WorldWideScience

Sample records for research university students

  1. University-Level Research Projects for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to provide an opportunity for high school students to participate in university-level research projects. In this case, students from Pinkerton Academy (Derry, New Hampshire) were invited to participate in efforts to catalog data from the COMPTEL experiment on NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These activities were part of a senior level honors course at Pinkerton. Although the success of this particular program was rather limited, we feel that the general concept is a sound one. In principle, the concept of partnerships between local schools and university researchers is one that could be especially attractive to soft money researchers. Programs can be carefully designed to benefit both the students and the research program.

  2. Ecological Footprint of Research University Students: A Pilot Case Study in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

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    See Tan Ang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological footprint (EF is potential to be applied in universities to assist building management units to coordinate in order to reduce environmental impact and to achieve sustainable resource consumption from its main activities including teaching-learning, research and operations. As many Malaysian universities declare to become sustainability campus, the adoption of ecological footprint in measuring campus sustainability will provide insight and better understanding about the performance of campus sustainability efforts. The main concept of ecological footprint which convert levels of consumption into the amount of land needed, will able to reveal the average student performance and impacts towards the campus. Further, a study is conducted to determine the average ecological footprint level of students in research universities Malaysia considering students formed the majority of the community in a campus. A pilot study has been conducted in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM among students staying in hostel together with staffs from UTM Office of Student Affairs and Alumni (HEMA and UTM Office of Asset and Development (PHB. Then, Redefining Progress (RP ecological footprint online calculator is used in computing the ecological footprint of UTM students.

  3. The University of Stuttgart IKE/University of Arizona student research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The University of Stuttgart's Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE) and the University of Arizona have had a joint program in which graduate students from the IKE spend 1 yr on the University of Arizona campus. This program started in 1982 largely as the result of an initiative begun by K.H. Hoecker, then director of IKE. Since 1985, Alfred Voss has been director and the program has continued without interruption. Under the program, the Deutscher Akademisher Austauschdienst, a government agency of the Federal Republic of Germany has funded scholarships for students from IKE, which provide support for 1 yr during which they attend the University of Arizona as visiting student scholars and engage in a research project under the direction of one of our faculty, which satisfies a part of the requirements for the Ingenieur-Diplom Fachrichtung Maschinenbau. The students get credit for their research from the University of Stuttgart. The topics have a broad range and include software development, artificial intelligence, radiation transport, and energy management studies

  4. Internationalization for Quality in Chinese Research Universities: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanhua; Yue, Yun

    2015-01-01

    China's rapidly expanding university system aims to balance quantity and quality through a variety of measures, including internationalization. This paper employs data from a survey of 1264 students from 39 higher education institutions in order to understand students' view on institutional approaches to internationalization. The data show that…

  5. Development of a Student Mentored Research Program between a Complementary and Alternative Medicine University and a Traditional, Research Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Barbara M.; Furner, Sylvia E.; Cramer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well-documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared to traditional, research intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out. The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM pre-doctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers. Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health (DC/MPH) and master of clinical and translational research (DC/MS CTS) were established. PMID:24988423

  6. Research on sportswear buying behavior of university students

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    Öndoğan Ziynet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sport is a necessary element for maintaining life in a healthier and more balanced way. There has been a rising trend of wearing sportswear in daily life besides sports. Developments in technology have raised expectations from sportswear. Individuals expect not only durability, design and being fashionable, but also demand performance and clothing comfort. This study aims to investigate university students’ awareness while buying sportswear. Professional sportsmen from Physical Education and Sports School students and Textile Engineering students having technical knowledge about clothes are included in this study. 100 students from each group were interviewed face to face. Results showed that Textile Engineering students pay more attention to technical characteristics due to their knowledge, however, aesthetic properties are revealed to be another important factor affecting buying decision. Buying decision of Physical Education and Sports School students is expected to be positively affected if they are given a seminar about raw material properties.

  7. Research Training Program for College and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-ORD seeks applications from eligible entities to enter into cooperative agreements with EPA that will provide training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students on-site at EPA-ORD research facilities located in Cincinnati, OH.

  8. Environmental Research Apprenticeship Program for College and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-ORD seeks applications from eligible entities to enter into a cooperative agreement with EPA that will provide training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students on-site at ORD’s GWERD research facility in Ada, Oklahoma.

  9. Student research in criticality safety at the University of Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    A very brief progress report on four University of Arizona student projects is given. Improvements were made in simulations of power pulses in aqueous solutions, including the TWODANT model. TWODANT calculations were performed to investigate the effect of assembly shape on the expansion coefficient of reactivity for solutions. Preliminary calculations were made of critical heights for the Los Alamos SHEBA assembly. Calculations to support French experiments to measure temperature coefficients of dilute plutonium solutions confirmed feasibility

  10. Exploring a Successful Community College Student Transition to a Research-University Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWine, Paul R.; Bresciani Ludvik, Marilee; Tucker, Mark; Mulholland, Shaila; Bracken, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to holistically investigate the environmental support needs of community college students as they transition into a research university. Both students and staff were interviewed to gain their perspective on the influences of the student transition process. Western University is a Carnegie classified Doctoral…

  11. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbari, Zohreh; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jadidi, Rahmatollah

    2015-01-01

    Health sciences research (HSR) is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3), but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7). The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  12. University Institutional Research and Student Recruitment Performance: Utilizing Marketing Communication for Knowledge Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    GONG, Reuy-Wei; TSAI, Fu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Institutional research constantly generate useful but heterogeneous knowledge for university administrations. Thus the effectiveness of institutional research dependes on the communication of those heterogeneous knowledge to major stakeholders (e.g., parents, students, teachers, etc.). A conceptual paper is developed in regards to the influences of institutional research, word-of-mouth (via internal students and faculties), quality signaling (to external prospect students and stakeh...

  13. University Students' Understanding of the Concepts Empirical, Theoretical, Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtonen, Mari

    2015-01-01

    University research education in many disciplines is frequently confronted by problems with students' weak level of understanding of research concepts. A mind map technique was used to investigate how students understand central methodological concepts of empirical, theoretical, qualitative and quantitative. The main hypothesis was that some…

  14. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  15. Pedagogical Conditions of Ensuring Students' Readiness for Scientific Researches--Example of Technical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slessarev, Yuri Vassilyevich; Moisseyev, Vassily Borisovich; Vostroknutov, Evgeniy Vladimirovich

    2015-01-01

    This article describes pedagogical conditions of ensuring students readiness for scientific researches on the basis of scientific literature and experience of Penza State Technological University students. Introduction of suggested conditions favors the process of training of highly skilled expert who is ready for generation of new ideas in fields…

  16. Student Staff Partnership to Create an Interdisciplinary Science Skills Course in a Research Intensive University

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    Woolmer, Cherie; Sneddon, Peter; Curry, Gordon; Hill, Bob; Fehertavi, Szonja; Longbone, Charlotte; Wallace, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects upon the development of a multidisciplinary lesson plan aimed at developing science skills for Physics and Astronomy, Geographical and Earth Sciences, and Chemistry students at a research intensive Scottish university. The lesson plan was co-developed with a small group of staff and undergraduate students from these…

  17. Values within the Context of Postmodernity and Their Roles in Happiness: A Research on University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Yemliha

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the relation between values and happiness of the university students in the Context of Postmodernity. The research is a descriptive study in the screening model. The study was carried out with 376 students from the faculties of Physical Education and Sports, Education, Science and Letters, Business, Theology,…

  18. University and student segmentation: multilevel latent-class analysis of students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Rüdiger; Daniel, Hans-Dieter

    2013-06-01

    It is often claimed that psychology students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics affect course enrollment, persistence, achievement, and course climate. However, the inter-institutional variability has been widely neglected in the research on students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics, but it is important for didactic purposes (heterogeneity of the student population). The paper presents a scale based on findings of the social psychology of attitudes (polar and emotion-based concept) in conjunction with a method for capturing beginning university students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics and identifying the proportion of students having positive attitudes at the institutional level. The study based on a re-analysis of a nationwide survey in Germany in August 2000 of all psychology students that enrolled in fall 1999/2000 (N= 1,490) and N= 44 universities. Using multilevel latent-class analysis (MLLCA), the aim was to group students in different student attitude types and at the same time to obtain university segments based on the incidences of the different student attitude types. Four student latent clusters were found that can be ranked on a bipolar attitude dimension. Membership in a cluster was predicted by age, grade point average (GPA) on school-leaving exam, and personality traits. In addition, two university segments were found: universities with an average proportion of students with positive attitudes and universities with a high proportion of students with positive attitudes (excellent segment). As psychology students make up a very heterogeneous group, the use of multiple learning activities as opposed to the classical lecture course is required. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Cultivation of university students in radiology using research facilities at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Byung Chul [Nuclear Training and Education Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of present research is to offer a specialized educational opportunity for potential users, university students in radiology, by developing specific curriculum on site at KAERI, using HANARO research reactor and National radiation research facilities. The specific items of this research accomplished are: First, Development and operation of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and National radiation research facilities to provide university students with opportunities to use the facilities. Second, Operation of the experiment training programs for university students in radiology to foster next generation specialists. Third, through the on-site experiment training for students in radiology, support future potential experts of the radiation research fields, and broaden the base. A textbook and a teaching aid, a questionnaire have been developed to support the program. 714 university students have completed the courses for radiology experiment from 2006 to 2017. It is hoped that these experiments broaden public awareness and acceptance by the present and potential future utilization of the research reactor and national radiation research facilities, thereby bring positive impacts to policy making.

  20. Applying Sleep Research to University Students: Recommendations for Developing a Student Sleep Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C.; Buboltz, Walter C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Many students are unaware that academic difficulties may be related to their sleep habits. This article introduces key elements of a student sleep education program that can be easily incorporated into many universities first-year orientation classes or as part of residential housing programs. (Author)

  1. Research on sportswear buying behavior of university students

    OpenAIRE

    Öndoğan Ziynet; Kılıç Arzu Şen; Boz Serkan; Tama Derya; Encan Berna Cüreklibatır; Necef Özlem Kurtoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Sport is a necessary element for maintaining life in a healthier and more balanced way. There has been a rising trend of wearing sportswear in daily life besides sports. Developments in technology have raised expectations from sportswear. Individuals expect not only durability, design and being fashionable, but also demand performance and clothing comfort. This study aims to investigate university students’ awareness while buying sportswear. Professional sportsmen from Physical Education and ...

  2. Denial of student visas leads to brain drain from university research

    CERN Multimedia

    Wertheimer, L K

    2002-01-01

    America's move to shut the gate on student visas after the terrorist attack on the Twin Towers, has created a brain drain for universities that rely on top foreign students to help with scientific research. Professors, graduate school deans and officials from national science societies say hundreds of foreign students recruited to work on projects in such areas as physics, math and petroleum engineering they couldn't get visas this fall. Some gave up and went to other countries instead (2 pages).

  3. Preferred learning styles among prospective research methodology course students at Taibah University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Abdallah, Ayat; Al-zalabani, Abdulmohsen; Alqabshawi, Reem

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of students' preferred learning styles is important while developing teaching strategies that influence student commitment during the course. The VARK questionnaire is one of the commonly used learning style inventories. The aim of this study was to determine and assess the sex-based differences in learning style preferences among second-year medical students at Taibah University who were prospective students for the research methodology course. All second-year medical students at Taibah University (n=129) were invited to participate in the study and were administered the Arabic version of the VARK questionnaire. A total of 89 students, 45 female and 44 male, completed the questionnaire with a response rate of 67%. The students were classified according to the VARK questionnaire as visual, read/write, auditory, kinesthetic, and multimodal learners. Nearly two-thirds (66.3%) of the students preferred multimodality for information presentation. Male and female students showed significantly different learning style preferences (P=0.02). Female students tended to prefer the multimodal learning style more compared with male students (77.8% vs. 54.5%, respectively). Furthermore, 33.7% of students preferred the single mode of information presentation (45.5% male and 22.2% female students); the auditory mode was the predominant selection among the unimodal male and female learners (41% of male vs. 11.1% of female students). The majority of the second-year medical students preferred multimodality in terms of learning preferences, with a significant difference between male and female students; female students tended to favor the multiple modes of information presentation more compared with male students. The study recommends modification of the teaching strategies of the current research methodology course toward the use of a variety of active learning techniques that would fit the different learning styles exhibited by the studied students, rather than classic

  4. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Anbari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences research (HSR is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. Results: The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3, but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7. The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. Conclusion: The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  5. A Research about Attitudes and Behaviors of University Students with Having Different Cultures towards the Environment through Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Serife

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the environmental attitudes and behaviors of the university students with different cultures. This research was prepared in accordance with survey model. The population of the research is composed of 300 university students with different cultures studying at Near East University in 2015-2016 academic…

  6. Survey Regarding the Competence and Interest towards Research of Romanian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjén, Beátrix-Aletta; Ciascai, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the respondents' opinion regarding their abilities and interest towards research. The survey was carried out on a sample of 51 respondents that are involved in research activities in the universities of origin. The participants are students from Faculties of Real and Applied Sciences. The results highlight…

  7. Students' Attitudes Towards Research at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Mahmoudi, Roghayeh; Habibi, Fatemeh; Latifi, Mahsoomeh; Zare-Gavgani, Vahideh

    2016-12-01

    In today's world, one of the criteria of progress in a country is research. In our country instead of paying to the research and study, attention is given to the training of human resources. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Students' Attitudes towards Research at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2015. In this cross-sectional study the data tool was questionnaire given to the study subjects. The study population were all the paramedical college students at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences selected. Cochrane methodology was used to determine the sample size, the t test used to know the attitudes and the ANOVA test to assess differences between the groups. The mean age of the students was 20 years (age range of 17 to 32 years), of them, 99 (61%) were female and 63 (39%) male, 100% undergraduate and 73% on their first semester. Their attitudes toward the usefulness of search for jobs and careers, anxiety, relationship with everyday life and Research problem was positive. Belief in research problem with the highest average and relation with everyday life with the lowest average, ranked the highest and lowest scores respectively. The findings also showed that there was insignificant difference between the variables of age, gender and level of education and the attitude of students towards research. The subjects under study had Positive attitude to research and in case of availability of research facilities, students would be more interested in performing research.

  8. READING HABITS IN DIGITAL ERA: A RESEARCH ON THE STUDENTS IN BORNEO UNIVERSITY

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    Firima Zona Tanjung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to explore the current reading habits of university students. Moreover, it aims to determine the effects of widespread use of the internet and other digital resources in reading habits and to give some possible recommendation to improve students’ reading habits in the digital era. The research design was descriptive survey research. The instrument of the research was questionnaire, which is based on Akarsu and Dariyemez (2014 and Chauhan and Lal (2012. The participants of the research were 320 students studying in six majors in Faculty of Teachers Training and Education at Borneo University. They were selected through the cluster random sampling. The questionnaire involved six categories, namely demographic information, frequency of items read, contents of online reading, online activities, content first clicked when online, and techniques to develop reading habits. All research data was analyzed using SPSS Statistics 22 program.

  9. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah-Kanagasabai, Camilla J.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18–53 years, M = 22, SD = 4.78) completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices. PMID:25983709

  10. Designing Research to Improve Students' Learning: "Industry/University" Collaborations for Educating Teacher-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    University/industry partnerships provide a vehicle for synthesizing knowledge from the fields of teachers' professional learning, higher degree research training and research impact. This analysis outlines a conceptual framework for having a direct research impact on socio-cultural, economic and environmental learning (SEEL). The particular case…

  11. Digital Entrepreneurships and Business Models Canvas: Applied Research for Communication University Students

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    Jorge Montalvo-Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital economy requires other business models different to the ones present in the physical world; therefore, they should be studied from a particular perspective. In this research a variety of canvas formats or business model canvas are compared and analyzed. The entrepreneurial intention of Communication students from the University of Lima is also studied. The methodology included a survey among students and an educational experience within the subject: Advertising Creativity. The main result of this research is a proposal canvas to design digital entrepreneurships in Communication, whether commercial or social businesses.

  12. Partnering with a Community College and Research University to attract Underrepresented Students to the Geosciences: The Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, J. S.; Saunders, D.; Smith, G.

    2015-12-01

    A NSF sponsored partnership between the University of Texas at Arlington and the Tarrant County College District aimed to attract underrepresented lower-division students interested in STEM to the geosciences. The program recruited 32 students over 3 years, developed an innovative field course, provided tutoring and mentoring programs, and offered research assistantships for students to work with the research university faculty on funded projects. Under-represented students were 66% of the group. The data was gathered via a web-based survey from April 2nd to April 17th, 2015, using both open ended and item-level responses. Out of 32 participants, the response rate was a significant 50%. Some of the survey results include: 1) Most students heard about the program from faulty who recruited them in introductory level classes; 2) Almost all agreed that the geosciences were interesting, fun, important and a good career path; 3) 92% of the community college respondents found transferring to a research university somewhat or not too difficult; 4) The most helpful parts of the program included faculty mentors, the field course, research assistant experiences and relationships with faculty. The least helpful parts included the tutoring services, relationships with other students, and the semester kickoff meetings; 5) over 60% of the students felt very confident in research skills, formulating research questions, lab skills, quantitative skills, time management, collaborating and working independently. They were less confident in planning research, graphing results, writing papers and making oral presentations; 6) most found the faculty very helpful in advising and mentoring, and 86% said they were comfortable asking at least one faculty member for a reference letter; 7) 93% said they were likely to pursue a geoscience career and 86% were confident or somewhat confident they would be successful.

  13. Scientific culture from the University. Research competence evaluation of students enrolled in the Summer Science Programs

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    Abel Antonio GRIJALVA VERDUGO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The training of young researchers from tertiary education represents a latent concern in educational centers worldwide. In that sense, there are private and public initiatives that encourage scientific culture inside and outside the school curriculum; such as the Summer Science Program in Mexico. This program aims to provide university students with research competence, to incorporate them into the production, creation, and transfer of knowledge through various means: graduate studies, collaboration with solid research groups, among others, so that they contribute to the social, economic, and technological development of their region. Therefore, this work inquires the research competence levels shown in eight generations of undergraduate students in a public university in the Mexican state of Sinaloa that completed the Summer Science Program.In the fieldwork, 227 students participated. They were divided into four knowledge areas: 1 Economic and administrative sciences, 2 Social sciences and humanities, 3 Engineering and Technology, and 4 Biological sciences. As data collecting instruments, interviews and polls were applied, as well as a structured questionnaire composed by 34 items; this report shows the findings of the last one. For the analysis, nonparametric statistics were used, to contrast the competence levels between the different subgroups of students. The results have a descriptive scope, but also allow visualizing a theoretical and empirical spectrum of the needs and strengths of the young researchers training programs

  14. Perspectives of Using Internet on the Scientific Research among the Postgraduate Students at the University of Khartoum-Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hassan, Esam Idress K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perspectives of using Internet on the scientific research among the Postgraduate Students at the University of Khartoum. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, the population consisted of all Postgraduate students at the University of Khartoum (Master & Ph.D.), registered during the…

  15. Involving High School Students in Computational Physics University Research: Theory Calculations of Toluene Adsorbed on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Jonas; Husmark, Teodor; Mathiesen, Christoffer; Sepahvand, Benjamin; Borck, Øyvind; Gunnarsson, Linda; Lydmark, Pär; Schröder, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    To increase public awareness of theoretical materials physics, a small group of high school students is invited to participate actively in a current research projects at Chalmers University of Technology. The Chalmers research group explores methods for filtrating hazardous and otherwise unwanted molecules from drinking water, for example by adsorption in active carbon filters. In this project, the students use graphene as an idealized model for active carbon, and estimate the energy of adsorption of the methylbenzene toluene on graphene with the help of the atomic-scale calculational method density functional theory. In this process the students develop an insight into applied quantum physics, a topic usually not taught at this educational level, and gain some experience with a couple of state-of-the-art calculational tools in materials research.

  16. Developing informational literacy among doctoral students and researchers - Case Åbo Akademi University Library and Turku University Library

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    Eva Costiander-Huldén

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a demand to include doctoral students and researchers in the curriculum for information literacy. Not only information search, but also the expertise of the librarians in scientific publishing, bibliometric analysis is demanded. As a result of the demand the two universities in Turku/Åbo have developed their research services. The libraries have also met for benchmarking and further cooperation is being discussed. 1.The implementation of three focus group interviews with 18 researchers at Åbo Akademi University The Focus Group survey methodology has its roots in social science qualitative research. It is widely used in the library world and is considered to be suitable particularly well for the evaluation and development of library services. The overall purpose with our interviews was to obtain feedback on how library users (in this case, researchers and graduate students wish ÅAUL to develop its services to better meet their needs. Three group interviews were conducted, with 6-8 participators. The following questions were, among others, discussed in every session: How do the researchers perceive the library's role in their daily work? What is the starting point for retrieving information (e.g. The MetaLib portal, Google Scholar or other? Is there a need for courses/more supervision in information search and reference management? Is there a need for tailored and integrated library services? As a result of the sessions and analysis of the group discussions a number of measures were proposed: Targeted teaching of subject-specific databases, more topic-specific sessions in the library portal and RefWorks. Compulsory information retrieval course for first year doctoral students. Information Weeks or "hands on" sessions on campus libraries. The library should participate more in workshops and seminars to increase their visibility and their services. The library should actively consider how to measure the impact and

  17. How Can the University Library Better Meet the Information Needs of Research Students? Experiences from Ulster University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Geraldine; Bates, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates academic library needs of doctoral students. The study identifies PhD students' information literacy training needs and explores current levels of library engagement, barriers to use, and gaps in existing services. First-year PhD students at Ulster University (UU) were surveyed and interviews were undertaken with three…

  18. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

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    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  19. The evaluation of research self-efficacy and relative factors in students of medical sciences in Qom Azad University 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kazemnejad Matak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Feel confident in the ability of students and their conceptions of research skills are the most important factors affecting research. This study is aimed to assess factors associated with self-efficacy of medical students of Islamic Azad University of Qom. Methods: In this sectional-analytic study, 303 students that are studying medical sciences at Islamic Azad university of Qom have participated. Samples of multistage sampling were selected in proportion to the share of each field. Data were collected using a questionnaire including personal, academic and research self-efficacy.Content validity by teachers and and reliability  with Cronbach's coefficient Alfay (0/72 was confirmed .Data were analyzed using SPSS software and using descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation  with inferential statistics and independent T of ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient and significance level (p 0/05. The T independent test also showed differences in self-efficacy in terms of passing a course or workshop on research methodology, history of co-running research projects and having research papers in journals and conferences (P >0/001. Conclusion: Considering the self-efficacy of students in this research, increase their research capacity by providing workshops right after being admitted to university and strengthen educational programs, raise their awareness of the regulations of talented students and young researchers club, increase motivation and empowerment of teachers in medical universities and creating a serious incentive for student in research are emphasized.

  20. International Students in Transition: Voices of Chinese Doctoral Students in a U.S. Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, I focused on international Chinese doctoral students and sought to better understand their lived experience in transition to U.S. higher education. I also aimed to explore strategies that can be employed to improve these students' academic and sociocultural experiences on American campuses. Guided by the adult transition theory…

  1. Institutional Barriers to Research on Sensitive Topics: Case of Sex Communication Research Among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey M. Noland

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available When conducting research on sensitive topics, it is challenging to use new methods of data collection given the apprehensions of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs. This is especially worrying because sensitive topics of research often require novel approaches. In this article a brief personal history of navigating the IRB process for conducting sex communication research is presented, along with data from a survey that tested the assumptions long held by many IRBs. Results support some of the assumptions IRBs hold about sex communication research, but do not support some other assumptions.

  2. Teaching-based research: Models of and experiences with students doing research and inquiry – results from a university-wide initiative in a research-intensive environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rump, Camilla Østerberg; Damsholt, Tine; Sandberg, Marie

    meat two to three times a year. The over-arching purpose of the project was to integrate research and teaching in order to qualify the students and their academic skills by organizing lessons in ways which introduces the students to the key research methods and processes of the subject. Several......Overall abstract The purpose of this symposium is to explore and compare a multitude of different approaches to implementing research based teaching in a specific institutional setting. The four case studies are characterized by including teaching based research, see e.g. Wilcoxon et al., 2011......,000 students. Following a 4 year’s strategy with a strong emphasis on research, pressure from scientific staff led to a 2012-2016 strategy with teaching as main focus of enhancement at the University. In a process of application by individual or groups of teachers, 8 thematic projects were initiated...

  3. The PIERDUB project: International Project on Education and Research in Donation at University of Barcelona: training university students about donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyalich, M; Paredes, D; Ballesté, C; Menjívar, A

    2010-01-01

    Donation and transplantation is an accepted therapeutic option when organ failure or tissue replacements are needed to save or improve the quality of life. However, in most medical schools there is no specific training for it, thus disregarding the key role of university students for the future success of the process. Knowledge diffusion about the donation procedure to clarify doubts and stimulate positive attitudes toward donation. Training university students in the donation and transplantation process. Research about the previous donation knowledge and the impact in donation indexes. Three different phases have been designed: (1) Training the University of Barcelona Health Sciences School students; (2) Training the Health Sciences School students in other faculties of Catalonia, Spain, and International; and (3) research. Since 2005, we have offered yearly an Optional Credits Course to medical students with duration of 45 hours, and two Donation days opened to health sciences students. Since 2007, promotional campaigns have been carried out in medicine and other health sciences faculties. Until now, 818 answered surveys have been collected to evaluate previous knowledge among university students. Training medical and other health sciences students in the donation process will improve quality of medical education and develop a trainer role for future professionals to help improve donation rates.

  4. Student-Teachers as Researchers: Towards a Professional Development Orientation in Teacher Education. Possibilities and Limitations in the Greek University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou, Eleni; Tsafos, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present and discuss the action research we conducted with the main purpose to investigate the proper ways to introduce action research to our student-teachers in the university so as to empower them in a lifelong professional development perspective. Although the obstacles we faced were many, it seemed possible and beneficial for…

  5. Managing disclosure of research misconduct by a graduate student to a university mental health professional during a clinical counseling session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Holly A; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2013-01-01

    This case looks at the question of how to consider obligations of confidentiality by a mental health professional who works for an institution and learns that a student has been using a drug intended for an animal research project. Dr. Paul Appelbaum, MD, a psychiatrist at Columbia University, examines the issue of the limits of confidentiality. Nicholas Steneck, PhD, a scholar in research misconduct at the University of Michigan, explores the obligations to report research misconduct. Walter Limehouse, MD, an ethicist at the Medical University of South Carolina, considers the systems issues raised by this case and offers some suggestions that might change the institutional environment.

  6. Research and analysis of the level of physical preparedness of Oles Honchar Dnipro National University students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Hotienko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study and analyze the level of physical preparedness of Oles Honchar Dnipro National University students. Material & Methods: the level of physical readiness of students was determined with the help of tests and standards for the annual assessment of the physical preparedness of the population of Ukraine, the results of which determine the level of development of the basic physical qualities: strength, endurance, speed, flexibility, agility. Students performed 5 types of tests. Results: obtained results made it possible to compile the dynamics of the level of physical preparedness of students: high, decent, medium, low, and also an appropriate assessment of the physical state: excellent, good, satisfactory, unsatisfactory. Conclusion: these data suggest that the majority of students are middle and low level of physical preparednes. In connection with the results suggested a set of exercises to improve the physical preparedness of students.

  7. University and Student Segmentation: Multilevel Latent-Class Analysis of Students' Attitudes towards Research Methods and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Rudiger; Daniel, Hans-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is often claimed that psychology students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics affect course enrolment, persistence, achievement, and course climate. However, the inter-institutional variability has been widely neglected in the research on students' attitudes towards research methods and statistics, but it is important…

  8. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN MEDICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS (RESEARCH WITHIN INTERNATIONAL PROJECT MAY MEASUREMENT MONTH INITIATIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анастасия Михайловна Кочергина

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. Arterial hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors in students of medical universities. Aim – to determine incidence of arterial hypertension and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in students of medical university. Methods. The study included 146 students of KemSMU, as well as 67 students of SamSMU who were surveyed during May 1-10, 2017 within the framework of the international project «MAY MEASUREMENT MONTH 2017 (MMM17» using a standard questionnaire supplemented with a developed questionnaire including questions about the daily consumption of coffee and energy drinks, the amount of vegetables and fruits consumed, salt, physical activity level and night duty as paramedical personnel. All students underwent a three-fold measurement of blood pressure (BP after 5 minutes of rest sitting. Results. The frequency of arterial hypertension among KemSMU students at the age of 22.04 ± 1.8 years is 4.1 %, among the SamSMU students at the age of 21.2 ± 0.73 years – 1.5 %. Individuals with arterial hypertension – more often men gender who regularly drink coffee. Male students have a higher incidence of several risk factors than female students. The high frequency of tabacco smoking among medical students (13 % – KemSMU, 7.5 % – SamSMU was detected, while 31.6 % of all smokers began to smoke during their studies. Conclusions. The most common risk factors determined among students were smoking, increased intake of salt. Young men significantly more often demonstrated the presence of risk factors than women of similar age.

  9. Strategies Employed by Iranian EFL Freshman University Students in Extensive Listening: A Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Farinaz Shirani; Yamat, Hamidah

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study on the strategies employed by Iranian freshmen in extensive listening. A group of 12 freshman university students were purposefully selected based on their scores in the Oxford Placement Test administered. Four learners were identified as advanced, four as intermediate, and four as lower…

  10. Information Literacy for Social Workers: University at Albany Libraries Prepare MSW Students for Research and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Brustman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In a series of workshops, University at Albany librarians collaborate with the School of Social Welfare to impart information literacy skills to Master in Social Work students. The rationale, curriculum, and embedded ACRL information literacy standards are discussed. Also presented are assessments and a discussion of the challenges of implementation.

  11. Engaging First-year University Students in Research: Promise, Potentials, and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Sangster

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Undergraduate Research Initiative at the University of Saskatchewan implemented a pilot project to organize, support, and promote curriculum-based research experience as an integral aspect of participating first-year courses. The framework for the course-based initiative was the research arc; usually in groups, students in these classes would develop a research question, investigate it using discipline-appropriate methodologies, and disseminate the results. Nine classes (Agriculture, Animal Bioscience, Environmental Science, Women’s and Gender Studies, Psychology, Kinesiology, and Interdisciplinary Studies participated in this program pilot. There were four key agents in the program: faculty instructors, research coaches, students in participating first-year classes, and university administrative staff. This preliminary evaluation of the pilot suggests that first-year undergraduate research experiences have potential to benefit the undergraduate student participants as well as the faculty and research coaches involved. The primary benefits that faculty reported experiencing included an increased interest in ways to engage learners, reexamination of and reflection on their teaching strategies, the pragmatic support of a research coach helping with their work load, and an invigoration of their research. The primary benefits to research coaches included enhancement of their professional skills, experience in lesson planning and facilitation, CV building, and an ideology shift in how to best facilitate learning for undergraduate students. The most prominent benefits for undergraduate students appeared to be that they gained a better idea about how researchers think and work, that they increased their understanding of how research works, and that their own research and professional skills had improved. Early, bottom-up evaluation identified characteristics of implementation that appear to best facilitate achievement of the initiative

  12. Early Opportunities Research Partnership Between Howard University, University of Maryland Baltimore County and NASA Goddard for Engaging Underrepresented STEM Students in Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; Venable, D. D.; Hoban, S.; Demoz, B.; Bleacher, L.; Meeson, B. W.; Farrell, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Howard University, University of Maryland Baltimore County and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) are collaborating to engage underrepresented STEM students and expose them to an early career pathway in NASA-related Earth & Space Science research. The major goal is to instill interest in Earth and Space Science to STEM majors early in their academic careers, so that they become engaged in ongoing NASA-related research, motivated to pursue STEM careers, and perhaps become part of the future NASA workforce. The collaboration builds on a program established by NASA's Dynamic Response of the Environments of Asteroids, the Moon and the moons of Mars (DREAM2) team to engage underrepresented students from Howard in summer internships. Howard leveraged this program to expand via NASA's Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) funding. The project pairs Howard students with GSFC mentors and engages them in cutting-edge Earth and Space Science research throughout their undergraduate tenure. The project takes a multi-faceted approach, with each year of the program specifically tailored to each student's strengths and addressing their weaknesses, so that they experience a wide array of enriching research and professional development activities that help them grow both academically and professionally. During the academic year, the students are at Howard taking a full load of courses towards satisfying their degree requirements and engaging in research with their GSFC mentors via regular telecons, e-mail exchanges, video chats & on an average one visit per semester to GSFC for an in-person meeting with their research mentor. The students extend their research with full-time summer internships at GSFC, culminating in a Capstone Project and Senior Thesis. As a result, these Early Opportunities Program students, who have undergone rigorous training in the Earth and Space Sciences, are expected to be well-prepared for graduate school and the NASA workforce.

  13. A STUDY ON LEARNING APPROACHES USED AMONG POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS IN RESEARCH UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roziana Shaari

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the method of learningapproaches adopted by post-graduate students in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia(UTM and to identifywhether these approaches are associated with demographic factors (age, gender,main streams, mode of study and working experience. Participants included 354post-graduate students from different faculties inUTM whereas questionnaireswere distributed via email and throughdesignated contact person. The One-WayAnalysis of Variance (ANOVA revealed that there were significant differenceson the usage of the three post-graduates’ learningapproaches across age, mainstreams and years of working experience. Significance was not seen betweenlearning approaches on gender and mode of study. Deep approach was found to bepreferred approaches to their learning methods. Ourinvestigation suggests thatapproach to learning should be included in their academics, however thesuggestion is tailored according on the tasks givento the students. Hence, weconcluded that further investigation could be carried out the effect of learningenvironment towards students dynamic in learning.

  14. A Study of the Relationship between Gender, Salary, and Student Ratings of Instruction at a Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magel, Rhonda C.; Doetkott, Curt; Cao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Salary studies in the United States and some other countries show a gap between male and female faculty salaries in higher education that widens over time. The present study examines one possible explanation, particularly at research universities, by examining changes in faculty salaries in relation to student ratings of instruction. Student…

  15. The research of the level of social media addiction of university students

    OpenAIRE

    Gazi, Mehmet Ali; Çetin, Muharrem; Çakı, Caner

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, social media hasbecome an indispensable part of our daily lives. Although there are many usefulapplications of social media, the excessive use of this medium led to livepersonal, social and occupational problems. With these problems, it began tolead social media addiction which describes as a new kind of addiction. ın thisregard, the survey will be applied 350 students who study at communicationfaculty of ınonu university through social media selected via simple randomsampling onlin...

  16. Researching with undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard; Mogensen, Kevin; Hjort-Madsen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    -established and proven university model of participant-directed, problem-oriented project work. We explore students' and researchers' experiences of being part of the collaboration, focusing on learning potentials and dilemmas associated with the multiple roles of researcher and student that characterized...

  17. The First National Student Conference: NASA University Research Centers at Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Editor); Mebane, Stacie (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference includes contributions from 13 minority universities with NASA University Research Centers. Topics discussed include: leadership, survival strategies, life support systems, food systems, simulated hypergravity, chromium diffusion doping, radiation effects on dc-dc converters, metal oxide glasses, crystal growth of Bil3, science and communication on wheels, semiconductor thin films, numerical solution of random algebraic equations, fuzzy logic control, spatial resolution of satellite images, programming language development, nitric oxide in the thermosphere and mesosphere, high performance polyimides, crossover control in genetic algorithms, hyperthermal ion scattering, etc.

  18. Denali Geographic 2012 : A University led scientific field experience for High School students at the Alaska Summer Research Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.; Burke, S.; Chebul, E.; Dempsey, A.; Hastings, H.; Terry, R.; Drake, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) annually provides the opportunity for ~150 exceptional high school students to engage in scientific exploration at the university level. In July 2012, University of Alaska Fairbanks instructors led a two-week long ASRA module, called 'Denali Geographic', where eight student participants from across the USA and Canada learned how to observe changes in the natural world and design their own experiments for a field expedition to Denali National Park and Preserve, with assistance from the National Park Service. Each student designed an experiment/observational project prior to the expedition to investigate changes across the expanse of the park. Projects included wildlife documentation; scat and track observations; soil ph and moisture with elevation and vegetation changes; wildflowers species distribution; waterborne insect populations; atmospheric pressure and temperature variations; construction of sustainable buildings to minimize human impact on the park; and park geology comparisons between outcrop and distal stream deposits. The students learned how to design experiments, purchase supplies needed to conduct the work, and select good locations in which to sample in the park. Students used equipment such as GPS to mark field locations; a range finder to determine distance from wildlife; a hygrometer for temperature and pressure; nets and sorting equipments to analyze insects; and the preparation of Plaster of Paris for creating casts of animal tracks. All observations were documented in their field notebooks and blog entries made to share their experiences. Day excursions as part of the module included Poker Flats Research Range, where students learned about the use of unmanned aerial vehicles in scientific exploration; Alaska Volcano Observatory, where students learned about volcanic hazards in Alaska and the North Pacific; Chena Hot Springs and the Ice Museum, where students learned about thermal imaging using a Forward

  19. Students of the Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra as Object of the Research Results in Developing Foreign Language Writing Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomíra MORAVCOVÁ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the foreign language is one of the most important language skills students develop and improve at the Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra. Strong writing skills are essential to their future success, whether they are related to writing general reports on agricultural issues at home or in the world as well as to working-out some research papers aimed at agriculture, but also at some other areas of the business world. We have to state that writing is perhaps one of the most difficult skills students can develop and improve at our University. They learn how to write effectively, they are encouraged to develop an awareness of themselves as students - writers and essay authors. This paper deals with the essay writing analysis in teaching foreign languages at the Slovak Agricultural University in Nitra, particularly from the point of their final results. The research was carried out in the Department of Languages and we present in our paper the results students achieved in writing essays in the two compared years, 2007 and 2010.

