. [Close teamwork between pathologist and surgeon can improve results in colorectal cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicholas P; Quirke, Philip; Hagemann-Madsen, Rikke Hjarnø

    2011-04-04

    Colorectal cancer is common in the Western world and is a leading cause of cancer related mortality. The introduction of multidisciplinary teams and focus on quality control has led to improved outcomes in which pathologists play a central role through feedback to surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists. This review focuses on the importance of pathological examination of the resection specimen and subsequent feedback to the surgical team regarding quality. Specific markers of oncological quality including grading the plane of surgery, tissue morphometry and lymph node yields are discussed.

  8. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  9. The Thunderbeat and Other Energy Devices in Laparoscopic Colorectal Resections: Analysis of Outcomes and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaix, Marco Ettore; Arezzo, Alberto; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Arolfo, Simone; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Morino, Mario

    2017-12-01

    The THUNDERBEAT™ (TB) is a recently developed energy-based device. To date, there are no clinical studies comparing TB and other energy sources, such as standard electrosurgery (ES), ultrasonic coagulating shears (US) and electrothermal bipolar vessel sealers (EBVS) in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection (LCR). The aim of this study was to compare outcomes and costs in patients undergoing LCR with TB, US, EBVS, or ES for both benign and malignant colorectal diseases. This study is a retrospective analysis of a prospective database of patients undergoing LCR. Unselected consecutive patients who had the laparoscopic dissection conducted by using TB were compared with consecutive patients undergoing LCR with US, EBVS, or ES. Mean operative time did not significantly differ between the groups (P = .947). Estimated blood loss was significantly higher in the ES group (P < .001). Device-related complications occurred in 2.5% of ES patients, in 2.5% of US patients, and in 5% of EBVS patients, while no complications occurred in TB patients (P = .768). No significant differences were observed in postoperative complication rates between the groups. Mean postoperative hospital stay was similar in the groups. Cost analysis showed no significant differences between US (1519.1 ± 303 €), EBVS (1474.4 ± 372.8 €), and TB (1474.3 ± 176.3 €) (P = .737). This is the first clinical study comparing TB and other energy-based devices in LCR. They all appear to be equally safe and effective. Costs of surgery are very similar. Further large randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these data.

  10. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Alcohol intake and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer: The Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Gapstur, Susan M; Newton, Christina C; Jacobs, Eric J; Campbell, Peter T

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, but to the authors' knowledge its influence on survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is unclear. The authors investigated associations between prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol intake with mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. The authors identified 2458 men and women who were diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic colorectal cancer between 1992 (enrollment into the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort) and 2011. Alcohol consumption was self-reported at baseline and updated in 1997, 1999, 2003, and 2007. Postdiagnosis alcohol data were available for 1599 participants. Of the 2458 participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer, 1156 died during follow-up through 2012. Prediagnosis and postdiagnosis alcohol consumption were not found to be associated with all-cause mortality, except for an association between prediagnosis consumption of colorectal cancer-specific mortality, although there was some suggestion of increased colorectal cancer-specific mortality with postdiagnosis drinking (RR, 1.27 [95% CI, 0.87-1.86] for current drinking of colorectal cancer. The association between postdiagnosis drinking and colorectal cancer-specific mortality should be examined in larger studies of individuals diagnosed with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2006-2013. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Indications for and results of combined modality treatment of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    Combined modality chemoirradiation is commonly used as a component of treatment in combination with maximum resection for both high-risk resectable and locally advanced primary or recurrent rectal cancers. With surgically resected but high-risk rectal cancers, postoperative chemoirradiation has been shown to improve both disease control (local and distant) and survival (disease-free and overall) and was recommended as standard adjuvant treatment at the 1990 National Institute of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference on Adjuvant treatment for patients with rectal and colon cancers. Subsequent intergroup trials are being conducted to help define optimal combinations of postoperative chemoirradiation for resected high-risk rectal cancers and to test sequencing issues of preoperative versus postoperative chemoirradiation. With locally unresectable primary or recurrent colorectal cancers, standard therapy with surgery, external beam irradiation (EBRT) and chemotherapy is often unsuccessful. When intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) is combined with standard treatment, local control and survival appear to be improved in separate analyses from the Mayo Clinic and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). However, routine use of systemic therapy is also needed as a component of treatment, in view of high rates of systemic failure. (orig.)

  13. Indications for and results of combined modality treatment of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, L.L. [Mayo Medical School and Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Combined modality chemoirradiation is commonly used as a component of treatment in combination with maximum resection for both high-risk resectable and locally advanced primary or recurrent rectal cancers. With surgically resected but high-risk rectal cancers, postoperative chemoirradiation has been shown to improve both disease control (local and distant) and survival (disease-free and overall) and was recommended as standard adjuvant treatment at the 1990 National Institute of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference on Adjuvant treatment for patients with rectal and colon cancers. Subsequent intergroup trials are being conducted to help define optimal combinations of postoperative chemoirradiation for resected high-risk rectal cancers and to test sequencing issues of preoperative versus postoperative chemoirradiation. With locally unresectable primary or recurrent colorectal cancers, standard therapy with surgery, external beam irradiation (EBRT) and chemotherapy is often unsuccessful. When intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) is combined with standard treatment, local control and survival appear to be improved in separate analyses from the Mayo Clinic and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). However, routine use of systemic therapy is also needed as a component of treatment, in view of high rates of systemic failure. (orig.)