  20. Features of Perception of Modern Russian Political Leaders in University Students (A Psychosemantic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobkin V.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents outcomes of a research on features of perception of modern Russian political leaders in young people. A technique of multidimensional semantic differential was employed: the subjects were asked to assess 15 objects (political leaders, 'my ideal', 'ideal leader', 'antipathetic person' and 'Myself' according to 33 personality traits using a seven-point scale. The outcomes suggest that the structure of the students' perception of political leaders is quite simple and is based on three modalities: 'morality', 'power' and 'intelligence'. Comparing these outcomes with the research data obtained in 2004 using the same technique allowed the authors to conclude that the students do not assess modern political leaders according to the moral qualities of the latter, but rather perceive them through the qualities of power associated with social manipulation.

  1. Researching with undergraduate students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard; Mogensen, Kevin; Hjort-Madsen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a particular case of undergraduate students working on subprojects within the framework of their supervisors' (the authors') research project during Autumn Semester 2012 and Spring Semester 2013. The article's purpose is to show that an institutionalized focus on students...... as "research learners" rather than merely curriculum learners proves productive for both research and teaching. We describe the specific university learning context and the particular organization of undergraduate students' supervision and assistantships. The case builds on and further enhances a well......-established and proven university model of participant-directed, problem-oriented project work. We explore students' and researchers' experiences of being part of the collaboration, focusing on learning potentials and dilemmas associated with the multiple roles of researcher and student that characterized...

  2. Motivating University Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Alves de Sousa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said

  3. Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

  4. Research-oriented series: a portal into the culture of biomedical research for junior medical students at Alfaisal University in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Mohammad Abrar; Dweik, Loai M; Abudan, Zainab; Gazal, Abdalla M; Abu-Dawas, Reema B; Chamseddin, Ranim A; Albali, Nawaf H; Ali, Alaa A; Khan, Tehreem A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A

    2015-03-01

    Student contributions to research have been shown to effectively reflect on their communication and critical thinking skills. Short-term research courses offer opportunities for medical students to advance their research experience in subsequent high-demanding long-term research opportunities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a research-oriented series (ROS) on undergraduate students at Alfaisal University in Saudi Arabia. The ROS was designed to comprise eight sessions. Each session addressed core principles and the practice of research concepts and was based on theoretical morning sessions supplemented by afternoon practical sessions delivered by experienced senior medical students and faculty members. Students were assessed comprehensively by the end of the ROS. The series was conducted twice, and 35 students were involved each time. A total of 70 enrolled students (35 men and 35 women) with grade point averages of >3.5 and online, self-administered questionnaire assessing their perception of knowledge, skills, and confidence after attending the ROS and evaluating their senior peers. Ninety percent of the medical students responded to the online survey and rated the ROS highly in improving their research knowledge, skills, and confidence. Male students reported significant gains compared with their female peers (Pstudent gains after attending the ROS. Qualitative responses were in support of three recurring themes favoring the unique learning environment in the ROS. In conclusion, the ROS offers a short-term systematic approach to fundamental steps and concepts of biomedical research. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  5. Increasing student engagement in science through field-based research: University of Idaho's WoW STEMcore Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, A. L.; Boylan, R. D.; Rittenburg, R.; Boll, J.; Allan, P.

    2013-12-01

    A recent statewide survey assessing STEM perceptions in Idaho showed that high school student interest in science and preparation for college are declining. To address this decline we are piloting an interdisciplinary, community and field-based water science education approach for 10th - 12th grade science courses during the 2013-14 school year called WoW STEMcore. The program is led by graduate students in the University of Idaho (UI) Waters of the West (WoW) program. Our methods are based on proven best practices from eight years of NSF GK-12 experience at UI and over a decade of GK-12 experience at more than 300 programs in the U.S. WoW STEMcore works to strengthen partnerships between WoW graduate students, high school teachers, and regional organizations that work on natural resource management or place-based science education with the intent of sustaining and merging efforts to increase scientific literacy among high school students and to better prepare them for higher education. In addition, graduate students gain outreach, education and communication experience and teachers are exposed to new and relevant research content and methods. WoW STEMcore is fostering these partnerships through water themed projects at three northern Idaho high schools. The pilot program will culminate in Spring 2014 with a regional Water Summit in which all participating students and partners will converge at a two-day youth scientific conference and competition where they can showcase their research and the skills they gained over the course of the year. We hypothesize that through a graduate student-led, field-based program that gets students out of the classroom and thinking about water resource issues in their communities, we will 1) fuel high school students' interest in science through hands on and inquiry-based pedagogy and 2) improve preparation for higher education by providing graduate student mentors to discuss the pathway from high school to college to a career. In

  6. Working Students at Greek Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Dimitrios M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Greece has the highest youth unemployment rate in the European Union. Even though it is clear that persistent unemployment requires bold measures in engaging young educated Greeks in the labour market, there is no coherent policy targeting that population group, especially university students. This research paper aims to explore the idea…

  7. Writing and University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Cecilia Andrade Calderón

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the exploratory-descriptive investigation carried out to explain the writing behavior of the students of the Universidad Colegio Mayor of Cundinamarca. To this effect, it refers to the results of the project that are based on the state of the art of writing in higher education; it is supported by various conceptualizations about its technique throughout time, orality and writing at the University, the act of writing, and references about specific didactics. Furthermore, the article proposes theoretical approaches concerned with the process of writing, such as constructivism, meaningful learning, metacognition, social practices of language and new writing tendencies in information media. Through all this, the article present a profile of the University students on the level of writing and it evaluates their editing skills and the level of writing productiveness. This allows offering an academic proposal with possible guidelines for the institution to strengthen writing ability in their students.

  8. A "CASE" Study on Developing Science Communication and Outreach Skills of University Graduate Student Researchers in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesche, M. E.; Conner, L.

    2015-12-01

    Well rounded scientific researchers are not only experts in their field, but can also communicate their work to a multitude of various audiences, including the general public and undergraduate university students. Training in these areas should ideally start during graduate school, but many programs are not preparing students to effectively communicate their work. Here, we present results from the NSF-funded CASE (Changing Alaska Science Education) program, which was funded by NSF under the auspices of the GK-12 program. CASE placed science graduate students (fellows) in K-12 classrooms to teach alongside of K-12 teachers with the goal of enhancing communication and teaching skills among graduate students. CASE trained fellows in inquiry-based and experiential techniques and emphasized the integration of art, writing, and traditional Alaska Native knowledge in the classroom. Such techniques are especially effective in engaging students from underrepresented groups. As a result of participation, many CASE fellows have reported increased skills in communication and teaching, as well as in time management. These skills may prove directly applicable to higher education when teaching undergraduate students.

  9. Geosciences Student Recruitment Strategies at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB): Earth System Science/Community-Research Based Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, E. L.; Behl, R.; Whitney, D.; Rodrigue, C.; Wechsler, S.; Holk, G.; Lee, C.; Francis, R. D.; Larson, D.

    2005-12-01

    Collaborations among geoscience-oriented departments at California State University, Long Beach (Geological Sciences, as well as portions of the Geography and Anthropology departments and a new, fast-growing Environmental Sciences and Policy (ES&P) program) are characterized by attention to three important elements: (1) community-based partnerships and research, (2) outreach and continuity within educational pipeline transitions from high school, to community college, to university, and, (3) sharing of resources and expertise. Three specific collaborations, (1) creation of the ES&P, (2) the NSF-funded Geoscience Diversity Enhancement Program (GDEP), and, (3) the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Materials, Environment, and Societies (IIRMES), are powerful illustrations of how these collaborations can work to foster geoscience student recruitment and academic development, particularly at urban, highly diverse institutions with limited resources. Through a combination of student surveys, focus groups, and institutional research supported by the GDEP program, we know (e.g., Whitney et al., 2005) that non-Caucasian students often express less affinity for the geosciences as a focus of study than Caucasians. Early exposure to positive field and laboratory experiences, better understanding of geoscience career possibilities, and better advising at high school and college levels are all excellent strategies for heightening student interest and recruitment in the geosciences, yet appear to be lacking for many of the students in the greater Long Beach, California area. GDEP, ES&P, and IIRMES all challenge these lacunae by emphasizing hands-on learning, research on relevant community-based problems, and one-on-one or small group research, advising and mentoring. Our current challenge is to help our high-school and community-college colleagues adopt their own model of these active-learning strategies, thereby priming the pump and patching the pipe(line) for student

  10. Improving University Research Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley O’Reilly

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the current data management practices of university researchers at an Intermountain West land-grant research university in the United States. Key findings suggest that researchers are primarily focused on the collection and housing of research data. However, additional research value exists within the other life cycle stages for research data—specifically in the stages of delivery and maintenance. These stages are where most new demands and requirements exist for data management plans and policies that are conditional for external grant funding; therefore, these findings expose a “gap” in current research practice. These findings should be of interest to academics and practitioners alike as findings highlight key management gaps in the life cycle of research data. This study also suggests a course of action for academic institutions to coalesce campus-wide assets to assist researchers in improving research value.

  11. Student Perceptions of Communication Skills in Undergraduate Science at an Australian Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Mapstone, Lucy D.; Matthews, Kelly E.

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutions globally are acknowledging the need to teach communication skills. This study used the Science Student Skills Inventory to gain insight into how science students perceive the development of communication skills across the degree programme. Responses were obtained from 635 undergraduate students enrolled in a Bachelor…

  12. Student Academic Freedom in Egypt: Perceptions of University Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain-Al-Dien, Muhammad M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate student academic freedom from the university education students' point of view in Egypt. This study adopted a survey research design in which the questionnaire was the main data collection instrument. The study participants comprised 800 university education students in Egypt. The result of the…

  13. The Relationship of Student Satisfaction to Key Indicators for Colleges and Universities. 2014 National Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Julie; Bodfish, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Student satisfaction is an indicator of institutional performance. By asking students how satisfied they are with their educational experience in areas such as instructional effectiveness, academic advising, registration, and campus climate, an institution can identify the areas that are performing well and those that need to be a priority for…

  14. Using a Modelling Language for Supporting University Students' Orienting Activity When Studying Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosonen, Kari; Ilomäki, Liisa; Lakkala, Minna

    2015-01-01

    The present study focuses on examining how digitally guided conceptual mapping can be used in orienting students in higher education to learn complex domain content and practices. The outcomes of conceptual mapping were investigated as the orienting bases created by the students that used digitalized conceptual tools to construct an external…

  15. Challenges Faced by African International Students at a Metropolitan Research University: A Phenomenological Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evivie, Loretta Gbemudu

    2009-01-01

    The number of international students coming to the United States has increased from 48,486 in 1959-1960 to 623,805 in the 2007-2008 academic years (Open Doors, 2008). These students contributed $15.5 billion to the United States economy, making education the nation's fifth largest service export (Open Doors, 2008). The literature has focused on…

  16. Morphological awareness in dyslexic university students

    OpenAIRE

    MARTIN, JENNIFER; FRAUENFELDER, ULI H.; COLÉ, PASCALE

    2017-01-01

    This research assessed phonological and morphological awareness in dyslexic university students. We tested 44 dyslexic university students in phonological and morphological awareness tasks and compared their performances to those of both matched chronological age and matched reading level controls. In the phonological awareness tests, the dyslexic university students performed at the same level as their reading level controls. In contrast, they systematically outperformed their reading level ...

  17. Research universities for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The `public outcomes` from research universities are educated students and research that extends the frontiers of knowledge. Measures of these `public outcomes` are inadequate to permit either research or education consumers to select research universities based on quantitative performance data. Research universities annually spend over $20 billion on research; 60% of these funds are provided by Federal sources. Federal funding for university research has recently grown at an annual rate near 6% during a time period when other performers of Federal research have experienced real funding cuts. Ten universities receive about 25% of the Federal funds spent on university research. Numerous studies of US research universities are reporting storm clouds. Concerns include balancing research and teaching, the narrow focus of engineering education, college costs, continuing education, and public funding of foreign student education. The absence of research on the `public outcomes` from university research results in opinion, politics, and mythology forming the basis of too many decisions. Therefore, the authors recommend studies of other nations` research universities, studies of various economic models of university research, analysis of the peer review process and how well it identifies the most capable research practitioners and at what cost, and studies of research university ownership of intellectual property that can lead to increased `public outcomes` from publicly-funded research performed by research universities. They advocate two practices that could increase the `public outcomes` from university research. These are the development of science roadmaps that link science research to `public outcomes` and `public outcome` metrics. Changes in the university research culture and expanded use of the Internet could also lead to increased `public outcomes`. They recommend the use of tax incentives to encourage companies to develop research partnerships with research

  18. Scientific Research Activity of Students Pre-Service Teachers of Sciences at University: The Aspects of Understanding, Situation and Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanauskas, Vincentas; Augiene, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    The development of student abilities of scientific research activity (SRA) in the process of studies appears as a highly important area. In the course of studies, students not only increase their general competencies, acquire professional abilities and skills but also learn to conduct research. This does not mean that all students will build their…

  19. Matching Expectations for Successful University Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Omari, Maryam; MacCallum, Judith; Young, Susan; Walker, Gabrielle; Holmes, Kirsten; Haski-Leventha, Debbie; Scott, Rowena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts. Design/methodology/approach: This research involved a multi-stage data collection process including interviews with student volunteers, and university and host representatives from six…

  20. Forgiveness and Subjective Happiness of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batik, Meryem Vural; Bingöl, Tugba Yilmaz; Kodaz, Aynur Firinci; Hosoglu, Rumeysa

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the forgiveness and subjective happiness level of university students in terms of gender, faculty, grade, residence, and parental attitudes, and to determine predictive role of forgiveness on subjective happiness. The study group consists of 828 university students (56.3% female, 43.7% male). The data was…

  1. Universities futureproofing youth mental health: research confirms that offering mindfulness courses to students increases their wellbeing and resilience to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Peter Brian; Dufour, G; Vainre, M; Wagner, AP; Stochl, Jan; Benton, A; Howarth, Emma Louise; Croudace, TJ

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Worldwide, increasing numbers of young people go to university, but there is concern about students’ rising need for mental health services. Young people’s journey through university provides a golden yet under-used opportunity for prevention. Mindfulness meditation training is popular amongst young people, but its effectiveness to increase wellbeing and resilience to stress in university students needs confirmation. Objective To address these issues the U...

  2. University Experiences and Women Engineering Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, LoAnn Debra Gienger

    Riverside University (a pseudonym), like many universities, has not significantly increased the number of women who graduate with bachelor's degrees in engineering. The purpose of the study is to understand how the university experiences of women students influence the decision to persist in an undergraduate engineering degree and to understand the role of self-perception in how the students perceive experiences as supporting or hindering their persistence in the major. Archival data, documents and artifacts, observations, individual interviews, and a focus group with women engineering students provide insights into students' perceived barriers and supports of student success. Analysis of the data results in two major themes. First, students' self-confidence and self-efficacy influence how women assimilate university experiences as either supportive or diminishing of academic success. Second, university policies and practices shape the campus environment within which student experiences are formed and influence a student's level of institutional, academic, and social integration. The results of the study indicate opportunities for university leadership to enhance strategies that positively shape students' institutional, academic and social integration as precursors toward increasing the number of women students who successfully complete undergraduate engineering degrees at Riverside University. Future research is indicated to better understand how gender and gender identity intersects with other demographic factors, such as socio-economic status, immigration status, and life stage (e.g., traditional versus non-traditional students), to support or deter the persistence of engineering students to degree completion.

  3. Fostering Student Entrepreneurship and University Spinoff Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Bailetti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A student spinoff company strives to transform knowledge acquired by students into an income-generating business. This article outlines how a university can increase the number of spinoff companies created by its student entrepreneurs. Student spinoff companies are of interest to all forward-thinking universities, particularly those that support research and teaching programs in the field of entrepreneurship. The spinoff companies provide tangible evidence that students acquire viable entrepreneurial skills while studying at the university. In addition, student spinoff companies contribute to regional economic development, commercialize knowledge that otherwise would go undeveloped, help universities attain and expand their core missions, and increase the return on the investments in university R&D. University policies developed specifically for student spinoff companies significantly affect the growth potential of such ventures. This article provides a model and a set of principles that universities can use to support and increase the number of student entrepreneurs at their institutions. The model and principles are grounded in research findings and practical experience. In addition, the article suggests that universities adopt a results-based management approach to plan and deploy initiatives to support student entrepreneurs. The approach is widely used by government agencies interested in increasing the outcomes from their investments.

  4. RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES IN MALAYSIA: WHAT BEHOLDS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooraini Mohamad Sheriff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Higher Education Strategic Plan Beyond 2020 aims at further strengthening Malaysian research universities and envisions that two Malaysian universities will be among the Top 100 world universities. To date there are 5 research universities in Malaysia, namely University of Malaya (UM, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM being the latest addition. These research universities are required to focus primarily on research and innovation activities, driven by highly competent academics and competitive student admissions. Research universities too are expected to explore their intellectual capacity and become models of Malaysian universities in conducting research activities aimed at knowledge advancement. Apart from this research universities are entrusted to generate their own income and establish holding companies responsible for conducting business ventures through the commercialization of their research products. Quality and quantity of researchers, research and postgraduates are also expected to increase in these research driven institutions. This calls for a visionary university leadership and the application of a new image and organizational principles. Education, training and employment policies too have to be reviewed, to ensure staff have the skills necessary for the development of research activities.

  5. Student perceptions of a healthy university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, M; Monk, R; Powell, S; Dooris, M

    2015-06-01

    As complex environments within which individuals and populations operate, universities present important contexts for understanding and addressing health issues. The healthy university is an example of the settings approach, which adopts a whole system perspective, aiming to make places within which people, learn, live, work and play supportive to health and well-being. The UK Healthy Universities Network has formulated an online toolkit, which includes a Self-Review Tool, intended to enable universities to assess what actions they need to take to develop as a healthy university. This paper presents findings from consultative research undertaken with students from universities in England, Scotland and Wales, which explored what they believe, represents a healthy university. Student surveys and focus groups were used to collect data across eleven universities in England, Scotland and Wales. A priori themes were used to develop our own model for a healthy university, and for the thematic coding phase of analysis. A healthy university would promote student health and well-being in every aspect of its business from its facilities and environment through to its curriculum. Access to reasonably priced healthy food and exercise facilities were key features of a healthy university for students in this study. The Self-Review Tool has provided a crucial start for universities undertaking the journey towards becoming a healthy university. In looking to the future both universities and the UK Healthy Universities Network will now need to look at what students want from their whole university experience, and consider how the Self-Review Tool can help universities embrace a more explicit conceptual framework. The concept of a healthy university that can tailor its facilities and supportive environments to the needs of its students will go some way to developing students who are active global citizens and who are more likely to value and prioritise health and well-being, in the

  6. Developing a Second Life Virtual Field Trip for University Students: An Action Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Shane; Andrews, Lynda; Luck, Edwina

    2012-01-01

    Background: Integrating 3D virtual world technologies into educational subjects continues to draw the attention of educators and researchers alike. The focus of this study is the use of a virtual world, Second Life, in higher education teaching. In particular, it explores the potential of using a virtual world experience as a learning component…

  7. Methodological Reflections on Researching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender University Students in Hong Kong: To What Extent Are They Vulnerable Interview Subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Yiu Tung

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, the importance of reflexivity has been acknowledged in higher education research. In this paper, I reflect on my experience of researching lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) university students in Hong Kong. The focus is not on the findings that emerge from the in-depth interviews conducted per se, but on the…

  8. Student Counselling at Utrecht University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The enormous increase in the number of students at Dutch universities in the sixties and seventies made it impossible for professors to deal with the many different questions students confronted them with. New professionals, student counsellors/psychologists and student advisers entered the

  9. [Research on relations among self-esteem, self-harmony and interpersonal-harmony of university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualing

    2014-03-01

    To learn characteristics and their mutual relations of self-esteem, self-harmony and interpersonal-harmony of university students, in order to provide the basis for mental health education. With a stratified cluster random sampling method, a questionnaire survey was conducted in 820 university students from 16 classes of four universities, chosen from 30 universities in Anhui Province. Meanwhile, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Self-harmony Scale and Interpersonal-harmony Diagnostic Scale were used for assessment. Self-esteem of university students has an average score of (30.71 +/- 4.77), higher than median thoery 25, and there existed statistical significance in the dimensions of gender (P = 0.004), origin (P = 0.038) and only-child (P = 0.005). University students' self-harmony has an average score of (98.66 +/- 8.69), among which there were 112 students in the group of low score, counting for 13.7%, 442 in that of middle score, counting for 53.95%, 265 in that of high score, counting for 32.33%. And there existed no statistical significance in the total-score of self-harmony and score differences from most of subscales in the dimention of gender and origin, but satistical significance did exist in the dimention of only-child (P = 0.004). It was statistically significant (P = 0.006) on the "stereotype" subscales, on the differences between university students from urban areas and rural areas. Every dimension of self-esteem and self -harmony and interpersonal harmony was correlated and statistically significant. Multiple regression analysis found that when there was a variable in self-esteem, the amount of the variable of self-harmony for explaination of interpersonal conversation dropped from 22.6% to 12%, and standard regression coefficient changing from 0.087 to 0.035. The trouble of interpersonal dating fell from 27.6% to 13.1%, the standard regression coefficient changing from 0.104 to 0.019. The bother of treating people fell from 30.9% to 15%, and the

  10. Early undergraduate research experience at Makerere University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To remain relevant the Faculty of Medicine Makerere University needs to identify research enhancing opportunities like undergraduate research experiences. Methods: This was a cross sectional study involving 424 graduate and undergraduate students of Makerere University Medical School on the traditional curriculum.

  11. ICT Learning Experience and Research Orientation as Predictors of ICT Skills and the ICT Use of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Jef C.; Heerwegh, Dirk; De Wit, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Since our first studies of information and communications technology (ICT) skills and ICT use at universities in 2004, ICT and its use by students has changed greatly. In order to obtain a more detailed picture of ICT skills, we first construct a new instrument to measure the self-perception of ICT skills (49 items) and of ICT use (53 items) by…

  12. Trends in Marijuana Use Among Undergraduate Students at the University of Maryland. Research Report No. 3-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, James D.

    Five hundred ninety-five students enrolled in undergraduate classes in psychology and business administration at the University of Maryland completed an anonymous questionnaire inquiring about their use or nonuse of marijuana, their reasons for using or not using the substance, and their attitudes toward the legal penalties for marijuana…

  13. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual‐Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S.; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Gold‐von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU‐NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU‐HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual‐degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5‐year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010–2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time‐limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual‐degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow‐up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. PMID:26365704

  14. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual-Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S; Cronstein, Bruce N; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-12-01

    To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU-NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU-HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual-degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5-year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010-2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time-limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual-degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow-up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. University students' mental health: Aksaray University example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Gündoğdu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether mental health scores of the university students differ based on gender, whether they study in their ideal majors, whether they are contended with their majors, economic condition perceived and perceptions on employment opportunity after graduation. The sample group of the study constituted 3492 students comprising 2037 female students and 1455 male students attending Faculty of Education (634, Engineering Faculty (1582, Economic and Administrative Sciences Faculty (1097, Faculty of Science and Letters (762, Medical Vocational College (540, Physical Training and Sports College (443 and Aksaray Vocational College (1452 of Aksaray University in 2010-2011 Academic Year. Symptom Checklist (SCL 90-R developed by Deragotis, (1983; eg Öner, 1997 has been used to collect data on mental health level of the students involved in the study. Statistical analysis of the data collected has been carried out using t Test, One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences have been found in students in terms of independent variants according to the general symptom average score and numerous sub-scale scores.

  16. Research self-efficacy and its relationship with academic performance in postgraduate students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyuri, Amir; Saberi, Behzad; Miri, Mohammadreza; Shahrestanaki, Ehsan; Bayat, Beyram Bibi; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    Research self-efficacy is one of the main factors influencing the successful conduction of research and following it in students. This study was performed with the aim of determining the research self-efficacy and its relationship with academic performance in postgraduate students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in 2016. This cross-sectional study was performed on 320 postgraduate students of TUMS in 2016. Proportional stratified sampling was done with simple random sampling from each school. The data were gathered with Phillips and Russell's research self-efficacy questionnaire, demographic questions, and grade point average (GPA) and were analyzed with independent t -tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multiple linear regressions in SPSS 18. Out of 320 students participating in this study, 152 patients (47.5%) were male and 168 (52.5%) were female with the mean age of 27.83 ± 4.3 years. The mean of research self-efficacy score was 186.18 ± 59.5 which was significant depended on college degrees and was significantly higher in doctorate students ( P = 0.0001). However, no significant difference was seen in research self-efficacy score of students due to gender ( P = 0.754) and school ( P = 0.364). There was a significant direct relationship between students' GPA and research self-efficacy score ( r = 0.393, P = 0.0001). Results of this study showed that the research self-efficacy score of TUMS postgraduate students is at an acceptable level, except the quantitative and computer skills that need appropriate educational interventions. As a direct and significant relationship existed between research self-efficacy score and student's academic performance, improving the research self-efficacy will also increase students' academic performance.

  17. Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal (ABSUMSAJ) provides a medium for publication of scientific paper written primarily by and for medical students and by experts. It aims to advance the frontier of biomedical sciences and encourage academic/medical researches based on ...

  18. Providing an Authentic Research Experience for University of the Fraser Valley Undergraduate Students by Investigating and Documenting Seasonal and Longterm Changes in Fraser Valley Stream Water Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, S. L.; Marsh, S. J.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Bourdages, M.; Paulson, D.; Groeneweg, A.; Bogaerts, P.; Robertson, K.; Clemence, E.; Smith, S.; Yakemchuk, A.; Faber, A.

    2017-12-01

    Undergraduate students in the Geography and Biology Departments at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) have been provided the opportunity to participate in the time series sampling of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and Fraser Valley tributaries as part of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) which is coordinated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Student research has focussed on Clayburn, Willband and Stoney Creeks that flow from Sumas Mountain northwards to the Fraser River. These watercourses are increasingly being impacted by anthropogenic activity including residential developments, industrial activity, and agricultural landuse. Students are instructed in field sampling protocols and the collection of water chemistry data and the care and maintenance of the field equipment. Students develop their own research projects and work in support of each other as teams in the field to collect the data and water samples. Students present their findings as research posters at local academic conferences and at UFV's Student Research Day. Through their involvement in our field research our students have become more aware of the state of our local streams, the methods used to monitor water chemistry and how water chemistry varies seasonally.

  19. <Research Papers>Kyoto University Students' Grammatical Abilities and Listening Comprehension as Measured by the TOEFL PBT and GRE

    OpenAIRE

    Aotani, Masayasu

    2012-01-01

    Kyoto University students' grammatical and syntactic skills, as well as their short listening comprehension skills, were compared with the corresponding world averages as measured by TOEFL. Grammatical and syntactic skills were operationalized as the structure (gap filling) and written expression (grammatical error detection) section scores from the TOEFL PBT (Paper-Based-Test) and the scores from the GRE's gap filling questions. Short listening comprehension skills were operationalized as th...

  20. An Action Research Study into the Role of Student Negotiation in Enhancing Perceived Student Engagement during English Speaking Classes at University Level in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

    2018-01-01

    A major issue in English language teaching in Turkey and other monolingual countries is the teaching of spoken English. This article reports the initial and final stages of an action research study which used student negotiation to enhance student engagement in speaking classes. The research was conducted in the English Language Teaching…

  1. Food intake of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greyce Luci BERNARDO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This narrative literature review aimed to analyze the results of studies on the food intake of university students. A literature search was conducted in July 2014 and updated in July 2016 in the Scopus, MedLine/PubMed, and SciELO databases, using descriptors related to university students and food intake in English and Portuguese. Overall, 37 studies that analyzed university students’ food intake were included in this review, eight of which were conducted in Brazil. The results demonstrated that most university students have unhealthy eating behaviors, such as high intake of fast foods, snacks, sweets, soft drinks, and alcoholic beverages, and low intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains, and legumes. Undergraduate students of health sciences, such as nursing, nutrition, and medicine, did not have healthier diets. University students’ food intake was characterized as unhealthy, regardless of undergraduate program or sex, especially among students who left the parents’ home and became responsible for their own food. Therefore, there is a need of developing public policies that promote healthy eating habits among students, such as interventions to change their eating habits and increase their access to healthy foods at the university environment.

  2. Education, Perception Factors, and Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence: Empirical Research on Chinese University Students' Perceptions and Attitudes Concerning Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili

    2016-06-09

    Research on perceptions and attitudes regarding intimate partner violence (IPV), a prominent predictor of IPV, is limited, and surveys on the relationships of the influencing factors are even rarer. Using a convenience sample of 2,057 students and assessed by the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale, this study explored Chinese university students' perceptions and attitudes concerning IPV to improve IPV prevention programs. It focused on the existences of the different perceptions and attitudes regarding gender, residence, major, and age under the same condition of educational attainment. Significant gender differences were found, with female students possessing better perceptions, which indicated that with the same education levels, the perceptions of females were better than those of males. Significant differences were also found for the first time in the literature between science students and arts students, with the latter holding better attitudes. No significant differences were seen between students from rural areas and students from urban areas, suggesting that with the same educational attainment, there were no perception differences between rural and urban residents. No significant perception differences were found among freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, which revealed that neither university education nor urban life had a significant effect on perceptions and attitudes concerning IPV for students who had finished high school education. In conclusion, the results of the current study indicated that among the other factors such as gender, residence, and age, education was the most powerful factor influencing perceptions and attitudes concerning IPV. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Attitudes Toward Euthanasia Among Turkish University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas Karaahmetoglu, Gulsen; Kutahyalioglu, Nesibe Sumeyye

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine perceptions and attitudes toward euthanasia among university students who are pursuing bachelor's degrees. Although the legalization and application of euthanasia are discussed commonly by health-care professionals and partially by lawyers, the ideas of other segments of society, especially university students, are taken place very rarely. The research was conducted descriptively to determine the ideas of 1,170 students at Kastamonu University from six different departments: arts and sciences, theology, tourism, nursing, school of physical education, and sports with using a questionnaire. Findings demonstrated that 73.2% of the students do not approve euthanasia. Also, it was found that there are significant differences depending on age, gender, department of study, income level, place of living, and the loss of kinsmen. This study serves as a resource for future research to understand the effects of sociodemographic characteristics on the decision of euthanasia.

  4. Mentoring Through Research as a Catalyst for the Success of Under-represented Minority Students in the Geosciences at California State University Northridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Pedone, V.; Simila, G. W.; Yule, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Catalyst Program of the Department of Geological Sciences at California State University Northridge has been developed by four faculty members who were the recipients of a three-year award (2002-2005) from the National Science Foundation. The goal of the program is to increase minority participation and success in the geosciences. The program seeks to enrich the educational experience by introducing students at all levels to research in the geosciences and to decrease obstacles that affect academic success. Both these goals are largely achieved by the formation of integrated high school, undergraduate, and graduate research groups, which also provide fulfilling and successful peer mentorship. The Catalyst Program provides significant financial support to participants to allow them to focus their time on their education. New participants first complete a specially designed course that introduces them to peer-mentoring, collaborative learning, and geological research. Students of all experience levels then become members of research teams, which deepens academic and research skills as well as peer-mentor relationships. The program was highly successful in its inaugural year. To date, undergraduates and graduate students in the program coauthored six abstracts at professional meetings and one conference paper. High-school students gained first hand experience of a college course and geologic research. Perhaps the most important impacts of the program are the close camaraderie that has developed and the increased ability of the Catalyst students to plan and execute research with greater confidence and self-esteem.

  5. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  6. Influences on Faculty Willingness to Mentor Undergraduate Students from Another University as Part of an Interinstitutional Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Danielle X.; Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Institutes of Health invested $31 million in 10 primary institutions across the United States through the Building Undergraduate Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program; one requirement of BUILD is sending undergraduate trainees from those primary institutions to partner institutions for research experiences. Mechanisms like BUILD are designed to broaden research opportunities for students, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined faculty willingness to mentor undergraduates from other institutions through structured training programs. Survey data from 536 faculty members at 13 institutions were collected in Fall 2013 and analyzed using multiple statistical techniques. Results show that faculty who valued the opportunity to increase diversity in the academy and those who believed that mentoring undergraduates benefited their own research expressed greater willingness to serve as research mentors to visiting undergraduates, and faculty who perceived that they did not have the ability to accommodate additional students expressed less willingness to do so. Most respondents viewed student and faculty incentives as motivating factors in their willingness to mentor, but their perspectives on different types of incentives varied based on faculty career stage, discipline, and research funding status. Results have important implications for designing multi-institutional undergraduate research training programs. PMID:27521237

  7. University/NETL Student Partnership Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Holder; Jonathan Mathews; Thomas Wilson; Steven Chuang; Cristina Amon; Turgay Ertekin; Karl Johnson; Goodarz Ahmadi; David Sholl

    2006-10-31

    The University/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Student Partnership Program stimulated basic and applied research in Energy and Environmental Science areas through NETL's Office of Science and Technology (OST). This Partnership Program supported the education of graduate students in Energy and Environmental Sciences, while fostering increased scientific interaction between NETL and the participating universities, by providing graduate student support for research at a NETL facility under the joint supervision of NETL and university faculty. Projects were intended to enhance a previously established scientific or engineering relationship or to create a new relationship. Major areas of research under the Partnership Program included CO{sub 2} sequestration, granular solids flow, multi-phase flow in porous solids, gas hydrates, nanotubes, acid-mine flow identification and remediation, water-gas shift reaction, circulating fluidized beds, slurry bubble column, fuel desulphurization, carbon fibers, and fuel cells.

  8. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  9. Reflections on Commercializing University Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Derek

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extent of commercialization of research in Canadian universities, explains why copyright enforcement is difficult, and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of licensing an innovation versus creating a spinoff company to exploit university discoveries. Explores issues related to sharing benefits of university discoveries. (SLD)

  10. Influences on Faculty Willingness to Mentor Undergraduate Students from Another University as Part of an Interinstitutional Research Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Danielle X; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Institutes of Health invested $31 million in 10 primary institutions across the United States through the Building Undergraduate Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program; one requirement of BUILD is sending undergraduate trainees from those primary institutions to partner institutions for research experiences. Mechanisms like BUILD are designed to broaden research opportunities for students, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined faculty willingness to mentor undergraduates from other institutions through structured training programs. Survey data from 536 faculty members at 13 institutions were collected in Fall 2013 and analyzed using multiple statistical techniques. Results show that faculty who valued the opportunity to increase diversity in the academy and those who believed that mentoring undergraduates benefited their own research expressed greater willingness to serve as research mentors to visiting undergraduates, and faculty who perceived that they did not have the ability to accommodate additional students expressed less willingness to do so. Most respondents viewed student and faculty incentives as motivating factors in their willingness to mentor, but their perspectives on different types of incentives varied based on faculty career stage, discipline, and research funding status. Results have important implications for designing multi-institutional undergraduate research training programs. © 2016 D. X. Morales et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Tuition fees and funding – barriers for non-traditional students? First results from the international research project Opening Universities for Lifelong Learning (OPULL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moissidis, Sonja; Schwarz, Jochen; Yndigegn, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    experts undertaken. The current situation and perspectives in each country together with critical issues on how fees and funding influence higher education access for non-traditional students in these countries are discussed and explored through the interview evidence. The initial findings of the first......Project OPULL – Opening Universities for Lifelong Learning – is undertaking research into ways of opening up higher education to vocationally qualified and experienced target groups in four European countries. Open university models in Germany, Denmark, Finland and the United Kingdom are being...... investigated in three research phases between 2009 and 2012 with the aim of identifying critical success factors for building open universities for Europe. This paper presents the first phase, in which educational systems in the participant countries have been mapped and interviews with lifelong learning...