  14. The Association of Cholelithiasis and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sărăcuț

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the literature there are a number of studies that suggest a possible correlation between cholelithiasis/cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer. The exposure of the colon mucosa to the action of bile acids that potentially have a carcinogenic effect due to the change in anatomy after cholecystectomy, seems to be the explanation of this association. The purpose of this paper was to search for such a correlation in our study group. Methods: We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study, analyzing the patients admitted to the First Surgical Clinic of the County Emergency Clinical Hospital Tîrgu Mureș, between January 1st, 2005 - December 31st, 2010. Analyzing the medical records, operation protocols and histopathological results, we paid attention to demographics, location of neoplasia, the time elapsed since the cholecystectomy to the discovery of neoplasia, histological types, trying to perform correlations between these parameters and the lithiasic factor. Results: Out of the 534 patients admitted and operated with the diagnosis of colorectal cancer, 15.6% (n = 83 showed a history of gallbladder stone affection. Most patients came from urban areas, the average age was 67.2 (range 39-88 years, females were more affected. The most common locations were: the sigmoid colon (26.5%, rectum (36.3% and the most common histological form was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Similar to other studies, our work suggests a slight increase in the incidence of colorectal cancer in patients that underwent a cholecystectomy, without drawing a firm conclusion. We deem it necessary to see if diet changes of the Romanian population affect this relationship

  15. Excess mortality after curative surgery for colorectal cancer changes over time and differs for patients with colon versus rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrebø, Bjørn Steinar; Søreide, Kjetil; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Søreide, Jon Arne; Kørner, Hartwig

    2013-06-01

    Improved management of colorectal cancer patients has resulted in better five-year survival for rectal cancer compared with colon cancer. We compared excess mortality rates in various time intervals after surgery in patients with colon and rectal cancer. We analysed all patients with curative resection of colorectal cancers reported in the Cancer Registry of Norway before (1994-1996) and after (2001-2003) national treatment guidelines were introduced. Excess mortality was analysed in different postoperative time intervals within the five-year follow-up periods for patients treated in 1994-1996 vs. 2001-2003. A total of 11 437 patients that underwent curative resection were included. For patients treated from 1994 to 1996, excess mortality was similar in colon and rectal cancer patients in all time intervals. For those treated from 2001 to 2003, excess mortality was significantly lower in rectal cancer patients than in colon cancer patients perioperatively (in the first 60 days: excess mortality ratio = 0.46, p = 0.007) and during the first two postoperative years (2-12 months: excess mortality ratio = 0.54, p = 0.010; 1-2 years: excess mortality ratio = 0.60, p = 0.009). Excess mortality in rectal cancer patients was significantly greater than in colon cancer patients 4-5 years postoperatively (excess mortality ratio = 2.18, p = 0.003). Excess mortality for colon and rectal cancer changed substantially after the introduction of national treatment guidelines. Short-term excess mortality rates was higher in colon cancer compared to rectal cancer for patients treated in 2001-2003, while excess mortality rates for rectal cancer patients was significantly higher later in the follow-up period. This suggests that future research should focus on these differences of excess mortality in patients curatively treated for cancer of the colon and rectum.

  16. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  17. Liver resection over the last decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, A.; Larsen, P.N.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    after resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma was estimated. RESULTS: 141 patients (71M/70F), median age 58 years (1-78), underwent a liver resection in the ten-year period. The number of resections increased from two in 1995 to 32 in 2004. Median hospital...... stay was 9 days (3-38). The most frequent complication was biliary leakage (7.8%), haemorrhage (2.8%) and hepatic insufficiency (2.8%). 30-days mortality was 1.4%. The actuarial 5-survival after hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastases and hepatocellular carcinoma was 39% and 42%, respectively...

  18. Family history of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives and metachronous colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Gupta, Samir; Baron, John A; Cross, Amanda J; Lieberman, David A; Murphy, Gwen; Martínez, María Elena

    2018-02-20

    Little is known about the relationship between having a first-degree relative (FDR) with colorectal cancer (CRC) and risk for metachronous colorectal adenoma (CRA) following polypectomy. We pooled data from seven prospective studies of 7697 patients with previously resected CRAs to quantify the relationship between having a FDR with CRC and risk for metachronous adenoma. Compared with having no family history of CRC, a positive family history in any FDR was significantly associated with increased odds of developing any metachronous CRA (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.01-1.29). Higher odds of CRA were observed among individuals with an affected mother (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.05-1.53) or sibling (OR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.11-1.62) as compared with those without, whereas no association was shown for individuals with an affected father. Odds of having a metachronous CRA increased with number of affected FDRs, with ORs (95% CIs) of 1.07 (0.93-1.23) for one relative and 1.39 (1.02-1.91) for two or more. Younger age of diagnosis of a sibling was associated with higher odds of metachronous CRA, with ORs (95% CIs) of 1.66 (1.08-2.56) for diagnosis at 65 years (p-trend = 0.008). Although limited by sample size, results for advanced metachronous CRA were similar to those for any metachronous CRA. A family history of CRC is related to a modestly increased odds of metachronous CRA. Future research should explore whether having a FDR with CRC, particularly at a young age, should have a role in risk stratification for surveillance colonoscopy.

  19. Endoscopic mucosal resection for early gastric cancer. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Sporea, Ioan; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gheorghe, Liana

    2002-03-01

    European experience in endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for early gastric cancer is still relatively low, since early stomach cancer is diagnosed at a much lower rate in Europe than in Japan and generally operable patients are referred to surgery for radical resection. Endoscopic mucosal resection or mucosectomy was developed as a promising technology to diagnose and treat mucosal lesions in the esophagus, stomach and colon. In contrast to surgical resection, EMR allows "early cancers" to be removed with a minimal cost, morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a patient with hepatic cirrhosis incidentally diagnosed with an elevated-type IIa early gastric cancer. Echoendoscopy was performed in order to assess the depth of invasion into the gastric wall confirming the only mucosal involvement. We performed an EMR using "cup and suction" method. After the procedure, the patient experienced an acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the ulcer bed requiring argon plasma coagulation. The histopathological examination confirmed an early cancer, without involvement of muscularis mucosae. The patient has had an uneventful evolution being well at six months after the procedure

  20. Variation in positron emission tomography use after colon cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christina E; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D; Chang, George J

    2015-05-01

    Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Surgical resection of synchronously metastatic adrenocortical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Benzon M; Strajina, Veljko; Cayo, Ashley K; Richards, Melanie L; Farley, David R; Grant, Clive S; Harmsen, William S; Evans, Doug B; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Bible, Keith C; Young, William F; Perrier, Nancy D; Que, Florencia G; Nagorney, David M; Lee, Jeffrey E; Thompson, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rapidly fatal, with few options for treatment. Patients with metachronous recurrence may benefit from surgical resection. The survival benefit in patients with hematogenous metastasis at initial presentation is unknown. A review of all patients undergoing surgery (European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors) stage IV ACC between January 2000 and December 2012 from two referral centers was performed. Kaplan-Meier estimates were analyzed for disease-free and overall survival (OS). We identified 27 patients undergoing surgery for stage IV ACC. Metastases were present in the lung (19), liver (11), and brain (1). A complete resection (R0) was achieved in 11 patients. The median OS was improved in patients undergoing R0 versus R2 resection (860 vs. 390 days; p = 0.02). The 1- and 2-year OS was also improved in patients undergoing R0 versus R2 resection (69.9 %, 46.9 % vs. 53.0 %, 22.1 %; p = 0.02). Patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy (eight patients) had a trend towards improved survival at 1, 2, and 5 years versus no neoadjuvant therapy (18 patients) [83.3 %, 62.5 %, 41.7 % vs. 56.8 %, 26.6 %, 8.9 %; p = 0.1]. Adjuvant therapy was associated with improved recurrence-free survival at 6 months and 1 year (67 %, 33 % vs. 40 %, 20 %; p = 0.04) but not improved OS (p = 0.63). Sex (p = 0.13), age (p = 0.95), and location of metastasis (lung, p = 0.51; liver, p = 0.67) did not correlate with OS after operative intervention. Symptoms of hormonal excess improved in 86 % of patients. Operative intervention, especially when an R0 resection can be achieved, following systemic therapy may improve outcomes, including OS, in select patients with stage IV ACC. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be of use in defining which patients may benefit from surgical intervention. Adjuvant therapy was associated with decreased recurrence but did not improve OS.

  2. Factors associated with delayed bleeding after resection of large nonpedunculated colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Timothy R; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias P; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Suzuki, Noriko; Bourikas, Leonidas A; Hart, Ailsa; Bassett, Paul; Saunders, Brian P

    2018-04-06

     Delayed bleeding is the most common significant complication after piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection (p-EMR) of large nonpedunculated colorectal polyps (NPCPs). Risk factors for delayed bleeding are incompletely defined. We aimed to determine risk factors for delayed bleeding following p-EMR.  Data were analyzed from a prospective tertiary center audit of patients with NPCPs ≥ 20 mm who underwent p-EMR between 2010 and 2012. Patient, polyp, and procedure-related data were collected. Four post p-EMR defect factors were evaluated for interobserver agreement and included in analysis. Delayed bleeding severity was reported in accordance with guidelines. Predictors of bleeding were identified.  Delayed bleeding requiring hospitalization occurred after 22 of 330 procedures (6.7 %). A total of 11 patients required blood transfusion; of these, 4 underwent urgent colonoscopy, 1 underwent radiological embolization, and 1 required surgery. Interobserver agreement for identification of the four post p-EMR defect factors was moderate (kappa range 0.52 - 0.57). Factors associated with delayed bleeding were visible muscle fibers ( P  = 0.03) and the presence of a "cherry red spot" ( P  = 0.05) in the post p-EMR defect. Factors not associated with delayed bleeding were American Association of Anesthesiologists class, aspirin use, polyp size, site, and use of argon plasma coagulation.  Visible muscle fibers and the presence of a "cherry red spot" in the resection defect were associated with delayed bleeding after p-EMR. These findings suggest evaluation and photodocumentation of the post p-EMR defect is important and, when considered alongside other patient and procedural factors, may help to reduce the incidence and severity of delayed bleeding. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symer, Matthew M; Wong, Natalie Z; Abelson, Jonathan S; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Yeo, Heather L

    2018-06-01

    Hormone replacement therapy has been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence, but its effect on colorectal cancer mortality is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hormone replacement therapy on survival from colorectal cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter randomized trial run from 1993 to 2001, with follow-up data recently becoming mature. Participants were women aged 55 to 74 years, without recent colonoscopy. Data from the trial were analyzed to evaluate colorectal cancer incidence, disease-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality based on subjects' use of hormone replacement therapy at the time of randomization: never, current, or former users. A total of 75,587 women with 912 (1.21%) incident colorectal cancers and 239 associated deaths were analyzed, with median follow-up of 11.9 years. Overall, 88.6% were non-Hispanic white, and colorectal cancer incidence in current users compared to never-users was lower (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.94; P = .005), as was death from colorectal cancer (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.47-0.85; P = .002) and all-cause mortality (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.72-0.80; P colorectal cancer incidence and improved colorectal cancer-specific survival, as well as all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Participation and barriers to colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Harmy Mohamed; Daud, Norwati; Noor, Norhayati Mohd; Rahim, Amry Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia, colorectal cancer is the most common cancer in males and the third most common in females. Mortality due to colorectal cancer can be effectively reduced with early diagnosis. This study was designed to look into colorectal cancer screening participation and its barriers among average risk individuals in Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted from August 2009 till April 2010 involving average risk individuals from 44 primary care clinics in West Malaysia. Each individual was asked whether they have performed any of the colorectal cancer screening methods in the past five years. The barrier questions had three domains: patient factors, test factors and health care provider factors. Descriptive analysis was achieved using Statistical Program for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12.0. A total of 1,905 average risk individuals responded making a response rate of 93.8%. Only 13 (0.7%) respondents had undergone any of the colorectal cancer screening methods in the past five years. The main patient and test factors for not participating were embarrassment (35.2%) and feeling uncomfortable (30.0%), respectively. There were 11.2% of respondents who never received any advice to do screening. The main reason for them to undergo screening was being advised by health care providers (84.6%). The study showed that participation in colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia is extremely low and multiple factors contribute to this situation. Given the importance of the disease, efforts should be made to increase colorectal cancer screening activities in Malaysia.