  12. Contractual Relationships Between Students and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Student personnel administrators recently were told that courts are saying that a legal contractual relationship exists between a student and a university. Edward H. Hammond, vice president for student affairs, Seton Hall University, said that students and universities are "parties to a contract" at a conference on student personnel administration…

  13. Growing an Emerging Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  14. Rock analyzes that could be key in biofuel production: student expands research in Germany: Escuela de Quimica sent to posgraduate student at Leipzig University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'neal Coto, Katzt; Puente Urbina, Allen

    2014-01-01

    University student of posgraduate in chemistry at the Universidad de Costa Rica has done an internship at the Universitat Leipzig, Germany. All the facilities were given to analyze samples of a type of sedimentary rock known as diatomite. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Xenon was used to remove the fatty acids present in vegetable oil or animal fat used in the production of biodiesel [es

  15. Burnout among Finnish and Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernesniemi, Elina; Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati; Cheng, Xuejiao; Hong, Jianzhong; Kuittinen, Matti

    2017-10-01

    In this study the levels of experienced burnout of Finnish and Chinese university students are compared using School Burnout Inventory (SBI). This study is motivated by earlier studies, which suggest that the level of student burnout is different in the culturally distinct Finnish and Chinese university systems, but which are based on different research instruments for the two groups. The sample studied consisted of 3,035 Finnish students and 2,309 Chinese students. Because of the cross-cultural nature of this study the level of structural equivalence of SBI between the cultural groups was examined and the effect of different response styles on the results was taken into account. Both standard and robust statistical methods were used for the analyses. The results showed that SBI with two extracted components is suitable for cross-cultural analysis between Finnish and Chinese university students. Virtually no difference was found in experienced overall burnout between the Finnish and Chinese students, which means that both university systems contain factors causing similar levels of student burnout. This study also verified that controlling for the response styles is important in cross-cultural studies as it was found to have a distinct effect on the results obtained from mean-level comparisons. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. University students' views on the utility of psychiatric advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyett, Anna M; Rooks, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    Rates of serious mental illnesses (SMIs) among university students are increasing, and universities are struggling with how to respond to students who show SMI symptoms. Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) allow individuals, when well, to document their wishes for treatment during a psychiatric crisis. This project explored the feasibility of using PADs in university settings by examining students' views towards PADs. Forty university students with SMIs were recruited for this study from 1 large university. A mixed-methods design was used, with both quantitative survey instruments and qualitative interviews with students. Respondents were positive about PAD utility for students. Respondents saw PADs as beneficial because PADs gave students control over their treatment. However, students also considered PADs potentially problematic because PAD use raised a risk of breaching student privacy and stigmatizing students with SMIs. Although a promising intervention for students with SMI, this approach requires further research.

  17. Psychology students from Leiden University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    We are glad to share with our department that a group of 41 Psychology students from Leiden university, Holland were on a three hours visit to RUC Psychology department on Friday , 10.3.2017. The department is a valuable partner for students’ exchange , almost every semester there are RUC students...... travelling to Leiden. The trip was planned by Study Association Labyrint Leiden, and consisted of students at all levels from the bachelor as well as masters programs. A group of RUC psychology students Wiebke Sandermann; Emma Stinne Engstrøm; Mikkel Brilner Lund were in the organising group along...... with the study director Hans Sønderstrup Hansen and Rashmi Singla. It was an enriching experience for the RUC organizing group. International coordinator for Psychology Dieuwerke de Groot in Leiden reciprocated by writing: “A very enthusiastic mail from our students telling me they had such a wonderful time...

  18. Student Target Marketing Strategies for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewison, Dale M.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2007-01-01

    As colleges and universities adopt marketing orientations to an ever-increasing extent, the relative merits of mass marketing and target marketing must also be explored. Researchers identify buyer types as potential students focused on quality, value or economy. On the other axis, learner types are described as those who focus on career,…

  19. Competencies Required in Education Research and Teaching Systematization according to Students from the Preschool, Primary and Secondary Education Programs of the University of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alberto Segura-Castillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the results of two online forums carried out with the participation of 42 students of the Licenciaturas  in Preschool Education, Primary Education and Secondary Education of the University of Costa Rica. The main purpose of the forums was to determine the insights of the participant students about the competencies they have achieved in the field of education research, and which have been the essential tools for them to systematize their own teaching practices. The discussion forums were part of the course FD5091 Métodos de Investigación Educativa [Education Research Methods] of the School of Teacher Education, delivered from March-April 2010.  Of the sample, 60 percent were students of the Preschool teaching program, 35 percent were from the Primary Education teaching program and 5 percent were from the Secondary Education teaching program in the fields of Science, Mathematics and Social Studies. According to the insights and beliefs showed by the participants –both, the future teachers and the profession practitioners–, there are no opportunities for research or systematization of their own teaching mediation, in the current work situation. (1 Translator’s Note: In Costa Rica, the “Licenciatura” is a one-year post-Bachelor study program, usually including thesis. “Primary Education” refers to students from the 1st to 6th grades, and “Secondary Education” refers to students from the 7th to 11th grades.

  20. How Can We Prevent and Reduce Bullying amongst University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Carrie Anne; Cowie, Helen

    2016-01-01

    While it has long been recognized that bullying occurs at school and in the workplace, recent research confirms that bullying also takes place among university students, including undergraduates, post-graduates and doctoral research students. In the UK, the National Union of Students (NUS) alerted staff and students to the issue in a series of…

  1. University Student Groups and Citizen Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUANITA HENAO-ESCOVAR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some advances of the research project on Practices of the Youth as Citizen Expressions. From the analysis of three university student groups taken from the 20 groups of youths that participate in this mixed method combining ethnographic strategies with narrative and discursive analysis, the article describes the trajectory and the practices of these groups and shows how the students live experiences that ease the development of different citizen expressions and abilities. The conclusions state that the creation, support and agency of these groups in the universities represent a way to encourage the formation of citizens, and some suggestions are presented related to this topic.

  2. University of Maine’s Follow a Researcher™ Program: Using Graduate Student Field Research as a Framework to Incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Practices in the K-12 Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluzienski, Lynn; Hamley, Catherine; Rodda, Charles; Kranich, Gregory; Wilson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Follow a Researcher™ is an innovative University of Maine 4-H program that connects youth with a graduate student who is conducting field research in a remote location. Using technology and social media, K-12 classrooms have an unprecedented opportunity to get to know a student researcher. Youth engage in the research process and witness NGSS Science and Engineering Practices in action.

  3. Research Students' Satisfaction in Jamshoro Education City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagul Huma Lashari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is performed to identify and examine research students? satisfaction in three universities; SU (University of Sindh, MUET (Mehran University of Engineering & Technology and LUMHS (Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences at Jamshoro Education City. Different service factors required for research students are identified and examined by using a triangulation technique (interviews and quantitative (survey questionnaire. Data is analyzed by using descriptive analysis and chi-square test to obtain the required results. In total, 27 service factors related to research students? satisfaction, identified by interviews & literature review have been organized under three clusters: ?University policies?; ?University Services? and ?Role of Supervisor?. The survey analysis revealed that all identified factors are positively related to research students? satisfaction. Result identifies difference in the research students? experiences with respect to their characteristics including (enrolled university, financial resources, employment status. The comparison of different service factors also shows differences in three clusters within the universities. The satisfaction of research students associated with ?role of supervisor? were identified as most satisfying experience in comparison to ?university policies? and ?university services? of Jamshoro Education City. In the end, research has derived a new framework of SDC (Satisfaction for Degree Completion framework to identify and examine the research students satisfaction

  4. Why Study Abroad? Sorting of Chinese Students across British Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebolla-Boado, Héctor; Hu, Yang; Soysal, Yasemin Nuhog¯lu

    2018-01-01

    This research contributes to the booming literature on the mobility of international students in higher education. We analyse university-level factors that affect the sorting of Chinese international students across British universities. We produced a unique data-set merging university-level data from the 2014 UK Higher Education Statistics Agency…

  5. Rates of Student Disciplinary Action in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has been conducted on student misconduct in universities, quantitative data on disciplinary action undertaken by institutions against student transgressions are largely absent from the literature. This paper provides baseline quantitative data on disciplinary action against students in the universities. It is…

  6. University of Mauritius Research Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Mauritius Research Journal is an international, peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, dedicated to make accessible the latest results of researchers from a broad sweep of subject areas. The UOM Research Journal accepts original articles, reviews of existing knowledge, short communications which have not ...

  7. Underrepresented Minority High School and College Students Report STEM-Pipeline Sustaining Gains After Participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salto, Lorena M.; Riggs, Matt L.; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A.; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  8. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M Salto

    Full Text Available An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS and undergraduate (UG student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical

  9. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salto, Lorena M; Riggs, Matt L; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  10. Ethnic Identities of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Özdikmenli-Demir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to understand the relationship between ethnic identity, victimization/witnessing community violence, ethnic discrimination, and aggression in a sample of university students living in the South East Region of Turkey. The participants were 263 university students of predominantly Kurdish ethnic origin. The results showed that males had higher levels of ethnic identity in the dimensions of exploration and commitment. Males also presented higher scores for witnessing community violence and lifetime exposure to ethnic discrimination. The most important predictor of participants’ ethnic identity was witnessing community violence. Participants who witnessed violent acts in their social environment had higher ethnic identity levels. Although the predictor variables could not explain an important part of the participants’ aggression levels, only perceived ethnic discrimination was positively related to aggressive behavior. The role of native language efficiency in ethnic identity is also discussed.

  11. Digital reading practices of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Shirley LÓPEZ GIL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on digital reading. The main objective of the research was to analyze the reading on screens practices of university students and how their practices are guided by professors and institutions of higher education. The research design was mixed and the type of study was descriptive of cross-sectional. The data collection techniques were questionnaire, document analysis and discussion group. ibm spss v.22 was used for statistical treatment of data and Atlas.Ti 7.0 was used for content analysis of qualitative information. The study showed that students usually read on screens, although many of their reading practices have recreational purposes. Students have troubles to find reliable information on the Internet when they have academic pursuits and frequently consult secondary sources. When texts are on screens, students generally scan information and surf from one document to another along hyperlinks. The boundaries between academic and leisure activities are not well defined; multitasking appears frequently. Students indicate there is a little guidance received from their professors or university. These findings show that students are constantly faced with digital reading, but practices do not always allow them to achieve their academic purposes, so it is necessary to strengthen the support offered to them, mainly from the classroom language. 

  12. Leadership Aspects of Hidden Curriculum Students Practice in Nigerian Universities: A Preview of Students' Union Government Contributions in University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emesini, Nnenna Orieoma

    2016-01-01

    The paper examined the leadership aspect of Hidden Curriculum that students practice in Nigerian Universities and their contributions to university governance. Four research questions guided the study and Ex-Post-Facto Method was adopted as the design. Unstructured interviews with staff/students officials cum critical analysis of Students' Union…

  13. Engaging college physics students with photonics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rhys; Chen, Lawrence R.

    2017-08-01

    As educators and researchers in the field of photonics, we find what we do to be very exciting, and sharing this passion and excitement to our university students is natural to us. Via outreach programs and college research funding, a new college and university collaboration has broadened our student audience: photonics is brought into the college classroom and research opportunities are provided to college students. Photonics-themed active learning activities are conducted in the college Waves and Modern Physics class, helping students forge relationships between course content and modern communications technologies. Presentations on photonics research are prepared and presented by the professor and past college student-researchers. The students are then given a full tour of the photonics university laboratories. Furthermore, funds are set aside to give college students a unique opportunity to assist the college professor with experiments during a paid summer research internship.

  14. university students` perception and utilization of technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in. Ethiopia (as a case). The researcher used survey research design and questionnaire (students=298) ... access online learning materials, doing assignments, projects and sharing personal and educational.

  15. Users or Students? Privacy in University MOOCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meg Leta; Regner, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Two terms, student privacy and Massive Open Online Courses, have received a significant amount of attention recently. Both represent interesting sites of change in entrenched structures, one educational and one legal. MOOCs represent something college courses have never been able to provide: universal access. Universities not wanting to miss the MOOC wave have started to build MOOC courses and integrate them into the university system in various ways. However, the design and scale of university MOOCs create tension for privacy laws intended to regulate information practices exercised by educational institutions. Are MOOCs part of the educational institutions these laws and policies aim to regulate? Are MOOC users students whose data are protected by aforementioned laws and policies? Many university researchers and faculty members are asked to participate as designers and instructors in MOOCs but may not know how to approach the issues proposed. While recent scholarship has addressed the disruptive nature of MOOCs, student privacy generally, and data privacy in the K-12 system, we provide an in-depth description and analysis of the MOOC phenomenon and the privacy laws and policies that guide and regulate educational institutions today. We offer privacy case studies of three major MOOC providers active in the market today to reveal inconsistencies among MOOC platform and the level and type of legal uncertainty surrounding them. Finally, we provide a list of organizational questions to pose internally to navigate the uncertainty presented to university MOOC teams.

  16. "What Today's University Students Have Taught Us”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Head

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, more students in the US are attending university than ever before. An unprecedented number of these students were born digital—meaning digital technologies have been a constant feature in their lives. For these young adults, information literacy competencies are always being formed, practiced, and learned. Project Information Literacy (PIL is a series of ongoing quantitative and qualitative research studies in the US that investigates what it is like to be a university student in the digital age. This research study has investigated how students find information and conduct research—in their words and through their experiences—for coursework, use in their everyday lives, and, once they graduate, in the workplace and their communities. Since 2008, more than 11,000 university students at nearly 60 US higher education institutions have been surveyed or interviewed, making PIL the largest study of information literacy ever conducted. Results from PIL’s studies have concluded students’ information competencies are put to the test in the vast information landscape they inhabit. Furthermore, finding and using information is exponentially more complex than it was a generation ago, especially since the information landscape has shifted from one of scarce resources to one of overload. In this keynote, five research takeaways were presented from PIL’s eight studies: (1 Students find research more difficult than ever before, (2 getting started is the hardest part of research, (3 frustrations begin with finding context, i.e., big picture, information-gathering, language, and situational context, (4 search strategies are based on predictability, familiarity, and efficiency, and (5 evaluation is the one information skills most learn to use. Discussion included implications of these findings for teaching, learning, work, and librarianship in the 21st century.

  17. Princeton University Materials Academy for underrepresented students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Daniel; Rodriguez Martinez, Sara; Cody, Linda

    Summer 2016 gave underrepresented high school students from Trenton New Jersey the opportunity to learn materials science, sustainability and the physics and chemistry of energy storage from Princeton University professors. New efforts to place this curriculum online so that teachers across the United States can teach materials science as a tool to teach ``real'' interdisciplinary science and meet the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The Princeton University Materials Academy (PUMA) is an education outreach program for underrepresented high school students. It is part of the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (PCCM), a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Materials Research Engineering and Science Center (MRSEC). PUMA has been serving the community of Trenton New Jersey which is only eight miles from the Princeton University campus. We reached over 250 students from 2003-2016 with many students repeating for multiple years. 100% of our PUMA students have graduated high school and 98% have gone on for college. This is compared with overall Trenton district graduation rate of 48% and a free and reduced lunch of 83%. We discuss initiatives to share the curriculum online to enhance the reach of PCCM' PUMA and to help teachers use materials science to meet NGSS and give their students opportunities to learn interdisciplinary science. MRSEC, NSF (DMR-1420541).

  18. "I Think Autism Is Like Running on Windows While Everyone Else Is a Mac": Using a Participatory Action Research Approach with Students on the Autistic Spectrum to Rearticulate Autism and the Lived Experience of University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jonathan; Potts, Megan; Fletcher, Daniel; Hodges, Simon; Howells, Jenny; Mitchell, Alex; Mallon, Brett; Ledger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This co-authored article outlines the research process and key findings from the Stratus Writers Project, a participatory action research project with a group of seven students on the autistic spectrum at a university in the North of England. The project explores their experiences of university through critical autobiographies and offers unique…

  19. Energy engineering: Student-researcher collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leban, Krisztina Monika; Ritchie, Ewen; Beckowska, Patrycja Maria

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on cooperation methods between researchers and students at different levels. Levels included in this work are BSc, MSc and PhD student levels. At Aalborg University, Department of Energy Technology education and research are closely linked. The relationship between student......-student; student-researcher and researcher -researcher is analyzed. The problems of work division, synchronization, transportation, storing and dissemination are disused. The importance of a proper work method and collaboration between researchers at different levels is underlined. As a case study, a research...

  20. Students Union, University Administration and Political Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... peculiarity of university students as elites in training, as well as a trajectory of students' union activities in university administration and political development around the world, this paper asserts, resting on the reciprocal determinism of the social learning theory, that students union makes university administration smooth.

  1. Nutritional knowledge assessment of syrian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louay Labban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that affect nutritional status and nutritional habits of individuals, families, and societies. Nutrition knowledge is an important tool in assessing the nutritional status of an individual, group or community. Researchers have been trying to design and develop reliable and valid questionnaires that distinguish and measure nutrition knowledge and its impact on dietary behavior and diet-health awareness. Many studies have shown that nutrition knowledge can affect someone to follow dietary recommendations. The aim of this study was to assess the nutrition knowledge of Syrian university students and to find out if there was any relationship between anthropometric measurements, socioeconomic status, type of university and nutrition knowledge of the students. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using valid nutrition knowledge questionnaire, which covered six main sections. The questionnaire was designed for this study and was adapted from Parameter and Wardle. The number of students participated in the study was 998 students and were selected from four universities in Syria. They were asked to complete the nutrition knowledge questionnaire under supervision of trained nutritionist. Anthropometric measurements were taken for all participants by trained professional. The results were statistically analyzed and P 30 had the highest points in TNK. Females had higher TNK score as compared with males. Furthermore, students enrolled in the private university and in health-related programs showed typically better TNK scores than those enrolled in public universities and in nonhealth-related programs. The highest TNK score based on BMI was found among students with BMI >30. The results support the likely value of including nutrition knowledge as a target for health education campaigns aimed at promoting healthy eating.

  2. Learning Orientations of IT Higher Education Students in UAE University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qirim, Nabeel; Tarhini, Ali; Rouibah, Kamel; Mohamd, Serhani; Yammahi, Aishah Rashid; Yammahi, Maraim Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    This research examines the learning preferences of students in UAE University (UAEU). The uniqueness of this research emanates from the fact that no prior research examined this area from the UAE's perspective. Thus, this research embarks on the fact that student learning strategies vary from one country to another due to many factors. This…

  3. Key Relationships for International Student University-to-Work Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadiuk, Natalee Elizabeth; Arthur, Nancy Marie

    2014-01-01

    International student research predominantly focuses on the initial and middle stages of their sojourn. Our research, however, specifically addresses how relationships support international students to successfully navigate the late-stage transition from university to work. In this qualitative study, we interviewed 18 international students from…

  4. The Power of Paradigms: A Discussion of the Absence of Bullying Research in the Context of the University Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleyshaw, Liz

    2010-01-01

    The literature on bullying is vast and this social phenomenon has been studied in depth in relation to schooling and the workplace. Between school and workplace lies higher education (HE), but there is a marked absence of published work regarding undergraduate student-to-student bullying in this setting. This theoretical paper explores possible…

  5. Using social network analysis to examine collaborative relationships among PhD and DNP students and faculty in a research-intensive university school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Yoon, Sunmoo; Larson, Elaine; Honig, Judy; Reame, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The nursing profession has seen a dramatic rise in the number of schools offering both DNP and PhD nursing programs. Information is limited on the impact of this parallel approach in doctoral education on the quality and scope of scholarly interactions or institutional culture.The authors studied collaboration characteristics across the DNP and PhD programs of a research-intensive university school of nursing, before and after programmatic enhancements. An IRB-approved online survey was delivered to faculty and students of both programs at baseline and one year after curricular changes. Response rates were 70% and 74%, respectively. The responses were analyzed by using social network analysis and descriptive statistics to characterize the number and strength of connections between and within student groups, and between students and faculty. At baseline, the flow of communication was centralized primarily through faculty. At Time 2, density of links between students increased and network centralization decreased, suggesting more distributed communication. This nonlinear quantitative approach may be a useful addition to the evaluation strategies for doctoral education initiatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on training model of the optoelectronic major university student's innovative ability under the guidance of TRIZ theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Xiao, Wenbo; Yan, Chao; Wan, Shengpeng; He, Xingdao; Jones, S. Gregory; Schmidt, Titania A. R.; Suzuki, Kenneth M.

    2017-08-01

    With the rapid development of optoelectronic technology, it is more and more difficult for the students to grasp the related knowledge, and to have innovative thinking and innovative ability. The reason is that the students can't understand that knowledge easily; In addition, the students find it is hard to find innovative projects to enhance themselves. This paper summarizes a teaching approach to impart innovative knowledge. The following is: help students to establish the following thinking, "according to the difficulties encountered in photovoltaic technology, identify and find the key problem, -> converted into the standard TRIZ problem →find their own solutions. The results show that this approach plays an important role in cultivating students' creative thinking.

  7. Survey on Consumption Behaviour of Energy Drink Among University Students: Example of Afyon Kocatepe University

    OpenAIRE

    Levent Şen; Hurşit Ertuğrul Dere; İlknur Koçak Şen

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the consumption behaviour and consumption awareness of energy drink among university students. Data were collected from 750 students in Afyon Kocatepe University by questionnaire which is improved by writers of this article. Tests were done with SPSS end of the research. Chi-square tests were done in %95 confidence interval to determine the relation of consumption and awareness of energy drink among the university students with gender, age ra...

  8. Professional and pre-professional pharmacy students' perceptions of team based learning (TBL) at a private research-intensive university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle M; Khalil, Karen; Iskaros, Olivia; Van Amburgh, Jenny A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmacy students need to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills as well as be a valuable team member. The use of team based learning (TBL) fosters effective team collaboration, enables continuous active and self-directed learning, and requires both individual and team accountability. The purpose was to evaluate pharmacy students' perceptions and experiences related to TBL in different years of the pharmacy curriculum. Two classes, Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy (intro), a required course, and Self-Care/Non-Prescription Medications (self-care), an elective course, utilize the TBL approach. Students enrolled in both courses were recruited to complete a validated questionnaire during the last class. There was 100% participation; the majority of students, regardless of course, expressed positive attitudes towards TBL. Variations, relevance of TBL activities and the use of TBL as a learning strategy, between the required intro class and the elective self-care class were observed using a Mann-Whitney U test (peffectiveness. It's important to consider the differences in professional development in these students and how this may impact their perceptions of TBL. TBL imparts more responsibility and accountability on the individual student allowing for the development of self-directed learners. Students, regardless of their year, found TBL to be an effective learning strategy. Third professional year (P3) pharmacy students further along in the curriculum are more accepting of TBL and are better able to appreciate the benefits of active and self-directed learning as well as working within a team. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Secondary school students' engagement profiles and their relationship with academic adjustment and achievement in university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Els C.M.; Jansen, Ellen P.W.A.; van de Grift, Wim J.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to distinguish secondary school students according to characteristics that contribute to success in university represents important knowledge in the research areas of university preparedness and student success in higher education. This study identified five secondary school student

  10. RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES IN MALAYSIA: WHAT BEHOLDS?

    OpenAIRE

    Nooraini Mohamad Sheriff; Noordini Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    The National Higher Education Strategic Plan Beyond 2020 aims at further strengthening Malaysian research universities and envisions that two Malaysian universities will be among the Top 100 world universities. To date there are 5 research universities in Malaysia, namely University of Malaya (UM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) being the latest addition. These res...

  11. Arab Students in a Hebrew University--Existing but Unnoticed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Rabah

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on ways in which Arab students cope with challenges of integrating into the academic life of a Hebrew university in Israel. From this research we can learn that the students face considerable hardships during their university studies. Some of these hardships derive from language barriers. In addition, findings show that the…

  12. Prediction of Problematic Internet Use by Attachment in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Hatice Irem Ozteke; Kesici, Sahin; Buyukbayraktar, Cagla Girgin; Yalcin, S. Barbaros

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this research is to examine the predictive power of attachment style on problematic internet use among university students. Participants of study consist of 481 university students (230 girls). Results indicate that there is a negative correlation between secure attachment style and social benefit/social comfort and there is a positive…

  13. Student's perception of examination malpractices in the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined student's perception of examination malpractices in the University of Ado – Ekiti, Ekiti State. A total number of 360 students randomly selected from eight faculties of the University were used as research subjects. The subjects were exposed to “Examination Malpractices Questionnaire” (EMQ) consisting ...

  14. Taiwanese University Students' Perspectives on Experiential Learning and Psychosocial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-Nii; Lai, Pi-Hui; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yueh-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This study described the relations of experiential learning and psychosocial development of Taiwanese university students through the qualitative method of phenomenology. Thirty-six students, age ranged from 19 to 25 years, from three research-oriented universities in northern Taiwan were interviewed. Seven themes were delineated: (1) discovering…

  15. Eating disorders among university student-athletes | Van Zyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disorders among athletes is an alarming issue, much deserving of the interest it has enthused among researchers. Therefore this study was conducted to contribute to the understanding and awareness of eating disorders among university student-athletes. A purposive sample of university student-athletes at two ...

  16. Nutritional habits in Italian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleman, Adele Anna; de Waure, Chiara; Soffiani, Valentina; Poscia, Andrea; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Dietary habits have been indicated by research as key elements in both disease pathogenesis and prevention and health promotion. We analyzed data collected from Italian university students regarding consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast-foods, sweets, energizing drinks, and coffee, average number of eating episodes per day and regularity of breakfast habits. 44% of the university student population eats in average at least 1 portion of fruit per day. 22.5% eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. 8.5% eats in average 5 times per day with 48.6% declaring an average of 3 eating episodes per day. 11.3% consumes eccessive amounts of caffeine. 49.1% of the females reaches the recommended consumption of fruit, compared to only 33.8% of males (p portions of vegetables per day, compared to 12.0% of males (p portion of fruit per day and less than 1 out of 4 eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. Less than 10% of the students eats in average 5 times per day and more than 1 out of 3 does not have breakfast regularly every morning. Interventions targeting university students are required in order to increase their knowledge on healthy eating habits and to ameliorate their dietary behaviours.

  17. Binge drinking among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Ferreira Carioca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the consumption of alcoholic beverages by college students, with an emphasis on practicing alcoholic binge. Methods: We selected randomly 102 students enrolled in different courses at a public university located in the city of Fortaleza. Alcohol consumption and socioeconomic data were investigated with a form. We evaluated both alcohol abuse by transforming the intake in grams of ethanol, such as the presence of alcoholic binge. The statistical package SPSS version 16.0 was used as an operational tool for data analysis, adopting p <0.05 significance level. Results: From the students assessed, 52 (51% were male and 50 (49% were female with a mean age of 21.9 ± 1.9 years. The prevalence of alcohol consumption was 29.4% (n = 30. The binge was observed in 64.7% (n = 11 of men and 46.2% (n = 6 women. The average ethanol intake on each occasion of consumption was 125.4 ± 92g for men and 61.5 ± 42.3 g of ethanol among women, with statistical difference (p = 0.008. Conclusions: The prevalence of alcohol consumption was low, although the binge has been high, especially among men, putting the group at risk to health, demanding the realization of educational activities.

  18. Homesickness and adjustment in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Christopher A; Walton, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    The transition to college or university can be an exciting new experience for many young adults. For some, intense homesickness can make this move difficult, even unsustainable. Homesickness--defined as the distress or impairment caused by an actual or anticipated separation from home--carries the unique hallmark of preoccupying thoughts of home and attachment objects. Sufferers typically report depression and anxiety, withdrawn behavior, and difficulty focusing on topics unrelated to home. For domestic and international university students, intense homesickness is particularly problematic. It can exacerbate preexisting mood and anxiety disorders, precipitate new mental and physical health problems, and sometimes lead to withdrawal from school. New research, consolidated here for the first time, points to promising prevention and treatment strategies for homesick students, the result of which can be a healthy, gratifying, and productive educational experience.

  19. Student Research Projects Inhibiting Factors from the Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Nikrooz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Identifying the research barriers and assess the ability of students to use the university services and facilities is crucial to promote research activities. Present study was carried out to determine the inhibiting factors influencing the student's research projects from the view point of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students in 2008. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 96 students of Yasuj Medical University were selected by stratified random sampling. The data were collected by validate & reliable questionnaire, containing demographic information, inhibiting factors related to students (personal and organization. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores against the personal barriers and the organizational barriers questions were 43.23±12.96 and 62.58±12.08 respectively. There was a significant difference between personal and organizational barriers (P<0.001 and personal barriers were more important. According to the results, the student's inadequate skills & knowledge of research methodology and lack of awareness of research topics were the most prevalent personal barriers. The most prevalent organizational barriers were unavailability of research consulters, inadequate research skills of consulter, insufficient facilities & equipment and lack of motivating staff & faculties. Other variables such as gender, subject of study and research experience are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: This study showed that the personal barriers were more important than organizational barriers which interfere with the student's research projects. This can be corrected and controlled by teachers, faculty members, university officials and students, themselves.

  20. University Students' Attitudes toward Physical Education Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjuan; Chen, Junjun; Baker, Miles

    2014-01-01

    While there have been many studies into students' attitudes toward Physical Education at the school level, far fewer studies have been conducted at the university level, especially in China. This study explored 949 students' attitudes toward their university Physical Education experiences in four Chinese universities. An intercorrelated model of…

  1. Academic Adjustment Issues in a Malaysian Research University: The Case of Cambodian, Laotian, Burmese, and Vietnamese Postgraduate Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Rany; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md; Bin Jamil, Hazri; Souriyavongsa, Thongma; Quyen, Le To Do

    2013-01-01

    The Malaysian government aims to help the bottom billion countries, which are its neighbouring countries in the South East Asian region, for their human capital development through providing university postgraduate scholarship projects. Those countries include Cambodia, Laos PDR, Burma or Myanmar, and Vietnam (CLMV), which are favourite countries…

  2. International Students' Perceptions of University Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cody J.; Lausch, David W.; Weatherford, Jenny; Goeken, Ryan; Almendares, Maria

    2017-01-01

    International students provide economic, cultural, and academic benefits to universities throughout the nation. However, many international students lack the support necessary to be successful and satisfied with their education. In order to determine international students' perceptions of their university experience, an online survey was emailed…

  3. Nutritional habits in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Anna Teleman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dietary habits have been indicated by research as key elements in both disease pathogenesis and prevention and health promotion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed data collected from Italian university students regarding consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast-foods, sweets, energizing drinks, and coffee, average number of eating episodes per day and regularity of breakfast habits. RESULTS: 44% of the university student population eats in average at least 1 portion of fruit per day. 22.5% eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. 8.5% eats in average 5 times per day with 48.6% declaring an average of 3 eating episodes per day. 11.3% consumes eccessive amounts of caffeine. 49.1% of the females reaches the recommended consumption of fruit, compared to only 33.8% of males (p < 0.05. 27.7% of females eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day, compared to 12.0% of males (p < 0.05. Eccessive coffee drinkers pass from 8.9% in the 18-21 age group to 16% in the 25-30 year old age group (p < 0.05. DISCUSSION: This study showed that the eating habits of young adults do not follow national recommendations. Less than 50% of university students eats at least 1 portion of fruit per day and less than 1 out of 4 eats at least 2 portions of vegetables per day. Less than 10% of the students eats in average 5 times per day and more than 1 out of 3 does not have breakfast regularly every morning. CONCLUSION: Interventions targeting university students are required in order to increase their knowledge on healthy eating habits and to ameliorate their dietary behaviours.

  4. An Exploration of the Instructional Practices of Former University Elementary Education Students: Are Research-Based Practices for Teaching Reading Being Implemented in Their Elementary Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covault, Jacquelyn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the instructional reading practices of four elementary teachers, all graduates of a small branch campus of a large Midwestern University, who obtained their Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education and have been employed in public elementary schools for nearly three years. The four individuals were former university students of…

  5. A Conceptual and Procedural Research on the Hierarchical Structure of Mathematics Emerging in the Minds of University Students: An Example of Limit-Continuity-Integral-Derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Arif; Çetin, Ömer Faruk; Bas, Fatih; Sagirli, Meryem Özturan

    2016-01-01

    In this present study, it was aimed to investigate whether the hierarchical structure of mathematics emerged in university students' minds or not, considering the concepts of limit, continuity derivative and integral from the perspective of students in the department of secondary school mathematics teacher training and the department of…

  6. From East to West: A Phenomenological Study of Indonesian Graduate Students' Experiences on the Acculturation Process at an American Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukminin, Amirul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry was to describe and understand the lived experiences of the acculturative process of the Indonesian graduate students at an American public university. The primary focus here was on better understanding how some events or changes become sources of difficulties, problems, or culture shock in Indonesian graduate students'…

  7. Actions and Achievements of Self-Regulated Learning in Personal Environments. Research on Students Participating in the Graduate Program in Preschool Education at the University of Granada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Barboza, Eduardo; Trujillo-Torres, Juan Manuel; López-Núñez, Juan Antonio; Sola-Martínez, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    This paper is intended to study the self-regulated learning (SRL) process in personal learning environments (PLEs) among students participating in the Graduate Program for Preschool Education at the University of Granada (Spain). The study is focused on self-regulatory actions carried out by students, and on their self-regulated learning…

  8. International Students' Networks: A Case Study in a UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Nashrawan; Cox, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The great influx of international students into UK universities has led to internationalisation becoming an important issue. Previous studies have focused on the integration of home and international students, illustrating a lack of intercultural interaction. Yet there has been a lack of research investigating international students' networks and…

  9. Stress level and academic performance of university students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the relationship between level of stress and students' academic performance in Universities in Kwara State, Nigeria. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. Proportional stratified random sampling was used to select 300 students for the study. A “Students' Stress Level Questionnaire ...

  10. Student Leadership in Selected Public Universities in Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rates by female students and tribalism/regionalism. This study observed the transformative nature of student leadership compared to what it was two decades ago and encouraged that student leadership is an integral component of modern university management. African Research Review Vol. 2 (3) 2008: pp. 195-221 ...

  11. Career Appearance Perceptions of Selected University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, Sarah; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Investigates perceptions of importance of appearance in job acquisition, retention and promotion among 498 university students. Focuses specifically on the relations between career appearance perceptions and demographic characteristics, university statuses, and current and projected employment situations. (Author/CM)

  12. Undergraduate Research as Engaged Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lorraine W.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter discusses the impact of undergraduate research as a form of engaged student learning. It summarizes the gains reported in post-fellowship assessment essays acquired from students participating in the Auburn University Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program. The chapter also discusses the program's efforts to increase opportunities…

  13. Visiting summer students enhance research skills

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Seven undergraduate students from universities across the nation and one from Virginia Tech are working side by side with Virginia Tech professors this summer on research projects related to sustainable management of resources.

  14. A Study of Internet Addiction and Depression among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Suhail Ahmad Bhat; Muzafar Hussain Kawa

    2015-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to assess internet addiction and depression among university students. The sample in the study consisted of one hundred thirty university students out of which 70 were males and 60 were females who were selected on the purposive basis from the main campus of Kashmir University. Young's Internet Addiction Scale (IAT), Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II 1996) and Demographic Data sheet were used to collect research data from informants. The obtained data were an...

  15. International Student Support Services at Ontario Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clayton; Whiteside, Brenda; Blanchard, Suzanne; Martin, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the Ontario Committee on Student Affairs and the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance partnered to examine the availability and use of international student support services at Ontario universities. Results of the recently administered Ontario Committee on Student Affairs, Canadian Bureau of International Education, and…

  16. Abortion Attitudes Among University Students in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardis, Panos D.

    This report hypothesized that Indian university students approve of abortion, that religiosity neutralizes the influence of education in abortion attitudes, and that Indian students are more liberal in their attitudes on abortion than American Catholic students. To test these hypotheses, the author collected data from 150 students from two…

  17. General view of university students “Marmara University Vocational School of Health Services Case”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akyurt Nuran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the attitude towards the socio-economic conditions and demographic characteristics and the university life of medical students. To determine the students’ sociodemographic characteristics “Personal Information Form” was used developed by researchers according to literature. The form contains expressions of the students such as the economic situation, future concerns, finding a job, university life, social & recreational activities, build up relationships with people and parents education level. Target group of the study were 349 students from Marmara University Vocational School of health. The environment of the survey was limited to the students studying in all programs at Marmara University Vocational School of Health. The research was carried out with students at Marmara University Vocational School of Health in the fall semester of 2014-2015.

  18. The Psychological Contract of Science Students: Social Exchange with Universities and University Staff from the Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Paddy; Prince, Nike

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been undertaken involving the student experience and depicting undergraduate students as consumers of education. This construction of the relationship between students and universities is based primarily on notions of economic exchange. In this paper, using the construct of the psychological contract, we show that social…

  19. The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project: Results of a Summer High-School Student, Teacher, University Scientist Partnership Using a Capstone Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Duane F.; Snow, Gregory R.; Claes, Daniel R.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports results from evaluation of the Cosmic Ray Observatory Project (CROP), a student, teacher, scientist partnership to engage high-school students and teachers in school based cosmic ray research. Specifically, this study examined whether an intensive summer workshop experience could effectively prepare teacher—student teams to engage in cutting edge high-energy physics research. Results showed that teachers and students could acquire enough knowledge about cosmic ray physics and self-efficacy for conducting cosmic ray research during a summer workshop to be full participants in an SSP conducting research in their schools, and a capstone anchoring approach using an authentic research activity was effective for motivating student engagement in didactic classroom learning. CROP demonstrated "proof of concept" that setting up cosmic ray detector arrays in schools run by teachers and students was feasible, but found that set-up and operation in a high-school was technically difficult.