  5. Case-mix study of single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) vs. Conventional laparoscopic surgery in colonic cancer resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, Tommie; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2013-01-01

    of administrations or amount of opioids were seen. Conclusion. With reservation of a small study group we find SILS is like worthy to CLS in colorectal cancer surgery and a benefit in postoperative recovery and pain is possible, but has to be investigated in larger randomised studies.......Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) may be even less invasive to a patient than conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS). Aim of the study of the applicability of the procedure, the first 1½ year of experiences and comparison with CLS for colonic cancer resections Material and methods. Since...

  6. Diagnostic value of serial measurement of C-reactive protein in serum and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in drainage fluid in the detection of infectious complications and anastomotic leakage in patients with colorectal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Zoran; Panišić, Marina; Milev, Boško; Mijušković, Zoran; Slavković, Damjan; Ignjatović, Mile

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative infectious complications are one of the most important problems in surgical treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), being present in up to 40% of patients. The aim of this paper was to establish the significance of serial measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in drainage fluid for the detection of infectious complications and anastomotic leakage (AL) in patients with colorectal resection. CRP and MMP-9 values in serum and drainage fluid, respectively, were measured on the first, third, fifth, and seventh postoperative day (POD) in 150 patients with colorectal resection and primary anastomosis. The values obtained were compared between the patients without complicatons and those with surgical site and remote infections and AL. Surgical site infections (SSIs) were observed in 41 (27.3%), and remote infections in 10 (6.7%) patients. Clinically evident AL was observed in 15 (10/6) patients. In 82% of the patients with SSIs, serum CRP value on POD 5 exceeded 82 mg/L, with 81% specificity. AL was reported in 85% and 92% of the patients on PODs 5 and 7, respectively, with CRP values of 77 mg/L and 90 mg/L, respectively. The specificity was 77% for POD 5 and 88% for POD 7. All the patients with CRP values exceeding 139 mg/L on POD 5 had some of SSIs and/or AL. The mean values of MMP-9 were not statistically different between the group without complications (n = 99) and the group with AL (n = 15). Serial measurement of CRP is recommended for screening of infectious complications of colorectal resection. Patients with CRP values above 139 mg/L on POD 5 cannot be discharged from hospital, and require an intensive search for infectious complications, particularly AL. MMP-9 measurement in drainage fluid is not relevant in the detection of AL in patients with colorectal resection.

  7. Ancestral susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huhn, S.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel (ed.); Hemminki, K.; Försti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 197-204 ISSN 0267-8357 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GAP304/10/1286 Grant - others:EU FP7(XE) HEALTH-F4-2007-200767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * molecular epidemiology * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  8. Colorectal cancer: what's new in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivoire, M.

    1992-01-01

    Five studies presented at the 1992 ASCO meeting are analysed. Kligerman's study was designed to determine if pre-treatment with WR-2721 could p rotect normal tissues from the toxicities induced by radiation therapy (in 100 patients with an advanced rectal cancer). This pre-treatment resulted in a 13% reduction of moderate and severe acute toxicity. No WR-2721 patient experienced moderate or severe late toxicities compared to five in the group without pre-treatment. Minski studied the acute toxicity (during treatment and two weeks after) of combined pelvic radiation therapy, 5-FU and leucovorin when delivered pre-operatively (16 patients) versus post-operatively (25 patients) in patients with rectal cancer. The final report of the inter group study of 5-FU plus levamisole as adjuvant therapy for stage C colon cancer was made by Moertel. With a median follow-up time of 5.5 years, the 5-FU plus levamisole treatment has reduced the recurrence rate by 39%, the cancer related death rate by 32% and the overall death rate by 31%. Most of the recurrences occurred during the first two years. There was a decrease in the liver, great omentum, peritoneum and lung metastases, but there was no modification in loco-regional recurrence rate. Welt presented a phase I/II study of radio-immunotherapy with I 131 monoclonal antibody A33 in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. Results were characterized by major hematologic toxicity and minor tumor response rate. Heiss undertook a prospective study to evaluate the influence of homologous blood transfusion on recurrence rate after colorectal cancer surgery. Fifty-eight patients receiving autologous blood transfusion were compared with sixty-two patients receiving homologous transfusion. With a median follow-up of 21 months a higher recurrence rate was found in the homologous group (29.4% versus 16.7%)

  9. Preadmission glucocorticoid use and anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections: a Danish cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva Bjerre; Erichsen, Rune; Baron, John A; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Riis, Anders H; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether preadmission glucocorticoid use increases the risk of anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections. Design A population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark (2001–2011). Participants We identified patients who had undergone a primary anastomosis after a colorectal cancer resection by linking medical registries. Participants who filled their most recent glucocorticoid prescription ≤90, 91–365 and >365 days before their surgery date were categorised as current, recent and former users, respectively. Main outcome measures We calculated 30-day absolute risk of anastomotic leakage and computed ORs using logistic regression models with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Of the 18 190 patients with colon cancer, anastomotic leakage occurred in 1184 (6.5%). Glucocorticoid use overall was not associated with an increased risk of leakage (6.4% vs 6.9% among never-users; OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.23). Categories of oral, inhaled or intestinal-acting glucocorticoids did not greatly affect risk of leakage. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 695 (13.2%) of 5284 patients with rectal cancer. Glucocorticoid use overall slightly increased risk of leakage (14.6% vs 12.8% among never-users; OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.72). Results did not differ significantly within glucocorticoid categories. Conclusions Preadmission glucocorticoids modestly increased the risk of anastomotic leakage mainly after rectal cancer resection. However, absolute risk differences were small and the clinical impact of glucocorticoid use may therefore be limited. PMID:26408282

  10. Is prevalence of colorectal polyps higher in patients with family history of colorectal cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela Maria; Bezerra, Carla Camila Rocha; Peixoto, Ana Ligia Rocha; Regadas, Francisco Sérgio Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; Siebra, José Airton Gonçalves; da Silva Fernandes, Graziela Olivia; Vasconcelos, Rafael Aragão

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjectives:To assess the prevalence of polyps in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer, in comparison to asymptomatic individuals with indication for screening.Methods:A prospective study in a group of patients who underwent colonoscopy between 2012 and 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I: no family history of colorectal cancer, and Group II: with a family history in first-degree relatives. Demographic characteristics, findings on colonoscopy...