  20. University Students` Perception and Utilization of Technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technology utilization can be described as the application of information and communication technology to teaching and learning. This paper examines university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in Ethiopia (as a case). The researcher used survey research design and ...

  1. Trend of newspaper consultation by students of federal University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research investigated the trend of Newspaper consultation by the students of Federal University of Technology, Owerri. Survey research design was adopted for this Study. Data was obtained from the University Library's Records of users' statistics for Newspaper consultation for ten years, 2004-2013. Questionnaire was ...

  2. Inter-Cultural Communication in Student Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    This article describes a project undertaken at the University of Southern Denmark designed to support active group work and inter-cultural communication between international students. The project is based on using group work and cooperative learning principles to do student research, therefore...... challenging the students to solve problems as a group. The main aim of the research is to investigate the possible effects of using integrated student research and group work using cooperative learning methods to develop international communication skills of students in multi-cultural higher education courses....

  3. The Establishment of an Organic Farmers’ Market as a Training Case Study and Research for Graduate Students of Organic Agriculture at the University of Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Schifani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  Despite the modest regional consumption of organic products, Sicily is one of the most important European regions in surface area per number of companies active in organic farming. The University of Palermo, as early as 2000, to promote the development and success in this industry, the Faculty of Agriculture, introduced two major degree programs in "Organic Farming". The objective of these courses is to train graduates who are technically capable of supporting the organic farmers market, to promote and facilitate the expansion of the consumption of organic products, and to create employment opportunities for young graduates. At the end of 2009, in the area of these activities, a training and research program involved numerous students in the creation of an "joint consumption" association whose purpose is the expansion of the consumption of organic products through the enhancement of a direct relationship with small organic farms who would be unlikely to penetrate large markets, or have relationships with large distribution networks.The project aims to assess the ability of the students of the Faculty to transmit the knowledge acquired in the program, and to investigate the relative issues regarding the new phenomenon emerging in recent years in Italy, represented by the spread of various forms of ethically-conscious consumption groups called "Gruppi di Acquisto Solidale (GAS" or Solidarity Purchase Groups.

  4. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise N. Burgoyne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a gauge students’ awareness of research activities, (b compare students’ perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c determine students’ motivation for research and (d obtain students’ personal views on doing research. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N=317 completed a research skills questionnaire developed by the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Applied Undergraduate Research Skills (CETL-AURS at Reading University. The questionnaire assessed students’ transferable skills, research-specific skills (e.g., study design, data collection and data analysis, research experience and attitude and motivation towards doing research. Results: The majority of students are motivated to pursue research. Graduate entrants and male students appear to be the most confident regarding their research skills competencies. Although all students recognise the role of research in medical practice, many are unaware of the medical research activities or successes within their university. Of those who report no interest in a career incorporating research, a common perception was that researchers are isolated from patients and clinical practice. Discussion: Students have a narrow definition of research and what it entails. An explanation for why research competence does not align more closely with research motivation is derived from students’ lack of understanding of the concept of translational research, as well as a lack of awareness of the research activity being undertaken by their teachers and mentors. We plan to address this with specific research awareness initiatives.

  5. Research project at Nagoya University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Nakai, N.; Nakano, E.

    1981-01-01

    We will have a dedicated facility from General Ionex Corporation at the Radioisotope Center of Nagoya Univeriy in 1981 FY. The building to install the machine was already completed in March 1981. We have held meetings of potential users of the facility and various research proposals have been presented by the participants from many departments of the university. The present research project at Nagoya is mainly devoted to the development of radiocarbon dating by the accelerator mass spectrometry, in which most of the users are interested. There are many archeological and geological samples in Japan which have too little carbon compounds for analysis by conventional radioactivity measurements. Concentrations of 14 C in these samples can be determined by the new technique. Some of the proposals connected with radiocarbon measurements are discussed

  6. Psychosocial correlates of Internet addiction among Jordanian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2015-04-01

    Internet addiction is a significant international mental health problem among university students. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the correlation of Internet addiction with university students' characteristics in Jordan using a descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design. The Internet Addiction Test, Beck Depression Inventory, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were administered to a random sample of 587 undergraduate university students. The findings demonstrated that university year level, student age, depression, and family support were significant correlates of Internet addiction. The current study should raise awareness in nurses and other health care providers that Internet addiction is a potential mental health problem for this student population. The findings from the current study will help develop appropriate interventions for these students and inform future research. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Internet Censorship in Turkey: University Students' Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hasan; Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study university students' opinions toward online censorship with references to their socio-political and economic variables. Considering the upwards trend and the increasing number of online restrictions in Turkey, the opinions of university students (n=138) are thought to give significant findings. The questionnaire…

  8. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  9. University Students' Intentions to Report Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozencroft, Kelly; Campbell, Marilyn; Orel, Alexandria; Kimpton, Melanie; Leong, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and less about whether they utilise anti-bullying policies. However, failure to report cyberbullying incidents to authorities would lessen the efficacy of these policies. This study investigated the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and their…

  10. Various Portraits of Finnish Open University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Arto; Nori, Hanna; Alho-Malmelin, Marika

    2007-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the background and goals of students at the Finnish open university in the beginning of the twenty-first century. The material consists of statistics based on the student records of the Finnish open university in 2000 (n = 9080) and of the stories, educational autobiographies written by the adult learners (n =…

  11. Multiple Intelligences of Students at Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataybeh, Abdalla; Al-Sheikh, Kholoud

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating different intelligence types among Jordanian students at different public and private universities in Jordan. To achieve such aim, it sought to identify and rank multiple intelligences that characterize students at Jordanian universities, and to identify and rank the differences in multiple intelligences…

  12. Are Our Students Prepared for University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    The A-level curricula are not preparing students for a university education, concentrating more on knowledge than skills. However, because of aspects such as the modular design of A-levels, subject knowledge can also be lacking in students as they enter university education. Diagnostic tests in maths and literacy for first year bioscience…

  13. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  14. Exemplary Chinese University Professors: Qualities and Impact on Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene P. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the qualities of Chinese university professors as perceived by their students and the effects of those qualities on student learning and motivation. Specifically, what qualities and personal characteristics do Chinese university students attribute to their favorite and least favorite professors, and how do those qualities and characteristics affect Chinese university students? Out of 280 students surveyed from three different universities, 226 surveys were completed, returned and included in the final analysis (response rate of 80.7%. The research found that Chinese students favored professors who are entertaining, who help them learn more and who provide them with helpful feedback on their assignments. Students disfavor professors who are boring, arrogant and do not provide helpful feedback or help them learn more. Linear regressions revealed a connection between high quality professors and student learning and motivation. Along with other studies, this research provides evidence that effective university professors are those who not only possess expertise in their fields, but in addition are engaging, student-focused and able to build rapport with their students.

  15. Popularity of the internet with university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Szpringer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Virtual reality constitutes an exceptional chance to support personal development, but it also creates new barriers and inequalities and it brings about many threats, both to the person and to society in general. Besides the indubitable advantages of the Internet, it more and more often endangers the harmonious development of a person. Virtual reality puts users in a situation in which interaction and communication is conducted differently to what they are used to based on their everyday experience. Aim of the research: The aim of the research was an analysis of the Internet’s popularity among university students. The method that was used was a diagnostic survey, carried out using questionnaires, which were the tools used to achieve the goal. Chosen results of the research, essential from the point of view of the formulated problem, were presented in the project. The research issue is encapsulated in the question: How popular is the Internet among university students? Material and methods: Empirical research was conducted in the academic year 2010/2011 at universities in the Świętokrzyskie province. A total of 950 students attending medical majors (nursing, physiotherapy, medical rescue, pedagogical majors (social rehabilitation, integrated pre-school and early education, pedagogy with logopaedics and technical majors (mechatronics, construction took part in the research. Results: More than 50% of the people that took part in the research were between 20 and 25 years of age. Over 33% of them were aged between 26 and 30. More than 87% of the participants used the Internet, 88% of the respondents had created a Facebook account, 81% of the students logged into the Nasza Klasa website and over 76% of them admitted to frequent use of scientific information found in the Internet. More than 55% of them benefited from psychological counselling via the Internet. In the presented research 75% of the students used the GG (Gadu

  16. Association of African Universities : Education and Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Association of African Universities : Education and Research Networking Unit. The Association of African Universities (AAU), headquartered in Accra, Ghana, is an international nongovernmental organization (NGO) that promotes cooperation between African universities and with the international community.

  17. Optimising Tertiary Student Accommodation within University Neighbourhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Ike, Nnenna; Baldwin, Claudia; Lathouras, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Tertiary students’ activities within neighbourhoods adjacent to universities engender positive and negative impacts that have consequences for neighbourhood sustainability. This might lead to studentification, a process that triggers physical, economic and socio-cultural transformation of university towns. Where non-student residents perceive negative impacts, it can lead to conflict and resentment towards the student population, mistrust between student and local resident groups and a decrea...

  18. University Students' Perceptions of Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, James F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the perceptions of American and international students on conflict resolution, and to determine if the students were willing to participate in conflict resolution. A survey was given to 226 students at an eastern university that asked them to identify a major international conflict and whether they felt…

  19. Depression and Anxiety in University Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wristen, Brenda G.

    2013-01-01

    Performance anxiety among musicians and music students has been widely addressed, but far less attention has been given to examining the rates and characteristics of broader mental distress in this population. This study examined depression and anxiety in music students at one university. A considerable number of students reported symptoms…

  20. The Survey of Jimma University Students Problems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Key Words: Economic problems, Social problems, Psychological problems, Academic problems, students. INTRODUCTION .... Reasons given by students for poor academic performance, Jimma University,. June 2002. Reasons. No of Students (%) ... sleep and other similar conditions - in 58. (41.0%), memory problem in 56 ...

  1. MENTAL HEALTH AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    Woodgate, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    We want to learn from university students about your experiences and perspectives on mental health and well-being in the context of being a student. Your input can help us develop evidence-based intervention programs that can help address the mental health needs of students. This survey should take 15-20 minutes to complete.

  2. University Student Attitudes and Behavior Toward Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Joseph L.; Sedlacek, William E.

    To investigate incidence and frequency of use of 8 drugs ranging from marijuana to LSD to heroin, 2 anonymous polls were administered to 2,141 incoming freshmen and returning students at the University of Maryland during the summer and fall of 1971. Students' reasons for using and not using drugs, students' attitudes toward legalizing, using, and…

  3. Gender Constructions and Legitimacy among University Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    Through empirical studies of students’ project groups at university level, I have identified a complex pattern of inclusion and exclusion processes going on among the students. First, there are the processes that relate to the other students' skills. Here, I found that the students are very obser...

  4. University Students' Giftedness Diagnosis and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narikbaeva, Lora M.

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the problem of students' giftedness development. Students' test results (n = 851) for "IQ level" and "creativity level" indicators demonstrated the need to improve the quality of work in reference to students' professional giftedness development at the university. Designed complex of pedagogical…

  5. Perceptions of acceptable conducts by university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Nazaré Marques

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Academic misconducts were mainly considered more acceptable than professional misconducts. Our results show that perceptions of acceptable conducts amongst optometry students are not very different from other students, and, against our initial prediction, do not show a general change in misconduct perception when students become more mature. Universities should pay more attention to this problem and take action.

  6. Together with Research Centers and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Domingos Garrido

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Journal Motricidade has always been walking in parallel with the scientific communities. We found that the affiliation of most authors has, nearly always, a University (Uni or a Research Center (RC. In fact it is almost impossible to conduct research outside these two universes. In this sense, Uni and RC feed the most, if not all, of scientific journals worldwide. By this I mean that is in the interest of Motricidade to be associated with high-quality RC and Uni equally recognized. With regard to RC, Motricidade will publish this year a supplement of the International Congress of Research Centre in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development (CIDESD. This RC has conducted research in a variety of areas within the Sport Sciences and Health and always with high recognition and associated publications. It was not by chance that this RC was evaluated with ‘very good’ by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT panel and has been granted funding. This Congress, which takes place every two years, targets to converge research and high level practices within these three areas: Sports, Health and Human Development. The 2016 CIDESD edition is dedicated to "Exercise and Health, Sports and Human Development" and will be held at the University of Évora, between 11 and 12 November of 2016. The readers can check the program in the following link http://gdoc.uevora.pt/450120 and get more information in the Congress Site available at http://www.cidesd2016.uevora.pt/. With regard to Uni, Motricidade signed a cooperation protocol with the University of Beira Interior (UBI in May of 2016, involving the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in Sports Sciences, Psychology, Human Development and Health. At the present, UBI hosts more than 6,000 students spread across five faculties - Arts & Letters, Sciences, Health Sciences, Humanities and Social Sciences and Engineering. When looking at the rankings, for instance

  7. The Use of University Services and Student Retention: Differential Links for Student Service Members or Veterans and Civilian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Kenona H.; Whiteman, Shawn D.; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M.; Barry, Adam E.

    2018-01-01

    Grounded in research and theory on college student retention, this study assessed differences in the use of various university services and the influence of key personnel on retention-related outcomes of student service members or veterans (SSM/Vs) compared with civilian students. Participants included 386 students, 199 (154 male, 45 female) of…

  8. An Evaluation of Three Methods of Racism-Sexism Training in a University Student Orientation Program. Research Report No. 1-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Warwick G.; And Others

    Three types of workshops dealing with racism and sexism were conducted for 1900 incoming university freshmen as part of their orientation program. The methods were a structured discussion model developed by Sedlacek and Brooks (1976), a Starpower simulation workshop, and a movie discussion group. Students were randomly assigned to one of the three…

  9. Bridging Gaps and Jumping through Hoops: First-Year History Students' Expectations and Perceptions of Assessment and Feedback in a Research-Intensive UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The wider context of arts and humanities education in the UK has demanded that university teachers and administrators focus on "end points." Increased emphasis on the generic and transferable skills attained through arts and humanities programmes, along with intense concern to raise students' reported levels of satisfaction, do not…

  10. University of Houston Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Talbot, R. W.; Hampton, D. L.; Molders, N.; Millan, R. M.; Halford, A. J.; Dunbar, B.; Morris, G. A.; Prince, J.; Gamblin, R.; Ehteshami, A.; Lehnen, J. N.; Greer, M.; Porat, I.; Alozie, M.; Behrend, C. C.; Bias, C.; Fenton, A.; Gunawan, B.; Harrison, W.; Martinez, A.; Mathur, S.; Medillin, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T. V.; Nowling, M.; Perez, D.; Pham, M.; Pina, M.; Thomas, G.; Velasquez, B.; Victor, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) is a NASA program to engage undergraduate students in rigorous scientific research, for the purposes of innovation and developing the next generation of professionals for an array of fields. The program is student led and executed from initial ideation to research to the design and deployment of scientific payloads. The University of Houston has been selected twice to participate in the USIP programs. The first program (USIP_UH I) ran from 2013 to 2016. USIP_UH II started in January of 2016, with funding starting at the end of May. USIP_UH I (USIP_UH II) at the University of Houston was (is) composed of eight (seven) research teams developing six (seven), distinct, balloon-based scientific instruments. These instruments will contribute to a broad range of geophysical sciences from Very Low Frequency recording and Total Electron Content to exobiology and ozone profiling. USIP_UH I had 12 successful launches with 9 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2015, and 4 piggyback flights with BARREL 3 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2015. USIP_UH II had 8 successful launches with 5 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2017, 3 piggyback flights with BARREL 4 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2016, and 1 flight each from CSBF and UH. The great opportunity of this program is capitalizing on the proliferation of electronics miniaturization to create new generations of scientific instruments that are smaller and lighter than ever before. This situation allows experiments to be done more cheaply which ultimately allows many more experiments to be done.

  11. Malaysian University Student Learning Involvement Scale (MUSLIS): Validation of a Student Engagement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Fauziah Md.; Hashim, Rosna Awang; Ariffin, Tengku Faekah Tengku

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In western countries, a model to explain student engagement in college or university has long been established. However, there is a lack of research to develop and validate a model which may help to better understand student engagement in the local university context. There is currently no established instrument to measure student…

  12. Counselling University Students: A Psychoanalytic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Sommantico

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a psychoanalytic approach to the counselling with university students, as it is proposed at the University of Naples Federico II. On one hand, the focus is on the specific evolution phase of counselling students, which is late adolescence; on the other hand, it is on the specific aspects of the approach at issue. The authors particularly carry out a description of three characteristics of psychoanalytic counselling with university students: the specific space-time of the setting, the functioning through the free association/freely floating attention, the transference/countertransference dynamic. The authors support their theses, by presenting the clinical case of a student, who consulted the Psychological Counselling Centre for University Students (CCPSU. Clinical excerpts of four counselling sessions are then briefly commented on the basis of the theoretical-clinical paradigm of reference.

  13. NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University and Research Education Program Promotes Climate Literacy by Engaging Students at Minority Serving Institutions in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Alston, E. J.; Chambers, L. H.; Bynum, A.; Montgomery, C.; Blue, S.; Kowalczak, C.; Leighton, A.; Bosman, L.

    2017-12-01

    NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University Research & Education Program - MUREP (ESTEEM) activities enhance institutional capacity of minority serving institutions (MSIs) related to Earth System Science, Technology and energy education; in turn, increasing access of underrepresented groups to science careers and opportunities. ESTEEM is a competitive portfolio that has been providing funding to institutions across the United States for 10 years. Over that time 76 separate activities have been funded. Beginning in 2011 ESTEEM awards focused on MSIs and public-school districts with high under-represented enrollment. Today ESTEEM awards focus on American Indian/Alaska Native serving institutions (Tribal Colleges and Universities), the very communities most severely in need of ability to deal with climate adaptation and resiliency. ESTEEM engages a multi-faceted approach to address economic and cultural challenges facing MSI communities. PIs (Principal Investigators) receive support from a management team at NASA, and are supported by a larger network, the ESTEEM Cohort, which connects regularly through video calls, virtual video series and in-person meetings. The cohort acts as a collective unit to foster interconnectivity and knowledge sharing in both physical and virtual settings. ESTEEM partners with NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLNTM) in a unique non-traditional model to leverage technical expertise. DLN services over 10,000 participants each year through interactive web-based synchronous and asynchronous events. These events allow for cost effective (no travel) engagement of multiple, geographically dispersed audiences to share local experiences with one another. Events allow PIs to grow their networks, technical base, professional connections, and develop a sense of community, encouraging expansion into larger and broader interactions. Over 256 connections, beyond the 76 individual members, exist within the cohort. PIs report

  14. First systematic plant proteomics workshop in Botany Department, University of Delhi: transferring proteomics knowledge to next-generation researchers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Renu; Abat, Jasmeet Kaur; Sehrawat, Ankita; Gupta, Ravi; Kashyap, Prakriti; Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Bhavana; Chaurasia, Satya Prakash; Chanu, Sougrakpam Yaiphabi; Masi, Antonio; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, Raj; Dunn, Michael J; Renaut, Jenny; Rakwal, Randeep

    2014-07-01

    International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) outlined ten initiatives to promote plant proteomics in each and every country. With greater emphasis in developing countries, one of those was to "organize workshops at national and international levels to train manpower and exchange information". This third INPPO highlights covers the workshop organized for the very first time in a developing country, India, at the Department of Botany in University of Delhi on December 26-30, 2013 titled - "1(st) Plant Proteomics Workshop / Training Program" under the umbrella of INPPO India-Nepal chapter. Selected 20 participants received on-hand training mainly on gel-based proteomics approach along with manual booklet and parallel lectures on this and associated topics. In house, as well as invited experts drawn from other Universities and Institutes (national and international), delivered talks on different aspects of gel-based and gel-free proteomics. Importance of gel-free proteomics approach, translational proteomics, and INPPO roles were presented and interactively discussed by a group of three invited speakers Drs. Ganesh Kumar Agrawal (Nepal), Randeep Rakwal (Japan), and Antonio Masi (Italy). Given the output of this systematic workshop, it was proposed and thereafter decided to be organized every alternate year; the next workshop will be held in 2015. Furthermore, possibilities on providing advanced training to those students / researchers / teachers with basic knowledge in proteomics theory and experiments at national and international levels were discussed. INPPO is committed to generating next-generation trained manpower in proteomics, and it would only happen by the firm determination of scientists to come forward and do it. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Age Differences Explain Social Class Differences in Students' Friendship at University: Implications for Transition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark; Wright, Chrysalis L.

    2015-01-01

    The present research tested the hypotheses that (a) working-class students have fewer friends at university than middle-class students and (b) this social class difference occurs because working-class students tend to be older than middle-class students. A sample of 376 first-year undergraduate students from an Australian university completed an…

  16. Engaging Chinese International Undergraduate Students in the American University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Heidi; Chen, Yajing

    2015-01-01

    Vincent Tinto's theory of academic and social integration provides a framework for investigating perceived problems associated with Chinese international students' engagement at a public research-intensive university in the U.S. Midwest ("Midwest" University). These "problems"--classroom silence, segregation and…

  17. The Work Values of First Year Spanish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Pascual, P. A.; Cano-Escoriaza, J.; Orejudo, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the work values of 2,951 first-year university students in Spain enrolled in degree programs within the five major areas of university studies. For our research, participants were asked to respond to a Scale of Work Values in which intrinsic, social, and pragmatic extrinsic values as well as extrinsic values related to…

  18. Perceptions of Students towards ICT Competencies at the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Gastelú, Carlos Arturo; Kiss, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the perceptions of university students towards their ICT Competencies from two universities, one in Mexico and the other in Hungary. The research type is quantitative and exploratory. The instrument consists of 14 questions related to three types of competencies: Basic, Application and Ethical. The sample…

  19. An Analysis of University Students' Attitudes towards Personalized Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Muhittin; Kisla, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze university students' attitudes towards personalized learning environments with respect to the independent variables of gender, age, university, year of study, knowledge about the environment, participation in the environment and being willing to participate in the environment. The correlative survey model is…

  20. Correlation Between University Students' Kinematic Achievement and Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çirkinoǧlu, A. G.; Dem&ircidot, N.

    2007-04-01

    In the literature, some researches on kinematics revealed that students have many difficulties in connecting graphs and physics. Also some researches showed that the method used in classroom affects students' further learning. In this study the correlation between university students' kinematics achieve and learning style are investigated. In this purpose Kinematics Achievement Test and Learning Style Inventory were applied to 573 students enrolled in general physics 1 courses at Balikesir University in the fall semester of 2005-2006. Kinematics Test, consists of 12 multiple choose and 6 open ended questions, was developed by researchers to assess students' understanding, interpreting, and drawing graphs. Learning Style Inventory, a 24 items test including visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles, was developed and used by Barsch. The data obtained from in this study were analyzed necessary statistical calculations (T-test, correlation, ANOVA, etc.) by using SPSS statistical program. Based on the research findings, the tentative recommendations are made.

  1. How can we prevent and reduce bullying amongst university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Anne Myers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While it has long been recognized that bullying occurs at school and in the workplace, recent research confirms that bullying also takes place among university students, including undergraduates, post-graduates and doctoral research students. In the UK, the National Union of Students (NUS alerted staff and students to the issue in a series of reports but it is not confined to the UK. Authors in the book edited by Cowie and Myers (2016a, 2016b present cross-national findings on the theme of bullying among university students (Pörhöla et al., 2016. In this article we discuss the urgent need for interventions to prevent and reduce bullying in this context. We also indicate the areas where little or no intervention is taking place, notably in the field of university policy.

  2. Student Use of Mobile Devices in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Neil; Rees, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly used by students in university lectures. This has resulted in controversy and the banning of mobile devices in some lectures. Although there has been some research into how students use laptop computers in lectures, there has been little investigation into the wider use of mobile devices. This study was designed to…

  3. How ICT Affects the Understanding of Stereometry among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaranis, Nicholas; Exarchakos, George M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to compare the level of competence in stereometry of the university students taught using the authors' ICT oriented learning method based on the Van Hiele model for stereometry concepts, as opposed to traditional teaching methodology. The study deals with second year undergraduate students form the Department of…

  4. Exhaustion in University Students and the Effect of Coursework Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    Although researchers have examined exhaustion extensively in occupational studies, this work-specific variable--despite its widespread acceptance and negative outcomes--has received little attention in regard to university students and their coursework. Objective: The author examined the severity of exhaustion in students and the relationship…

  5. Satisfaction of Preparatory Year Students with University Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Omear S.

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the level of satisfaction of preparatory year students at Al-Baha University with the academic and non-academic services they receive, and determining whether there were any differences in student satisfaction on the basis of personal variables (gender, college, distance). This research used quantitative…

  6. University Students' Opinions Concerning Science-Technology-Society Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Determining what students think about science, technology, and society (STS) is of great importance. This also provides the basis for scientific literacy. As such, this study was conducted with a total of 102 senior students attending a university located in western Turkey. This study utilized the survey model as a research model and the…

  7. Anxiety among University Students and Its Effects on Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongel, Kurtulus; Balci, Umut Gok; Simsek, Yasemin; Ileri, Hande; Kucuk, Ece Fidan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It is purposed to determine food habits of the students of Faculty of Medicine at Izmir Katip Çelebi University and to research how it is affected by anxiety in this study. Methodology: While the study was carried out in March, April and May in 2014, its universe was composed of totally 196 students who were from 1st, 2nd and 3rd classes…

  8. Mental health among students of pedagogical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinauskas R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with questions of mental health among students of pedagogical universities. There were analysed differences in the level of mental health among sporting and non-sporting students. Two methods were used in the inquiry. Stepanov's questionnaire was used to estimate the level of mental health, Gundarov's questionnaire was used to evaluate psychical satisfaction. The sample consisted of 263 sporting students (athletes and 288 non-sporting students. Results have shown that the level of mental health among sporting students was higher than the level of mental health among non-sporting students.

  9. The psychological role of music listening in emotion regulation for stress coping amongst university students

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the psychological influence of music listening among university students to assist them to cope with stress. University students often suffer high levels of stress. Music is an important accompaniment for the lives of university students, and it plays a significant role in their stress coping strategies and emotion regulation. The aim of the current research is to examine how university students use music to manage their stress. The researcher was keen to understand u...

  10. Challenges of research recruitment in a university setting in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeboncoeur, Claudia; Foster, Charlie; Townsend, Nick

    2017-05-20

    The recruitment is an integral part of most research projects in medical sciences involving human participants. In health promotion research, there is increasing work on the impact of environments. Settings represent environments such as schools where social, physical and psychological development unfolds. In this study, we investigated weight gain in students within a university setting. Barriers to access and recruitment of university students within a specific setting, in the context of health research are discussed. An online survey on health behaviours of first year students across 101 universities in England was developed. Ethics committees of each institutions were contacted to obtain permission to recruit and access their students. Recruitment adverts were standardized and distributed within restrictions imposed by universities. Three time points and incentives were used. Several challenges in recruiting from a university setting were found. These included (i) ethics approval, (ii) recruitment approval, (iii) navigating restrictions on advertisement and (iv) logistics of varying university academic calendars. We also faced challenges of online surveys including low recruitment, retention and low eligibility of respondents. From the 101 universities, 28 allowed dissemination of adverts. We obtained 1026 responses at T1, 599 at T2 and 497 at T3. The complete-case sample represented 13% of those originally recruited at T1. Conducting research on students within the university setting is a time consuming and challenging task. To improve research-based health promotion, universities could work together to increase consistency as to their policies on student recruitment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Research collaboration among academics in selected Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... collaboration at the universities in the two countries; each country and universities degree of collaboration during the research period; trends of research collaboration from 2003 – 2013; influence of research collaboration on research impact; and the relationship between research collaboration and knowledge sharing.

  12. Investigating Student Understanding of the Universe: Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Virginia; Coble, K.; Nickerson, M.; Cochran, G.; Camarillo, C. T.; Bailey, J. M.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2011-05-01

    Chicago State University (CSU) offers an introductory astronomy course that services students from a variety of majors including pre-service teachers. At CSU, we have been investigating methods and tools that will improve student conceptual understanding in astronomy for this diverse group of students. We have analyzed pre-course surveys, pre-course essays, exams, and interviews in an effort to better understand the ideas and difficulties in understanding that students have in regards to the structure of the universe. Analysis of written essays has revealed that our students do have some knowledge of the objects in the universe, but interviews inform us that their understanding of the structure of the universe is superficial. This project is a part of a larger study; also see our posters on student ideas about dark matter, the age and expansion of the universe, and perceptions of astronomical sizes and distances. This work was supported by NASA ROSES E/PO Grant #NNXlOAC89G, as well as by the Illinois Space Grant Consortium and National Science Foundation CCLI Grant #0632563 at Chicago State University and the Fermi E/PO program at Sonoma State University.

  13. The impact of science shops on university research and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2000-01-01

    on their daily life; to give students opportunities for real life project work; to renew research and education at the university by drawing attention to new social topics and needs. Based on a case study of the Science Shop at the Technical University of Denmark potentials, prerequisites and limits...

  14. Research report on South African university mental skills norms for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous research has recommended establishment of local sport code norms. The aim of this study was to establish preliminary South African university norms for rugby, cricket, soccer, athletics, hockey and netball. The sample consisted of 121 university students from a South African institution. Norms are presented in ...

  15. The Challenges of Establishing Social Learning Spaces at a Johannesburg University Student Residence: Student Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agherdien, Najma; Petersen, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on two cycles of a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study on student experiences of the process of establishing social learning spaces in a Johannesburg university student residence. We draw on Wenger's (2009) notion of "social learning spaces" to explore the manner in which students mediate their social and…

  16. The napping behaviour of Australian university students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Lovato

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported sleep and napping behaviour of Australian university students and the relationship between napping and daytime functioning. A sample of 280 university first-year psychology students (median age  = 19.00 years completed a 6-item napping behaviour questionnaire, a 12-item Daytime Feelings and Functioning Scale, the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results indicated that 53.6% of students reported napping with 34% napping at least 1-2 times per week, and 17% napping three or more occasions per week. Long naps, those over 30 minutes, were taken by 77% of the napping students. Sixty-one percent of students reported they took long naps during the post-lunch dip period, from 2-4 pm. Students who nap at least once per week reported significantly more problems organizing their thoughts, gaining motivation, concentrating, and finishing tasks than students who did not nap. Students who napped also felt significantly more sleepy and depressed when compared to students who did not nap. The results also indicated that nap frequency increased with daytime sleepiness. The majority of students (51% reported sleeping 6-7 hours per night or less. Overall, the results from this study suggest that among this population of Australian first-year university students habitual napping is common and may be used in an attempt to compensate for the detrimental effects of excessive sleepiness.

  17. Healthy Lifestyle of Czech University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Marholdová, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The thesis deals with the healthy lifestyle of Czech university students. The main objectives are to map the healthy lifestyle of Czech university students, especially to find out whether they follow the principles of healthy lifestyle, to find out their knowledge concerning this issue, to find out if there are any obstacles to follow the healthy lifestyle and to find out whether they know any projects supporting health and healthy lifestyle. In the theoretical part of the thesis the basic te...

  18. Tutorials in university students with a disability

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquín Gairín Sallán; José Luís Muñoz Moreno

    2013-01-01

    This article places an emphasis on the importance of tutorials for students with a disability in universities. It presented the most significant results of the study of tutorials carried out in help services, units or offices for students with a disability inmore than 45 Spanish universities, in relation to promotion, reception, completion and graduation. The contributions highlight the importance of organising a response through a Tutorial Action Plan made up of the stages of motivation and ...

  19. University of South Bohemia students' awareness about eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    PEKÁRKOVÁ, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The thesis focuses on knowledge of eating disorders by students of University of South Bohemia. The theoretical part defines particular types of eating disorders and the causes related with this problems. There are possible treatment methods for eating disorders mentioned at the end of this part. The practical part deals with students? awareness of eating disorders. It focuses on students? knowledge of eating disorders and orthorexia nerovosa. The research is based on questionnaire constructi...

  20. Basic needs of Universiti Utara Malaysia students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Suzilah; Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Enn, Chang Tzu

    2017-11-01

    Basic needs are defined as goods or services that are essential for human to live and function. Wants on the other hand, are goods or services that are not necessary but we desire or wish for in order to fulfil our needs. In university, students' needs and wants are not always easily detectable due to different generations of students. The students' desires are also caused by peer interactions, course needs and cultural differences. For example older generations requires typewriter but new generations need a laptop. Many university students have difficulty to differentiate between basic needs and wants. This leads to financial management problem which can affect their academic performance. The purpose of this study is to identify students of Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) basic needs. Based on past studies conducted by 3 universities, 12 items related to students' basic needs were identified. However, only 9 items are considered relevant to UUM students. A study on a focus group consist of 18 students from different background was conducted to validate the 9 items of basic needs by using in depth interviews. The findings indicated food, clothing, books, stationery, photocopying, printing & binding, information & communication technology (ICT), mobile phone bills, transportation and others (which includes toiletries, groceries, sport, & entertainment) as the 9 items. The findings also revealed that student basic needs for ICT are not only laptop and printer but also a smartphone. As for clothing, requirements are different according to programs the student majors in. A business student need full business attire, law students need a proper robe for moot courts and curriculum activities require the students to be in uniform. These are basic needs and not desires or wants.

  1. Nuclear energy research in Germany 2008. Research centers and universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromm, Walter

    2009-01-01

    This summary report presents nuclear energy research at research centers and universities in Germany in 2008. Activities are explained on the basis of examples of research projects and a description of the situation of research and teaching in general. Participants are the - Karlsruhe Research Center, - Juelich Research Center (FZJ), - Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center (FZD), - Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), - Technical University of Dresden, - University of Applied Sciences, Zittau/Goerlitz, - Institute for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems (IKE) at the University of Stuttgart, - Reactor Simulation and Reactor Safety Working Group at the Bochum Ruhr University. (orig.)

  2. Are psychology university student gamblers representative of non-university students and general gamblers? A comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Russell, Alex; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Students recruited from psychology undergraduate university populations are commonly used in psychology research, including gambling studies. However, the extent to which the use of this subpopulation produces findings that can be extrapolated to other groups is questionable. The present study was designed to compare results from university-recruited psychology student gamblers to those obtained from a sample of gamblers recruited from the general population that also included students. An online survey measuring gambling behavior and Internet gambling, attitudes and knowledge about gambling and problem gambling severity was posted on websites accessed by gamblers. Participants were recruited from two sources, a psychology undergraduate university population (n = 461) and online websites (n = 4,801). Results showed university-recruited students differed significantly from both adults and students recruited from the general population in respect to demographic variables and gambling behavior. Psychology undergraduate students were younger, more likely to be female, and had lower incomes. When relevant demographic variables were controlled, psychology undergraduate students were found to gamble less frequently, at different times, and to be at lower-risk for gambling-related problems, but had more irrational beliefs and more negative attitudes towards gambling than gamblers recruited from the general population. Results suggest that caution should be used in extrapolating findings from research using university-recruited psychology student gamblers to wide community populations due to differences related to gambling thoughts, attitudes and behaviors.

  3. First Aid Knowledge of University Students in Poisoning Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Sonay; Yildirim, Gulay; Kose, Selmin; Yildirim, Senay; Ozhan, Fatma; Senturan, Leman

    2014-12-01

    Poisoning is a crucial public health problem which needs serious approach and response to treatment. In case of poisoning, proper first aid is lifesaving and application should be applied in every condition. This research was conducted in order to evaluate first aid knowledge of university students for poisoning. The research was conducted between the dates of May 2013-June 2013 with the permission gained from the University Rectorship. The cohort of the research contained 4,560 students who received education in Istanbul. The sample of the study included 936 students who accepted to participate in the research and attended the school during the research. The data were collected by using a questionnaire form, which had 21 questions prepared by researchers. Analysis of the data was carried out with a percentage evaluation method and chi square tests in a computer environment. In our study, 92.6% of students (n=867) knew the phone number of the ambulance in case of emergency. In addition, 57.3% of students (n=536) knew the phone number of the poison hotline, and it was seen that they answered correctly the questions regarding the relation between body system and indications of poisoning. It was determined that the students who received education in medical departments answered the questions correctly more than the students who had education in other departments. (p≤0.001, p≤0.01). It was observed that the university students in medical departments had more first aid knowledge on poisoning cases compared to the students in other departments who did not have sufficient information regarding these issues. It is thought that first aid education in all departments of universities, both poisoning and other first aid issues, should be conveyed to all students.

  4. Experiences of student mother in Ugandan universities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    introduction of various programmes such as: distance learning, evening, and weekend programmes coupled with the growing number of private Universities that currently stand at more than 10 in number. For this study, which inquired about the experiences of student mothers in Ugandan Universities, data was collected ...

  5. Cyberbullying and Victimisation among Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Yavuz; Eristi, Bahadir

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent of cyberbullying and victimisation among Turkish university students at a state college of education. A personal information form and 56 scaled items were administered to 254 students. Items addressing cyberbullying victimisation were adopted from a recent study, whereas parallel cyberbullying items were…

  6. Supporting University Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ashleigh; Goldstein, Jody; Murphy, Deirdra; Trietsch, Rhoda; Keeves, Jacqueline; Mendes, Eva; Queenan, Alexa

    2018-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students with autism spectrum disorder are entering higher education. Their success can be jeopardized by organizational, social/emotional, and academic challenges if appropriate supports are not in place. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group model for university students with autism spectrum…

  7. FORECASTING CAREER PLANNING OF STUDENT OF UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Danilenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the forecasting model of career planning of student of University. This model has an empirical nature and lets to control the process and the content of student learning taking into account of his individual characteristics and the predictions of his potential careers.

  8. Exploring Foreign Undergraduate Students' Experiences of University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Danica Wai Yee; Winder, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    Although international students are an important source of income to universities in the UK, the emotional impact of their experiences may be ignored and unacknowledged. This study explored the personal experiences of international students studying for an undergraduate degree in the UK. Semi-structured interviews with five participants were…

  9. Nigerian University Students' Practices for Preventing Sexually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) remain an important public health challenge among Nigerian students. Abuja University is located in a region of high STDs prevalence. However, it is not clear what students do to minimize their risk of contracting STDs. The purpose of the study was to explore sexual practices that ...

  10. Gender Constructions and Legitimacy among University Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    During a case study of students’ project groups at university level, I identified complex patterns of inclusion and exclusion processes going on among the students. First, there are the processes that relate to the other student’s skills. Here, I found that the students are very observant of each...

  11. University Undergraduate Students, Perceptions of The Wireless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on Uni versity Undergraduate students' perceptions of the use of the wireless internet of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria. Using emperical and new field data, this exploratory study investigated the students' perceptions of internet use in relation to library use. The study adopted a ...

  12. Depression and Related Problems in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2012-01-01

    Method: Depression and related problems were studied in a sample of 283 university students. Results: The students with high depression scores also had high scores on anxiety, intrusive thoughts, controlling intrusive thoughts and sleep disturbances scales. A stepwise regression suggested that those problems contributed to a significant proportion…

  13. Behavior of Engineering Students in Kuwait University

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Al-Ajmi; R. S. Al-Kandari

    2015-01-01

    This initial study is concerned with the behavior of engineering students in Kuwait University which became a concern due to the global issues of education in all levels. A survey has been conducted to identify academic and societal issues affecting the engineering student performance. The study is drawing major conclusions with regard to private tutoring and the online availability of textbooks’ solution manuals.

  14. University engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Esmat; Abaszadeh, Abas; Maddah, Sadat Sayad Bagher

    2013-11-01

    Collaborative methods of learning in the university have been a successful and the main aspects of the students' engagement. The purpose of this study was to determine university engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This research was a descriptive correlation study on a total of 238 nursing students with different levels of education were asked to fill four subscales of the modified National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) tool with a total of 40 items. NSSE reliability was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.78). The NSSE instrument relies on a students' self-reports tool. Data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics by SPSS version 16. Means scores of university engagement in nursing students was 96.6 ± 19. 07. There was a significant positive correlation in components including active and collaborative learning (ACL) level, students' level of academic challenge (LAC) as well as student faculty interaction (SFI), supportive campuses environment and enriching educational experiences (EEE)with total score of university engagement (P engagement level in nursing students is moderate and there is a significant association between the model of teaching and ACL, and LAC and EEE.

  15. Ethical Perception of University Students about Academic Dishonesty in Pakistan: Identification of Student's Dishonest Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Rana Rashid; Waheed, Ajmal

    2014-01-01

    The current research work aims to explore major activities performed by the university students during academic misconducts and their perception regarding such activities. The study further explores the ethical limits drawn by the students about academic dishonesty. Case study methodology is utilized in this research. Sixty-one post graduate and…

  16. Courses as research and students in the roles as researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    -like lecture rooms so dominant at the universities incite specific pedagogical and didactical “routines and rituals”: lectures come with specific hierarchical roles ascribed to the lecturer (the provider of knowledge) and the students (the receivers of knowledge). Methods Inspired by theories...... in which a MA course in cross media communication was turned into a research laboratory providing the students with roles as researcher. The students took part in an ongoing field of research concerning methods and theories within this particular field of communication studies and invited them theorize...... and analyze the specific topics of said research field in collaboration with senior researchers. As a research team, they were provided with a series of research questions and the task to engage in a research project-like process and to create research reports during the course and present them at conference...

  17. Prevalence of metabolic components in university students

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Ana Roberta Vilarouca da; Sousa, Luana Savana Nascimento de; Rocha, Telma de Sousa; Cortez, Ramiro Marx Alves; Macêdo, Layla Gonçalves do Nascimento; Almeida, Paulo César de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the frequency of components of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among university students.METHOD: descriptive study with 550 students, from various courses run by a public university. The socioeconomic data, lifestyle, and components of MetS were filled out using a questionnaire. Blood sample collection was undertaken in the university itself by a contracted clinical analysis laboratory.RESULTS: 66.2% were female, with a mean age of 22.6±4.41; 71.7% were sedentary; 1.8% stated...

  18. Tutorials in university students with a disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Gairín Sallán

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article places an emphasis on the importance of tutorials for students with a disability in universities. It presented the most significant results of the study of tutorials carried out in help services, units or offices for students with a disability inmore than 45 Spanish universities, in relation to promotion, reception, completion and graduation. The contributions highlight the importance of organising a response through a Tutorial Action Plan made up of the stages of motivation and awareness-raisin, planning, execution, evaluation and institutionalisation. Among the principle conclusions, the importance of moving towards a truly inclusive university through tutorial activity is highlighted, thereby providing a guide for providing assistance to university students with a disability.

  19. Person-Environment Fit and Its Effects on University Students: A Response Surface Methodology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, Brad; Kim, Tae-Yeol; Nichols, Brooke

    2011-01-01

    The amount of time, effort, and money expended in pursuit of a college degree makes it important that students choose a university that is a good fit for them. Unfortunately students often determine whether a university is a fit for them through trial and error. This research investigated student-university fit and its relationship with…

  20. Personality and psychopathology of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosevski, Dusica L; Milovancevic, Milica P; Gajic, Saveta D

    2010-01-01

    University students represent the national capital and investment for the future, with an implicit mission both for their families and for society as a whole. However, they face multiple stressors such as academic overload, constant pressure to succeed, competition with peers and in some countries financial burden and concerns about the future. As all this may lead to psychopathology, the health of university students has been the subject of increasing focus in recent years. Multiple protective and risk factors are involved in the psychological well being and distress of university students. Specific risk factors for the development of psychopathology are high test anxiety, lower self-efficacy, as well as certain personality traits. Moreover, some students arrive at college with already existing mental health problems. The most frequent mental disorders among students are substance abuse, depression, self-harm and suicide, eating and anxiety disorders. Acquiring and improving knowledge about the student population is a crucial factor in the development of mental health promotion programs in order to meet their needs and to help them cope with various problems. Better understanding and care of the personality profile of university students can be helpful in academic and career choice and prevention of future mental health problems.

  1. Examining University Students' Anger and Satisfaction with Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Gülsen Büyüksahin

    2017-01-01

    The current research aims to study university students' levels of anger and satisfaction with life, based on gender, years of attendance, accommodation, and whether they experience adjustment problems. The current research participants included a total of 484 individuals (X-bar age = 22.56; SD = 1.72; range = 19-37), with 269 (55.6%) males and 215…

  2. Research Universities as Knowledge Networks: The Role of Institutional Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the elaboration of institutional research practice, which is an important element of any research university. The study addresses three questions. First, how did institutional research arise, and what is its raison d'etre in a research university? Second, how can institutional research contribute to the improvement of the…

  3. Market Positioning of Public and Private Universities:Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Kahar ADAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on universities strategies for admitting students and the rate at which private sector universities expand in today’s higher educational setups. This paper answers the following question: to what extend are the public universities different from the private universities? In an attempt to find the answers, the whole study is developedtowards students’ perception of the universities positioning in terms of what they are offering to the customers, through what they prompt people to apply for admission? Therefore, thispaper looks at the prevailing admission strategies and potential students’ entry requirements at both public and private universities to determine the theoretical systems that are used by these universities in competition for customers (students. A quantitative survey of students in both public and private universities in Ghana was undergone In all, a total number of 255 questionnaires were printed. Only 187 were answered and returned out of 200 distributed questionnaires to the public sector universities whereas 55 questionnaires were distributed to the private sector students and 51 were answered and returned. This research was based on sampling data collection methods. The findings show that there are three categories of universities such as Publicly/Fully Independent Chartered Universities, Privately Owned Universities and Personal/Sole Proprietorship University Colleges. All these affect students’ choices for admission application. The findings clearly indicate that both public and private universitiespurposes are related using Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient formulae to that of the sole proprietorship colleges. Also, the admission requirement strategies differ between public and private universities.

  4. Transformational Leadership in Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Ryann M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to preserve research integrity, leaders at postsecondary research institutions must utilize transformational leadership behaviors in order to promote a campus culture that is the most conducive to responsible research conduct. In support of this assertion, the issue of research misconduct and its potential consequences for both…

  5. Bayer Facts of Science Education XV: A View from the Gatekeepers—STEM Department Chairs at America's Top 200 Research Universities on Female and Underrepresented Minority Undergraduate STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer Corporation

    2012-06-01

    Diversity and the underrepresentation of women, African-Americans, Hispanics and American Indians in the nation's science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields are the subjects of the XV: A View from the Gatekeepers—STEM Department Chairs at America's Top 200 Research Universities on Female and Underrepresented Minority Undergraduate STEM Students. Annual public opinion research project commissioned by Bayer Corporation, the Bayer Facts surveys examine science education and science literacy issues. The 15th in the series and the fifth to explore diversity and underrepresentation, this research is a direct outgrowth of last year's results which found 40 percent of the country's female and underrepresented minority (URM) chemists and chemical engineers working today were discouraged from pursuing their STEM career at some point in their lives. US colleges were cited as places where this discouragement most often happened and college professors as the individuals most likely responsible. Does such discouragement still occur in American colleges today? To answer this and other questions about the undergraduate environment in which today's students make their career decisions, the survey polls 413 STEM department chairs at the nation's 200 top research universities and those that produce the highest proportion of female and URM STEM graduates. The survey also asks the chairs about their institutions track record recruiting and retaining female and URM STEM undergraduates, preparedness of these students to study STEM, the impact of traditional introductory STEM courses on female and URM students and barriers these students face pursuing their STEM degrees.

  6. Factors Influencing uUniversity Research Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Fiona; Geare, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This research extends our understanding of research productivity by examining features of managerial practice and culture within university departments. Adopting a robust comparative research design, capturing both interview and survey data sourced from multiple stakeholders from New Zealand universities, we seek to identify factors associated…

  7. SPORT AND MENTAL HEALTH LEVEL AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouloud Kenioua

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study of mental health level of university student, athletes and non-athletes. Material: The tested group consisted of 160 male and female undergraduates from Ouargla University, Algeria; 80 students-athletes from Institute of Physical Education and Sports and 80 students-non-athletes from Department of Psychology, English and Mathematics. In the study we used health mental scale, adapted by Diab (2006 to Arab version scale, formed from five dimensions (Competence and self-confidence, Capacity for social interaction, Emotional maturity, Freedom from neurotic symptoms, self rating and aspects of natural deficiencies. Results: the findings indicated that university students have high level of mental health. And the mean of the responses of students-athletes group by mental health scale reached (M = 32.40, with standard deviation (STD =5.83, while the mean of the responses of students-non athletes group by mental health scale has reached (M=27.47, with standard deviation (STD=7.88. T-value, required to know significance of differences between means of students-athletes and students-non athletes has reached (T=4.51, (DF=185, p -0.01. So there are significant statistical differences between student athletes and non-athletes in their responses by mental health scale in favor of the student athletes. Conclusion:sports are beneficial in respect to mental health among university students and emphasizing the importance of the mental health of university students through its integration in the various recreational and competitive activities. Future qualitative research, covering multi-variables’ tests on mental health and others psychological characteristics could be performed in sports area.

  8. Quality of Faculty Life and Lifelong Learning Tendencies of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beytekin, Osman Ferda; Kadi, Aysegül

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the university students' opinions about quality of faculty life and their lifelong learning tendencies. Research was conducted with 375 university students. According to the findings: the quality of faculty life of students differ according to gender. Male students have lower quality of faculty life than…

  9. Assessing Weather Curiosity in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    This research focuses upon measuring an individual's level of trait curiosity about the weather using the Weather Curiosity Scale (WCS). The measure consists of 15 self-report items that describe weather preferences and/or behaviors that people may perform more or less frequently. The author reports on two initial studies of the WCS that have used the responses of 710 undergraduate students from a large university in the southeastern United States. In the first study, factor analysis of the 15 items indicated that the measure was unidimensional - suggesting that its items singularly assessed weather curiosity. The WCS also was internally consistent as evidenced by an acceptable Cronbach's alpha, a = .81). The second study sought to identify other personality variables that may relate with the WCS scores and thus illuminate the nature of weather curiosity. Several clusters of personality variables appear to underlie the curiosity levels people exhibited, the first of which related to perceptual curiosity (r = .59). Being curious about sights, sounds, smells, and textures generally related somewhat to curiosity about weather. Two measures of trait sensitivity to environmental stimulation, the Highly Sensitive Person Scale (r = .47) and the Orientation Sensitivity Scale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (r = .43), also predicted weather curiosity levels. Finally, possessing extraverted personality traits (r = .34) and an intense style of experiencing one's emotions (r = .33) related to weather curiosity. How can this measure be used in K-12 or post-secondary settings to further climate literacy? First, the WCS can identify students with natural curiosities about weather and climate so these students may be given more challenging instruction that will leverage their natural interests. Second, high-WCS students may function as weather and climate ambassadors during inquiry-based learning activities and thus help other students who are not as oriented to the

  10. Promoting Undergraduate Research at Grand Valley State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemersma, P.; Mekik, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    Grand Valley State University (GVSU) is a relatively young, rapidly growing, predominately undergraduate institution of about 20,000 students located in western Michigan in which undergraduate research plays a vital role in the education of our students. Student research is supported and actively promoted by 1) creating university funding opportunities and taking advantage of small outside funding sources 2) building a tradition of undergraduate research 3) incorporating small research activities into classes and 4) educating students explicitly in how to prepare a professional poster, give a professional talk and write a journal article. As the saying goes, if you have money, the students will come. At GVSU most students recognize the value of a research experience but need income to pay for college expenses. The internally funded Student Summer Scholars program at GVSU provides student salary and faculty stipend for a summer research project (\\6000 per grant). The geology department has also been successful at obtaining grants from the NASA Michigan Space Grant Consortium (\\5,000 plus a 100% GVSU match). We have been successful in using these easier to obtain smaller grants to fund undergraduate projects. In some cases small grants actually allow us to pursue "risky" or otherwise difficult to fund projects. Undergraduate research "counts" at GVSU and once a tradition and critical mass of undergraduate research has been established, it can become self-sustaining. To recognize the achievements of undergraduate research at GVSU, there is an annual Student Scholarship Day in which the students (580 university wide) present the results of their research. Also, by persuading students in our introductory classes (for extra credit) to attend Student Scholarship Day, the students, early in their college career, can see what fellow students can accomplish and student presenters can revel in their role of researcher and educator. Such an event helps to build a tradition

  11. A Comparison of the Expertise of University Faculty and Students in American Political Science: Implications for Future Research on High School Civics and Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budano, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the disciplinary knowledge and nature of expertise among political science experts studying American political science. A comparison group of students who had completed an introductory undergraduate course in American political science also participated in the study. Numerous research studies have found that civics and…

  12. Student and Staff Perceptions of a Vacation Research Assistantship Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Felicity; Stephens, Danielle; Morgan, Jessica; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    There is a push for universities to equip graduates with desirable employability skills and "hands-on" experience. This article explores the perceptions of students and staff experiences of a research assistantship scheme. Nine students from the University of Worcester were given the opportunity to work as a student vacation researcher…

  13. The attitudes of medical students to research | Nel | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To establish the attitudes of University of Cape Town (UCT) medical students towards research and to investigate the factors influencing these attitudes. Methods. ... A number of perceived barriers to student research were identified including a lack of adequate training, time and research opportunities. Conclusion. Students ...

  14. Portuguese Public University Student Satisfaction: A Stakeholder Theory-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardes, Emerson; Alves, Helena; Raposo, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the importance of the student stakeholder to universities, the objective of this research project was to evaluate student satisfaction at Portuguese public universities as regards their self-expressed core expectations. The research was based both on stakeholder theory itself and on previous studies of university stakeholders.…

  15. [Cognitive research about the use of virtual worlds among the students enrolled to the faculty of medicine and surgery "Campus Bio-Medico University" in Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambone, V; Alessi, A; Macchi, I; Milighetti, S; Muzii, L

    2009-01-01

    The main difference between a virtual reality and a generic representation is to be directly involved into the action you are performing. As a matter of fact, within the shift from real to virtual world, our biological physique does not mutate but is amplified and connected to the virtual world by technological interfaces. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement (or replace) standard training. One of the two main goals of our study is to test, at first, how much students enrolled to the Faculty of Medicine at "University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome" are familiar with synthetic worlds, how long they have been using them and how they would like their Avatar to look like. Moreover, the second aim is to collect students' opinion about the use of virtual, interactive environments to enable learning and participation in dynamic, problem based, clinical, virtual simulations. Simulations might be used to allow learners to make mistakes safely in lieu of real life situations, learn from those mistakes and ultimately to improve performances by subsequent avoidance of those mistakes. The selected approach to the study is based on a semi-structured questionnaire made of 14 questions administered to all the medical students. Most of the students appear not to be very confident with virtual worlds mostly because of a lack of interest. However, a large majority of them are likely to use a virtual world for fun or escaping from reality. Students would select and customize their Avatar by giving her/him the same sexual identity, same figure, same social class but different employment. It is important to notice that a wide majority of the students is interested in practicing on a virtual world in order to manage new experiences and being able to face them; their willing is to get benefits from the ability to make mistakes in a safe environment as well as to record a positive impact on their understanding.

  16. Effects of Perceived Social Support and Psychological Resilience on Social Media Addiction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Okan; Tas, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of perceived social support and psychological resilience on social media addiction among university students. The research group was composed of 503 university students. The ages of participant students varied between 17 and 31 years old. 340 (67.6%) of the participants are female and 163 (32.4%) of them are…

  17. Chinese students studying at Australian universities with specific reference to nursing students: a narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Carol Chunfeng; Andre, Kate; Greenwood, Kenneth Mark

    2015-04-01

    To report the current knowledge on the Chinese nursing students' learning at Australian universities. The intent is to provide educators and researchers with a background to the contexts, the methodologies, the emphases of various relevant studies, and to provide recommendations for future research. Attracting international students has become an important part of Australian universities' business and contributes to their cultural diversity. Teaching international students has received considerable attention in the educational research literature. Experiences of international students can vary greatly depending on their country of origin. This paper critically reviews current literature relating to issues for Chinese students and in particular, Chinese nursing students, the biggest single group of international nursing students at Australian universities Narrative literature review. A comprehensive search of seven electronic databases for literature between 2003 and 2014 helped to identify qualitative and quantitative studies that addressed issues of Asian international students with English as a second language (ESL) (included nursing students) studying in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, the United States and China. Pertinent websites were also searched. The reference lists and bibliographies of retrieved articles were hand- searched to identify other relevant studies. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The majority of existing literature claimed that there is a range of challenges confronting international students including Chinese nursing students, in assimilation into their host country. These include issues with English language proficiency, cultural barriers, social problems, different learning styles, academic demands, perceived racism, homesickness, lack of assertiveness and financial problems. There is limited research about the Chinese students' study in Australia. In particular, the learning experience of Chinese nursing students

  18. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university..

  19. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university.

  20. Students' Usage of Facebook for Academic Purposes: A Case Study of Public and Private Universities in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongteeraparp, Ampai

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine how Thai university students used Facebook for academic purposes and how public university students differed from private university students in this regard. This was an exploratory research where a questionnaire was used to collect data from 460 undergraduate students in Bangkok, Thailand. The data…

  1. Estudiantes universitarios y juego patológico. Un estudio empírico en la Universidad de Murcia / University students and pathological gambling. A empirical research in the University of Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Ángeles Jiménez Tallón

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of pathological gambling characteristics in a sample of university students. In total, 908 students from different faculties at the University of Murcia (Spain were assessed by answering the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS. The results showed that 4.18% were probable pathological gamblers, 6.39% were at risk of pathological gambling, 49.5% could gamble without such risk, and 39.91% stated they never gambled. There were more male than female pathological gamblers and the male gamblers played more kinds of games than female gamblers. Male gamblers also spent more money on gambling per day than women and experienced more criticism for doing so than women.

  2. Budgeting and spending habits of university students in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, the majority of university students spend money on groceries and fast food. Female students are more likely than male students to have a budget. Recommendations to improve the budgeting and spending habits of university students are suggested. Keywords: budgeting, spending, habit, university students, ...

  3. Title: The Impact of 2006-2012 CReSIS Summer Research Programs that Influence Student's Choice of a STEM Related Major in College Authors: Dr. Darnell Johnson Djohnson@mail.ecsu.edu Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina 27909 Dr. Linda Hayden Haydenl@mindspring.com Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 27909

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: Researchers, policymakers, business, and industry have indicated that the United States will experience a future shortage of professionals in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. Several strategies have been suggested to address this impending shortage, one of which includes increasing the representation of females and minorities in the STEM fields. In order to increase the representation of underrepresented students in the STEM fields, it is important to understand the motivational factors that impact underrepresented students' interest in STEM academics and extracurricular programs. Research indicates that greater confidence leads to greater interest and vice versa (Denissen et al., 2007). In this paper, the mathematics research team examined the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority secondary students studying in STEM fields. An undergraduate research mathematics team focused on the link between summer research and the choice of an undergraduate discipline. A Chi Square Statistical Test was used to examine Likert Scale results on the attitude of students participating in the 2006-2012 Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Summer Research Programs for secondary students. This research was performed at Elizabeth City State University located in northeastern North Carolina about the factors that impact underrepresented students' choices of STEM related majors in college. Results can be used to inform and guide educators, administrators, and policy makers in developing programs and policy that support and encourage the STEM development of underrepresented students. Index Terms: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), Underrepresented students

  4. Factors promoting agricultural research in Nigeria universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... The purpose of the study is to determine the factors promoting agricultural research in Nigerian universities. Stratified ... Major findings of the study showed that funding, collaboration and ICT promote agricultural research in Nigerian universities.

  5. Research Universities in Developing Countries: Centers or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one of the key elements in the globalization of science, the research university is at the center of science, scholarship, and the new knowledge economies. The research university educates the new generation of personnel needed for technological and intellectual leadership, develops new knowledge so necessary for ...

  6. Student Attendance: Research and Strategies. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Howard

    2005-01-01

    What are the characteristics of successful student attendance programs for the high school? It is commonly believed and well supported by research that students who attend school regularly are more successful than those who do not. The challenge for high schools is to design and implement attendance policies and programs that monitor, encourage,…

  7. Factors Influencing Research Activity among Medical Students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at describing the factors that influence research among medical students in a Kenyan University. Subjects and Methods This descriptive cross sectional study involved medical students at the School of Medicine, University of Nairobi. An open questionnaire regarding research activity was administered to ...

  8. Factors Influencing Research Activity among Medical Students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-18

    Jul 18, 2010 ... This study aimed at describing the factors that influence research among medical students in a Kenyan University. Subjects and Methods. This descriptive cross sectional study involved medical students at the School of Medicine, University of Nairobi. An open question- naire regarding research activity was ...

  9. Perceived stress and bruxism in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Carpinelli, Luna; Savarese, Giulia

    2016-12-21

    Many studies have shown the correlation between bruxism and stress that affects the quality of life of university students. The present study highlights this correlation-for the first time-in a group of university students in Italy. We have investigated the prevalence of awake and asleep bruxism and its correlation with perceived stress in a group of 278 Italian undergraduate students (117 M). A self report questionnaire was constructed using a socio-demographic test, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the item n. 8 of the Fonseca Questionnaire for presence of bruxism. The perceived stress score using PSS-10 scale was 32.2 (SD 4.6, 95% CL 31.6-32.7) for all the subjects, with significant gender difference: M = 31.2 and F = 32.9 (P = 0.0019). The prevalence for awake bruxism was 37.9% (F = 40.8%; M = 34.2%,), while for sleep bruxism was 31.8% (F = 33.3%; M = 29.1%), both without significant gender difference. A positive correlation, with significant concordance and dependence, between stress score and awake bruxism was present for male students only. University students showed higher bruxism and stress levels compared to the general population, with higher stress for females, but, even if female students show higher stress, a correlation between stress and bruxism exists only for male gender. Further studies should be performed.

  10. THE COMPATIBILITY STUDENT CHOICE OF UNIVERSITY MAJORING; A PRELIMINARY STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daharnis Daharnis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuous improvements in order to optimize the basic education to higher education are still running. Based on that purpose, there are many factors to supporting the students' learning activities success; one of the factors is suitability with majors in university. The purpose of this study is to reveal the condition of the compatibility of students majoring with their interest, then to describe the information when the student choose their majoring. Samples in this study were 122 peoples, taken by random sampling from the Padang State University. Data obtained by distributing questionnaires. The results showed that there are students that their major do not match with their interest (22.13%, only 3.28% of students who feel compatible with their major. This result should be a major concern, particularly for counselor in schools for design counseling services to solve these problems. The result of this study used as a grand tour or a preliminary study for further research.

  11. Depression amongst Nigerian university students. Prevalence and sociodemographic correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewuya, Abiodun O; Ola, Bola A; Aloba, Olutayo O; Mapayi, Boladale M; Oginni, Olaleye O

    2006-08-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and examine the socio-demographic correlates of depressive disorder among university students in Western Nigeria. A representative sample of students living in the halls of residence of a federal university (n = 1,206) completed sets of questionnaires on socio-demographic details, problems encountered in the university, alcohol use and smoking. Depressive disorder was assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). A total of 101 (8.3%) students met the criteria for depressive disorder with 68 (5.6%) having minor depressive disorder and 33 (2.7%) having major depressive disorder. The factors that were significantly associated with depressive disorders in the students include problems with accommodation (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.79-4.16), very large family size (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.42-5.73), female gender (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.46-3.35), heavy cigarette smoking (OR 3.67, 95% CI 2.23-6.05) and high level of alcohol consumption (OR 9.44, 95% CI 3.32-26.89). Depression is common among Nigerian university students and significantly associated with sociodemographic factors. An effective model for the prediction of the development of depression in university students need to be developed and evaluated and interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of depression among this population need further research.

  12. Materials research at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Information briefly describing the total research activity related to the science of materials is reported. Emphasis is placed on physical and mechanical properties of composite materials, energy transportation, superconductors, microwave electronics, and solid state electrochemistry.

  13. Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Åke; Taube, Karin; Ahl, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The opinion of university students on distance education using ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Baile Ayensa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Distance education within the university context has been spread worldwide for more than four decades and has been mainly developed in the last years thanks to the use of the information and communications technology (ICT. There are few studies investigating the opinion of university students on distance education using ICT tools compared with traditional learning (face to face. There are no studies on the best valued teaching techniques either nor why they are considered so. This lack of research justifies the present study. Methodology. A survey was conducted among university students of Psychology from the Open University of Madrid (Udima. 177 students took part in the study filling in a 15 item questionnaire through a Google Docs. Results. The students consider distance education using ICT to be better or as good as traditional (face to face education; they also highly value this methodology as far as the improvement of their capabilities and academic achievement is concerned. Besides, the best valued didactic tools are those that seem to allow higher autonomy to the student and have less technological demands. Discussion. The results of this research are similar to those found in previous studies that analyzed other educational levels or populations. Paradoxically, synchronous or more innovative tools were not the best valued, probably because of the unique profile of the student within the distance education system.

  15. Thinking styles of university deaf or hard of hearing students and hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sanyin; Hu, Xiaozhong; Sin, Kuen Fung

    2016-08-01

    Although their university enrollment has increased dramatically over the past two decades, deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) students face great challenges and a tremendous environmental adjustment when entering a mainstream university. This study aims to facilitate DHH students' university success through exploring differences in thinking styles between DHH and hearing students from Art and Design academic disciplines in two universities in China. The Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (TSI-R2) and its accommodated version were administered to 286 hearing and 256 DHH students, respectively. A demographic sheet was administered to all 542 participants. Results show that DHH students tended to score significantly lower on Type I thinking styles (legislative and global), Type II executive style, and Type III external style than hearing students. In addition, differences in Type I styles (liberal and hierarchical) and Type II executive style between DHH and hearing students were significantly influenced by institution. The present research indicates that DHH and hearing students have significant differences in their thinking styles. This yields implications for the higher education of DHH students, and for deaf schools preparing DHH students for university entry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Portuguese state university performance according to students: an efficiency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Wagner Mainardes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research project is to evaluate the performance of Portuguese state universities in accordance with the expectations and satisfactions of their students and through recourse to the DEA methodology and thus representing one of the very few studies analysing university performance based upon student perceptions. According to an output oriented Variable Returns to Scale model, handling the responses returned by 1,669 students, the results demonstrate that faculties generally attain a good relationship between student expectations and their levels of satisfaction. We furthermore conclude that university scale does not guarantee efficiency. Hence, irrespective of size, universities are able to ensure the satisfaction of their students. Finally, the results show that satisfying only certain expectations related to specific aspects does not prove sufficient to guaranteeing overall student satisfaction. The analysis also correspondingly finds that while some decision making units prove efficient in satisfying expectations on specific aspects, they fail to attain such efficiency in the overall perspective of students.

  17. Student Communication and Study Habits of First-Year University Students in the Digital Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Echenique, Eliana; Bullen, Mark; Marqués-Molías, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the study habits of-university students, their use digital technologies and how they communicate with each other and their professors. We conclude that most students feel comfortable with digital technologies and that they use social media for connecting and interacting with friends rather than for academic…

  18. Factors Influencing Student Satisfaction in Universities in the Gulf Region: Does Gender of Students Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahoo, Sanjai K.; Harvey, Heather L.; Tamim, Rana M.

    2013-01-01

    While various research studies have focused on antecedents and consequences of student satisfaction, few studies have done so in the Gulf region. The objective of the present study was therefore to design and empirically examine a model of student satisfaction in a private university in the Gulf region that operates in a high-technology-enabled…

  19. Networks of Solidarity: Student mobilizations against sexual violence in universities

    OpenAIRE

    Vidu Afloarei, Ana

    2017-01-01

    [eng] According to the United States Department of Justice (Krebs et al., 2016), 1 in 5 women are sexually assaulted in college. Gender-based violence occurring in universities and on university campuses is an issue researched at the international level, especially in the United States (Coker et al., 2016). Several social and student movements have been working in different parts of the world to prevent and overcome this problem. Their influence has created situations favorable to the establi...

  20. Maritime Cyber Security University Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    computer network, against which agents launch common attacks ( SQL injection , DDoS, etc.). The decision aid will then be trained to recognize potential...POMDP Partially Observable Markov Decision Process RDC Research and Development Center SEIM Security Event Information Management SQL Structured Query

  1. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  2. Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal (ABSUMSAJ) provides a medium for the publication of scientific papers written primarily by and for medical ... Papers consistent with recent trends in the scientific and medical fields and in accordance with international guidelines are given preference.

  3. Modeling Environmental Literacy of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teksoz, Gaye; Sahin, Elvan; Tekkaya-Oztekin, Ceren

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposed an Environmental Literacy Components Model to explain how environmental attitudes, environmental responsibility, environmental concern, and environmental knowledge as well as outdoor activities related to each other. A total of 1,345 university students responded to an environmental literacy survey (Kaplowitz and Levine…

  4. University Students' Attitudes: Croatia versus Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Norman V.; Racic, Stanko; Gelo, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed Croatian and Turkish business school students, from universities emphasizing globalization, to analyze whether consideration for travel to the USA is affected by attitude toward their own country and the USA. The results from comparing and contrasting differences between these countries and differences between males and females in each…

  5. The African Student in the American University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Doris

    This paper gathers information on the values, cognition, and educational background of African students studying at universities in the United States. The section on values notes that Americans are task-oriented individualists, while Africans are primarily relationship-oriented collectivists. These values of sharing and relationship orientation…

  6. Mindfulness, Stress, and Coping among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Angele; Rodger, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 135 first-year university students living in residence completed questionnaires that measured individual differences in mindfulness, coping styles, and perceived stress. Findings revealed significant positive relationships between mindfulness and rational coping, and significant negative relationships with emotional and avoidant coping…

  7. Bullying amongst University Students in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Helen; Myers, Carrie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    This study with 20 university students examined perspectives in three different participant roles: the perpetrator, the target and the bystander. The purpose of the exercise was to resolve the outcome of an alleged incident of cyberbullying using a social network site via the means of a restorative conference. The findings suggest that the power…

  8. Empowering University Students through Physical Fitness for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated 252 University of Ilorin students' awareness of the benefits of physical fitness and the need for empowering them for lifetime productivity. Data were collected using a self developed questionnaire and analysed using frequency counts, percentage and chi-square.

  9. Determinants of Happiness in Undergraduate University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Deborah M.; MacLeod, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between happiness, and six other life domains: Academic Success, Financial Security, Familial Support, Living Environment, Self-Image and Social Relations. Participants were one hundred and ninety- two students from a small undergraduate university. The purpose of the study was to determine which life domain…

  10. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    At low power research reactor is being set up in Andhra University to cater to the needs of researchers and isotope users by the Department of Atomic Energy in collaboration with Andhra University. This reactor is expected to be commissioned by 2001-02. Departments like Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics, Life Sciences, Pharmacy, Medicine and Engineering would be the beneficiaries of the availability of this reactor. In this paper, details of the envisaged research programme and training activities are discussed. (author)

  11. Smoking at school: views of Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Nazmiye; Erdogan, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    The recent interest in cigarette smoking among university students has brought attention to problems concerning opinions, attitudes, prevention, health education, policy formulation and implementation. This survey research tested five hypotheses on the views of college students about smoking in school hallways and cafeteria, compliance with anti smoking laws, considering cigarette smoking as an expression of freedom of choice, teachers' smoking in classrooms and in their offices, and school administration's policy on enforcing the law. Hypothesized differences between students' views on the issues according to gender, smoking status and years at school were investigated. Data were obtained from 3,659 students attending six universities in Ankara, Turkey. The study findings provided support for all the hypothesized differences (except a single issue). Males and females differed significantly on all the issues studied. The majority of nonsmoking students have anti-smoking views in regards of the studied issues as compared to regular and occasional smokers. Smokers and nonsmokers markedly disagree on banning cigarette smoking in the cafeteria and hallways. However, the majority of students are against teachers' smoking in classrooms and in their offices with the doors open. Although most students want a smoke free environment, there is no active-anti smoking policy on smoking by universities. Findings point out the need for campus-wide effective smoking prevention programs, as well as cessation programs and services for the students.

  12. Lifestyle practice among Malaysian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Mohd Noor, Nor Aini Binti

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that a healthy lifestyle is of benefit in the prevention of diseases such as cancer and promotion of well-being. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine lifestyle practice and associated factors among university students in Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted over six months from November 2011 until May 2012 among the students from the Management and Science University. This study was approved by its ethical committee , the students being explained the objective and invited to participate. A consent form was signed by all study participants. Questionnaire was distributed randomly to the students of the five faculties through their lecturers in different faculty. For univariate analysis t-test and ANOVA test were performed. Multiple linear regression used for multivariate analysis using SPSS 13.0. A total number of 1100 students participated with a mean age of 22.1±2.21 (SD) years. The majority were 22 years or younger (56.3%), female (54%), Malay (61.5%), single (92.3%), with family monthly income ≥5000 Ringgit Malaysia (41.2%). Regarding lifestyle, about were 31.6% smokers, 75.6% never drank alcohol and 53.7% never exercised. Multivariate analysis showed that age, sex, race, parent marital status, participant marital status, type of faculty, living status, smoking status, exercise, residency, brushing teeth, fiber intake and avoid fatty food significantly influenced the practice of drinking alcohol among university students (p=0.006, p=0.042, pcoffee consumption and fiber intake were significantly influenced the practice of fruits consumption (p=0.008, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p=0.002, p<0.001, P<0.001; respectively). This study showed a poor practice of healthy lifestyle among university students. Therefore universities should emphasize a healthy lifestyle in all faculties as a required subject. Socio-demographic characteristics significantly influenced practice and thus

  13. Behavioral Activation for Moderately Depressed University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrysiak, Michael; Nicholas, Christopher; Hopko, Derek R.

    2009-01-01

    Although depression is prevalent among university students, limited and dated research has examined the efficacy of behavioral interventions in treating this population (C. Lee, 2005). On the basis of a modified version of the Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD; D. R. Hopko & C. W. Lejuez, 2007; C. W. Lejuez, D. R. Hopko, & S. D.…

  14. An Evaluation of the University of Education, Winneba Student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Abstract. In recent years, school-based mentoring for student teaching interns through School-University partnerships has become an increasingly important aspect of the process by which teacher trainees learn how to teach. However, sustainable partnerships require careful consideration and thoughtful research if they are ...