  11. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the literature about anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer a review is presented of the frequency, potential risk factors and consequences of leakage. The risk factors are evaluated according to the level of scientific evidence of the individual background...

  12. Intersphincteric Resection for Low Rectal Cancer – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russu Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment for low rectal cancer represents a challenge: to perform a radical resection and to preserve the sphincter’s function. We report a case of intersphincteric resection in a combined multimodality treatment for low rectal cancer, with good oncologic and functional outcome. Case presentation: We report a case of a 73 years old woman admitted in April 2014 in surgery, for low rectal cancer. The diagnostic was established by colonoscopy and malignancy confirmed by biopsy. Complete imaging was done using computed tomography and magnetic resonance to establish the exact stage of the disease. The interdisciplinary individualized treatment began with radiotherapy (total dose of 50 Gy, administered in 25 fractions followed by surgery after eight weeks. We performed intersphincteric rectal resection by a modified Schiessel technique. There were no postoperative complications and the oncologic and functional results were very good at one year follow up. Conclusions: Intersphincteric resection, in this selected case of low rectal cancer, represented an efficient surgical treatment, with good functional results and quality of life for the patient. A multidisciplinary team is an invaluable means of assessing and further managing the appropriate, tailored to the case, treatment in the aim of achieving best results.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Periostin Expression and Its Prognostic Value for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewu Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrin is important for cell growth, invasion and metastasis, which are frequently observed in malignant tumors. The periostin (POSTN gene encodes the ligand for integrin, one of the key focal adhesion proteins contributing to the formation of a structural link between the extracellular matrix and integrins. High expression levels of the POSTN gene are correlated with numerous human malignancies. We examined POSTN protein in colorectal cancer specimens from 115 patients by strictly following up using immunohistochemistry. Cytoplasm immunohistochemical staining showed POSTN protein expression in colorectal cancers. The positive expression rate of POSTN protein (59.13%, 68/115 in colorectal cancers was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosa (0.47%, 11/109. POSTN over-expression in colorectal cancers was positively correlated with tumor size, differentiation, lymph node metastasis, serosal invasion, clinical stage and five-year survival rates. Further analysis showed that patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer and high POSTN expression levels had lower survival rates than those with early stage colorectal cancer and low POSTN expression levels. Overall, our results showed that POSTN played an important role in the progression of colorectal cancers.

  16. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Rennert, Hedy S; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Coffee contains several bioactive compounds relevant to colon physiology. Although coffee intake is a proposed protective factor for colorectal cancer, current evidence remains inconclusive. We investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a population-based case-control study in northern Israel. We also examined this association by type of coffee, by cancer site (colon and rectum), and by ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs). Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing colorectal cancer [OR (drinkers vs. non-drinkers), 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.86; P consumption alone (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99; P = 0.04) and for boiled coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.94; P = 0.004). Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing colorectal cancer. Compared with 2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.39-0.54; P colorectal cancer (Ptrend cancers. Coffee consumption may be inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer in a dose-response manner. Global coffee consumption patterns suggest potential health benefits of the beverage for reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 634-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  18. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Laparoscopic surgery in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressler Hernandez, Norlan; Martinez Perez, Elliot; Fernandez Rodriguez, Leopoldo; Torres Core, Ramiro

    2011-01-01

    In the current age of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has been established as oncologically equivalent to conventional open surgery. The advantages of laparoscopic surgery have translated into smaller incisions and shorter recovery. Since the advent of laparoscopy, surgeons have been fueled to develop less invasive operative methods as feasible alternatives to traditional procedures. As techniques evolved and technology advanced, laparoscopy became more widely accepted and is now more commonly used in many institutions. Recently, a trend toward less invasive surgery, driven by patient and surgeon alike, has been a major objective for many institutions because of the ability of laparoscopic surgery to reduce postoperative pain, achieve a quicker recovery time, and improve cosmetic outcomes. Although still evolving, traditional laparoscopy has served as a foundation for even further refinements in the minimally invasive approach and as a result, more advanced equipment and newer techniques have arisen

  1. Open versus laparoscopic liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (the Oslo-CoMet Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretland, Åsmund Avdem; Kazaryan, Airazat M; Bjørnbeth, Bjørn Atle; Flatmark, Kjersti; Andersen, Marit Helen; Tønnessen, Tor Inge; Bjørnelv, Gudrun Maria Waaler; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Kristiansen, Ronny; Øyri, Karl; Edwin, Bjørn

    2015-03-04

    Laparoscopic liver resection is used in specialized centers all over the world. However, laparoscopic liver resection has never been compared with open liver resection in a prospective, randomized trial. The Oslo-CoMet Study is a randomized trial into laparoscopic versus open liver resection for the surgical management of hepatic colorectal metastases. The primary outcome is 30-day perioperative morbidity. Secondary outcomes include 5-year survival (overall, disease-free and recurrence-free), resection margins, recurrence pattern, postoperative pain, health-related quality of life, and evaluation of the inflammatory response. A cost-utility analysis of replacing open surgery with laparoscopic surgery will also be performed. The study includes all resections for colorectal liver metastases, except formal hemihepatectomies, resections where reconstruction of vessels/bile ducts is necessary and resections that need to be combined with ablation. All patients will participate in an enhanced recovery after surgery program. A biobank of liver and tumor tissue will be established and molecular analysis will be performed. After 35 months of recruitment, 200 patients have been included in the trial. Molecular and immunology data are being analyzed. Results for primary and secondary outcome measures will be presented following the conclusion of the study (late 2015). The Oslo-CoMet Study will provide the first level 1 evidence on the benefits of laparoscopic liver resection for colorectal liver metastases. The trial was registered in ClinicalTrals.gov (NCT01516710) on 19 January 2012.

  2. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  3. Genetic Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S; Giannakis, Marios; Wells, Daniel K; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Quist, Michael; Nowak, Jonathan A; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Inamura, Kentaro; Morikawa, Teppei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Connolly, Charles; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Geybels, Milan S; Grady, William M; Hsu, Li; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Kim, Yeon Joo; Krystofinski, Paige; Leiserson, Mark D M; Montoya, Dennis J; Nadel, Brian B; Pellegrini, Matteo; Pritchard, Colin C; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Quist, Elleanor H; Raphael, Ben J; Salipante, Stephen J; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Shinbrot, Eve; Shirts, Brian; Shukla, Sachet; Stanford, Janet L; Sun, Wei; Tsoi, Jennifer; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Wheeler, David A; Wu, Catherine J; Yu, Ming; Zaidi, Syed H; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Garraway, Levi A; Hudson, Thomas J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ribas, Antoni; Ogino, Shuji; Peters, Ulrike

    2018-06-01

    To understand the genetic drivers of immune recognition and evasion in colorectal cancer, we analyzed 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumor samples, including 179 classified as microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high). This set includes The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal cancer cohort of 592 samples, completed and analyzed here. MSI-high, a hypermutated, immunogenic subtype of colorectal cancer, had a high rate of significantly mutated genes in important immune-modulating pathways and in the antigen presentation machinery, including biallelic losses of B2M and HLA genes due to copy-number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. WNT/β-catenin signaling genes were significantly mutated in all colorectal cancer subtypes, and activated WNT/β-catenin signaling was correlated with the absence of T-cell infiltration. This large-scale genomic analysis of colorectal cancer demonstrates that MSI-high cases frequently undergo an immunoediting process that provides them with genetic events allowing immune escape despite high mutational load and frequent lymphocytic infiltration and, furthermore, that colorectal cancer tumors have genetic and methylation events associated with activated WNT signaling and T-cell exclusion. Significance: This multi-omic analysis of 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumors reveals that it should be possible to better monitor resistance in the 15% of cases that respond to immune blockade therapy and also to use WNT signaling inhibitors to reverse immune exclusion in the 85% of cases that currently do not. Cancer Discov; 8(6); 730-49. ©2018 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 663 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Low Penetrance Alleles in Colorectal Cancer: the arachidonic acid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.E. Siezen

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, we can conclude that we have successfully identified low penetrance alleles in the PPAR., PLA2G2A and ALOX15 genes, conferring differential colorectal adenoma risk, and two such alleles in the PTGS2 gene, one of which is also involved in colorectal cancer risk. These

  5. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate anticancer effects of bergenin on human colorectal cancer cell lines. Methods: Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 was treated with various concentrations of bergenin for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were analyzed ...

  6. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Courtney; Kim, David H; Bartel, Twyla B; Cash, Brooks D; Chang, Kevin J; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Garcia, Evelyn M; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Lambert, Drew L; Levy, Angela D; Marin, Daniele; Peterson, Christine M; Scheirey, Christopher D; Smith, Martin P; Weinstein, Stefanie; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-05-01

    This review summarizes the relevant literature regarding colorectal screening with imaging. For individuals at average or moderate risk for colorectal cancer, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening. After positive results on a fecal occult blood test or immunohistochemical test, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer detection. For individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn colitis), optical colonoscopy is preferred because of its ability to obtain biopsies to detect dysplasia. After incomplete colonoscopy, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening for individuals at average, moderate, or high risk. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patients' Awareness Of The Prevention And Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziki, Łukasz; Puła, Anna; Stawiski, Konrad; Mudza, Barbara; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Dziki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patients' awareness of the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, hospitalised at the Department of General and Colorectal Surgery of the Medical University in Łódź during the period from January 2015 to April 2015, were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their families' medical case record, factors predisposing them to the development of colorectal cancer, the tests applied in diagnostics, and the treatment process. The questionnaire comprised 42 closed-ended questions with one correct answer. A statistical analysis of all answers was carried out. The study group consisted of 30 men and 20 women aged 27-94 years old. A strong, statistically significant negative correlation between a patient's age and his/her awareness of the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer was noted (pcancer (p=0.008), and the awareness of the prevention programme. The women's group was characterised by statistically significantly greater awareness of colonoscopy as a screening examination (p=0.004). Patients need more information on colorectal cancer, its risk factors, prevention, the treatment process, and postoperative care. Lack of awareness of the colorectal cancer issue can be one of the major factors contributing to the high incidence of this disease.

  8. Risk of second primary colorectal cancer among colorectal cancer cases: A population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha P Raj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with history of colorectal cancer (CRC are at increased risk for developing a second primary colorectal cancer (SPCRC as compared to the general population. However, the degree of risk is uncertain. Here, we attempt to quantify the risk, using data from the large population-based California Cancer Registry (CCR. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the CCR data for cases with surgically-treated colon and rectal cancer diagnosed during the period 1990-2005 and followed through up to January 2008. We excluded those patients diagnosed with metastatic disease and those in whom SPCRC was diagnosed within 6 months of the diagnosis of the primary CRC. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated to evaluate risk as compared to the underlying population after taking into account age, sex, ethnicity, and time at risk. Results: The study cohort consisted of 69809 cases with colon cancer and 34448 with rectal cancer. Among these patients there were 1443 cases of SPCRCs. The SIR for developing SPCRC was higher in colon cancer survivors (SIR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.5 as compared to the underlying population. The incidence of SPCRC was also higher in females (SIR=1.5; 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.6 and Hispanics (SIR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.7 to 2.4 with primary colon cancer. The SIR for developing an SPCRC was higher only among those whose initial tumor was located in the descending colon (SIR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.3 to 2.0 and proximal colon (SIR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.6. Conclusions: Our results confirm that CRC patients, especially females and Hispanics, are at a higher risk of developing SPCRC than the general population. Differential SPCRC risk by colorectal tumor subsite is dependent on gender and ethnicity, underscoring the heterogeneous nature of CRC.