  15. Pedagogical Management of University Students' Communication Ability Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatolievna, Spirchagova Tatiana; Munirovna, Nasyrova Albina; Kasimovna, Vakhitova Dilyara; Mirzayanovna, Sadrieva Liliya; Anatolievna, Brodskaya Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    The development of social interaction forms emphasizes urgency and importance of the topic. The purpose of the study is to find out peculiarities of pedagogical management of university students' communication ability development. The leading approach to the research was the narrative approach which allows considering pedagogical management of…

  16. Campus-Based University Students' Use of Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, Paul; Caspi, Avner; Trumper, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    This investigation explores the kinds of study strategies used by campus-based university students in terms of the dialogues they engaged in while learning physics and chemistry in both large and small classes. Research objectives were threefold: (1) to document what dialogue types, mediated through which resources, were generally utilized by…

  17. What Factors Influence Vietnamese Students' Choice of University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Mai Thi Ngoc; Thorpe, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the factors that influence Vietnamese students' choice of university in a little researched context where the effects of globalization and education reform are changing higher education. Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative survey was completed by 1,124 current or recently completed university…

  18. Demanding life situations in university students: gender aspect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Millová, Katarína; Blatný, Marek; Kohoutek, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2008), s. 12-19 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : coping strategies * demanding life situations * gender differences Subject RIV: AN - Psychology http://www.spao.eu/archive/2008/spao2008_demanding_life_situations_in_university_students.pdf

  19. University Student and Lecturer Perceptions of Positive Emotions in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Anna Dluzewska; Fitness, Julie; Wood, Leigh Norma

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation exploring the experience and functionality of positive feelings and emotions in learning and teaching. The role of emotions in learning is receiving increasing attention; however, few studies have researched how university students and academics experience and perceive positive emotions. A prototype…

  20. Attitudes of Kuwait University Students towards Modern Standard Arabic (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhmama, Djilali; Bouhmama, Soumia

    2015-01-01

    This research work endeavors to examine Kuwait University language students' attitude towards Modern Standard Arabic under the spread of English as a dominant language. It attempts also to examine differences between males and females' attitudes towards English as medium of instruction as opposed to Modern Standard Arabic. The undertaken study…

  1. English Grammar and Thai University Students: An Insurmountable Linguistic Battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengboon, Saksit

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating English grammar knowledge of a group of Thai university students. The three main research questions revolved around their knowledge of English grammar, the kinds of difficulties they had encountered in using the grammar as well as their perceptions of the roles of grammar in using English. The participants were…

  2. University Teaching with a Disability: Student Learnings beyond the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Lynnaire; Kotevski, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the learning experience of university students who were tutored by a teacher with quadriplegia mixed type cerebral palsy. It was inspired by Pritchard's [2010. "Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers." "Journal of Social Inclusion" 1 (1): 43-51] argument that the presence of people with a…

  3. Student Migration & the State University: Analysis, Strategies & Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murabito, William J.

    This study sought to determine why significant numbers of potential students at the State University of New York (SUNY) were enrolling in higher education facilities out-of-state and in private institutions. The study's work group participants included system and campus experts in the areas of academics, policy analysis, institutional research,…

  4. Gender differences in cigarette smoking among university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined gender differences in smoking among university students using a descriptive survey research design. Seventy-two participants (male: 34; female: 38; age range: 21 to 35 years; mean age: 25.6 years) were randomly drawn from all faculties who were attending a seminar on leadership. A questionnaire ...

  5. Psychological Well-Being and Internet Addiction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardak, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between Internet addiction and psychological well-being. Participants were 479 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale and the Scales of Psychological Well-Being. The relationships between Internet addiction and psychological…

  6. Teaching academic writing to first year university students: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research has pointed out that assessment practices related to academic writing are often unclear to students and this has consequences to their styles of learning hence the overall outcomes of their university studies (Lillis, 2006, 1999; Ivanič, 1998; Lea & Street, 1998). The purpose of this paper is to critically examine to ...

  7. An Evaluation of the University of Education, Winneba Student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, school-based mentoring for student teaching interns through School-University partnerships has become an increasingly important aspect of the process by which teacher trainees learn how to teach. However, sustainable partnerships require careful consideration and thoughtful research if they are to be ...

  8. Responses of African Universities to HIV and Aids: Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... University to HIV/AIDS should be. Implications of these findings for counselling including the need for counsellors to collaborate with faculty and administration to mainstream HIV/AIDS are discussed. Keywords: HIV/AIDS; Counselling; Students' Perspectives on HIV/AIDS. International Journal of Educational Research Vol ...

  9. E-Book versus Printed Materials: Preferences of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumaoglu, Gonca; Sacici, Esra; Torun, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Reading habits, accessing resources, and material preferences change rapidly in a digital world. University students, as digital natives, are accessing countless resources, from lecture notes to research papers electronically. The change of reading habits with a great scale has led to differentiation on accessibility of resources, archiving them…

  10. Self esteem and assertiveness of final year Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagözoğlu, Serife; Kahve, Emine; Koç, Oznur; Adamişoğlu, Derya

    2008-07-01

    This study developed a quantitative methodology to ascertain the level of self esteem and assertiveness of last year students in baccalaureate degree programs at Cumhuriyet University Nursing School, School for Health Sciences' Midwifery School, Education Faculty's Mathematics Teacher, Classroom Teacher, and Social Sciences Teacher programs and to determine if there is a correlation between self esteem and assertiveness. The research population was a total of 372 students who were in their final year of university in these programs. Sampling was not done in the research, the entire population was studied. However there was a total of 82 students who were not included in the research because of illness, absenteeism, registration on hold, who could not be found on campus or who did not want to participate in the research and who did not correctly complete the survey form. The research was conducted with total of 290 students. Total response rate was 77.9%. The data were collected using a "Personal Information Form," Stanley Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory (SEI) and Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS). Frequency distribution, t test, correlation and variance analysis were used in the analysis of the data. The results of the study were that the nursing students had the highest scores from SEI (80.64+/-15.83). Similarly the nursing students had the highest scores on the RAS (36.29+/-25.33).

  11. Teaching Hypothesis-Oriented Thinking to Medical Students: The University of Florida's Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacpoole, Peter W.; Fisher, Waldo R.; Flotte, Terence R.; Geiser, Edward A.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Hutson, Alan D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes student-led research projects conducted at the University of Florida's General Clinical Research Center. First-year medical and M.D.-Ph.D. students collaborate on a hypothesis-driven experiment involving students as volunteer subjects and investigators. Feedback indicates students find the program useful and that it encourages pursuit of…

  12. Does 12-Week Latin Dance Training Affect the Self-Confidence of the University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric, Odemis; Ilhan, Adilogullari

    2016-01-01

    In this research, it is aimed to investigate the effect of 12-week Latin dance training on the self-confidence of university students. This research was conducted with a total of 60 students, including 30 students as control and 30 students as the working group. A 33-item self-confidence scale developed by Akin (2007) was applied to both control…

  13. Great Zimbabwe University Psychology Students' Perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to explore psychology students' perceptions of field trips to two prisons, two psychiatric hospitals and a special school. This research is premised on exploring views of students on the rationale, organization as well as effectiveness of field trips. A quantitative approach was adopted, particularly making use ...

  14. Building Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research Networks: Reflections on Qualitative Research Group (QRG) at the University of Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kerstin Stieber; Halas, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    As qualitative research methodologies continue to evolve and develop, both students and experienced researchers are showing greater interest in learning about and developing new approaches. To meet this need, faculty at the University of Manitoba created the Qualitative Research Group (QRG), a community of practice that utilizes experiential…

  15. Engaging High School Students as Co-Researchers in Qualitative Research: Logistical, Methodological and Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dana L.; McVea, Kristine L. S. P.; Creswell, John W.; Harter, Lynn; Mickelson, William; McEntarffer, Rob

    This paper explores six phases of a research project designed specifically to engage high school students as co-researchers in a multisite qualitative study exploring perceptions of tobacco use among high school students in four schools. It describes how university researchers collaborated with the high school students and summarizes seven major…

  16. Searching for Psychological Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelino António Gonçalves Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aims to identify psychological predictors of suicidal ideation in university students. We collected a sample of 366 participants, representing a population of 7102 students from a university in northern Portugal (95% CI. Both in the whole sample and in the intra-gender analysis, students with suicidal ideation revealed higher levels of depressive symptoms, loneliness, social anxiety and fears of abandonment, and lower levels of comfort with intimacy and trust in others. Loneliness and depression are significant predictors of suicidal ideation, with an odds ratio of 1.095 and 1.108, respectively. The results were consistent with those found in the literature, and call for more research and implementation of intervention protocols in university populations.

  17. [Knowledge about sexuality in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P; Alvarado, R

    1989-01-01

    This study explores the level of sexual knowledge among chilean university students in 4 different professions, compares their responses and verifies them with selected socio-demographic variables. 813 university students were interviewed in 1st and 3rd year medical school, law and engineering from the University of Chile and in education, from the Superior Blas Canas Institute of Pedagogy. The group is equally divided between each of the 4 professions; 64.7% are men with 95.5% single and 84.7% are between 17.22; only 37.5% attended a mixed school; 73.1% are Catholic. The survey aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) but this article only analyzes the attitudes of students through 6 variables: anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery, contraception, venereal diseases, sources claimed by the interviewee to receive information and self-evaluation of actual levels of knowledge. Results demonstrated knowledge about anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery and venereal diseases, but great disparity with contraception. Students are not learning about methods of contraception in school, possibly due to fear on the part of the faculty or their own lack of information. 3 factors influenced levels of knowledge: 1) formal education; 2) experience; and 3) personal interest. The highest results were from students of medicine with the lowest being students in engineering and education. Those that were in their 3rd year of school or married appeared more knowledgeable possibly due to more sexual experience and the need to prevent pregnancies. The females in all variables scored higher due to their own interest in preventing pregnancies, and because women are socialized in interpersonal relations and maternity issues. More than 1/2 the students gave themselves bad evaluations concerning their levels of sexual knowledge.

  18. Marketing Communications Mix of Universities - Communication With Students in an Increasing Competitive University Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašticová Martina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this period of increasing competition among universities and demographic decline in the Czech Republic, every manager working within the academic sphere must focus on optimizing the marketing activities of tertiary education. The aim of this study is to analyze the methods and styles of marketing communications universities and their faculties use when communicating with prospective students. The paper identifies procedures which help to optimize the choice, combination and connection of elements and activities of the marketing communications mix in relation with prospective students. A semi-structured interview and questionnaire method were used to achieve the research objective. The study concludes by discussing the research outcomes. Also, practical recommendations are discussed and interpreted and proposals are presented for further research into the marketing strategy of Czech universities and their faculties.

  19. Research: Clinical electives at the University of Michigan from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research: Clinical electives at the University of Michigan from the perspective of Ghanaian medical students: A qualitative study. ... The 60- to 90-minute interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and transcripts were coded by three investigators in an iterative process of thematic identification, codebook ...

  20. Mistreatment of university students most common during medical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuutinen Matti

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study concerns the occurrence of various forms of mistreatment by staff and fellow students experienced by students in the Faculty of Medicine and the other four faculties of the University of Oulu, Finland. Methods A questionnaire with 51 questions on various forms of physical and psychological mistreatment was distributed to 665 students (451 females after lectures or examinations and filled in and returned. The results were analysed by gender and faculty. The differences between the males and females were assessed statistically using a test for the equality of two proportions. An exact two-sided P value was calculated using a mid-P approach to Fisher's exact test (the null hypothesis being that there is no difference between the two proportions. Results About half of the students answering the questionnaire had experienced some form of mistreatment by staff during their university studies, most commonly humiliation and contempt (40%, negative or disparaging remarks (34%, yelling and shouting (23%, sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based mistreatment (17% and tasks assigned as punishment (13%. The students in the Faculty of Medicine reported every form of mistreatment more commonly than those in the Faculties of Humanities, Education, Science and Technology. Experiences of mistreatment varied, but clear messages regarding its patterns were to be found in each faculty. Female students reported more instances of mistreatment than males and were more disturbed by them. Professors, lecturers and other staff in particular mistreated female students more than they mistreated males. About half of the respondents reported some form of mistreatment by their fellow students. Conclusion Students in the Faculty of Medicine reported the greatest amount of mistreatment. If a faculty mistreats its students, its success in the main tasks of universities, research, teaching and learning, will be threatened. The results

  1. News UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

  2. Investigating Daily Mobile Device Use Among University Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, Ahmad R.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates daily mobile device use among Indonesian university students by using survey data collected in the first quarter of 2016. The data show that 55.49% of the students spend more than five hours a day on their mobile devices. OLS regression analysis shows that female students, owners of the most expensive smartphone or tablet, and those who access social media apps and play mobile games frequently are more likely to spend more time on their mobile devices each day. Contrary to that, those who consider themselves as laggards are less likely to do so. The findings in this study help better understand how university students in Indonesia use their mobile device and lay a foundation as part of a larger research agenda about the relationship between mobile technology and education in Indonesia.

  3. Risky behaviours among university students in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of psychoactive substances is one of the most important public health issues. Tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs are among the top risk factors for ill-health defined by World Health Organisation. The risky behaviours acquired in teenage can be magnified or decreased during university when a person starts having more awareness about the importance of own wellness. This paper describes the results of the project "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk" with respect to risky behaviours in a large sample of Italian university students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 18 questions of the survey "Sportello Salute Giovani" dealing with risky behaviors, the use of psychoactive substances such as tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs were included. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Besides, chi square test were used to test the differences in sex, age class and socio-economic status. RESULTS: About 24% of the interviewed students currently smokes. 89% and 42.2% respectively drinks at least rarely or weekly beer, wine or spirits. About 40% of students smoked at least a joint and about 2% used other drugs (mostly cocaine. CONCLUSION: The "Sportello Salute Giovani" survey suggests that the frequency of risky behaviours in Italian university students is not reassuring, although they should be aware about the negative consequences on their and others health because of their educational level.

  4. Sociological Analysis of Professional Identity of the Students, Case Study: Students of University of Mazandaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Heydari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By studying of present situation of universities in Iran, through research regarding students' lives, this article seeks to consider the features of students' professional identity. The professional identity is a social one, made, in relation with other individuals, through practical learning and instruction and professional experiments. For the students, the formally start of a social involvement, coincides with the start of their studies, and the formation of their professional identities will be intensified and reinforced through practical instructions concerning their fields. The method used in this study is qualitative research in the way of grounded theory method. To create the sample, the theoretical method is used and continued to reach saturation stage. The findings, hence, are collected applying the prevalence interview technique for 19 students and group interview for 15 students of University ofMazandaran. The research findings suggest that, the professional identities of the students have two features of scientific and personal identities. The students' scientific identity is formed by the students' tendencies and attitudes, and also their scientific actions and efforts. The personal identity is a perception that student builds up of himself as a scientific actor present at university environment. The development of a professional identity, in addition, is associated with the position of the individual within the community. Hence, the gender, socio-economic status, supports by family and friends, individual's social environment and networks influence on the formation of his professional identity.

  5. International Community-University Research Alliance Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The International Community-University Research Alliance program (ICURA) is a joint initiative of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and IDRC. ICURA seeks to foster innovative research, training and the creation of new knowledge in areas of importance to the social, cultural and economic ...

  6. Is Our Safety and Security Guaranteed on University of Cape Coast Campus? Undergraduates Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, G. A.; Akoto, J. S.; Abnory, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    In higher education like other institutions, safety and security of persons particularly students resident on university campuses remain topical. The limited research conducted on the experiences of university students in Ghana reflects paucity of literature on safety and security on university campuses in Ghana where such issues have been…

  7. Analysis of Instructional Impact on the Running Performance of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Most universities provide a plethora of physical activity courses in which students may choose to participate. Little research exists on the instructional impact of university students' participation in physical activity courses. Although some papers have produced positive findings regarding the Sport Education model in the university setting,…

  8. Problematic Alcohol Use among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfa Mekonen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlcohol is attributable to many diseases and injury-related health conditions, and it is the fifth leading risk factor of premature death globally. Hence, the objective of this study was to assess the proportion and associated factors of problematic alcohol use among University students.Material and methodsCross-sectional study was conducted among 725 randomly selected University students from November to December 2015. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire, and problematic alcohol use was assessed by Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Chi-square test was used to show association of problematic use and each variable and major predicators was identified using logistic regression with 95% confidence interval (CI; and variables with p-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.ResultsAbout 83 (11.4% of the samples were problematic alcohol users of which 6.8% had medium level problems and 4.6% had high level problems. Significantly associated variables with problematic alcohol use among students were presence of social phobia (AOR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.8, lifetime use of any substance (AOR = 6.9, 95% CI: 3.8, 12.7, higher score in students cumulative grade point average (AOR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4, 0.9, and having intimate friend who use alcohol (AOR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.8.ConclusionProblematic alcohol use among university students was common and associated with social phobia, poor academic achievement, lifetime use of any substance, and peer pressure. Strong legislative control of alcohol in universities is important to reduce the burden of alcohol.

  9. The Inequality of Self-Efficacy between Junior College and Traditional University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education research highlights the difficulties students face when transitioning from a junior college to a traditional university. This study explored a gap between junior vs. traditional university students' academic self-efficacy beliefs. This study also controlled for the effects of the student role-identity and academic performance on…

  10. Enhancement of quality in chemical inquiry by pre-university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rens, L.; Pilot, A.; van Dijk, H.

    2004-01-01

    Our pre-university chemistry students face problems achieving sufficient quality in chemical inquiry. To try to enhance the quality of student performance in chemical inquiry, Dutch pre-university chemistry students (age 17) carried out an authentic research project on 'Diffusion of ions in

  11. Enhancement of quality in chemical inquiry by pre-university students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rens, L.; Pilot, A.; van Dijk, H.

    2005-01-01

    Our pre-university chemistry students face problems achieving sufficient quality in chemical inquiry. To try to enhance the quality of student performance in chemical inquiry, Dutch pre-university chemistry students (age 17) carried out an authentic research project on 'Diffusion of ions in

  12. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  13. The Monsoon Wedding Phenomenon: Understanding Indian Students Studying in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard; Kumar, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    How does the University sector identify and support the diverse needs of Indian students? This paper reports on a research project carried out on undergraduate students from India enrolled at a Melbourne-based University. The focus is the need to understand why Indian students choose an overseas destination for tertiary study. The intent is to…

  14. Participation in a scientific pre-university program and medical students' interest in an academic career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Leng, W.E. (Wendy E.); K.M. Stegers-Jager (Karen); M.Ph. Born (Marise); Frens, M.A. (Maarten A.); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The proportion of medical doctors involved in research activities is declining. Undergraduate medical research programs are positively associated with medical students' research interest. Scientific pre-university programs (SPUPs) outside the medical domain are also

  15. UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

    2004-07-01

    The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

  16. Sleep and somatic complaints in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlarb AA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Angelika A Schlarb,1,* Merle Claßen,1,* Sara M Hellmann,1 Claus Vögele,2 Marco D Gulewitsch3 1Faculty of Psychology and Sports Science, University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany; 2Faculty of Psychology, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg; 3Faculty of Science, Department of Psychology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Sleep problems are common among university students. Poor sleep is associated with impaired daily functioning, increased risk of psychiatric symptoms, and somatic complaints such as pain. Previous results suggest that poor sleep exacerbates pain, which in turn negatively affects sleep. The purpose of the present study was to determine prevalence rates, comorbidity, and role of depression as a factor of moderating the relationship between sleep and physical complaints in German university students. Samples and methods: In total, 2443 German university students (65% women completed a web survey. Self-report measures included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, three modules of the Patient Health Questionnaire, and a questionnaire on the functional somatic syndromes (FSSs. Results: More than one-third (36.9% reported poor sleep as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Somatoform syndrome was identified in 23.5%, and the prevalence of any FSS was 12.8%. Self-reported sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep disturbances, use of sleep medications, and daytime dysfunctioning were significant predictors of somatoform syndrome, whereas sleep efficiency and sleep duration influenced somatic complaints indirectly. Moderate correlations were found between stress, anxiety, somatoform syndrome, depression, and overall sleep quality. The effect of somatic complaints on sleep quality was associated with the severity of depression. Anxiety shows direct effects on somatization and depression but only indirect associations with sleep quality

  17. University Students' Views about Their Cyber Bullying Behaviors and Self-Exposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the views of university students on the presence and exposure of cyber bully behavior. The research study group consists of 10 male students who are higher education students. One of the qualitative research methods is "case study". In this direction, a "semi-structured interview form"…

  18. Frequency of childhood abuse in university students

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    Cem Zeren

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Child abuse or bad behaviors against childrenis a social, medical problem and is old as the historyof humanity. The analysis of the frequency of childhoodabuse in university students and the comparison of thefactors related with abuse were aimed in this study.Materials and methods: A questionnaire of social anddemographic features and Childhood Trauma Questionnairewhich is valid and reliable in Turkey were used inthis study.Results: The questionnaires were performed to 150students and 60 % of them were female. The mean agewas 19.04±1.28 (17-26 years. The emotional (p=0.025,physical (p=0.004 and sexual (p=0.001 abuse of malestudents were significantly higher than female students.The emotional (p=0.009 and total (p=0.026 abuse ofstudents who had families with lower income levels weresignificantly high. Also the frequency of emotional abusein students with divorced parents was significantly increased(p=0.012.Conclusions: Since child abuse and neglect may beassociated with the stresses of family life, the economicand social stresses of family should be determined andsolution advices to these should be developed. A multidisciplinarymanagement is required to detect, treat andrehabilitate the childhood abuse.Key words: Childhood, university student, sexual abuse

  19. Breastfeeding knowledge of university nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Azza; Bantz, Diana; Richardson, Clara

    2011-01-01

    To assess breastfeeding knowledge among senior nursing students and identify the types of breastfeeding knowledge the students have. We also investigated the relationship between the different types of breastfeeding knowledge. An exploratory descriptive design used a convenience sample of 115 students from two schools of nursing in two Midwestern universities. Students who completed maternal/child nursing didactic and clinical courses were eligible to participate. A Breastfeeding Knowledge Questionnaire adapted from Brodribb, Fallon, Jackson, and Hegney (2008) was used. The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering knowledge about benefits of breastfeeding, physiology of lactation, and breastfeeding management. Content and face validity were considered, and Cronbach's α for internal consistency was 0.70. Eligible students completed the questionnaire in class. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to describe student knowledge and to test the differences in breastfeeding knowledge. Findings revealed a mean knowledge score of 17 ± 2.9 (total possible score 24). There was a significant difference in the students' knowledge regarding physiology of lactation and benefits of breastfeeding (t = -3.615, p = .000) and between benefits and breastfeeding management (t = 5.255, p = .000). There was a positive relationship between knowledge of physiology of lactation and breastfeeding management (r = 0.369, p = .000). Strategies are warranted to improve breastfeeding education in the nursing curriculum, focusing on breastfeeding management skills.

  20. Parental Influences on Hmong University Students' Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports findings from a series of focus groups conducted on Hmong American university students. The purpose of the focus groups was to understand how, from the perspective of Hmong American students themselves, acculturative stress and parents influencedacademic success. Findings of a thematic analysis centered on general themes across focus group respondents that related to parental socialization, gendered socialization, and ethnic identification. Each identified themes is discussed in reference to gendered patterns of experiences in Hmong American families and in reference to academic success.

  1. Student Research Society of the Pediatric Surgery Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Veselyi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Student research society of clinic of children surgery of Donetsk National Medical university named after M. Gorkyi exists since 1968. Our student research society has two main directions in activity of the students — theoretical and practical ones, and both of them are presented during meetings of research society. During a spring semester the student scientific conference is carried out. The best works are represented on University, Ukrainian and international student conferen-ces. The obligatory form of activity in student research society is the immediate involvement in diagnostic and medical manipulations. The enhancement of activity of student research society allows increase learning efficiency of children surgery students at Higher Medical School.

  2. The importance of university research in maintaining the nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the university in maintaining and revitalizing the nuclear option should have four goals. First, it must attract highly skilled students who have an interest in math and science and help foster their interest in nuclear science and engineering. Next, it must present a state-of-the-art educational program that contains meaningful research to maintain these students. The third goal of nuclear engineering departments is to provide the nontechnical student a fair assessment of benefits and risks associated with commercial nuclear power relative to other sources of electricity. Lastly, it must effectively communicate to all students a compelling vision of nuclear power as a vital energy resource that will grow. The most difficult role for the university is to successfully convey a future for those in the nuclear science and engineering program

  3. Building technology transfer within research universities an entrepreneurial approach

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    For the past number of years, academic entrepreneurship has become one of the most widely studied topics in the entrepreneurship literature. Yet, despite all the research that has been conducted to date, there has not been a systematic attempt to analyze critically the factors which lie behind successful business spin-offs from university research. In this book, a group of academic thought-leaders in the field of technology transfer examine a number of areas critical to the promotion of start-ups on campus. Through a series of case studies, they examine current policies, structures, program initiatives and practices of fourteen international universities to develop a theory of successful academic entrepreneurship, with the aim of helping other universities to enhance the quality of their university transfer programs. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students working on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology transfer, as well as senior managers and policymakers.

  4. iUTAH Summer Research Institutes: Supporting the STEM Pipeline Through Engagement of High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students, Secondary Teachers, and University Faculty in Authentic, Joint Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L. A.; Malone, M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple types of programs are needed to support the STEM workforce pipeline from pre-college through graduate school and beyond. Short-term, intensive programs provide opportunities to participate in authentic scientific research for students who may not be sure of their interest in science and for teachers who may be unable to devote an entire summer to a research experience. The iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-Systainability) Summer Research Institute utilizes an innovative approach for a 5-day program that engages high school and undergraduate students as well as middle and high school teachers in conducting research projects led by graduate students and faculty members. Each Institute involves 3-4 half to full-day research projects. Participants collect (usually in the field) and analyze data for use in on-going research or that is related to a current research project. The participants work in groups with the graduate students to create a poster about each research project. They present their posters on the last day of the Institute at the state-wide meeting of all researchers and involved in this EPSCoR-funded program. In addition to introducing participants to research, one of the Institute's goals is to provide opportunities for meaningful near-peer interactions with students along the STEM pipeline from high school to undergraduate to graduate school. On the end-of-Institute evaluations, almost all students have reported that their discussions with other participants and with graduate students and faculty were a "Highly effective" or "Effective" part of the Institute. In response to a question about how the Institute will impact their course choices or their plans to pursue a career in science, many high school and undergraduate students have noted that they plan to take more science courses. Each year several undergraduates who were previously unsure about a career in science have indicated that they now intend to pursue a

  5. The Relationship between Self Concept and Response towards Student's Academic Achievement among Students Leaders in University Putra Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamaludin; Ghazali, Mazila; Hassan, Aminuddin

    2011-01-01

    This is a quantitative research using correlational method. The purpose of this research is to study the relationship between self concept and ability to handle stress on academic achievement of student leaders in University Putra Malaysia. The sample size consists of 106 respondents who are the Student Supreme Council and Student Representative…

  6. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  7. Bullying amongst University Students in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cowie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study with 20 university students examined perspectives in three different participant roles: the perpetrator, the target and the bystander. The purpose of the exercise was to resolve the outcome of an alleged incident of cyberbullying using a social network site via the means of a restorative conference. The findings suggest that the power of the peer group needs to be fully understood if cyberbullying, is to be tackled efficiently. The bystanders tended to blame the victim and were reluctant to intervene, the victim felt let down and marginalised by peers’ indifference and hostility, and the bully failed to realise or understand the consequences of their actions. The study offers ideas for strategies and policies to address the issue of cyberbullying with university students.

  8. Migraine among medical students in Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ahmed, Samar Farouk; Alroughani, Raed; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-10

    Medical students routinely have triggers, notably stress and irregular sleep, which are typically associated with migraine. We hypothesized that they may be at higher risk to manifest migraine. We aimed to determine the prevalence of migraine among medical students in Kuwait University. This is cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months were subjected to two preliminary questions and participants with at least one positive response were asked to perform the validated Identification of Migraine (ID Migraine™) test. Frequency of headache per month and its severity were also reported. Migraine headache was suggested in 27.9% subjects based on ID-Migraine™. Migraine prevalence (35.5% and 44%, versus 31.1%, 25%, 21.1%, 14.8%, 26.5%, p Kuwait University compared to other published studies. The migraine prevalence, frequency and headache severity, all increased in the final two years of education.

  9. [Trends in food consumption of university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Piero, Alexia; Bassett, Natalia; Rossi, Analia; Sammán, Norma

    2015-04-01

    The university students need to consolidate good dietary habits based on an adequate selection of food, which is a factor of fundamental importance to maintain good health and prevent disease. to evaluate the food intake and diet profile of university students from Tucumán and its variation over time. Analyse if they accomplish current dietary recommendations. Data collection was carried out during the years 1998-1999 (G1) and 2012-2013 (G2); was performed by a self-survey and food frequency questionnaire of food consumption. It was applied to 329 university students selected randomly. The dietary pattern was described by frequency of usual consumption of principal food groups. Students were 25.2% male and 74.8% female, mean age 23 ± 3 years. In general, in both groups most of the students had a normal BMI, but had a high percentage of men with overweight (18.2%) and obesity (12.1%) and women with underweight (11.6%). According to the groups and sex analysis some significant statistically differences in macronutrient composition of the diet were observed: the G1 was higher carbohydrate intake than proteins and lipids; also differences in the intake of some micronutrients were found, with a higher intake of iron and less intake of vitamins B1, B2, niacin and C in G2. The diet was monotonous for both groups and with differences in the profile of nutrients. The most notable was the gradual increase consumption of sugary products, processed foods, snacks and decrease consumption of dairy, fish, fruits and vegetables in G2. In both groups, adequacy of dietary intake of the university students did not cover the recommendations of iron, calcium and vitamin A. Given the food profile observed in the student population, is warned the need to promote changes to prevent the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease in adulthood; it should be convenient to carrying out food and nutrition education. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All

  10. Iranian university students' perceived reproductive health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Abedian, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    One proposed strategy to improve youth health is needs assessment, a process for determining and addressing the needs of individual groups. The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes and perceptions of Iranian university students toward reproductive health needs, in order to promote the provision of reproductive health services. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 548 students who were randomly selected from eight universities in Sari City, Iran. Topics covered the participants' attitudes towards reproductive health needs as well as their opinion about proper sources of information in this area, as measured using a 5-point Likert scale. The mean age of participants was 21.57 years, and 57.82% were female. The maximum score of perceived reproductive health needs was related to "Be informed about appropriate behavior with my spouse", and the majority of students (82.82%) supported family-based reproductive health education with emphasis on the mothers' role. Although 65.14% of the participants agreed that "When a young has been raped, it's better that she/he counsel with her/his family", 11.67% of them stated that she/he must hide the problem. Finally, we found that 60.40% of the students preferred someone in a health care center as the one to explain how to use any contraception that may be provided for them. Taken as a whole, these findings support the critical importance of programming for university students as part of a comprehensive strategy to improve the health and development of young adults.

  11. [Nutritional characteristics and lifestyle in university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo-Varela, M T; de Luis Román, D A; González-Sagrado, M; Izaola Jauregui, O; Conde Vicente, R; Aller de la Fuente, R

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and the lifestyle characteristic of our society lead young people to conditions of potential cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to assess the anthropometrical situation and the lifestyle in a sample of university students. A full anthropometrical evaluation was undertaken, including bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), in 111 students in the last year of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, as well as a lifestyle questionnaire (physical activity, alcohol and cigarette consumption). A sexual dimorphism was found in weight distribution according to the classification proposed by SEEDO: 6.4% of women presented a weight lower than the health recommendations (there no men in this group) whereas 27.8% of men and 6.5% of women were in the overweight range. 15.3% of the cases had excessive waist circumference. Fat mass by BIA was higher among women. On the other hand, 67% of university students stated to perform regular physical activity, 16.7% stated being cigarette smokers, and 55.6% stated to consume high-grade alcohol. To conclude, we studied a sample population of young and healthy subjects with, however, a significant percentage of women with body weight lower than the healthy standards, overweighed people, and smokers usually taking high-grade alcohol. These data should elicit an alert of the potential cardiovascular risk in the university population if action is not taken. This population should be included in the health promotion plans.

  12. Use of Students as Research Subjects: Institutional Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A brief history of research involving humans is followed by discussion of the use of students in university research projects and institutional responsibility to students and the public. Institutions are encouraged to incorporate specific controls into research policies to avoid legal problems in the areas of contract theory, fiduciary…

  13. Empowering and Engaging Students in Learning Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Breit, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    The capacity to conduct research is essential for university graduates to survive and thrive in their future career. However, research methods courses have often been considered by students as "abstract", "uninteresting", and "hard". Thus, motivating students to engage in the process of learning research methods has become a crucial challenge for…

  14. Researching Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaabi, Sultan Ali R.; Alkaabi, Warda; Vyver, Glen

    2017-01-01

    Motivation has been studied by different scientists in different fields of knowledge such as biology, psychology, and education for a long period, which has cultivated a wealth of knowledge in these disciplines. The richness in motivation theories poses complexity in motivation research. Due to these complexities, many researchers focus on using a…

  15. An Investigation of Problematic Internet Usage Behaviors on Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Esra; Ceyhan, A. Aykut

    2007-01-01

    This research aims at examining the relationships between problematic internet usage (PIU) behavior and some demographic information and qualifications related to internet use of Turkish university students. The research was conducted with 2084 university students. Data was collected by means of Problematic Internet Usage Scale (Ceyhan, Ceyhan…

  16. Whatsapp for Educational Purposes for Female Students at College of Education--King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaad, Nawal Hamad Mohmad

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at finding out the educational usages of "Whatsapp" by the Saudi female students who are involved in the College of Education at King Saud University. To achieve the goal of this study, the researcher uses a simple sample of (122) female students from the Education College of King Saud University, which is chosen…

  17. Students' Use of Personal Technologies in the University Classroom: Analysing the Perceptions of the Digital Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Debra; Schott, Nicole; Wykes, Timothy; Szeto, Justin; Kolpin, Samantha; Lopez, Carla; Smith, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Faculty frequently express concerns about students' personal use of information and communication technologies in today's university classrooms. As a requirement of a graduate research methodology course in a university in Ontario, Canada, the authors conducted qualitative research to gain an in-depth understanding of students' perceptions of this…

  18. [2013 research ranking of Spanish public universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buela-Casal, Gualberto; Quevedo-Blasco, Raúl; Guillén-Riquelme, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of research production and productivity is becoming increasingly necessary for universities. Having reliable and clear data is extremely useful in order to uncover strengths and weaknesses. The objective of this article is to update the research ranking of Spanish public universities with the 2013 data. Assessment was carried out based on articles in journals indexed in the JCR, research periods, R+D projects, doctoral theses, FPU grants, doctoral studies awarded with a citation of excellence, and patents, providing a rating, both for each individual indicator and globally, in production and productivity. The same methodology as previous editions was followed. In the global ranking, the universities with a higher production are Barcelona, Complutense of Madrid, and Granada. In productivity, the first positions are held by the universities Pompeu Fabra, Pablo de Olavide, and the Autonomous University of Barcelona. Differences can be found between the universities in production and productivity, while there are also certain similarities with regard to the position of Spanish universities in international rankings.

  19. [Psychosocial aspects regarding pregnant university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupiñán-Aponte, María R; Rodríguez-Barreto, Lucía

    2009-12-01

    Determining the subjective construction of psychosocial factors affecting pregnancy in adolescents in a sample of students. 68 students who had become pregnant during their adolescence were selected after reviewing their files and sampling by logical criteria. The implications of pregnancy on personal, family and academic conditions were analysed by means of life stories and in-depth interviews. Crises and adjustments appeared in family and affective structure during the first trimester of pregnancy which culminated in them accepting motherhood as part of their life project, thereby reproducing the single-mother stereotype. Accompaniment of the pair occurred mainly during the first months, followed by abandonment. Although prejudiced, the university community's support had a bearing on interest in personal and academic development and in the baby. Specialised referents were consulted which scared the girls due to their pathological emphasis, thereby leading to them consulting family sources. The pregnant girls' mothers provided ongoing support for their daughters; this was not true of the fathers with whom constant conflict was presented. The services offered by the university were little used even though their importance was recognised. Forming integral students require programmes preparing students to be responsible for motherhood and fatherhood. Prevention was conveyed as promoting healthy affective links and strengthening family and social communication.

  20. The Impact of Facebook on University-Students Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Iustina ȘTEFĂNICĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of increased competition between higher education institutions (HEI has resulted in a transformation within the education market. To survive in this internationally competitive and hostile market, HEIs must engage in mutually beneficial relationships with key stakeholders and tailor management practices in line with their vision. Thus there is a symbiotic relationship between the HEI, their stakeholders and the stakeholders’ needs. This article aims to clarify the interests of the primary stakeholder, the Romanian student, by analysing their perception of the Facebook engagement strategies used by Romanian universities. In writing this case study we used a quantitative approach - online questionnaires - distributed to student stakeholders through the official Facebook accounts of the public and private Romanian universities.  The research was restricted to 285 questionnaires; the number of valid questionnaires obtained during the time allocated for data collection. The intrinsic value of the study is its integrative approach to the theories and studies regarding the engagement strategies available to HEIs through social media and the research of a heretofore unexplored area in Romanian literature. The study has three key findings: 1 Students welcome an active official Facebook presence by their University and professors; 2 Students have a direct interest and strongly believe that they will derive benefit from the Facebook publication of academic and administrative information; and 3 Students would be highly supportive and appreciative of informal Facebook interaction.  Finally we recommend further qualitative research to assess the totality of the impact of social media on the university-students relationship.