  9. Underpinning the repurposing of anthracyclines towards colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Smith, David Hersi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. We propose a repurposing strategy where anthracyclines are reintroduced to a subgroup of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with the highest likelihood of response. In breast cancer, DNA topoisomerase II alpha gene (TOP2A) alterations predict incremental benefit...... of anthracyclines, but this association has not been investigated in colorectal cancer. Frequency analysis of TOP2A gene alterations in colorectal cancer and the association with prognosis are evaluated and the challenges of using a TOP2A/CEN-17 FISH probe combination are addressed. Material and methods. Formalin......-fixed, paraffin-embedded material from 154 stage III colorectal cancer patients included in the RANX05 clinical trial was retrospectively assessed for TOP2A gene alterations using FISH. The TOP2A/CEN-17 ratio as well as the TOP2A gene copy number alone was used to define gene alterations and associations between...

  10. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Tárraga López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle. 19 , 20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55-64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. Objective To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. Methodology A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. Results 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin

  11. Circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity after MRI assessment and adjuvant treatment in 189 patients undergoing rectal cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G S; Eardley, N; McNicol, F; Healey, P; Hughes, M; Rooney, P S

    2014-05-01

    The management of rectal cancer relies on accurate MRI staging. Multi-modal treatments can downstage rectal cancer prior to surgery and may have an effect on MRI accuracy. We aim to correlate the findings of MRI staging of rectal cancer with histological analysis, the effect of neoadjuvant therapy on this and the implications of circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity following neoadjuvant therapy. An analysis of histological data and radiological staging of all cases of rectal cancer in a single centre between 2006 and 2011 were conducted. Two hundred forty-one patients had histologically proved rectal cancer during the study period. One hundred eighty-two patients underwent resection. Median age was 66.6 years, and male to female ratio was 13:5. R1 resection rate was 11.1%. MRI assessments of the circumferential resection margin in patients without neoadjuvant radiotherapy were 93.6 and 88.1% in patients who underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Eighteen patients had predicted positive margins following chemoradiotherapy, of which 38.9% had an involved CRM on histological analysis. MRI assessment of the circumferential resection margin in rectal cancer is associated with high accuracy. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has a detrimental effect on this accuracy, although accuracy remains high. In the presence of persistently predicted positive margins, complete resection remains achievable but may necessitate a more radical approach to resection.

  12. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P resection, appears to be a safe and effective, but time-limited, diverting technique to protect an elective low colorectal anastomosis. PMID:25546660

  13. The COLON study: Colorectal cancer: Longitudinal, Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that may influence colorectal tumour recurrence, survival and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkels, Renate M; Heine-Bröring, Renate C; van Zutphen, Moniek; van Harten-Gerritsen, Suzanne; Kok, Dieuwertje E G; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Kampman, Ellen

    2014-05-27

    There is clear evidence that nutrition and lifestyle can modify colorectal cancer risk. However, it is not clear if those factors can affect colorectal cancer treatment, recurrence, survival and quality of life. This paper describes the background and design of the "COlorectal cancer: Longitudinal, Observational study on Nutritional and lifestyle factors that may influence colorectal tumour recurrence, survival and quality of life" - COLON - study. The main aim of this study is to assess associations of diet and other lifestyle factors, with colorectal cancer recurrence, survival and quality of life. We extensively investigate diet and lifestyle of colorectal cancer patients at diagnosis and during the following years; this design paper focusses on the initial exposures of interest: diet and dietary supplement use, body composition, nutrient status (e.g. vitamin D), and composition of the gut microbiota. The COLON study is a multi-centre prospective cohort study among at least 1,000 incident colorectal cancer patients recruited from 11 hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients with colorectal cancer are invited upon diagnosis. Upon recruitment, after 6 months, 2 years and 5 years, patients fill out food-frequency questionnaires; questionnaires about dietary supplement use, physical activity, weight, height, and quality of life; and donate blood samples. Diagnostic CT-scans are collected to assess cross-sectional areas of skeletal muscle, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat and intermuscular fat, and to assess muscle attenuation. Blood samples are biobanked to facilitate future analyse of biomarkers, nutrients, DNA etc. Analysis of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, and analysis of metabolomic profiles are scheduled. A subgroup of patients with colon cancer is asked to provide faecal samples before and at several time points after colon resection to study changes in gut microbiota during treatment. For all patients, information on vital status is retrieved by linkage with

  14. Intersphincteric Resection and Coloanal Anastomosis in Treatment of Distal Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Cipe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of distal rectal cancer, abdominoperineal resection is traditionally performed. However, the recognition of shorter safe distal resection line, intersphincteric resection technique has given a chance of sphincter-saving surgery for patients with distal rectal cancer during last two decades and still is being performed as an alternative choice of abdominoperineal resection. The first aim of this study is to assess the morbidity, mortality, oncological, and functional outcomes of intersphincteric resection. The second aim is to compare outcomes of patients who underwent intersphincteric resection with the outcomes of patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection.

  15. Total mesorectum resection and coloanal anastomosis with J colonic reservoir for treatment of medium and low rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra Mesa, Jose Luis; Vazquez Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Diaz Salas, Carlos; Perez Penna, Lourdes; Naranjo Hernandez, Daisy

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Proctosigmoidectomy with total mesorectum resection, reservoir in J and colorectal is useful in patients with low and middle rectum cancer, to avoid the definite terminal colostomy. The aim of present paper was to analyze the feasibility of such surgical technique, the multidisciplinary integral treatment and the results obtained. METHODS: Fifteen patients were studied suffering of low and middle adenocarcinoma treated between January, 1996 and December, 2002 in Splanchnic Surgery Service of National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology of La Habana City. Treatment included a combination of radiotherapy plus neocoadjuvant concurrent chemotherapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and surgery. RESULTS: Mean age of patients was of 56 years. The adenocarcinoma was the histological type diagnosed in all patients. Tumor staging the following: T1 and T2, in four patients (27%, respectively); T3 in seven patients (46%). Four patients (20%) had complications due to radiation treatment and five (33,3%), by surgical treatment. Surgical mortality occurred in one patient (6,6%) and eleven patients (73,3%) survived over 5 years. Neither patient had pelvic tumor relapse or by colorectal anastomosis. There was good sphincter continence. CONCLUSIONS: Total mesorectum resection and colorectal anastomosis with a colonic reservoir in J prevent the definite terminal colostomy, to cure a high percentage of patients with low and middle rectum cancer without respecting the oncology surgery principles, is well accepted by patients and it is feasible in our practice. (author)

  16. Evaluation of prognostic factors in liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer: a preplanned analysis of the FIRE-1 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessen, C; Fischer von Weikersthal, L; Laubender, R P; Stintzing, S; Modest, D P; Schalhorn, A; Schulz, C; Heinemann, V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Liver-limited disease (LLD) denotes a specific subgroup of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 479 patients with unresectable mCRC from an irinotecan-based randomised phase III trial were evaluated. Patients with LLD and non-LLD and hepatic resection were differentiated. Based on baseline patient characteristic, prognostic factors for hepatic resection were evaluated. Furthermore, prognostic factors for median overall survival (OS) were estimated via Cox regression in LLD patients. Results: Secondary liver resection was performed in 38 out of 479 patients (resection rate: 7.9%). Prognostic factors for hepatic resection were LLD, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), node-negative primary, alkaline phosphatase (AP) and Karnofsky performance status (PS). Median OS was significantly increased after hepatic resection (48 months), whereas OS in LLD (17 months) and non-LLD (19 months) was comparable in non-resected patients. With the inapplicability of Koehne's risk classification in LLD patients, a new score based on only the independent prognostic factors LDH and white blood cell (WBC) provided markedly improved information on the outcome. Conclusion: Patients undergoing hepatic resection showed favourable long-term survival, whereas non-resected LLD patients and non-LLD patients did not differ with regard to progression-free survival and OS. The LDH levels and WBC count were confirmed as prognostic factors and provide a useful and simple score for OS-related risk stratification also in LLD. PMID:23963138

  17. Treatment strategies in colorectal cancer patients with initially unresectable liver-only metastases, a study protocol of the randomised phase 3 CAIRO5 study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiskens, Joost; Gulik, Thomas M van; Lienden, Krijn P van; Engelbrecht, Marc RW; Meijer, Gerrit A; Grieken, Nicole CT van; Schriek, Jonne; Keijser, Astrid; Mol, Linda; Molenaar, I Quintus; Verhoef, Cornelis; Jong, Koert P de; Dejong, Kees HC; Kazemier, Geert; Ruers, Theo M; Wilt, Johanus HW de; Tinteren, Harm van; Punt, Cornelis JA

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver-only metastases may be cured after downsizing of metastases by neoadjuvant systemic therapy. However, the optimal neoadjuvant induction regimen has not been defined, and the lack of consensus on criteria for (un)resectability complicates the interpretation of published results. CAIRO5 is a multicentre, randomised, phase 3 clinical study. Colorectal cancer patients with initially unresectable liver-only metastases are eligible, and will not be selected for potential resectability. The (un)resectability status is prospectively assessed by a central panel consisting of at least one radiologist and three liver surgeons, according to predefined criteria. Tumours of included patients will be tested for RAS mutation status. Patients with RAS wild type tumours will be treated with doublet chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) and randomised between the addition of either bevacizumab or panitumumab, and patients with RAS mutant tumours will be randomised between doublet chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI) plus bevacizumab or triple chemotherapy (FOLFOXIRI) plus bevacizumab. Radiological evaluation to assess conversion to resectability will be performed by the central panel, at an interval of two months. The primary study endpoint is median progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints are the R0/1 resection rate, median overall survival, response rate, toxicity, pathological response of resected lesions, postoperative morbidity, and correlation of baseline and follow-up evaluation with respect to outcomes by the central panel. CAIRO5 is a prospective multicentre trial that investigates the optimal systemic induction therapy for patients with initially unresectable, liver-only colorectal cancer metastases. CAIRO 5 is registered at European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT) (2013-005435-24). CAIRO 5 is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02162563, June 10, 2014

  18. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  19. Resection Of Hepatal Metastases In Patients With Colorectal Carcinoma - Multidisciplinary Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavata, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of colorectal cancer have focused on the role of chemotherapy as systemic treatment in an attempt to prolong survival and improve treatment outcomes for patients. Despite the use of systemic chemotherapy, however, the median survival of patients with metastatic disease has been reported 33 months in maximum. It is important to underline the role of surgery not only by the elimination of the primary tumor, but also of metastasis in the liver. Using correct combination of surgery and chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic disease, substantial prolongation in the survival can be achieved. Communication between oncologist, surgeon and radiologist as the multidisciplinary approach is crucial for correct management of patients with metastatic liver disease with respect to their maximal benefit. (author)

  20. Adjuvant Everolimus for Resected Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with renal cell cancer who have undergone partial or complete nephrectomy will be randomly assigned to take everolimus tablets or matching placebo tablets daily for 54 weeks.