  1. Research collaboration among academics in selected Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the nature, patterns and trends of research collabor ation among academics in six universities in Nigeria and South Africa between 2003 and 2013. The paper determined the level and extent of knowledge sharing among the actors by exploring: research collaboration within, between and beyond the ...

  2. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators

  3. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  4. NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L Block; Ali T-Raissi [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of the activities and results from 36 hydrogen research projects being conducted over a four-year period by Florida universities for the U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program entitled 'NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities' is managed by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). FSEC has 22 years of experience in conducting research in areas related to hydrogen technologies and fuel cells. The R and D activities under this program cover technology areas related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. (authors)

  5. The analysis of aging and elderly age quality in empirical research: data based on University of the Third Age (U3A) students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Więczkowska, Halina; Muszalik, Marta; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate aging and elderly age quality in elderly individuals and persons entering the elderly age participating U3A continuous education courses. The research included 255 students of the U3A located in Bydgoszcz, Poland. The research included 235 women and 20 men of mean age 64.43 years. The dominant group was persons with secondary education (65.9%), and higher education (28.2%) as well as married (54.5%). All of the subjects included in the study were fully mobile. The study was conducted based on authors' original questionnaire which consisted of 24 questions and a basic personal data form surveying age, gender, marital status, level of education as well as self-reported illnesses and health problems. The research assumed the majority of positive responses as the sign of happy aging and experiencing one's own old age. Positive correlation was observed between the statement that human beings influence quality and shape of their lives, and therefore they are responsible for their own life. The higher the level of fulfilling aims in life the more frequently elderly age was perceived as a happy period. In the research data there was a relationship observed between levels of education and discrimination, i.e., the higher level of education the fewer cases of discrimination experienced: χ(2)=12.992 (df=2; phappiness in family and mental efficiency. The biggest worries concerned serious diseases and being dependent on other people. Most often indicated ways to lead happy elderly life were being active and open to people as well as showing optimistic attitude. The research, which was conducted on a relatively large group of people (n=255), proves positive aging direction among the elderly and persons entering late adulthood period who attend continuous education courses at U3A. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human research ethics committees in technical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top 50 technical universities in the world shows that, where not specifically mandated by law, most technical universities do not employ ethics committees to review human studies. As the domains of basic and applied sciences expand, ethics committees are increasingly needed to guide and oversee all such research regardless of legal requirements. We offer as examples, from our experience as an ethics committee in a major European technical university, ways in which such a committee provides needed services and can help ensure more ethical studies involving humans outside the standard medical context. We provide some arguments for creating such committees, and in our supplemental article, we provide specific examples of cases and concerns that may confront technical, engineering, and design research, as well as outline the general framework we have used in creating our committee. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN TEACHING ENGLISH UNIVERSITY STUDENT: LECTURER PRESENTATION VERSUS STUDENTS PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Nur Wasiah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to describe the students‘ perspective and to know which strategy is more preferred by the students and to know some benefits after implementing the two strategies. The subjects of the research were nineteen students of master degree program of State University of Semarang in the second semester. The instruments of the research were interview guidance, field notes and questionnaire. The data of the research were collected by doing observation, conducting interview, and giving questionnaire. The data were analyzed by using the triangulation technique. The result showed that there are 37% students who prefer lecturer presentation, 37% students who prefer students presentation and 26% students who prefer both of lecturer and students presentation. This research also found that the students got some benefits in increasing their motivation in learning English independently, increasing their knowledge, increasing their vocabulary mastery. In conclusion, the students preferred student presentation to increase their English skills and they preferred lecturer presentation to increase their knowledge.

  8. Alcohol consumption in Colombian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Betancourth Zambrano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alcohol consumption is conceived as a public health problem. Given the significant prevalence of consumption and its negative consequences, it is necessary to contribute to the prevention from the identification of populations at risk, such as the university, and the factors that influence the development of consumption. Objective: To identify and analyze the factors associated with alcohol consumption in university students from the South-western of Colombia. Materials and methods: A descriptive and cross-sectional study with a sample of 849 university students obtained by stratified random sampling was made. A questionnaire to characterize the consumption of alcohol and the sociodemographic factors was used for quantitative data collection. The analysis of the information included statistical descriptive for prevalence, consumption and polyconsumption pattern, as well as the relationship among the variables through the Chi-square test. Results: A prevalence of consumption of alcohol of 97.5% was found, most of the students reported consuming alcohol with their group of friends (76%, followed by the family (24.9%. The frequency of alcohol consumption is mainly given every month (25.8% and every fifteen days (18.8%. In addition, associations between sex and the frequency of alcohol consumption (p=000, the number of type of alcoholic beverages (p= 000 were found, where the men are the ones who most consumed and who mainly mixed different types of beverages. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption levels are maintained over time and it is necessary that universities are concerned by an integral education which make it possible to reduce alcohol consumption.

  9. Time and Money Explain Social Class Differences in Students' Social Integration at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark; Wright, Chrysalis L.

    2017-01-01

    Working-class students tend to be less socially integrated at university than middle-class students. The present research investigated two potential reasons for this working-class social exclusion effect. First, working-class students may have fewer finances available to participate in social activities. Second, working-class students tend to be…

  10. The value and cost of university research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a brief overview of the value and costs of U.S. university research reactors (URRs). More than three dozen URRs are currently operating in an approximately equal number of states. These URRs are an important part of the U.S. capabilities in nuclear science and technology. These multipurpose research facilities are located on the campuses of universities and colleges and therefore are easily accessible to university staff and students as well as to the high-technology industries, which often are located near universities. The close proximity, i.e., convenient location, to a diverse user base is a major reason for the multifaceted applications of URRs, including basic and applied science, technology, education, and industrial applications. The URRs have an extraordinarily broad range of applicability, including medicine and the life sciences, materials science, environmental sciences, earth and planetary sciences, and nuclear energy

  11. Strategic Research, Post-modern Universities and Research Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Arie

    2004-01-01

    The old division of labour between fundamental and applied or problem-oriented research has almost disappeared, and with it, the functional distinctions between universities, public labs and industrial and other private research. Doctoral research training can then also become diversified in terms

  12. Research and research impact of a technical university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Schwarz, S.; Tijssen, R. J. W.

    1998-01-01

    The research output of the Danish Technical University (DTU) has been studied as an aspect of the organization's research policy and visibility in its international context. Papers published in the three-year period (1992-94) were grouped according to 20 clusters of research areas. Using citation...

  13. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  14. Students' Perceptions of E-Assessment at Saudi Electronic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadoon, Hamadah

    2017-01-01

    This study explored students' perceptions of E-assessment at Saudi Electronic University. The university recently implemented this mode of assessment in the learning management system it uses. Therefore it is important to examine the students' perceptions of this mode at the university level. The results were encouraging. Students had positive…

  15. Bullying at a University: Students' Experiences of Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Meriläinen, Matti

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on bullying at a Finnish university. In May 2010 an e-questionnaire was sent to each university student (N?=?10,551), and 27% of these students (N?=?2,805) responded. According to the results, 5% of the university students had experienced either indirect public bullying or direct verbal bullying on campus. In most cases, the…

  16. ADS research activities at Sungkyunkwan University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, S.I.; Behzad, M.; Chai, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The Emerging Nuclear Technology Group was formed in 2009 as a multidisciplinary, international group with an aim of developing Thorium based Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) technology for future nuclear energy. The recent status of research being done in Sungkyunkwan University is described here. Our research activities include researches on computational modeling, partitioning and transmutation, reactor core design, detector development and life cycle assessment analysis. (J.P.N.)

  17. The link between drinking and gambling among undergraduate university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, David C; Racicot, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore different aspects of the link between alcohol use and gambling among undergraduate university students (N = 121). Potential aspects of the link examined included level of involvement in each behavior, consequences, motives for involvement, and impaired control over involvement. Results confirmed that drinking and gambling among university students are associated, consistent with the expectations of a problem syndrome model. The strongest link was between general dimensions of problematic involvement for both behaviors. Students who drink to cope and have other indicators of alcohol problems are more likely to gamble to cope, gamble to win money, and have higher gambling involvement and gambling-related problems. However, the salience of drinking and gambling to cope in this relationship is an interesting finding that needs further exploration and extension to other problem behaviors. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. University students' achievement goals and approaches to learning in mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Francisco; Berbén, A B G

    2009-03-01

    Achievement goals (AG) and students' approaches to learning (SAL) are two research perspectives on student motivation and learning in higher education that have until now been pursued quite independently. This study sets out: (a) to explore the relationship between the most representative variables of SAL and AG; (b) to identify subgroups (clusters) of students with multiple AG; and (c) to examine the differences between these clusters with respect to various SAL and AG characteristics. The participants were 680 male and female 1st year university students studying different subjects (e.g. mathematics, physics, economics) but all enrolled on mathematics courses (e.g. algebra, calculus). Participants completed a series of questionnaires that measured their conceptions of mathematics, approaches to learning, course experience, personal 2 x 2 AG, and perceived AG. SAL and AG variables were moderately associated and related to both the way students perceived their academic environment and the way they conceived of the nature of mathematics (i.e. the perceptual-cognitive framework). Four clusters of students with distinctive multiple AG were identified and when the differences between clusters were analysed, we were able to attribute them to various constructs including perceptual-cognitive framework, learning approaches, and academic performance. This study reveals a consistent pattern of relationships between SAL and AG perspectives across different methods of analysis, supports the relevance of the 2 x 2 AG framework in a mathematics learning context and suggests that AG and SAL may be intertwined aspects of students' experience of learning mathematics at university.

  19. Partially specified physics problems: university students' attitudes and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusic, M; Erceg, N; Slisko, J

    2011-01-01

    In this research we asked the fourth year students (N = 50) of a technical faculty of the University of Split (Republic of Croatia) to solve a partially specified physics problem related to gravitational force. The task for the students was to decide whether the situation described in the problem is feasible or not. Nevertheless, the formulation of the problem is such that it does not give students any explicit advice regarding what to calculate or how to judge the feasibility of the given situation in the real world. The research was carried out using a structured written exam method. The worksheet was structured in order to assess explicitly a few elements of the students' problem-solving performance. Based on their results, the examinees were classified into four categories, depending on what they could or could not accomplish during problem solving. A majority of students were not able to solve the given physical problem completely. A selection of students' and professors' observations is also included. Our results show that traditionally formulated numerical exercises, which are mostly used in physics teaching, do not develop students' abilities in higher-order thinking (i.e. planning, decision making or result evaluation) to a desirable extent. We suggest that partially specified problems should be given to students, both in problem-solving sessions and exams, in order to prepare them for dealing with ill-structured tasks in real life.

  20. Are Turkish University Students Autonomous or Not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Kırtık

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tried to determine Turkish learners’ attitudes, and the Turkish education system’s approach towards learner autonomy with regard to three main points: 1 whether Turkish university students are aware of learner autonomy or not 2 whether Turkish university students have the characteristics of autonomous learners (whether they are autonomous learners or not, and 3 if the Turkish education system is suitable for fostering learner autonomy or not from the viewpoint of the participants. Participants were 50 second grade learners in the English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe University (N=10, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University (N=10, and Uludag University (N=30 who had already taken courses about learner autonomy.  The data were collected by means of a questionnaire which had two Likert-scale sections and an open-ended questions section. The first Likert-scale section contained 15 characteristics of autonomous learners each of which was rated by the participants in a scale from strongly disagree to agree, from 1 to 5. In the second Likert-scale section, the participants were asked to rate the Turkish education system’s five basic elements such as school curriculums, course materials, approaches used by the teachers in classrooms, learning activities, and classroom settings. Additionally, learners’ opinions about their awareness and understanding of learner autonomy were gathered by five open ended questions. The results proposed that the participants were aware of learner autonomy, and had the characteristics of autonomous learners. On the other hand, results showed that the Turkish education system was not suitable for autonomous learners and did not foster learner autonomy. The findings suggested that the Turkish education system should be designed again in such a way to support the autonomous learners and to foster learner autonomy in all sections of the education.

  1. Hand hygiene knowledge and practice among university students: evidence from Private Universities of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Marufa Sultana,1 Rashidul Alam Mahumud,1 Abdur Razzaque Sarker,1 Sarder Mahmud Hossain,21Health Economics and Financing Research Group, Centre for Equity and Health System (CEHS, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, 2Department of Public Health, Northern University Bangladesh, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Hand hygiene has achieved the reputation of being a convenient means of preventing communicable diseases. Although causal links between hand hygiene and rates of infectious disease have also been established earlier, studies focusing on hand hygiene among university-going students are not adequate in number. This study evaluated handwashing knowledge, practice, and other related factors among the selected university students in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 undergraduate students from four selected universities. A pretested, semistructured questionnaire, that included a checklist associated with handwashing practice, was applied to capture all relevant data. The mean (± SD age of the participants was 20.4 (±1.8 years. The majority of the students washed their hands with water, but only 22.5% washed their hands effectively by maintaining the correct steps and frequency of handwashing with water, and soap or hand sanitizer. The mean (± SD score of the participants’ hand hygiene practice was 50.81 (±4.79, while the total score with all perfect answers was considered as 66. Regression coefficient demonstrated that age has a negative influence on hand hygiene practice, as older students have lower scores compared to the younger ones (P<0.01. However, the unmarried students were a significant predictor for influencing the incensement of handwashing practice compared to the married ones (P<0.01. Findings of this study designate widespread insufficient hand hygiene practice in the university-going students and indicate a need for an extensive public health education

  2. Students' Suggestions for Eliminating Bullying at a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Puhakka, Helena; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija

    2015-01-01

    Students' suggestions for how to eliminate bullying at universities were gathered as part of an e-questionnaire sent to each university student (N = 10,551) at a Finnish university. The suggestions (n = 2804) regarding how to address bullying at universities were divided into the following four classes: support (944), punishment (78), support and…

  3. Biomedical research competencies for osteopathic medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruser, des Anges; Dubin, Bruce; Brown, Sarah K; Bakken, Lori L; Licciardone, John C; Podawiltz, Alan L; Bulik, Robert J

    2009-10-13

    Without systematic exposure to biomedical research concepts or applications, osteopathic medical students may be generally under-prepared to efficiently consume and effectively apply research and evidence-based medicine information in patient care. The academic literature suggests that although medical residents are increasingly expected to conduct research in their post graduate training specialties, they generally have limited understanding of research concepts.With grant support from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and a grant from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation, the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) is incorporating research education in the osteopathic medical school curriculum. The first phase of this research education project involved a baseline assessment of students' understanding of targeted research concepts. This paper reports the results of that assessment and discusses implications for research education during medical school. Using a novel set of research competencies supported by the literature as needed for understanding research information, we created a questionnaire to measure students' confidence and understanding of selected research concepts. Three matriculating medical school classes completed the on-line questionnaire. Data were analyzed for differences between groups using analysis of variance and t-tests. Correlation coefficients were computed for the confidence and applied understanding measures. We performed a principle component factor analysis of the confidence items, and used multiple regression analyses to explore how confidence might be related to the applied understanding. Of 496 total incoming, first, and second year medical students, 354 (71.4%) completed the questionnaire. Incoming students expressed significantly more confidence than first or second year students (F = 7.198, df = 2, 351, P = 0.001) in their ability to understand the research concepts. Factor analyses

  4. Self-Esteem & Academic Performance among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muhammad; Zaidi, Syed Muhammad Imran Haider; Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    The current study was conducted to assess the self-esteem and academic performance among university students after arising of several behavioral and educational problems. A total number of 80 students, 40 male students and 40 female students were selected through purposive sampling from G. C. University Faisalabad. The participants were…

  5. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  6. Physical protection of radioactive materials in a University Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    1998-01-01

    Although nuclear research centers attached to universities usually do not keep large inventories of radioactive or special nuclear material, the mentioned material has still to be under strict surveillance and safeguards if applicable. One problem in such research centers is the large and frequent fluctuation of persons - mainly students, scientists or visiting guest scientists - using such materials for basic or applied research. In the present paper an overview of protective actions in such a research institute will be given and experience of more than 36 years will be presented. (author)

  7. Variables affecting medical faculty students' achievement: a mersin university sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogenler, Oya; Selvi, Huseyin

    2014-03-01

    TRAINING PROVIDED IN MEDICAL FACULTIES IS MAINLY COMPOSED OF TWO PHASES: preclinical and clinical. Preclinical period, or the first three years, consists of theoretical classes and practical implementations to develop vocational skills. In the clinical period, students are given applied courses. This study aimed to determine the role of demographic characteristics and medical students' life habits on their academic achievement. For this purpose, a 20-item survey form with two sections developed by the researchers was used. Students were also asked to identify the averages of committee exams as the academic achievement indicator. Participating students (n = 287) were from Mersin University Medical Faculty during 2012-2013 session. Totally, 60.3% of the students were males with an average age of 21.16 ± 1.39, and their general grade point average was 63.39 ± 9.08. Students in their second year (P = 0.000), who were females (P = 0.000), graduated from Anatolian Teachers High Schools (P = 0.002), financially well off (P = 0.026), stayed in state hostels (P = 0.032), did not smoke (P = 0.042) and regularly did sports (P = 0.016) were significantly more successful compared to others. Students' socioeconomic resources and habits play roles on academic achievement. Solutions that incorporate economic support which can eliminate negative situations leading to inequality of opportunity among students would increase students' achievement.

  8. Research about the reasons why university students practice sport. The example of Granada University INVESTIGACIÓN SOBRE LOS MOTIVOS POR LOS QUE LOS ESTUDIANTES UNIVERSITARIOS PRACTICAN DEPORTE. EL CASO DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE GRANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Medina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Through this paper, the motivation of Granada University´s students for the physical activity in the sport program of this organization has tried to be known. With this aim, fifty-five students who are participants in these activities were selected to complete a Lickert´s Scale with six factors and twenty-six items. Next to statistic analysis, the best factor chosen was "Fitness - Health", taking away importance to the aspects related with "Situacional Reasons" and "Self-realization". At the same time, sexual differences related with physical activity in these activities organized by Granada University were determined, verifying that girls value more the socializators and group practice aspects than boys.
    KEY WORDS: Motivation, physical activity, youngsters, university sports.

     

     

    A través de este trabajo se pretende conocer cuál es la motivación de los estudiantes de la Universidad de Granada por la actividad física dentro de las actividades deportivas organizadas por dicho organismo. Con este fin, se seleccionó una muestra de 50 jóvenes universitarios que realizan deporte dentro de estas actividades, empleando para ello una escala de opinión tipo Lickert con 6 categorías y 26 motivos hacia los cuales los cuestionados debían mostrar su grado de conformidad. Después del análisis estadístico, se comprobó cómo la categoría mejor puntuada fue la denominada como Forma Física -Salud, restando importancia a los aspectos relacionados con las Razones Situacionales y de Autorrealización. A su vez, se determinaron las diferencias en cuanto al sexo por la práctica deportiva en estas actividades organizadas por la Universidad de Granada, comprobando que las chicas valoran más los aspectos socializadores y de práctica en grupo que los chicos.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Motivación, actividad física, jóvenes, deporte universitario

  9. The Scholarship of Canadian Research University Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fox

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a national survey of Canadian research university librarians conducted by the author in 2006. The study deals with the motivation of librarians to engage in scholarly activities, the requirement for scholarship by librarians at Canadian research universities, the perceived importance of scholarship as a criterion for promotion and tenure, levels and forms of participation in scholarship, and librarians’ assessment of various types of support for scholarship. The study concluded that 13% of the sample population could be considered active scholars, and suggests that there may be a correlation between level of scholarly intensity and gender. The paper concludes with questions for further study.

  10. Relationship between gender and university students' academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was based on the impact of gender on academic performance ON Arts-related subjects, a case study of Nasarawa State University, Keffi, using a sample of 160 participants derived from Art-based faculties. A questionnaire was used as the prime instrument to correlate the participant's responses to their ...

  11. Engaging community college students in physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Megan; Napoli, Maria; Lubin, Arica; Kramer, Liu-Yen; Aguirre, Ofelia; Kuhn, Jens-Uwe; Arnold, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    Recruiting talent and fostering innovation in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines demands that we attract, educate, and retain a larger and more diverse cohort of students. In this regard, Community Colleges (CC), serving a disproportionate number of underrepresented minority, female and nontraditional students, represent a pool of potential talent that, due to a misguided perception of its students as being less capable, often remains untapped. We will present our strategies to attract and support the academic advancement of CC students in the STEM fields through our NSF-sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates program entitled Internships in Nanosystems Science Engineering and Technology (INSET). For more than a decade, INSET has offered a physics research projects to CC students. The key components of INSET success are: 1) the involvement of CC faculty with a strong interest in promoting student success in all aspects of program planning and execution; 2) the design of activities that provide the level of support that students might need because of lack of confidence and/or unfamiliarity with a university environment; and 3) setting clear goals and high performance expectations.

  12. Chilean university students: knowledge and concern about HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Lilian; Cianelli, Rosina; Guzman, Edwin; Cabieses, Báltica; Irarrázabal, Lisette; Bernales, Margarita; Araya, Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    According to a 2004 report by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, Chile has an incipient HIV/AIDS epidemic. Regardless of the classification, every year the cumulative incidence of HIV/AIDS increases. Young Chileans have been the most affected group; still, their knowledge, attitudes, and concerns about HIV/AIDS are not known. This study describes Chilean university students' HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, their worry about getting the virus, and the correlation between both variables. A convenience sample of 45 university students responded to an anonymous self-administered questionnaire after orally consenting to participate in this study. Overall, students had good levels of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, with 77% responding correctly to at least 85% of the questions. Despite this knowledge, almost 56% of students stated that they were not worried about getting HIV/AIDS. The situation was corroborated by a nonsignificant statistical correlation between both variables (p > .05). These results are congruent with literature from other countries and strengthen the need for further research to clarify why university students, the majority of whom are well-educated and engage in behaviors that place them at risk for contracting the virus, do not worry about HIV.

  13. A Self-Study of the Teaching of Action Research in a University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-ah

    2011-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of action research, teaching action research in a university setting can present challenges. Analyzing my own experiences of teaching a university-based course on action research, this self-study investigates what my students (all classroom teachers) did and did not understand about action research and what hindered…

  14. Involving Undergraduates in Aging Research at a University in Transition: An AREA Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stacey

    2006-01-01

    Involving students in research with older adults at a university in transition has its unique challenges. The goal of this paper is to discuss some of the rewards and lessons learned in undertaking a research program involving undergraduates at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UC-CS). UC-CS is a regional university in transition from…

  15. The Influence of Vocabulary and Grammar Masteryon the Students' Writing Skill at YOGYAKARTA State University

    OpenAIRE

    Hastuti, Saptin Dwi Setyo

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of (1) the students' vocabulary mastery on their writing skill, (2) the students' grammar mastery on their writing skill and(3) the students' vocabulary and grammar mastery on their writing skill at Yogyakarta State University. This research was an ex-post facto. The population comprised the third semester students of Pendidikan Bahasa Inggris (PBI) study program at the Languages and Arts Faculty, Yogyakarta State University in the academic year 20...

  16. The difficulties of adapting university teaching for students with disabilities: an analysis focussed on inclusive guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Pérez, Pedro; Alegre de la Rosa, Olga María; López Aguilar, David

    2012-01-01

    The need for specific attention for the personal, social, academic and professional development of students with disabilities is a challenge that the university is committed to. Although significant progress has been made, promoted by an inclusive educational approach, there are still many difficulties faced by students to intergrate into university education. To advance a deeper understanding of the issues affecting these students, research has been conducted with a sample of 113 students wi...

  17. Sleep problems in university students - an intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarb, Angelika Anita; Friedrich, Anja; Claßen, Merle

    2017-01-01

    Up to 60% of all college students suffer from a poor sleep quality, and 7.7% meet all criteria of an insomnia disorder. Sleep problems have a great impact on the students' daily life, for example, the grade point average. Due to irregular daytime routines, chronotype changes, side jobs and exam periods, they need specialized treatments for improving sleep. "Studieren wie im Schlaf" (SWIS; (studying in your sleep)) is a multicomponent sleep training that combines Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia and Hypnotherapy for Insomnia to improve students' sleep, insomnia symptoms and nightmares. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the acceptance, feasibility and the first effects of SWIS. Twenty-seven students (mean =24.24, standard deviation =3.57) participated in a study of pre-post design. The acceptance and feasibility were measured with questionnaires. In addition, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), sleep logs and actigraphy were implemented. Further variables encompassed daytime sleepiness, sleep-related personality traits and cognitions about sleep. Seventy-four percent of the participants reported symptoms of an insomnia disorder, and 51.9% fulfilled all criteria of an insomnia disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fifth edition). Correspondingly, the students suffered from clinically relevant sleep problems according to the PSQI. The SWIS sleep training is a well-accepted and feasible program. Significant improvements were observed in the subjective sleep quality and sleep-related personality traits, as well as clinical improvements in objective sleep measures. Findings showed that SWIS is a feasible program for the treatment of sleep problems in college and university students due to its various effects on sleep and cognitive outcomes. Further evaluation of follow-up measurements and additional variables, that is, cognitive performance and mental health, is needed.

  18. Smoking at School: Views of Turkish University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmiye Erdogan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent interest in cigarette smoking among university students has brought attention to problems concerning opinions, attitudes, prevention, health education, policy formulation and implementation. This survey research tested five hypotheses on the views of college students about smoking in school hallways and cafeteria, compliance with anti smoking laws, considering cigarette smoking as an expression of freedom of choice, teachers’ smoking in classrooms and in their offices, and school administration’s policy on enforcing the law. Hypothesized differences between students’ views on the issues according to gender, smoking status and years at school were investigated. Data were obtained from 3,659 students attending six universities in Ankara, Turkey. The study findings provided support for all the hypothesized differences (except a single issue. Males and females differed significantly on all the issues studied. The majority of nonsmoking students have anti-smoking views in regards of the studied issues as compared to regular and occasional smokers. Smokers and nonsmokers markedly disagree on banning cigarette smoking in the cafeteria and hallways. However, the majority of students are against teachers’ smoking in classrooms and in their offices with the doors open. Although most students want a smoke free environment, there is no active-anti smoking policy on smoking by universities. Findings point out the need for campus-wide effective smoking prevention programs, as well as cessation programs and services for the students.

  19. University students toward mobility in the liquid modernity era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Marciniak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses conditions in the society of liquid modernity in lightof Zygmunt Bauman’s diagnosis. Because of those conditions, mobility (generallyspeaking, the lack of strong bonds with physical and social space became very important.The article aims to discuss the point to which Bauman’s diagnosis coincideswith the characteristics of Poles who grew up after accession to the European Unionin 2004. The issue is analyzed on the basis of author’s pilot research into the mobilityof university students (N=92 of the Faculty of Educational Studies of Adam MickiewiczUniversity in Poznań. It concludes with an attempt to explain the researchfindings.

  20. Trends and Features of Student Research Integration in Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, Svetlana; Makarova, Elena; Andreassen, John-Erik

    2016-01-01

    This study examines trends and features of student research integration in educational program during international cooperation between Østfold University College in Norway and Southern Federal University in Russia. According to research and education approach the international project is aimed to use four education models, which linked student…

  1. Government-University-Industry-Research Roundtable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    Roundtable projects active during 1993 are described in this section. Projects completed in prior years are not included here, but publications resulting from them are included in the list of publications which are attached. Such prior projects include nurturing science and engineering talent, research facility financing, multidisciplinary research and education, university-industry-federal laboratory partnerships, and federal-state cooperation in science and technology.

  2. Outreach to Science Faculty and Students through Research Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tina; Hebblethwaite, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Penfield Library at the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) has a gallery exhibit space near the front entrance that is used to showcase student-faculty research and art class projects. This article features the library's outreach efforts to science faculty and students through research exhibitions. The library held an exhibition…

  3. Analysis of Action Research Conducted by Student Teachers and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined action research conducted by student teachers, a major education component in the preparation of teachers in Ethiopia. It sheds light on the existing practices of engaging student teachers in action research and its facilitation at the Faculty of Education of Haramaya University. Data were gathered from ...

  4. Upper Secondary Chemistry Students in a Pharmacochemistry Research Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rens, L.; van Muijlwijk, J.; Beishuizen, J.J.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with the participation of 10 upper secondary chemistry students, aged 16-17, and their chemistry teacher in a pharmacochemistry research community on anti-allergy medicines at VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Participation of students in scientific research raises the

  5. University-Community Research Partnership for Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analyses the existing university–community partnership in research in Tanzania and proposes a bottom-top model instead of the traditional top-bottom approach which works with perceived needs of communities rather than real needs. Given their core missions, many universities assume that they achieve their ...

  6. Northern Illinois U. students participate in particle research

    CERN Multimedia

    Goluszka, J

    2003-01-01

    University students are diligently working on a variety of high-tech research topics designed to improve digital technology. A typical project is "evaluating scintillation material for digital hadron calorimeters" (1 page).

  7. Psychological stress among dental students at the University of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ghazaleh, Suha B; Rajab, Lamis D; Sonbol, Hawazen N

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of psychological stress as well as the perceived sources of stress among undergraduate dental students at the University of Jordan. The top perceived stressors were compared with those of a previous study that examined the perceived sources of stress among undergraduate dental students at the University of Jordan in the year 2000. Psychological stress was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Perceived sources of stress were evaluated using the Dental Environment Stress questionnaire. In the study, 520 students completed the questionnaires, for a response rate of 74 percent. These students showed a high level of psychological stress, with 70 percent at the cutoff point of a score of more than 3 for the GHQ-12. Women had a higher level of stress than men: 73 percent scored more than 3 on the GHQ-12 vs. 63 percent for men, which was statistically significant at p=0.05. The top perceived sources of stress from the year 2000 were mostly unaltered in our study, despite a substantial increase in the number of students as well as changes in the curriculum. Further research is needed into methods to minimize stress on dental students.

  8. Survey on Consumption Behaviour of Energy Drink Among University Students: Example of Afyon Kocatepe University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Şen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate the consumption behaviour and consumption awareness of energy drink among university students. Data were collected from 750 students in Afyon Kocatepe University by questionnaire which is improved by writers of this article. Tests were done with SPSS end of the research. Chi-square tests were done in %95 confidence interval to determine the relation of consumption and awareness of energy drink among the university students with gender, age range, school which is graduated, monthly expense, smoking and use of alcohol, the most consumed beverage types, and degree of licence. According to search results, it was found that energy drink consumption behaviour did not change with regard to the different age. On the other hand, male college graduates compared to other types of high school, it was determined that 701 TL per month and over spenders in relation to the lower income groups consumed more energy drinks . In addition, it was found that the groups that use alcohol, smokers, coffee drinkers and undergraduate students were consumed much more energy drinks than the others. When the answers measured the energy drink consumption behaviour of the students participated in the survey were considered, it was concluded that the awareness of the energy drink consumption was not high enough.

  9. Investigation of self-esteem for university students in terms of doing sports

    OpenAIRE

    CIMEN, Fadime; KUMARTASLI, Mehmet; SOYLEYICI, Senem

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate self-esteem of university students in terms of doing exercise variable. Totally 300 students from Suleyman Demirel University voluntarily participated in the research. The students were grouped into two: doing exercises (n: 150) and not doing exercises (n: 150). In the research, Self-respect scale developed by Arıcak (1999) was used. In the analysis of findings obtained, frequency analysis, independent ''t'' test and One Way ANOVA s...

  10. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  11. Perceptions of acceptable conducts by university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Dora Nazaré; Macedo, António Filipe

    2016-01-01

    To determine perceptions of acceptable conducts amongst under and postgraduate optometry students and to compare them with students from other disciplines. Students (under/postgraduate) of optometry (n=156) and other courses (n=54) from University of Minho participated in a voluntary online questionnaire about perception of conducts, classifying as acceptable or unacceptable 15 academic or professional scenarios. 210 questionnaires were analyzed. Differences in perceptions were found between optometry under and postgraduates in scenario 5, Chi-square(2,156)=4.3, p=0.038, and scenario 7, Chi-square(2,156)=7.0, p=0.008 (both with cheating more acceptable for postgrads). Differences between under and postgraduates from other courses were found in scenario 9 (taking supplies from classroom more acceptable for undergrads), Chi-square(1,54)=5.0, p=0.025, and scenario 14 (forging a signature more acceptable for postgrads), Chi-square(1,54)=3.9, p=0.046. Differences between optometry and other courses undergraduates were observed in scenario 2 (plagiarism more acceptable for optometry undergrads), Chi-square(1,154)=8.3, p=0.004 and scenario 9 (taking supplies from classroom more acceptable for other undergrads), chi-square(1,54)=7.8, p=0.005. Differences between optometry and other courses postgraduates were observed in scenario 7, Chi-square(1,56)=5.8, p=0.016, scenario 10 (both with cheating more acceptable for optometry postgrads), chi-square(1,54)=8.1, p=0.004 and scenario 14 (forging a signature more acceptable for other postgrads), Chi-square(1,54)=6.1, p=0.026. Academic misconducts were mainly considered more acceptable than professional misconducts. Our results show that perceptions of acceptable conducts amongst optometry students are not very different from other students, and, against our initial prediction, do not show a general change in misconduct perception when students become more mature. Universities should pay more attention to this problem and take

  12. Students' Writing "In Transition" from A-Levels to University: How Assessment Drives Students' Understandings, Practices and Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sally

    2017-01-01

    The lament that "students can't write" remains loud and defiant, even after years of research pointing to the myriad factors that make students' writing challenging, particularly when they move into university. This paper reports on a longitudinal, ethnographic study which explored students' writing "in transition," from…

  13. The Effectiveness of Student Extracurricular Activities in Evaluating Violent Behavior among Students in the Preparatory Year at Hail University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleid, Alkhamsah Saleh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of student extracurricular activities in evaluating violent behavior among students in the preparatory year at Hail University. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, and used two tools for the purpose of the study, the study sample consisted of 104 (violent) female students from the…

  14. The impact of materialism on the entrepreneurial intention of university students in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Fatoki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between materialism and the entrepreneurial intention of students at a South African university. In addition, the study examined if there is a significant gender difference in the materialistic values of university students. The quantitative research technique was adopted for the study. The survey method and the self-administered approach were used for data collection. The research participants comprised of 169 conveniently sampled business students. The Cronbach’s alpha was used to ensure reliability. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis, T-test, Pearson correlation and regression. The results indicated that there is a positive but insignificant relationship between materialism and the entrepreneurial intention of university students. There is no significant gender difference in the materialistic values of university students. Recommendations were suggested in order to manage the materialistic values of university students.

  15. Homeless university students: Experiences with foyer-type service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Grace

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Some young people who have been homeless during their secondary schooling manage to obtain a university place. These young people, and others who become homeless during their university courses, have the opportunity to build a sustainable exit from homelessness through education and support. Very little is known about how many young Australians are in this situation, or what can be done to assist them to complete their degrees. This article reports on research that aimed to document the experiences of 11 university students who had experienced homelessness. The research focussed on the difficulties that these young people faced, and the types of environments and service responses that can make a difference for them. The students were part of a larger study of a foyer-type service. The research found that these young people took longer than the standard duration to complete their degrees. Their study was facilitated by provision of stable, safe accommodation and support when they were acutely homeless, relief from other pressures such as family conflict, protection while maturing, time for overseas born including refugee young people to develop language, skills, and resources, support to heal from past damaging experiences and improve their health, assistance to gain entry to preferred university courses, and pathways into stable housing for the duration of their study.

  16. Improving the academic performance of university biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Latasha Shireen

    Studies indicated that teaching styles and learning styles of students play a very important role in the academic success of students. A lack of knowledge about teaching styles and learning styles often complicates the challenge of learning and, therefore, affects the academic achievement of students. The research site at a college had a retention rate of 70% of its biology majors and needed to improve the retention rate of the biology program. The purpose of this study was to improve the academic performance of university biology students through a multicomponent program, the Student Retention Engagement Program. The 3 components included students and teachers understanding students' learning styles, teachers acquiring knowledge of learner-based teaching methodology, and peer mentoring. In the implementation of this applied dissertation, the researcher sought to increase the grade point averages of 100 Biology 103 students from 2.25 to at least an overall 2.50 out of a 4.00 point grade point average scale. After implementation of the intervention strategies. the overall retention ratc of biology majors was also targeted to improve from 70% to at least 75%. The focus of the dissertation was on the outcomes associated with implementing successful teaching and learning strategies with the biology students. In 1 component of the Student Retention Engagement Program, biology teachers learned to identify their preferred teaching styles through a teaching perspectives inventory administered during a professional development program. A training program focused on utilizing teaching strategies for specific student learning styles was implemented. Another component involved training and using upper class peer mentors. The supervisors of the Office of Retention selected upper class participants who held a 3.0 or higher grade point average. A learning style inventory was administered to the upper class peer mentors and participating students. The results helped to identify

  17. The clinical academic workforce of the future: a cross-sectional study of factors influencing career decision-making among clinical PhD students at two research-intensive UK universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica; Lambert, Trevor; Pugh, Chris; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi J; Rees, Geraint; Best, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine clinical doctoral students’ demographic and training characteristics, career intentions, career preparedness and what influences them as they plan their future careers. Design and setting Online cross-sectional census surveys at two research-intensive medical schools in England in 2015–2016. Participants All medically qualified PhD students (N=523) enrolled at the University of Oxford and University College London were invited to participate. We report on data from 320 participants (54% male and 44% female), who were representative by gender of the invited population. Main outcome measures Career intentions. Results Respondents were mainly in specialty training, including close to training completion (25%, n=80), and 18% (n=57) had completed training. Half (50%, n=159) intended to pursue a clinical academic career (CAC) and 62% (n=198) were at least moderately likely to seek a clinical lectureship (CL). However, 51% (n=163) had little or no knowledge about CL posts. Those wanting a CAC tended to have the most predoctoral medical research experience (χ2 (2, N=305)=22.19, p=0.0005). Key reasons cited for not pursuing a CAC were the small number of senior academic appointments available, the difficulty of obtaining research grants and work-life balance. Conclusions Findings suggest that urging predoctoral clinicians to gain varied research experience while ensuring availability of opportunities, and introducing more flexible recruitment criteria for CL appointments, would foster CACs. As CL posts are often only open to those still in training, the many postdoctoral clinicians who have completed training, or nearly done so, do not currently gain the opportunity the post offers to develop as independent researchers. Better opportunities should be accompanied by enhanced career support for clinical doctoral students (eg, to increase knowledge of CLs). Finally, ways to increase the number of senior clinical academic appointments should be

  18. The Effect of Immersive Virtual Environments on Student Perception and Interest in a University Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serviss, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the perceptions of potential college students after participating in a recruitment presentation of a university. The focus was to conduct user research to establish some causal relationship between the design of a university marketing tool and a behavior such as the interest of potential students in the…

  19. A Critical Race Case Analysis of Black Undergraduate Student Success at an Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Shaun R.; Smith, Edward J.; Davis, Charles H. F., III

    2018-01-01

    Presented in this article is a case study of Black students' enrollment, persistence, and graduation at Cityville University, an urban commuter institution. We combine quantitative data from the University's Office of Institutional Research and the U.S. Department of Education with qualitative insights gathered in interviews with students,…

  20. The Effects of Impetuous, Exploratory, and Overall Indecisiveness on Self-Esteem among Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Enver

    2007-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to determine the relationships between levels of indecisiveness and their self-esteem among Turkish university students. The study was designed and implemented in 2006 with 320 voluntary university students of whom 170 were females and 150 males in Giresun, Turkey. The Personal Indecisiveness Scale (PIS;…

  1. Understanding the Effect of Loneliness on Academic Participation and Success among International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of loneliness on academic participation and success among 213 students studying at Usak University. A total of 213 international students studying at Usak University, including 151 males and 62 females, were selected and participated in the research voluntarily. In the study, feelings of…

  2. The Relationship between University Students' Attitude to Listening to Music and Their Level of Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Nil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyse the relationship between university students' attitude to listening to music and their level of optimism. The study group for the research consists of 508 students who studied at Aksaray University in the 2012-13 academic year. Simple random sampling is used. In this study, the "Attitude Scale for…

  3. Muslim Students' Cultural and Religious Experiences in City, Suburban and Regional University Campuses in NSW, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Adam; Dunn, Kevin; Hopkins, Peter; Worthington, Lisa; Amin, Faroque

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been much research about the growing ethnic and religious diversity on university campuses across the world, relatively little is known about the religious and cultural experiences of Muslim students on university campuses in Australia. We draw upon an analysis of a questionnaire that was completed by 323 Muslim students who…

  4. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  5. Orientation Programs and Student Retention in Distance Learning: The Case of University of Cape Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhin, Vera; Wang'eri, Tabitha

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated how orientation programs predict student retention in distance learning at the University of Cape Coast. A correlational research design was employed for the study. The target population was level-200 students in the distance education program at the university. Seven hundred and twenty-seven participants were selected from…

  6. Performance and Mastery Orientation of High School and University/College Students: A Rasch Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Debus, Raymond L.; Malmberg, Lars-Erik

    2008-01-01

    This investigation assesses performance and mastery orientation from a Rasch perspective among high school and university students and provides a complementary approach to the factor analytic methods typical in goal theory research. Data shows that both school and university students are high in mastery orientation relative to performance…

  7. Factors Affecting University Students' Intention to Use Cloud Computing in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababah, Khalid Ali; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Nassar, Bilal

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the factors affecting students' intention to use cloud computing in the Jordanian universities. To achieve this purpose, a quantitative research approach which is a survey-based was deployed. Around 400 questionnaires were distributed randomly to Information Technology (IT) students at four universities in…

  8. Investigating the Impact of Internet Dependency on Student-Teachers' Loneliness of Adiyaman University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytaç, Kürsat Yusuf

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of internet dependency on student- teachers' loneliness of Admiyaman University. The study also examined the differences in internet dependency and loneliness among students and teachers of Adiyaman University of Turkey. The standard questionnaire of Jung (1996) was used to measure the internet…

  9. University Research Reactors: Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, John A.; Hu Linwen

    2000-01-01

    University research reactors are underutilized and, as a result, are being decommissioned. The reason for the lack of utilization is shown to be a chronic inability to generate sufficient funds to procure and maintain state-of-the-art instrumentation for prospective researchers. The role of these reactors in nuclear science/engineering education is explored and the rationale for their continued operation is presented. It is argued that base financial support for both reactor operations and the technical support staff needed to interface with experimenters is necessary if these research facilities are not to be irretrievably lost from the educational infrastructure of the United States

  10. Engaging undergraduate nursing students in research: the students' experience of a summer internship program pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepanec, Diane; Clarke, Diana; Plohman, James; Gerard, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Educators continue to struggle with ways to foster an interest in and a passion for nursing research among undergraduate students. The purpose of this article is to describe the introduction of undergraduate student internships at the Manitoba Centre for Nursing and Health Research, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, as an innovation in education that allowed students to be employed while engaging them in student learning, scientific inquiry, and scholarship through one-to-one faculty-student research mentorships. In this article, the key components of the summer internship program are described, along with five nursing students' experiences of their participation in the program. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Students' vulnerability in educational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, L M; Dullabh, H

    2012-06-01

    Dental teaching institutions in South Africa recently implemented "learner-centred" curricula and expected educators to alter their teaching styles accordingly, but perhaps without providing adequate training in this paedagogical philosophy. At the same time, the lecturers were required to conduct evidence-based research to evaluate the outcomes. Thus, clinicians/lecturers also became researchers, using their own students or student material for assessment purposes. Previously, this form of educational research, which was carried out in normal academic settings, was not subject to review by Institutional Review Boards (IRB). However, concerns have risen that learners may be a vulnerable population due to their position in the academic institution, and the power and knowledge differentials that exist between them and the lecturer/researcher. This raises ethical concerns regarding their autonomy and ability to provide free, voluntary, informed consent to be research participants. This paper questions whether educational research may lead to student vulnerability, and proposes some recommendations for educators and institutions involved in educational research.

  12. The Sociocultural Adjustment Trajectory of International University Students and the Role of University Structures: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Rebecca; Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    The present research explores the sociocultural adjustment of international students and the role played by university structures in the process. The adjustment process of international students has been modelled in psychological literature as a U-curve, a learning curve and most recently as a long, uneven and unending process of change. Yet,…

  13. Attitude of Students Towards Teaching Practice Exercise in Nigerian University: A Case Study of University of Uyo, Uyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikitde, Godwin; Ado, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed students teachers' attitude towards teaching practice exercise in the faculty of Education, University of Uyo, Uyo, Akwa Ibom of Nigeria. The study was guided by three research questions and two hypotheses. The survey design was adopted for the study. A sample of 163 student teachers constituted the study. A questionnaire…

  14. Perception on science and museum in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry de Jesús Gallardo Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available La investigación tiene como objetivo identificar las percepciones sobre ciencia y museología en estudiantes universitarios, así mismo describe características sociales y culturales de los estudiantes universitarios de la Frontera Colombo-venezolana en función de sus características sociales y culturales. La metodología se enmarca dentro del paradigma cuantitativo a través de encuestas semiestructuradas, mapas perceptuales y análisis multivariado. La muestra la constituyen estudiantes universitarios que visitan por primera vez el Centro Interactivo de Ciencia y Tecnología de la Frontera. Los resultados aportan elementos fundamentales para cimentar el desarrollo de programas que estimulen la creatividad y la capacidad innovadora en sus estudiantes. -------------- The research aims to identify perceptions about science and museology in university students, as well as describe social and cultural characteristics of university students in the Colombo-Venezuelan Border in terms of their social and cultural characteristics. The methodology is framed within the quantitative paradigm through semi-structured surveys, perceptual maps and multivariate analysis. The sample is made up of university students who are visiting the Interactive Science and Technology Center on the Border for the first time. The results provide fundamental elements to cement the development of programs that stimulate creativity and innovative capacity in its students.

  15. Case Study: Students of University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Samim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the existence of probable relationship between the popular music consumption and aggressive, anti-social behaviors. we took the fact of the existence of some kind of anti-social aggression amongst the students interested in popular music, as the basis for the this study The instrument used to collect data for this project was a self-report questionnaire, not objective observation The questionnaires were distributed to 410 students of the University of Isfahan The interpretation of survey results indicates the existence of an actual and meaningful relationship between the use of popular music and aggressive behaviors Survey results indicate negative feedback about the popular music consumption from the post-Revolutionary era (referring to 1978 Revolution in Iran, and reveal positive response with regard to the use of popular music from the post-Revolutionary era Another interesting result uncovers that the most aggressive students are amongst the audience for the Western genres of popular music (rap, rock, heavy metal As a result and considering the musicological features of the "popular music" as well as the socio-psychological characteristics of the youth, one may conclude that all types and genres of popular music from the post-Revolutionary era, seem to be more appropriate to the young population of nowadays Iran.

  16. Culture-Based Contextual Learning to Increase Problem-Solving Ability of First Year University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samo, Damianus Dao; Darhim; Kartasasmita, Bana G.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the differences in problem-solving ability between first-year University students who received culture-based contextual learning and conventional learning. This research is a quantitative research using quasi-experimental research design. Samples were the First-year students of mathematics education department;…

  17. Courses as research and students in the roles as researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    -like lecture rooms so dominant at the universities incite specific pedagogical and didactical “routines and rituals”: lectures come with specific hierarchical roles ascribed to the lecturer (the provider of knowledge) and the students (the receivers of knowledge). Methods Inspired by theories...... on entrepeneurship education and also methods for ‘gamifying’ education (Sandvik 2016), this paper claims that the routines and rituals described above may go against ideas about creating learning environments that are engaging and inspiring and which urge the students to be in charge of their own learning processes...... and development. They (may) work counter to making students active and to provide a sense of being part of an academic environment. They contradict the idea that learning is not (just) about acquiring knowledge, it is also about researching and creating knowledge. Results The paper present and discuss a case...

  18. The Relationship between Spirituality and Quality of Life among University Students: An Autoregressive Cross-Lagged Panel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wilfred W. F.; Hui, C. Harry; Lam, Jasmine; Lau, Esther Y. Y.; Cheung, Shu-Fai

    2015-01-01

    University represents a critical transition from secondary school. University students are exposed to many new opportunities and intellectual stimulations, and some may find university life stressful and demanding. The quality of life (QoL) of university students is thus an important topic for researchers and educators alike. Furthermore, many…

  19. Comrades’ power: Student representation and activism in universities in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwangi J. Macharia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, student politics and governance of universities in Kenya and in otherAfrican countries have undergone a tremendous transformation. The unprecedentedexpansion and massification of public universities, the introduction of ‘Module 2’programmes, the admission of private, ‘parallel’ and ‘school-based’ students, and thesubstantial increase in private universities have impacted on the governance of theinstitutions and student politics in different ways. In this context, this article exploresstudent involvement in university governance and describes the structure of students’unions in Kenyan universities in comparison with students exercising ‘comrades’ power’ inuniversities in Kenya.

  20. Mobile Interventions Targeting Risky Drinking Among University Students: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Anne H; Gajecki, Mikael; Sinadinovic, Kristina; Andersson, Claes

    Mobile interventions based on text messages, automated telephone programs (interactive voice response (IVR)), and smartphone apps offer a new approach targeting hazardous alcohol use in university students. This review covers seven recent studies involving college or university students that evaluated intervention efficacy in comparison to controls: four using text messages, one using IVR, and two smartphone apps. Only the study evaluating IVR reported positive results for the primary outcome. Two of the text message studies reported positive results on secondary outcomes, while the other two reported no differences in comparison to control groups. For smartphone apps, one study reported positive results on secondary outcomes, while the other showed no differences in comparison to controls for a web-based app and negative results for a native app. Further development of mobile interventions is needed for this at-risk population, both in terms of intervention content and use of robust research designs.

  1. Web Portal Usability among Nigerian University Students: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The web portal technology by Nigerian universities was adopted as a way to help curb one of the burdens of university's principal managerial operations: “students' academic management”. This study evaluates usability or "ease of use" of University of Benin (UNIBEN) web portal from the students' holistic view through the ...

  2. What influences students to university education? Insights from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many reasons have been advanced for this apparent decline hence it was felt in this study that perhaps some answers might be found from students currently at university. A sample of 220 students taking different courses at university were asked to indicate why they had taken university education as well as how previous ...

  3. Social Support and Stress among University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M.; Dawani, Hania A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of social support and perceived stress among university students in Jordan. A sample of 241 university students from private and government universities in Jordan answered self-report questionnaires including the perceived social support scale and perceived stress scale.…

  4. Students' Leadership in Selected Public Universities in Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Students' Leadership in Selected Public Universities in. Kenya: Disfranchised Pressure Groups or an Integral. Component in University Management? Bosire, Joseph, C. Chemnjor and M. Ngware. Abstract. This paper was based on an exploratory study carried out on student leadership in three public universities in Kenya ...

  5. University Students' Online Information Searching Strategies in Different Search Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Jung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Hou, Huei-Tse; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the role of search context played in university students' online information searching strategies. A total of 304 university students in Taiwan were surveyed with questionnaires in which two search contexts were defined as searching for learning, and searching for daily life information. Students' online search strategies…

  6. Physical inactivity and associated factors among university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Few studies exist investigating physical activity among university students in Africa. Therefore, the study aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of physical activity in a sample of university students. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with undergraduate students that were recruited conveniently from ...

  7. Alcohol-Related Injuries among Eastern Croatian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskulin, Ivan; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Miskulin, Maja

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the alcohol consumption patterns and to identify the association of injury with excess drinking among Croatian students. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 845 university students by the use of the WHO AUDIT questionnaire. A total of 39.9% of the university students reported some level of excess…

  8. University students' attributions towards academic success or failure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explored university students' perceptions of attributions to success or failure. A random cross-sectional survey design was employed. Seventy-two students (male = 44, female = 28) were randomly selected from the student population of a state university of age ranges 20 to 49 years. The data, collected using a ...

  9. Effects of Cigarettes Smoking on Pulmonary Function among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariri Azian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary function testing is a physiological test that measures how an individual inhales or exhales volumes of air as a function of time. Smoking is greatly associated with reduction of pulmonary function. This research is aimed to estimate the values of peak expiratory flow (PEF, forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC and ratio between FEV1/FVC among smoking and non-smoking students in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. Smoking is often related to obstructive disorder with low value of FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. These pulmonary functions were analyzed based on several variables such as; the number of cigarette smoked per day, duration of smoking, age, and body mass index (BMI values. 70 healthy volunteers consist of smoking and non- smoking students was selected through several sessions. Students were interviewed to answer questionnaire on demographic, lifestyles and their smoking habit. The pulmonary function tests were conducted according to American Thoracic Society (ATS standards. The results of the pulmonary functions were analyzed by using SPSS software to compare the pulmonary functions between the smoker and the non-smoker students. The results of the studies showed that the number of cigarettes smoked by respondent and the BMI values were the significant predictors of the decrease in FEV1/FVC values among university students

  10. Computer literacy among students of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robabi, Hassan; Arbabisarjou, Azizollah

    2015-01-01

    The need for medical students to be computer literate is vital. With the rapid integration of information technology (IT) in the health care field, equipping students of medical universities withcomputer competencies to effectively use are needed. The purpose of this study was to assess computer literacy (CL) needs of medical sciences students. This is descriptive-analytic. The population of the study comprised all students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. 385 students from allschools (Medicine, dentistry, paramedics, health, rehabilitation, nursing and midwifery) were selected through randomized- classified sampling. For data collecting, the Lin Tung- Cheng questionnaire was used which it contained 24 items in six sections.The obtained data analyzed by SPSS 15. The results showed that the 77.1% had personal computer. The total mean of students' computer literacy around six domains was 141.9±49.5 out of 240. The most familiarity with computers was the ability to it in internet (29.0±11.4) and the lowest was familiarity and using ability of hard ware (17.5±10.6). There was a significant relationship between passing the Computer lesson (P=0.001), passing Computer course (P=0.05) and having personal computer (P=0.001) with the mean of computer literacy. In sum, the medical sciences students' familiarity with computer literacy was not satisfactory and they had not appropriate familiarity with computer literacy skills. The researchers suggest the officials and in-charges to plan educational program for improving computer literacy skills in medical sciences students.

  11. Increased body weight affects academic performance in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S. Anderson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For K-12 students, obesity has been linked to student educational achievements. The study objective was to determine whether academic performance in university students is correlated with BMI. Students from two consecutive academic years (Jan–May 2013 and Jan–May 2014 were given an optional class survey in May, as extra credit. Of the 452 students that completed the survey, 204 females and 75 males (N = 279; 73% female and 27% male consented to participate in the study. The number of correct answers to problem-solving questions (PSQs and the overall final grade for the class were compared to the calculated BMI using linear regression with a Pearson's R correlation and unpaired t-tests. BMI was significantly negatively correlated with student's final grades (P = 0.001 Pearson's r = −0.190 and PSQs were positively correlated with final grades (P < 0.001; Pearson's r = 0.357. Our findings show a correlation between healthy body weight and improved academic performance. Further, the data suggest that future research in the area of body weight, diet, and exercise and any correlations of these with academic performance in college students are warranted.

  12. Increased body weight affects academic performance in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Angela S; Good, Deborah J

    2017-03-01

    For K-12 students, obesity has been linked to student educational achievements. The study objective was to determine whether academic performance in university students is correlated with BMI. Students from two consecutive academic years (Jan-May 2013 and Jan-May 2014) were given an optional class survey in May, as extra credit. Of the 452 students that completed the survey, 204 females and 75 males (N = 279; 73% female and 27% male) consented to participate in the study. The number of correct answers to problem-solving questions (PSQs) and the overall final grade for the class were compared to the calculated BMI using linear regression with a Pearson's R correlation and unpaired t -tests. BMI was significantly negatively correlated with student's final grades ( P  = 0.001 Pearson's r = - 0.190) and PSQs were positively correlated with final grades ( P  academic performance. Further, the data suggest that future research in the area of body weight, diet, and exercise and any correlations of these with academic performance in college students are warranted.

  13. The Emerging Workforce of International University Student Workers: Injury Experience in an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Thamrin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available International university students are a growing section of the workforce and are thought to be at greater risk of injury. Qualitative studies have highlighted vulnerabilities, but there is a shortage of quantitative research exploring the injury experience and associated risk factors of this emerging issue. In this study, a total of 466 university student workers across a range of study programs in a single Australian university completed an online survey, with questions relating to their background, working experience, training and injury experience. Risk factors for injury were explored in a multivariate statistical model. More than half had not received any safety training before they started work, and 10% reported having had a work injury. About half of these injuries occurred after training. Statistically significant risk factors for injury included working more than 20 h per week (adjusted odds ratio 2.20 (95% CI 1.03–4.71 and lack of confidence in discussing safety issues (AOR 2.17; 95% CI 1.13–4.16. The findings suggest the need for a more engaging and effective approach to safety education and a limit on working hours. This situation is a moral challenge for universities, in that they are effectively sponsoring young workers in the community. It is recommended that longitudinal studies of international student workers be conducted.

  14. How Am I Going to Pay for That?!: First-Generation University Students and Their Financial Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Judith J. Andrews

    2013-01-01

    This study examines first-generation research-university students in relation to their financial considerations. It is driven by the question, What is the relationship between first-generation college-student status and financial considerations among research-university students? It explores the impact of such variables as first-generation student…

  15. University of Venda's male students' attitudes towards contraception and family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raselekoane, Nanga R; Morwe, Keamogetse G; Tshitangano, Takalani

    2016-07-08

    Many young men continue to disregard the importance of contraception and family planning in South Africa. The fact that even university students also do not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to their own health and well-being. This paper aims at investigating the attitudes of male students towards contraception and the promotion of female students' sexual health rights and well-being at the University of Venda. Quantitative research method is used to determine how attitudes of 60 male students towards contraception can jeopardise the health and well-being of both male and female students. This study reveals that the majority of 60 male students at the University of Venda have a negative attitude towards contraceptives. As a result, male students at the University of Venda are not keen on using contraceptives. Male students' negative attitude and lack of interest in contraceptives and family planning also limit progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals on primary health care, especially with regard to sexual and reproductive health and well-being of female students at the University of Venda. The fact that more than half of the male students interviewed did not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to health and well-being of students, including violation of female students' sexual and reproductive health rights in South Africa. This calls for radical health promotion and sexual and reproductive rights programmes which should specifically target male students at the University of Venda.

  16. The socio-cultural and learning experiences of music students in a British university

    OpenAIRE

    Dibben, N.

    2006-01-01

    Research into student experience in Higher Education has largely focused on students' role as learners. However, the student experience encompasses a much wider range of behaviours and beliefs than can be captured through a focus on teaching and learning alone. I report the findings of a research project which explored student experience in the music department of a British red-brick university. Music presents a particularly interesting case study given the presence of extra-curricular musica...

  17. The Relation of Eating Habits with Obesity in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Altın

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to determine the relation of eating habits with obesity in university students. Hereby, totally 604 students including 226 females and 378 males, studying at 5 different faculties of Selcuk University in the 2013-2014 academic year, participated in this study. The students’ heights, weights and body mass indexes (BMI were estimated, their BMI values were calculated by dividing body weights (cm into square meter (m² of height. A questionnaire was applied to the relevant students in order to assess their eating habits through the BAI (Eating Habits Index developed by Demirezen and Coşansu in 2005. The BAI internal consistency analysis the Cronbach alpha value was estimated as 0,76. To determine the differences from the total points in BAI between the female and male students, t-test was used in the independent groups; the answers to the questions by the students were expressed as percentages and frequencies. Within this study; the female students’ BMI value was found out as 26,23 ± 7,74, the male students’ BMI value was also found out as 23,43 ± 8,12, in all of the groups this value was estimated as 24,77 ± 7,02 as well. According to the reports of the World Health Organization, these values are regarded as a category of overweight ones (Table 1. While the total BAI value of females was 13,2, the BAI value of males was 12,4, when considering the all relevant students in the research, this value was calculated as 12,7. According to these results, considering the university students’ eating habits, it is concluded that males have risks at a medium level while females have higher risks of obesity.

  18. Roles of University Support for International Students in the United States: Analysis of a Systematic Model of University Identification, University Support, and Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehee; Yu, Hongsik

    2015-01-01

    Unlike previous research on international students' social support, this current study applied the concept of organizational support to university contexts, examining the effects of university support. Mainly based on the social identity/self-categorization stress model, this study developed and tested a path model composed of four key…

  19. University Students' Behavioral Intention to Use Mobile Learning: Evaluating the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Youl; Nam, Min-Woo; Cha, Seung-Bong

    2012-01-01

    As many Korean universities have recommended the implementation of mobile learning (m-learning) for various reasons, the number of such tertiary learning opportunities has steadily grown. However, little research has investigated the factors affecting university students' adoption and use of m-learning. A sample of 288 Konkuk university students…

  20. The Student Perception of University Support and Structure Scale: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintre, Maxine G.; Gates, Shawn K. E.; Pancer, W. Mark; Pratt, Michael S.; Polivy, Janet; Birnie-Lefcovitch, S.; Adams, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    A new scale, the Student Perception of University Support and Structure Scale (SPUSS), was developed for research on the transition to university. The scale was based on concepts derived from Baumrind's (1971) theory of parenting styles. Data were obtained from two separate cohorts of freshmen (n=759 and 397) attending six Canadian universities of…

  1. New research facilities at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.C.; Rhyne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia is investing its resources for a significant expansion of the research capabilities and utilization of MURR to provide it the opportunity to deliver on its obligation to become the nation's premier educational institution in nuclear-related fields and so that it can provide scientific personnel and a state-of-the-art research test bed to support the national need for highly trained graduates in nuclear science and engineering

  2. THE FREQUENT SKIN DISEASES DIAGNOSED AT UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim KAYMAK

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of some skin diseases are increasing at adolescent and early adulthood period. The most frequent disease at this period is acne vulgaris whereas fungal diseases, dermatitis, dermatosis which are due to stress and other reasons, oral mucosal lesions and herpetic lesions of perioral region are also frequent. In this research we aim to determine the frequent dermatologic diseases of university students and 147 female, 74 male, a total of 221 students are included. We questioned the dermatologic complaints of students, then examined dermatologically in detail and registered ages, sexes, findings of the dermatological examination and dermatological diagnostic informations. As a result it is found out that the most frequent diseases are acne vulgaris (34.1%, allergic and pruritic dermatosis (16.6%, fungal diseases ( 13.0%, and eritamatous-squamous disease (8.3%. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(6.000: 313-320

  3. Pre-University Chemistry Students in a Mimicked Scholarly Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rens, Lisette; Hermarij, Philip; Pilot, Albert; Beishuizen, Jos; Hofman, Herman; Wal, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is a significant component in scientific research. Introducing peer review into inquiry processes may be regarded as an aim to develop student understanding regarding quality in inquiries. This study examines student understanding in inquiry peer reviews among pre-university chemistry students, aged 16-17, when they enact a design of a…

  4. Student Teacher Activities--Are They Relevant? The University Supervisor's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Thomas H.; Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional student teaching experience includes a complex, triadic relationship between student teacher, cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor. Studies seeking to understand this experience from the perspectives of the student teacher and cooperating teacher are commonly found in the literature; yet research specific to the…

  5. Differing Gender Preferences for Educational Media among Thai Students Studying English at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Samuel Jacob

    2012-01-01

    There have been many reports indicating that there are differences between male and female students in various issues in education. This research examined the preferences for various forms of educational media by freshmen students studying English in Thailand. Approximately 3000 students at seven university campuses in central Thailand were…

  6. Prior Education of Open University Students Contributes to Their Capability in Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Saara; Lehtinen, Taina; Rusanen, Erja; Hyytinen, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this study is on Open University students' entry-level critical thinking skills. The research questions were: how are students' age, and level and discipline of previous education related to critical thinking skills; is the level and discipline of previous education connected to the accuracy of students' self-evaluation of their…

  7. Transactional Distance among Open University Students: How Does it Affect the Learning Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassandrinou, Amanda; Angelaki, Christina; Mavroidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the presence of transactional distance among students, the factors affecting it, as well as the way it influences the learning process of students in a blended distance learning setting in Greece. The present study involved 12 postgraduate students of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). A qualitative research was conducted,…

  8. "Free in Time, Not Free in Mind": First-Year University Students Becoming More Independent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng

    2017-01-01

    In school-to-university transition literature, autonomy has been implied or explicitly explained as an important factor to predict the persistence and engagement of students in higher education; however, little qualitative research addresses students' transition in relation to autonomy, what these students have to go through in terms of becoming…

  9. Going Bush: International Student Perspectives on Living and Studying at an Australian Rural University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgeworth, Kathryn; Eiseman, John

    2007-01-01

    While there is a significant body of literature concerned with the experience of international students arriving to live and study at urban university campuses, very little of this research addresses the issue of overseas students' transition to rural areas. What issues do international students face when they arrive to live and study in rural…

  10. The Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Projects at the University of Houston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Talbot, R. W.; Glennie, C. L.; Rodrigues, D.; Jinghong, C.; Alozie, M.; Behrend, C. C.; Bias, C.; Ehteshami, A.; Fenton, A.; Greer, M.; Gunawan, B.; Harrison, W.; Jordan, J.; Lalata, M. C.; Lehnen, J. N.; Martinez, A.; Mathur, S.; Medillin, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T. V.; Nowling, M.; Perez, D.; Pham, M.; Pina, M.; Porat, I.; Prince, J.; Thomas, G. C.; Velasquez, B.; Victor, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) is a NASA program to engage undergraduate students in rigorous scientific research, for the purposes of innovation and developing the next generation of professionals for an array of fields. The program is student led and executed from initial ideation to research to the design and deployment of scientific payloads. The University of Houston has been selected twice to participate in the USIP programs. The first program (USIP_UH I) ran from 2013 to 2016. USIP_UH II started in January of this year, with funding starting at the end of May. USIP_UH I (USIP_UH II) at the University of Houston was (is) composed of eight (seven) research teams developing six (seven), distinct, balloon-based scientific instruments. These instruments will contribute to a broad range of geophysical sciences from Very Low Frequency recording and Total Electron Content to exobiology and ozone profiling. USIP_UH I had 12 successful launches with 9 recoveries from Fairbanks, AK in March 2015 and 4 piggyback flights with BARREL 3 from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden in August, 2015. Additional flights with BARREL 4 will take place in August 2016. The great opportunity of this program is capitalizing on the proliferation of electronics miniaturization to create new generations of scientific instruments that are smaller and lighter than ever before. This situation allows experiments to be done more cheaply which ultimately allows many more experiments to be done.

  11. University-Industry Research Relationships: The Research Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Donald R.

    1982-01-01

    Legal issues related to a research agreement include: project scope, sponsor commitment, university responsibility, funds administration, exclusivity of sponsorship, industry's technical collaboration, reporting, funding, use of results, proprietary information from the sponsor, patent rights, licensing, indemnification, use of school name, and…

  12. Geoscience Education Research, Development, and Practice at Arizona State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.; Reynolds, S. J.; Johnson, J.; Baker, D. R.; Luft, J.; Middleton, J.

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience education research and professional development thrive in an authentically trans-disciplinary environment at Arizona State University (ASU), benefiting from a long history of mutual professional respect and collaboration among STEM disciplinary researchers and STEM education researchers--many of whom hold national and international stature. Earth science education majors (pre-service teachers), geoscience-education graduate students, and practicing STEM teachers richly benefit from this interaction, which includes team teaching of methods and research courses, joint mentoring of graduate students, and collaboration on professional development projects and externally funded research. The geologically, culturally, and historically rich Southwest offers a superb setting for studies of formal and informal teaching and learning, and ASU graduates the most STEM teachers of any university in the region. Research on geoscience teaching and learning at ASU is primarily conducted by three geoscience faculty in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and three science-education faculty in the Mary Lou Fulton Institute and Graduate School of Education. Additional collaborators are based in the College of Teacher Education and Leadership, other STEM schools and departments, and the Center for Research on Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (CRESMET). Funding sources include NSF, NASA, US Dept Ed, Arizona Board of Regents, and corporations such as Resolution Copper. Current areas of active research at ASU include: Visualization in geoscience learning; Place attachment and sense of place in geoscience learning; Affective domain in geoscience learning; Culturally based differences in geoscience concepts; Use of annotated concept sketches in learning, teaching, and assessment; Student interactions with textbooks in introductory courses; Strategic recruitment and retention of secondary-school Earth science teachers; Research-based professional

  13. Tuition Rich, Mission Poor: Nonresident Enrollment Growth and the Socioeconomic and Racial Composition of Public Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquette, Ozan; Curs, Bradley R.; Posselt, Julie R.

    2016-01-01

    Many public research universities fail to enroll a critical mass of low-income and underrepresented minority (URM) students. Though founded with a commitment to access, public research universities face pressure to increase tuition revenue and to recruit high-achieving students. These pressures create an incentive to recruit nonresident students,…

  14. Ready for university? A cross national study on students' perceived preparedness for university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.P.W.A.; van der Meer, J.

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured before students commenced their study at a university in New

  15. Drug Consumption in University Students of Cienfuegos Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl López Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Foundation: in the last decades there has been an increment of the use and abuse of drugs in certain social groups. University students are in a vulnerable period, characterized by high alcohol and tobacco consumption. Objective: to characterize drug consumption in university students of Cienfuegos province. Methods: descriptive correlational study, realized in both universities of Cienfuegos province in 2015. From the total of the third year university students understood as the universe, 87 students, selected by a stratified proportional ramdomized sampling, were applied a survey. Results: cigarette consumption was present in 37.5 % of the student son the University of Medical Sciences and 33.3 % in the Carlos Rafael Rodríguez University. With regards to alcohol and coffee students from the University of Medical Sciences reported 75 and 85.4 % respectively and those of the Carlos Rafael Rodríguez University 53.8 and 69.2 % respectively. Conclusion: the characterization of drug consumption in University students of Cienfuegos province evidenced an increase of tobacco, alcohol and coffee. At comparing both universities the consumption predominated in the University of Medical Sciences.

  16. Enculturation and alcohol use problems among aboriginal university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Cheryl L; Wild, T Cameron; Schopflocher, Donald P; Laing, Lory; Veugelers, Paul J; Parlee, Brenda; McKennitt, Daniel W

    2011-12-01

    To examine associations between aboriginal enculturation, Canadian acculturation, and alcohol problems among aboriginal university students living in an urban area in Canada. Data for this mixed methods study were collected through in-person surveys with a convenience sample of aboriginal university students (n = 60) in 2008/2009. Students evidenced high levels of aboriginal enculturation and Canadian acculturation. aboriginal enculturation was significantly associated with reduced alcohol problems for aboriginal university students. There was no association between Canadian acculturation and alcohol problems. Qualitative findings suggest aboriginal cultural practices helped students cope with problems in their daily lives and provided them with both personal and social rewards. This study found aboriginal enculturation was significantly associated with reduced alcohol problems among aboriginal university students. Results support the growth of programs and services that encourage aboriginal students to maintain their cultural identity within the university setting.

  17. INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE PROFILES IN RUSSIAN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A Novikova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of intercultural competence (ICC as a psychological phenomenon including the analysis of its models, factors, and profiles. The results of an empirical study in two major multinational Russian universities (388 students, of which 254 young women and 134 young men are presented. The aim of the study was to identify the typological profiles of the ICC and their characteristics in relation to personality traits. ICC was studied based on the “Dynamic model of intercultural sensitivity” by M. Bennet. The author’s modification of the “Scale of intercultural sensitivity” by O.E. Khuhlaev and M.Y. Chibisova in the adaptation of Y.A. Lopashenko was used for the ICC diagnostics. Personality traits were considered in the framework of the Five-Factor Model (P. Costa and R. McCrae and were measured by a short form of the “Five-Factor Questionnaire” in Russian adaptation by M.V. Bodunov and S.D. Biryukov. We identified four ICC profiles of students provisionally called “ethnocentrists”, “negativists”, “undecided (ambivalent”, and “ethnorelativists”. It is shown that the profiles differ not only in the correlation between the severity of parameters of the ICC, but also in personality traits. The results can be used for the design of ICC development and formation programs, based on the identified psychological specifics of ICC profiles.

  18. Stress in university students and cardiovascular response to academic stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Teresa; Silva, Ana Patrícia; Monteiro, Iolanda; Gomes, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: University students are frequently exposed to events that can cause stress and anxiety, producing elevated cardiovascular responses. Repeated exposure to academic stress has implications to students’ success and well-being and may contribute to the development of long-term health problems. Objective: To identify stress levels and coping strategies in university students and assess the impact of stress experience in heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: 17 university students, 1...

  19. Comrades’ power: Student representation and activism in universities in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Mwangi J. Macharia

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, student politics and governance of universities in Kenya and in otherAfrican countries have undergone a tremendous transformation. The unprecedentedexpansion and massification of public universities, the introduction of ‘Module 2’programmes, the admission of private, ‘parallel’ and ‘school-based’ students, and thesubstantial increase in private universities have impacted on the governance of theinstitutions and student politics in different ways. In this context, this arti...

  20. Fruit, Vegatables and Fast Food Consumption among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Avram; Mihaela Oravitan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the prevalence of fruit, vegetables and fast food consumption among students from Timisoara university center and provide evidence based information for increasing healthy food choices in order to prevent cardiovascular diseases. Material and Methods: We perform a cross-sectional study on 435 university students from the Timisoara university center, Romania (mean age: 22±4.8 years). The students were recruited using internet and public announcements in the student’s cam...